Science.gov

Sample records for dynamic texture scaling

  1. The interactive scaling hypothesis and dynamic textures in nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkov, S.

    2002-03-01

    A new approach to the description of the dynamic textures (DT) in the systems with continuous symmetry is proposed. Such textures take place in various dissipative motions of liquid crystals with participation of different extended objects: topological defects in the order parameter field and suspended particles. The main idea of the approach is to transfer the law of interaction between the extended objects (hedgehogs, disclinations, boojums, colloidal particles, etc.) to the host system by redefining its spatiotemporal scales. I call this procedure the interactive scaling (IS). In a number of experiments with nematics^1-3 a pair of objects behaves itself as two point particles interacting by means of the attractive force F_a=CK(a/r)^m-1, where r is the separation between particle centers, K is the Frank elastic constant, C is a constant, and m>= 1. The dynamics of the objects is purely dissipative with the Stokes-type drag due to the reorientation of the order parameter (director) field in some vicinities of the objects. For the pair's dissipative dynamics in nematics we find the velocity v of reducing the interparticle distance r: v(r)=v_c(a/r)^m-1, with v_c=2CK/lη, where η is the orientational viscosity and l is the drag length. The parameters C, a and l can be estimated theoretically and defined experimentally. The IS hypothesis postulates the time dependence of the director field in the form n (r,; t)= n(x+ɛ v(2|x|)t/2,;y,;z) to yield the DT equation for n(r): (2νɛ^m/ax^m-1)partial_xn=nabla^2 n+(nablan)^2n, where ν=Ca/l is the IS ratio, ɛ=sign(x) and v(2|x|) coincides with the velocity of approaching the pair's particles in the x direction. This equation corresponds to the "one-constant approximation" and the absence of fluid flow. For m=2 (the "Coulombic" force) in the planar case: n=[\\cosΦ,sinΦ,0], we find the disclination solution of the DT equation: Φ=(k/2)C_νint_0^φ\\cos^2νφdφ, where k is an integer, φ is the polar angle and C

  2. Emotional effects of dynamic textures.

    PubMed

    Toet, Alexander; Henselmans, Menno; Lucassen, Marcel P; Gevers, Theo

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the effects of various spatiotemporal dynamic texture characteristics on human emotions. The emotional experience of auditory (eg, music) and haptic repetitive patterns has been studied extensively. In contrast, the emotional experience of visual dynamic textures is still largely unknown, despite their natural ubiquity and increasing use in digital media. Participants watched a set of dynamic textures, representing either water or various different media, and self-reported their emotional experience. Motion complexity was found to have mildly relaxing and nondominant effects. In contrast, motion change complexity was found to be arousing and dominant. The speed of dynamics had arousing, dominant, and unpleasant effects. The amplitude of dynamics was also regarded as unpleasant. The regularity of the dynamics over the textures' area was found to be uninteresting, nondominant, mildly relaxing, and mildly pleasant. The spatial scale of the dynamics had an unpleasant, arousing, and dominant effect, which was larger for textures with diverse content than for water textures. For water textures, the effects of spatial contrast were arousing, dominant, interesting, and mildly unpleasant. None of these effects were observed for textures of diverse content. The current findings are relevant for the design and synthesis of affective multimedia content and for affective scene indexing and retrieval. PMID:23145257

  3. Fine-scale Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 19 May 2003

    This image shows fine-scale textures around a crater southwest of Athabasca Vallis. These fine scale ridges are most likely the remnants of older flood eroded layered rocks and not longitudinal grooves carved out of the landscape by flooding. These features are ridges and not grooves. Also note the layers visible on the southeast side of the island.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 9.6, Longitude 155.9 East (204.1). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Categorizing dynamic textures using a bag of dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Avinash; Chaudhry, Rizwan; Vidal, René

    2013-02-01

    We consider the problem of categorizing video sequences of dynamic textures, i.e., nonrigid dynamical objects such as fire, water, steam, flags, etc. This problem is extremely challenging because the shape and appearance of a dynamic texture continuously change as a function of time. State-of-the-art dynamic texture categorization methods have been successful at classifying videos taken from the same viewpoint and scale by using a Linear Dynamical System (LDS) to model each video, and using distances or kernels in the space of LDSs to classify the videos. However, these methods perform poorly when the video sequences are taken under a different viewpoint or scale. In this paper, we propose a novel dynamic texture categorization framework that can handle such changes. We model each video sequence with a collection of LDSs, each one describing a small spatiotemporal patch extracted from the video. This Bag-of-Systems (BoS) representation is analogous to the Bag-of-Features (BoF) representation for object recognition, except that we use LDSs as feature descriptors. This choice poses several technical challenges in adopting the traditional BoF approach. Most notably, the space of LDSs is not euclidean; hence, novel methods for clustering LDSs and computing codewords of LDSs need to be developed. We propose a framework that makes use of nonlinear dimensionality reduction and clustering techniques combined with the Martin distance for LDSs to tackle these issues. Our experiments compare the proposed BoS approach to existing dynamic texture categorization methods and show that it can be used for recognizing dynamic textures in challenging scenarios which could not be handled by existing methods. PMID:23257470

  5. Heterogeneous patterns enhancing static and dynamic texture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa da Silva, Núbia; Martinez Bruno, Odemir

    2013-02-01

    Some mixtures, such as colloids like milk, blood, and gelatin, have homogeneous appearance when viewed with the naked eye, however, to observe them at the nanoscale is possible to understand the heterogeneity of its components. The same phenomenon can occur in pattern recognition in which it is possible to see heterogeneous patterns in texture images. However, current methods of texture analysis can not adequately describe such heterogeneous patterns. Common methods used by researchers analyse the image information in a global way, taking all its features in an integrated manner. Furthermore, multi-scale analysis verifies the patterns at different scales, but still preserving the homogeneous analysis. On the other hand various methods use textons to represent the texture, breaking texture down into its smallest unit. To tackle this problem, we propose a method to identify texture patterns not small as textons at distinct scales enhancing the separability among different types of texture. We find sub patterns of texture according to the scale and then group similar patterns for a more refined analysis. Tests were performed in four static texture databases and one dynamical one. Results show that our method provide better classification rate compared with conventional approaches both in static and in dynamic texture.

  6. Network-scale dynamics of sediment mixtures: how do tectonics affect surface bed texture and channel slope?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, N. M.; Bras, R. L.; Tucker, G. E.

    2003-04-01

    An alluvial channel's slope and bed texture are intimately linked. Along with fluvial discharge, these variables are the key players in setting alluvial transport rates. We know that both channel slope and mean grain size usually decrease downstream, but how sensitive are these variables to tectonic changes? Are basin concavity and downstream fining drastically disrupted during transitions from one tectonic regime to another? We explore these questions using the CHILD numerical landscape evolution model to generate alluvial networks composed of a sand and gravel mixture. The steady-state and transient patterns of both channel slope and sediment texture are investigated. The steady-state patterns in slope and sediment texture are verified independently by solving the erosion equations under equilibrium conditions, i.e. the case when the erosion rate is equal to the uplift rate across the entire landscape. The inclusion of surface texture as a free parameter (as opposed to just channel slope) leads to some surprising results. In all cases, an increase in uplift rate results in channel beds which are finer at equilibrium (for a given drainage area). Higher uplift rates imply larger equilibrium transport rates; this leads to finer channels that have a smaller critical shear stress to entrain material, and therefore more material can be transported for a given discharge (and channel slope). Changes in equilibrium slopes are less intuitive. An increase in uplift rates can cause channel slopes to increase, remain the same, or decrease, depending on model parameter values. In the surprising case in which equilibrium channel slopes decrease with increasing uplift rates, we suggest that surface texture changes more than compensate for the required increase in transport rates, causing channel slopes to decrease. These results highlight the important role of sediment grain size in determining transport rates and caution us against ignoring this important variable in fluvial

  7. Scale-free texture of the fast solar wind.

    PubMed

    Hnat, B; Chapman, S C; Gogoberidze, G; Wicks, R T

    2011-12-01

    The higher-order statistics of magnetic field magnitude fluctuations in the fast quiet solar wind are quantified systematically, scale by scale. We find a single global non-Gaussian scale-free behavior from minutes to over 5 h. This spans the signature of an inertial range of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and a ~1/f range in magnetic field components. This global scaling in field magnitude fluctuations is an intrinsic component of the underlying texture of the solar wind and puts a strong constraint on any theory of solar corona and the heliosphere. Intriguingly, the magnetic field and velocity components show scale-dependent dynamic alignment outside of the inertial range. PMID:22304144

  8. Scale-Space Mutual Information for Textural-Patterns Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Seedahmed, Gamal H.; Ward, Andy L.

    2005-08-22

    The essence of image texture is typically understood by two aspects. First, within a texture-pattern there is a significant variation in intensity values between nearby pixels. Second, texture is a homogeneous property at some spatial scale larger than the spatial resolution of the image. Motivated by the essential aspects of image texture, this paper proposes a novel methodology that combines the use of scale-space and mutual information to characterize textural-patterns. Scale-space offers the mechanism for a multi-scale representation of the image, which will be used to address the scale aspect of texture. On the other hand, mutual information provides a measure to quantify the dependency relationship across the scale-space. It has been found that the proposed methodology has the potential to capture different properties of texture such as periodicity, scale, fineness, coarseness, and spatial extent or size. Practical examples are provided to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed methodology.

  9. Magnetization dynamics of imprinted non-collinear spin textures

    SciTech Connect

    Streubel, Robert Kopte, Martin; Makarov, Denys; Fischer, Peter; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2015-09-14

    We study the magnetization dynamics of non-collinear spin textures realized via imprint of the magnetic vortex state in soft permalloy into magnetically hard out-of-plane magnetized Co/Pd nanopatterned heterostructures. Tuning the interlayer exchange coupling between soft- and hard-magnetic subsystems provides means to tailor the magnetic state in the Co/Pd stack from being vortex- to donut-like with different core sizes. While the imprinted vortex spin texture leads to the dynamics similar to the one observed for vortices in permalloy disks, the donut-like state causes the appearance of two gyrofrequencies characteristic of the early and later stages of the magnetization dynamics. The dynamics are described using the Thiele equation supported by the full scale micromagnetic simulations by taking into account an enlarged core size of the donut states compared to magnetic vortices.

  10. Differential rotation and cloud texture: Analysis using generalized scale invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Pflug, K.; Lovejoy, S. ); Schertzer, D. )

    1993-02-14

    The standard picture of atmospheric dynamics is that of an isotropic two-dimensional large scale and an isotropic three-dimensional small scale, the two separated by a dimensional transition called the [open quotes]mesoscale gap.[close quotes] Evidence now suggests that, on the contrary, atmospheric fields, while strongly anisotropic, are nonetheless scale invariant right through the mesoscale. Using visible and infrared satellite cloud images and the formalism of generalized scale invariance (GSI), the authors attempt to quantify the anisotropy for cloud radiance fields in the range 1-1000 km. To do this, the statistical translational invariance of the fields is exploited by studying the anisotropic scaling of lines of constant Fourier amplitude. This allows the investigation of the change in shape and orientation of average structures with scale. For the three texturally-and meteorologically-very different images analyzed, three different generators of anisotropy are found that generally reproduce well the Fourier space anisotropy. Although three cases are a small number from which to infer ensemble-averaged properties, the authors conclude that while cloud radiances are not isotropic (self-similar), they are nonetheless scaling. Since elsewhere (with the help of simulations) it is shown that the generator of the anisotropy is related to the texture, it is argued here that GSI could potentially provide a quantitative basis for cloud classification and modeling. 59 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Robust Texture Image Representation by Scale Selective Local Binary Patterns.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenhua; Wang, Xingzheng; Zhou, Jie; You, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Local binary pattern (LBP) has successfully been used in computer vision and pattern recognition applications, such as texture recognition. It could effectively address grayscale and rotation variation. However, it failed to get desirable performance for texture classification with scale transformation. In this paper, a new method based on dominant LBP in scale space is proposed to address scale variation for texture classification. First, a scale space of a texture image is derived by a Gaussian filter. Then, a histogram of pre-learned dominant LBPs is built for each image in the scale space. Finally, for each pattern, the maximal frequency among different scales is considered as the scale invariant feature. Extensive experiments on five public texture databases (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Columbia Utrecht Database, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan-Textures under varying Illumination, Pose and Scale, University of Maryland, and Amsterdam Library of Textures) validate the efficiency of the proposed feature extraction scheme. Coupled with the nearest subspace classifier, the proposed method could yield competitive results, which are 99.36%, 99.51%, 99.39%, 99.46%, and 99.71% for UIUC, CUReT, KTH-TIPS, UMD, and ALOT, respectively. Meanwhile, the proposed method inherits simple and efficient merits of LBP, for example, it could extract scale-robust feature for a 200×200 image within 0.24 s, which is applicable for many real-time applications. PMID:26685235

  12. Topologically protected dynamics of spin textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, O. A.; Abanov, Ar.

    2015-06-01

    We study current-induced dynamics of spin textures in thin magnetic nanowires. We derive effective equations of motion describing the dynamics of the domain-wall soft modes associated with topological defects. Because the magnetic domain walls are topological objects, these equations are universal and depend only on a few parameters. We obtain spin spiral domain-wall structure in ferromagnetic wires with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and critical current dependence on this interaction. We also find the most efficient way to move the domain walls by resonant current pulses and propose a procedure to determine their dynamics by measuring the voltage induced by a moving domain wall. Based on translationally non-invariant nanowires, we show how to make prospective magnetic memory nanodevices much more energy efficient.

  13. Adaptive Texture Synthesis for Large Scale City Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despine, G.; Colleu, T.

    2015-02-01

    Large scale city models textured with aerial images are well suited for bird-eye navigation but generally the image resolution does not allow pedestrian navigation. One solution to face this problem is to use high resolution terrestrial photos but it requires huge amount of manual work to remove occlusions. Another solution is to synthesize generic textures with a set of procedural rules and elementary patterns like bricks, roof tiles, doors and windows. This solution may give realistic textures but with no correlation to the ground truth. Instead of using pure procedural modelling we present a method to extract information from aerial images and adapt the texture synthesis to each building. We describe a workflow allowing the user to drive the information extraction and to select the appropriate texture patterns. We also emphasize the importance to organize the knowledge about elementary pattern in a texture catalogue allowing attaching physical information, semantic attributes and to execute selection requests. Roofs are processed according to the detected building material. Façades are first described in terms of principal colours, then opening positions are detected and some window features are computed. These features allow selecting the most appropriate patterns from the texture catalogue. We experimented this workflow on two samples with 20 cm and 5 cm resolution images. The roof texture synthesis and opening detection were successfully conducted on hundreds of buildings. The window characterization is still sensitive to the distortions inherent to the projection of aerial images onto the facades.

  14. Cosmological texture is incompatible with Planck-scale physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Richard; Hsu, Stephen D. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Watkins, Richard; Widrow, Lawrence M.

    1992-01-01

    Nambu-Goldstone modes are sensitive to the effects of physics at energies comparable to the scale of spontaneous symmetry breaking. We show that as a consequence of this the global texture proposal for structure formation requires rather severe assumptions about the nature of physics at the Planck scale.

  15. Texture

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Glendon W.

    2005-01-03

    The chapter focuses on the quantitative aspect of soil texture, the classification of size separates, methods for obtaining particle-size distributions, textural classifications, and how quantitative textural information can be used to estimate other soil properties.

  16. Spatiotemporal Directional Number Transitional Graph for Dynamic Texture Recognition.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Adín Ramírez; Chae, Oksam

    2015-10-01

    Spatiotemporal image descriptors are gaining attention in the image research community for better representation of dynamic textures. In this paper, we introduce a dynamic-micro-texture descriptor, i.e., spatiotemporal directional number transitional graph (DNG), which describes both the spatial structure and motion of each local neighborhood by capturing the direction of natural flow in the temporal domain. We use the structure of the local neighborhood, given by its principal directions, and compute the transition of such directions between frames. Moreover, we present the statistics of the direction transitions in a transitional graph, which acts as a signature for a given spatiotemporal region in the dynamic texture. Furthermore, we create a sequence descriptor by dividing the spatiotemporal volume into several regions, computing a transitional graph for each of them, and represent the sequence as a set of graphs. Our results validate the robustness of the proposed descriptor in different scenarios for expression recognition and dynamic texture analysis. PMID:26340258

  17. Scale invariant texture descriptors for classifying celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Hegenbart, Sebastian; Uhl, Andreas; Vécsei, Andreas; Wimmer, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Scale invariant texture recognition methods are applied for the computer assisted diagnosis of celiac disease. In particular, emphasis is given to techniques enhancing the scale invariance of multi-scale and multi-orientation wavelet transforms and methods based on fractal analysis. After fine-tuning to specific properties of our celiac disease imagery database, which consists of endoscopic images of the duodenum, some scale invariant (and often even viewpoint invariant) methods provide classification results improving the current state of the art. However, not each of the investigated scale invariant methods is applicable successfully to our dataset. Therefore, the scale invariance of the employed approaches is explicitly assessed and it is found that many of the analyzed methods are not as scale invariant as they theoretically should be. Results imply that scale invariance is not a key-feature required for successful classification of our celiac disease dataset. PMID:23481171

  18. Effect of texturing on polarization switching dynamics in ferroelectric ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Sergey; Genenko, Yuri A.; Koruza, Jurij; Schultheiß, Jan; von Seggern, Heinz; Sakamoto, Wataru; Ichikawa, Hiroki; Murata, Tatsuro; Hayashi, Koichiro; Yogo, Toshinobu

    2016-01-01

    Highly (100),(001)-oriented (Ba0.85Ca0.15)TiO3 (BCT) lead-free piezoelectric ceramics were fabricated by the reactive templated grain growth method using a mixture of plate-like CaTiO3 and BaTiO3 particles. Piezoelectric properties of the ceramics with a high degree of texture were found to be considerably enhanced compared with the BCT ceramics with a low degree of texture. With increasing the Lotgering factor from 26% up to 94%, the piezoelectric properties develop towards the properties of a single crystal. The dynamics of polarization switching was studied over a broad time domain of 8 orders of magnitude and was found to strongly depend on the degree of orientation of the ceramics. Samples with a high degree of texture exhibited 2-3 orders of magnitude faster polarization switching, as compared with the ones with a low degree of texture. This was rationalized by means of the Inhomogeneous Field Mechanism model as a result of the narrower statistical distribution of the local electric field values in textured media, which promotes a more coherent switching process. The extracted microscopic parameters of switching revealed a decrease of the critical nucleus energy in systems with a high degree of texture providing more favorable switching conditions related to the enhanced ferroelectric properties of the textured material.

  19. Identifying Differences and Similarities in Static and Dynamic Contact Angles between Nanoscale and Microscale Textured Surfaces Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Slovin, Mitchell R; Shirts, Michael R

    2015-07-28

    We quantify some of the effects of patterned nanoscale surface texture on static contact angles, dynamic contact angles, and dynamic contact angle hysteresis using molecular dynamics simulations of a moving Lennard-Jones droplet in contact with a solid surface. We observe static contact angles that change with the introduction of surface texture in a manner consistent with theoretical and experimental expectations. However, we find that the introduction of nanoscale surface texture at the length scale of 5-10 times the fluid particle size does not affect dynamic contact angle hysteresis even though it changes both the advancing and receding contact angles significantly. This result differs significantly from microscale experimental results where dynamic contact angle hysteresis decreases with the addition of surface texture due to an increase in the receding contact angle. Instead, we find that molecular-kinetic theory, previously applied only to nonpatterned surfaces, accurately describes dynamic contact angle and dynamic contact angle hysteresis behavior as a function of terminal fluid velocity. Therefore, at length scales of tens of nanometers, the kinetic phenomena such as contact line pinning observed at larger scales become insignificant in comparison to the effects of molecular fluctuations for moving droplets, even though the static properties are essentially scale-invariant. These findings may have implications for the design of highly hierarchical structures with particular wetting properties. We also find that quantitatively determining the trends observed in this article requires the careful selection of system and analysis parameters in order to achieve sufficient accuracy and precision in calculated contact angles. Therefore, we provide a detailed description of our two-surface, circular-fit approach to calculating static and dynamic contact angles on surfaces with nanoscale texturing. PMID:26110823

  20. Multi-Scale Fractal Analysis of Image Texture and Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emerson, Charles W.

    1998-01-01

    Fractals embody important ideas of self-similarity, in which the spatial behavior or appearance of a system is largely independent of scale. Self-similarity is defined as a property of curves or surfaces where each part is indistinguishable from the whole, or where the form of the curve or surface is invariant with respect to scale. An ideal fractal (or monofractal) curve or surface has a constant dimension over all scales, although it may not be an integer value. This is in contrast to Euclidean or topological dimensions, where discrete one, two, and three dimensions describe curves, planes, and volumes. Theoretically, if the digital numbers of a remotely sensed image resemble an ideal fractal surface, then due to the self-similarity property, the fractal dimension of the image will not vary with scale and resolution. However, most geographical phenomena are not strictly self-similar at all scales, but they can often be modeled by a stochastic fractal in which the scaling and self-similarity properties of the fractal have inexact patterns that can be described by statistics. Stochastic fractal sets relax the monofractal self-similarity assumption and measure many scales and resolutions in order to represent the varying form of a phenomenon as a function of local variables across space. In image interpretation, pattern is defined as the overall spatial form of related features, and the repetition of certain forms is a characteristic pattern found in many cultural objects and some natural features. Texture is the visual impression of coarseness or smoothness caused by the variability or uniformity of image tone or color. A potential use of fractals concerns the analysis of image texture. In these situations it is commonly observed that the degree of roughness or inexactness in an image or surface is a function of scale and not of experimental technique. The fractal dimension of remote sensing data could yield quantitative insight on the spatial complexity and

  1. Dynamics of Spreading on Micro-Textured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Rothstein, Jonathan; Kavehpour, Pirouz

    2015-11-01

    Ultrahydrophobic surfaces, due to their large water-repellency characteristic, have a vast variety of applications in technology and nature, such as de-icing of airplane wings, efficiency increase of power plants, and efficiency of pesticides on plants, etc. The significance of ultrahydrophobic surfaces requires enhancing the knowledge on the spreading dynamics on such surfaces. The best way to produce an ultrahydrophobic surface is by patterning of smooth hydrophobic surfaces with micron sized posts. In this research, the micro-textured surfaces have been fabricated by patterning several different sizes of micro-textured posts on Teflon plates. The experimental study has been performed using forced spreading with Tensiometer to obtain the dependencw of dynamic contact angle to the contact line velocity to describe the spreading dynamics of Newtonian liquids on the micro-textured surfaces. The effect of the geometrical descriptions of the micro-posts along with the physical properties of liquids on the spreading dynamics on micro-textured Teflon plates have been also studied.

  2. Model for interacting instabilities and texture dynamics of patterns.

    PubMed

    Das, A; Kumar, K; Ganesh, N

    2001-07-01

    A simple model to study interacting instabilities and textures of resulting patterns for thermal convection is presented. The model, consisting of a twelve-mode dynamical system derived for periodic square lattice, describes convective patterns in the form of stripes and patchwork quilt. The interaction between stationary zigzag stripes and standing patchwork quilt pattern leads to spatiotemporal patterns of twisted patchwork quilt. Textures of these patterns, which depend strongly on Prandtl number, are investigated numerically using the model. The model also shows an interesting possibility of a multicritical point, where stability boundaries of four different structures meet. PMID:11461385

  3. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Azar Alizadeh; Vaibhav Bahadur; Sheng Zhong; Wen Shang; Ri Li; James Ruud; Masako Yamada; Liehi Ge; Ali Dhinojwala; Manohar S Sohal

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially for hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-structure interaction at various temperatures.

  4. Uterus segmentation in dynamic MRI using LBP texture descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namias, R.; Bellemare, M.-E.; Rahim, M.; Pirró, N.

    2014-03-01

    Pelvic floor disorders cover pathologies of which physiopathology is not well understood. However cases get prevalent with an ageing population. Within the context of a project aiming at modelization of the dynamics of pelvic organs, we have developed an efficient segmentation process. It aims at alleviating the radiologist with a tedious one by one image analysis. From a first contour delineating the uterus-vagina set, the organ border is tracked along a dynamic mri sequence. The process combines movement prediction, local intensity and texture analysis and active contour geometry control. Movement prediction allows a contour intitialization for next image in the sequence. Intensity analysis provides image-based local contour detection enhanced by local binary pattern (lbp) texture descriptors. Geometry control prohibits self intersections and smoothes the contour. Results show the efficiency of the method with images produced in clinical routine.

  5. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  6. Texture sensing of cytoskeletal dynamics in cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Satarupa; Lee, Rachel; Hourwitz, Matthew J.; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John T.; Losert, Wolfgang

    Migrating cells can be directed towards a target by gradients in properties such as chemical concentration or mechanical properties of the surrounding microenvironment. In previous studies we have shown that micro/nanotopographical features on scales comparable to those of natural collagen fibers can guide fast migrating amoeboid cells by aligning actin polymerization waves to such nanostructures. We find that actin microfilaments and microtubules are aligned along the nanoridge topographies, modulating overall cell polarity and directional migration in epithelial cells. This work shows that topographic features on a biologically relevant length scale can modulate migration outcomes by affecting the texture sensing property of the cytoskeleton.

  7. Probabilistic latent semantic analysis for dynamic textures recognition and localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Hu, Shiqiang

    2014-11-01

    We present a framework for dynamic textures (DTs) recognition and localization by using a model developed in the text analysis literature: probabilistic latent semantic analysis (pLSA). The novelty is revealed in three aspects. First, chaotic feature vector is introduced and characterizes each pixel intensity series. Next, the pLSA model is employed to discover the topics by using the bag of words representation. Finally, the spatial layout of DTs can be found. Experimental results are conducted on the well-known DTs datasets. The results show that the proposed method can successfully build DTs models and achieve higher accuracies in DTs recognition and effectively localize DTs.

  8. Classifying scaled and rotated textures using a region-matched algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chih-Chia; Chen, Yu-Tin

    2012-07-01

    A novel method to correct texture variations resulting from scale magnification, narrowing caused by cropping into the original size, or spatial rotation is discussed. The variations usually occur in images captured by a camera using different focal lengths. A representative region-matched algorithm is developed to improve texture classification after magnification, narrowing, and spatial rotation. By using a minimum ellipse, a representative region-matched algorithm encloses a specific region extracted by the J-image segmentation algorithm. After translating the coordinates, the equation of an ellipse in the rotated texture can be formulated as that of an ellipse in the original texture. The rotated invariant property of ellipse provides an efficient method to identify the rotated texture. Additionally, the scale-variant representative region can be classified by adopting scale-invariant parameters. Moreover, a hybrid texture filter is developed. In the hybrid texture filter, the scheme of texture feature extraction includes the Gabor wavelet and the representative region-matched algorithm. Support vector machines are introduced as the classifier. The proposed hybrid texture filter performs excellently with respect to classifying both the stochastic and structural textures. Furthermore, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms conventional design algorithms.

  9. Textural constraints on the dynamics of the 2000 Miyakejima eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garozzo, Ileana; Romano, Claudia; Giordano, Guido; Geshi, Nobuo; Vona, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Miyakejima Volcano is a basaltic-andesite stratovolcano active from ~10.000 years, located on the north of the Izu-Bonin arc. During the last 600 years the volcano has been characterized mainly by flank fissure activity, with explosive phreatomagmatic eruptions on the coastal areas. In the last century, the activity became more frequent and regular with intervals of 20 to 70 years (1940, 1962, 1983 and 2000). The last activity started on 27 June 2000, with a minor submarine eruption on the west coast of the volcano, and proceeded with six major summit eruptions from July 8 to August 29. The eruptions led to the formation of a collapse caldera ~1.6 km across. The total erupted tephra represents only 1.7% in volume of the caldera, the high fragmentation of magma produced mainly fine-grained volcanic ash. In order to improve the understanding on the triggering and dynamics of this explosive eruption, we carried out a detailed investigation of the erupted materials with particular attention to the textural features of juvenile pyroclasts (Vesicle and Crystal Size Distributions). The stratigraphic record can be divided into six fall units, corresponding to the six summit eruptions, although juvenile materials were identified only in 4 units (unit 2, 4, 5, 6). We selected about 100 juvenile grains sampled from the bottom to the top of each level, to be analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The study of juvenile morphological features allowed us to recognize the existence of three characteristic morphotypes, showing marked differences in their external morphologies and internal textures (from poorly to highly crystallized and vesiculated clasts). The distribution of these morphotypes is non-homogeneous along the eruptive sequence indicating changes of dynamics during magma ascent. Juveniles do not show features inherited from the interaction with external water. Vesicle Volume Distributions of the selected ash grains show that the three types of pyroclasts experienced

  10. Droplets impact on textured surfaces: Mesoscopic simulation of spreading dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxiang; Chen, Shuo

    2015-02-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have attracted much attention due to their excellent water-repellent property. In the present study, droplets in the ideal Cassie state were focused on, and a particle-based numerical method, many-body dissipative particle dynamics, was employed to explore the mechanism of droplets impact on textured surfaces. A solid-fluid interaction with three linear weight functions was used to generate different wettability and a simple but efficient method was introduced to compute the contact angle. The simulated results show that the static contact angle is in good agreement with the Cassie-Baxter formula for smaller ∅S and Fa, but more deviation will be produced for larger ∅S and Fa, and it is related to the fact that the Cassie-Baxter theory does not consider the contact angle hysteresis effect in their formula. Furthermore, high impact velocity can induce large contact angle hysteresis on textured surfaces with larger ∅S and Fa. The typical time-based evolutions of the spreading diameter were simulated, and they were analyzed from an energy transformation viewpoint. These results also show that the dynamical properties of droplet, such as rebounding or pinning, contact time and maximum spreading diameters, largely depend on the comprehensive effects of the material wettability, fraction of the pillars and impact velocities of the droplets.

  11. Multi-scale surface texture to improve blue response of nanoporous black silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toor, Fatima; Branz, Howard M.; Page, Matthew R.; Jones, Kim M.; Yuan, Hao-Chih

    2011-09-01

    We characterize the optical and carrier-collection physics of multi-scale textured p-type black Si solar cells with conversion efficiency of 17.1%. The multi-scale texture is achieved by combining density-graded nanoporous layer made by metal-assisted etching with micron-scale pyramid texture. We found that (1) reducing the thickness of nanostructured Si layer improves the short-wavelength spectral response and (2) multi-scale texture permits thinning of the nanostructured layer while maintaining low surface reflection. We have reduced the nanostructured layer thickness by 60% while retaining a solar-spectrum-averaged black Si reflectance of less than 2%. Spectral response at 450 nm has improved from 57% to 71%.

  12. Control carrier recombination of multi-scale textured black silicon surface for high performance solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, M.; Yuan, G. D.; Peng, Y.; Chen, H. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, Z. Q.; Wang, J. X.; Cai, B.; Zhu, Y. M.; Chen, Y.; Liu, J. H.; Li, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    We report an enhanced performance of multi-scale textured black silicon solar cell with power conversion efficiency of 15.5% by using anisotropic tetramethylammonium hydroxide etching to control the recombination. The multi-scale texture can effectively reduce the surface reflectance in a wide wavelength range, and both the surface and Auger recombination can be effectively suppressed by etching the samples after the n++ emitter formed. Our result shows that the reformed solar cell has higher conversion efficiency than that of conventional pyramid textured cell (15.3%). This work presents an effective method for improving the performance of nanostructured silicon solar cells.

  13. Texture descriptions of lunar surface derived from LOLA data: Kilometer-scale roughness and entropy maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Ling, Zongcheng; Zhang, Jiang; Chen, Jian; Wu, Zhongchen; Ni, Yuheng; Zhao, Haowei

    2015-11-01

    The lunar global texture maps of roughness and entropy are derived at kilometer scales from Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) data obtained by Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) aboard on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft. We use statistical moments of a gray-level histogram of elevations in a neighborhood to compute the roughness and entropy value. Our texture descriptors measurements are shown in global maps at multi-sized square neighborhoods, whose length of side is 3, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 pixels, respectively. We found that large-scale topographical changes can only be displayed in maps with longer side of neighborhood, but the small scale global texture maps are more disorderly and unsystematic because of more complicated textures' details. Then, the frequency curves of texture maps are made out, whose shapes and distributions are changing as the spatial scales increases. Entropy frequency curve with minimum 3-pixel scale has large fluctuations and six peaks. According to this entropy curve we can classify lunar surface into maria, highlands, different parts of craters preliminarily. The most obvious textures in the middle-scale roughness and entropy maps are the two typical morphological units, smooth maria and rough highlands. For the impact crater, its roughness and entropy value are characterized by a multiple-ring structure obviously, and its different parts have different texture results. In the last, we made a 2D scatter plot between the two texture results of typical lunar maria and highlands. There are two clusters with largest dot density which are corresponded to the lunar highlands and maria separately. In the lunar mare regions (cluster A), there is a high correlation between roughness and entropy, but in the highlands (Cluster B), the entropy shows little change. This could be subjected to different geological processes of maria and highlands forming different landforms.

  14. The Relationship between Filling-in Induction and Spatio-Temporal Frequency of Sorrounding Dynamic Textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Masae; Yokota, Yasunari

    To elucidate perceptual filling-in mechanisms in peripheral vision, we investigated dependency of filling-in occurrence on spatio-temporal frequency of dynamic textures surrounding the filling-in target. We first measured spatial frequency sensitivity of the filling-in target in static texture. Then, the time to filling-in, when dynamic textures which have variously limited spatio-temporal frequency are surrounding the filling-in target, were measured. According to the hypothesis of filling-in process which has already proposed by the authors, the tendency of inducing filling-in, i.e., the attenuation factor of perceptual power for filling-in target in dynamic textures, is estimated as a function of spatio-temporal frequency. It was suggested that surrounding texture with stronger perception promotes filling-in more intensively.

  15. Learning How to Extract Rotation-Invariant and Scale-Invariant Features from Texture Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya-Zegarra, Javier A.; Papa, João Paulo; Leite, Neucimar J.; da Silva Torres, Ricardo; Falcão, Alexandre

    2008-12-01

    Learning how to extract texture features from noncontrolled environments characterized by distorted images is a still-open task. By using a new rotation-invariant and scale-invariant image descriptor based on steerable pyramid decomposition, and a novel multiclass recognition method based on optimum-path forest, a new texture recognition system is proposed. By combining the discriminating power of our image descriptor and classifier, our system uses small-size feature vectors to characterize texture images without compromising overall classification rates. State-of-the-art recognition results are further presented on the Brodatz data set. High classification rates demonstrate the superiority of the proposed system.

  16. Simulation studies of defect textures and dynamics in 3-d cholesteric droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez-Pinto, Vianney; Lu, Shin-Ying; Selinger, Jonathan; Selinger, Robin

    2010-03-01

    We model defect texture evolution in droplets of cholesteric liquid crystals by solving for the dynamics of the nematic director field. In order to accommodate defects in the simulated texture, we use a finite difference formulation that is explicitly independent of sign reversal of the director at any position in the sample. Textures are visualized using either the Berreman 4x4 matrix method or by mapping free energy density. We study both planar and focal conic cholesteric textures in 3-d spherical and cylindrical droplets, with the goal to optimize device geometries for bistable display applications.

  17. Simulation studies of dynamics and defect textures in 3-d cholesteric droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez-Pinto, Vianney; Lu, Shin-Ying; Selinger, Jonathan; Selinger, Robin

    2010-04-01

    We model defect texture evolution in droplets of cholesteric liquid crystals by solving for the dynamics of the nematic director field. In order to accommodate defects in the simulated texture, we use a finite difference formulation that is explicitly independent of sign reversal of the director at any position in the sample. Textures are visualized using either the Berreman 4x4 matrix method or by mapping free energy density. We study both planar and focal conic cholesteric textures in 3-d spherical and cylindrical droplets, with the goal to optimize device geometries for bistable display applications.

  18. A scale- and orientation-adaptive extension of Local Binary Patterns for texture classification

    PubMed Central

    Hegenbart, Sebastian; Uhl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Local Binary Patterns (LBPs) have been used in a wide range of texture classification scenarios and have proven to provide a highly discriminative feature representation. A major limitation of LBP is its sensitivity to affine transformations. In this work, we present a scale- and rotation-invariant computation of LBP. Rotation-invariance is achieved by explicit alignment of features at the extraction level, using a robust estimate of global orientation. Scale-adapted features are computed in reference to the estimated scale of an image, based on the distribution of scale normalized Laplacian responses in a scale-space representation. Intrinsic-scale-adaption is performed to compute features, independent of the intrinsic texture scale, leading to a significantly increased discriminative power for a large amount of texture classes. In a final step, the rotation- and scale-invariant features are combined in a multi-resolution representation, which improves the classification accuracy in texture classification scenarios with scaling and rotation significantly. PMID:26240440

  19. The influence of bulk composition and dynamic melting conditions on olivine chondrule textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Harold C., Jr.; Hewins, Roger H.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of the bulk composition and the dynamic melting conditions on the texture of olivine chondrules were investigated in a series of heating experiments. It is shown that variations in the olivine chondrule textures can be produced by varying the FeO/(FeO + MgO) ratio between the average Type IA and Type II chondrule compositions, could affect the texture of a chondrule at a constant initial melting temperature and heating time. A range of the heating times and the masses of precursor spheres caused variations in the degree of melting and in chondrule textures. Chondrule textures were distributed on a graph of initial temperatures vs. FeO/(FeO + MgO) ratios as bands parallel to the olivine disappearance curve. This graph could be used to predict chondrule textures from Fe/(FeO + MgO) ratios at specific initial melting temperatures.

  20. The effect of multi-scale laser textured surface on lubrication regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segu, Dawit Zenebe; Choi, Si Geun; Choi, Jae hyouk; Kim, Seock Sam

    2013-04-01

    Laser surface texturing (LST) is a surface engineering process used to improve tribological characteristics of materials by creating patterned microstructures on the mechanical contact surface. In LST technology, a pulsated laser beam is used to create arranged dimples on surface by a material ablation process, which can improve load capacity, wear resistances, lubrication lifetime, and reduce friction coefficients. In the present study, the effect of multi-scale LST on lubricant regime was investigated. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser was applied on steel (AISI 52100) to create arranged dimples. To optimize the surface texturing effect on friction, multi-scale texture dimples with some specific formula arrays were fabricated by laser ablation process by combining circles and ellipses. The tribological testing of multi-scale textured surface was performed by a flat-on-flat unidirectional tribometer under lubrication, and the results compared with that of untextured surface. Through an increase in sliding speed and dimple depth the beneficial effect of multi-scale LST performance was achieved. The multi-scale textured surface had lower friction coefficient performance than the untextured surface due to hydrodynamic lubrication effect.

  1. Rotation and Scale Invariant Wavelet Feature for Content-Based Texture Image Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Moon-Chuen; Pun, Chi-Man

    2003-01-01

    Introduces a rotation and scale invariant log-polar wavelet texture feature for image retrieval. The underlying feature extraction process involves a log-polar transform followed by an adaptive row shift invariant wavelet packet transform. Experimental results show that this rotation and scale invariant wavelet feature is quite effective for image…

  2. Computer-aided mass detection in mammography: False positive reduction via gray-scale invariant ranklet texture features

    SciTech Connect

    Masotti, Matteo; Lanconelli, Nico; Campanini, Renato

    2009-02-15

    In this work, gray-scale invariant ranklet texture features are proposed for false positive reduction (FPR) in computer-aided detection (CAD) of breast masses. Two main considerations are at the basis of this proposal. First, false positive (FP) marks surviving our previous CAD system seem to be characterized by specific texture properties that can be used to discriminate them from masses. Second, our previous CAD system achieves invariance to linear/nonlinear monotonic gray-scale transformations by encoding regions of interest into ranklet images through the ranklet transform, an image transformation similar to the wavelet transform, yet dealing with pixels' ranks rather than with their gray-scale values. Therefore, the new FPR approach proposed herein defines a set of texture features which are calculated directly from the ranklet images corresponding to the regions of interest surviving our previous CAD system, hence, ranklet texture features; then, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier is used for discrimination. As a result of this approach, texture-based information is used to discriminate FP marks surviving our previous CAD system; at the same time, invariance to linear/nonlinear monotonic gray-scale transformations of the new CAD system is guaranteed, as ranklet texture features are calculated from ranklet images that have this property themselves by construction. To emphasize the gray-scale invariance of both the previous and new CAD systems, training and testing are carried out without any in-between parameters' adjustment on mammograms having different gray-scale dynamics; in particular, training is carried out on analog digitized mammograms taken from a publicly available digital database, whereas testing is performed on full-field digital mammograms taken from an in-house database. Free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve analysis of the two CAD systems demonstrates that the new approach achieves a higher reduction of FP marks

  3. Modelling Nonlinear Dynamic Textures using Hybrid DWT-DCT and Kernel PCA with GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadekar, Premanand Pralhad; Chopade, Nilkanth Bhikaji

    2016-06-01

    Most of the real-world dynamic textures are nonlinear, non-stationary, and irregular. Nonlinear motion also has some repetition of motion, but it exhibits high variation, stochasticity, and randomness. Hybrid DWT-DCT and Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) with YCbCr/YIQ colour coding using the Dynamic Texture Unit (DTU) approach is proposed to model a nonlinear dynamic texture, which provides better results than state-of-art methods in terms of PSNR, compression ratio, model coefficients, and model size. Dynamic texture is decomposed into DTUs as they help to extract temporal self-similarity. Hybrid DWT-DCT is used to extract spatial redundancy. YCbCr/YIQ colour encoding is performed to capture chromatic correlation. KPCA is applied to capture nonlinear motion. Further, the proposed algorithm is implemented on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), which comprise of hundreds of small processors to decrease time complexity and to achieve parallelism.

  4. Geomorphometric analysis of fine-scale morphology for extensive areas: a new surface-texture operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisani, Sebastiano; Rocca, Michele

    2014-05-01

    The application of geomorphometric analysis to high resolution digital terrain models (HRDTM) amplifies our capability to characterize and interpret fine-scale solid earth surface morphology. In this context it is possible to analyze fine-scale morphology in term of surface texture (e.g. Trevisani, 2012; Lucieer, 2005) and retrieve information linked to the different geomorphic processes and factors; this kind of analysis has an interesting potential to be exploited in the context of quantitative geomorphologic/geologic interpretation and geo-engineering. We developed a multiscale texture operator capable to synthetize the main characteristics of local surface texture in an efficient way. The proposed operator can be viewed as an hybrid between classical geostatistical spatial continuity indexes (e.g. variogram, Atkinson, 2000) and the well-known operator based on (rotation invariant) local binary patterns (Ojala, 2002). An important characteristic of the operator is to derive information on surface texture in an easily interpretable form so as to facilitate its use by experts for the interpretation of geomorphic processes and factors. Moreover this surface texture operator could be used for the derivation of more complex and ad-hoc surface texture indexes. We present the application of the operator in the analysis of different HRDTMs, mainly in the context of alpine environment. A particular interesting example is the application of the surface texture analysis in an extensive area (hundreds of km2), including also urbanized zones, and the evaluation of potential links between surface texture and lithological and geo-structural factors. References Atkinson, P.M. & Lewis, P. 2000, "Geostatistical classification for remote sensing: An introduction", Computers and Geosciences, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 361-371. Lucieer, A., Stein, A., 2005. Texture-based landform segmentation of LiDAR imagery. International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation 6, 261

  5. High-dynamic-range texture compression for rendering systems of different capacities.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen; Lu, Yan; Wu, Feng; Li, Shipeng; Tardif, John

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for high-dynamic-range (HDR) texture compression (TC) suitable for rendering systems of different capacities. Based on the previously proposed DHTC scheme, we first work out an improved joint-channel compression framework, which is robust and flexible enough to provide compressed HDR textures at different bit rates. Then, two compressed HDR texture formats based on the proposed framework are developed. The 8 bpp format is of near lossless visual quality, improving upon known state-of-the-art algorithms. And, to our knowledge, the 4 bpp format is the first workable 4 bpp solution with good quality. We also show that HDR textures in the proposed 4 bpp and 8 bpp formats can compose a layered architecture in the texture consumption pipeline, to significantly save the memory bandwidth and storage in real-time rendering. In addition, the 8 bpp format can also be used to handle traditional low dynamic range (LDR) RGBA textures. Our scheme exhibits a practical solution for compressing HDR textures at different rates and LDR textures with alpha maps. PMID:19910661

  6. Soil Texture Controls Broad Scale DOC Transport Efficiency in Watersheds (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M.

    2013-12-01

    Global change is altering the carbon cycle, including the movement of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) through river basins. The transport of DOC is controlled by climate dynamics and watershed configuration, including land cover, thus the many factors hamper our ability to predict DOC transport across broad spatial scales. We present an analysis of DOC transport across the conterminous United States using the U.S. Geological Survey's historical data, including over 400 sites ranging from small headwater watersheds to large river basins. We analyzed the slope of the log-log DOC concentration versus discharge relationship (C-Q slope). This slope, across sites, generally follows a log-normal distribution with a mode very close to zero (no change in concentration per unit increase in discharge), and a skew towards positive values. We used watershed attributes from these sites to build a regression tree model for predicting the C-Q slope. Generally, the two most important factors for predicting C-Q slope were soil texture and indices of groundwater contributions to a site. Watersheds with coarser soils and greater groundwater contributions tended to have the highest C-Q slopes. Surprisingly, the model did not choose watershed scale as an important predictor. The results emphasize the importance of hydrologic flow pathways in controlling DOC transport, and suggest that aquatic processes play a relatively smaller role in regulating DOC transport.

  7. Textural kinetics: a novel dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI feature for breast lesion classification.

    PubMed

    Agner, Shannon C; Soman, Salil; Libfeld, Edward; McDonald, Margie; Thomas, Kathleen; Englander, Sarah; Rosen, Mark A; Chin, Deanna; Nosher, John; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-06-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast has emerged as an adjunct imaging tool to conventional X-ray mammography due to its high detection sensitivity. Despite the increasing use of breast DCE-MRI, specificity in distinguishing malignant from benign breast lesions is low, and interobserver variability in lesion classification is high. The novel contribution of this paper is in the definition of a new DCE-MRI descriptor that we call textural kinetics, which attempts to capture spatiotemporal changes in breast lesion texture in order to distinguish malignant from benign lesions. We qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrated on 41 breast DCE-MRI studies that textural kinetic features outperform signal intensity kinetics and lesion morphology features in distinguishing benign from malignant lesions. A probabilistic boosting tree (PBT) classifier in conjunction with textural kinetic descriptors yielded an accuracy of 90%, sensitivity of 95%, specificity of 82%, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.92. Graph embedding, used for qualitative visualization of a low-dimensional representation of the data, showed the best separation between benign and malignant lesions when using textural kinetic features. The PBT classifier results and trends were also corroborated via a support vector machine classifier which showed that textural kinetic features outperformed the morphological, static texture, and signal intensity kinetics descriptors. When textural kinetic attributes were combined with morphologic descriptors, the resulting PBT classifier yielded 89% accuracy, 99% sensitivity, 76% specificity, and an AUC of 0.91. PMID:20508965

  8. Formations of Bacteria-like Textures by dynamic reactions in Meteorite and Syntheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Y.

    2009-05-01

    1. Introduction Spherule texture can be formed in dynamic reaction during meteoritic impact in air. However, there are no reports on nano-bacteria-like (i.e. spherule-chained) textures with iron (and Nickel) oxides (with chlorine) in composition and micro-texture with 100nm order [1] in meteorite and synthetic experiment. The purpose of the present study is to elucidate spherule-chained texture with micro-texture of 100nm in order found in the Kuga iron meteorite, Iwakuni, Yamaguchi, Japan, and its first artificial synthesis in laboratory. 2. Two textures in the Kuga meteorite: The Kuga iron meteorite found in Kuga, Iwakuni, Yamaguchi, Japan reveals spherule-chained texture with Fe, Ni-rich composition with 10μm in size, where each spherule contained "long micro-texture in 100nm in size"[1,2]. The complex texture of flow and chained shapes can be found only in the fusion crust of the meteorite formed by quenched and random processes with vapor-melting process in air of the Earth. The FE-ASEM with EDX analyses by an in-situ observation indicate that the matrix of the spherule-chained texture with Fe, Ni, O-rich (with minor Cl) composition is carbon-rich composition formed by impact reactions in air. 3. Comparison with Martian meteorite Remnant of life in ocean can be found by mineralized fossil, which can be found in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 as bacteria-like chained texture of magnetite in composition (in 100nm order) around carbonate spherules [3]. Similarity of bacteria-like texture of the ALH84001 compared with the Kuga meteorites in this study are composition of Fe-rich, C-bearing, and chained texture of small size replaced by Fe and O-rich composition in air. Major difference of these textures is no carbonates minerals in the Kuga meteorite at dynamic reaction in air [1, 2, 3]. 4. First synthesis of bacteria- like akaganeite: A bacteria-like texture with Fe oxides (with minor chlorine as akaganeite-like compositions) is synthesized by chlorine and water

  9. Correlation modeling between process condition of sandblasting and surface texture: A multi-scale approach.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsin Shen; Bigerelle, Maxence; Vincent, Renald; Deltomb, Raphael

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, the influence of sandblasting condition (working pressure) on surface texture is modeled, relying on a multi-scale approach and statistical analysis. To improve the correlation modeling between the process condition and surface texture, special effort is made to identification of an optimal parameter set, including 3D roughness parameters, cut-off lengths, filter types and model types. A power law relationship is identified between the pressure and Sdq computed with a cut-off length of 120 µm using a low-pass filter. Experimental and theoretical arguments are provided for justification. SCANNING 38:191-201, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26249107

  10. Dynamic recrystallization and texture evolution of Mg–Y–Zn alloy during hot extrusion process

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, L.B.; Li, X.; Zhang, D.P.; Cheng, L.R.; Meng, J.; Zhang, H.J.

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure and texture evolution of Mg{sub 98.5}Y{sub 1}Zn{sub 0.5} and Mg{sub 92.5}Y{sub 5}Zn{sub 2.5} (atomic percent) alloys during hot extrusion were systematically investigated. The coarse LPSO phases with higher volume fraction (∼ 57%) suppressed the twinning generation in the initial stage of extrusion, and accelerated the dynamic recrystallization through the particle deformation zones. Therefore, the volume fraction of DRXed grains in as-extruded Mg{sub 92.5}Y{sub 5}Zn{sub 2.5} alloy was much higher than that of Mg{sub 98.5}Y{sub 1}Zn{sub 0.5} alloy. The intensive recrystallization process resulted in the conventional basal texture weakening, although the texture evolution was mainly dominated by flow behavior. The dynamic recrystallization behavior in Mg{sub 92.5}Y{sub 5}Zn{sub 2.5} alloy restricted the formation of deformation texture, and thus the more random texture was observed during the whole extrusion process. - Highlights: • The densely coarse LPSO phases suppressed the twinning deformation. • Coarse LPSO phases induced the particle stimulated nucleation effect. • Dynamic recrystallization resulted in the basal texture weakening effect.

  11. Probability maps as a way to communicate uncertainty in soil texture classes at landscape scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, Barry; Lark, Murray

    2014-05-01

    Soil texture is critical for a range of functions and degradation threats including soil carbon cycling, hydrology and erosion. The texture of a soil at a point in the landscape is often expressed as a class in a soil texture triangle. The boundaries between these classes are based on the proportions of sand, silt and clay-sized particles. Soils are typically attributed to a single class, without considering the uncertainty associated with class membership. We demonstrate an approach for communicating uncertainty in spatial prediction of soil texture classes using a database of 2600 measurements of particle size distribution across part of England. A subset of these measurements included repeated analyses of separate aliquots from the same sample from which we could compute uncertainties associated with analytical and subsampling variance to include in our uncertainty analysis. After appropriate transformation for compositional variables, the spatial variation of the soil particle size classes was modelled geostatistically using robust variogram estimators to produce a validated linear model of coregionalization. This was then used to predict the composition of topsoil at the nodes of a fine grid. The predictions were backtransformed to the original scales of measurement by a Monte Carlo integration over the prediction distribution on the transformed scale. This approach allowed the probability to be computed for each class in the soil texture classification, at each node on the grid. The probability of each class, and derived information such as the class of maximum probability could therefore be mapped. We validated the predictions at a set of randomly sampled locations. We consider this technique has the potential to improve the communication of uncertainty associated with the application of soil texture classifications in soil science.

  12. Multi-modality registration via multi-scale textural and spectral embedding representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Rusu, Mirabela; Viswanath, Satish; Penzias, Gregory; Pahwa, Shivani; Gollamudi, Jay; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-03-01

    Intensity-based similarity measures assume that the original signal intensity of different modality images can provide statistically consistent information regarding the two modalities to be co-registered. In multi-modal registration problems, however, intensity-based similarity measures are often inadequate to identify an optimal transformation. Texture features can improve the performance of the multi-modal co-registration by providing more similar appearance representations of the two images to be co-registered, compared to the signal intensity representations. Furthermore, texture features extracted at different length scales (neighborhood sizes) can reveal similar underlying structural attributes between the images to be co-registered similarities that may not be discernible on the signal intensity representation alone. However one limitation of using texture features is that a number of them may be redundant and dependent and hence there is a need to identify non-redundant representations. Additionally it is not clear which features at which specific scales reveal similar attributes across the images to be co-registered. To address this problem, we introduced a novel approach for multimodal co-registration that employs new multi-scale image representations. Our approach comprises 4 distinct steps: (1) texure feature extraction at each length scale within both the target and template images, (2) independent component analysis (ICA) at each texture feature length scale, and (3) spectrally embedding (SE) the ICA components (ICs) obtained for the texture features at each length scale, and finally (4) identifying and combining the optimal length scales at which to perform the co-registration. To combine and co-register across different length scales, -mutual information (-MI) was applied in the high dimensional space of spectral embedding vectors to facilitate co-registration. To validate our multi-scale co-registration approach, we aligned 45 pairs of prostate

  13. Bio-inspired scale-like surface textures and their tribological properties.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Christian; Schäfer, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Friction, wear and the associated energy dissipation are major challenges in all systems containing moving parts. Examples range from nanoelectromechanical systems over hip prosthesis to off-shore wind turbines. Bionic approaches have proven to be very successful in many engineering problems, while investigating the potential of a bio-inspired approach in creating morphological surface textures is a relatively new field of research. Here, we developed laser-created textures inspired by the scales found on the skin of snakes and certain lizards. We show that this bio-inspired surface morphology reduced dry sliding friction forces by more than 40%. In lubricated contacts the same morphology increased friction by a factor of three. Two different kinds of morphologies, one with completely overlapping scales and one with the scales arranged in individual rows, were chosen. In lubricated as well as unlubricated contacts, the surface texture with the scales in rows showed lower friction forces than the completely overlapping ones. We anticipate that these results could have significant impact in all dry sliding contacts, ranging from nanoelectromechanical and micro-positioning systems up to large-scale tribological contacts which cannot be lubricated, e.g. because they are employed in a vacuum environment. PMID:26125522

  14. Multi-Scale Fractal Analysis of Image Texture and Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emerson, Charles W.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.

    1997-01-01

    Fractals embody important ideas of self-similarity, in which the spatial behavior or appearance of a system is largely scale-independent. Self-similarity is a property of curves or surfaces where each part is indistinguishable from the whole. The fractal dimension D of remote sensing data yields quantitative insight on the spatial complexity and information content contained within these data. Analyses of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) images of homogeneous land covers near Huntsville, Alabama revealed that the fractal dimension of an image of an agricultural land cover indicates greater complexity as pixel size increases, a forested land cover gradually grows smoother, and an urban image remains roughly self-similar over the range of pixel sizes analyzed(l0 to 80 meters). The forested scene behaves as one would expect-larger pixel sizes decrease the complexity of the image as individual clumps of trees are averaged into larger blocks. The increased complexity of the agricultural image with increasing pixel size results from the loss of homogeneous groups of pixels in the large fields to mixed pixels composed of varying combinations of NDVI values that correspond to roads and vegetation. The same process occur's in the urban image to some extent, but the lack of large, homogeneous areas in the high resolution NDVI image means the initially high D value is maintained as pixel size increases. The slope of the fractal dimension-resolution relationship provides indications of how image classification or feature identification will be affected by changes in sensor resolution.

  15. Large-scale structure in a texture-seeded cold dark matter cosmogony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Spergel, David N.; Turok, Nail

    1991-01-01

    This paper studies the formation of large-scale structure by global texture in a flat universe dominated by cold dark matter. A code for evolution of the texture fields was combined with an N-body code for evolving the dark matter. The results indicate some promising aspects: with only one free parameter, the observed galaxy-galaxy correlation function is reproduced, clusters of galaxies are found to be significantly clustered on a scale of 20-50/h Mpc, and coherent structures of over 50/h Mpc in the galaxy distribution were found. The large-scale streaming motions observed are in good agreement with the observations: the average magnitude of the velocity field smoothed over 30/h Mpc is 430 km/sec. Global texture produces a cosmic Mach number that is compatible with observation. Also, significant evolution of clusters at low redshift was seen. Possible problems for the theory include too high velocity dispersions in clusters, and voids which are not as empty as those observed.

  16. Lunar textural analysis based on WAC-derived kilometer-scale roughness and entropy maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Wang, XueQiang; Zhang, Jiang; Chen, Jian; Ling, Zongcheng

    2016-06-01

    In general, textures are thought to be some complicated repeated patterns formed by elements, or primitives which are sorted in certain rules. Lunar surfaces record the interactions between its outside environment and itself, thus, based on high-resolution DEM model or image data, there are some topographic features which have different roughness and entropy values or signatures on lunar surfaces. Textures of lunar surfaces can help us to concentrate on typical topographic and photometric variations and reveal the relationships between obvious features (craters, impact basins, sinuous rilles (SRs) and ridges) with resurfacing processes on the Moon. In this paper, the term surface roughness is an expression of the variability of a topographic or photometric surface at kilometer scale, and the term entropy can characterize the variability inherent in a geological and topographic unit and evaluate the uncertainty of predictions made by a given geological process. We use the statistical moments of gray-level histograms in different-sized neighborhoods (e.g., 3, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 pixels) to compute the kilometer-scale roughness and entropy values, using the mosaic image from 70°N to 70°S obtained by Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Wide Angle Camera (WAC). Large roughness and entropy signatures were only found in the larger scale maps, while the smallest 3-pixel scale map had more disorderly and unsystematic textures. According to the entropy values in 10-pixel scale entropy map, we made a frequency curve and categorized lunar surfaces into three types, shadow effects, maria and highlands. A 2D scatter plot of entropy versus roughness values was produced and we found that there were two point clusters corresponding to the highlands and maria, respectively. In the last, we compared the topographic and photometric signatures derived from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data and WAC mosaic image. On the lunar surfaces, the ridges have obvious multilevel

  17. Nanometer-scale features on micrometer-scale surface texturing: a bone histological, gene expression, and nanomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Paulo G; Takayama, Tadahiro; Yoo, Daniel; Jimbo, Ryo; Karunagaran, Sanjay; Tovar, Nick; Janal, Malvin N; Yamano, Seiichi

    2014-08-01

    Micro- and nanoscale surface modifications have been the focus of multiple studies in the pursuit of accelerating bone apposition or osseointegration at the implant surface. Here, we evaluated histological and nanomechanical properties, and gene expression, for a microblasted surface presenting nanometer-scale texture within a micrometer-scale texture (MB) (Ossean Surface, Intra-Lock International, Boca Raton, FL) versus a dual-acid etched surface presenting texture at the micrometer-scale only (AA), in a rodent femur model for 1, 2, 4, and 8weeks in vivo. Following animal sacrifice, samples were evaluated in terms of histomorphometry, biomechanical properties through nanoindentation, and gene expression by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Although the histomorphometric, and gene expression analysis results were not significantly different between MB and AA at 4 and 8 weeks, significant differences were seen at 1 and 2 weeks. The expression of the genes encoding collagen type I (COL-1), and osteopontin (OPN) was significantly higher for MB than for AA at 1 week, indicating up-regulated osteoprogenitor and osteoblast differentiation. At 2 weeks, significantly up-regulated expression of the genes for COL-1, runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX-2), osterix, and osteocalcin (OCN) indicated progressive mineralization in newly formed bone. The nanomechanical properties tested by the nanoindentation presented significantly higher-rank hardness and elastic modulus for the MB compared to AA at all time points tested. In conclusion, the nanotopographical featured surfaces presented an overall higher host-to-implant response compared to the microtextured only surfaces. The statistical differences observed in some of the osteogenic gene expression between the two groups may shed some insight into the role of surface texture and its extent in the observed bone healing mechanisms. PMID:24813260

  18. Scale Space Graph Representation and Kernel Matching for Non Rigid and Textured 3D Shape Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Garro, Valeria; Giachetti, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel framework for 3D object retrieval that relies on tree-based shape representations (TreeSha) derived from the analysis of the scale-space of the Auto Diffusion Function (ADF) and on specialized graph kernels designed for their comparison. By coupling maxima of the Auto Diffusion Function with the related basins of attraction, we can link the information at different scales encoding spatial relationships in a graph description that is isometry invariant and can easily incorporate texture and additional geometrical information as node and edge features. Using custom graph kernels it is then possible to estimate shape dissimilarities adapted to different specific tasks and on different categories of models, making the procedure a powerful and flexible tool for shape recognition and retrieval. Experimental results demonstrate that the method can provide retrieval scores similar or better than state-of-the-art on textured and non textured shape retrieval benchmarks and give interesting insights on effectiveness of different shape descriptors and graph kernels. PMID:26372206

  19. Dynamic crystallization of chondrule melts of porphyritic olivine composition - Textures experimental and natural

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, Gary

    1989-01-01

    A full range of textures characteristic for porphyritic olivine chondrules was reproduced in melts of the same composition, crystallized under dynamic crystallization conditions (under controlled cooling), as determined by electron microprobe analyses. The primary differences between the natural and experimentally produced porphyritic olivine textures were the nature and the extent of matrix crystallization, which reflected the subsolidus or low-temperature cooling history. The most confining limits on the chondrule-forming process were found to be the presence of crystalline precursors for the chondrule melts and the upper temperature limit of melting.

  20. Internal stresses at the crystalline scale in textured ZrO2 films before lateral cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdin, Clotilde; Pascal, Serge; Tang, Yan

    2015-05-01

    Zirconium oxide layers are submitted to internal stresses that play a role in damage of the layer. Lateral cracking is often observed during Zr alloys oxidation. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the microstresses at the crystalline scale on the lateral cracking within a growing oxide on a plane substrate. A parametric study was carried out taking into account the crystallographic texture of the oxide and the presence of a tetragonal zirconia at the metal-oxide interface. Macroscopic computations and polycrystalline aggregate computations were performed. The result indicating the (1 0 6 bar) fiber texture as the most favorable was recovered. It was found that under macroscopic compressive stresses parallel to the plane metal-oxide interface, positive microstresses perpendicular to the interface develops. They can trigger the lateral cracking and the phenomenon is promoted by the presence of tetragonal zirconia at the metal-oxide interface.

  1. Post-black etching on emitter to improve performance of multi-scale texture silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yurong; Yang, Haigang; Cao, Weiwei; Wang, Guangna; Ma, Heng; Chang, Fanggao

    2014-09-01

    A simple, low-cost, post-black etching process atop the random pyramidal emitter has been proposed and investigated. The multi-scale texture is achieved by combining nanoporous layer formed by the post-black etching with micron-scale pyramid texture. Compared to the pre-black etched Si solar cells, our experiments clearly show the advantage of post-black etched texturing: it enables high blue response and improved conversion efficiency. As a result, the enhancement of 7.1 mA/cm2 on the short-circuit current density and improvement of 31 % in the conversion efficiency have been reached.

  2. Dynamic Crystallization Experiments on LEW97008: Experimental Reproduction of Chondroid Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, J. W.; Le, L.; Lofgren, G. E.; McSween, H. Y, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic crystallization experiments were conducted using LEW97008 (L3.4) as starting material. Experiments were melted at temperatures well below its liquidus (1250-1450 C) in order to document the textural and compositional changes that occur in UOC material with modest amounts of partial melting and subsequent crystallization. The textures of the experimental products compare very well to natural chondroids (partially melted nebular particles that would become chondrules if more completely melted). Thus it is possible to use the textures in these experiments as a guide to unraveling the melting and cooling histories of natural chondroids. The Antarctic meteorite LEW97008 was chosen as the starting material for our experiments. As an L3.4 it is slightly more metamorphosed than would ordinarily be preferred, but this meteorite is unusually fresh for an Antarctic meteorite, which made it attractive.

  3. 17.1%-Efficient Multi-Scale-Textured Black Silicon Solar Cells without Dielectric Antireflection Coating: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, F.; Page, M. R.; Branz, H. M.; Yuan, H. C.

    2011-07-01

    In this work we present 17.1%-efficient p-type single crystal Si solar cells with a multi-scale-textured surface and no dielectric antireflection coating. Multi-scale texturing is achieved by a gold-nanoparticle-assisted nanoporous etch after conventional micron scale KOH-based pyramid texturing (pyramid black etching). By incorporating geometric enhancement of antireflection, this multi-scale texturing reduces the nanoporosity depth required to make silicon 'black' compared to nanoporous planar surfaces. As a result, it improves short-wavelength spectral response (blue response), previously one of the major limiting factors in 'black-Si' solar cells. With multi-scale texturing, the spectrum-weighted average reflectance from 350- to 1000-nm wavelength is below 2% with a 100-nm deep nanoporous layer. In comparison, roughly 250-nm deep nanopores are needed to achieve similar reflectance on planar surface. Here, we characterize surface morphology, reflectivity and solar cell performance of the multi-scale textured solar cells.

  4. Dynamics of convective scale interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, James F. W.; Sinclair, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Several of the mesoscale dynamic and thermodynamic aspects of convective scale interaction are examined. An explanation of how sounding data can be coupled with satellite observed cumulus development in the warm sector and the arc cloud line's time evolution to develop a short range forecast of expected convective intensity along an arc cloud line. The formative, mature and dissipating stages of the arc cloud line life cycle are discussed. Specific properties of convective scale interaction are presented and the relationship between arc cloud lines and tornado producing thunderstorms is considered.

  5. Rotation invariant texture retrieval considering the scale dependence of Gabor wavelet.

    PubMed

    Chaorong Li; Guiduo Duan; Fujin Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Obtaining robust and efficient rotation-invariant texture features in content-based image retrieval field is a challenging work. We propose three efficient rotation-invariant methods for texture image retrieval using copula model based in the domains of Gabor wavelet (GW) and circularly symmetric GW (CSGW). The proposed copula models use copula function to capture the scale dependence of GW/CSGW for improving the retrieval performance. It is well known that the Kullback-Leibler distance (KLD) is the commonly used similarity measurement between probability models. However, it is difficult to deduce the closed-form of KLD between two copula models due to the complexity of the copula model. We also put forward a kind of retrieval scheme using the KLDs of marginal distributions and the KLD of copula function to calculate the KLD of copula model. The proposed texture retrieval method has low computational complexity and high retrieval precision. The experimental results on VisTex and Brodatz data sets show that the proposed retrieval method is more effective compared with the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25879945

  6. Large-Scale Point-Cloud Visualization through Localized Textured Surface Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Arikan, Murat; Preiner, Reinhold; Scheiblauer, Claus; Jeschke, Stefan; Wimmer, Michael

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel scene representation for the visualization of large-scale point clouds accompanied by a set of high-resolution photographs. Many real-world applications deal with very densely sampled point-cloud data, which are augmented with photographs that often reveal lighting variations and inaccuracies in registration. Consequently, the high-quality representation of the captured data, i.e., both point clouds and photographs together, is a challenging and time-consuming task. We propose a two-phase approach, in which the first (preprocessing) phase generates multiple overlapping surface patches and handles the problem of seamless texture generation locally for each patch. The second phase stitches these patches at render-time to produce a high-quality visualization of the data. As a result of the proposed localization of the global texturing problem, our algorithm is more than an order of magnitude faster than equivalent mesh-based texturing techniques. Furthermore, since our preprocessing phase requires only a minor fraction of the whole data set at once, we provide maximum flexibility when dealing with growing data sets. PMID:26357377

  7. Flavor hierarchies from dynamical scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panico, Giuliano; Pomarol, Alex

    2016-07-01

    One main obstacle for any beyond the SM (BSM) scenario solving the hierarchy problem is its potentially large contributions to electric dipole moments. An elegant way to avoid this problem is to have the light SM fermions couple to the BSM sector only through bilinears, overline{f}f . This possibility can be neatly implemented in composite Higgs models. We study the implications of dynamically generating the fermion Yukawa couplings at different scales, relating larger scales to lighter SM fermions. We show that all flavor and CP-violating constraints can be easily accommodated for a BSM scale of few TeV, without requiring any extra symmetry. Contributions to B physics are mainly mediated by the top, giving a predictive pattern of deviations in Δ F = 2 and Δ F = 1 flavor observables that could be seen in future experiments.

  8. Dynamic scaling in spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappas, C.; Mezei, F.; Ehlers, G.; Manuel, P.; Campbell, I. A.

    2003-08-01

    We present neutron spin echo (NSE) results and a revisited analysis of historical data on spin glasses, which reveal a pure power-law time decay of the spin autocorrelation function s(Q,t)=S(Q,t)/S(Q) at the glass temperature Tg. The power law exponent is in excellent agreement with that calculated from dynamic and static critical exponents deduced from macroscopic susceptibility measurements made on a quite different time scale. This scaling relation involving exponents of different physical quantities determined by completely independent experimental methods is stringently verified experimentally in a spin glass. As spin glasses are a subgroup of the vast family of glassy systems also comprising structural glasses and other noncrystalline systems the observed strict critical scaling behavior is important. Above the phase transition the strikingly nonexponential relaxation, best fitted by the Ogielski (power-law times stretched exponential) function, appears as an intrinsic, homogeneous feature of spin glasses.

  9. Dynamic superhydrophobic behavior in scalable random textured polymeric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, David; Park, Sung-hoon; Lee, Sangeui; Verma, Neil; Bandaru, Prabhakar R.

    2016-03-01

    Superhydrophobic (SH) surfaces, created from hydrophobic materials with micro- or nano- roughness, trap air pockets in the interstices of the roughness, leading, in fluid flow conditions, to shear-free regions with finite interfacial fluid velocity and reduced resistance to flow. Significant attention has been given to SH conditions on ordered, periodic surfaces. However, in practical terms, random surfaces are more applicable due to their relative ease of fabrication. We investigate SH behavior on a novel durable polymeric rough surface created through a scalable roll-coating process with varying micro-scale roughness through velocity and pressure drop measurements. We introduce a new method to construct the velocity profile over SH surfaces with significant roughness in microchannels. Slip length was measured as a function of differing roughness and interstitial air conditions, with roughness and air fraction parameters obtained through direct visualization. The slip length was matched to scaling laws with good agreement. Roughness at high air fractions led to a reduced pressure drop and higher velocities, demonstrating the effectiveness of the considered surface in terms of reduced resistance to flow. We conclude that the observed air fraction under flow conditions is the primary factor determining the response in fluid flow. Such behavior correlated well with the hydrophobic or superhydrophobic response, indicating significant potential for practical use in enhancing fluid flow efficiency.

  10. Sound texture recognition through dynamical systems modeling of empirical mode decomposition.

    PubMed

    Van Nort, Doug; Braasch, Jonas; Oliveros, Pauline

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes a system for modeling, recognizing, and classifying sound textures. The described system translates contemporary approaches from video texture analysis, creating a unique approach in the realm of audio and music. The signal is first represented as a set of mode functions by way of the Empirical Mode Decomposition technique for time/frequency analysis, before expressing the dynamics of these modes as a linear dynamical system (LDS). Both linear and nonlinear techniques are utilized in order to learn the system dynamics, which leads to a successful distinction between unique classes of textures. Five classes of sounds comprised a data set, consisting of crackling fire, typewriter action, rainstorms, carbonated beverages, and crowd applause, drawing on a variety of source recordings. Based on this data set the system achieved a classification accuracy of 90%, which outperformed both a Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficient based LDS-modeling approach from the literature, as well as one based on a standard Gaussian Mixture Model classifier. PMID:23039465

  11. Impact of Sub-grid Soil Textural Properties on Simulations of Hydrological Fluxes at the Continental Scale Mississippi River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Samaniego, L. E.; Livneh, B.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of soil hydraulic properties such as porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity is required to accurately model the dynamics of near-surface hydrological processes (e.g. evapotranspiration and root-zone soil moisture dynamics) and provide reliable estimates of regional water and energy budgets. Soil hydraulic properties are commonly derived from pedo-transfer functions using soil textural information recorded during surveys, such as the fractions of sand and clay, bulk density, and organic matter content. Typically large scale land-surface models are parameterized using a relatively coarse soil map with little or no information on parametric sub-grid variability. In this study we analyze the impact of sub-grid soil variability on simulated hydrological fluxes over the Mississippi River Basin (≈3,240,000 km2) at multiple spatio-temporal resolutions. A set of numerical experiments were conducted with the distributed mesoscale hydrologic model (mHM) using two soil datasets: (a) the Digital General Soil Map of the United States or STATSGO2 (1:250 000) and (b) the recently collated Harmonized World Soil Database based on the FAO-UNESCO Soil Map of the World (1:5 000 000). mHM was parameterized with the multi-scale regionalization technique that derives distributed soil hydraulic properties via pedo-transfer functions and regional coefficients. Within the experimental framework, the 3-hourly model simulations were conducted at four spatial resolutions ranging from 0.125° to 1°, using meteorological datasets from the NLDAS-2 project for the time period 1980-2012. Preliminary results indicate that the model was able to capture observed streamflow behavior reasonably well with both soil datasets, in the major sub-basins (i.e. the Missouri, the Upper Mississippi, the Ohio, the Red, and the Arkansas). However, the spatio-temporal patterns of simulated water fluxes and states (e.g. soil moisture, evapotranspiration) from both simulations, showed marked

  12. Evolution of foredune texture following dynamic restoration, Doughboy Bay, Stewart Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konlechner, T. M.; Ryu, W.; Hilton, M. J.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Growing concern regarding the geomorphic and associated biotic effects of dune management practises has led to an increase in the number of dune restoration projects globally. Most recent projects aim to enhance the efficiency of aeolian sediment dynamics and increase dune mobility by decreasing vegetation cover, but we lack objective measures to evaluate such projects. Here we demonstrate the use of landscape metrics to quantify the evolution of foredune texture following the removal of vegetation. A long-term program of marram grass (Ammophila arenaria) eradication in southern New Zealand (Doughboy Bay, Stewart Island) is examined. Four metrics: bare sand area, patch adjacency, complexity, and the range of proximity, are used to classify a series of foredune textures beginning with the pre-restoration state through the phases of marram removal, to the current state. Foredune texture at Doughboy Bay has evolved from a semi-stable to an active state as the consequence of restoration. Two metrics, bare sand and adjacency, appear to be particularly good measures of change following marram removal. Patterns and rates of change for these metrics are consistent with ground observations of increased 'naturalness' (native plant communities, sand mobility) over the same period. The set of landscape metrics derived for Doughboy Bay were compared to similar sets measured for a nearby foredune system where marram invasion has not occurred, and where conditions presumably represent equilibrium foredune texture. Since the removal of marram at Doughboy Bay and the consequent remobilization of the sand surface, the foredune texture has increased in similarity to that of the reference site, indicating a favourable shift in plant cover as a result of the restoration program. We conclude that landscape metrics can be used to track changes in foredune morphology following restoration. Second, the planning, management, and monitoring of coastal dune restoration programs will benefit

  13. Using Parameters of Dynamic Pulse Function for 3d Modeling in LOD3 Based on Random Textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadehashrafi, B.

    2015-12-01

    The pulse function (PF) is a technique based on procedural preprocessing system to generate a computerized virtual photo of the façade with in a fixed size square(Alizadehashrafi et al., 2009, Musliman et al., 2010). Dynamic Pulse Function (DPF) is an enhanced version of PF which can create the final photo, proportional to real geometry. This can avoid distortion while projecting the computerized photo on the generated 3D model(Alizadehashrafi and Rahman, 2013). The challenging issue that might be handled for having 3D model in LoD3 rather than LOD2, is the final aim that have been achieved in this paper. In the technique based DPF the geometries of the windows and doors are saved in an XML file schema which does not have any connections with the 3D model in LoD2 and CityGML format. In this research the parameters of Dynamic Pulse Functions are utilized via Ruby programming language in SketchUp Trimble to generate (exact position and deepness) the windows and doors automatically in LoD3 based on the same concept of DPF. The advantage of this technique is automatic generation of huge number of similar geometries e.g. windows by utilizing parameters of DPF along with defining entities and window layers. In case of converting the SKP file to CityGML via FME software or CityGML plugins the 3D model contains the semantic database about the entities and window layers which can connect the CityGML to MySQL(Alizadehashrafi and Baig, 2014). The concept behind DPF, is to use logical operations to project the texture on the background image which is dynamically proportional to real geometry. The process of projection is based on two vertical and horizontal dynamic pulses starting from upper-left corner of the background wall in down and right directions respectively based on image coordinate system. The logical one/zero on the intersections of two vertical and horizontal dynamic pulses projects/does not project the texture on the background image. It is possible to define

  14. The Effects of Grain Size and Texture on Dynamic Abnormal Grain Growth in Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, Philip J.; Taleff, Eric M.

    2016-07-01

    This is the first report of abnormal grain morphologies specific to a Mo sheet material produced from a commercial-purity arc-melted ingot. Abnormal grains initiated and grew during plastic deformation of this material at temperatures of 1793 K and 1813 K (1520 °C and 1540 °C). This abnormal grain growth during high-temperature plastic deformation is termed dynamic abnormal grain growth, DAGG. DAGG in this material readily consumes nearly all grains near the sheet center while leaving many grains near the sheet surface unconsumed. Crystallographic texture, grain size, and other microstructural features are characterized. After recrystallization, a significant through-thickness variation in crystallographic texture exists in this material but does not appear to directly influence DAGG propagation. Instead, dynamic normal grain growth, which may be influenced by texture, preferentially occurs near the sheet surface prior to DAGG. The large grains thus produced near the sheet surface inhibit the subsequent growth of the abnormal grains produced by DAGG, which preferentially consume the finer grains near the sheet center. This produces abnormal grains that span the sheet center but leave unconsumed polycrystalline microstructure near the sheet surface. Abnormal grains are preferentially oriented with the < 110rangle approximately along the tensile axis. These results provide additional new evidence that boundary curvature is the primary driving force for DAGG in Mo.

  15. Electrical manipulation of dynamic magnetic impurity and spin texture of helical Dirac fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-Qiang; Zhong, Min; Zheng, Shi-Han; Yang, Mou; Wang, Guang-Hui

    2016-05-01

    We have theoretically investigated the spin inelastic scattering of helical electrons off a high-spin nanomagnet absorbed on a topological surface. The nanomagnet is treated as a dynamic quantum spin and driven by the spin transfer torque effect. We proposed a mechanism to electrically manipulate the spin texture of helical Dirac fermions rather than by an external magnetic field. By tuning the bias voltage and the direction of impurity magnetization, we present rich patterns of spin texture, from which important fingerprints exclusively associated with the spin helical feature are obtained. Furthermore, it is found that the nonmagnetic potential can create the resonance state in the spin density with different physics as the previously reported resonance of charge density.

  16. Lava Textures, Magma Crystallization History, and the Dynamics of Merapi and Aleutian Mush Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Del Marmol, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The subsurface dynamics of magma in mush columns beneath arc volcanoes is recorded in the textures of the basic lavas. A detailed comparison of lava textures from large mature volcanoes in Indonesia (Merapi) and the Aleutian Islands (Adak and Atka), shows remarkably similar, often indistinguishable, textures of high alumina basalts (HAB) and basaltic andesites (BA). We suggest a systematic characterization of these distinctive textures into a few simple categories reflecting the subsurface history of crystallization within solidification fronts (SFs) and subsequent transport dynamics. The HABs are strongly plagioclase-phyric and of two main groups: A1 consists of large, idiomorphic, mildly zoned, plagioclase (20-30 vol.%) with small amounts of olivine (2-8%) set in a finely crystalline groundmass of these same phases; A2 is similar, but contains an additional pervasive population of large 'old' plagioclase, rounded, often highly zoned, and sometimes broken; A1+ is a subclass of A1 where traces of 'old' plagioclase are present. Similar categories exist in the BA lavas except overall crystallinity is higher and olivine is replaced by large clinopyroxenes containing or mantled with magnetite. In a temporal stratigraphic sense, the early lavas are generally HAB A1 types and transition into, sometimes alternating, HAB A2 types followed by BA types. The initial establishment of the mush column is by hot, highly mobile primary magmas, followed by increasingly more thermally mature magmas containing debris from disrupted SFs. The detailed nature of this debris, its variation in time, and the volumes give important insights on the size and vigor of the mush column staging chambers.

  17. A Comparison of Texture Development in an Experimental and Industrial Tertiary Oxide Scale in a Hot Strip Mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xianglong; Jiang, Zhengyi; Zhao, Jingwei; Wei, Dongbin; Zhou, Ji; Zhou, Cunlong; Huang, Qingxue

    2015-12-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) has been used to investigate the microstructure and texture-based features of an industrial tertiary oxide scale formed on a micro-alloyed low-carbon steel from a hot strip mill. EBSD-derived maps demonstrate that the oxide scale consists primarily of magnetite (Fe3O4) with a small amount of hematite ( α-Fe2O3) which scatters near the surface, at the oxide/steel interface and at the cracking edges. The results extracted from these maps reveal that there is a significant difference between the industrial and the laboratory oxide scales in their grain boundaries, phase boundaries, and texture evolutions. There are high proportions of special coincidence site lattice boundaries Σ3 and Σ13b in the magnetite of the industrial oxide scale, rather than the lower orders of Σ5, Σ7, and Σ17b, which develop in the experimental oxide scale. Within the phase boundaries, the orientation relationships between the magnetite and the hematite correspond to the matching planes and directions {111}Fe3O4||{0001} α-Fe2O3 and {110}Fe3O4||{110} α-Fe2O3. Magnetite in both of these oxide scales develops a relatively weak {001} fiber texture component including a strong {001}<100> cube and a slightly strong {100}<210> texture components. Unlike the {001}<110> rotated cube component in the experimental oxide scale, the magnetite in the industrial tertiary oxide scale develops a strong {112}<110> and a relatively strong {113}<110> and {111}<110> texture components. These findings have the potential to provide a convincing step forward for oxidation research.

  18. Biaxial Texture Evolution of Nanostructured Films under Dynamic Shadowing Effect and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang

    Texture formation and evolution in polycrystalline films are quite complicated, and they still remain as challenging subjects. Oblique angle deposition is an effective way to control the texture due to the shadowing effect introduced by oblique incident flux. A new dynamic oblique angle sputter deposition technique, called flipping rotation, was developed. In this rotation mode, the substrate is arranged to rotate continuously at a fixed speed around an axis lying within and parallel to the substrate. The incident flux is always perpendicular to the rotational axis and the flux incident angle relative to the substrate normal changes continuously. To study the texture formation and evolution of Mo and W films grown by DC magnetron sputter depositions, three film categories were prepared: (1) normal incidence deposition without the shadowing effect, (2) stationary oblique angle deposition at various fixed flux incident angles with static shadowing effect, and (3) convention rotation and flipping rotation deposition with dynamic shadowing effect. Under the normal incidence deposition, ultrathin (2.5 nm) to thin (100 nm) Mo films have been deposited on SO2 membranes on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. These samples can be directly compared with the films grown on glass or native oxide covered Si substrates. The result of a fiber texture with the [110] out-of-plane direction implies that the growth has gone through a recrystallization process that selects the minimum surface energy plane parallel to the substrate. This is in contrast to the conventional understanding of the selection of out-of-plane orientation, which is the fastest growth direction [100] at room temperature based on the low Mo homologous temperature (room temperature/melting temperature) of ~0.1. Under stationary oblique angle deposition, Mo thin films in the range of 175 nm to 1300 nm were observed to undergo a dramatic change in crystal texture orientation from a (110)[11¯¯0] biaxial

  19. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON TEXTURE EVOLUTION IN TANTALUM DURING DYNAMIC-EXTRUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo, Carl P.; Escobedo-Diaza, Juan P.; Gray III, George T.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Martinez, Daniel T.

    2012-06-20

    Motivation of this project is: (1) Build a furnace as a cross section of a gun barrel capable of temperatures up to 600 Celsius; (2) To examine the influence of temperature, texture, and extrusion velocity in Tantalum; (3) Constrain parameters to improve and assist in constitutive model development using high speed imaging & PDV (in-situ); (4) Understanding microstructural development in materials using the dynamic extrusion technique; and (5) Use as a validation test for developing fracture models important to industry, the DoD, and the DOE.

  20. Use of mobile gammaspectrometry for estimation of texture at regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierke, C.; Werban, U.; Dietrich, P.

    2012-04-01

    In the last years gamma-ray measurements from air and ground were increasingly used for spatial mapping of physical soil parameters. Many applications of gamma-ray measurements for soil characterisation and in digital soil mapping (DSM) are known from Australia or single once from Northern America. During the last years there are attempts to use that method in Europe as well. The measured isotope concentration of the gamma emitter 40K, 238U and 232Th in soils depends on different soil parameters, which are the result of composition and properties of parent rock and processes during soil geneses under different climatic conditions. Grain size distribution, type of clay minerals and organic matter are soil parameters which influence directly the gamma-ray concentration. From former studies we know, that there are site specific relationships at the field scale between gamma-ray measurements and soil properties. One of the target soil properties in DSM is for e.g. the spatial distribution of texture at the landscape scale. Thus there is a need of more regional understanding of gamma-ray concentration and soil properties with regard to the complex geology of Europe. We did systematic measurements at different field sites across Europe to investigate the relationship between the concentrations of gamma radiant and grain size. The areas are characterised by different pedogenesis and varying clay content. For the measurement we used a mobile 4l Na(I) detector with GPS connection, which is mounted on a sledge and can be towed across the agricultural used plane. Additionally we selected points for soil sampling and analysis of soil texture. For the interpretation we used the single nuclide concentration as well as the ratios. The results show site specific relationships dependent from source material. At soils developed from alluvial sediments the K/Th ratio is an indicator for clay content at regional scale. At soils developed from loess sediments Th can be used do

  1. Tribological analysis of the ventral scale structure in a Python regius in relation to laser textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aal, H. A.; El Mansori, M.

    2013-09-01

    Laser texturing is one of the leading technologies applied to modify surface topography. To date, however, a standardized procedure to generate deterministic textures is virtually non-existent. In nature, especially in squamata, there are many examples of deterministic structured textures that allow species to control friction and condition their tribological response for efficient function. In this work, we draw a comparison between industrial surfaces and reptilian surfaces. We chose the Python regius species as a bio-analogue with a deterministic surface. We first study the structural make up of the ventral scales of the snake (both construction and metrology). We further compare the metrological features of the ventral scales to experimentally recommended performance indicators of industrial surfaces extracted from open literature. The results indicate the feasibility of engineering a laser textured surface based on the reptilian ornamentation constructs. It is shown that the metrological features, key to efficient function of a rubbing deterministic surface, are already optimized in the reptile. We further show that optimization in reptilian surfaces is based on synchronizing surface form, textures and aspects to condition the frictional response. Mimicking reptilian surfaces, we argue, may form a design methodology potentially capable of generating advanced deterministic surface constructs capable of efficient tribological function.

  2. Multi-scale texture-based level-set segmentation of breast B-mode images.

    PubMed

    Lang, Itai; Sklair-Levy, Miri; Spitzer, Hedva

    2016-05-01

    Automatic segmentation of ultrasonographic breast lesions is very challenging, due to the lesions' spiculated nature and the variance in shape and texture of the B-mode ultrasound images. Many studies have tried to answer this challenge by applying a variety of computational methods including: Markov random field, artificial neural networks, and active contours and level-set techniques. These studies focused on creating an automatic contour, with maximal resemblance to a manual contour, delineated by a trained radiologist. In this study, we have developed an algorithm, designed to capture the spiculated boundary of the lesion by using the properties from the corresponding ultrasonic image. This is primarily achieved through a unique multi-scale texture identifier (inspired by visual system models) integrated in a level-set framework. The algorithm׳s performance has been evaluated quantitatively via contour-based and region-based error metrics. We compared the algorithm-generated contour to a manual contour delineated by an expert radiologist. In addition, we suggest here a new method for performance evaluation where corrections made by the radiologist replace the algorithm-generated (original) result in the correction zones. The resulting corrected contour is then compared to the original version. The evaluation showed: (1) Mean absolute error of 0.5 pixels between the original and the corrected contour; (2) Overlapping area of 99.2% between the lesion regions, obtained by the algorithm and the corrected contour. These results are significantly better than those previously reported. In addition, we have examined the potential of our segmentation results to contribute to the discrimination between malignant and benign lesions. PMID:27010737

  3. Instrumental measurement of cooked rice texture by dynamic rheological testing and its relation to the fine structure of rice starch.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Prakash, Sangeeta; Nicholson, Timothy M; Fitzgerald, Melissa A; Gilbert, Robert G

    2016-08-01

    Increasing demands for better instrumental methods to evaluate cooked rice texture is driving innovations in rice texture research. This study characterized cooked rice texture by descriptive sensory analysis and two instrumental methods (texture profile analysis (TPA) and dynamic rheological testing) using a set of 18 varieties of rice with a wide range in amylose content (0-30%). The panellists' results indicated that hardness and stickiness were the two most discriminating attributes among 13 tested textural attributes. The consistency coefficient (K(*)) and loss tangent (tan δ) from a dynamic frequency sweep were used to compare with hardness and stickiness tested by TPA and sensory panellists, showing that using K(*) to express hardness, and tan δ to express stickiness, are both statistically and mechanistically meaningful. The instrumental method is rationalized in terms of starch structural differences between rices: a higher proportion of both amylose and long amylopectin branches with DP 70-100 causes a more elastic and less viscous texture, which is readily understood in terms of polymer dynamics in solution. PMID:27112873

  4. Variability sensitivity of dynamic texture based recognition in clinical CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwitt, Roland; Razzaque, Sharif; Lowell, Jeffrey; Aylward, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic texture recognition using a database of template models has recently shown promising results for the task of localizing anatomical structures in Ultrasound video. In order to understand its clinical value, it is imperative to study the sensitivity with respect to inter-patient variability as well as sensitivity to acquisition parameters such as Ultrasound probe angle. Fully addressing patient and acquisition variability issues, however, would require a large database of clinical Ultrasound from many patients, acquired in a multitude of controlled conditions, e.g., using a tracked transducer. Since such data is not readily attainable, we advocate an alternative evaluation strategy using abdominal CT data as a surrogate. In this paper, we describe how to replicate Ultrasound variabilities by extracting subvolumes from CT and interpreting the image material as an ordered sequence of video frames. Utilizing this technique, and based on a database of abdominal CT from 45 patients, we report recognition results on an organ (kidney) recognition task, where we try to discriminate kidney subvolumes/videos from a collection of randomly sampled negative instances. We demonstrate that (1) dynamic texture recognition is relatively insensitive to inter-patient variation while (2) viewing angle variability needs to be accounted for in the template database. Since naively extending the template database to counteract variability issues can lead to impractical database sizes, we propose an alternative strategy based on automated identification of a small set of representative models.

  5. A multi-scale model for texture development in Zr/Nb nanolayered composites processed by accumulative roll bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardeljan, M.; Knezevic, M.; Nizolek, T.; Beyerlein, I. J.; Zheng, S. J.; Carpenter, J. S.; McCabe, R. J.; Mara, N. A.; Pollock, T. M.

    2014-08-01

    Recently it has been demonstrated that nanolayered hcp/bcc Zr/Nb composites can be fabricated with a severe plastic deformation technique called accumulative roll bonding (ARB) [1]. The final layer thickness averaged to approximately 90 nm for both phases. Interestingly, the texture measurements show that the textures in each phase correspond to those of rolled single-phase rolled Zr and Nb for a wide range of layer thickness from the micron to the nanoscales. This is in remarkable contrast to fcc/bcc Cu/Nb layered composites made by the same ARB technique, which developed textures that strongly deviated from theoretical rolling textures of Cu or Nb alone when the layers were refined to submicron and nanoscale dimensions. To model texture evolution and reveal the underlying deformation mechanisms, we developed a 3D multiscale model that combines crystal plasticity finite element with a thermally activated dislocation density based hardening law [2]. For systematic study, the model is applied to a two-phase Zr/Nb polycrystalline laminate and to the same polycrystalline Zr and polycrystalline Nb as single-phase metals. Consistent with the measurement, the model predicts that texture evolution in the phases in the composite and the relative activities of the hcp slip modes are very similar to those in the phases in monolithic form. In addition, the two-phase model also finds that no through-thickness texture gradient develops. This result suggests that neither the nanoscale grain sizes nor the bimetal Zr/Nb interfaces induce deformation mechanisms different from those at the coarse-grain scale.

  6. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of texture evolution in 904L stainless steel under dynamic shock compression

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Nanan; Wang, Y. D.; Peng, R. Lin; Sun, Xin; Ren, Yang; Wang, L.; Cai, H. N.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of strain rate on development of deformation texture under a dynamic shock compression of a 904L stainless steel was quantitatively investigated using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and crystallographic orientation distribution function (ODF) analysis. Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar technique was used to generate a high strain rate of > 103 s-1 for preparing the deformed samples. Starting with an almost random texture in a solution treatment condition, the deformed material developed several typical texture components, such as ‘Goss’ texture and ‘Brass’ texture. Compared to the texture components displayed in the state of quasi-static compression deformation, it was found that the high-speed deformation generated much weaker texture components. In combination with the change in microstructures observed by EBSD and TEM technique, the high-energy X-ray diffraction provides a powerful tool for characterizing the strain-rate dependence of grain rotation at each stage of deformation. The deformation heterogeneity evident in our experiment can be explained by a transition of deformation mechanism from the dislocation/twin-dominated mode to shear-band-dominated one with increasing strain rate.

  7. Nanometer Scale Titanium Surface Texturing Are Detected by Signaling Pathways Involving Transient FAK and Src Activations

    PubMed Central

    Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Bonfante, Estevam A.; Jimbo, Ryo; Hayashi, Mariko; Andersson, Martin; Alves, Gutemberg; Takamori, Esther R.; Beltrão, Paulo J.; Coelho, Paulo G.; Granjeiro, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is known that physico/chemical alterations on biomaterial surfaces have the capability to modulate cellular behavior, affecting early tissue repair. Such surface modifications are aimed to improve early healing response and, clinically, offer the possibility to shorten the time from implant placement to functional loading. Since FAK and Src are intracellular proteins able to predict the quality of osteoblast adhesion, this study evaluated the osteoblast behavior in response to nanometer scale titanium surface texturing by monitoring FAK and Src phosphorylations. Methodology Four engineered titanium surfaces were used for the study: machined (M), dual acid-etched (DAA), resorbable media microblasted and acid-etched (MBAA), and acid-etch microblasted (AAMB). Surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thereafter, those 4 samples were used to evaluate their cytotoxicity and interference on FAK and Src phosphorylations. Both Src and FAK were investigated by using specific antibody against specific phosphorylation sites. Principal Findings The results showed that both FAK and Src activations were differently modulated as a function of titanium surfaces physico/chemical configuration and protein adsorption. Conclusions It can be suggested that signaling pathways involving both FAK and Src could provide biomarkers to predict osteoblast adhesion onto different surfaces. PMID:24999733

  8. Efficient Black Silicon Solar Cells with Multi-Scale Surface Texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toor, Fatima; Nemeth, William; Page, Matthew; Wang, Qi; Branz, Howard; Yuan, Hao-Chih

    2011-03-01

    A nanostructured, density-graded surface layer can replace conventional quarter-wavelength coatings as the anti-reflection layer in photovoltaics. If the layer is comprised of structures smaller than the wavelength of the incident light and the density is graded across more than about half the wavelength of the light, reflection is strongly suppressed (H. M. Branz et al., APL {94} 2009). We developed an inexpensive liquid etch technique for silicon to produce ``black Si'' based upon this physics. However, the problem of high carrier recombination within this nanostructured layer must be overcome to improve beyond the present best solar cell with its confirmed 16.8% black silicon sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiency (H-C. Yuan et al., APL {95} 2009). In this work, we combine the black Si layer with conventional KOH-etched pyramidal surface texture (Y. Xiu et al., Langmuir {24 }2008) at micron-scale. Pyramids contribute anti-reflection based on geometric optics. Combining the pyramids with nanostructures only 100 nm deep provides reflectivity below 2% across a wavelength range from 350 - 1000 nm. To-date, we have obtained a solar cell efficiency of 17% with a Voc of 613 mV, Jsc of 35 mA/cm2 and fill-factor of 78%. These cells have improved blue response compared to the best planar black Si cells.

  9. Assessing texture measures with respect to their sensitivity to scale-dependent higher order correlations in medical images using surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räth, Christoph; Müller, Dirk; Sidorenko, Irina; Monetti, Roberto; Bauer, Jan

    2010-03-01

    The quantitative characterization of images showing tissue probes being visualized by e.g. CT or MR is of great interest in many fields of medical image analysis. A proper quantification of the information content in such images can be realized by calculating well-suited texture measures, which are able to capture the main characteristics of the image structures under study. Using test images showing the complex trabecular structure of the inner bone of a healthy and osteoporotic patient we propose and apply a novel statistical framework, with which one can systematically assess the sensitivity of texture measures to scale-dependent higher order correlations (HOCs). To this end, so-called surrogate images are generated, in which the linear properties are exactly preserved, while parts of the higher order correlations (if present) are wiped out in a scale dependent manner. This is achieved by dedicated Fourier phase shuffling techniques. We compare three commonly used classes of texture measures, namely spherical Mexican hat wavelets (SMHW), Minkowski functionals (MF) and scaling indices (SIM). While the SMHW were sensitive to HOCs on small scales (Significance S=19-23), the MF and SIM could detect the HOCs very well for the larger scales (S = 39 (MF) and S = 29 (SIM)). Thus the three classes of texture measures are complimentary with respect to their ability to detect scaledependent HOCs. The MF and SIM are, however, slightly preferable, because they are more sensitive to HOCs on length scales, which the important structural elements, i.e. the trabeculae, are considered to have.

  10. Inpainting for videos with dynamic objects using texture and structure reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, V. V.; Marchuk, V. I.; Gapon, N. V.; Zhuravlev, A. V.; Maslennikov, S.; Stradanchenko, S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes a novel inpainting approach for removing marked dynamic objects from videos captured with a camera, so long as the objects occlude parts of the scene with a static background. Proposed approach allow to remove objects or restore missing or tainted regions present in a video sequence by utilizing spatial and temporal information from neighboring scenes. The algorithm iteratively performs following operations: achieve frame; update the scene model; update positions of moving objects; replace parts of the frame occupied by the objects marked for remove with use of a background model. In this paper, we extend an image inpainting algorithm based texture and structure reconstruction by incorporating an improved strategy for video. An image inpainting approach based on the construction of a composite curve for the restoration of the edges of objects in a frame using the concepts of parametric and geometric continuity is presented. It is shown that this approach allows to restore the curved edges and provide more flexibility for curve design in damaged frame by interpolating the boundaries of objects by cubic splines. After edge restoration stage, a texture reconstruction using patch-based method is carried out. We demonstrate the performance of a new approach via several examples, showing the effectiveness of our algorithm and compared with state-of-the-art video inpainting methods.

  11. A lattice-based MRF model for dynamic near-regular texture tracking.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Chieh; Liu, Yanxi

    2007-05-01

    A near-regular texture (NRT) is a geometric and photometric deformation from its regular origin--a congruent wallpaper pattern formed by 2D translations of a single tile. A dynamic NRT is an NRT under motion. Although NRTs are pervasive in man-made and natural environments, effective computational algorithms for NRTs are few. This paper addresses specific computational challenges in modeling and tracking dynamic NRTs, including ambiguous correspondences, occlusions, and drastic illumination and appearance variations. We propose a lattice-based Markov-Random-Field (MRF) model for dynamic NRTs in a 3D spatiotemporal space. Our model consists of a global lattice structure that characterizes the topological constraint among multiple textons and an image observation model that handles local geometry and appearance variations. Based on the proposed MRF model, we develop a tracking algorithm that utilizes belief propagation and particle filtering to effectively handle the special challenges of the dynamic NRT tracking without any assumption on the motion types or lighting conditions. We provide quantitative evaluations of the proposed method against existing tracking algorithms and demonstrate its applications in video editing. PMID:17356199

  12. A Framework for Establishing Standard Reference Scale of Texture by Multivariate Statistical Analysis Based on Instrumental Measurement and Sensory Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Ruicong; Zhao, Lei; Xie, Nan; Wang, Houyin; Shi, Bolin; Shi, Jingye

    2016-01-13

    A framework of establishing standard reference scale (texture) is proposed by multivariate statistical analysis according to instrumental measurement and sensory evaluation. Multivariate statistical analysis is conducted to rapidly select typical reference samples with characteristics of universality, representativeness, stability, substitutability, and traceability. The reasonableness of the framework method is verified by establishing standard reference scale of texture attribute (hardness) with Chinese well-known food. More than 100 food products in 16 categories were tested using instrumental measurement (TPA test), and the result was analyzed with clustering analysis, principal component analysis, relative standard deviation, and analysis of variance. As a result, nine kinds of foods were determined to construct the hardness standard reference scale. The results indicate that the regression coefficient between the estimated sensory value and the instrumentally measured value is significant (R(2) = 0.9765), which fits well with Stevens's theory. The research provides reliable a theoretical basis and practical guide for quantitative standard reference scale establishment on food texture characteristics. PMID:26630554

  13. Molecular dynamics study on the wettability of a hydrophobic surface textured with nanoscale pillars.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengqing; Kim, Hyojeong; Ha, Man Yeong; Jang, Joonkyung

    2014-03-28

    Using molecular dynamics simulation, we studied the wetting properties of a surface textured with hydrophobic pillars, several nanometers in size. The drying transition of water confined between square or circular pillars was related to the Wenzel (WZ) to Cassie-Baxter (CB) transition of a water droplet deposited on periodic pillars. The inter-pillar spacing at which the drying occurs was compared to that predicted from the continuum theory. Such a comparison revealed that the line tension plays an important role in the drying behavior of the present nm-sized pillars. The water molecules near the pillar walls were layered and ordered in orientation. Our simulation showed a long-lived CB state which eventually turns into the WZ state. In this transition, water slowly penetrated down into the inter-pillar gap until it reached the half height of the pillar, and then quickly reached the base of the pillar. PMID:24513852

  14. Textured micrometer scale templates as light managing fabrication platform for organic solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhary, Sumit; Ho, Kai-Ming; Park, Joong-Mok; Nalwa, Kanwar Singh; Leung, Wai Y.

    2016-07-26

    A three-dimensional, microscale-textured, grating-shaped organic solar cell geometry. The solar cells are fabricated on gratings to give them a three-dimensional texture that provides enhanced light absorption. Introduction of microscale texturing has a positive effect on the overall power conversion efficiency of the devices. This grating-based solar cell having a grating of pre-determined pitch and height has shown improved power-conversion efficiency over a conventional flat solar cell. The improvement in efficiency is accomplished by homogeneous coverage of the grating with uniform thickness of the active layer, which is attributed to a sufficiently high pitch and low height of the underlying gratings. Also the microscale texturing leads to suppressed reflection of incident light due to the efficient coupling of the incident light into modes that are guided in the active layer.

  15. Fluid dynamics: Swimming across scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Johannes; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2014-10-01

    The myriad creatures that inhabit the waters of our planet all swim using different mechanisms. Now, a simple relation links key physical observables of underwater locomotion, on scales ranging from millimetres to tens of metres.

  16. Dynamical scaling analysis of plant callus growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, J.; Buceta, J.; Juarez, K.; Pumariño, B.; de la Torre, J.; Iriondo, J. M.

    2003-07-01

    We present experimental results for the dynamical scaling properties of the development of plant calli. We have assayed two different species of plant calli, Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa, under different growth conditions, and show that their dynamical scalings share a universality class. From a theoretical point of view, we introduce a scaling hypothesis for systems whose size evolves in time. We expect our work to be relevant for the understanding and characterization of other systems that undergo growth due to cell division and differentiation, such as, for example, tumor development.

  17. Dynamic scaling for avalanches in disordered systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Guang-Ping; Li, Mo

    2001-03-01

    Dynamic scaling for fracture or breakdown process in disordered systems is investigated in a two-dimensional random field Ising model (RFIM). We find two evolving stages in the avalanche process in the RFIM. At the short-time regime, a power-law growth of the avalanche size {Delta}s is observed; and at late times, the conventional nucleation and growth process is found. At the critical point of the RFIM, the avalanche size is found to obey the dynamic scaling law {Delta}s{approx}t{sup (d-{beta}/{nu})/z}. From this dynamic scaling relation, the critical strength of the random field D{sub c} and the critical exponents, {beta}, {nu}, and z, are determined. The observed dynamics is explained by a simple nucleation theory of first-order phase transformations.

  18. Motion Estimation for Dynamic Texture Videos Based on Locally and Globally Varying Models.

    PubMed

    Sakaino, Hidetomo

    2015-11-01

    Motion estimation, i.e., optical flow, of fluid-like and dynamic texture (DT) images/videos is an important challenge, particularly for understanding outdoor scene changes created by objects and/or natural phenomena. Most optical flow models use smoothness-based constraints using terms such as fluidity from the fluid dynamics framework, with constraints typically being incompressibility and low Reynolds numbers (Re ). Such constraints are assumed to impede the clear capture of locally abrupt image intensity and motion changes, i.e., discontinuities and/or high Re over time. This paper exploits novel physics-based optical flow models/constraints for both smooth and discontinuous changes using a wave generation theory that imposes no constraint on Re or compressibility of an image sequence. Iterated two-step optimization between local and global optimization is also used: first, an objective function with varying multiple sine/cosine bases with new local image properties, i.e., orientation and frequency, and with a novel transformed dispersion relationship equation are used. Second, the statistical property of image features is used to globally optimize model parameters. Experiments on synthetic and real DT image sequences with smooth and discontinuous motions demonstrate that the proposed locally and globally varying models outperform the previous optical flow models. PMID:26099146

  19. Characterization of Urban Landscape Using Super-Resolution UAS Data, Multiple Textural Scales and Data-Mining Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, M.; Blundell, B.

    2015-12-01

    Characterization of urban environments is a high priority for the U.S. Army as battlespaces have transitioned from the predominantly open spaces of the 20th century to urban areas where soldiers have reduced situational awareness due to the diversity and density of their surroundings. Creating high-resolution urban terrain geospatial information will improve mission planning and soldier effectiveness. In this effort, super-resolution true-color imagery was collected with an Altivan NOVA unmanned aerial system over the Muscatatuck Urban Training Center near Butlerville, Indiana on September 16, 2014. Multispectral texture analysis using different algorithms was conducted for urban surface characterization at a variety of scales. Training samples extracted from the true-color and texture images. These data were processed using a variety of meta-algorithms with a decision tree classifier to create a high-resolution urban features map. In addition to improving accuracy over traditional image classification methods, this technique allowed the determination of the most significant textural scales in creating urban terrain maps for tactical exploitation.

  20. Analyzing fine-scale wetland composition using high resolution imagery and texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szantoi, Zoltan; Escobedo, Francisco; Abd-Elrahman, Amr; Smith, Scot; Pearlstine, Leonard

    2013-08-01

    In order to monitor natural and anthropogenic disturbance effects to wetland ecosystems, it is necessary to employ both accurate and rapid mapping of wet graminoid/sedge communities. Thus, it is desirable to utilize automated classification algorithms so that the monitoring can be done regularly and in an efficient manner. This study developed a classification and accuracy assessment method for wetland mapping of at-risk plant communities in marl prairie and marsh areas of the Everglades National Park. Maximum likelihood (ML) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers were tested using 30.5 cm aerial imagery, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), first and second order texture features and ancillary data. Additionally, appropriate window sizes for different texture features were estimated using semivariogram analysis. Findings show that the addition of NDVI and texture features increased classification accuracy from 66.2% using the ML classifier (spectral bands only) to 83.71% using the SVM classifier (spectral bands, NDVI and first order texture features).

  1. Change in Magma Dynamics at Okataina Rhyolite Caldera revealed by Plagioclase Textures and Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, P. A. R.

    2015-12-01

    A fundamental reorganization of magma dynamics at Okataina volcano, New Zealand, occurred at 26 ka involving a change from smaller volume, high-temperature rhyodacite magmas to a lower eruptive tempo of larger volume, low-temperature, rhyolite magmas. Zircon studies demonstrate the presence of a periodically active, long-lived (100,000 yr) magmatic reservoir. However, there is little correlation between periods of zircon crystallization and eruption events. In contrast, the changing magmatic dynamics is revealed in plagioclase growth histories. Crystals from the ~0.7 ka Kaharoa eruption are characterized by resorbed cores displaying a cellular-texture of high-An (>40) zones partially replaced by low-An (<30) zones, surrounded by a resorption surface and a prominent normal-zoned rim (An50-20). Elevated An, Fe, Mg, Sr and Ti follow the resorption surface and display rimward depletion trends, accompanied by Ba and REE enrichment. The zonation is consistent with fractional crystallization and cooling. The cores display wide trace element diversity, pointing to crystallization in a variety of melts, before transport and mixing into a common magma where the rims grew. Plagioclase from the ~36 ka Hauparu eruption display several regrowth zones separated by resorption surfaces, which surround small resorbed cores with a spongy cellular texture of variable An content (An 40-50). The crystals display step-wise re-growth of successively higher An, Fe, Mg and Ti content, consistent with progressive mafic recharge. Two crystal groups are distinguished by trace element chemistry indicating growth in separate melts and co-occurrence via magma-mingling. The contrasting zoning patterns in plagioclase correspond to the evolutionary history of magmatism at Okataina. Emptying of the magma reservoir following caldera eruption at 46 ka reduced barriers to mafic magma ascent. This is recorded by the frequent resorption and recharge episodes in Hauparu crystals. Subsequent re

  2. Automated retrieval of forest structure variables based on multi-scale texture analysis of VHR satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beguet, Benoit; Guyon, Dominique; Boukir, Samia; Chehata, Nesrine

    2014-10-01

    The main goal of this study is to design a method to describe the structure of forest stands from Very High Resolution satellite imagery, relying on some typical variables such as crown diameter, tree height, trunk diameter, tree density and tree spacing. The emphasis is placed on the automatization of the process of identification of the most relevant image features for the forest structure retrieval task, exploiting both spectral and spatial information. Our approach is based on linear regressions between the forest structure variables to be estimated and various spectral and Haralick's texture features. The main drawback of this well-known texture representation is the underlying parameters which are extremely difficult to set due to the spatial complexity of the forest structure. To tackle this major issue, an automated feature selection process is proposed which is based on statistical modeling, exploring a wide range of parameter values. It provides texture measures of diverse spatial parameters hence implicitly inducing a multi-scale texture analysis. A new feature selection technique, we called Random PRiF, is proposed. It relies on random sampling in feature space, carefully addresses the multicollinearity issue in multiple-linear regression while ensuring accurate prediction of forest variables. Our automated forest variable estimation scheme was tested on Quickbird and Pléiades panchromatic and multispectral images, acquired at different periods on the maritime pine stands of two sites in South-Western France. It outperforms two well-established variable subset selection techniques. It has been successfully applied to identify the best texture features in modeling the five considered forest structure variables. The RMSE of all predicted forest variables is improved by combining multispectral and panchromatic texture features, with various parameterizations, highlighting the potential of a multi-resolution approach for retrieving forest structure

  3. Electrically Switchable and Permanently Stable Light Scattering Modes by Dynamic Fingerprint Chiral Textures.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ko-Ting; Lee, Po-Yi; Qasim, Malik M; Liu, Cheng-Kai; Cheng, Wen-Fa; Wilkinson, Timothy D

    2016-04-27

    Negative dielectric nematic liquid crystals (LCs) doped with two azobenzene materials provide electrically switchable and permanently stable scattering mode light modulators based on dynamic fingerprint chiral textures (DFCT) with inhomogeneously helical axes. These light modulators can be switched between transparent (stable large domains of DFCT) states and scattering (stable small domains of DFCT) states by applying electric fields with different frequencies. The generation of DFCT results from the long flexible side chains of the doped chiral dopant. That is, if the DFCT can be obtained, then the large domains of DFCT reflect an intrinsically stable state. Moreover, the stabilization of the small domains of DFCT are caused by the terminal rigid restricted side chains of the other doped chiral dopant. Experimentally, the required amplitude to switch the light modulator from a scattering (transparent) state to a transparent (scattering) state decreases as the frequency of the applied electric field increases (decreases) within the set limits. This study is the first report on the advantages of the light scattering mode of DFCT, including low operating voltage, permanently stable transmission, wide viewing angle, high contrast, and polarization-independent scattering and transparency. PMID:27035635

  4. Magnitude correlations and dynamical scaling for seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Godano, Cataldo; Lippiello, Eugenio; De Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2007-12-06

    We analyze the experimental seismic catalog of Southern California and we show the existence of correlations between earthquake magnitudes. We propose a dynamical scaling hypothesis relating time and magnitude as the physical mechanism responsible of the observed magnitude correlations. We show that experimental distributions in size and time naturally originate solely from this scaling hypothesis. Furthermore we generate a synthetic catalog reproducing the organization in time and magnitude of experimental data.

  5. Dynamical Scaling in Branching Models for Seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Lippiello, Eugenio; Godano, Cataldo; De Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2007-03-02

    We propose a branching process based on a dynamical scaling hypothesis relating time and mass. In the context of earthquake occurrence, we show that experimental power laws in size and time distribution naturally originate solely from this scaling hypothesis. We present a numerical protocol able to generate a synthetic catalog with an arbitrary large number of events. The numerical data reproduce the hierarchical organization in time and magnitude of experimental interevent time distribution.

  6. Untangling the effects of shallow groundwater and soil texture as drivers of subfield-scale yield variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipper, Samuel C.; Soylu, Mehmet Evren; Booth, Eric G.; Loheide, Steven P.

    2015-08-01

    Water table depth (WTD), soil texture, and growing season weather conditions all play critical roles in determining agricultural yield; however, the interactions among these three variables have never been explored in a systematic way. Using a combination of field observations and biophysical modeling, we answer two questions: (1) under what conditions can a shallow water table provide a groundwater yield subsidy and/or penalty to corn production?; and (2) how do soil texture and growing season weather conditions influence the relationship between WTD and corn yield?. Subfield-scale yield patterns during a dry (2012) and wet (2013) growing season are used to identify sensitivity to weather. Areas of the field that are negatively impacted by wet growing seasons have the shallowest observed WTD (<1 m), while areas with consistently strong yield have intermediate WTD (1-3 m). Parts of the field that perform consistently poorly are characterized by deep WTD (>3 m) and coarse soil textures. Modeling results find that beneficial impacts of shallow groundwater are more common than negative impacts under the conditions studied, and that the optimum WTD is shallower in coarser soils. While groundwater yield subsidies have a higher frequency and magnitude in coarse-grained soils, the optimum WTD responds to growing season weather at a relatively constant rate across soil types. We conclude that soil texture defines a baseline upon which WTD and weather interact to determine overall yield. Our work has implications for water resource management, climate/land use change impacts on agricultural production, and precision agriculture.

  7. Multi-scale textural feature extraction and particle swarm optimization based model selection for false positive reduction in mammography.

    PubMed

    Zyout, Imad; Czajkowska, Joanna; Grzegorzek, Marcin

    2015-12-01

    The high number of false positives and the resulting number of avoidable breast biopsies are the major problems faced by current mammography Computer Aided Detection (CAD) systems. False positive reduction is not only a requirement for mass but also for calcification CAD systems which are currently deployed for clinical use. This paper tackles two problems related to reducing the number of false positives in the detection of all lesions and masses, respectively. Firstly, textural patterns of breast tissue have been analyzed using several multi-scale textural descriptors based on wavelet and gray level co-occurrence matrix. The second problem addressed in this paper is the parameter selection and performance optimization. For this, we adopt a model selection procedure based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for selecting the most discriminative textural features and for strengthening the generalization capacity of the supervised learning stage based on a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. For evaluating the proposed methods, two sets of suspicious mammogram regions have been used. The first one, obtained from Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM), contains 1494 regions (1000 normal and 494 abnormal samples). The second set of suspicious regions was obtained from database of Mammographic Image Analysis Society (mini-MIAS) and contains 315 (207 normal and 108 abnormal) samples. Results from both datasets demonstrate the efficiency of using PSO based model selection for optimizing both classifier hyper-parameters and parameters, respectively. Furthermore, the obtained results indicate the promising performance of the proposed textural features and more specifically, those based on co-occurrence matrix of wavelet image representation technique. PMID:25795630

  8. Simple scaling of catastrophic landslide dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ekström, Göran; Stark, Colin P

    2013-03-22

    Catastrophic landslides involve the acceleration and deceleration of millions of tons of rock and debris in response to the forces of gravity and dissipation. Their unpredictability and frequent location in remote areas have made observations of their dynamics rare. Through real-time detection and inverse modeling of teleseismic data, we show that landslide dynamics are primarily determined by the length scale of the source mass. When combined with geometric constraints from satellite imagery, the seismically determined landslide force histories yield estimates of landslide duration, momenta, potential energy loss, mass, and runout trajectory. Measurements of these dynamical properties for 29 teleseismogenic landslides are consistent with a simple acceleration model in which height drop and rupture depth scale with the length of the failing slope. PMID:23520108

  9. Texture analysis on parametric maps derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Jacobus FA; Lu, Yonggang; Gupta, Gaorav; Lee, Nancy Y; Stambuk, Hilda E; Mazaheri, Yousef; Deasy, Joseph O; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the merits of texture analysis on parametric maps derived from pharmacokinetic modeling with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) as imaging biomarkers for the prediction of treatment response in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). METHODS: In this retrospective study, 19 HNSCC patients underwent pre- and intra-treatment DCE-MRI scans at a 1.5T MRI scanner. All patients had chemo-radiation treatment. Pharmacokinetic modeling was performed on the acquired DCE-MRI images, generating maps of volume transfer rate (Ktrans) and volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space (ve). Image texture analysis was then employed on maps of Ktrans and ve, generating two texture measures: Energy (E) and homogeneity. RESULTS: No significant changes were found for the mean and standard deviation for Ktrans and ve between pre- and intra-treatment (P > 0.09). Texture analysis revealed that the imaging biomarker E of ve was significantly higher in intra-treatment scans, relative to pretreatment scans (P < 0.04). CONCLUSION: Chemo-radiation treatment in HNSCC significantly reduces the heterogeneity of tumors. PMID:26834947

  10. Slope-scale dynamic states of rockfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, F.; Crosta, G. B.

    2009-04-01

    Rockfalls are common earth surface phenomena characterised by complex dynamics at the slope scale, depending on local block kinematics and slope geometry. We investigated the nature of this slope-scale dynamics by parametric 3D numerical modelling of rockfalls over synthetic slopes with different inclination, roughness and spatial resolution. Simulations were performed through an original code specifically designed for rockfall modeling, incorporating kinematic and hybrid algorithms with different damping functions available to model local energy loss by impact and pure rolling. Modelling results in terms of average velocity profiles suggest that three dynamic regimes (i.e. decelerating, steady-state and accelerating), previously recognized in the literature through laboratory experiments on granular flows, can set up at the slope scale depending on slope average inclination and roughness. Sharp changes in rock fall kinematics, including motion type and lateral dispersion of trajectories, are associated to the transition among different regimes. Associated threshold conditions, portrayed in "phase diagrams" as slope-roughness critical lines, were analysed depending on block size, impact/rebound angles, velocity and energy, and model spatial resolution. Motion in regime B (i.e. steady state) is governed by a slope-scale "viscous friction" with average velocity linearly related to the sine of slope inclination. This suggest an analogy between rockfall motion in regime B and newtonian flow, whereas in regime C (i.e. accelerating) an analogy with a dilatant flow was observed. Thus, although local behavior of single falling blocks is well described by rigid body dynamics, the slope scale dynamics of rockfalls seem to statistically approach that of granular media. Possible outcomes of these findings include a discussion of the transition from rockfall to granular flow, the evaluation of the reliability of predictive models, and the implementation of criteria for a

  11. Multi-scale modelling and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Plathe, Florian

    Moving from a fine-grained particle model to one of lower resolution leads, with few exceptions, to an acceleration of molecular mobility, higher diffusion coefficient, lower viscosities and more. On top of that, the level of acceleration is often different for different dynamical processes as well as for different state points. While the reasons are often understood, the fact that coarse-graining almost necessarily introduces unpredictable acceleration of the molecular dynamics severely limits its usefulness as a predictive tool. There are several attempts under way to remedy these shortcoming of coarse-grained models. On the one hand, we follow bottom-up approaches. They attempt already when the coarse-graining scheme is conceived to estimate their impact on the dynamics. This is done by excess-entropy scaling. On the other hand, we also pursue a top-down development. Here we start with a very coarse-grained model (dissipative particle dynamics) which in its native form produces qualitatively wrong polymer dynamics, as its molecules cannot entangle. This model is modified by additional temporary bonds, so-called slip springs, to repair this defect. As a result, polymer melts and solutions described by the slip-spring DPD model show correct dynamical behaviour. Read more: ``Excess entropy scaling for the segmental and global dynamics of polyethylene melts'', E. Voyiatzis, F. Müller-Plathe, and M.C. Böhm, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 16, 24301-24311 (2014). [DOI: 10.1039/C4CP03559C] ``Recovering the Reptation Dynamics of Polymer Melts in Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulations via Slip-Springs'', M. Langeloth, Y. Masubuchi, M. C. Böhm, and F. Müller-Plathe, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 104907 (2013). [DOI: 10.1063/1.4794156].

  12. Supervised classification of brain tissues through local multi-scale texture analysis by coupling DIR and FLAIR MR sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, Enea; Veronese, Elisa; Calabrese, Massimiliano; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Grisan, Enrico

    2012-02-01

    The automatic segmentation of brain tissues in magnetic resonance (MR) is usually performed on T1-weighted images, due to their high spatial resolution. T1w sequence, however, has some major downsides when brain lesions are present: the altered appearance of diseased tissues causes errors in tissues classification. In order to overcome these drawbacks, we employed two different MR sequences: fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and double inversion recovery (DIR). The former highlights both gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM), the latter highlights GM alone. We propose here a supervised classification scheme that does not require any anatomical a priori information to identify the 3 classes, "GM", "WM", and "background". Features are extracted by means of a local multi-scale texture analysis, computed for each pixel of the DIR and FLAIR sequences. The 9 textures considered are average, standard deviation, kurtosis, entropy, contrast, correlation, energy, homogeneity, and skewness, evaluated on a neighborhood of 3x3, 5x5, and 7x7 pixels. Hence, the total number of features associated to a pixel is 56 (9 textures x3 scales x2 sequences +2 original pixel values). The classifier employed is a Support Vector Machine with Radial Basis Function as kernel. From each of the 4 brain volumes evaluated, a DIR and a FLAIR slice have been selected and manually segmented by 2 expert neurologists, providing 1st and 2nd human reference observations which agree with an average accuracy of 99.03%. SVM performances have been assessed with a 4-fold cross-validation, yielding an average classification accuracy of 98.79%.

  13. Improving the textural characterization of trabecular bone structure to quantify its changes: the locally adapted scaling vector method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeth, Christoph W.; Mueller, Dirk; Boehm, Holger F.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Link, Thomas M.; Monetti, Roberto

    2005-04-01

    We extend the recently introduced scaling vector method (SVM) to improve the textural characterization of oriented trabecular bone structures in the context of osteoporosis. Using the concept of scaling vectors one obtains non-linear structural information from data sets, which can account for global anisotropies. In this work we present a method which allows us to determine the local directionalities in images by using scaling vectors. Thus it becomes possible to better account for local anisotropies and to implement this knowledge in the calculation of the scaling properties of the image. By applying this adaptive technique, a refined quantification of the image structure is possible: we test and evaluate our new method using realistic two-dimensional simulations of bone structures, which model the effect of osteoblasts and osteoclasts on the local change of relative bone density. The partial differential equations involved in the model are solved numerically using cellular automata (CA). Different realizations with slightly varying control parameters are considered. Our results show that even small changes in the trabecular structures, which are induced by variation of a control parameters of the system, become discernible by applying the locally adapted scaling vector method. The results are superior to those obtained by isotropic and/or bulk measures. These findings may be especially important for monitoring the treatment of patients, where the early recognition of (drug-induced) changes in the trabecular structure is crucial.

  14. Cell water dynamics on multiple time scales

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Erik; Halle, Bertil

    2008-01-01

    Water–biomolecule interactions have been extensively studied in dilute solutions, crystals, and rehydrated powders, but none of these model systems may capture the behavior of water in the highly organized intracellular milieu. Because of the experimental difficulty of selectively probing the structure and dynamics of water in intact cells, radically different views about the properties of cell water have proliferated. To resolve this long-standing controversy, we have measured the 2H spin relaxation rate in living bacteria cultured in D2O. The relaxation data, acquired in a wide magnetic field range (0.2 mT–12 T) and analyzed in a model-independent way, reveal water dynamics on a wide range of time scales. Contradicting the view that a substantial fraction of cell water is strongly perturbed, we find that ≈85% of cell water in Escherichia coli and in the extreme halophile Haloarcula marismortui has bulk-like dynamics. The remaining ≈15% of cell water interacts directly with biomolecular surfaces and is motionally retarded by a factor 15 ± 3 on average, corresponding to a rotational correlation time of 27 ps. This dynamic perturbation is three times larger than for small monomeric proteins in solution, a difference we attribute to secluded surface hydration sites in supramolecular assemblies. The relaxation data also show that a small fraction (≈0.1%) of cell water exchanges from buried hydration sites on the microsecond time scale, consistent with the current understanding of protein hydration in solutions and crystals. PMID:18436650

  15. Effect of micro/nano-scale textures on anti-adhesive wear properties of WC/Co-based TiAlN coated tools in AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kedong; Deng, Jianxin; Sun, Jialin; Jiang, Chao; Liu, Yayun; Chen, Shuai

    2015-11-01

    In cutting of stainless steel with coated tool, the steel chip adhering to tool surface is usually severe and consequently causes serious adhesive and frictional problems, which is the major reason for the failure of coated tool. To solve the problem, a surface engineering approach, namely, a highly functionalization of tool surfaces by textures may be of great importance. Thus, the effect of micro/nano-scale textures on anti-adhesive wear properties of TiAlN coated tools in AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel cutting was investigated. For this purpose, two types of surface textures were fabricated on the rake faces of WC/Co carbide tools: (i) micro-scale textures fabricated by Nd:YAG laser, (ii) micro/nano-scales textures fabricated by Nd:YAG laser and femtosecond laser. Then, these textured tools were deposited with TiAlN coatings using cathode arc-evaporation technique. Wet cutting experiments were carried out with the micro-scale textured coated tool (MCT), micro/nano-scale textured coated tool (MNCT), and the conventional coated tool (CCT). Results obtained in this work demonstrated the feasibility of fabricating micro- or micro/nano-scale textures on tools substrate surfaces to improve the anti-adhesive wear properties of TiAlN coated tool. The rake face micro/nano-scale textured tool was the most effective. Moreover, mechanisms for the anti-adhesive properties enhancement were proposed.

  16. Multi-Scale Modeling of Magnetospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Toth, G.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a key element in many phenomena in space plasma, e.g. Coronal mass Ejections, Magnetosphere substorms. One of the major challenges in modeling the dynamics of large-scale systems involving magnetic reconnection is to quantifY the interaction between global evolution of the magnetosphere and microphysical kinetic processes in diffusion regions near reconnection sites. Recent advances in small-scale kinetic modeling of magnetic reconnection significantly improved our understanding of physical mechanisms controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site in collisionless plasma. However the progress in studies of small-scale geometries was not very helpful for large scale simulations. Global magnetosphere simulations usually include non-ideal processes in terms of numerical dissipation and/or ad hoc anomalous resistivity. Comparative studies of magnetic reconnection in small scale geometries demonstrated that MHD simulations that included non-ideal processes in terms of a resistive term 11 J did not produce fast reconnection rates observed in kinetic simulations. In collisionless magnetospheric plasma, the primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site is nongyrotropic pressure effects with spatial scales comparable with the particle Larmor radius. We utilize the global MHD code BATSRUS and replace ad hoc parameters such as "critical current density" and "anomalous resistivity" with a physically motivated model of dissipation. The primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site in incorporated into MHD description in terms of non-gyrotropic corrections to the induction equation. We will demonstrate that kinetic nongyrotropic effects can significantly alter the global magnetosphere evolution. Our approach allowed for the first time to model loading/unloading cycle in response to steady southward IMF driving. The role of solar wind parameters and

  17. Correlation of object-based texture measures at multiple scales in sub-decimeter resolution aerial photography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Texture measures are commonly used to increase the number of input bands in order to improve classification accuracy, especially for panchromatic or true color imagery. While the use of texture measures in pixel-based analysis has been well documented, this is not the case for texture measures calcu...

  18. Effects of texture on salt precipitation dynamics and deposition patterns in drying porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi Rad, Mansoureh; Shokri, Nima

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the physics of water evaporation from saline porous media is important in many natural and engineering applications such as durability of building materials and preservation of monuments, CO2 sequestration and water quality. Also excess of salt accumulation in soil may result in soil salinization which is a global problem adversely affecting vegetation, plant growth and crop production. Thus it is important to understand the parameters affecting salt transport and precipitation in porous media. We applied X-ray micro-tomography to investigate the dynamics of salt precipitation during evaporation from porous media as influenced by the particle and pore sizes. The packed beds were saturated with NaCl solution of 3 Molal and the time-lapse X-ray imaging was continued for one day. The results show that the presence of preferential evaporation sites (associated with fine pores) on the surface of the sand columns influences significantly the patterns and dynamics of NaCl precipitation (Norouzi Rad et al., 2013; Norouzi Rad and Shokri, 2014). They confirm the formation of an increasingly thick and discrete salt crust with increasing grain size in the sand column due to the presence of fewer fine pores (preferential precipitation sites) at the surface compared to the sand packs with finer grains. Fewer fine pores on the surface also results in shorter stage-1 precipitation for the columns with larger grain sizes. A simple model for the evolution of salt crust thickness based on this principle shows a good agreement with our experiments. Our results provide new insights regarding the physics of salt precipitation and its complex dynamics in porous media during evaporation. References Norouzi Rad, M., Shokri, N., Sahimi, M. (2013), Pore-Scale Dynamics of Salt Precipitation in Drying Porous Media, Phys. Rev. E, 88, 032404. Norouzi Rad, M., Shokri, N. (2014), Effects of grain angularity on NaCl precipitation in porous media during evaporation, Water Resour. Res

  19. Large-scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Glancing Angle Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubartt, Bradley; Liu, Xuejing; Amar, Jacques

    2013-03-01

    While a variety of methods have been developed to carry out atomistic simulations of thin-film growth at small deposition angles with respect to the substrate normal, due to the complex morphology as well as the existence of multiple scattering of depositing atoms by the growing thin-film, realistically modeling the deposition process for large deposition angles can be quite challenging. Accordingly, we have developed a computationally efficient method based on the use of a single graphical processing unit (GPU) to carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the deposition and growth of thin-films via glancing angle deposition. Using this method we have carried out large-scale MD simulations, based on an embedded-atom-method potential, of Cu/Cu(100) growth up to 20 monolayers for deposition angles ranging from 50° to 85° and for both random and fixed azimuthal angles. Our results for the thin-film porosity, roughness, lateral correlation length, and density vs height will be presented and compared with experiments. Results for the dependence of the microstructure, grain-size distribution, surface texture, and defect concentration on deposition angle will also be presented. Supported by NSF DMR-0907399

  20. Small-scale dynamic gap test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Malcolm David

    2012-03-01

    In this paper we describe a new small-scale test, requiring small quantities of energetic material, designed using our CHARM ignition and growth routine in the DYNA2D hydrocode. The new test is a modified gap test and uses detonating nitromethane to provide dynamic confinement (instead of a thick metal case) whilst exposing the sample to a long duration shock wave. This arrangement allows less reactive materials that are below their critical diameter, more time to react. We present details of the modelling of the test together with some preliminary experiments to demonstrate the potential of the new test method.

  1. Testing particle filters on convective scale dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslehner, Mylene; Craig, George. C.; Janjic, Tijana

    2014-05-01

    Particle filters have been developed in recent years to deal with highly nonlinear dynamics and non Gaussian error statistics that also characterize data assimilation on convective scales. In this work we explore the use of the efficient particle filter (P.v. Leeuwen, 2011) for convective scale data assimilation application. The method is tested in idealized setting, on two stochastic models. The models were designed to reproduce some of the properties of convection, for example the rapid development and decay of convective clouds. The first model is a simple one-dimensional, discrete state birth-death model of clouds (Craig and Würsch, 2012). For this model, the efficient particle filter that includes nudging the variables shows significant improvement compared to Ensemble Kalman Filter and Sequential Importance Resampling (SIR) particle filter. The success of the combination of nudging and resampling, measured as RMS error with respect to the 'true state', is proportional to the nudging intensity. Significantly, even a very weak nudging intensity brings notable improvement over SIR. The second model is a modified version of a stochastic shallow water model (Würsch and Craig 2013), which contains more realistic dynamical characteristics of convective scale phenomena. Using the efficient particle filter and different combination of observations of the three field variables (wind, water 'height' and rain) allows the particle filter to be evaluated in comparison to a regime where only nudging is used. Sensitivity to the properties of the model error covariance is also considered. Finally, criteria are identified under which the efficient particle filter outperforms nudging alone. References: Craig, G. C. and M. Würsch, 2012: The impact of localization and observation averaging for convective-scale data assimilation in a simple stochastic model. Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc.,139, 515-523. Van Leeuwen, P. J., 2011: Efficient non-linear data assimilation in geophysical

  2. Is micro-nano texture the only reason for under-water superoleophobicity of fish scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunda, Naga Siva Kumar; Waghmare, Prashant; Mitra, Sushanta

    2014-11-01

    There is a huge surge in developing liquid repellant surfaces based on the micro/nanostructures that are inherently present in nature, like the one in case of fish scales. Through systematic contact angle measurement of oil drops on fish scales submerged in souring water medium, we have demonstrated that the superhydrophobic/superoleophobic nature of fish scales is attributed to a combination of the mucus layer and the hierarchical structures. The mucus layer on the fish scales produces an unprecedented contact angle close to 180o in contrast to the contact angle of 150o produced in the absence of the mucus layer. We have also identified, through FTIR analysis, that the distinct chemical signatures of mucus accountable for such large contact angles.

  3. Using Parameters of Dynamic Pulse Function for 3d Modeling in LOD3 Based on Random Textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadehashrafi, B.

    2015-12-01

    The pulse function (PF) is a technique based on procedural preprocessing system to generate a computerized virtual photo of the façade with in a fixed size square(Alizadehashrafi et al., 2009, Musliman et al., 2010). Dynamic Pulse Function (DPF) is an enhanced version of PF which can create the final photo, proportional to real geometry. This can avoid distortion while projecting the computerized photo on the generated 3D model(Alizadehashrafi and Rahman, 2013). The challenging issue that might be handled for having 3D model in LoD3 rather than LOD2, is the final aim that have been achieved in this paper. In the technique based DPF the geometries of the windows and doors are saved in an XML file schema which does not have any connections with the 3D model in LoD2 and CityGML format. In this research the parameters of Dynamic Pulse Functions are utilized via Ruby programming language in SketchUp Trimble to generate (exact position and deepness) the windows and doors automatically in LoD3 based on the same concept of DPF. The advantage of this technique is automatic generation of huge number of similar geometries e.g. windows by utilizing parameters of DPF along with defining entities and window layers. In case of converting the SKP file to CityGML via FME software or CityGML plugins the 3D model contains the semantic database about the entities and window layers which can connect the CityGML to MySQL(Alizadehashrafi and Baig, 2014). The concept behind DPF, is to use logical operations to project the texture on the background image which is dynamically proportional to real geometry. The process of projection is based on two vertical and horizontal dynamic pulses starting from upper-left corner of the background wall in down and right directions respectively based on image coordinate system. The logical one/zero on the intersections of two vertical and horizontal dynamic pulses projects/does not project the texture on the background image. It is possible to define

  4. Analysis of image versus position, scale and direction reveals pattern texture anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehoucq, Roland; Weiss, Jerome; Dubrulle, Berengere; Amon, Axelle; Le Bouil, Antoine; Crassous, Jerome; Amitrano, David; Graner, Francois

    2014-12-01

    Pattern heterogeneities and anisotropies often carry significant physical information. We provide a toolbox which: (i) cumulates analysis in terms of position, direction and scale; (ii) is as general as possible; (iii) is simple and fast to understand, implement, execute and exploit. It consists in dividing the image into analysis boxes at a chosen scale; in each box an ellipse (the inertia tensor) is fitted to the signal and thus determines the direction in which the signal is more present. This tensor can be averaged in position and/or be used to study the dependence with scale. This choice is formally linked with Leray transforms and anisotropic wavelet analysis. Such protocol is intutively interpreted and consistent with what the eye detects: relevant scales, local variations in space, priviledged directions. It is fast and parallelizable. Its several variants are adaptable to the user's data and needs. It is useful to statistically characterize anisotropies of 2D or 3D patterns in which individual objects are not easily distinguished, with only minimal pre-processing of the raw image, and more generally applies to data in higher dimensions. It is less sensitive to edge effects, and thus better adapted for a multiscale analysis down to small scale boxes, than pair correlation function or Fourier transform. Easy to understand and implement, it complements more sophisticated methods such as Hough transform or diffusion tensor imaging. We use it on various fracture patterns (sea ice cover, thin sections of granite, granular materials), to pinpoint the maximal anisotropy scales. The results are robust to noise and to user choices. This toolbox could turn also useful for granular materials, hard condensed matter, geophysics, thin films, statistical mechanics, characterisation of networks, fluctuating amorphous systems, inhomogeneous and disordered systems, or medical imaging, among others.

  5. Potassium Feldspar Megacrysts in Granites: Passive Markers of Magma Dynamics or Products of Textural Coarsening?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. R.; Glazner, A. F.; Coleman, D. S.

    2006-12-01

    Megacrysts of potassium feldspar (K-spar) in granitic rocks are commonly interpreted as early-crystallizing phases whose textural relationships record flow, settling, and diapirism within evolving magma chambers. However, experimental studies on granitic magmas show that K-spar does not begin to nucleate until the system is at least 30% crystalline, and that much of the final crystallization history records co-crystallization of K-spar, quartz, and sodic plagioclase. These data require that the megacrysts cannot have reached large sizes until the magma was largely crystallized and incapable of flow. We have made chemical and textural observations of K-spar megacrysts from the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite (TIS), California. Cathodoluminescence images show sawtooth oscillatory zoning in K-spars, albite-rich rims on plagioclase, reaction zones at boundaries between plagioclase and K-spar, and almost no perthite. Electron microprobe analyses of the sawtooth zones reveal a sharp outward increase in Ba concentration at each zone boundary. Plagioclase core compositions follow whole-rock compositions, becoming increasingly albitic toward the center of the TIS, but K-spar in all units is highly potassic (Or80-95). A three-feldspar assemblage (An15-35, An1-7, and Or80-95) occurs in several megacrystic samples. Stained rock slabs reveal tentacles of interstitial K-spar radiating from megacryst edges far into the adjacent matrix, and a deficit of smaller K-spar crystals in megacrystic units. K-spar size measurements across the contacts of the TIS from the 10 largest crystals within a 1 m2 area show a steady increase in the average megacryst area from 0.2 to 30 cm2. In contrast, bulk rock K2O and K-spar mode (vol%) are constant across this same transect (at 3.7± 0.5 wt% and 22± 5 vol% respectively). Extreme feldspar compositions, phase equilibria, and textural observations argue for late development of K- spar megacrysts during the prolonged and probably cyclic cooling history of

  6. Coevolutionary dynamics on scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungmin; Kim, Yup

    2005-05-01

    We investigate Bak-Sneppen coevolution models on scale-free networks with various degree exponents γ including random networks. For γ>3 , the critical fitness value fc approaches a nonzero finite value in the limit N→∞ , whereas fc approaches zero as 2<γ⩽3 . These results are explained by showing analytically fc(N)≃A/⟨(k+1)2⟩N on the networks with size N . The avalanche size distribution P(s) shows the normal power-law behavior for γ>3 . In contrast, P(s) for 2<γ⩽3 has two power-law regimes. One is a short regime for small s with a large exponent τ1 and the other is a long regime for large s with a small exponent τ2(τ1>τ2) . The origin of the two power regimes is explained by the dynamics on an artificially made star-linked network.

  7. Colloquium: Hierarchy of scales in language dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, Richard A.

    2015-11-01

    Methods and insights from statistical physics are finding an increasing variety of applications where one seeks to understand the emergent properties of a complex interacting system. One such area concerns the dynamics of language at a variety of levels of description, from the behaviour of individual agents learning simple artificial languages from each other, up to changes in the structure of languages shared by large groups of speakers over historical timescales. In this Colloquium, we survey a hierarchy of scales at which language and linguistic behaviour can be described, along with the main progress in understanding that has been made at each of them - much of which has come from the statistical physics community. We argue that future developments may arise by linking the different levels of the hierarchy together in a more coherent fashion, in particular where this allows more effective use of rich empirical data sets.

  8. Scaling and dynamics of washboard roads.

    PubMed

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Taberlet, Nicolas; Morris, Stephen W; McElwaine, Jim N

    2009-06-01

    Granular surfaces subjected to forces due to rolling wheels develop ripples above a critical speed. The resulting pattern, known as washboard or corrugated road, is common on dry unpaved roads. We investigated this phenomenon theoretically and experimentally using laboratory-scale apparatus and beds of dry sand. A thick layer of sand on a circular track was forced by a rolling wheel on an arm whose weight and moment of inertia could be varied. We compared the ripples made by the rolling wheel to those made using a simple inclined plow blade. We investigated the dependence of the critical speed on various parameters and described a scaling argument that leads to a dimensionless ratio, analogous to the hydrodynamic Froude number, which controls the instability. This represents the crossover between conservative dynamic forces and dissipative static forces. Above onset wheel-driven ripples move in the direction of motion of the wheel, but plow-driven ripples move in the reverse direction for a narrow range of Froude numbers. PMID:19658502

  9. Slip Dynamics in Small Scale Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maass, Robert; Derlet, Peter; Greer, Julia; Volkert, Cynthia

    2015-03-01

    Classical work showed that dislocation velocities are strongly dependent on applied stress. Numerous experiments have validated this for individual or groups of dislocations in macroscopic crystals by using imaging techniques combined with either mechanical data or time resolved topological data. Developments in small scale mechanical testing allow to correlate the intermittency of collective dislocation motion with the mechanical response. Discrete forward surges in displacement can be related to dislocation avalanches, which are triggered by the evolving dislocation sub-structure. We study the spatiotemporal characteristics of intermittent plastic flow in quasi-statically sheared single crystalline Au crystals with diameters between 300 nm and 10000 nm, whose displacement bursts were recorded at several kHz (Scripta Mater. 2013, 69, 586; Small, available online). Both the crystallographic slip magnitude, as well as the velocity of the slip events are exhibiting power-law scaling as. The obtained slip velocity distribution has a cubic decay at high values, and a saturated flat shoulder at lower velocities. No correlation between the slip velocity and the applied stress or plastic strain is found. Further, we present DD-simulations that are supportive of our experimental findings. The simulations suggest that the dynamics of the internal stress fields dominate the evolving dislocation structure leading to velocities that are insensitive to the applied stress - a regime indicative of microplasticity.

  10. Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting surimi as affected by nano-scaled fish bone and heating rates.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; Park, Jae W

    2015-08-01

    Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting (PW) surimi were investigated at various heating rates with the use of nano-scaled fish bone (NFB) and calcium chloride. Addition of NFB and slow heating improved gel strength significantly. Activity of endogenous transglutaminase (ETGase) from PW surimi was markedly induced by both NFB calcium and calcium chloride, showing an optimal temperature at 30°C. Initial storage modulus increased as NFB calcium concentration increased and the same trend was maintained throughout the temperature sweep. Rheograms with temperature sweep at slow heating rate (1°C/min) exhibited two peaks at ∼ 35°C and ∼ 70°C. However, no peak was observed during temperature sweep from 20 to 90°C at fast heating rate (20°C/min). Protein patterns of surimi gels were affected by both heating rate and NFB calcium concentration. Under slow heating, myosin heavy chain intensity decreased with NFB calcium concentration, indicating formation of ε-(γ-glutamyl) lysine cross-links by ETGase and NFB calcium ion. PMID:25766799

  11. Symmetric textures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramond, P. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-01-01

    The Wolfenstein parametrization is extended to the quark masses in the deep ultraviolet, and an algorithm to derive symmetric textures which are compatible with existing data is developed. It is found that there are only five such textures.

  12. Symmetric textures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramond, P.

    1993-04-01

    The Wolfenstein parametrization is extended to the quark masses in the deep ultraviolet, and an algorithm to derive symmetric textures which are compatible with existing data is developed. It is found that there are only five such textures.

  13. Long length scales of element transport during reaction texture development in orthoamphibole-cordierite gneiss: Thor-Odin dome, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goergen, Eric T.; Whitney, Donna L.

    2012-02-01

    First-order factors controlling the textural and chemical evolution of metamorphic rocks are bulk composition and pressure-temperature-time ( P- T- t) path. Although it is common to assume that major element bulk composition does not change during regional metamorphism, rocks with reaction textures such as corona structures record evidence for major changes in effective bulk composition (EBC) and therefore provide significant insight into the scale, pathways, and mechanisms of element transport during metamorphism. Quantifying changes in EBC is essential for petrologic applications such as calculation of phase diagrams (pseudosections). The progressive growth of complex corona structures on garnet and Al2SiO5 porphyroblasts in orthoamphibole-cordierite gneiss Thor-Odin dome (British Columbia, Canada) reduced the EBC volume of the rock during metamorphism and therefore had a dramatic effect on the evolution of the stable mineral assemblage. These rocks contain a chemical and textural record of metamorphic reactions and preserve 3D networks (reaction pathways) connecting corona structures. These coronal networks record long (>cm) length scales of localized element transport during metamorphism. P- T, T- X, and P- X pseudosections are used to investigate the control of effective bulk composition on phase assemblage evolution. Despite textural complexity and evidence for disequilibrium, mineral assemblages and compositions were successfully modeled and peak metamorphic conditions estimated at 750°C and 9 kbar. These results illustrate how textural and chemical changes during metamorphism can be evaluated using an integrated petrographic and pseudosection approach, highlight the importance of effective bulk composition choice for application of phase equilibria methods in metamorphic rocks, and show how corona structures can be used to understand the scale of compositional change and element transport during metamorphism.

  14. Texture Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Julie

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to provide an opportunity for her first graders to explore texture through an engaging subject, the author developed a three-part lesson that features fish in a mixed-media artwork: (1) Exploring Textured Paint; (2) Creating the Fish; and (3) Role Playing. In this lesson, students effectively explore texture through painting, drawing,…

  15. Impacts of pore to regional scale variations in authigenic composition and texture on anthropogenically influenced fluid-rock interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, B. B.

    2015-12-01

    Diagenetic history plays a dominant role in determining the suitability of subsurface rock units as hosts for fluids that have societal importance. The performance of subsurface aquifers and storage facilities for CO2, natural gas, and liquid waste, is largely tied to the evolution of pore space and distribution and composition of authigenic minerals. While geoscientists may be well aware of the importance and nuances of diagenesis, project managers and decision-makers are unlikely to have a geologic understanding of determining factors such as burial history, fluid flow, and mineral thermodynamics. Thus, if falls to the geoscientists to effectively communicate meaningful conceptual models that adequately capture diagenetic heterogeneity and the potential for temporal changes with anthropogenically-induced changes in subsurface chemistry. This can be particularly difficult in subsurface systems that are sparsely sampled. Here, we look at the example of the basal Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone and overlying Eau Claire Formation in the Illinois Basin, the respective reservoir and seal for the largest ongoing demonstration of anthropogenic CO2 sequestration in the United States. Relatively few cores are available to study the pore-scale composition and structure of these units, and those that are available show a complex and spatially variable diagenetic history. Compilation of past studies and new analyses from the Illinois Basin are combined to illustrate the burial history and fluid flow record that will influence how these units respond to the massive volumes of supercritical CO2 injected into the subsurface. Pore to regional scale differences in authigenic mineral composition and texture result in significantly different predicted fluid-rock interactions and various potential consequences of injection. This project provides examples of both successes and challenges associated with communicating the diagentic complexity to stakeholders and the potential

  16. Texture and Composition of Pumice and Scoria Provide New Insights into the Dynamics of Explosive Eruptions at Campi Flegrei (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polacci, M.; Piochi, M.; de Astis, G.; Zanetti, A.; Mangiacapra, A.; Vannucci, R.; Giordano, D.

    2007-12-01

    Campi Flegrei (CF), a nested caldera located west of the densely-inhabited city of Naples, has been the site of volcanic activity for the past 60 ka BP. The last eruption occurred in AD 1538, but geochemical and geophysical signals have been monitored for the last tens of years clearly indicating that the magmatic system is still active. Volcanic risk mitigation in this area is therefore a primary goal of the scientific community. Here we combine new and literature data on the texture and composition of pumice and scoria clasts of selected CF eruptions with the goal to investigate their relationship to, and implications for, the eruption dynamics. We focus on three events with decreasing eruption intensity and magnitude: the Campanian Ignimbrite (39 ka), Agnano Monte Spina (4.1 ka) and Monte Nuovo (AD 1538) eruptions. Previous studies indicate that phenocryst and major element bulk compositions, as well as the original volatile content, are comparable in samples from the investigated eruptions. From these observations we derive that similar pre-eruptive physico-chemical conditions governed magma storage in the shallow crust before the occurrence of the above eruptions. Our investigation displays however a significant heterogeneity among the studied samples in terms of crystal and vesicle texture and abundance, composition of microlites and glassy groundmass, residual groundmass water content, and, finally, rheological properties of the related magmas. We ascribe such textural, compositional and rheological variability to different mechanisms of volatile exsolution, separation from the melt and outgassing accompanying magma ascent along the conduit and generated primarily by changes in the magma ascent rate. Low ascent rates allow open-system degassing, groundmass crystallization in response to water exsolution and the development of permeable flow pathways through which volatiles escape non-explosively to the surface potentially decreasing the overall eruption

  17. An informal paper on large-scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. C.

    1975-01-01

    Large scale systems are defined as systems requiring more than one decision maker to control the system. Decentralized control and decomposition are discussed for large scale dynamic systems. Information and many-person decision problems are analyzed.

  18. Small-scale dynamic confinement gap test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Malcolm

    2011-06-01

    Gap tests are routinely used to ascertain the shock sensitiveness of new explosive formulations. The tests are popular since that are easy and relatively cheap to perform. However, with modern insensitive formulations with big critical diameters, large test samples are required. This can make testing and screening of new formulations expensive since large quantities of test material are required. Thus a new test that uses significantly smaller sample quantities would be very beneficial. In this paper we describe a new small-scale test that has been designed using our CHARM ignition and growth routine in the DYNA2D hydrocode. The new test is a modified gap test and uses detonating nitromethane to provide dynamic confinement (instead of a thick metal case) whilst exposing the sample to a long duration shock wave. The long duration shock wave allows less reactive materials that are below their critical diameter, more time to react. We present details on the modelling of the test together with some preliminary experiments to demonstrate the potential of the new test method.

  19. Current Scientific Issues in Large Scale Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. L. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Topics in large scale atmospheric dynamics are discussed. Aspects of atmospheric blocking, the influence of transient baroclinic eddies on planetary-scale waves, cyclogenesis, the effects of orography on planetary scale flow, small scale frontal structure, and simulations of gravity waves in frontal zones are discussed.

  20. Texture Representations Using Subspace Embeddings

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaodong; Tian, YingLi

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a texture representation framework to map local texture patches into a low-dimensional texture subspace. In natural texture images, textons are entangled with multiple factors, such as rotation, scaling, viewpoint variation, illumination change, and non-rigid surface deformation. Mapping local texture patches into a low-dimensional subspace can alleviate or eliminate these undesired variation factors resulting from both geometric and photometric transformations. We observe that texture representations based on subspace embeddings have strong resistance to image deformations, meanwhile, are more distinctive and more compact than traditional representations. We investigate both linear and non-linear embedding methods including Principle Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), and Locality Preserving Projections (LPP) to compute the essential texture subspace. The experiments in the context of texture classification on benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed subspace embedding representations achieve the state-of-the-art results while with much fewer feature dimensions. PMID:23710105

  1. Texture Representations Using Subspace Embeddings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodong; Tian, Yingli

    2013-07-15

    In this paper, we propose a texture representation framework to map local texture patches into a low-dimensional texture subspace. In natural texture images, textons are entangled with multiple factors, such as rotation, scaling, viewpoint variation, illumination change, and non-rigid surface deformation. Mapping local texture patches into a low-dimensional subspace can alleviate or eliminate these undesired variation factors resulting from both geometric and photometric transformations. We observe that texture representations based on subspace embeddings have strong resistance to image deformations, meanwhile, are more distinctive and more compact than traditional representations. We investigate both linear and non-linear embedding methods including Principle Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), and Locality Preserving Projections (LPP) to compute the essential texture subspace. The experiments in the context of texture classification on benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed subspace embedding representations achieve the state-of-the-art results while with much fewer feature dimensions. PMID:23710105

  2. Ascent and emplacement dynamics of obsidian lavas inferred from microlite textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, Kenneth S.; Manga, Michael; Gardner, James E.; Williams, Matthew

    2015-10-01

    To assess the eruption and emplacement of volumetrically diverse rhyolite lavas, we measured microlite number densities and orientations from samples collected from nine lavas in Yellowstone Caldera and two from Mono Craters, USA. Microlite populations are composed of Fe-Ti oxides ± alkali feldspar ± clinopyroxene. Number densities range from 108.11 ± 0.03 to 109.45 ± 0.15 cm-3 and do not correlate with distance from the vent across individual flows and are remarkably similar between large- and small-volume lavas. Together, those observations suggest that number densities are unmodified during emplacement and that ascent rates in the conduit are similar between small domes and large lava flows. Microtextures produced by continuous decompression experiments best replicate natural textures at decompression rates of 1-2 MPa hr-1. Acicular microlites have a preferred orientation in all natural samples. Because the standard deviation of microlite orientation does not become better aligned with distance travelled, we conclude that microlites exit the conduit aligned and that strain during subaerial flow was insufficient to further align microlites. The orientations of microlite trend and plunge in near-vent samples indicate that pure shear was the dominant style of deformation in the conduit. We speculate that collapsing permeable foam(s) provides a mechanism to concurrently allow microlite formation and alignment in response to the combination of degassing and flattening by pure shear.

  3. Pore Scale Dynamics of Microemulsion Formation.

    PubMed

    Unsal, Evren; Broens, Marc; Armstrong, Ryan T

    2016-07-19

    Experiments in various porous media have shown that multiple parameters come into play when an oleic phase is displaced by an aqueous solution of surfactant. In general, the displacement efficiency is improved when the fluids become quasi-miscible. Understanding the phase behavior oil/water/surfactant systems is important because microemulsion has the ability to generate ultralow interfacial tension (<10(-2) mN m(-1)) that is required for miscibility to occur. Many studies focus on microemulsion formation and the resulting properties under equilibrium conditions. However, the majority of applications where microemulsion is present also involve flow, which has received relatively less attention. It is commonly assumed that the characteristics of an oil/water/surfactant system under flowing conditions are identical to the one under equilibrium conditions. Here, we show that this is not necessarily the case. We studied the equilibrium phase behavior of a model system consisting of n-decane and an aqueous solution of olefin sulfonate surfactant, which has practical applications for enhanced oil recovery. The salt content of the aqueous solution was varied to provide a range of different microemulsion compositions and oil-water interfacial tensions. We then performed microfluidic flow experiments to study the dynamic in situ formation of microemulsion by coinjecting bulk fluids of n-decane and surfactant solution into a T-junction capillary geometry. A solvatochromatic fluorescent dye was used to obtain spatially resolved compositional information. In this way, we visualized the microemulsion formation and the flow of it along with the excess phases. A complex interaction between the flow patterns and the microemulsion properties was observed. The formation of microemulsion influenced the flow regimes, and the flow regimes affected the characteristics of the microemulsion formation. In particular, at low flow rates, slug flow was observed, which had profound

  4. Texture and composition of pumices and scoriae from the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy): Implications on the dynamics of explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piochi, M.; Polacci, M.; de Astis, G.; Zanetti, A.; Mangiacapra, A.; Vannucci, R.; Giordano, D.

    2008-03-01

    The Campi Flegrei (CF) caldera is one of the most dangerous quiescent volcanic systems in the world. Its activity mostly resulted in low-magnitude explosive eruptions, such as that of the Monte Nuovo tuff cone that represents the last eruptive event within the caldera (A.D. 1538). However, there have been more energetic Plinian events, e.g., the Agnano Monte Spina eruption (4.1 ka), and very highly explosive, caldera-forming eruptions, e.g., the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption (39 ka). Here, we integrate new and literature data on the groundmass texture and composition of pyroclastic products from the three above eruptions with the aim of unraveling how volatiles content, degassing mechanisms, and crystallization processes influence magma explosivity and eruption dynamics at CF. Previous studies indicate that the investigated rocks share similar major element bulk and phenocryst chemistry; also similar is the water content of their trapped melt inclusions. These observations suggest that the magmas feeding these eruptions had comparable physicochemical properties during storage in the shallow crust. However, our investigations indicate that the studied rocks differ in texture and composition of the groundmass and viscosity of the related magmas. We ascribe such differences to the variable style of volatile exsolution and outgassing from the melt, primarily in response to changes of the rate of magma ascent to the surface. We conclude that the magma ascent rate was the key parameter in driving explosive eruptions at CF, and we suggest that this parameter may be influenced by magma-water interaction and/or magma chamber geometry and replenishment.

  5. Multiscale functions, scale dynamics, and applications to partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresson, Jacky; Pierret, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Modeling phenomena from experimental data always begins with a choice of hypothesis on the observed dynamics such as determinism, randomness, and differentiability. Depending on these choices, different behaviors can be observed. The natural question associated to the modeling problem is the following: "With a finite set of data concerning a phenomenon, can we recover its underlying nature? From this problem, we introduce in this paper the definition of multi-scale functions, scale calculus, and scale dynamics based on the time scale calculus [see Bohner, M. and Peterson, A., Dynamic Equations on Time Scales: An Introduction with Applications (Springer Science & Business Media, 2001)] which is used to introduce the notion of scale equations. These definitions will be illustrated on the multi-scale Okamoto's functions. Scale equations are analysed using scale regimes and the notion of asymptotic model for a scale equation under a particular scale regime. The introduced formalism explains why a single scale equation can produce distinct continuous models even if the equation is scale invariant. Typical examples of such equations are given by the scale Euler-Lagrange equation. We illustrate our results using the scale Newton's equation which gives rise to a non-linear diffusion equation or a non-linear Schrödinger equation as asymptotic continuous models depending on the particular fractional scale regime which is considered.

  6. The Challenge of Scale - SEM Imaging of the Textural and Compositional Heterogeneity of Tight Shales from the Nanometer to Centimeter Scale (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, J.; Green, S.; Suarez-Rivera, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    Shales and mudstones are heterogeneous at all scales. Their inherent variability derives from the complex interplay between original composition, processes of transport and deposition, compaction, and diagenetic processes that start shortly after deposition and may continue for 100,000's and even millions of years. Multiple pathways lead from fresh mud to solid shale, and the course taken determines the physical and chemical characteristics of the resulting rock. The journey from mud to rock and the controls on rock properties are encoded in the fine scale microscopic details of rock constituents. To visualize these details in a context that extends multiple orders of length scales away from a specific observation is critical, and requires high resolution SEM imaging across representative areas that include the full assemblage of shale components (fecal pellets, silt streaks, winnowed lags, clay drapes, fossil tests, organic macerals, etc.) as well as fine scale stratification (sub-mm to mm scale). Characterization of shale cores (or outcrop) through mm-cm scale visual observations of sedimentary structures and textures, as well as through closely spaced (mm-scale) measurements of physical and compositional properties, enables robust differentiation of rock intervals with unique characteristics. The latter can be designated as representative shale microfacies, and it is these that we then sample for high resolution imaging. The micro-scale fabrics revealed by this imaging are critical for understanding the small scale spatial variability that crucially influences how fluids and gases travel through this rock, how well it may perform as a seal, how likely it may leak, or how well it might perform as a reservoir. We found that high resolution examination of argon ion milled areas of approximately 5 mm by 5 mm size allows us to overcome the contextual limitations of traditional SEM study of shales where typical observation footprints range from of 50 to 100 μm in

  7. Automatic Texture Mapping with AN Omnidirectional Camera Mounted on a Vehicle Towards Large Scale 3d City Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, F.; Li, D.; Yan, L.; Fan, H.

    2012-07-01

    Today high resolution panoramic images with competitive quality have been widely used for rendering in some commercial systems. However the potential applications such as mapping, augmented reality and modelling which need accurate orientation information are still poorly studied. Urban models can be quickly obtained from aerial images or LIDAR, however with limited quality or efficiency due to low resolution textures and manual texture mapping work flow. We combine an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) with the traditional Structure from Motion (SFM) method without any prior information based on a general camera model which can handle various kinds of omnidirectional and other kind of single perspective image sequences even with unconnected or weakly connected frames. The orientation results is then applied to mapping the textures from panoramas to the existing building models obtained from aerial photogrammetry. It turns out to largely improve the quality of the models and the efficiency of the modelling procedure.

  8. Extrapolating Dynamic Leidenfrost Principles to Metallic Nanodroplets on Asymmetrically Textured Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Horne, Joseph E; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Terrones, Humberto; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to enhance our knowledge on how to control the movement of metallic nanodroplets, here we have used classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate whether Cu nanostructures deposited on nanopillared substrates can be made to jump at desired angles. We find that such control is possible, especially for Cu nanostructures that are symmetric; for asymmetric nanostructures, however, control is more uncertain. The work presented here borrows ideas from two seemingly different fields, metallic droplets and water droplets in the dynamic Leidenfrost regime. Despite the differences in the respective systems, we find common ground in their behavior on nanostructured surfaces. Due to this, we suggest that the ongoing research in Leidenfrost droplets is a fertile area for scientists working on metallic nanodroplets. PMID:26123648

  9. Extrapolating dynamic leidenfrost principles to metallic nanodroplets on asymmetrically textured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, Joseph E.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Terrones, Humberto; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2015-06-30

    In an effort to enhance our knowledge on how to control the movement of metallic nanodroplets, here we have used classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate whether Cu nanostructures deposited on nanopillared substrates can be made to jump at desired angles. We find that such control is possible, especially for Cu nanostructures that are symmetric; for asymmetric nanostructures, however, control is more uncertain. The work presented here borrows ideas from two seemingly different fields, metallic droplets and water droplets in the dynamic Leidenfrost regime. Despite the differences in the respective systems, we find common ground in their behavior on nanostructured surfaces. As a result, we suggest that the ongoing research in Leidenfrost droplets is a fertile area for scientists working on metallic nanodroplets.

  10. Extrapolating dynamic leidenfrost principles to metallic nanodroplets on asymmetrically textured surfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Horne, Joseph E.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Terrones, Humberto; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2015-06-30

    In an effort to enhance our knowledge on how to control the movement of metallic nanodroplets, here we have used classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate whether Cu nanostructures deposited on nanopillared substrates can be made to jump at desired angles. We find that such control is possible, especially for Cu nanostructures that are symmetric; for asymmetric nanostructures, however, control is more uncertain. The work presented here borrows ideas from two seemingly different fields, metallic droplets and water droplets in the dynamic Leidenfrost regime. Despite the differences in the respective systems, we find common ground in their behavior on nanostructuredmore » surfaces. As a result, we suggest that the ongoing research in Leidenfrost droplets is a fertile area for scientists working on metallic nanodroplets.« less

  11. Scaling Parameters of the Lewis-Kostiakov Water Infiltration Equation Across Soil Textural Classes and Extension to Rain Infiltration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A recent study showed that the Brooks-Corey equation parameters for soil hydraulic properties were strongly correlated to the pore-size distribution index (lambda), the slope of the log-log soil moisture characteristic curve across eleven soil textural classes from sand to clay. It further showed th...

  12. Molecular Scale Dynamics of Large Ring Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooßen, S.; Brás, A. R.; Krutyeva, M.; Sharp, M.; Falus, P.; Feoktystov, A.; Gasser, U.; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W.; Wischnewski, A.; Richter, D.

    2014-10-01

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture.

  13. Molecular scale dynamics of large ring polymers.

    PubMed

    Gooßen, S; Brás, A R; Krutyeva, M; Sharp, M; Falus, P; Feoktystov, A; Gasser, U; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W; Wischnewski, A; Richter, D

    2014-10-17

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture. PMID:25361284

  14. Quasiparticle dynamics and spin-orbital texture of the SrTiO3 two-dimensional electron gas.

    PubMed

    King, P D C; McKeown Walker, S; Tamai, A; de la Torre, A; Eknapakul, T; Buaphet, P; Mo, S-K; Meevasana, W; Bahramy, M S; Baumberger, F

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) in SrTiO3 have become model systems for engineering emergent behaviour in complex transition metal oxides. Understanding the collective interactions that enable this, however, has thus far proved elusive. Here we demonstrate that angle-resolved photoemission can directly image the quasiparticle dynamics of the d-electron subband ladder of this complex-oxide 2DEG. Combined with realistic tight-binding supercell calculations, we uncover how quantum confinement and inversion symmetry breaking collectively tune the delicate interplay of charge, spin, orbital and lattice degrees of freedom in this system. We reveal how they lead to pronounced orbital ordering, mediate an orbitally enhanced Rashba splitting with complex subband-dependent spin-orbital textures and markedly change the character of electron-phonon coupling, co-operatively shaping the low-energy electronic structure of the 2DEG. Our results allow for a unified understanding of spectroscopic and transport measurements across different classes of SrTiO3-based 2DEGs, and yield new microscopic insights on their functional properties. PMID:24572991

  15. Quasiparticle dynamics and spin-orbital texture of the SrTiO3 two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. D. C.; McKeown Walker, S.; Tamai, A.; de la Torre, A.; Eknapakul, T.; Buaphet, P.; Mo, S.-K.; Meevasana, W.; Bahramy, M. S.; Baumberger, F.

    2014-02-01

    Two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) in SrTiO3 have become model systems for engineering emergent behaviour in complex transition metal oxides. Understanding the collective interactions that enable this, however, has thus far proved elusive. Here we demonstrate that angle-resolved photoemission can directly image the quasiparticle dynamics of the d-electron subband ladder of this complex-oxide 2DEG. Combined with realistic tight-binding supercell calculations, we uncover how quantum confinement and inversion symmetry breaking collectively tune the delicate interplay of charge, spin, orbital and lattice degrees of freedom in this system. We reveal how they lead to pronounced orbital ordering, mediate an orbitally enhanced Rashba splitting with complex subband-dependent spin-orbital textures and markedly change the character of electron-phonon coupling, co-operatively shaping the low-energy electronic structure of the 2DEG. Our results allow for a unified understanding of spectroscopic and transport measurements across different classes of SrTiO3-based 2DEGs, and yield new microscopic insights on their functional properties.

  16. Planck scale unification and dynamical symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Lykken, Joseph D.; Willenbrock, Scott

    1993-09-01

    We explore the possibility of unification of gauge couplings near the Planck scale in models of extended technicolor. We observe that models of the form G X SU(3)_c X SU(2)_L X U(1)_Y cannot be realized, due to the presence of massless neutral Goldstone bosons (axions) and light charged pseudo-Goldstone bosons; thus, unification of the known forces near the Planck scale cannot be achieved. The next simplest possibility, G X SU(4)_{PS} X SU(2)_L X U(1)_{T_{3R}}, cannot lead to unification of the Pati-Salam and weak gauge groups near the Planck scale. However, superstring theory provides relations between couplings at the Planck scale without the need for an underlying grand-unified gauge group, which allows unification of the SU(4)PS and SU(2)L couplings.

  17. Texture-defined objects influence responses of blowfly motion-sensitive neurons under natural dynamical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Thomas W.; Kern, Roland; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The responses of visual interneurons of flies involved in the processing of motion information do not only depend on the velocity, but also on other stimulus parameters, such as the contrast and the spatial frequency content of the stimulus pattern. These dependencies have been known for long, but it is still an open question how they affect the neurons’ performance in extracting information about the structure of the environment under the specific dynamical conditions of natural flight. Free-flight of blowflies is characterized by sequences of phases of translational movements lasting for just 30–100 ms interspersed with even shorter and extremely rapid saccade-like rotational shifts in flight and gaze direction. Previous studies already analyzed how nearby objects, leading to relative motion on the retina with respect to a more distant background, influenced the response of a class of fly motion sensitive visual interneurons, the horizontal system (HS) cells. In the present study, we focused on objects that differed from their background by discontinuities either in their brightness contrast or in their spatial frequency content. We found strong object-induced effects on the membrane potential even during the short intersaccadic intervals, if the background contrast was small and the object contrast sufficiently high. The object evoked similar response increments provided that it contained higher spatial frequencies than the background, but not under reversed conditions. This asymmetry in the response behavior is partly a consequence of the depolarization level induced by the background. Thus, our results suggest that, under the specific dynamical conditions of natural flight, i.e., on a very short timescale, the responses of HS cells represent object information depending on the polarity of the difference between object and background contrast and spatial frequency content. PMID:24808836

  18. Design of periodic nano- and macro-scale textures for high-performance thin-film multi-junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krc, J.; Sever, M.; Kovacic, M.; Moulin, E.; Campa, A.; Lipovsek, B.; Steltenpool, M.; van Erven, A. J. M.; Haug, F.-J.; Ballif, C.; Topic, M.

    2016-06-01

    Surface textures in thin-film silicon multi-junction solar cells play an important role in gaining the photocurrent of the devices. In this paper, a design of the textures is carried out for the case of amorphous silicon/micro-crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/μc-Si:H) solar cells, employing advanced modelling to determine the textures for defect-free silicon layer growth and to increase the photocurrent. A model of non-conformal layer growth and a hybrid optical modelling approach are used to perform realistic 3D simulations of the structures. The hybrid optical modelling includes rigorous modelling based on the finite element method and geometrical optics models. This enables us to examine the surface texture scaling from nano- to macro-sized (several tens or hundreds of micrometers) texturisation features. First, selected random and periodic nanotextures are examined with respect to critical positions of defect-region formation in Si layers. We show that despite careful selection of a well-suited semi-ellipsoidal periodic texture for defect-free layer growth, defective regions in Si layers of a-Si:H/μc-Si:H cell cannot be avoided if the lateral and vertical dimensions of the nano features are optimised only for high gain in photocurrent. Macro features are favourable for defect-free layer growth, but do not render the photocurrent gains as achieved with light-scattering properties of the optimised nanotextures. Simulation results show that from the optical point of view the semi-ellipsoidal periodic nanotextures with lateral features smaller than 0.4 μm and vertical peak-to-peak heights around or above 0.3 μm are required to achieve a gain in short-circuit current of the top cell with respect to the state-of-the-art random texture (>16% increase), whereas lateral dimensions around 0.8 μm and heights around 0.6 μm lead to a >6% gain in short-circuit current of the bottom cell.

  19. On the density scaling of liquid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragiadakis, D.; Roland, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Superpositioning of relaxation data as a function of the product variable TVγ, where T is temperature, V the specific volume, and γ a material constant, is an experimental fact demonstrated for approximately 100 liquids and polymers. Such scaling behavior would result from the intermolecular potential having the form of an inverse power law (IPL), suggesting that an IPL is a good approximation for certain relaxation properties over the relevant range of intermolecular distances. However, the derivation of the scaling property of an IPL liquid is based on reduced quantities, for example, the reduced relaxation time equal to T1/2V-1/3 times the actual relaxation time. The difference between scaling using reduced rather than unreduced units is negligible in the supercooled regime; however, at higher temperature the difference can be substantial, accounting for the purported breakdown of the scaling and giving rise to different values of the scaling exponent. Only the γ obtained using reduced quantities can be sensibly related to the intermolecular potential.

  20. Role of integrin α2 β1 in mediating osteoblastic differentiation on three-dimensional titanium scaffolds with submicron-scale texture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaokun; Schwartz, Zvi; Gittens, Rolando A; Cheng, Alice; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Chen, Haifeng; Boyan, Barbara D

    2015-06-01

    Hierarchical surface roughness of titanium and titanium alloy implants plays an important role in osseointegration. In vitro and in vivo studies show greater osteoblast differentiation and bone formation when implants have submicron-scale textured surfaces. In this study, we tested the potential benefit of combining a submicron-scale textured surface with three-dimensional (3D) structure on osteoblast differentiation and the involvement of an integrin-driven mechanism. 3D titanium scaffolds were made using orderly oriented titanium meshes and microroughness was added to the wire surface by acid-etching. MG63 and human osteoblasts were seeded on 3D scaffolds and 2D surfaces with or without acid etching. At confluence, increased osteocalcin, vascular endothelial growth factor, osteoprotegerin (OPG), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were observed in MG63 and human osteoblasts on 3D scaffolds in comparison to 2D surfaces at the protein level, indicating enhanced osteoblast differentiation. To further investigate the mechanism of osteoblast-3D scaffold interaction, the role of integrin α2β1 was examined. The results showed β1 and α2β1 integrin silencing abolished the increase in osteoblastic differentiation markers on 3D scaffolds. Time course studies showed osteoblasts matured faster in the 3D environment in the early stage of culture, while as cells proliferated, the maturation slowed down to a comparative level as 2D surfaces. After 12 days of postconfluent culture, osteoblasts on 3D scaffolds showed a second-phase increase in ALP activity. This study shows that osteoblastic differentiation is improved on 3D scaffolds with submicron-scale texture and is mediated by integrin α2β1. PMID:25203434

  1. Role of integrin α2β1 in mediating osteoblastic differentiation on three-dimensional titanium scaffolds with submicron-scale texture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaokun; Schwartz, Zvi; Gittens, Rolando A.; Cheng, Alice; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Chen, Haifeng; Boyan, Barbara D.

    2014-01-01

    Hierarchical surface roughness of titanium and titanium alloy implants plays an important role in osseointegration. In vitro and in vivo studies show greater osteoblast differentiation and bone formation when implants have submicron-scale textured surfaces. In this study, we tested the potential benefit of combining a submicron-scale textured surface with three-dimensional (3D) structure on osteoblast differentiation and the involvement of an integrin-driven mechanism. 3D titanium scaffolds were made using orderly oriented titanium meshes and microroughness was added to the wire surface by acid-etching. MG63 and human osteoblasts were seeded on 3D scaffolds and 2D surfaces with or without acid etching. At confluence, increased osteocalcin, vascular endothelial growth factor, osteoprotegerin (OPG), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were observed in MG63 and human osteoblasts on 3D scaffolds in comparison to 2D surfaces at the protein level, indicating enhanced osteoblast differentiation. To further investigate the mechanism of osteoblast-3D scaffold interaction, the role of integrin α2β1 was examined. The results showed β1 and α2β1 integrin silencing abolished the increase in osteoblastic differentiation markers on 3D scaffolds. Time course studies showed osteoblasts matured faster in the 3D environment in the early stage of culture, while as cells proliferated, the maturation slowed down to a comparative level as 2D surfaces. After 12 days of postconfluent culture, osteoblasts on 3D scaffolds showed a second-phase increase in ALP activity. This study shows that osteoblastic differentiation is improved on 3D scaffolds with submicron-scale texture and is mediated by integrin α2β1. PMID:25203434

  2. Multi-Scale Dynamics From Earth's Surface into the Thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, David

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric structures ranging from very small scales near Earth's surface to much larger scales in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) appear to exhibit common features and underlying dynamics. Above the turbopause at ~110 km, kinematic viscosity and thermal diffusivity largely suppress flow instabilities leading to turbulence. Below the turbopause, however, multi-scale dynamics appear to drive systematic transfers of energy both among quasi-two-dimensional (2D) motions at larger scales and to three-dimensional (3D) instabilities and turbulence at smaller scales. Such multi-scale dynamics arise due to superposed GWs and background wind shears and readily drive local layered structures comprising thinner, strongly stratified and sheared "sheets" and thicker, weakly stratified and sheared "layers". These environments initiate various types of instabilities that yield local turbulence and mixing that contribute to maintenance of the "sheet and layer" (S&L) structures. Idealized modeling of these dynamics describe many S&L flow, instability, and turbulence features that are confirmed by observations from the stable boundary layer into the mesosphere. Similar dynamics accompany larger-scale gravity waves that encounter variable stratification and shear, and that induce strong local body forces, throughout the atmosphere.

  3. Dynamic control of substrate bias for highly c-axis textured thin ferromagnetic CoCrTa film in inductively coupled plasma-assisted sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Okimura, Kunio; Oyanagi, Junya

    2005-01-01

    This study shows highly c-axis textured thin ferromagnetic Co-based alloy (CoCrTa) film growth in inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-assisted sputtering with an internal coil with an insulated surface. Dynamic control of the substrate bias achieved highly c-axis textured CoCrTa film with a thickness of 70 nm in 3 min depositions on a Si substrate. The prepared film showed a smooth, dense surface consisting of small crystal grains. The film had a perpendicular magnetic coercivity of 1030 Oe and coercive squareness of 0.36. ICP-assisted sputtering with an internal coil with an insulated surface enabled higher-density ({>=}1.0x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}) plasma with lower space potential ({<=}30 V) compared to ICP-assisted sputtering with bare coil systems. Therefore, the proposed bias control is quite effective for textured growth of thinner Co layers via the effect of a high flux of ions with proper energies. This method can be a candidate for the deposition technique of c-axis textured films as perpendicular magnetic recording media.

  4. Dynamic Assessment in Phonological Disorders: The Scaffolding Scale of Stimulability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaspey, Amy M.; Stoel-Gammon, Carol

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic assessment is applied to phonological disorders with the Scaffolding Scale of Stimulability (SSS). The SSS comprises a 21-point hierarchical scale of cues and linguistic environments. With the SSS, clinicians assess stimulability as a diagnostic indicator and use the measure to monitor progress across treatment. Unlike other phonological…

  5. Scale invariance in the dynamics of spontaneous behavior

    PubMed Central

    Proekt, Alex; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos; Pfaff, Donald W.

    2012-01-01

    Typically one expects that the intervals between consecutive occurrences of a particular behavior will have a characteristic time scale around which most observations are centered. Surprisingly, the timing of many diverse behaviors from human communication to animal foraging form complex self-similar temporal patterns reproduced on multiple time scales. We present a general framework for understanding how such scale invariance may arise in nonequilibrium systems, including those that regulate mammalian behaviors. We then demonstrate that the predictions of this framework are in agreement with detailed analysis of spontaneous mouse behavior observed in a simple unchanging environment. Neural systems operate on a broad range of time scales, from milliseconds to hours. We analytically show that such a separation between time scales could lead to scale-invariant dynamics without any fine tuning of parameters or other model-specific constraints. Our analyses reveal that the specifics of the distribution of resources or competition among several tasks are not essential for the expression of scale-free dynamics. Rather, we show that scale invariance observed in the dynamics of behavior can arise from the dynamics intrinsic to the brain. PMID:22679281

  6. Metastable and scaling regimes of one-dimensional Kawasaki dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarracín, F. A. Gómez; Rosales, H. D.; Grynberg, M. D.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the large-time scaling regimes arising from a variety of metastable structures in a chain of Ising spins with both first- and second-neighbor couplings while subject to Kawasaki dynamics. Depending on the ratio and sign of these former, different dynamic exponents are suggested by finite-size scaling analyses of relaxation times. At low but nonzero temperatures these are calculated via exact diagonalizations of the evolution operator in finite chains under several activation barriers. In the absence of metastability the dynamics is always diffusive.

  7. Energy conserving, linear scaling Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cawkwell, M J; Niklasson, Anders M N

    2012-10-01

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations with long-term conservation of the total energy and a computational cost that scales linearly with system size have been obtained simultaneously. Linear scaling with a low pre-factor is achieved using density matrix purification with sparse matrix algebra and a numerical threshold on matrix elements. The extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] yields microcanonical trajectories with the approximate forces obtained from the linear scaling method that exhibit no systematic drift over hundreds of picoseconds and which are indistinguishable from trajectories computed using exact forces. PMID:23039583

  8. Dynamic scaling and temperature effects in thin film roughening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Assis, T. A.; Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic scaling of mesoscopically thick films (up to 104 atomic layers) grown with the Clarke-Vvedensky model is investigated numerically in 2 + 1 dimensions for broad ranges of values of the diffusion-to-deposition ratio R and lateral neighbor detachment probability ɛ, but with no barrier at step edges. The global roughness scales with the film thickness t as W ˜ tβ/[R3/2(ɛ + a)], where β ≈ 0.2 is the growth exponent consistent with Villain-Lai-Das Sarma (VLDS) scaling and a = 0.025. This general dependence on R and ɛ is inferred from renormalization studies and shows a remarkable effect of the former but a small effect of the latter, for ɛ ⩽ 0.1. For R ⩾ 104, very smooth surfaces are always produced. The local roughness shows apparent anomalous scaling for very low temperatures (R ⩽ 102), which is a consequence of large scaling corrections to asymptotic normal scaling. The scaling variable R3/2(ɛ + a) also represents the temperature effects in the scaling of the correlation length and appears in the dynamic scaling relation of the local roughness, which gives dynamic exponent z ≈ 3.3 also consistent with the VLDS class.

  9. SU-E-I-100: Heterogeneity Studying for Primary and Lymphoma Tumors by Using Multi-Scale Image Texture Analysis with PET-CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dengwang; Wang, Qinfen; Li, H; Chen, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is studying tumor heterogeneity of the primary and lymphoma by using multi-scale texture analysis with PET-CT images, where the tumor heterogeneity is expressed by texture features. Methods: Datasets were collected from 12 lung cancer patients, and both of primary and lymphoma tumors were detected with all these patients. All patients underwent whole-body 18F-FDG PET/CT scan before treatment.The regions of interest (ROI) of primary and lymphoma tumor were contoured by experienced clinical doctors. Then the ROI of primary and lymphoma tumor is extracted automatically by using Matlab software. According to the geometry size of contour structure, the images of tumor are decomposed by multi-scale method.Wavelet transform was performed on ROI structures within images by L layers sampling, and then wavelet sub-bands which have the same size of the original image are obtained. The number of sub-bands is 3L+1.The gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) is calculated within different sub-bands, thenenergy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity were extracted from GLCM.Finally, heterogeneity statistical analysis was studied for primary and lymphoma tumor using the texture features. Results: Energy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity are calculated with our experiments for heterogeneity statistical analysis.Energy for primary and lymphomatumor is equal with the same patient, while gray in-homogeneity and inertia of primaryare 2.59595±0.00855, 0.6439±0.0007 respectively. Gray in-homogeneity and inertia of lymphoma are 2.60115±0.00635, 0.64435±0.00055 respectively. The experiments showed that the volume of lymphoma is smaller than primary tumor, but thegray in-homogeneity and inertia were higher than primary tumor with the same patient, and the correlation with lymphoma tumors is zero, while the correlation with primary tumor isslightly strong. Conclusion: This studying showed that there were effective heterogeneity

  10. Scale-invariant entropy-based theory for dynamic ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Mahulikar, Shripad P. E-mail: spm@aero.iitb.ac.in; Kumari, Priti

    2014-09-01

    Dynamically Ordered self-organized dissipative structure exists in various forms and at different scales. This investigation first introduces the concept of an isolated embedding system, which embeds an open system, e.g., dissipative structure and its mass and/or energy exchange with its surroundings. Thereafter, scale-invariant theoretical analysis is presented using thermodynamic principles for Order creation, existence, and destruction. The sustainability criterion for Order existence based on its structured mass and/or energy interactions with the surroundings is mathematically defined. This criterion forms the basis for the interrelationship of physical parameters during sustained existence of dynamic Order. It is shown that the sufficient condition for dynamic Order existence is approached if its sustainability criterion is met, i.e., its destruction path is blocked. This scale-invariant approach has the potential to unify the physical understanding of universal dynamic ordering based on entropy considerations.

  11. Grain-scale Dynamics in Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2002-09-30

    High explosives can have reactions to external stimuli that range from mild pressure bursts to full detonation. The ability to predict these responses is important for understanding the performance as well as the safety and reliability of these important materials. At present, we have only relatively simple phenomenological computational models for the behavior of high explosives under these conditions. These models are limited by the assumption that the explosive can be treated as homogeneous. In reality the explosive is a highly heterogeneous composite of irregular crystallites and plastic binder. The heterogeneous nature of explosives is responsible for many of their unique mechanical and chemical properties. We use computational models to simulate the response of explosives to external mechanical stimuli at the grain-scale level. The ultimate goal of this work is to understand the detailed processes involved with the material response, so that we can develop realistic material models, which can be used in a hydrodynamics/multi-physics code to model real systems. The new material models will provide a more realistic description of the explosive system during the most critical period of ignition and initiation. The focus of this work is to use the results of grain-scale simulations to develop an advanced macroscopic reactive flow model that is consistent with our understanding of the grain-scale details, and that can incorporate such information quantitatively. The objective is to connect changes to observed properties of the explosive (grain size distribution, binder thickness distribution, void shape, size, and separation distribution, binder mechanical properties, etc.) with predictions of the resulting sensitivity and performance.

  12. Independent Component Analysis of Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, Roberto; Portilla, Javier

    2000-01-01

    A common method for texture representation is to use the marginal probability densities over the outputs of a set of multi-orientation, multi-scale filters as a description of the texture. We propose a technique, based on Independent Components Analysis, for choosing the set of filters that yield the most informative marginals, meaning that the product over the marginals most closely approximates the joint probability density function of the filter outputs. The algorithm is implemented using a steerable filter space. Experiments involving both texture classification and synthesis show that compared to Principal Components Analysis, ICA provides superior performance for modeling of natural and synthetic textures.

  13. Scaling and Universality at Dynamical Quantum Phase Transitions.

    PubMed

    Heyl, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Dynamical quantum phase transitions (DQPTs) at critical times appear as nonanalyticities during nonequilibrium quantum real-time evolution. Although there is evidence for a close relationship between DQPTs and equilibrium phase transitions, a major challenge is still to connect to fundamental concepts such as scaling and universality. In this work, renormalization group transformations in complex parameter space are formulated for quantum quenches in Ising models showing that the DQPTs are critical points associated with unstable fixed points of equilibrium Ising models. Therefore, these DQPTs obey scaling and universality. On the basis of numerical simulations, signatures of these DQPTs in the dynamical buildup of spin correlations are found with an associated power-law scaling determined solely by the fixed point's universality class. An outlook is given on how to explore this dynamical scaling experimentally in systems of trapped ions. PMID:26551800

  14. Scaling and Universality at Dynamical Quantum Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyl, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Dynamical quantum phase transitions (DQPTs) at critical times appear as nonanalyticities during nonequilibrium quantum real-time evolution. Although there is evidence for a close relationship between DQPTs and equilibrium phase transitions, a major challenge is still to connect to fundamental concepts such as scaling and universality. In this work, renormalization group transformations in complex parameter space are formulated for quantum quenches in Ising models showing that the DQPTs are critical points associated with unstable fixed points of equilibrium Ising models. Therefore, these DQPTs obey scaling and universality. On the basis of numerical simulations, signatures of these DQPTs in the dynamical buildup of spin correlations are found with an associated power-law scaling determined solely by the fixed point's universality class. An outlook is given on how to explore this dynamical scaling experimentally in systems of trapped ions.

  15. Scaling properties of excursions in heartbeat dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Ramírez, I.; Guzmán-Vargas, L.

    2010-02-01

    In this work we study the excursions, defined as the number of beats to return to a local mean value, in heartbeat interval time series from healthy subjects and patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). First, we apply the segmentation procedure proposed by Bernaola-Galván et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 87 (2001) 168105), to nonstationary heartbeat time series to identify stationary segments with a local mean value. Next, we identify local excursions around the local mean value and construct the distributions to analyze the time organization and memory in the excursions sequences from the whole time series. We find that the cumulative distributions of excursions are consistent with a stretched exponential function given by g(x)~e-aτb, with a=1.09±0.15 (mean value±SD) and b=0.91±0.11 for healthy subjects and a=1.31±0.23 and b=0.77±0.13 for CHF patients. The cumulative conditional probability G(τ|τ0) is considered to evaluate if τ depends on a given interval τ0, that is, to evaluate the memory effect in excursion sequences. We find that the memory in excursions sequences under healthy conditions is characterized by the presence of clusters related to the fact that large excursions are more likely to be followed by large ones whereas for CHF data we do not observe this behavior. The presence of correlations in healthy data is confirmed by means of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) while for CHF records the scaling exponent is characterized by a crossover, indicating that for short scales the sequences resemble uncorrelated noise.

  16. Triadic closure dynamics drives scaling laws in social multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimek, Peter; Thurner, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Social networks exhibit scaling laws for several structural characteristics, such as degree distribution, scaling of the attachment kernel and clustering coefficients as a function of node degree. A detailed understanding if and how these scaling laws are inter-related is missing so far, let alone whether they can be understood through a common, dynamical principle. We propose a simple model for stationary network formation and show that the three mentioned scaling relations follow as natural consequences of triadic closure. The validity of the model is tested on multiplex data from a well-studied massive multiplayer online game. We find that the three scaling exponents observed in the multiplex data for the friendship, communication and trading networks can simultaneously be explained by the model. These results suggest that triadic closure could be identified as one of the fundamental dynamical principles in social multiplex network formation.

  17. Probing scale interaction in brain dynamics through synchronization.

    PubMed

    Barardi, Alessandro; Malagarriga, Daniel; Sancristobal, Belén; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi; Pons, Antonio J

    2014-10-01

    The mammalian brain operates in multiple spatial scales simultaneously, ranging from the microscopic scale of single neurons through the mesoscopic scale of cortical columns, to the macroscopic scale of brain areas. These levels of description are associated with distinct temporal scales, ranging from milliseconds in the case of neurons to tens of seconds in the case of brain areas. Here, we examine theoretically how these spatial and temporal scales interact in the functioning brain, by considering the coupled behaviour of two mesoscopic neural masses (NMs) that communicate with each other through a microscopic neuronal network (NN). We use the synchronization between the two NM models as a tool to probe the interaction between the mesoscopic scales of those neural populations and the microscopic scale of the mediating NN. The two NM oscillators are taken to operate in a low-frequency regime with different peak frequencies (and distinct dynamical behaviour). The microscopic neuronal population, in turn, is described by a network of several thousand excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons operating in a synchronous irregular regime, in which the individual neurons fire very sparsely but collectively give rise to a well-defined rhythm in the gamma range. Our results show that this NN, which operates at a fast temporal scale, is indeed sufficient to mediate coupling between the two mesoscopic oscillators, which evolve dynamically at a slower scale. We also establish how this synchronization depends on the topological properties of the microscopic NN, on its size and on its oscillation frequency. PMID:25180311

  18. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  19. Leptogenesis with a dynamical seesaw scale

    SciTech Connect

    Sierra, D. Aristizabal; Vicente, A.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J.W.F. E-mail: mariam@ific.uv.es E-mail: Avelino.Vicente@ulg.ac.be

    2014-07-01

    In the simplest type-I seesaw leptogenesis scenario right-handed neutrino annihilation processes are absent. However, in the presence of new interactions these processes are possible and can affect the resulting B-L asymmetry in an important way. A prominent example is provided by models with spontaneous lepton number violation, where the existence of new dynamical degrees of freedom can play a crucial role. In this context, we provide a model-independent discussion of the effects of right-handed neutrino annihilations. We show that in the weak washout regime, as long as the scattering processes remain slow compared with the Hubble expansion rate throughout the relevant temperature range, the efficiency can be largely enhanced, reaching in some cases maximal values. Moreover, the B-L asymmetry yield turns out to be independent upon initial conditions, in contrast to the ''standard'' case. On the other hand, when the annihilation processes are fast, the right-handed neutrino distribution tends to a thermal one down to low temperatures, implying a drastic suppression of the efficiency which in some cases can render the B-L generation mechanism inoperative.

  20. Scale-Independent Measures and Pathologic Cardiac Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Luís A.; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    1998-09-01

    We study several scale-independent measures of cardiac interbeat interval dynamics defined through the application of the wavelet transform. We test their performance in detecting heart disease using a database consisting of records of interbeat intervals for a group of healthy individuals and subjects with congestive heart failure. We find that scale-independent measures effectively distinguish healthy from pathologic behavior and propose a new two-variable scale-independent measure that could be clinically useful. We compare the performance of a recently proposed scale-dependent measure and find that the results depend on the database analyzed and on the analyzing wavelet.

  1. Analyzing µCT images of bone specimen with wavelets and scaling indices: Which texture measure does better to depict the trabecular bone structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeth, Christoph W.; Bauer, Jan; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Link, Thomas M.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Eckstein, Felix; Monetti, Roberto

    2007-03-01

    The visualisation and subsequent quantification of the inner bone structure plays an important role for better understanding the disease- or drug-induced changes of the bone in the context of osteoporosis. Scaling indices (SIM) are well suited to quantify these structures on a local level, especially to discriminate between plate-like and rod-like structural elements. Local filters based on wavelets (WVL) are a standard technique in texture analysis. So far, they are mainly used for two-dimensional image data sets. Here we extend the formalism of the spherical Mexican hat wavelets to the analysis of three-dimensional tomographic images and evaluate its performance in comparison with scaling indices, histomorphometric measures and BMD. μCT images with isotropic resolution of 30 x 30 x 30 μm of a sample of 19 trabecular bone specimen of human thoracic vertebrae were acquired. In addition, the bone mineral density was measured by QCT. The maximum compressive strength (MCS) was determined in a biomechanical test. Some wavelet-based as well as all scaling index- based texture measures show a significantly higher correlation with MCS (WVL: ρ2=0.54, SIM: ρ2=0.53-0.56) than BMD (ρ2=0.46), where we find slightly better correlations for SIM than for WVL. The SIM and WVL results are comparable but not better to those obtained with histomorphometric measures (BV/TV: ρ2=0.45, Tr. N.: ρ2=0.67, Tr.Sp.: ρ2=0.67). In conclusion, WVL and SIM techniques can successfully be applied to μCT image data. Since the two measures characterize the image structures on a local scale, they offer the possibility to directly identify and discriminate rods and sheets of the trabecular structure. This property may give new insights about the bone constituents responsible for the mechanical strength.

  2. Micro-scale drop dynamics for heat transfer enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, Marianne; Shyy, Wei

    2002-05-01

    With rapid advances in micro-device fabrication, computational techniques, and diagnostic tools, there is a significant interest in applying micro-scale fluid dynamics and heat transfer to flow control, flight vehicle protection, and thermal management. Utilizing energy transfer associated with phase change, multiphase systems offer many new opportunities. To elucidate the main scientific issues and technical implications, recent research addressing the interplay between capillarity, moving boundaries, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and phase change of micro-scale multiphase systems is reviewed. The parametric variations in contact angle, surface tension, impact velocity, and liquid viscosity related to drop impingement and heat transfer are discussed.

  3. High-scale axions without isocurvature from inflationary dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Orlofsky, Nicholas; Pierce, Aaron

    2016-05-01

    Observable primordial tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would point to a high scale of inflation HI . If the scale of Peccei-Quinn (PQ) breaking fa is greater than H/I 2 π , CMB constraints on isocurvature naively rule out QCD axion dark matter. This assumes the potential of the axion is unmodified during inflation. We revisit models where inflationary dynamics modify the axion potential and discuss how isocurvature bounds can be relaxed. We find that models that rely solely on a larger PQ-breaking scale during inflation fI require either late-time dilution of the axion abundance or highly super-Planckian fI that somehow does not dominate the inflationary energy density. Models that have enhanced explicit breaking of the PQ symmetry during inflation may allow fa close to the Planck scale. Avoiding disruption of inflationary dynamics provides important limits on the parameter space.

  4. High-scale axions without isocurvature from inflationary dynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kearney, John; Orlofsky, Nicholas; Pierce, Aaron

    2016-05-31

    Observable primordial tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would point to a high scale of inflation HI. If the scale of Peccei-Quinn (PQ) breaking fa is greater than HI/2π, CMB constraints on isocurvature naively rule out QCD axion dark matter. This assumes the potential of the axion is unmodified during inflation. We revisit models where inflationary dynamics modify the axion potential and discuss how isocurvature bounds can be relaxed. We find that models that rely solely on a larger PQ-breaking scale during inflation fI require either late-time dilution of the axion abundance or highly super-Planckian fI that somehowmore » does not dominate the inflationary energy density. Models that have enhanced explicit breaking of the PQ symmetry during inflation may allow fa close to the Planck scale. Lastly, avoiding disruption of inflationary dynamics provides important limits on the parameter space.« less

  5. Dynamical generation of the weak and dark matter scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambye, Thomas; Strumia, Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    Assuming that naturalness should be modified by ignoring quadratic divergences, we propose a simple extension of the standard model where the weak scale is dynamically generated together with an automatically stable vector. Identifying it as thermal dark matter, the model has one free parameter. It predicts one extra scalar, detectable at colliders, which triggers a first-order dark/electroweak cosmological phase transition with production of gravitational waves. Vacuum stability holds up to the Planck scale.

  6. Improved scaling of temperature-accelerated dynamics using localization.

    PubMed

    Shim, Yunsic; Amar, Jacques G

    2016-07-01

    While temperature-accelerated dynamics (TAD) is a powerful method for carrying out non-equilibrium simulations of systems over extended time scales, the computational cost of serial TAD increases approximately as N(3) where N is the number of atoms. In addition, although a parallel TAD method based on domain decomposition [Y. Shim et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 205439 (2007)] has been shown to provide significantly improved scaling, the dynamics in such an approach is only approximate while the size of activated events is limited by the spatial decomposition size. Accordingly, it is of interest to develop methods to improve the scaling of serial TAD. As a first step in understanding the factors which determine the scaling behavior, we first present results for the overall scaling of serial TAD and its components, which were obtained from simulations of Ag/Ag(100) growth and Ag/Ag(100) annealing, and compare with theoretical predictions. We then discuss two methods based on localization which may be used to address two of the primary "bottlenecks" to the scaling of serial TAD with system size. By implementing both of these methods, we find that for intermediate system-sizes, the scaling is improved by almost a factor of N(1/2). Some additional possible methods to improve the scaling of TAD are also discussed. PMID:27394097

  7. Improved scaling of temperature-accelerated dynamics using localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Yunsic; Amar, Jacques G.

    2016-07-01

    While temperature-accelerated dynamics (TAD) is a powerful method for carrying out non-equilibrium simulations of systems over extended time scales, the computational cost of serial TAD increases approximately as N3 where N is the number of atoms. In addition, although a parallel TAD method based on domain decomposition [Y. Shim et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 205439 (2007)] has been shown to provide significantly improved scaling, the dynamics in such an approach is only approximate while the size of activated events is limited by the spatial decomposition size. Accordingly, it is of interest to develop methods to improve the scaling of serial TAD. As a first step in understanding the factors which determine the scaling behavior, we first present results for the overall scaling of serial TAD and its components, which were obtained from simulations of Ag/Ag(100) growth and Ag/Ag(100) annealing, and compare with theoretical predictions. We then discuss two methods based on localization which may be used to address two of the primary "bottlenecks" to the scaling of serial TAD with system size. By implementing both of these methods, we find that for intermediate system-sizes, the scaling is improved by almost a factor of N1/2. Some additional possible methods to improve the scaling of TAD are also discussed.

  8. Balance models for equatorial planetary-scale dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ian Hiu-Fung

    This thesis aims at advancing our understanding of large-scale dynamics in the tropics, specifically the characterization of slow planetary-scale motions through a balance theory; current balance theories in the tropics are unsatisfactory as they filter out Kelvin waves, which are an important component of variability, along with fast inertia-gravity (IG) waves. Recent studies have shown that estimations of tropical variability (particularly Kelvin waves) differ significantly between different reanalysis datasets, and we hypothesize that this discrepancy is largely driven by the lack of suitable balance relations that maximize information obtained from observations. The first part of the thesis concerns the derivation of a balance model that filters out IG waves, but retains slow Rossby and Kelvin waves. Our theory relies on the anisotropy of planetary-scale motions in the tropics, where the zonal scale is typically much larger than the meridional scale. We show that the dynamics of the balance model reproduces planetary-scale dynamics well, but an important point is that the balance relations can also accurately describe the slow dynamics even in the isotropic regime. Moreover, the method can be generalized to cases with strong nonlinearity, diabatic heating, or to more realistic models of the atmosphere. From a practical perspective, our model is an improvement over existing theories as in addition to accurately capturing Kelvin wave dynamics, it also has the potential to provide better constraints on diabatic heating, which is a significant source of uncertainty in tropical variability at present. In the second part of the thesis we explore how our balance theory can be applied to data assimilation systems. Through `identical twin' experiments, we determined that our theory can be used in an ensemble Kalman filter system to produce more accurate and balanced analyses. This is achieved by using a modified localization function and analysis schemes that partition

  9. Scaled control moment gyroscope dynamics effects on performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leve, Frederick A.

    2015-05-01

    The majority of the literature that discusses the dynamics of control moment gyroscopes (CMG) contains formulations that are not derived from first principles and make simplifying assumptions early in the derivation, possibly neglecting important contributions. For small satellites, additional dynamics that are no longer negligible are shown to cause an increase in torque error and loss of torque amplification. The goal of the analysis presented here is to provide the reader with a complete and general analytical derivation of the equations for dynamics of a spacecraft with n-CMG and to discuss the performance degradation imposed to CMG actuators when scaling them for small satellites. The paper first derives the equations of motion from first principles for a very general case of a spacecraft with n-CMG. Each contribution of the dynamics is described with its effect on the performance of CMG and its significance on scaled CMG performance is addressed. It is shown analytically and verified numerically, that CMG do not scale properly with performance and care must be taken in their design to trade performance, size, mass, and power when reducing their scale.

  10. Seismic texture and amplitude analysis of large scale fluid escape pipes using time lapses seismic surveys: examples from the Loyal Field (Scotland, UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrelli, Daniele; Jihad, Ali; Iacopini, David; Bond, Clare

    2016-04-01

    Fluid escape pipes are key features of primary interest for the analysis of vertical fluid flow and secondary hydrocarbon migration in sedimentary basin. Identified worldwide (Løset et al., 2009), they acquired more and more importance as they represent critical pathways for supply of methane and potential structure for leakage into the storage reservoir (Cartwright & Santamarina, 2015). Therefore, understanding their genesis, internal characteristics and seismic expression, is of great significance for the exploration industry. Here we propose a detailed characterization of the internal seismic texture of some seal bypass system (e.g fluid escape pipes) from a 4D seismic survey (released by the BP) recently acquired in the Loyal Field. The seal by pass structure are characterized by big-scale fluid escape pipes affecting the Upper Paleogene/Neogene stratigraphic succession in the Loyal Field, Scotland (UK). The Loyal field, is located on the edge of the Faroe-Shetland Channel slope, about 130 km west of Shetland (Quadrants 204/205 of the UKCS) and has been recently re-appraised and re developed by a consortium led by BP. The 3D detailed mapping analysis of the full and partial stack survey (processed using amplitude preservation workflows) shows a complex system of fluid pipe structure rooted in the pre Lista formation and developed across the paleogene and Neogene Units. Geometrical analysis show that pipes got diameter varying between 100-300 m and a length of 500 m to 2 km. Most pipes seem to terminate abruptly at discrete subsurface horizons or in diffuse termination suggesting multiple overpressured events and lateral fluid migration (through Darcy flows) across the overburden units. The internal texture analysis of the large pipes, (across both the root and main conduit zones), using near, medium and far offset stack dataset (processed through an amplitude preserved PSTM workflow) shows a tendency of up-bending of reflection (rather than pulls up artefacts

  11. Emergence of scaling in human-interest dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhang, Zike; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Human behaviors are often driven by human interests. Despite intense recent efforts in exploring the dynamics of human behaviors, little is known about human-interest dynamics, partly due to the extreme difficulty in accessing the human mind from observations. However, the availability of large-scale data, such as those from e-commerce and smart-phone communications, makes it possible to probe into and quantify the dynamics of human interest. Using three prototypical "Big Data" sets, we investigate the scaling behaviors associated with human-interest dynamics. In particular, from the data sets we uncover fat-tailed (possibly power-law) distributions associated with the three basic quantities: (1) the length of continuous interest, (2) the return time of visiting certain interest, and (3) interest ranking and transition. We argue that there are three basic ingredients underlying human-interest dynamics: preferential return to previously visited interests, inertial effect, and exploration of new interests. We develop a biased random-walk model, incorporating the three ingredients, to account for the observed fat-tailed distributions. Our study represents the first attempt to understand the dynamical processes underlying human interest, which has significant applications in science and engineering, commerce, as well as defense, in terms of specific tasks such as recommendation and human-behavior prediction. PMID:24326949

  12. Emergence of scaling in human-interest dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhang, Zike; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Human behaviors are often driven by human interests. Despite intense recent efforts in exploring the dynamics of human behaviors, little is known about human-interest dynamics, partly due to the extreme difficulty in accessing the human mind from observations. However, the availability of large-scale data, such as those from e-commerce and smart-phone communications, makes it possible to probe into and quantify the dynamics of human interest. Using three prototypical ``Big Data'' sets, we investigate the scaling behaviors associated with human-interest dynamics. In particular, from the data sets we uncover fat-tailed (possibly power-law) distributions associated with the three basic quantities: (1) the length of continuous interest, (2) the return time of visiting certain interest, and (3) interest ranking and transition. We argue that there are three basic ingredients underlying human-interest dynamics: preferential return to previously visited interests, inertial effect, and exploration of new interests. We develop a biased random-walk model, incorporating the three ingredients, to account for the observed fat-tailed distributions. Our study represents the first attempt to understand the dynamical processes underlying human interest, which has significant applications in science and engineering, commerce, as well as defense, in terms of specific tasks such as recommendation and human-behavior prediction.

  13. Emergence of scaling in human-interest dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhang, Zike; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Human behaviors are often driven by human interests. Despite intense recent efforts in exploring the dynamics of human behaviors, little is known about human-interest dynamics, partly due to the extreme difficulty in accessing the human mind from observations. However, the availability of large-scale data, such as those from e-commerce and smart-phone communications, makes it possible to probe into and quantify the dynamics of human interest. Using three prototypical “Big Data” sets, we investigate the scaling behaviors associated with human-interest dynamics. In particular, from the data sets we uncover fat-tailed (possibly power-law) distributions associated with the three basic quantities: (1) the length of continuous interest, (2) the return time of visiting certain interest, and (3) interest ranking and transition. We argue that there are three basic ingredients underlying human-interest dynamics: preferential return to previously visited interests, inertial effect, and exploration of new interests. We develop a biased random-walk model, incorporating the three ingredients, to account for the observed fat-tailed distributions. Our study represents the first attempt to understand the dynamical processes underlying human interest, which has significant applications in science and engineering, commerce, as well as defense, in terms of specific tasks such as recommendation and human-behavior prediction. PMID:24326949

  14. Global and Multi-scale Dynamics of the Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. S.; Sitnov, M. I.

    2001-05-01

    Earth's magnetosphere during substorms demonstrates a number of characteristic features such as low effective dimension, hysteresis and power-law spectra of fluctuations on different scales. The dynamics, on the largest scale, associated with substorms, are in reasonable agreement with low-dimensional magnetospheric models and in particular those of inverse bifurcations. However, deviations from the low-dimensional picture are not negligible, making the nonequilibrium phase transition more appropriate as a dynamical analogue of the substorm activity. On the other hand, the multi- scale magnetospheric dynamics cannot be restricted to the self-organized criticality (SOC), which is based on a class of mathematical analogues of sandpiles. Like real sandpiles the magnetosphere demonstrates during substorms the features, which are distinct from SOC and more reminiscent again to conventional phase transitions. While the multi-scale substorm activity resembles second-order phase transitions, the largest substorm avalanches are shown to reveal the features of first-order nonequilibrium transitions including hysteresis phenomenon and global structure of the type of the "temperature-pressure-density" diagram. Moreover, this diagram allows one to compute a critical exponent, consistent with the second-order phase transitions, and reflects the multiscale aspect of the substorm activity, different from power-law frequency and scale spectra of autonomous systems. In contrast to SOC exponents, the exponent relates input and output parameters of the magnetosphere. Using an analogy with the dynamical Ising model in the mean-field approximation we show the connection between this data-derived exponent of nonequilibrium transitions in the magnetosphere and the standard critical exponent β of equilibrium second-order phase transitions. We discuss also further developments of the phase tarnsition approach to modeling magnetospheric activity using the multifractal, mutual information

  15. Thermodynamic scaling of dynamic properties of liquid crystals: Verifying the scaling parameters using a molecular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Katsuhiko

    2013-08-01

    The thermodynamic scaling of molecular dynamic properties of rotation and thermodynamic parameters in a nematic phase was investigated by a molecular dynamic simulation using the Gay-Berne potential. A master curve for the relaxation time of flip-flop motion was obtained using thermodynamic scaling, and the dynamic property could be solely expressed as a function of TV^{γ _τ }, where T and V are the temperature and volume, respectively. The scaling parameter γτ was in excellent agreement with the thermodynamic parameter Γ, which is the logarithm of the slope of a line plotted for the temperature and volume at constant P2. This line was fairly linear, and as good as the line for p-azoxyanisole or using the highly ordered small cluster model. The equivalence relation between Γ and γτ was compared with results obtained from the highly ordered small cluster model. The possibility of adapting the molecular model for the thermodynamic scaling of other dynamic rotational properties was also explored. The rotational diffusion constant and rotational viscosity coefficients, which were calculated using established theoretical and experimental expressions, were rescaled onto master curves with the same scaling parameters. The simulation illustrates the universal nature of the equivalence relation for liquid crystals.

  16. Thermodynamic scaling of dynamic properties of liquid crystals: verifying the scaling parameters using a molecular model.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Katsuhiko

    2013-08-28

    The thermodynamic scaling of molecular dynamic properties of rotation and thermodynamic parameters in a nematic phase was investigated by a molecular dynamic simulation using the Gay-Berne potential. A master curve for the relaxation time of flip-flop motion was obtained using thermodynamic scaling, and the dynamic property could be solely expressed as a function of TV(γτ) , where T and V are the temperature and volume, respectively. The scaling parameter γτ was in excellent agreement with the thermodynamic parameter Γ, which is the logarithm of the slope of a line plotted for the temperature and volume at constant P2. This line was fairly linear, and as good as the line for p-azoxyanisole or using the highly ordered small cluster model. The equivalence relation between Γ and γ(τ) was compared with results obtained from the highly ordered small cluster model. The possibility of adapting the molecular model for the thermodynamic scaling of other dynamic rotational properties was also explored. The rotational diffusion constant and rotational viscosity coefficients, which were calculated using established theoretical and experimental expressions, were rescaled onto master curves with the same scaling parameters. The simulation illustrates the universal nature of the equivalence relation for liquid crystals. PMID:24007031

  17. Observing scale-invariance in non-critical dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gros, C.; Marković, D.

    2013-01-01

    Recent observation for scale invariant neural avalanches in the brain have been discussed in details in the scientific literature. We point out, that these results do not necessarily imply that the properties of the underlying neural dynamics are also scale invariant. The reason for this discrepancy lies in the fact that the sampling statistics of observations and experiments is generically biased by the size of the basins of attraction of the processes to be studied. One has hence to precisely define what one means with statements like 'the brain is critical' . We recapitulate the notion of criticality, as originally introduced in statistical physics for second order phase transitions, turning then to the discussion of critical dynamical systems. We elucidate in detail the difference between a 'critical system', viz a system on the verge of a phase transition, and a 'critical state', viz state with scaleinvariant correlations, stressing the fact that the notion of universality is linked to critical states. We then discuss rigorous results for two classes of critical dynamical systems, the Kauffman net and a vertex routing model, which both have non-critical states. However, an external observer that samples randomly the phase space of these two critical models, would find scale invariance. We denote this phenomenon as 'observational criticality' and discuss its relevance for the response properties of critical dynamical systems.

  18. The Acceleration Scale, Modified Newtonian Dynamics and Sterile Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaferio, Antonaldo; Angus, Garry W.

    General relativity is able to describe the dynamics of galaxies and larger cosmic structures only if most of the matter in the universe is dark, namely, it does not emit any electromagnetic radiation. Intriguingly, on the scale of galaxies, there is strong observational evidence that the presence of dark matter appears to be necessary only when the gravitational field inferred from the distribution of the luminous matter falls below an acceleration of the order of 10^{-10} m s^{-2}. In the standard model, which combines Newtonian gravity with dark matter, the origin of this acceleration scale is challenging and remains unsolved. On the contrary, the full set of observations can be neatly described, and were partly predicted, by a modification of Newtonian dynamics, dubbed MOND, that does not resort to the existence of dark matter. On the scale of galaxy clusters and beyond, however, MOND is not as successful as on the scale of galaxies, and the existence of some dark matter appears unavoidable. A model combining MOND with hot dark matter made of sterile neutrinos seems to be able to describe most of the astrophysical phenomenology, from the power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies to the dynamics of dwarf galaxies. Whether there exists a yet unknown covariant theory that contains general relativity and Newtonian gravity in the weak field limit and MOND as the ultra-weak field limit is still an open question.

  19. Micron-scale coherence in interphase chromatin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zidovska, Alexandra; Weitz, David A.; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin structure and dynamics control all aspects of DNA biology yet are poorly understood, especially at large length scales. We developed an approach, displacement correlation spectroscopy based on time-resolved image correlation analysis, to map chromatin dynamics simultaneously across the whole nucleus in cultured human cells. This method revealed that chromatin movement was coherent across large regions (4–5 µm) for several seconds. Regions of coherent motion extended beyond the boundaries of single-chromosome territories, suggesting elastic coupling of motion over length scales much larger than those of genes. These large-scale, coupled motions were ATP dependent and unidirectional for several seconds, perhaps accounting for ATP-dependent directed movement of single genes. Perturbation of major nuclear ATPases such as DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase II, and topoisomerase II eliminated micron-scale coherence, while causing rapid, local movement to increase; i.e., local motions accelerated but became uncoupled from their neighbors. We observe similar trends in chromatin dynamics upon inducing a direct DNA damage; thus we hypothesize that this may be due to DNA damage responses that physically relax chromatin and block long-distance communication of forces. PMID:24019504

  20. Multi-Scale Dynamics of Twinning in SMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faran, Eilon; Shilo, Doron

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical response of shape memory alloys (SMA) is determined by the dynamics of discrete twin boundaries, and is quantified through constitutive material laws called kinetic relations. Extracting reliable kinetic relations, as well as revealing the physical characteristics of the energy barriers that dictate these relations, are essential for understanding and modeling the overall twinning phenomena. Here, we present a comprehensive, multi-scale study of discrete twin boundary dynamics in a ferromagnetic SMA, NiMnGa. The combination of dynamic-pulsed magnetic field experiments, in conjunction with low-rate uniaxial compression tests, leads to the identification of the dominant energy barriers for twinning. In particular, we show how different mechanisms of motion for overcoming the atomic-scale lattice potential give rise to several kinetic relations that are valid at different ranges of the driving force. In addition, a unique statistical analysis of the low-rate loading curve allows distinguishing between events at different length scales. This analysis leads to the identification of a characteristic length scale (~15 μm) for the distance between barriers that are responsible for the twinning stress property. This characteristic distance is in agreement with the typical thickness of the internal micro-twin structure, which was recently found in these materials.

  1. Solar chromospheric fine scale structures: dynamics and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, K.

    2012-01-01

    The solar chromosphere is a very inhomogeneous and dynamic layer of the solar atmosphere that exhibits several phenomena on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. High-resolution and long-duration observations, employing mostly lines, such as Halpha, the Ca II infrared lines and the Ca II H and K lines, obtained both from ground-based telescope facilities (e.g. DST, VTT, THEMIS, SST, DOT), as well as state-of-the-art satellites (e.g. SOHO, TRACE, HINODE) reveal an incredibly rich, dynamic and highly structured chromospheric environment. What is known in literature as the chromospheric fine-scale structure mainly consists of small fibrilar-like features that connect various parts of quiet/active regions or span across the chromospheric network cell interiors, showing a large diversity of both physical and dynamic characteristics. The highly dynamic, fine-scale chromospheric structures are mostly governed by flows which reflect the complex geometry and dynamics of the local magnetic field and play an important role in the propagation and dissipation of waves. A comprehensive study of these structures requires deep understanding of the physical processes involved and investigation of their intricate link with structures/processes at lower photospheric levels. Furthermore, due to their large number present on the solar surface, it is essential to investigate their impact on the mass and energy transport to higher atmospheric layers through processes such as magnetic reconnection and propagation of waves. The in-depth study of all aforementioned characteristics and processes, with the further addition of non-LTE physics, as well as the use of three-dimensional numerical simulations poses a fascinating challenge for both theory and numerical modeling of chromospheric fine-scale structures.

  2. Dynamics of deep submarine silicic explosive eruptions in the Kermadec arc, as reflected in pumice vesicularity textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotella, Melissa D.; Wilson, Colin J. N.; Barker, Simon J.; Ian Schipper, C.; Wright, Ian C.; Wysoczanski, Richard J.

    2015-08-01

    Despite increasing recognition of silicic pumice-bearing deposits in the deep marine environment, the processes involved in explosive silicic submarine eruptions remain in question. Here we present data on bubble sizes and number densities (number of bubbles per unit of melt matrix) for deep submarine-erupted pumices from three volcanoes (Healy, Raoul SW and Havre) along the Kermadec arc (SW Pacific) to investigate the effects of a significant (>~1 km) overlying water column and the associated increased hydrostatic pressure on magma vesiculation and fragmentation. We compare these textural data with those from chemically similar, subaerially-erupted pyroclasts from nearby Raoul volcano as well as submarine-erupted 'Tangaroan' fragments derived by non-explosive, buoyant detachment of foaming magma from Macauley volcano, also along the Kermadec arc. Deep submarine-erupted pumices are macroscopically similar (colour, density, texture) to subaerial or shallow submarine-erupted pumices, but show contrasting microscopic bubble textures. Deep submarine-erupted pyroclasts have fewer small (< 10 μm diameter) bubbles and narrower bubble size distributions (BSDs) when compared to subaerially erupted pyroclasts from Raoul (35-55 μm vs. 20-70 μm range in volume based median bubble size, respectively). Bubble number density (BND) values are consistently lower than subaerial-erupted pyroclasts and do not display the same trends of decreasing BND with increasing vesicularity. We interpret these textural differences to result from deep submarine eruptions entering the water column at higher pressures than subaerial eruptions entering the atmosphere (~ 10 MPa vs. 0.1 MPa for a vent at 1000 mbsl). The presence of an overlying water column acts to suppress rapid acceleration of magma, as occurs in the upper conduit of subaerial eruptions, therefore suppressing coalescence, permeability development and gas loss, amounting to closed-system degassing conditions. The higher confining

  3. Improving predictions of large scale soil carbon dynamics: Integration of fine-scale hydrological and biogeochemical processes, scaling, and benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, W. J.; Dwivedi, D.; Ghimire, B.; Hoffman, F. M.; Pau, G. S. H.; Randerson, J. T.; Shen, C.; Tang, J.; Zhu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical model representations of decadal- to centennial-scale soil-carbon dynamics are a dominant cause of uncertainty in climate change predictions. Recent attempts by some Earth System Model (ESM) teams to integrate previously unrepresented soil processes (e.g., explicit microbial processes, abiotic interactions with mineral surfaces, vertical transport), poor performance of many ESM land models against large-scale and experimental manipulation observations, and complexities associated with spatial heterogeneity highlight the nascent nature of our community's ability to accurately predict future soil carbon dynamics. I will present recent work from our group to develop a modeling framework to integrate pore-, column-, watershed-, and global-scale soil process representations into an ESM (ACME), and apply the International Land Model Benchmarking (ILAMB) package for evaluation. At the column scale and across a wide range of sites, observed depth-resolved carbon stocks and their 14C derived turnover times can be explained by a model with explicit representation of two microbial populations, a simple representation of mineralogy, and vertical transport. Integrating soil and plant dynamics requires a 'process-scaling' approach, since all aspects of the multi-nutrient system cannot be explicitly resolved at ESM scales. I will show that one approach, the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation, improves predictions of forest nitrogen and phosphorus experimental manipulations and leads to very different global soil carbon predictions. Translating model representations from the site- to ESM-scale requires a spatial scaling approach that either explicitly resolves the relevant processes, or more practically, accounts for fine-resolution dynamics at coarser scales. To that end, I will present recent watershed-scale modeling work that applies reduced order model methods to accurately scale fine-resolution soil carbon dynamics to coarse-resolution simulations. Finally, we

  4. A Lagrangian dynamic subgrid-scale model turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneveau, C.; Lund, T. S.; Cabot, W.

    1994-01-01

    A new formulation of the dynamic subgrid-scale model is tested in which the error associated with the Germano identity is minimized over flow pathlines rather than over directions of statistical homogeneity. This procedure allows the application of the dynamic model with averaging to flows in complex geometries that do not possess homogeneous directions. The characteristic Lagrangian time scale over which the averaging is performed is chosen such that the model is purely dissipative, guaranteeing numerical stability when coupled with the Smagorinsky model. The formulation is tested successfully in forced and decaying isotropic turbulence and in fully developed and transitional channel flow. In homogeneous flows, the results are similar to those of the volume-averaged dynamic model, while in channel flow, the predictions are superior to those of the plane-averaged dynamic model. The relationship between the averaged terms in the model and vortical structures (worms) that appear in the LES is investigated. Computational overhead is kept small (about 10 percent above the CPU requirements of the volume or plane-averaged dynamic model) by using an approximate scheme to advance the Lagrangian tracking through first-order Euler time integration and linear interpolation in space.

  5. Anisotropic texture of ice sheet surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Benjamin E.; Raymond, Charles F.; Scambos, Theodore

    2006-03-01

    In this paper we analyze the magnitude and spatial organization of small-scale surface features (the surface texture) of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. The texture is revealed in shaded relief maps of digital elevation models because surface slopes emphasize short-wavelength topography. We show that the surface slope components parallel to and perpendicular to the ice flow direction of ice sheets are both qualitatively and quantitatively different from one another. The parallel component variations are larger in magnitude than the perpendicular component variations, and features in maps of the parallel component are elongated perpendicular to the ice flow direction, while features in maps of the perpendicular component are elongated at a diagonal to the ice flow direction. These properties may be explained by a simple model of glacier dynamics in which a linearly viscous slab of ice flows over a random, isotropic, red noise bed. In this model an anisotropic surface results from an isotropic bed because the surface anisotropy derives from the anisotropic transfer of bed topography to the surface by viscous flow dynamics. The modeling results suggest that analysis of surface texture magnitude and anisotropy can be used to identify areas of sliding ice from surface topography data alone and can be used to roughly estimate sliding rates where bed topography is known.

  6. Bed form dynamics in distorted lightweight scale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aberle, Jochen; Henning, Martin; Ettmer, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The adequate prediction of flow and sediment transport over bed forms presents a major obstacle for the solution of sedimentation problems in alluvial channels because bed forms affect hydraulic resistance, sediment transport, and channel morphodynamics. Moreover, bed forms can affect hydraulic habitat for biota, may introduce severe restrictions to navigation, and present a major problem for engineering structures such as water intakes and groynes. The main body of knowledge on the geometry and dynamics of bed forms such as dunes originates from laboratory and field investigations focusing on bed forms in sand bed rivers. Such investigations enable insight into the physics of the transport processes, but do not allow for the long term simulation of morphodynamic development as required to assess, for example, the effects of climate change on river morphology. On the other hand, this can be achieved through studies with distorted lightweight scale models allowing for the modification of the time scale. However, our understanding of how well bed form geometry and dynamics, and hence sediment transport mechanics, are reproduced in such models is limited. Within this contribution we explore this issue using data from investigations carried out at the Federal Waterways and Research Institute in Karlsruhe, Germany in a distorted lightweight scale model of the river Oder. The model had a vertical scale of 1:40 and a horizontal scale of 1:100, the bed material consisted of polystyrene particles, and the resulting dune geometry and dynamics were measured with a high spatial and temporal resolution using photogrammetric methods. Parameters describing both the directly measured and up-scaled dune geometry were determined using the random field approach. These parameters (e.g., standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis) will be compared to prototype observations as well as to results from the literature. Similarly, parameters describing the lightweight bed form dynamics, which

  7. Multi-Scale Dynamics, Control, and Simulation of Granular Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Basinger, Scott; Swartzlander, Grover

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present some ideas regarding the modeling, dynamics and control aspects of granular spacecraft. Granular spacecraft are complex multibody systems composed of a spatially disordered distribution of a large number of elements, for instance a cloud of grains in orbit. An example of application is a spaceborne observatory for exoplanet imaging, where the primary aperture is a cloud instead of a monolithic aperture. A model is proposed of a multi-scale dynamics of the grains and cloud in orbit, as well as a control approach for cloud shape maintenance and alignment, and preliminary simulation studies are carried out for the representative imaging system.

  8. Scale-Invariant Correlations in Dynamic Bacterial Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao; Dong, Xu; Be'er, Avraham; Swinney, Harry L.; Zhang, H. P.

    2012-04-01

    In Bacillus subtilis colonies, motile bacteria move collectively, spontaneously forming dynamic clusters. These bacterial clusters share similarities with other systems exhibiting polarized collective motion, such as bird flocks or fish schools. Here we study experimentally how velocity and orientation fluctuations within clusters are spatially correlated. For a range of cell density and cluster size, the correlation length is shown to be 30% of the spatial size of clusters, and the correlation functions collapse onto a master curve after rescaling the separation with correlation length. Our results demonstrate that correlations of velocity and orientation fluctuations are scale invariant in dynamic bacterial clusters.

  9. Dynamic response of scale models subjected to impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillsdon, Graham K.

    1997-05-01

    Presented with the problem of possible failure of large structures due to dynamic loading, and the cost of staging full scale tests. The Oxford University's Department of Engineering Science, supported by British Gas and Rolls Royce, has been scale modeling these events experimentally. The paper looks at two areas of research: (1) The structural integrity of a particular type of Liquified Natural Gas Storage Tank, and its vulnerability to blast loading. (2) The ability of Large Aero Engine Fan blades to withstand impacts associated with birds, stones, ice etc.

  10. Survey of decentralized control methods. [for large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is presented of the types of problems that are being considered by control theorists in the area of dynamic large scale systems with emphasis on decentralized control strategies. Approaches that deal directly with decentralized decision making for large scale systems are discussed. It is shown that future advances in decentralized system theory are intimately connected with advances in the stochastic control problem with nonclassical information pattern. The basic assumptions and mathematical tools associated with the latter are summarized, and recommendations concerning future research are presented.

  11. Dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Keke Luo, Yiping

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, the dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales are studied. We study the symmetries and quantities based on the calculation of variation and Lie transformation group. Particular focus lies in: the Noether symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity and the Lie symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity if the infinitesimal transformations satisfy the structure equation. As the new application of result, at end of the article, we give a simple example of Noether symmetry and Lie symmetry on time scales.

  12. Dynamical decoupling leads to improved scaling in noisy quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekatski, Pavel; Skotiniotis, Michalis; Dür, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    We consider the usage of dynamical decoupling in quantum metrology, where the joint evolution of system plus environment is described by a Hamiltonian. We show that by ultra-fast unitary control operations acting locally only on system qubits, noise can be eliminated while the desired evolution is only reduced by at most a constant factor, leading to Heisenberg scaling. We identify all kinds of noise where such an approach is applicable. Only noise that is generated by the Hamiltonian to be estimated itself cannot be altered. However, even for such parallel noise, one can achieve an improved scaling as compared to the standard quantum limit for any local noise by means of symmetrization. Our results are also applicable in other schemes based on dynamical decoupling, e.g. the generation of high-fidelity entangling gates.

  13. Toward Simplification of Dynamic Subgrid-Scale Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. David

    1997-01-01

    We examine the relationship between the filter and the subgrid-scale (SGS) model for large-eddy simulations, in general, and for those with dynamic SGS models, in particular. From a review of the literature, it would appear that many practitioners of LES consider the link between the filter and the model more or less as a formality of little practical effect. In contrast, we will show that the filter and the model are intimately linked, that the Smagorinsky SGS model is appropriate only for filters of first- or second-order, and that the Smagorinsky model is inconsistent with spectral filters. Moreover, the Germano identity is shown to be both problematic and unnecessary for the development of dynamic SGS models. Its use obscures the following fundamental realization: For a suitably chosen filter, the computible resolved turbulent stresses, property scaled, closely approximate the SGS stresses.

  14. Scaling law for dynamical hysteresis of cavity solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadipanah, Sahar; Kheradmand, Reza; Prati, Franco

    2016-02-01

    By applying to a cavity soliton a control beam modulated in time, we study numerically the performance of the soliton as a flip-flop memory. The soliton is switched on and off periodically through a hysteresis cycle whose size increases dynamically with the modulation frequency. We show that the phenomenon is ruled by a scaling law with an exponent compatible with the theoretical value 2/3 predicted in much simpler systems in the low-frequency limit.

  15. Unveiling Bacterial Interactions through Multidimensional Scaling and Dynamics Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Dorado-Morales, Pedro; Vilanova, Cristina; P. Garay, Carlos; Martí, Jose Manuel; Porcar, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new strategy to identify and visualize bacterial consortia by conducting replicated culturing of environmental samples coupled with high-throughput sequencing and multidimensional scaling analysis, followed by identification of bacteria-bacteria correlations and interactions. We conducted a proof of concept assay with pine-tree resin-based media in ten replicates, which allowed detecting and visualizing dynamical bacterial associations in the form of statistically significant and yet biologically relevant bacterial consortia. PMID:26671778

  16. Dynamically Scaled Glottal Flow Through Symmetrically Oscillating Vocal Fold Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halvorson, Lori; Baitinger, Andrew; Sherman, Erica; Krane, Michael; Zhang, Lucy; Wei, Timothy

    2011-11-01

    Experimental results derived from DPIV measurements in a scaled up dynamic human vocal fold model are presented. The 10x scale vocal fold model is a new design that incorporates key features of vocal fold oscillatory motion. This includes coupling of down/upstream rocking as well as the oscillatory open/close motions. Experiments were dynamically scaled to examine a range of frequencies, 100 - 200 Hz, corresponding to the male and female voice. By using water as the working fluid, very high resolution, both spatial and temporal resolution, was achieved. Time resolved movies of flow through symmetrically oscillating vocal folds will be presented. Both individual realizations as well as phase-averaged data will be shown. Key features, such as randomness and development time of the Coanda effect, vortex shedding, and volume flow rate data will be shown. In this talk, effects associated with paralysis of one vocal fold will be discussed. This talk provides the baseline fluid dynamics for the vocal fold paralysis study presented in Sherman, et al. Supported by the NIH.

  17. Dynamic Leidenfrost Effect: Relevant Time and Length Scales.

    PubMed

    Shirota, Minori; van Limbeek, Michiel A J; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-02-12

    When a liquid droplet impacts a hot solid surface, enough vapor may be generated under it to prevent its contact with the solid. The minimum solid temperature for this so-called Leidenfrost effect to occur is termed the Leidenfrost temperature, or the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature when the droplet velocity is non-negligible. We observe the wetting or drying and the levitation dynamics of the droplet impacting on an (isothermal) smooth sapphire surface using high-speed total internal reflection imaging, which enables us to observe the droplet base up to about 100 nm above the substrate surface. By this method we are able to reveal the processes responsible for the transitional regime between the fully wetting and the fully levitated droplet as the solid temperature increases, thus shedding light on the characteristic time and length scales setting the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature for droplet impact on an isothermal substrate. PMID:26918994

  18. Dynamic Leidenfrost Effect: Relevant Time and Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Minori; van Limbeek, Michiel A. J.; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-02-01

    When a liquid droplet impacts a hot solid surface, enough vapor may be generated under it to prevent its contact with the solid. The minimum solid temperature for this so-called Leidenfrost effect to occur is termed the Leidenfrost temperature, or the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature when the droplet velocity is non-negligible. We observe the wetting or drying and the levitation dynamics of the droplet impacting on an (isothermal) smooth sapphire surface using high-speed total internal reflection imaging, which enables us to observe the droplet base up to about 100 nm above the substrate surface. By this method we are able to reveal the processes responsible for the transitional regime between the fully wetting and the fully levitated droplet as the solid temperature increases, thus shedding light on the characteristic time and length scales setting the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature for droplet impact on an isothermal substrate.

  19. Automated Macular Pathology Diagnosis in Retinal OCT Images Using Multi-Scale Spatial Pyramid and Local Binary Patterns in Texture and Shape Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Ying; Chen, Mei; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S.; Rehg, James M.

    2011-01-01

    We address a novel problem domain in the analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images: the diagnosis of multiple macular pathologies in retinal OCT images. The goal is to identify the presence of normal macula and each of three types of macular pathologies, namely, macular edema, macular hole, and age-related macular degeneration, in the OCT slice centered at the fovea. We use a machine learning approach based on global image descriptors formed from a multi-scale spatial pyramid. Our local features are dimension-reduced Local Binary Pattern histograms, which are capable of encoding texture and shape information in retinal OCT images and their edge maps, respectively. Our representation operates at multiple spatial scales and granularities, leading to robust performance. We use 2-class Support Vector Machine classifiers to identify the presence of normal macula and each of the three pathologies. To further discriminate sub-types within a pathology, we also build a classifier to differentiate full-thickness holes from pseudo-holes within the macular hole category. We conduct extensive experiments on a large dataset of 326 OCT scans from 136 subjects. The results show that the proposed method is very effective (all AUC > 0.93). PMID:21737338

  20. Automated macular pathology diagnosis in retinal OCT images using multi-scale spatial pyramid and local binary patterns in texture and shape encoding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ying; Chen, Mei; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S; Rehg, James M

    2011-10-01

    We address a novel problem domain in the analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images: the diagnosis of multiple macular pathologies in retinal OCT images. The goal is to identify the presence of normal macula and each of three types of macular pathologies, namely, macular edema, macular hole, and age-related macular degeneration, in the OCT slice centered at the fovea. We use a machine learning approach based on global image descriptors formed from a multi-scale spatial pyramid. Our local features are dimension-reduced local binary pattern histograms, which are capable of encoding texture and shape information in retinal OCT images and their edge maps, respectively. Our representation operates at multiple spatial scales and granularities, leading to robust performance. We use 2-class support vector machine classifiers to identify the presence of normal macula and each of the three pathologies. To further discriminate sub-types within a pathology, we also build a classifier to differentiate full-thickness holes from pseudo-holes within the macular hole category. We conduct extensive experiments on a large dataset of 326 OCT scans from 136 subjects. The results show that the proposed method is very effective (all AUC>0.93). PMID:21737338

  1. Dislocation dynamics simulations of plasticity at small scales

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Caizhi

    2010-01-01

    As metallic structures and devices are being created on a dimension comparable to the length scales of the underlying dislocation microstructures, the mechanical properties of them change drastically. Since such small structures are increasingly common in modern technologies, there is an emergent need to understand the critical roles of elasticity, plasticity, and fracture in small structures. Dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations, in which the dislocations are the simulated entities, offer a way to extend length scales beyond those of atomistic simulations and the results from DD simulations can be directly compared with the micromechanical tests. The primary objective of this research is to use 3-D DD simulations to study the plastic deformation of nano- and micro-scale materials and understand the correlation between dislocation motion, interactions and the mechanical response. Specifically, to identify what critical events (i.e., dislocation multiplication, cross-slip, storage, nucleation, junction and dipole formation, pinning etc.) determine the deformation response and how these change from bulk behavior as the system decreases in size and correlate and improve our current knowledge of bulk plasticity with the knowledge gained from the direct observations of small-scale plasticity. Our simulation results on single crystal micropillars and polycrystalline thin films can march the experiment results well and capture the essential features in small-scale plasticity. Furthermore, several simple and accurate models have been developed following our simulation results and can reasonably predict the plastic behavior of small scale materials.

  2. Validation of Bubble Dynamics Equation for a Nano-scale Bubble via Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, S.; Hyodo, H.; Watanabe, S.

    2015-12-01

    For a validation of the application of conventional bubble dynamics to a nano-scale bubble behaviour, we simulated a nano-scale bubble collapsing or vibration by Molecular Dynamics (MD) method and compared the result with the solution of Rayleigh-Plesset (RP) equation and that of Confined RP (CRP) equation, whose boundary condition was corrected to be consistent with that of MD simulation. As a result, a good coincidence was obtained between MD, RP, and CRP in the case of one-component fluid. In addition, also a good correspondence was obtained particularly in the comparison between MD and CRP in the case of two-component fluid containing non-condensable gas. The present results indicate that conventional bubble dynamics equation can be applied even to a nano-scale tiny bubble.

  3. Polar Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03638 Polar Textures

    This image illustrates the variety of textures that appear in the south polar region during late summer.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.5S, Longitude 57.9E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Polar Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03646 Polar Textures

    This VIS image shows part of the south polar region. The ejecta from the relatively young crater covers the rougher textured polar surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 81S, Longitude 54.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Some distinguishing characteristics of contour and texture phenomena in images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of generalized contour/texture discrimination techniques is a central element necessary for machine vision recognition and interpretation of arbitrary images. Here, the visual perception of texture, selected studies of texture analysis in machine vision, and diverse small samples of contour and texture are all used to provide insights into the fundamental characteristics of contour and texture. From these, an experimental discrimination scheme is developed and tested on a battery of natural images. The visual perception of texture defined fine texture as a subclass which is interpreted as shading and is distinct from coarse figural similarity textures. Also, perception defined the smallest scale for contour/texture discrimination as eight to nine visual acuity units. Three contour/texture discrimination parameters were found to be moderately successful for this scale discrimination: (1) lightness change in a blurred version of the image, (2) change in lightness change in the original image, and (3) percent change in edge counts relative to local maximum.

  6. Probabilistic multi-scale modeling of pathogen dynamics in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packman, A. I.; Drummond, J. D.; Aubeneau, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Most parameterizations of microbial dynamics and pathogen transport in surface waters rely on classic assumptions of advection-diffusion behavior in the water column and limited interactions between the water column and sediments. However, recent studies have shown that strong surface-subsurface interactions produce a wide range of transport timescales in rivers, and greatly the opportunity for long-term retention of pathogens in sediment beds and benthic biofilms. We present a stochastic model for pathogen dynamics, based on continuous-time random walk theory, that properly accounts for such diverse transport timescales, along with the remobilization and inactivation of pathogens in storage reservoirs. By representing pathogen dynamics probabilistically, the model framework enables diverse local-scale processes to be incorporated in system-scale models. We illustrate the application of the model to microbial dynamics in rivers based on the results of a tracer injection experiment. In-stream transport and surface-subsurface interactions are parameterized based on observations of conservative tracer transport, while E. coli retention and inactivation in sediments is parameterized based on direct local-scale experiments. The results indicate that sediments are an important reservoir of enteric organisms in rivers, and slow remobilization from sediments represents a long-term source of bacteria to streams. Current capability, potential advances, and limitations of this model framework for assessing pathogen transmission risks will be discussed. Because the transport model is probabilistic, it is amenable to incorporation into risk models, but a lack of characterization of key microbial processes in sediments and benthic biofilms hinders current application.

  7. An integrated spectral-textural approach for environmental change monitoring and assessment: analyzing the dynamics of green covers in a highly developing region.

    PubMed

    Sakieh, Yousef; Gholipour, Mostafa; Salmanmahiny, Abdolrassoul

    2016-04-01

    The present study compares the effectiveness of two common preclassification change detection (CD) methods that use two-dimensional data space of spectral-textural (S-T) change information. The methods are principal component analysis (PCA) and change vector analysis (CVA) in the Gorgan Township area, Golestn Province, Iran. A series of texture-based information was calculated mainly to separate those land use/land cover (LULC) conversions that are spectrally indistinguishable and also to provide a basis for automatic classification of S-T data space. Both methods were evaluated in terms of accuracy and the required time and expertise. Having the two-dimensional S-T data space generated, support vector machine (SVM) classifier was implemented to automatically extract changed pixels and the receiving operator characteristic (ROC) was employed to assess the accuracy of the output. According to the results, the study area has witnessed substantial mutual transformations between various LULCs among agricultural lands were the most dynamic category in the region. The PCA method applied to the S-T information achieved a ROC of 0.90-indicating an acceptable performance-while the S-T CVA method achieved a lower value of 0.75. The S-T PCA method was considerably less time-consuming and less expertise demanding as well as more accurate in our study area. PMID:26935736

  8. Irradiation direction from texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenderink, Jan J.; Pont, Sylvia C.

    2003-10-01

    We present a theory of image texture resulting from the shading of corrugated (three-dimensional textured) surfaces, Lambertian on the micro scale, in the domain of geometrical optics. The derivation applies to isotropic Gaussian random surfaces, under collimated illumination, in normal view. The theory predicts the structure tensors from either the gradient or the Hessian of the image intensity and allows inferences of the direction of irradiation of the surface. Although the assumptions appear prima facie rather restrictive, even for surfaces that are not at all Gaussian, with the bidirectional reflectance distribution function far from Lambertian and vignetting and multiple scattering present, we empirically recover the direction of irradiation with an accuracy of a few degrees.

  9. Physical naturalness and dynamical breaking of classical scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikinheimo, Matti; Racioppi, Antonio; Spethmann, Christian; Raidal, Martti; Tuominen, Kimmo

    2014-05-01

    We propose a model of a confining dark sector, dark technicolor, that communicates with the Standard Model (SM) through the Higgs portal. In this model electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking and dark matter (DM) share a common origin, and the EW scale is generated dynamically. Our motivation to suggest this model is the absence of evidence for new physics from recent Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data. Although the conclusion is far from certain at this point, this lack of evidence may suggest that no mechanism exists at the EW scale to stabilize the Higgs mass against radiative corrections from ultraviolet (UV) physics. The usual reaction to this puzzling situation is to conclude that the stabilizing new physics is either hidden from us by accident, or that it appears at energies that are currently inaccessible, such that nature is indeed fine-tuned. In order to re-examine the arguments that have led to this dichotomy, we review the concept of naturalness in effective field theories, discussing in particular the role of quadratic divergences in relation to different energy scales. This leads us to suggest classical scale invariance as a guideline for model building, implying that explicit mass scales are absent in the underlying theory.

  10. A physical scaling model for aggregation and disaggregation of field-scale surface soil moisture dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Richa; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2015-07-01

    Scaling relationships are needed as measurements and desired predictions are often not available at concurrent spatial support volumes or temporal discretizations. Surface soil moisture values of interest to hydrologic studies are estimated using ground based measurement techniques or utilizing remote sensing platforms. Remote sensing based techniques estimate field-scale surface soil moisture values, but are unable to provide the local-scale soil moisture information that is obtained from local measurements. Further, obtaining field-scale surface moisture values using ground-based measurements is exhaustive and time consuming. To bridge this scale mismatch, we develop analytical expressions for surface soil moisture based on sharp-front approximation of the Richards equation and assumed log-normal distribution of the spatial surface saturated hydraulic conductivity field. Analytical expressions for field-scale evolution of surface soil moisture to rainfall events are utilized to obtain aggregated and disaggregated response of surface soil moisture evolution with knowledge of the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The utility of the analytical model is demonstrated through numerical experiments involving 3-D simulations of soil moisture and Monte-Carlo simulations for 1-D renderings—with soil moisture dynamics being represented by the Richards equation in each instance. Results show that the analytical expressions developed here show promise for a principled way of scaling surface soil moisture.

  11. Scaling in the aggregation dynamics of a magnetorheological fluid.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-García, P; Melle, Sonia; Pastor, J M; Rubio, M A

    2007-11-01

    We present experimental results on the aggregation dynamics of a magnetorheological fluid, namely, an aqueous suspension of micrometer-sized superparamagnetic particles, under the action of a constant uniaxial magnetic field using video microscopy and image analysis. We find a scaling behavior in several variables describing the aggregation kinetics. The data agree well with the Family-Vicsek scaling ansatz for diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation. The kinetic exponents z and z' are obtained from the temporal evolution of the mean cluster size S(t) and the number of clusters N(t), respectively. The crossover exponent Delta is calculated in two ways: first, from the initial slope of the scaling function; second, from the evolution of the nonaggregated particles, n1(t). We report on results of Brownian two-dimensional dynamics simulations and compare the results with the experiments. Finally, we discuss the differences obtained between the kinetic exponents in terms of the variation in the crossover exponent and relate this behavior to the physical interpretation of the crossover exponent. PMID:18233655

  12. Dynamic pattern evolution on scale-free networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haijun; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    A general class of dynamic models on scale-free networks is studied by analytical methods and computer simulations. Each network consists of N vertices and is characterized by its degree distribution, P(k), which represents the probability that a randomly chosen vertex is connected to k nearest neighbors. Each vertex can attain two internal states described by binary variables or Ising-like spins that evolve in time according to local majority rules. Scale-free networks, for which the degree distribution has a power law tail P(k) ∼ k-γ, are shown to exhibit qualitatively different dynamic behavior for γ < 5/2 and γ > 5/2, shedding light on the empirical observation that many real-world networks are scale-free with 2 < γ < 5/2. For 2 < γ < 5/2, strongly disordered patterns decay within a finite decay time even in the limit of infinite networks. For γ > 5/2, on the other hand, this decay time diverges as ln(N) with the network size N. An analogous distinction is found for a variety of more complex models including Hopfield models for associative memory networks. In the latter case, the storage capacity is found, within mean field theory, to be independent of N in the limit of large N for γ > 5/2 but to grow as Nα with α = (5 - 2γ)/(γ - 1) for 2 < γ < 5/2. PMID:16006533

  13. Spontaneous Neural Dynamics and Multi-scale Network Organization

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Brett L.; He, Biyu J.; Honey, Christopher J.; Jerbi, Karim; Maier, Alexander; Saalmann, Yuri B.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous neural activity has historically been viewed as task-irrelevant noise that should be controlled for via experimental design, and removed through data analysis. However, electrophysiology and functional MRI studies of spontaneous activity patterns, which have greatly increased in number over the past decade, have revealed a close correspondence between these intrinsic patterns and the structural network architecture of functional brain circuits. In particular, by analyzing the large-scale covariation of spontaneous hemodynamics, researchers are able to reliably identify functional networks in the human brain. Subsequent work has sought to identify the corresponding neural signatures via electrophysiological measurements, as this would elucidate the neural origin of spontaneous hemodynamics and would reveal the temporal dynamics of these processes across slower and faster timescales. Here we survey common approaches to quantifying spontaneous neural activity, reviewing their empirical success, and their correspondence with the findings of neuroimaging. We emphasize invasive electrophysiological measurements, which are amenable to amplitude- and phase-based analyses, and which can report variations in connectivity with high spatiotemporal precision. After summarizing key findings from the human brain, we survey work in animal models that display similar multi-scale properties. We highlight that, across many spatiotemporal scales, the covariance structure of spontaneous neural activity reflects structural properties of neural networks and dynamically tracks their functional repertoire. PMID:26903823

  14. Pattern Formation and Reaction Textures during Dunite Carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisabeth, H. P.; Zhu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Alteration of olivine-bearing rocks by fluids is one of the most pervasive geochemical processes on the surface of the Earth. Serpentinized and/or carbonated ultramafic rocks often exhibit characteristic textures on many scales, from polygonal mesh textures on the grain-scale to onion-skin or kernel patterns on the outcrop scale. Strong disequilibrium between pristine ultramafic rocks and common geological fluids such as water and carbon dioxide leads to rapid reactions and coupled mechanical and chemical feedbacks that manifest as characteristic textures. Textural evolution during metasomatic reactions can control effective reaction rates by modulating dynamic porosity and therefore reactant supply and reactive surface area. We run hydrostatic experiments on thermally cracked dunites saturated with carbon dioxide bearing brine at 15 MPa confining pressure and 150°C to explore the evolution of physical properties and reaction textures as carbon mineralization takes place in the sample. Compaction and permeability reduction are observed throughout experiments. Rates of porosity and permeability changes are sensitive to pore fluid chemistry. After reaction, samples are imaged in 3-dimension (3D) using a dual-beam FIB-SEM. Analysis of the high resolution 3D microstructure shows that permeable, highly porous domains are created by olivine dissolution at a characteristic distance from pre-existing crack surfaces while precipitation of secondary minerals such as serpentine and magnesite is limited largely to the primary void space. The porous dissolution channels provide an avenue for fluid ingress, allow reactions to continue and could lead to progressive hierarchical fracturing. Initial modeling of the system indicates that this texture is the result of coupling between dissolution-precipitation reactions and the local stress state of the sample.

  15. Current scaling of axially radiated power in dynamic hohlraums and dynamic hohlraum load design for ZR.

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Raymond Cecil; Nash, Thomas J.; Sanford, Thomas W. L.

    2007-03-01

    We present designs for dynamic hohlraum z-pinch loads on the 28 MA, 140 ns driver ZR. The scaling of axially radiated power with current in dynamic hohlraums is reviewed. With adequate stability on ZR this scaling indicates that 30 TW of axially radiated power should be possible. The performance of the dynamic hohlraum load on the 20 MA, 100 ns driver Z is extensively reviewed. The baseline z-pinch load on Z is a nested tungsten wire array imploding onto on-axis foam. Data from a variety of x-ray diagnostics fielded on Z are presented. These diagnostics include x-ray diodes, bolometers, fast x-ray imaging cameras, and crystal spectrometers. Analysis of these data indicates that the peak dynamic radiation temperature on Z is between 250 and 300 eV from a diameter less than 1 mm. Radiation from the dynamic hohlraum itself or from a radiatively driven pellet within the dynamic hohlraum has been used to probe a variety of matter associated with the dynamic hohlraum: the tungsten z-pinch itself, tungsten sliding across the end-on apertures, a titanium foil over the end aperture, and a silicon aerogel end cap. Data showing the existence of asymmetry in radiation emanating from the two ends of the dynamic hohlraum is presented, along with data showing load configurations that mitigate this asymmetry. 1D simulations of the dynamic hohlraum implosion are presented and compared to experimental data. The simulations provide insight into the dynamic hohlraum behavior but are not necessarily a reliable design tool because of the inherently 3D behavior of the imploding nested tungsten wire arrays.

  16. Dynamic coupling of pore-scale and reservoir-scale models for multiphase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Qiang; Thompson, Karsten

    2013-09-01

    The concept of coupling pore-scale and continuum-scale models for subsurface flow has long been viewed as beneficial, but implementation has been slow. In this paper, we present an algorithm for direct coupling of a dynamic pore-network model for multiphase flow with a traditional continuum-scale simulator. The ability to run the two models concurrently (exchanging parameters and boundary conditions in real numerical time) is made possible by a new dynamic pore-network model that allows simultaneous injection of immiscible fluids under either transient-state or steady-state conditions. Allowing the pore-scale model to evolve to steady state during each time step provides a unique method for reconciling the dramatically different time and length scales across the coupled models. The model is implemented by embedding networks in selected gridblocks in the reservoir model. The network model predicts continuum-scale parameters such as relative permeability or average capillary pressure from first principles, which are used in the continuum model. In turn, the continuum reservoir simulator provides boundary conditions from the current time step back to the network model to complete the coupling process. The model is tested for variable-rate immiscible displacements under conditions in which relative permeability depends on flow rate, thus demonstrating a situation that cannot be modeled using a traditional approach. The paper discusses numerical challenges with this approach, including the fact that there is not a way to explicitly force pore-scale phase saturation to equal the continuum saturation in the host gridblock without an artificial constraint. Hurdles to implementing this type of modeling in practice are also discussed.

  17. Local dynamic subgrid-scale models in channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabot, William H.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) model has given good results in the large-eddy simulation (LES) of homogeneous isotropic or shear flow, and in the LES of channel flow, using averaging in two or three homogeneous directions (the DA model). In order to simulate flows in general, complex geometries (with few or no homogeneous directions), the dynamic SGS model needs to be applied at a local level in a numerically stable way. Channel flow, which is inhomogeneous and wall-bounded flow in only one direction, provides a good initial test for local SGS models. Tests of the dynamic localization model were performed previously in channel flow using a pseudospectral code and good results were obtained. Numerical instability due to persistently negative eddy viscosity was avoided by either constraining the eddy viscosity to be positive or by limiting the time that eddy viscosities could remain negative by co-evolving the SGS kinetic energy (the DLk model). The DLk model, however, was too expensive to run in the pseudospectral code due to a large near-wall term in the auxiliary SGS kinetic energy (k) equation. One objective was then to implement the DLk model in a second-order central finite difference channel code, in which the auxiliary k equation could be integrated implicitly in time at great reduction in cost, and to assess its performance in comparison with the plane-averaged dynamic model or with no model at all, and with direct numerical simulation (DNS) and/or experimental data. Other local dynamic SGS models have been proposed recently, e.g., constrained dynamic models with random backscatter, and with eddy viscosity terms that are averaged in time over material path lines rather than in space. Another objective was to incorporate and test these models in channel flow.

  18. Local dynamic subgrid-scale models in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabot, William H.

    1994-12-01

    The dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) model has given good results in the large-eddy simulation (LES) of homogeneous isotropic or shear flow, and in the LES of channel flow, using averaging in two or three homogeneous directions (the DA model). In order to simulate flows in general, complex geometries (with few or no homogeneous directions), the dynamic SGS model needs to be applied at a local level in a numerically stable way. Channel flow, which is inhomogeneous and wall-bounded flow in only one direction, provides a good initial test for local SGS models. Tests of the dynamic localization model were performed previously in channel flow using a pseudospectral code and good results were obtained. Numerical instability due to persistently negative eddy viscosity was avoided by either constraining the eddy viscosity to be positive or by limiting the time that eddy viscosities could remain negative by co-evolving the SGS kinetic energy (the DLk model). The DLk model, however, was too expensive to run in the pseudospectral code due to a large near-wall term in the auxiliary SGS kinetic energy (k) equation. One objective was then to implement the DLk model in a second-order central finite difference channel code, in which the auxiliary k equation could be integrated implicitly in time at great reduction in cost, and to assess its performance in comparison with the plane-averaged dynamic model or with no model at all, and with direct numerical simulation (DNS) and/or experimental data. Other local dynamic SGS models have been proposed recently, e.g., constrained dynamic models with random backscatter, and with eddy viscosity terms that are averaged in time over material path lines rather than in space. Another objective was to incorporate and test these models in channel flow.

  19. Brain structure and dynamics across scales: in search of rules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Jing; Kennedy, Henry

    2016-04-01

    Louis Henry Sullivan, the father of skyscrapers, famously stated 'Form ever follows function'. In this short review, we will focus on the relationship between form (structure) and function (dynamics) in the brain. We summarize recent advances on the quantification of directed- and weighted-mesoscopic connectivity of mammalian cortex, the exponential distance rule for mesoscopic and microscopic circuit wiring, a spatially embedded random model of inter-areal cortical networks, and a large-scale dynamical circuit model of money's cortex that gives rise to a hierarchy of timescales. These findings demonstrate that inter-areal cortical networks are dense (hence such concepts as 'small-world' need to be refined when applied to the brain), spatially dependent (therefore purely topological approach of graph theory has limited applicability) and heterogeneous (consequently cortical areas cannot be treated as identical 'nodes'). PMID:26868043

  20. Efficient Schmidt number scaling in dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Krafnick, Ryan C; García, Angel E

    2015-12-28

    Dissipative particle dynamics is a widely used mesoscale technique for the simulation of hydrodynamics (as well as immersed particles) utilizing coarse-grained molecular dynamics. While the method is capable of describing any fluid, the typical choice of the friction coefficient γ and dissipative force cutoff rc yields an unacceptably low Schmidt number Sc for the simulation of liquid water at standard temperature and pressure. There are a variety of ways to raise Sc, such as increasing γ and rc, but the relative cost of modifying each parameter (and the concomitant impact on numerical accuracy) has heretofore remained undetermined. We perform a detailed search over the parameter space, identifying the optimal strategy for the efficient and accuracy-preserving scaling of Sc, using both numerical simulations and theoretical predictions. The composite results recommend a parameter choice that leads to a speed improvement of a factor of three versus previously utilized strategies. PMID:26723591

  1. Efficient Schmidt number scaling in dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafnick, Ryan C.; García, Angel E.

    2015-12-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics is a widely used mesoscale technique for the simulation of hydrodynamics (as well as immersed particles) utilizing coarse-grained molecular dynamics. While the method is capable of describing any fluid, the typical choice of the friction coefficient γ and dissipative force cutoff rc yields an unacceptably low Schmidt number Sc for the simulation of liquid water at standard temperature and pressure. There are a variety of ways to raise Sc, such as increasing γ and rc, but the relative cost of modifying each parameter (and the concomitant impact on numerical accuracy) has heretofore remained undetermined. We perform a detailed search over the parameter space, identifying the optimal strategy for the efficient and accuracy-preserving scaling of Sc, using both numerical simulations and theoretical predictions. The composite results recommend a parameter choice that leads to a speed improvement of a factor of three versus previously utilized strategies.

  2. Ultrafast cooling reveals microsecond-scale biomolecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Polinkovsky, Mark E; Gambin, Yann; Banerjee, Priya R; Erickstad, Michael J; Groisman, Alex; Deniz, Ashok A

    2014-01-01

    The temperature-jump technique, in which the sample is rapidly heated by a powerful laser pulse, has been widely used to probe the fast dynamics of folding of proteins and nucleic acids. However, the existing temperature-jump setups tend to involve sophisticated and expensive instrumentation, while providing only modest temperature changes of ~10-15 °C, and the temperature changes are only rapid for heating, but not cooling. Here we present a setup comprising a thermally conductive sapphire substrate with light-absorptive nano-coating, a microfluidic device and a rapidly switched moderate-power infrared laser with the laser beam focused on the nano-coating, enabling heating and cooling of aqueous solutions by ~50 °C on a 1-μs time scale. The setup is used to probe folding and unfolding dynamics of DNA hairpins after direct and inverse temperature jumps, revealing low-pass filter behaviour during periodic temperature variations. PMID:25517430

  3. Quantum Geometry and Quantum Dynamics at the Planck Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Bojowald, Martin

    2009-12-15

    Canonical quantum gravity provides insights into the quantum dynamics as well as quantum geometry of space-time by its implications for constraints. Loop quantum gravity in particular requires specific corrections due to its quantization procedure, which also results in a discrete picture of space. The corresponding changes compared to the classical behavior can most easily be analyzed in isotropic models, but perturbations around them are more involved. For one type of corrections, consistent equations have been found which shed light on the underlying space-time structure at the Planck scale: not just quantum dynamics but also the concept of space-time manifolds changes in quantum gravity. Effective line elements provide indications for possible relationships to other frameworks, such as non-commutative geometry.

  4. Small-Scale Tropopause Dynamics and TOMS Total Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, John L.

    2002-01-01

    This project used Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP TOMS) along-track ozone retrievals, in conjunction with ancillary meteorological fields and modeling studies, for high resolution investigations of upper troposphere and lower stratosphere dynamics. Specifically, high resolution along-track (Level 2) EP TOMS data were used to investigate the beautiful fine-scale structure in constituent and meteorological fields prominent in the evolution of highly non-linear baroclinic storm systems. Comparison was made with high resolution meteorological models. The analyses provide internal consistency checks and validation of the EP TOMS data which are vital for monitoring ozone depletion in both polar and midlatitude regions.

  5. Examining a scaled dynamical system of telomere shortening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyrenne, Benoit M.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2015-02-01

    A model of telomere dynamics is proposed and examined. Our model, which extends a previously introduced model that incorporates stem cells as progenitors of new cells, imposes the Hayflick limit, the maximum number of cell divisions that are possible. This new model leads to cell populations for which the average telomere length is not necessarily a monotonically decreasing function of time, in contrast to previously published models. We provide a phase diagram indicating where such results would be expected via the introduction of scaled populations, rate constants and time. The application of this model to available leukocyte baboon data is discussed.

  6. Investigations of Static and Dynamic Scaling Phenomena in Polymeric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Iksoo

    In this dissertation we study two aspects of polymer physics, namely polymer statics and polymer dynamics. Particularly we investigate the tricritical collapse transition of trails in two dimensions and the dynamics of an entangled linear polymer in a fixed network. In order to clarify whether tricritical trails belong to the same universality class of the self-avoiding walk (SAW) at the Theta- and Theta^'-temperatures, we systematically investigate the asymptotic scaling behavior of different properties of tricritical trials. Using numerical methods such as exact series enumeration on a triangular lattice and the scanning simulation method on a square lattice, we estimate accurately the tricritical temperature T_ t, size exponent nu _ t, partition function exponent gamma_ t, connectivity constant mu_ t, crossover exponent phi_ t, specific heat exponent alpha_ t, universal ratio < G^2>/ < R^2>, winding angle distribution P_ N(theta), and surface partition function exponents gamma _{1t}, gamma_ {11t} for tricritical trails. We provide analytic bounds for T_ t, gamma_ t and mu_ t. We also study the tricritical collapse transition of trails as well as other lattice walks on a two dimensional Sierpinski gasket using real space renormalization group. Comparison of our results with those of the SAW at the Theta - and Theta^' -temperatures suggests that tricritical trails may not belong to the same universality class as that of the SAW at the Theta- and Theta^ '-temperatures. We investigate the dynamics of an entangled linear polymer in a fixed network on the basis of the recently proposed repton model. We put a special emphasis on resolving the discrepancies between the reptation theory and experiments. First we examine the scaling of the disengagement time tau_ d, Rouse time tau _ R, and a mean square displacement of a single repton phi(t) for the whole hierarchy of characteristic time scales. The scaling of these quantities agree with Doi's theory. We examine the

  7. Multifractality and scale invariance in human heartbeat dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Emily S. C.; Tsang, Yue-Kin

    2007-10-01

    Human heart rate is known to display complex fluctuations. Evidence of multifractality in heart rate fluctuations in healthy state has been reported [Ivanov , Nature (London) 399, 461 (1999)]. This multifractal character could be manifested as the dependence of the probability density functions (PDFs) of the interbeat interval increments, which are the differences in two interbeat intervals that are separated by n beats, on n . On the other hand, “scale invariance in the PDFs of detrended healthy human heart rate increments” was recently reported [Kiyono , Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 178103 (2004)]. In this paper, we clarify that the scale invariance reported is actually exhibited by the PDFs of the increments of the “detrended” integrated healthy interbeat interval and should, therefore, be more accurately referred as the scale invariance or n independence of the PDFs of the sum of n detrended interbeat intervals. Indeed, we demonstrate explicitly that the PDFs of detrended healthy interbeat interval increments are scale or n dependent in accord with its multifractal character. Our work also establishes that this n independence of the PDFs of the sum of n detrended interbeat intervals is a general feature of human heartbeat dynamics, shared by heart rate fluctuations in both healthy and pathological states.

  8. Global texture and the microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Turok, N. ); Spergel, D. )

    1990-06-04

    The metric perturbation produced by a collapsing knot'' of global texture in a flat background is calculated. This is used to calculate the energy shift for photons traversing such knots, leading to a prediction for the microwave anisotropy pattern produced in the global-texture scenario for large-scale structure formation. The metric is also used to calculate the velocity field induced in nonrelativistic matter, on scales well inside the horizon. This would produce an early generation of small gravitationally bound objects. At larger scales, the texture field would induce coherent velocity fields on a scale comparable to that seen in galaxy surveys.

  9. Wavelet transform analysis of chromatin texture changes during heat shock.

    PubMed

    Herbomel, G; Grichine, A; Fertin, A; Delon, A; Vourc'h, C; Souchier, C; Usson, Y

    2016-06-01

    Texture analysis can be a useful tool to investigate the organization of chromatin. Approaches based on multiscale analysis and in particular the 'à trou' wavelet analysis has already been used for microscopy (Olivo Marin). In order to analyse texture changes, the statistical properties of the wavelet coefficient images were summarized by the first four statistical orders: mean, standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis of the coefficient image histogram. The 'à trou' transform provided a representation of the wavelet coefficients and texture parameters with the same statistical robustness throughout the scale spaces. It was applied for quantifying chromatin texture and heat-induced chromatin changes in living cells. We investigated the changes by both laser scanning and spinning disk confocal microscopies and compared the texture parameters before and after increasing duration of heat shock exposure (15 min, 30 min and 1 h). Furthermore, as activation of the heat shock response also correlates with a rapid localization of HSF1 within a few nuclear structures termed nuclear stress bodies (nSBs), we compared the dynamics of nSBs formation with that of textural changes during 1 h of continuous heat shock. Next, we studied the recovery phase following a 1-h heat shock. Significant differences were observed, particularly affecting the perinucleolar region, even for the shortest heat shock time affecting mostly the skewness and standard deviation. Furthermore, progressive changes could be observed according to the duration of heat shock, mostly affecting fine details (pixel-wise changes) as revealed by the parameters, obtained from the first- and second-order wavelet coefficients. 'A trou' wavelet texture analysis provided a sensitive and efficient tool to investigate minute changes of chromatin. PMID:26694695

  10. Multi-Scale Modeling of Global of Magnetospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Rastatter, L.; Toth, G.; DeZeeuw, D.; Gombosi, T.

    2010-01-01

    To understand the role of magnetic reconnection in global evolution of magnetosphere and to place spacecraft observations into global context it is essential to perform global simulations with physically motivated model of dissipation that is capable to reproduce reconnection rates predicted by kinetic models. In our efforts to bridge the gap between small scale kinetic modeling and global simulations we introduced an approach that allows to quantify the interaction between large-scale global magnetospheric dynamics and microphysical processes in diffusion regions near reconnection sites. We utilized the high resolution global MHD code BATSRUS and incorporate primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of reconnection sites in terms of kinetic corrections to induction and energy equations. One of the key elements of the multiscale modeling of magnetic reconnection is identification of reconnection sites and boundaries of surrounding diffusion regions where non-MHD corrections are required. Reconnection site search in the equatorial plane implemented in our previous studies is extended to cusp and magnetopause reconnection, as well as for magnetotail reconnection in realistic asymmetric configurations. The role of feedback between the non-ideal effects in diffusion regions and global magnetosphere structure and dynamics will be discussed.

  11. Structures and dynamics of small scales in decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallas, V.; Alexakis, A.

    2013-10-01

    The topological and dynamical features of small scales are studied in the context of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows using direct numerical simulations. Joint probability density functions (PDFs) of the invariants of gradient quantities related to the velocity and the magnetic fields demonstrate that structures and dynamics at the time of maximum dissipation depend on the large scale initial conditions at the examined Reynolds numbers. This is evident in particular from the fact that each flow has a different shape for the joint PDF of the invariants of the velocity gradient in contrast to the universal teardrop shape of hydrodynamic turbulence. The general picture that emerges from the analysis of the invariants is that regions of high vorticity are correlated with regions of high strain rate S also in contrast to hydrodynamic turbulent flows. Magnetic strain dominated regions are also well correlated with region of high current density j. Viscous dissipation ({∝ } S^2) as well as Ohmic dissipation ({∝ } j^2) resides in regions where strain and rotation are locally almost in balance. The structures related to the velocity gradient possess different characteristics than those associated with the magnetic field gradient with the latter being locally more quasi-two dimensional.

  12. Complex processes from dynamical architectures with time-scale hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    The idea that complex motor, perceptual, and cognitive behaviors are composed of smaller units, which are somehow brought into a meaningful relation, permeates the biological and life sciences. However, no principled framework defining the constituent elementary processes has been developed to this date. Consequently, functional configurations (or architectures) relating elementary processes and external influences are mostly piecemeal formulations suitable to particular instances only. Here, we develop a general dynamical framework for distinct functional architectures characterized by the time-scale separation of their constituents and evaluate their efficiency. Thereto, we build on the (phase) flow of a system, which prescribes the temporal evolution of its state variables. The phase flow topology allows for the unambiguous classification of qualitatively distinct processes, which we consider to represent the functional units or modes within the dynamical architecture. Using the example of a composite movement we illustrate how different architectures can be characterized by their degree of time scale separation between the internal elements of the architecture (i.e. the functional modes) and external interventions. We reveal a tradeoff of the interactions between internal and external influences, which offers a theoretical justification for the efficient composition of complex processes out of non-trivial elementary processes or functional modes. PMID:21347363

  13. Surface Texture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03191 Surface Texture

    Now that all the frost is gone, the south polar region is exhibiting more than just layering and surface markings. As this image shows, the polar surface is not smooth at this resolution.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 85.9S, Longitude 192.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. Fracture-induced softening for large-scale ice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, T.; Levermann, A.

    2014-04-01

    Floating ice shelves can exert a retentive and hence stabilizing force onto the inland ice sheet of Antarctica. However, this effect has been observed to diminish by the dynamic effects of fracture processes within the protective ice shelves, leading to accelerated ice flow and hence to a sea-level contribution. In order to account for the macroscopic effect of fracture processes on large-scale viscous ice dynamics (i.e., ice-shelf scale) we apply a continuum representation of fractures and related fracture growth into the prognostic Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) and compare the results to observations. To this end we introduce a higher order accuracy advection scheme for the transport of the two-dimensional fracture density across the regular computational grid. Dynamic coupling of fractures and ice flow is attained by a reduction of effective ice viscosity proportional to the inferred fracture density. This formulation implies the possibility of non-linear threshold behavior due to self-amplified fracturing in shear regions triggered by small variations in the fracture-initiation threshold. As a result of prognostic flow simulations, sharp across-flow velocity gradients appear in fracture-weakened regions. These modeled gradients compare well in magnitude and location with those in observed flow patterns. This model framework is in principle expandable to grounded ice streams and provides simple means of investigating climate-induced effects on fracturing (e.g., hydro fracturing) and hence on the ice flow. It further constitutes a physically sound basis for an enhanced fracture-based calving parameterization.

  15. Quantitative Reactivity Scales for Dynamic Covalent and Systems Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuntao; Li, Lijie; Ye, Hebo; Zhang, Ling; You, Lei

    2016-01-13

    Dynamic covalent chemistry (DCC) has become a powerful tool for the creation of molecular assemblies and complex systems in chemistry and materials science. Herein we developed for the first time quantitative reactivity scales capable of correlation and prediction of the equilibrium of dynamic covalent reactions (DCRs). The reference reactions are based upon universal DCRs between imines, one of the most utilized structural motifs in DCC, and a series of O-, N-, and S- mononucleophiles. Aromatic imines derived from pyridine-2-carboxyaldehyde exhibit capability for controlling the equilibrium through distinct substituent effects. Electron-donating groups (EDGs) stabilize the imine through quinoidal resonance, while electron-withdrawing groups (EWGs) stabilize the adduct by enhancing intramolecular hydrogen bonding, resulting in curvature in Hammett analysis. Notably, unique nonlinearity induced by both EDGs and EWGs emerged in Hammett plot when cyclic secondary amines were used. This is the first time such a behavior is observed in a thermodynamically controlled system, to the best of our knowledge. Unified quantitative reactivity scales were proposed for DCC and defined by the correlation log K = S(N) (R(N) + R(E)). Nucleophilicity parameters (R(N) and S(N)) and electrophilicity parameters (R(E)) were then developed from DCRs discovered. Furthermore, the predictive power of those parameters was verified by successful correlation of other DCRs, validating our reactivity scales as a general and useful tool for the evaluation and modeling of DCRs. The reactivity parameters proposed here should be complementary to well-established kinetics based parameters and find applications in many aspects, such as DCR discovery, bioconjugation, and catalysis. PMID:26652793

  16. Vegetal Optimality and Macro-Scale Dynamic Vegetation - Scaling from Leaf to Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quebbeman, J.; Ramirez, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Macro-scale spatially distributed hydrologic models require extensive parameterization of both soil and vegetal properties. Proper parameterization of vegetation is critical for understanding vegetal response to hydro-climatic variability, as vegetation provides a key feedback to climate. A common practice for Dynamic Global Vegetation Models is to use plant functional types (PFTs), which limit vegetation to discrete classes. We present a physically based long-term macro-scale coupled vegetation and hydrology model capable of responding dynamically to climate variability, and parameterize it assuming vegetal optimality hypotheses. We hypothesize that canopy scale vegetation will adopt a strategy that maximizes the expected net assimilation, minus photosynthetic system construction and maintenance costs, over an annual basis. We perform stochastic multi-decadal simulations to estimate the expected fitness for a unique vegetal parameterization and water use strategy. As a result, optimal parameter sets are defined, which can be used instead of a PFT characterization of land cover. Estimates of evaporation, transpiration and gross primary production obtained using the optimal parameter sets over a range of climates are then compared against FLUXNET data.

  17. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  18. Intrinsic Multi-Scale Dynamic Behaviors of Complex Financial Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Fang-Yan; Zheng, Bo; Jiang, Xiong-Fei

    2015-01-01

    The empirical mode decomposition is applied to analyze the intrinsic multi-scale dynamic behaviors of complex financial systems. In this approach, the time series of the price returns of each stock is decomposed into a small number of intrinsic mode functions, which represent the price motion from high frequency to low frequency. These intrinsic mode functions are then grouped into three modes, i.e., the fast mode, medium mode and slow mode. The probability distribution of returns and auto-correlation of volatilities for the fast and medium modes exhibit similar behaviors as those of the full time series, i.e., these characteristics are rather robust in multi time scale. However, the cross-correlation between individual stocks and the return-volatility correlation are time scale dependent. The structure of business sectors is mainly governed by the fast mode when returns are sampled at a couple of days, while by the medium mode when returns are sampled at dozens of days. More importantly, the leverage and anti-leverage effects are dominated by the medium mode. PMID:26427063

  19. Intrinsic Multi-Scale Dynamic Behaviors of Complex Financial Systems.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Fang-Yan; Zheng, Bo; Jiang, Xiong-Fei

    2015-01-01

    The empirical mode decomposition is applied to analyze the intrinsic multi-scale dynamic behaviors of complex financial systems. In this approach, the time series of the price returns of each stock is decomposed into a small number of intrinsic mode functions, which represent the price motion from high frequency to low frequency. These intrinsic mode functions are then grouped into three modes, i.e., the fast mode, medium mode and slow mode. The probability distribution of returns and auto-correlation of volatilities for the fast and medium modes exhibit similar behaviors as those of the full time series, i.e., these characteristics are rather robust in multi time scale. However, the cross-correlation between individual stocks and the return-volatility correlation are time scale dependent. The structure of business sectors is mainly governed by the fast mode when returns are sampled at a couple of days, while by the medium mode when returns are sampled at dozens of days. More importantly, the leverage and anti-leverage effects are dominated by the medium mode. PMID:26427063

  20. Simulating Field-Scale Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics Using EPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Causarano, Hector J.; Shaw, Joey N.; Franzluebbers, A. J.; reeves, D. W.; Raper, Randy L.; Balkcom, Kipling S.; Norfleet, M. L.; Izaurralde, R Cesar

    2007-07-01

    Simulation models integrate our knowledge of soil organic C (SOC) dynamics and are useful tools for evaluating impacts of crop management on soil C sequestration; yet, they require local calibration. Our objectives were to calibrate the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model, and evaluate its performance for simulating SOC fractions as affected by soil landscape and management. An automated parameter optimization procedure was used to calibrate the model for a site-specific experiment in the Coastal Plain of central Alabama. The ability of EPIC to predict corn (Zea mays L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) yields and SOC dynamics on different soil landscape positions (summit, sideslope and drainageway) during the initial period of conservation tillage adoption (5 years) was evaluated using regression and mean squared deviations. Simulated yield explained 88% of measured yield variation, with greatest disagreement on the sideslope position and highest agreement in the drainageway. Simulations explained approximately 1, 34 and 40% of the total variation in microbial biomass C (MBC), particulate organic C (POC) and total organic C (TOC), respectively. Lowest errors on TOC simulations (0-20 cm) were found on the sideslope and summit. We conclude that the automated parameterization was generally successful, although further work is needed to refine the MBC and POC fractions, and to improve EPIC predictions of SOC dynamics with depth. Overall, EPIC was sensitive to spatial differences in C fractions that resulted from differing soil landscape positions. The model needs additional refinement for accurate simulations of field-scale SOC dynamics affected by short-term management decisions.

  1. Surface Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 8 May 2003

    The variable surface textures observed in this THEMIS image are the result of different lava flow units. Flow fronts indicate material was once semi-fluid and filled in pre-existing impact craters. Channels observed in the eastern half of the image suggest additional materials may have once flowed and eroded older units.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 36.5, Longitude 217.6East (142.4). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. On the Dynamics of Small-Scale Solar Magnetic Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Title, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    We report on the dynamics of the small-scale solar magnetic field, based on analysis of very high resolution images of the solar photosphere obtained at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope. The data sets are movies from 1 to 4 hr in length, taken in several wavelength bands with a typical time between frames of 20 s. The primary method of tracking small-scale magnetic elements is with very high contrast images of photospheric bright points, taken through a 12 A bandpass filter centered at 4305 A in the Fraunhofer 'G band.' Previous studies have established that such bright points are unambiguously associated with sites of small-scale magnetic flux in the photosphere, although the details of the mechanism responsible for the brightening of the flux elements remain uncertain. The G band bright points move in the intergranular lanes at speeds from 0.5 to 5 km/s. The motions appear to be constrained to the intergranular lanes and are primarily driven by the evolution of the local granular convection flow field. Continual fragmentation and merging of flux is the fundamental evolutionary mode of small-scale magnetic structures in the solar photosphere. Rotation and folding of chains or groups of bright points are also observed. The timescale for magnetic flux evolution in active region plage is on the order of the correlation time of granulation (typically 6-8 minutes), but significant morphological changes can occur on timescales as short as 100 S. Smaller fragments are occasionally seen to fade beyond observable contrast. The concept of a stable, isolated subarcsecond magnetic 'flux tube' in the solar photosphere is inconsistent with the observations presented here.

  3. Advantage of topological texture measures derived from Minkowski functionals (MF) and scaling index method (SIM) in comparison with biomechanical finite elements method (FEM) for the prediction of osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenko, Irina; Bauer, Jan; Monetti, Roberto; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst; Eckstein, Felix; Raeth, Christoph

    2010-03-01

    The assessment of trabecular bone microarchitecture by numerical analysis of high resolution magnetic resonance (HRMR) images provides global and local structural characteristics, which improve the understanding of the progression of osteoporosis and its diagnosis. In the present work we apply the finite elements method (FEM), which models the biomechanical behaviour of the bone, the scaling index method (SIM), which describes the topology of the structure on a local level, and Minkowski Functionals (MF), which are global topological characteristics, for analysing 3D HRMR images of 48 distal radius specimens in vitro. Diagnostic performance of texture measures derived from the numerical methods is compared with regard to the prevalence of vertebral fractures. Both topological methods show significantly better results than those obtained using bone mineral density (BMD) measurement and the failure load estimated by FEM. The receiver operating characteristic analysis for differentiating subjects with and without fractures reveals area under the curve of 0.63 for BMD, 0.66 for maximum compressive strength as determined in a biomechanical test, 0.72 for critical load estimated by FEM, 0.79 for MF4 and 0.86 for SIM, i.e. local topological characteristics derived by SIM suit best for diagnosing osteoporosis. The combination of FEM and SIM on tissue level shows that in both weak and strong bones the plate-like substructure of the trabecular network are the main load bearing part of the inner bone and that the relative amount of plates to rods is the most important characteristic for the prediction of bone strength.

  4. Evaluation of Kirkwood-Buff integrals via finite size scaling: a large scale molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dednam, W.; Botha, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    Solvation of bio-molecules in water is severely affected by the presence of co-solvent within the hydration shell of the solute structure. Furthermore, since solute molecules can range from small molecules, such as methane, to very large protein structures, it is imperative to understand the detailed structure-function relationship on the microscopic level. For example, it is useful know the conformational transitions that occur in protein structures. Although such an understanding can be obtained through large-scale molecular dynamic simulations, it is often the case that such simulations would require excessively large simulation times. In this context, Kirkwood-Buff theory, which connects the microscopic pair-wise molecular distributions to global thermodynamic properties, together with the recently developed technique, called finite size scaling, may provide a better method to reduce system sizes, and hence also the computational times. In this paper, we present molecular dynamics trial simulations of biologically relevant low-concentration solvents, solvated by aqueous co-solvent solutions. In particular we compare two different methods of calculating the relevant Kirkwood-Buff integrals. The first (traditional) method computes running integrals over the radial distribution functions, which must be obtained from large system-size NVT or NpT simulations. The second, newer method, employs finite size scaling to obtain the Kirkwood-Buff integrals directly by counting the particle number fluctuations in small, open sub-volumes embedded within a larger reservoir that can be well approximated by a much smaller simulation cell. In agreement with previous studies, which made a similar comparison for aqueous co-solvent solutions, without the additional solvent, we conclude that the finite size scaling method is also applicable to the present case, since it can produce computationally more efficient results which are equivalent to the more costly radial distribution

  5. Extended MPEG Video Format for Efficient Dynamic Voltage Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Kwanhu; Bang, Sung-Yong; Chung, Eui-Young

    We present an extended MPEG video format for efficient Dynamic Voltage Scaling (DVS). DVS technique has been widely researched, but the execution time variation of a periodic task (i. e. MPEG decoding) is still a challenge to be tackled. Unlike previous works, we focus on the data (video stream) rather than the execution code to overcome such limitation. The proposed video format provides the decoding costs of frames to help the precise prediction of their execution times at client machines. The experimental results show that the extended format only increases the data size less than 1% by adding about 10bits representing the decoding cost of each frame. Also, a DVS technique adjusted for the proposed format achieves 90% of efficiency compared to the oracle case, while keeping the run time overhead of the technique negligible.

  6. Lightweight computational steering of very large scale molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Beazley, D.M.; Lomdahl, P.S.

    1996-09-01

    We present a computational steering approach for controlling, analyzing, and visualizing very large scale molecular dynamics simulations involving tens to hundreds of millions of atoms. Our approach relies on extensible scripting languages and an easy to use tool for building extensions and modules. The system is extremely easy to modify, works with existing C code, is memory efficient, and can be used from inexpensive workstations and networks. We demonstrate how we have used this system to manipulate data from production MD simulations involving as many as 104 million atoms running on the CM-5 and Cray T3D. We also show how this approach can be used to build systems that integrate common scripting languages (including Tcl/Tk, Perl, and Python), simulation code, user extensions, and commercial data analysis packages.

  7. Modeling and Dynamic Simulation of a Large Scale Helium Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, C.; Qiu, T. N.; Wu, J. H.; Xie, X. J.; Li, Q.

    In order to simulate the transient behaviors of a newly developed 2 kW helium refrigerator, a numerical model of the critical equipment including a screw compressor with variable-frequency drive, plate-fin heat exchangers, a turbine expander, and pneumatic valves wasdeveloped. In the simulation,the calculation of the helium thermodynamic properties arebased on 32-parameter modified Benedict-Webb-Rubin (MBWR) state equation.The start-up process of the warm compressor station with gas management subsystem, and the cool-down process of cold box in an actual operation, were dynamically simulated. The developed model was verified by comparing the simulated results with the experimental data.Besides, system responses of increasing heat load were simulated. This model can also be used to design and optimize other large scale helium refrigerators.

  8. Dynamics of the McDonnell-Douglas Large Scale Dynamic Rig and dynamic calibration of the rotor balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Khanh; Lau, Benton

    1994-01-01

    A shake test was performed on the Large Scale Dynamic Rig in the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel in support of the McDonnell Douglas Advanced Rotor Technology (MDART) Test Program. The shake test identifies the hub modes and the dynamic calibration matrix of the rotor balance. For hub mode identification, three configurations were tested: wind tunnel scale unlocked with dampers engaged and disengaged, and wind tunnel scale locked. Test data were analyzed with a multi-degree-of-freedom time domain algorithm to identify the modal properties of the hub modes. The damping of the low frequency hub modes (ground resonance modes) increases significantly with the wind tunnel dampers engaged. For dynamic calibration of the rotor balance, the shake test was performed only with the wind tunnel dampers engaged. The dynamic calibration matrix, computed from the shake test data using a least squares error method, is used to correct the five-per-rev vibratory balance readings. The corrections are large for the side force, moderate for the axial force and inplane hub moments, and small for the normal force.

  9. BHQ revisited (2): Texture development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Rüdiger; Heilbronner, Renée

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) is mostly used to derive the kinematics of flow or conditions and processes of deformation. Observations from naturally and experimentally deformed rocks indicate that specific texture types might relate to deformation conditions or flow laws - with a number of variables being based on assumptions that are not fully tested. For example, the activity of certain slip systems is interpreted from pole figure geometries assuming that grains are oriented such that the shear stress is minimized, thus enforcing specific c-axis and a-xis directions, so-called "easy glide" orientations. Black Hills Quartzite (BHQ) deformed experimentally in the dislocation creep regime reveals a CPO development that depends on finite strain (Heilbronner & Tullis, 2006). In that study the CPO development was tracked through the analysis of optically derived C-axis pole figures and corresponding orientation maps indicating a transition from a girdle distribution to a single maximum around the kinematic y-axis with increasing strain. In this contribution, we re-measure the same samples using EBSD. The availability of the full crystal orientations in combination with novel techniques of orientation and misorientation mapping and combinations of fabric and texture data allow us to analyze the texture development in more detail. Special emphasis is on (a) the ratio of glide to dynamic recrystallization, (b) the relation of grain scale strain to bulk strain and (c) the development of intragranular misorientations with increasing recrystallization and strain. One interesting result of our analysis concerns the inference of "easy glide" grains based on their c-axis direction. As it turns out, the alignment of -directions at the periphery of the pole figure is more rapidly attained than the clustering of the c-axis about the y-axis (classical interpretation for prism glide) or at the periphery (classical interpretation for basal glide). It

  10. Cross-scale Interactions and Changing Pattern-Process Relationships: Consequences for System Dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cross-scale interactions occur either when fine-scale processes influence a broad spatial extent or a long time period, or when broad-scale drivers interact with fine-scale processes to determine system dynamics. Cross-scale interactions are increasing recognized as having important influences on e...

  11. Scale-free avalanche dynamics in crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ispanovity, Pater Dusan; Laurson, Lasse; Zaiser, Michael; Zapperi, Stefano; Groma, Istvan; Alava, Mikko

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the properties of strain bursts (dislocation avalanches) occurring during plastic deformation of crystalline matter using two dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD). We perform quasistatic stress-controlled simulations with three DDD models differing in the spatiotemporal discretization and the mobility law assumed for individual dislocations. We find that each model exhibits identical avalanche dynamics with the following properties: (i) strain burst sizes follow a power law distribution characterized by an exponent τ ~ 1 . 0 and (ii) the distribution in truncated at a cutoff that diverges with increasing system size at any applied stress level. It has been proposed earlier that plastic yielding can be described in terms of a continuous phase transition of depinning type and its critical point is at the yield stress. We will demonstrate, however, that our results are inconsistent with cutoff scaling in depinning systems (like magnetic domain walls or earthquakes) and that the system behaves as critical at every stress level. We, therefore, conclude that in the models studied plastic yielding cannot be associated with a continuous phase transition. Financial supports of the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA) under Contract Numbers PD-105256 and K-105335 and of the European Commission under Grant Agreement No. CIG-321842 are acknowledged.

  12. Monitoring Large-Scale Sediment Transport Dynamics with Multibeam Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, D. R.; Simmons, S. M.; Best, J. L.; Keevil, G. M.; Oberg, K.; Czuba, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Multibeam Echo-Sounder systems have developed rapidly over recent decades and are routinely deployed to provide high-resolution bathymetric information in and range of environments. Modern data handling and storage technologies now facilitate the logging of the raw acoustic back-scatter information that was previously discarded by these systems. This paper describes methodologies that exploit this logging capability to quantify both the concentration and dynamics of suspended sediment within the water column. This development provides a multi-purpose tool for the holistic surveying of sediment transport dynamics by imaging suspended sediment concentration, the associated flows and providing concurrent high-resolution bathymetry. Results obtained a RESON 7125 MBES are presented from both well constrained dock-side testing and full field deployment over dune bedforms in the Mississippi. The capacity of the system to image suspended sediment structures is demonstrated and a novel methodology for estimating 2D flow velocities, based on frame cross-correlation methods, is introduced. The results demonstrate the capability of MBES systems to successfully map spatial and temporal variations in suspended sediment concentration throughout a 2D swath and application of the velocity estimation algorithms allow real-time holistic monitoring of turbulent flow processes and suspended sediment fluxes at a scale previously unrealisable. Turbulent flow over a natural dune bedform on the Mississippi is used to highlight the process information provided and the insights that can be gleaned for this technical development.

  13. Dynamics of ice stream temporal variability: Modes, scales, and hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robel, A. A.; Degiuli, E.; Schoof, C.; Tziperman, E.

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms governing temporal variability of ice stream flow remains one of the major barriers to developing accurate models of ice sheet dynamics and ice‒climate interactions. Here we analyze a simple model of ice stream hydrology coupled to ice flow dynamics and including drainage and basal cooling processes. Analytic and numerical results from this model indicate that there are two major modes of ice stream behavior: steady‒streaming and binge‒purge variability. The steady‒streaming mode arises from friction‒stabilized subglacial meltwater production, which may also activate and interact with subglacial drainage. The binge‒purge mode arises from a sufficiently cold environment sustaining successive cycles of thinning‒induced basal cooling and stagnation. Low prescribed temperature at the ice surface and weak geothermal heating typically lead to binge‒purge behavior, while warm ice surface temperature and strong geothermal heating will tend to produce steady‒streaming behavior. Model results indicate that modern Siple Coast ice streams reside in the binge‒purge parameter regime near a subcritical Hopf bifurcation to the steady‒streaming mode. Numerical experiments exhibit hysteresis in ice stream variability as the surface temperature is varied by several degrees. Our simple model simulates Heinrich event‒like variability in a hypothetical Hudson Strait ice stream including dynamically determined purge time scale, till freezing and basal cooling during the binge phase. These findings are an improvement on studies of both modern and paleo‒ice stream variability and provide a framework for interpreting complex ice flow models.

  14. Local-scale dynamics and local drivers of bushmeat trade.

    PubMed

    Nyaki, Angela; Gray, Steven A; Lepczyk, Christopher A; Skibins, Jeffrey C; Rentsch, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    Bushmeat management policies are often developed outside the communities in which they are to be implemented. These policies are also routinely designed to be applied uniformly across communities with little regard for variation in social or ecological conditions. We used fuzzy-logic cognitive mapping, a form of participatory modeling, to compare the assumptions driving externally generated bushmeat management policies with perceptions of bushmeat trade dynamics collected from local community members who admitted to being recently engaged in bushmeat trading (e.g., hunters, sellers, consumers). Data were collected during 9 workshops in 4 Tanzanian villages bordering Serengeti National Park. Specifically, we evaluated 9 community-generated models for the presence of the central factors that comprise and drive the bushmeat trade and whether or not models included the same core concepts, relationships, and logical chains of reasoning on which bushmeat conservation policies are commonly based. Across local communities, there was agreement about the most central factors important to understanding the bushmeat trade (e.g., animal recruitment, low income, and scarcity of food crops). These matched policy assumptions. However, the factors perceived to drive social-ecological bushmeat trade dynamics were more diverse and varied considerably across communities (e.g., presence or absence of collaborative law enforcement, increasing human population, market demand, cultural preference). Sensitive conservation issues, such as the bushmeat trade, that require cooperation between communities and outside conservation organizations can benefit from participatory modeling approaches that make local-scale dynamics and conservation policy assumptions explicit. Further, communities' and conservation organizations' perceptions need to be aligned. This can improve success by allowing context appropriate policies to be developed, monitored, and appropriately adapted as new evidence is

  15. Ongoing dynamics in large-scale functional connectivity predict perception

    PubMed Central

    Sadaghiani, Sepideh; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Kleinschmidt, Andreas; D’Esposito, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Most brain activity occurs in an ongoing manner not directly locked to external events or stimuli. Regional ongoing activity fluctuates in unison with some brain regions but not others, and the degree of long-range coupling is called functional connectivity, often measured with correlation. Strength and spatial distributions of functional connectivity dynamically change in an ongoing manner over seconds to minutes, even when the external environment is held constant. Direct evidence for any behavioral relevance of these continuous large-scale dynamics has been limited. Here, we investigated whether ongoing changes in baseline functional connectivity correlate with perception. In a continuous auditory detection task, participants perceived the target sound in roughly one-half of the trials. Very long (22–40 s) interstimulus intervals permitted investigation of baseline connectivity unaffected by preceding evoked responses. Using multivariate classification, we observed that functional connectivity before the target predicted whether it was heard or missed. Using graph theoretical measures, we characterized the difference in functional connectivity between states that lead to hits vs. misses. Before misses compared with hits and task-free rest, connectivity showed reduced modularity, a measure of integrity of modular network structure. This effect was strongest in the default mode and visual networks and caused by both reduced within-network connectivity and enhanced across-network connections before misses. The relation of behavior to prestimulus connectivity was dissociable from that of prestimulus activity amplitudes. In conclusion, moment to moment dynamic changes in baseline functional connectivity may shape subsequent behavioral performance. A highly modular network structure seems beneficial to perceptual efficiency. PMID:26106164

  16. Energy Conservation Using Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling for Computational Cloud.

    PubMed

    Florence, A Paulin; Shanthi, V; Simon, C B Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new technology which supports resource sharing on a "Pay as you go" basis around the world. It provides various services such as SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS. Computation is a part of IaaS and the entire computational requests are to be served efficiently with optimal power utilization in the cloud. Recently, various algorithms are developed to reduce power consumption and even Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS) scheme is also used in this perspective. In this paper we have devised methodology which analyzes the behavior of the given cloud request and identifies the associated type of algorithm. Once the type of algorithm is identified, using their asymptotic notations, its time complexity is calculated. Using best fit strategy the appropriate host is identified and the incoming job is allocated to the victimized host. Using the measured time complexity the required clock frequency of the host is measured. According to that CPU frequency is scaled up or down using DVFS scheme, enabling energy to be saved up to 55% of total Watts consumption. PMID:27239551

  17. Energy Conservation Using Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling for Computational Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Florence, A. Paulin; Shanthi, V.; Simon, C. B. Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new technology which supports resource sharing on a “Pay as you go” basis around the world. It provides various services such as SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS. Computation is a part of IaaS and the entire computational requests are to be served efficiently with optimal power utilization in the cloud. Recently, various algorithms are developed to reduce power consumption and even Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS) scheme is also used in this perspective. In this paper we have devised methodology which analyzes the behavior of the given cloud request and identifies the associated type of algorithm. Once the type of algorithm is identified, using their asymptotic notations, its time complexity is calculated. Using best fit strategy the appropriate host is identified and the incoming job is allocated to the victimized host. Using the measured time complexity the required clock frequency of the host is measured. According to that CPU frequency is scaled up or down using DVFS scheme, enabling energy to be saved up to 55% of total Watts consumption. PMID:27239551

  18. Social and Ecological Dynamics of Small-Scale Fisheries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, K.; Kramer, D.; Frank, K.

    2012-12-01

    Globalization's reach is rapidly extending to touch some of the most remote communities of the world, but we have yet to understand its scale and impact. On Nicaragua's previously remote Miskitu Coast, the introduction of new markets and global demand for seafood has resulted in changes in fishermen's harvest behavior manifested within the local fishery. Small-scale fisheries are a significant component in sustaining global fish trade, ensuring food security, and alleviating poverty, but because the fishermen are disperse, numerous and located in remote areas, the social and ecological dynamics of the system are poorly understood. Previous work has indicated a decline in fish abundance as a result of connection to markets, yet fishermen's response to this decline and the resulting shift in harvest strategy requires further examination. I identify the ecological and social factors that explain changes in fishermen behavior and use an innovative application of social network analysis to understand these changes. I also use interviews with fishermen and fishery-dependent surveys to measure catch and release behavior and seasonal gear use. Results demonstrate multiple cliques within a community that mitigate the response of fishermen to changes in the fishery. This research applies techniques in social science to address challenges in sustainable management of fisheries. As fisheries managers consider implementing new regulations, such as seasonal restrictions on gear, it is essential to understand not just how this might impact fish abundance, but how and why human systems respond as they do.

  19. Spatiotemporal dynamics of large-scale brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, Jeremy

    Understanding the dynamics of large-scale brain activity is a tough challenge. One reason for this is the presence of an incredible amount of complexity arising from having roughly 100 billion neurons connected via 100 trillion synapses. Because of the extremely high number of degrees of freedom in the nervous system, the question of how the brain manages to properly function and remain stable, yet also be adaptable, must be posed. Neuroscientists have identified many ways the nervous system makes this possible, of which synaptic plasticity is possibly the most notable one. On the other hand, it is vital to understand how the nervous system also loses stability, resulting in neuropathological diseases such as epilepsy, a disease which affects 1% of the population. In the following work, we seek to answer some of these questions from two different perspectives. The first uses mean-field theory applied to neuronal populations, where the variables of interest are the percentages of active excitatory and inhibitory neurons in a network, to consider how the nervous system responds to external stimuli, self-organizes and generates epileptiform activity. The second method uses statistical field theory, in the framework of single neurons on a lattice, to study the concept of criticality, an idea borrowed from physics which posits that in some regime the brain operates in a collectively stable or marginally stable manner. This will be examined in two different neuronal networks with self-organized criticality serving as the overarching theme for the union of both perspectives. One of the biggest problems in neuroscience is the question of to what extent certain details are significant to the functioning of the brain. These details give rise to various spatiotemporal properties that at the smallest of scales explain the interaction of single neurons and synapses and at the largest of scales describe, for example, behaviors and sensations. In what follows, we will shed some

  20. Nonlinear Dynamics of Extended Hydrologic Systems over long time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lall, Upmanu

    2014-05-01

    We often view our knowledge of hydrology and hence of nature as intransient, at least over the time scales over which we study processes we wish to predict and understand. Over the last few decades, this assumption has come under question, largely because of the vocal expression of a changing climate, but also the recurrent demonstration of significant land use change, both of which significantly affect the boundary conditions for terrestrial hydrology that is our forte. Most recently, the concepts of hydromorphology and social hydrology have entered the discussion, and the notion that climate and hydrology influence human action, which in turn shapes hydrology, is being recognized. Finally, as a field, we seem to be coming to the conclusion that the hydrologic system is an open system, whose boundaries evolve in time, and that the hydrologic system, at many scales, has a profound effect on the systems that drive it -- whether they be the ecological and climatic systems, or the social system. What a mess! Complexity! Unpredictability! At a certain level of abstraction, one can consider the evolution of these coupled systems with nonlinear feedbacks and ask what types of questions are relevant in terms of such a coupled evolution? What are their implications at the planetary scale? What are their implications for a subsistence farmer in an arid landscape who may under external influence achieve a new transient hydro-ecological equilibrium? What are the implications for the economy and power of nations? In this talk, I will try to raise some of these questions and also provide some examples with very simple dynamical systems that suggest ways of thinking about some practical issues of feedback across climate, hydrology and human behavior.

  1. Links between small-scale dynamics and large-scale averages and its implication to large-scale hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, L.

    2012-04-01

    Changes to the hydrological cycle under a changing climate challenge our understanding of the interaction between hydrology and climate at various spatial and temporal scales. Traditional understanding of the climate-hydrology interaction were developed under a stationary climate and may not adequately summarize the interactions in a transient state when the climate is changing; for instance, opposite long-term temporal trend of precipitation and discharge has been observed in part of the world, as a result of significant warming and the nonlinear nature of the climate and hydrology system. The patterns of internal climate variability, ranging from monthly to multi-centennial time scales, largely determine the past and present climate. The response of these patterns of variability to human-induced climate change will determine much of the regional nature of climate change in the future. Therefore, understanding the basic patterns of variability is of vital importance for climate and hydrological modelers. This work showed that at the scale of large river basins or sub-continents, the temporal variation of climatic variables ranging from daily to inter-annual, could be well represented by multiple sets, each consists of limited number of points (when observations are used) or pixels (when gridded datasets are used), covering a small portion of the total domain area. Combined with hydrological response units, which divide the heterogeneity of the land surface into limited number of categories according to similarity in hydrological behavior, one could describe the climate-hydrology interaction and changes over a large domain with multiple small subsets of the domain area. Those points (when observations are used), or pixels (when gridded data are used), represent different patterns of the climate-hydrology interaction, and contribute uniquely to an averaged dynamic of the entire domain. Statistical methods were developed to identify the minimum number of points or

  2. Steady, dynamic, creep/recovery, and textural properties of yoghurt/molasses blends: Temperature sweep tests and applicability of Cox-Merz rule.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Ali; Bayrambaş, Kadir; Eroglu, Zeynep; Toker, Omer S; Yilmaz, Mustafa T; Karaman, Safa; Dogan, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    In this study, physicochemical, rheological (steady, dynamic, and creep/recovery), and textural properties of yoghurt/molasses blends (0, 5, 10, and 15% molasses) were investigated. The blends showed shear thinning behavior, as described by Ostwald de Waele model (R(2) ( )≥ 0.955). Consistency coefficient value (K) of the blends decreased with increasing molasses concentration in the sample. Storage modulus (G') of blends was higher than loss modulus (G″), exhibiting weak gel-like behavior. Molasses addition decreased G' and G″ values. Temperature sweep tests indicated that blends followed Arrhenius relationship. A modified Cox-Merz rule was applicable using shift factors. Compliance values (J(t)) increased as molasses concentration increased, revealing that deformation stability and internal viscosity (η1) decreased with concentration. Creep behavior was characterized using Burger model. Obtained J data as a function of time could be satisfactorily fitted to Burger model (R(2) ( )≥ 0.994). The final percentage recovery of blends remarkably decreased with the increase of molasses concentration. Firmness, consistency, cohesiveness, and viscosity index values decreased with molasses addition. According to the results of the current study, molasses amount to be added to the yoghurt should be determined regarding rheological properties since resistance of the sample to deformation decreased with increase in molasses concentration. PMID:25614154

  3. Dynamics and scaling of polymers in a dilute solution: Analytical treatment in two and higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punkkinen, O.; Falck, E.; Vattulainen, I.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2005-03-01

    We consider the dynamical scaling of a single polymer chain in good solvent. In the case of two-dimensional systems, Shannon and Choy [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1455 (1997)] have suggested that the dynamical scaling for a dilute polymer solution breaks down. Using scaling arguments and analytical calculations based on the Zimm model, we show that the dynamical scaling of a dilute two-dimensional polymer system holds when the relevant dynamical quantities are properly extracted from finite systems. Most important, the polymer diffusion coefficient in two dimensions scales logarithmically with system size, in excellent agreement with our extensive computer simulations. This scaling is the reason for the failure of the previous attempts to resolve the dynamical scaling of dilute two-dimensional polymer systems. In three and higher dimensions our analytic calculations are in agreement with previous results in the literature.

  4. Large-scale dynamics of sandy coastlines: Diffusivity and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FalquéS, A.; Calvete, D.

    2005-03-01

    The dynamics of small-amplitude perturbations of an otherwise rectilinear coastline due to the wave-driven alongshore sediment transport is examined at large time and length scales (years and kilometers). A linear stability analysis is performed by using an extended one-line shoreline model with two main improvements: (1) the curvature of the coastline features is accounted for and (2) the coastline features are assumed to extend offshore as a bathymetric perturbation up to a finite distance. For high incidence angles, instability is found in accordance with Ashton et al. (2001). However, it is seen that instability is inhibited by high waves with long periods and gently sloping shorefaces so that in this case the coastline may be stable for any angle. Similarly, there is no instability if the bathymetric perturbation is confined very close to the coast. It is found that the traditional linearized one-line model (Larson et al., 1987) tends to overpredict the coastline diffusivity. The overprediction is small for the conditions leading to a stable coastline and for moderate incidence angles but can be very dramatic for the conditions favoring instability. An interesting finding is that high-angle waves instability has a dominant wavelength at the linear regime, which is in the order of 4-15 km, one to two orders of magnitude larger than the length scale of surf zone rhythmic features. Intriguingly, this is roughly the same range of the wavelength of some observed shoreline sand waves and, in particular, those observed along the Dutch coast. A model application to this coast is presented.

  5. Structure and dynamics of DNA loops on nucleosomes studied with atomistic, microsecond-scale molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pasi, Marco; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    DNA loop formation on nucleosomes is strongly implicated in chromatin remodeling and occurs spontaneously in nucleosomes subjected to superhelical stress. The nature of such loops depends crucially on the balance between DNA deformation and DNA interaction with the nucleosome core. Currently, no high-resolution structural data on these loops exist. Although uniform rod models have been used to study loop size and shape, these models make assumptions concerning DNA mechanics and DNA–core binding. We present here atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations for two different loop sizes. The results point to the key role of localized DNA kinking within the loops. Kinks enable the relaxation of DNA bending strain to be coupled with improved DNA–core interactions. Kinks lead to small, irregularly shaped loops that are asymmetrically positioned with respect to the nucleosome core. We also find that loop position can influence the dynamics of the DNA segments at the extremities of the nucleosome. PMID:27098037

  6. Structure and dynamics of DNA loops on nucleosomes studied with atomistic, microsecond-scale molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pasi, Marco; Lavery, Richard

    2016-06-20

    DNA loop formation on nucleosomes is strongly implicated in chromatin remodeling and occurs spontaneously in nucleosomes subjected to superhelical stress. The nature of such loops depends crucially on the balance between DNA deformation and DNA interaction with the nucleosome core. Currently, no high-resolution structural data on these loops exist. Although uniform rod models have been used to study loop size and shape, these models make assumptions concerning DNA mechanics and DNA-core binding. We present here atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations for two different loop sizes. The results point to the key role of localized DNA kinking within the loops. Kinks enable the relaxation of DNA bending strain to be coupled with improved DNA-core interactions. Kinks lead to small, irregularly shaped loops that are asymmetrically positioned with respect to the nucleosome core. We also find that loop position can influence the dynamics of the DNA segments at the extremities of the nucleosome. PMID:27098037

  7. Fluid mechanics of dynamic stall. II - Prediction of full scale characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical extrapolations are made from experimental subscale dynamics to predict full scale characteristics of dynamic stall. The method proceeds by establishing analytic relationships between dynamic and static aerodynamic characteristics induced by viscous flow effects. The method is then validated by predicting dynamic test results on the basis of corresponding static test data obtained at the same subscale flow conditions, and the effect of Reynolds number on the static aerodynamic characteristics are determined from subscale to full scale flow conditions.

  8. Holographic Scaling and Dynamical Gauge Effects in Disordered Atomic Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemelke, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    Quantum systems with strong disorder, and those far from equilibrium or interacting with a thermal reservior, present unique challenges in a range of physical contexts, from non-relativistic condensed-matter settings, such as in study of localization phenomena, to relativistic cosmology and the study of fundamental interactions. Recently, two related concepts, that of the entropy of entanglement, and the controversial suggestion of entropic emergent gravity, have shed insight on several long-standing questions along these lines, suggesting that strongly disordered systems with causal barriers (either relativistic or those with Lieb-Robinson-like bounds) can be understood using holographic principles in combination with the equivalence between quantum vacuua thermal baths via the Unruh effect. I will discuss a range of experiments performed within a strong, topologically disordered medium for neutral atoms which simultaneously introduces quenched disorder for spin and mass transport, and provides simple mechanisms for open coupling to various types of dissipative baths. Under conditions in which a subset of quantum states are continuously decoupled from the thermal bath, dark state effects lead to slow light phenomena mimicking gravitational lensing in general relativity in a characterizable table-top disordered medium. Non-equilibrium steady-states are observed in direct analogy with the evaporation of gravitational singularities, and we observe scaling behaviors that can be directly connected to holographic measures of the information contained in disorder. Finally, I will show how a dynamic-gauge-field picture of this and similar systems can lead to a natural description of non-equilibrium and disordered phenomena, and how it provides some advantages over the Harris and Luck criteria for describing critical phenomena. Connections between out-of-equilibrium dynamics and some long-unresolved issues concerning the existence of a gauge-boson mass gap in certain Yang

  9. Dynamics and scaling of two-dimensional polymers in a dilute solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falck, E.; Punkkinen, O.; Vattulainen, I.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2003-11-01

    The breakdown of dynamical scaling for a dilute polymer solution in two dimensions has been suggested by Shannon and Choy [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1455 (1997)]. However, we show here through extensive computer simulations that dynamical scaling holds when the relevant dynamical quantities are properly extracted from finite systems. To verify dynamical scaling, we present results based on mesoscopic simulations in two dimensions for a polymer chain in a good solvent with full hydrodynamic interactions. We also present analytical arguments for the size dependence of the diffusion coefficient and find excellent agreement with the present large-scale simulations.

  10. A FRAMEWORK FOR FINE-SCALE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AIR QUALITY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine-scale Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of pollutant concentrations within roadway and building microenvironments is feasible using high performance computing. Unlike currently used regulatory air quality models, fine-scale CFD simulations are able to account rig...

  11. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multicomponent metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamical aspects of a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulations with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (self diffusion coefficient, self relaxation time, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx˜1300 K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs well above the melting point of the system (Tm˜900 K) in the equilibrium liquid state; and the crossover temperature Tx is roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature of the system (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a nonparametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter α2 and the four-point correlation function χ4.

  12. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multi-component metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamic aspects of such a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (diffusion coefficient, relaxation times, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx ~1300K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs in the equilibrium liquid state well above the melting temperature of the system (Tm ~ 900K), and the crossover temperature ismore » roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a non-parametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter and the four-point correlation function.« less

  13. Small-scale nonlinear dynamics of K-mouflage theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brax, Philippe; Valageas, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the small-scale static configurations of K-mouflage models defined by a general function K (χ ) of the kinetic terms. The fifth force is screened by the nonlinear K-mouflage mechanism if K'(χ ) grows sufficiently fast for large negative χ . In the general nonspherically symmetric case, the fifth force is not aligned with the Newtonian force. For spherically symmetric static matter density profiles, we show that the results depend on the potential function W-(y )=y K'(-y2/2 ) ; i.e., W-(y ) must be monotonically increasing to +∞ for y ≥0 to guarantee the existence of a single solution throughout space for any matter density profile. Small radial perturbations around these static profiles propagate as travelling waves with a velocity greater than the speed of light. Starting from vanishing initial conditions for the scalar field and for a time-dependent matter density corresponding to the formation of an overdensity, we numerically check that the scalar field converges to the static solution. If W- is bounded, for high-density objects there are no static solutions throughout space, but one can still define a static solution restricted to large radii. Our dynamical study shows that the scalar field relaxes to this static solution at large radii, whereas spatial gradients keep growing with time at smaller radii. If W- is not bounded but nonmonotonic, there is an infinite number of discontinuous static solutions. However, the Klein-Gordon equation is no longer a well-defined hyperbolic equation, which leads to complex characteristic speeds and exponential instabilities. Therefore, these discontinuous static solutions are not physical, and these models are not theoretically sound. Such K-mouflage scenarios provide an example of theories that can appear viable at the cosmological level, for the cosmological background and perturbative analysis, while being meaningless at a nonlinear level for small-scale configurations. This shows the importance of

  14. Macroscopic elastic properties of textured ZrN-AlN polycrystalline aggregates: From ab initio calculations to grain-scale interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holec, D.; Tasnádi, F.; Wagner, P.; Friák, M.; Neugebauer, J.; Mayrhofer, P. H.; Keckes, J.

    2014-11-01

    Despite the fast development of computational material modeling, the theoretical description of macroscopic elastic properties of textured polycrystalline aggregates starting from basic principles remains a challenging task. In this study we use a supercell-based approach to obtain the elastic properties of a random solid solution cubic Zr1 -xAlxN system as a function of the metallic sublattice composition and texture descriptors. The employed special quasirandom structures are optimized not only with respect to short-range-order parameters, but also to make the three cubic directions [1 0 0 ] , [0 1 0 ] , and [0 0 1 ] as similar as possible. In this way, only a small spread of elastic constant tensor components is achieved and an optimum trade-off between modeling of chemical disorder and computational limits regarding the supercell size and calculational time is proposed. The single-crystal elastic constants are shown to vary smoothly with composition, yielding x ≈0.5 an alloy constitution with an almost isotropic response. Consequently, polycrystals with this composition are suggested to have Young's modulus independent of the actual microstructure. This is indeed confirmed by explicit calculations of polycrystal elastic properties, both within the isotropic aggregate limit and with fiber textures with various orientations and sharpness. It turns out that for low AlN mole fractions, the spread of the possible Young's modulus data caused by the texture variation can be larger than 100 GPa. Consequently, our discussion of Young's modulus data of cubic Zr1 -xAlxN contains also the evaluation of the texture typical for thin films.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation investigations of atomic-scale wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yuchong; Falk, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Frictional running-in and material transfer in wear take place at the micro- and nano-scale but the fundamental physics remain poorly understood. Here we intend to investigate wear and running-in phenomena in silicon based materials, which are widely utilized in micro/nano electromechanical systems(MEMS/NEMS). We use an atomic force microscopy (AFM) model composed of a crystalline silicon tip and substrate coated with native oxide layers. Molecular dynamics simulation has been performed over a range of temperatures, external loads and slip rates. Results show that adhesive wear takes place across the interface in an atom-by-atom fashion which remodels the tip leading to a final steady state. We quantify the rate of material transfer as a function of the coverage of non-bridging oxygen (NBO) atoms, which has a pronounced change of the system's tribological and wear behaviors. A constitutive rate and state model is proposed to predict the evolution of frictional strength and wear. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Award No. 0926111.

  16. Scale-free avalanche dynamics in the stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolozzi, M.; Leinweber, D. B.; Thomas, A. W.

    2006-10-01

    Self-organized criticality (SOC) has been claimed to play an important role in many natural and social systems. In the present work we empirically investigate the relevance of this theory to stock-market dynamics. Avalanches in stock-market indices are identified using a multi-scale wavelet-filtering analysis designed to remove Gaussian noise from the index. Here, new methods are developed to identify the optimal filtering parameters which maximize the noise removal. The filtered time series is reconstructed and compared with the original time series. A statistical analysis of both high-frequency Nasdaq E-mini Futures and daily Dow Jones data is performed. The results of this new analysis confirm earlier results revealing a robust power-law behaviour in the probability distribution function of the sizes, duration and laminar times between avalanches. This power-law behaviour holds the potential to be established as a stylized fact of stock market indices in general. While the memory process, implied by the power-law distribution of the laminar times, is not consistent with classical models for SOC, we note that a power-law distribution of the laminar times cannot be used to rule out self-organized critical behaviour.

  17. ISM and dynamical scaling relations in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade we have seen a tremendous progress in our understanding of the life cycle of galaxies. Particularly powerful has been the synergy between representative surveys of cold gas, dust and metals and improved theoretical models able to follow the evolution of the different phases of the ISM in a self-consistent way. At the same time, the advent of optical integral field spectroscopic surveys is finally allowing us to quantify how the kinematical properties of gas and stars vary across the Hubble sequence. In this talk, I will review recent observational work aimed at providing a local benchmark for the study of the star formation cycle in galaxies and dynamical scaling relations in galaxies. By combining observations obtained as part the Herschel Reference Survey, the GALEX Arecibo SDSS survey, the ALFALFA survey and the SAMI Galaxy Survey, I will discuss what nearby galaxies can teach us about the interplay between kinematics, star formation, chemical enrichment and environmental effects in our neighbourhoods.

  18. Ion beam texturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    A microscopic surface texture is created by sputter etching a surface while simultaneously sputter depositing a lower sputter yield material onto the surface. A xenon ion beam source has been used to perform this texturing process on samples as large as three centimeters in diameter. Ion beam textured surface structures have been characterized with SEM photomicrographs for a large number of materials including Cu, Al, Si, Ti, Ni, Fe, Stainless steel, Au, and Ag. Surfaces have been textured using a variety of low sputter yield materials - Ta, Mo, Nb, and Ti. The initial stages of the texture creation have been documented, and the technique of ion beam sputter removal of any remaining deposited material has been studied. A number of other texturing parameters have been studied such as the variation of the texture with ion beam power, surface temperature, and the rate of texture growth with sputter etching time.

  19. Clustering of time-evolving scaling dynamics in a complex signal.

    PubMed

    Saghir, Hamidreza; Chau, Tom; Kushki, Azadeh

    2016-07-01

    Complex time series are widespread in physics and physiology. Multifractal analysis provides a tool to study the scaling dynamics of such time series. However, the temporal evolution of scaling dynamics has been ignored by traditional tools such as the multifractal spectrum. We present scaling maps that add the time dimension to the study of scaling dynamics. This is particularly important in cases in which the dynamics of the underlying processes change in time or in applications that necessitate real-time detection of scaling dynamics. In addition, we present a methodology for automatic clustering of existing scaling regimes in a signal. We demonstrate the methodology on time-evolving correlated and uncorrelated noise and the output of a physiological control system (i.e., cardiac interbeat intervals) in healthy and pathological states. PMID:27575136

  20. Clustering of time-evolving scaling dynamics in a complex signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghir, Hamidreza; Chau, Tom; Kushki, Azadeh

    2016-07-01

    Complex time series are widespread in physics and physiology. Multifractal analysis provides a tool to study the scaling dynamics of such time series. However, the temporal evolution of scaling dynamics has been ignored by traditional tools such as the multifractal spectrum. We present scaling maps that add the time dimension to the study of scaling dynamics. This is particularly important in cases in which the dynamics of the underlying processes change in time or in applications that necessitate real-time detection of scaling dynamics. In addition, we present a methodology for automatic clustering of existing scaling regimes in a signal. We demonstrate the methodology on time-evolving correlated and uncorrelated noise and the output of a physiological control system (i.e., cardiac interbeat intervals) in healthy and pathological states.

  1. Whey Texturization for Snacks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extrusion processing is used to modify the physical texture (texturization) of whey proteins, expanding their potential use in snack foods. Texturization changes the globular folding of proteins improving their interaction with other ingredients, and is the basis for creating new whey enriched snack...

  2. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multi-component metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamic aspects of such a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (diffusion coefficient, relaxation times, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx ~1300K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs in the equilibrium liquid state well above the melting temperature of the system (Tm ~ 900K), and the crossover temperature is roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a non-parametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter and the four-point correlation function.

  3. Texture of Tethys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This richly textured look at Saturn's moon Tethys shows the huge crater Odysseus and its central mountain in relief, as well as many smaller impact sites. Vertical relief on solid solar system bodies is often most easily visible near the terminator (the line between day and night). Tethys is 1,071 kilometers (665 miles) across.

    North on Tethys is up in this view. The lit portion of Tethys seen here is on the moon's leading hemisphere as it orbits Saturn.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on June 27, 2005, at a distance of approximately 490,000 kilometers (304,000 miles) from Tethys and at a Sun-Tethys-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 117 degrees. The image scale is 3 kilometers (2 miles) per pixel.

  4. Scaling properties of the anisotropic critical current density in bulk textured YBaCuO. Evidence toward a 3D flux line lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Braithwaite, D.; Bourgault, D.; Sulpice, A.; Barbut, J.M.; Tournier, R. l'Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble ); Monot, I.; Lepropre, M.; Provost, J.; Desgardin, G. )

    1993-04-01

    The dc transport critical current densities of melt texture grown and magnetically melt textured bulk YBaCuO have been measured at 77 K and in magnetic fields. A maximum value of over 31,000 A/cm[sup 2] is obtained with a field of 7 teslas applied parallel to the (a,b) planes. Over the rest of the angular range the critical current is shown to be determined mainly by the c-axis component of the applied field. Although this dependency is expected in the presence of two-dimensional vortices, in fact the data are shown to correspond better to the behavior expected of an anisotropic three-dimensional superconductor. These results are compared to magnetization measurements on the same samples. Results show that when the field is directed close to the c-axis, superconducting transport currents flow at fields well above the field at which the irreversible magnetization disappears.

  5. Lava flow surface textures - SIR-B radar image texture, field observations, and terrain measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, Lisa R.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Hayashi, Joan N.

    1990-01-01

    SIR-B images, field observations, and small-scale (cm) terrain measurements are used to study lave flow surface textures related to emplacement processes of a single Hawaiian lava flow. Although smooth pahoehoe textures are poorly characterized on the SIR-B data, rougher pahoehoe types and the a'a flow portion show image textures attributed to spatial variations in surface roughness. Field observations of six distinct lava flow textural units are described and used to interpret modes of emplacement. The radar smooth/rough boundary between pahoehoe and a'a occurs at a vertical relief of about 10 cm on this lava flow. While direct observation and measurement most readily yield information related to lava eruption and emplacement processes, analyses of remote sensing data such as those acquired by imaging radars and altimeters can provide a means of quantifying surface texture, identifying the size and distribution of flow components, and delineating textural unit boundaries.

  6. Dynamic Scaling of Lipofuscin Deposition in Aging Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, H. E.

    2011-07-01

    Lipofuscin is a membrane-bound cellular waste that can be neither degraded nor ejected from the cell but can only be diluted through cell division and subsequent growth. The fate of postmitotic (non-dividing) cells such as neurons, cardiac myocytes, skeletal muscle fibers, and retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) is to accumulate lipofuscin, which as an "aging pigment" has been considered a reliable biomarker for the age of cells. Environmental stress can accelerate the accumulation of lipofuscin. For example, accumulation in brain cells appears to be an important issue connected with heavy consumption of alcohol. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, whose abnormal accumulation is related to a range of disorders including Type IV mucolipidosis (ML4), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) which is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. We introduce a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth and aggregation that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin. As an example of lipofuscin deposit in a given kind of postmitotic cell, we study the kinetics of lipofuscin growth in a RPE cell. Our results agree with a linear growth of the number of lipofuscin granules with age. We apply the dynamic scaling approach to our model and find excellent data collapse for the cluster size distribution. An unusual feature of our model is that while small particles are removed from the cell the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation.

  7. Laser surface texturing of tool steel: textured surfaces quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šugár, Peter; Šugárová, Jana; Frnčík, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In this experimental investigation the laser surface texturing of tool steel of type 90MnCrV8 has been conducted. The 5-axis highly dynamic laser precision machining centre Lasertec 80 Shape equipped with the nano-second pulsed ytterbium fibre laser and CNC system Siemens 840 D was used. The planar and spherical surfaces first prepared by turning have been textured. The regular array of spherical and ellipsoidal dimples with a different dimensions and different surface density has been created. Laser surface texturing has been realized under different combinations of process parameters: pulse frequency, pulse energy and laser beam scanning speed. The morphological characterization of ablated surfaces has been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. The results show limited possibility of ns pulse fibre laser application to generate different surface structures for tribological modification of metallic materials. These structures were obtained by varying the processing conditions between surface ablation, to surface remelting. In all cases the areas of molten material and re-cast layers were observed on the bottom and walls of the dimples. Beside the influence of laser beam parameters on the machined surface quality during laser machining of regular hemispherical and elipsoidal dimple texture on parabolic and hemispherical surfaces has been studied.

  8. Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations and approximate dynamic programming on time scales.

    PubMed

    Seiffertt, John; Sanyal, Suman; Wunsch, Donald C

    2008-08-01

    The time scales calculus is a key emerging area of mathematics due to its potential use in a wide variety of multidisciplinary applications. We extend this calculus to approximate dynamic programming (ADP). The core backward induction algorithm of dynamic programming is extended from its traditional discrete case to all isolated time scales. Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations, the solution of which is the fundamental problem in the field of dynamic programming, are motivated and proven on time scales. By drawing together the calculus of time scales and the applied area of stochastic control via ADP, we have connected two major fields of research. PMID:18632378

  9. Some aspects of control of a large-scale dynamic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoki, M.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques of predicting and/or controlling the dynamic behavior of large scale systems are discussed in terms of decentralized decision making. Topics discussed include: (1) control of large scale systems by dynamic team with delayed information sharing; (2) dynamic resource allocation problems by a team (hierarchical structure with a coordinator); and (3) some problems related to the construction of a model of reduced dimension.

  10. Dynamics of Two Dimensional Bose Gases and the Role of Scale Invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Jeff

    2016-05-01

    The controllable study of dynamics has become commonplace in cold atom experiments. However, the theoretical exploration of dynamics has relied heavily on numerical simulations due to the vast complexity of dynamical many body problems. The situation is simplified in two dimensional Bose gases thanks to the presence of scale invariance. This symmetry is presumed to have an important effect on the dynamics of the system but has yet to be studied in the context of cold gases. In this talk we report a study of interacting two dimensional Bose gases and the role scale invariance plays on the system's dynamics.

  11. Separation Surfaces in the Spectral TV Domain for Texture Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horesh, Dikla; Gilboa, Guy

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel notion of separation surfaces for image decomposition. A surface is embedded in the spectral total-variation (TV) three dimensional domain and encodes a spatially-varying separation scale. The method allows good separation of textures with gradually varying pattern-size, pattern-contrast or illumination. The recently proposed total variation spectral framework is used to decompose the image into a continuum of textural scales. A desired texture, within a scale range, is found by fitting a surface to the local maximal responses in the spectral domain. A band above and below the surface, referred to as the \\textit{Texture Stratum}, defines for each pixel the adaptive scale-range of the texture. Based on the decomposition an application is proposed which can attenuate or enhance textures in the image in a very natural and visually convincing manner.

  12. Dynamic scaling behaviors of linear fractal Langevin-type equation driven by nonconserved and conserved noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Xun, Zhi-Peng; Wu, Ling; Chen, Yi-Li; Xia, Hui; Hao, Da-Peng; Tang, Gang

    2016-06-01

    In order to study the effects of the microscopic details of fractal substrates on the scaling behavior of the growth model, a generalized linear fractal Langevin-type equation, ∂h / ∂t =(- 1) m + 1 ν∇ mzrw h (zrw is the dynamic exponent of random walk on substrates), driven by nonconserved and conserved noise is proposed and investigated theoretically employing scaling analysis. Corresponding dynamic scaling exponents are obtained.

  13. Crystalline silicon solar cells with micro/nano texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, Dimitre Z.; Du, Chen-Hsun

    2013-02-01

    Crystalline silicon solar cells with two-scale texture consisting of random upright pyramids and surface nanotextured layer directly onto the pyramids are prepared and reflectance properties and I-V characteristics measured. Random pyramids texture is produced by etching in an alkaline solution. On top of the pyramids texture, a nanotexture is developed using an electroless oxidation/etching process. Solar cells with two-scale surface texturization are prepared following the standard screen-printing technology sequence. The micro/nano surface is found to lower considerably the light reflectance of silicon. The short wavelengths spectral response (blue response) improvement is observed in micro/nano textured solar cells compared to standard upright pyramids textured cells. An efficiency of 17.5% is measured for the best micro/nano textured c-Si solar cell. The efficiency improvement is found to be due to the gain in both Jsc and Voc.

  14. A numerical model for dynamic crustal-scale fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Fluid flow in the crust is often envisaged and modeled as continuous, yet minimal flow, which occurs over large geological times. This is a suitable approximation for flow as long as it is solely controlled by the matrix permeability of rocks, which in turn is controlled by viscous compaction of the pore space. However, strong evidence (hydrothermal veins and ore deposits) exists that a significant part of fluid flow in the crust occurs strongly localized in both space and time, controlled by the opening and sealing of hydrofractures. We developed, tested and applied a novel computer code, which considers this dynamic behavior and couples it with steady, Darcian flow controlled by the matrix permeability. In this dual-porosity model, fractures open depending on the fluid pressure relative to the solid pressure. Fractures form when matrix permeability is insufficient to accommodate fluid flow resulting from compaction, decompression (Staude et al. 2009) or metamorphic dehydration reactions (Weisheit et al. 2013). Open fractures can close when the contained fluid either seeps into the matrix or escapes by fracture propagation: mobile hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). In the model, closing and sealing of fractures is controlled by a time-dependent viscous law, which is based on the effective stress and on either Newtonian or non-Newtonian viscosity. Our simulations indicate that the bulk of crustal fluid flow in the middle to lower upper crust is intermittent, highly self-organized, and occurs as mobile hydrofractures. This is due to the low matrix porosity and permeability, combined with a low matrix viscosity and, hence, fast sealing of fractures. Stable fracture networks, generated by fluid overpressure, are restricted to the uppermost crust. Semi-stable fracture networks can develop in an intermediate zone, if a critical overpressure is reached. Flow rates in mobile hydrofractures exceed those in the matrix porosity and fracture networks by orders of magnitude

  15. 1st- and 2nd-order motion and texture resolution in central and peripheral vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. A.; Sperling, G.

    1995-01-01

    STIMULI. The 1st-order stimuli are moving sine gratings. The 2nd-order stimuli are fields of static visual texture, whose contrasts are modulated by moving sine gratings. Neither the spatial slant (orientation) nor the direction of motion of these 2nd-order (microbalanced) stimuli can be detected by a Fourier analysis; they are invisible to Reichardt and motion-energy detectors. METHOD. For these dynamic stimuli, when presented both centrally and in an annular window extending from 8 to 10 deg in eccentricity, we measured the highest spatial frequency for which discrimination between +/- 45 deg texture slants and discrimination between opposite directions of motion were each possible. RESULTS. For sufficiently low spatial frequencies, slant and direction can be discriminated in both central and peripheral vision, for both 1st- and for 2nd-order stimuli. For both 1st- and 2nd-order stimuli, at both retinal locations, slant discrimination is possible at higher spatial frequencies than direction discrimination. For both 1st- and 2nd-order stimuli, motion resolution decreases 2-3 times more rapidly with eccentricity than does texture resolution. CONCLUSIONS. (1) 1st- and 2nd-order motion scale similarly with eccentricity. (2) 1st- and 2nd-order texture scale similarly with eccentricity. (3) The central/peripheral resolution fall-off is 2-3 times greater for motion than for texture.

  16. Conceptual design and analysis of a dynamic scale model of the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. A.; Gronet, M. J.; Tan, M. K.; Thorne, J.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the conceptual design study performed to evaluate design options for a subscale dynamic test model which could be used to investigate the expected on-orbit structural dynamic characteristics of the Space Station Freedom early build configurations. The baseline option was a 'near-replica' model of the SSF SC-7 pre-integrated truss configuration. The approach used to develop conceptual design options involved three sets of studies: evaluation of the full-scale design and analysis databases, conducting scale factor trade studies, and performing design sensitivity studies. The scale factor trade study was conducted to develop a fundamental understanding of the key scaling parameters that drive design, performance and cost of a SSF dynamic scale model. Four scale model options were estimated: 1/4, 1/5, 1/7, and 1/10 scale. Prototype hardware was fabricated to assess producibility issues. Based on the results of the study, a 1/4-scale size is recommended based on the increased model fidelity associated with a larger scale factor. A design sensitivity study was performed to identify critical hardware component properties that drive dynamic performance. A total of 118 component properties were identified which require high-fidelity replication. Lower fidelity dynamic similarity scaling can be used for non-critical components.

  17. Texture of fermion mass matrices in partially unified theories

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, B. |; Nandi, S. |

    1996-12-31

    We investigate the texture of fermion mass matrices in theories with partial unification (for example, SU(2){sub L} {times} SU(2){sub R} {times} SU(4){sub c}) at a scale of {approximately} 10{sup 12} GeV. Starting with the low energy values of the masses and the mixing angles, we find only two viable textures with at most four texture zeros. One of these corresponds to a somewhat modified Fritzsch textures. A theoretical derivation of these textures leads to new interesting relations among the masses and the mixing angles. 13 refs.

  18. Dynamic conductivity scaling in photoexcited V2O3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Elsa; Wang, Siming; Ramírez, Juan Gabriel; Liu, Mengkun; Zhang, Jingdi; Geng, Kun; Schuller, Ivan K.; Averitt, Richard D.

    2015-08-01

    Optical-pump terahertz-probe spectroscopy is used to investigate ultrafast far-infrared conductivity dynamics during the insulator-to-metal transition in vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3 ). The resultant conductivity increase occurs on a tens of picosecond time scale, exhibiting a strong dependence on the initial temperature and fluence. We have identified a scaling of the conductivity dynamics upon renormalizing the time axis with a simple power law (α ≃1 /2 ) that depends solely on the initial, final, and conductivity onset temperatures. Qualitative and quantitative considerations indicate that the dynamics arise from nucleation and growth of the metallic phase which can be described by the Avrami model. We show that the temporal scaling arises from spatial scaling of the growth of the metallic volume fraction, highlighting the self-similar nature of the dynamics. Our results illustrate the important role played by mesoscopic effects in phase transition dynamics.

  19. Two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ruiting; Liu, Geng; Liu, Tianxiang

    2016-05-01

    Detailed behaviors of nanoscale textured surfaces during the reciprocating sliding contacts are still unknown although they are widely used in mechanical components to improve tribological characteristics. The current research of sliding contacts of textured surfaces mainly focuses on the experimental studies, while the cost is too high. Molecular dynamics(MD) simulation is widely used in the studies of nanoscale single-pass sliding contacts, but the CPU cost of MD simulation is also too high to simulate the reciprocating sliding contacts. In this paper, employing multiscale method which couples molecular dynamics simulation and finite element method, two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces are investigated. Four textured surfaces with different texture shapes are designed, and a rigid cylindrical tip is used to slide on these textured surfaces. For different textured surfaces, average potential energies and average friction forces of the corresponding sliding processes are analyzed. The analyzing results show that "running-in" stages are different for each texture, and steady friction processes are discovered for textured surfaces II, III and IV. Texture shape and sliding direction play important roles in reciprocating sliding contacts, which influence average friction forces greatly. This research can help to design textured surfaces to improve tribological behaviors in nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts.

  20. Two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Ruiting; Liu, Geng; Liu, Tianxiang

    2016-04-01

    Detailed behaviors of nanoscale textured surfaces during the reciprocating sliding contacts are still unknown although they are widely used in mechanical components to improve tribological characteristics. The current research of sliding contacts of textured surfaces mainly focuses on the experimental studies, while the cost is too high. Molecular dynamics(MD) simulation is widely used in the studies of nanoscale single-pass sliding contacts, but the CPU cost of MD simulation is also too high to simulate the reciprocating sliding contacts. In this paper, employing multiscale method which couples molecular dynamics simulation and finite element method, two dimensional nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts of textured surfaces are investigated. Four textured surfaces with different texture shapes are designed, and a rigid cylindrical tip is used to slide on these textured surfaces. For different textured surfaces, average potential energies and average friction forces of the corresponding sliding processes are analyzed. The analyzing results show that "running-in" stages are different for each texture, and steady friction processes are discovered for textured surfaces II, III and IV. Texture shape and sliding direction play important roles in reciprocating sliding contacts, which influence average friction forces greatly. This research can help to design textured surfaces to improve tribological behaviors in nanoscale reciprocating sliding contacts.

  1. Texture and wettability of metallic lotus leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankiewicz, C.; Attinger, D.

    2016-02-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with the self-cleaning behavior of lotus leaves are sought for drag reduction and phase change heat transfer applications. These superrepellent surfaces have traditionally been fabricated by random or deterministic texturing of a hydrophobic material. Recently, superrepellent surfaces have also been made from hydrophilic materials, by deterministic texturing using photolithography, without low-surface energy coating. Here, we show that hydrophilic materials can also be made superrepellent to water by chemical texturing, a stochastic rather than deterministic process. These metallic surfaces are the first analog of lotus leaves, in terms of wettability, texture and repellency. A mechanistic model is also proposed to describe the influence of multiple tiers of roughness on wettability and repellency. This demonstrated ability to make hydrophilic materials superrepellent without deterministic structuring or additional coatings opens the way to large scale and robust manufacturing of superrepellent surfaces.Superhydrophobic surfaces with the self-cleaning behavior of lotus leaves are sought for drag reduction and phase change heat transfer applications. These superrepellent surfaces have traditionally been fabricated by random or deterministic texturing of a hydrophobic material. Recently, superrepellent surfaces have also been made from hydrophilic materials, by deterministic texturing using photolithography, without low-surface energy coating. Here, we show that hydrophilic materials can also be made superrepellent to water by chemical texturing, a stochastic rather than deterministic process. These metallic surfaces are the first analog of lotus leaves, in terms of wettability, texture and repellency. A mechanistic model is also proposed to describe the influence of multiple tiers of roughness on wettability and repellency. This demonstrated ability to make hydrophilic materials superrepellent without deterministic structuring or additional

  2. Dynamic scaling and large scale effects in turbulence in compressible stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pharasi, Hirdesh K.; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the propagation of sound in a turbulent fluid which is confined between two horizontal parallel plates, maintained at different temperatures. In the homogeneous fluid, Staroselsky et al. had predicted a divergent sound speed at large length scales. Here we find a divergent sound speed and a vanishing expansion coefficient at large length scales. Dispersion relation and the question of scale invariance at large distance scales lead to these results.

  3. Crossover from antipersistent to persistent behavior in time series possessing the generalyzed dynamic scaling law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.; Morales Matamoros, Oswaldo; Gálvez M., Ernesto; Pérez A., Alfonso

    2004-03-01

    The behavior of crude oil price volatility is analyzed within a conceptual framework of kinetic roughening of growing interfaces. We find that the persistent long-horizon volatilities satisfy the Family-Viscek dynamic scaling ansatz, whereas the mean-reverting in time short horizon volatilities obey the generalized scaling law with continuously varying scaling exponents. Furthermore we find that the crossover from antipersistent to persistent behavior is accompanied by a change in the type of volatility distribution. These phenomena are attributed to the complex avalanche dynamics of crude oil markets and so a similar behavior may be observed in a wide variety of physical systems governed by avalanche dynamics.

  4. QCD dynamics in mesons at soft and hard scales

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.; Souchlas, N. A.; Tandy, P. C.

    2010-07-27

    Using a ladder-rainbow kernel previously established for the soft scale of light quark hadrons, we explore, within a Dyson-Schwinger approach, phenomena that mix soft and hard scales of QCD. The difference between vector and axial vector current correlators is examined to estimate the four quark chiral condensate and the leading distance scale for the onset of non-perturbative phenomena in QCD. The valence quark distributions, in the pion and kaon, defined in deep inelastic scattering, and measured in the Drell Yan process, are investigated with the same ladder-rainbow truncation of the Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations.

  5. Capillary Rise on Legs of a Small Animal and on Artificially Textured Surfaces Mimicking Them

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Marie; Ishii, Daisuke; Ito, Shuto; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Okumura, Ko

    2014-01-01

    The wharf roach Ligia exotica is a small animal that lives by the sea and absorbs water from the sea through its legs by virtue of a remarkable array of small blades of micron scale. We find that the imbibition dynamics on the legs is rather complex on a microscopic scale, but on a macroscopic scale the imbibition length seems to simply scale linearly with elapsed time. This unusual dynamics of imbibition, which usually slows down with time, is advantageous for long-distance water transport and results from repetition of unit dynamics. Inspired by the remarkable features, we study artificially textured surfaces mimicking the structure on the legs of the animal. Unlike the case of the wharf roach, the linear dynamics were not reproduced on the artificial surfaces, which may result from more subtle features on the real legs that are not faithfully reflected on the artificial surfaces. Instead, the nonlinear dynamics revealed that hybrid structures on the artificial surfaces speed up the water transport compared with non-hybrid ones. In addition, the dynamics on the artificial surfaces turn out to be well described by a composite theory developed here, with the theory giving useful guiding principles for designing hybrid textured surfaces for rapid imbibition and elucidating physical advantages of the microscopic design on the legs. PMID:24849071

  6. Quantifying the Impact of Agricultural Land Management Practices on Soil Carbon Dynamics at Different Temporal and Spatial Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. G.; Papanicolaou, T.; Wacha, K.

    2012-12-01

    Vast amounts of rich, organic topsoil are lost from agricultural landscapes each year through the combination of both tillage- and rainfall-induced erosion. The implications of these losses lead to soil and water quality degradation, as well as decreased biomass production and grain yields within a watershed. Further, the effects of land management practices on soil carbon can be felt at a much larger scale in terms of the global carbon cycle, where the interactions of carbon between the atmosphere, vegetation, and soil are highly dynamic. During tillage- and rainfall-induced erosion, organic material encapsulated within soil aggregates are dislodged and redistributed along the hillslope. Additionally, this redistribution increases decomposition rates and the release of carbon dioxide fluxes to the atmosphere by changing soil texture, bulk density, and water holding capacities, which are key parameters that affect microbial activity. In this ongoing study, the combination of extensive field data, geo-spatial tools, and a coupled erosion (Water Erosion Prediction Project) - biogeochemical (CENTURY) model were used to assess the soil carbon sequestration potential for representative crop rotations in a highly productive agricultural watershed, at various spatial and temporal scales. Total Belowground Carbon Allocation was selected as a metric to assess carbon sequestration because it implements a mass balance approach of the various carbon fluxes stemming from soil detachment (erosion/deposition), heterotrophic respiration from microbial decomposition, and plant production. The results from this study show that the use of conservation practices can sequester 35 g C/m2 within the soils of the studied watershed over a 2-year crop rotation. Extrapolating to the watershed scale shows that the system is a net sink of carbon. Providing accurate assessment of the carbon fluxes associated with agricultural land management practices can provide much insight to global climate

  7. Does small scale structure significantly affect cosmological dynamics?

    PubMed

    Adamek, Julian; Clarkson, Chris; Durrer, Ruth; Kunz, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The large-scale homogeneity and isotropy of the Universe is generally thought to imply a well-defined background cosmological model. It may not. Smoothing over structure adds in an extra contribution, transferring power from small scales up to large. Second-order perturbation theory implies that the effect is small, but suggests that formally the perturbation series may not converge. The amplitude of the effect is actually determined by the ratio of the Hubble scales at matter-radiation equality and today-which are entirely unrelated. This implies that a universe with significantly lower temperature today could have significant backreaction from more power on small scales, and so provides the ideal testing ground for understanding backreaction. We investigate this using two different N-body numerical simulations-a 3D Newtonian and a 1D simulation which includes all relevant relativistic effects. We show that while perturbation theory predicts an increasing backreaction as more initial small-scale power is added, in fact the virialization of structure saturates the backreaction effect at the same level independently of the equality scale. This implies that backreaction is a small effect independently of initial conditions. Nevertheless, it may still contribute at the percent level to certain cosmological observables and therefore it cannot be neglected in precision cosmology. PMID:25699430

  8. The role of large-scale, extratropical dynamics in climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, T.G.

    1994-02-01

    The climate modeling community has focused recently on improving our understanding of certain processes, such as cloud feedbacks and ocean circulation, that are deemed critical to climate-change prediction. Although attention to such processes is warranted, emphasis on these areas has diminished a general appreciation of the role played by the large-scale dynamics of the extratropical atmosphere. Lack of interest in extratropical dynamics may reflect the assumption that these dynamical processes are a non-problem as far as climate modeling is concerned, since general circulation models (GCMs) calculate motions on this scale from first principles. Nevertheless, serious shortcomings in our ability to understand and simulate large-scale dynamics exist. Partly due to a paucity of standard GCM diagnostic calculations of large-scale motions and their transports of heat, momentum, potential vorticity, and moisture, a comprehensive understanding of the role of large-scale dynamics in GCM climate simulations has not been developed. Uncertainties remain in our understanding and simulation of large-scale extratropical dynamics and their interaction with other climatic processes, such as cloud feedbacks, large-scale ocean circulation, moist convection, air-sea interaction and land-surface processes. To address some of these issues, the 17th Stanstead Seminar was convened at Bishop`s University in Lennoxville, Quebec. The purpose of the Seminar was to promote discussion of the role of large-scale extratropical dynamics in global climate change. Abstracts of the talks are included in this volume. On the basis of these talks, several key issues emerged concerning large-scale extratropical dynamics and their climatic role. Individual records are indexed separately for the database.

  9. Advecting Procedural Textures for 2D Flow Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of specially generated 3D procedural textures for visualizing steady state 2D flow fields. We use the flow field to advect and animate the texture over time. However, using standard texture advection techniques and arbitrary textures will introduce some undesirable effects such as: (a) expanding texture from a critical source point, (b) streaking pattern from the boundary of the flowfield, (c) crowding of advected textures near an attracting spiral or sink, and (d) absent or lack of textures in some regions of the flow. This paper proposes a number of strategies to solve these problems. We demonstrate how the technique works using both synthetic data and computational fluid dynamics data.

  10. The effect of texture granularity on texture synthesis quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golestaneh, S. Alireza; Subedar, Mahesh M.; Karam, Lina J.

    2015-09-01

    Natural and artificial textures occur frequently in images and in video sequences. Image/video coding systems based on texture synthesis can make use of a reliable texture synthesis quality assessment method in order to improve the compression performance in terms of perceived quality and bit-rate. Existing objective visual quality assessment methods do not perform satisfactorily when predicting the synthesized texture quality. In our previous work, we showed that texture regularity can be used as an attribute for estimating the quality of synthesized textures. In this paper, we study the effect of another texture attribute, namely texture granularity, on the quality of synthesized textures. For this purpose, subjective studies are conducted to assess the quality of synthesized textures with different levels (low, medium, high) of perceived texture granularity using different types of texture synthesis methods.

  11. Colloidal aspects of texture perception.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Ton; van Aken, George A; de Jongh, Harmen H J; Hamer, Rob J

    2009-08-30

    Recently, considerable attention has been given to the understanding of texture attributes that cannot directly be related to physical properties of food, such as creamy, crumbly and watery. The perception of these attributes is strongly related to the way the food is processed during food intake, mastication, swallowing of it and during the cleaning of the mouth after swallowing. Moreover, their perception is modulated by the interaction with other basic attributes, such as taste and aroma attributes (e.g. sourness and vanilla). To be able to link the composition and structure of food products to more complicated texture attributes, their initial physical/colloid chemical properties and the oral processing of these products must be well understood. Understanding of the processes in the mouth at colloidal length scales turned out to be essential to grasp the interplay between perception, oral physiology and food properties. In view of the huge differences in physical chemical properties between food products, it is practical to make a distinction between solid, semi-solid, and liquid food products. The latter ones are often liquid dispersions of emulsion droplets or particles in general. For liquid food products for instance flow behaviour and colloidal stability of dispersed particles play a main role in determining their textural properties. For most solid products stiffness and fracture behaviour in relation to water content are essential while for semi-solids a much larger range of mechanical properties will play a role. Examples of colloidal aspects of texture perception will be discussed for these three categories of products based on selected sensory attributes and/or relevant colloidal processes. For solid products some main factors determining crispness will be discussed. For crispiness of dry cellular solid products these are water content and the architecture of the product at mesoscopic length scales (20-1000 microm). In addition the distribution of

  12. Breakdown of Dynamical Scaling for Dilute Polymer Solutions in 2D?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falck, Emma; Punkkinen, Olli; Ala-Nissila, Tapio; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2004-03-01

    The breakdown of dynamical scaling for a dilute polymer solution in 2D has been suggested by Shannon and Choy [1]. However, we show here through extensive computer simulations that dynamical scaling holds when the relevant dynamical quantities are properly extracted from finite systems. To verify dynamical scaling, we present results based on mesoscopic simulations in 2D for a polymer chain in a good solvent with full hydrodynamic interactions. We also present analytical arguments for the size-dependence of the diffusion coefficient and find excellent agreement with the present large-scale simulations. 1. S. R. Shannon and T. C. Choy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1455 (1997). 2. E. Falck et al., Phys. Rev. E 68, 050102 (2003).

  13. Texture analysis of clinical radiographs using radon transform on a local scale for differentiation between post-menopausal women with and without hip fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Holger F.; Körner, Markus; Baumert, Bernhard; Linsenmaier, Ulrich; Reiser, Maximilian

    2011-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a chronic condition characterized by demineralization and destruction of bone tissue. Fractures associated with the disease are becoming an increasingly relevant issue for public health institutions. Prediction of fracture risk is a major focus research and, over the years, has been approched by various methods. Still, bone mineral density (BMD) obtained by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) remains the clinical gold-standard for diagnosis and follow-up of osteoporosis. However, DXA is restricted to specialized diagnostic centers and there exists considerable overlap in BMD results between populations of individuals with and without fractures. Clinically far more available than DXA is conventional x-ray imaging depicting trabecular bone structure in great detail. In this paper, we demonstrate that bone structure depicted by clinical radiographs can be analysed quantitatively by parameters obtained from the Radon Transform (RT). RT is a global analysis-tool for detection of predefined, parameterized patterns, e.g. straight lines or struts, representing suitable approximations of trabecular bone texture. The proposed algorithm differentiates between patients with and without fractures of the hip by application of various texture-metrics based on the Radon-Transform to standard x-ray images of the proximal femur. We consider three different regions-of-interest in the proximal femur (femoral head, neck, and inter-trochanteric area), and conduct an analysis with respect to correct classification of the fracture status. Performance of the novel approach is compared to DXA. We draw the conclusion that performance of RT is comparable to DXA and may become a useful supplement to densitometry for the prediction of fracture risk.

  14. Heating and Large Scale Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    2000-01-01

    The effort was concentrated in the areas: coronal heating mechanism, unstructured adaptive grid algorithms, numerical modeling of magnetic reconnection in the MRX experiment: effect of toroidal magnetic field and finite pressure, effect of OHMIC heating and vertical magnetic field, effect of dynamic MESH adaption.

  15. Reasoning with Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallant, Amy; Tinker, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    The studies reported in this paper are an initial effort to explore the applicability of computational models in introductory science learning. Two instructional interventions are described that use a molecular dynamics model embedded in a set of online learning activities with middle and high school students in 10 classrooms. The studies indicate…

  16. Simulating field-scale soil organic carbon dynamics using EPIC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulation models integrate our understanding of soil organic C (SOC) dynamics and are useful tools for evaluating impacts of crop management on soil C sequestration, yet, they require local calibration. Our objectives were to calibrate the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model, and e...

  17. Texture in Biomedical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrou, Maria

    An overview of texture analysis methods is given and the merits of each method for biomedical applications are discussed. Methods discussed include Markov random fields, Gibbs distributions, co-occurrence matrices, Gabor functions and wavelets, Karhunen-Loève basis images, and local symmetry and orientation from the monogenic signal. Some example applications of texture to medical image processing are reviewed.

  18. Measuring Meat Texture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the complex and highly structured nature of muscle tissue, meat is an inherently tough and widely variable food product. In order to better predict and control meat tenderness issues, accurate measures of meat texture are needed. Unfortunately, the multifaceted characteristic of meat texture ...

  19. Dynamic scaling in ion etching of tungsten films

    SciTech Connect

    Peverini, Luca; Ziegler, Eric; Kozhevnikov, Igor

    2007-07-30

    Grazing incidence x-ray scattering is employed in situ and in real time to investigate quantitatively the time-dependent roughening of an ion bombarded tungsten layer. The evolution of surface morphology is analyzed in terms of power spectral density functions extracted directly from the measured scattering diagrams. In the [1x10{sup -4},4.6x10{sup -2}] nm{sup -1} spatial frequency range, roughness spectra for progressive thickness are shown to obey a universal scaling form leading to scaling exponents consistent with the prediction of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation in 2+1 dimensions.

  20. Modelling Deformation and Texture Evolution in OFHC Copper at Large Strain and High Strain Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, Nicola; Testa, Gabriel; Ruggiero, Andrew; Iannitti, Gianluca; Hörnqvist, Magnus; Mortazavi, Nooshin

    2015-06-01

    In this work, a two-scale approach to simulate high rate deformation and texture evolution in OFHC copper is presented. The modified Rusinek-Klepaczko material model was used to simulate the response of the material at continuum scale accounting for different deformation mechanisms occurring over an extensive range of strain rate and temperature. Material model parameters were determined from characterization test (mainly uniaxial tests) results. Successively, the model was validated simulating material deformation in Taylor anvil impact, symmetric Taylor impact (rod-on-rod) and dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) tests. Texture evolution, under different deformation paths was simulated using the crystal plasticity package CPFEM and results were compared with those obtained by EBSD analysis. The possibility to incorporate the effect of grain size evolution and fragmentation at continuum scale is discussed.

  1. Dynamic optimization methodology based on subgrid-scale dissipation for large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Changping; Xiao, Zuoli; Li, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic procedure based on subgrid-scale dissipation is proposed for large eddy simulation of turbulent flows. In the new method, the model coefficients are determined by minimizing the square error of the resolved dissipation rate based on the Germano identity. A dynamic two-term mixed model is tested and evaluated both a priori and a posteriori in simulations of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence. The new dynamic procedure proves to be more effective to optimize the model coefficients as compared with traditional method. The corresponding dynamic mixed model can predict the physical quantities more accurately than traditional dynamic mixed model.

  2. Dynamic properties of small-scale solar wind plasma fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Riazantseva, M. O.; Budaev, V. P.; Zelenyi, L. M.; Zastenker, G. N.; Pavlos, G. P.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Prech, L.; Nemec, F.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the latest results of the studies of small-scale fluctuations in a turbulent flow of solar wind (SW) using measurements with extremely high temporal resolution (up to 0.03 s) of the bright monitor of SW (BMSW) plasma spectrometer operating on astrophysical SPECTR-R spacecraft at distances up to 350 000 km from the Earth. The spectra of SW ion flux fluctuations in the range of scales between 0.03 and 100 s are systematically analysed. The difference of slopes in low- and high-frequency parts of spectra and the frequency of the break point between these two characteristic slopes was analysed for different conditions in the SW. The statistical properties of the SW ion flux fluctuations were thoroughly analysed on scales less than 10 s. A high level of intermittency is demonstrated. The extended self-similarity of SW ion flux turbulent flow is constantly observed. The approximation of non-Gaussian probability distribution function of ion flux fluctuations by the Tsallis statistics shows the non-extensive character of SW fluctuations. Statistical characteristics of ion flux fluctuations are compared with the predictions of a log-Poisson model. The log-Poisson parametrization of the structure function scaling has shown that well-defined filament-like plasma structures are, as a rule, observed in the turbulent SW flows. PMID:25848078

  3. Comprehensive lake dynamics mapping at continental scales using Landsat 8

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inland lakes, important water resources, play a crucial role in the global water cycle and are sensitive to global warming and human activities. There clearly is a pressing need to understand temporal and spatial variations of lakes at global and continental scales. The recent operation of Landsat...

  4. Dynamic properties of small-scale solar wind plasma fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Riazantseva, M O; Budaev, V P; Zelenyi, L M; Zastenker, G N; Pavlos, G P; Safrankova, J; Nemecek, Z; Prech, L; Nemec, F

    2015-05-13

    The paper presents the latest results of the studies of small-scale fluctuations in a turbulent flow of solar wind (SW) using measurements with extremely high temporal resolution (up to 0.03 s) of the bright monitor of SW (BMSW) plasma spectrometer operating on astrophysical SPECTR-R spacecraft at distances up to 350,000 km from the Earth. The spectra of SW ion flux fluctuations in the range of scales between 0.03 and 100 s are systematically analysed. The difference of slopes in low- and high-frequency parts of spectra and the frequency of the break point between these two characteristic slopes was analysed for different conditions in the SW. The statistical properties of the SW ion flux fluctuations were thoroughly analysed on scales less than 10 s. A high level of intermittency is demonstrated. The extended self-similarity of SW ion flux turbulent flow is constantly observed. The approximation of non-Gaussian probability distribution function of ion flux fluctuations by the Tsallis statistics shows the non-extensive character of SW fluctuations. Statistical characteristics of ion flux fluctuations are compared with the predictions of a log-Poisson model. The log-Poisson parametrization of the structure function scaling has shown that well-defined filament-like plasma structures are, as a rule, observed in the turbulent SW flows. PMID:25848078

  5. Unique Testing Capabilities of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, an Exercise in Aeroelastic Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is the world's most capable aeroelastic test facility. Its large size, transonic speed range, variable pressure capability, and use of either air or R-134a heavy gas as a test medium enable unparalleled manipulation of flow-dependent scaling quantities. Matching these scaling quantities enables dynamic similitude of a full-scale vehicle with a sub-scale model, a requirement for proper characterization of any dynamic phenomenon, and many static elastic phenomena. Select scaling parameters are presented in order to quantify the scaling advantages of TDT and the consequence of testing in other facilities. In addition to dynamic testing, the TDT is uniquely well-suited for high risk testing or for those tests that require unusual model mount or support systems. Examples of recently conducted dynamic tests requiring unusual model support are presented. In addition to its unique dynamic test capabilities, the TDT is also evaluated in its capability to conduct aerodynamic performance tests as a result of its flow quality. Results of flow quality studies and a comparison to a many other transonic facilities are presented. Finally, the ability of the TDT to support future NASA research thrusts and likely vehicle designs is discussed.

  6. Aesthetics by Numbers: Links between Perceived Texture Qualities and Computed Visual Texture Properties

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Richard H. A. H.; Haak, Koen V.; Thumfart, Stefan; Renken, Remco; Henson, Brian; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2016-01-01

    Our world is filled with texture. For the human visual system, this is an important source of information for assessing environmental and material properties. Indeed—and presumably for this reason—the human visual system has regions dedicated to processing textures. Despite their abundance and apparent relevance, only recently the relationships between texture features and high-level judgments have captured the interest of mainstream science, despite long-standing indications for such relationships. In this study, we explore such relationships, as these might be used to predict perceived texture qualities. This is relevant, not only from a psychological/neuroscience perspective, but also for more applied fields such as design, architecture, and the visual arts. In two separate experiments, observers judged various qualities of visual textures such as beauty, roughness, naturalness, elegance, and complexity. Based on factor analysis, we find that in both experiments, ~75% of the variability in the judgments could be explained by a two-dimensional space, with axes that are closely aligned to the beauty and roughness judgments. That a two-dimensional judgment space suffices to capture most of the variability in the perceived texture qualities suggests that observers use a relatively limited set of internal scales on which to base various judgments, including aesthetic ones. Finally, for both of these judgments, we determined the relationship with a large number of texture features computed for each of the texture stimuli. We find that the presence of lower spatial frequencies, oblique orientations, higher intensity variation, higher saturation, and redness correlates with higher beauty ratings. Features that captured image intensity and uniformity correlated with roughness ratings. Therefore, a number of computational texture features are predictive of these judgments. This suggests that perceived texture qualities—including the aesthetic appreciation

  7. Aesthetics by Numbers: Links between Perceived Texture Qualities and Computed Visual Texture Properties.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Richard H A H; Haak, Koen V; Thumfart, Stefan; Renken, Remco; Henson, Brian; Cornelissen, Frans W

    2016-01-01

    Our world is filled with texture. For the human visual system, this is an important source of information for assessing environmental and material properties. Indeed-and presumably for this reason-the human visual system has regions dedicated to processing textures. Despite their abundance and apparent relevance, only recently the relationships between texture features and high-level judgments have captured the interest of mainstream science, despite long-standing indications for such relationships. In this study, we explore such relationships, as these might be used to predict perceived texture qualities. This is relevant, not only from a psychological/neuroscience perspective, but also for more applied fields such as design, architecture, and the visual arts. In two separate experiments, observers judged various qualities of visual textures such as beauty, roughness, naturalness, elegance, and complexity. Based on factor analysis, we find that in both experiments, ~75% of the variability in the judgments could be explained by a two-dimensional space, with axes that are closely aligned to the beauty and roughness judgments. That a two-dimensional judgment space suffices to capture most of the variability in the perceived texture qualities suggests that observers use a relatively limited set of internal scales on which to base various judgments, including aesthetic ones. Finally, for both of these judgments, we determined the relationship with a large number of texture features computed for each of the texture stimuli. We find that the presence of lower spatial frequencies, oblique orientations, higher intensity variation, higher saturation, and redness correlates with higher beauty ratings. Features that captured image intensity and uniformity correlated with roughness ratings. Therefore, a number of computational texture features are predictive of these judgments. This suggests that perceived texture qualities-including the aesthetic appreciation-are sufficiently

  8. Texture and wettability of metallic lotus leaves.

    PubMed

    Frankiewicz, C; Attinger, D

    2016-02-21

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with the self-cleaning behavior of lotus leaves are sought for drag reduction and phase change heat transfer applications. These superrepellent surfaces have traditionally been fabricated by random or deterministic texturing of a hydrophobic material. Recently, superrepellent surfaces have also been made from hydrophilic materials, by deterministic texturing using photolithography, without low-surface energy coating. Here, we show that hydrophilic materials can also be made superrepellent to water by chemical texturing, a stochastic rather than deterministic process. These metallic surfaces are the first analog of lotus leaves, in terms of wettability, texture and repellency. A mechanistic model is also proposed to describe the influence of multiple tiers of roughness on wettability and repellency. This demonstrated ability to make hydrophilic materials superrepellent without deterministic structuring or additional coatings opens the way to large scale and robust manufacturing of superrepellent surfaces. PMID:26537609

  9. Texture synthesis: textons revisited.

    PubMed

    Charalampidis, Dimitrios

    2006-03-01

    This paper introduces a technique for synthesizing natural textures, with emphasis on quasiperiodic and structural textures. Textures are assumed to be composed of three components, namely illumination, structure, and stochastic. The contribution of this work is that, in contrast to previous techniques, it proposes a joint approach for handling the texture's global illumination, irregular structure, and stochastic component which may be correlated to the other two components. Furthermore, the proposed technique does not produce verbatim copies in the synthesized texture. More specifically, a top-down approach is used for extraction of texture elements (textons) in which, in contrast to previous texton-based approaches, no assumptions regarding perfect periodicity are made. The structure itself can be modeled as a stochastic process. Consequently, textons are allowed to have irregular and nonidentical shapes. In the synthesis stage, a new nonregular textural structure is designed from the original one that defines the place holders for textons. We call such place holders empty textons (e-textons). The e-textons are filled in by a representative texton. Since e-textons do not have identical shapes, a texton shape-matching procedure is required. After adding the illumination to the structural component, a strictly localized version of a block sampling technique is applied to add the stochastic component. The block sampling technique combined with the addition of the illumination component provides a significant improvement in the appearance of synthesized textures. Results show that the proposed method is successful in synthesizing structural textures visually indistinguishable to the original. Moreover, the method is successful in synthesizing a variety of stochastic textures. PMID:16519362

  10. Ecohydrological response to snowmelt dynamics from plot to regional scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotch, N. P.; Musselman, K. N.; Trujillo, E.; Brooks, P. D.; McConnell, J. R.; Williams, M. W.

    2010-12-01

    New remote sensing and in situ measurement capabilities afford improved understanding of distributed ecohydrological processes in mountainous regions. In this regard, distributed ecohydrologic instrument clusters allow us to observe micro-scale variability in snow-vegetation interactions while remotely sensed data allow us to observe integrated ecosystem-scale response to snow-water availability. Instrument clusters deployed in the Central and Southern Rockies and the Sierra Nevada reveal the dominant role of vegetation in controlling the timing and magnitude of snow accumulation and snowmelt. In this regard, vegetation structure largely controlled the distribution of snow accumulation with 29% greater accumulation in open versus under-canopy locations. Snow ablation rates were diminished by 39% in under-canopy locations. Similarly, differences in climate altered snow-season duration, snowmelt infiltration and evapotranspiration. Commencement of the growing season was coincident with melt-water input to the soil and lagged behind springtime increases in air temperature by several days. Similarly, the timing of peak soil moisture was highly dependent upon snow ablation, occurring within one week of snow disappearance on average. Analysis of remotely sensed vegetation greenness data at the regional scale reveals a coherent signal with regard to these plot-scale measurements. A strong elevational dependence in the relationships between snow disappearance timing and peak vegetation greenness are evident whereby vegetation greenness is highly sensitive to inter-annual variability in snow disappearance timing at low - mid elevations whereas higher elevation forest greenness was relatively insensitive. These elevational variations suggest a switch from water limitations at the lower elevation to energy limitations at the highest elevations. Given potential future changes in the hydroclimatology of mountainous regions, the results of these multi-scale measurements may

  11. Neuronal long-range temporal correlations and avalanche dynamics are correlated with behavioral scaling laws.

    PubMed

    Palva, J Matias; Zhigalov, Alexander; Hirvonen, Jonni; Korhonen, Onerva; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus; Palva, Satu

    2013-02-26

    Scale-free fluctuations are ubiquitous in behavioral performance and neuronal activity. In time scales from seconds to hundreds of seconds, psychophysical dynamics and the amplitude fluctuations of neuronal oscillations are governed by power-law-form long-range temporal correlations (LRTCs). In millisecond time scales, neuronal activity comprises cascade-like neuronal avalanches that exhibit power-law size and lifetime distributions. However, it remains unknown whether these neuronal scaling laws are correlated with those characterizing behavioral performance or whether neuronal LRTCs and avalanches are related. Here, we show that the neuronal scaling laws are strongly correlated both with each other and with behavioral scaling laws. We used source reconstructed magneto- and electroencephalographic recordings to characterize the dynamics of ongoing cortical activity. We found robust power-law scaling in neuronal LRTCs and avalanches in resting-state data and during the performance of audiovisual threshold stimulus detection tasks. The LRTC scaling exponents of the behavioral performance fluctuations were correlated with those of concurrent neuronal avalanches and LRTCs in anatomically identified brain systems. The behavioral exponents also were correlated with neuronal scaling laws derived from a resting-state condition and with a similar anatomical topography. Finally, despite the difference in time scales, the scaling exponents of neuronal LRTCs and avalanches were strongly correlated during both rest and task performance. Thus, long and short time-scale neuronal dynamics are related and functionally significant at the behavioral level. These data suggest that the temporal structures of human cognitive fluctuations and behavioral variability stem from the scaling laws of individual and intrinsic brain dynamics. PMID:23401536

  12. On why dynamic subgrid-scale models work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, J.

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic subgrid models have proved to be remarkably successful in predicting the behavior of turbulent flows. Part of the reasons for their success are well understood. Since they are constructed to generate an effective viscosity which is proportional to some measure of the turbulent energy at the high wavenumber end of the spectrum, their eddy viscosity vanishes as the flow becomes laminar. This alone would justify their use over simpler models. But beyond this obvious advantage, which is confined to inhomogeneous and evolving flows, the reason why they also work better in simpler homogeneous cases, and how they do it without any obvious adjustable parameter, is not clear. This lack of understanding of the internal mechanisms of a useful tool is disturbing, not only as an intellectual challenge, but because it raises the doubt of whether it will work in all cases. This note is an attempt to clarify those mechanisms. We will see why dynamic models are robust and how they can get away with even comparatively gross errors in their formulations. This will suggest that they are only particular cases of a larger family of robust models, all of which would be relatively insensitive to large simplifications in the physics of the flow. We will also construct some such models, although mostly as research tools. It will turn out, however, that the standard dynamic formulation is not only robust to errors, but also behaves as if it were substantially well formulated. The details of why this is so will still not be clear at the end of this note, specially since it will be shown that the 'a priori' testing of the stresses gives, as is usual in most subgrid models, very poor results. But it will be argued that the basic reason is that the dynamic formulation mimics the condition that the total dissipation is approximately equal to the production measured at the test filter level.

  13. Impact of Soil Texture on Soil Ciliate Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, J. F.; Brown, S.; Habtom, E.; Brinson, F.; Epps, M.; Scott, R.

    2014-12-01

    Soil water content and connectivity strongly influence microbial activities in soil, controlling access to nutrients and electron acceptors, and mediating interactions between microbes within and between trophic levels. These interactions occur at or below the pore scale, and are influenced by soil texture and structure, which determine the microscale architecture of soil pores. Soil protozoa are relatively understudied, especially given the strong control they exert on bacterial communities through predation. Here, ciliate communities in soils of contrasting textures were investigated. Two ciliate-specific primer sets targeting the 18S rRNA gene were used to amplify DNA extracted from eight soil samples collected from Sumter National Forest in western South Carolina. Primer sets 121F-384F-1147R (semi-nested) and 315F-959R were used to amplify soil ciliate DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the resulting PCR products were analyzed by gel electrophoresis to obtain quantity and band size. Approximately two hundred ciliate 18S rRNA sequences were obtained were obtained from each of two contrasting soils. Sequences were aligned against the NCBI GenBank database for identification, and the taxonomic classification of best-matched sequences was determined. The ultimate goal of the work is to quantify changes in the ciliate community under short-timescale changes in hydrologic conditions for varying soil textures, elucidating dynamic responses to desiccation stress in major soil ciliate taxa.

  14. Lava flow texture LiDAR signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelley, P.; Garry, W. B.; Scheidt, S. P.; Irwin, R. P., III; Fox, J.; Bleacher, J. E.; Hamilton, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution point clouds and digital elevation models (DEMs) are used to investigate lava textures on the Big Island of Hawaii. An experienced geologist can distinguish fresh or degraded lava textures (e.g., blocky, a'a and pahoehoe) visually in the field. Lava texture depends significantly on eruption conditions, and it is therefore instructive, if accurately determined. In places where field investigations are prohibitive (e.g., Mercury, Venus, the Moon, Mars, Io and remote regions on Earth) lava texture must be assessed from remote sensing data. A reliable method for differentiating lava textures in remote sensing data remains elusive. We present preliminary results comparing properties of lava textures observed in airborne and terrestrial Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Airborne data, in this study, were collected in 2011 by Airborne 1 Corporation and have a ~1m point spacing. The authors collected the terrestrial data during a May 2014 field season. The terrestrial scans have a heterogeneous point density. Points close to the scanner are 1 mm apart while 200 m in the distance points are 10 cm apart. Both platforms offer advantages and disadvantages beyond the differences in scale. Terrestrial scans are a quantitative representation of what a geologist sees "on the ground". Airborne scans are a point of view routinely imaged by other remote sensing tools, and can therefore be quickly compared to complimentary data sets (e.g., spectral scans or image data). Preliminary results indicate that LiDAR-derived surface roughness, from both platforms, is useful for differentiating lava textures, but at different spatial scales. As all lava types are quite rough, it is not simply roughness that is the most advantageous parameter; rather patterns in surface roughness can be used to differentiate lava surfaces of varied textures. This work will lead to faster and more reliable volcanic mapping efforts for planetary exploration as well as terrestrial

  15. A FRAMEWORK FOR FINE-SCALE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AIR QUALITY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses a framework for fine-scale CFD modeling that may be developed to complement the present Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system which itself is a computational fluid dynamics model. A goal of this presentation is to stimulate discussions on w...

  16. On the spatio-temporal dynamics of soil moisture at the field scale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper, we review the state of the art of characterizing and analyzing spatio-temporal dynamics of soil moisture content at the field scale. We discuss measurement techniques that have become available in recent years and that provide unique opportunities to characterize field scale soil mois...

  17. Parachute Dynamics Investigations Using a Sensor Package Airdropped from a Small-Scale Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Jessica; Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2005-01-01

    We explore the utility of various sensors by recovering parachute-probe dynamics information from a package released from a small-scale, remote-controlled airplane. The airdrops aid in the development of datasets for the exploration of planetary probe trajectory recovery algorithms, supplementing data collected from instrumented, full-scale tests and computer models.

  18. Scaling laws in the dynamics of crime growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Luiz G. A.; Ribeiro, Haroldo V.; Mendes, Renio S.

    2013-06-01

    The increasing number of crimes in areas with large concentrations of people have made cities one of the main sources of violence. Understanding characteristics of how crime rate expands and its relations with the cities size goes beyond an academic question, being a central issue for contemporary society. Here, we characterize and analyze quantitative aspects of murders in the period from 1980 to 2009 in Brazilian cities. We find that the distribution of the annual, biannual and triannual logarithmic homicide growth rates exhibit the same functional form for distinct scales, that is, a scale invariant behavior. We also identify asymptotic power-law decay relations between the standard deviations of these three growth rates and the initial size. Further, we discuss similarities with complex organizations.

  19. Interplay between Functional Connectivity and Scale-Free Dynamics in Intrinsic fMRI Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ciuciu, Philippe; Abry, Patrice; He, Biyu J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies employing functional connectivity-type analyses have established that spontaneous fluctuations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals are organized within large-scale brain networks. Meanwhile, fMRI signals have been shown to exhibit 1/f-type power spectra – a hallmark of scale-free dynamics. We studied the interplay between functional connectivity and scale-free dynamics in fMRI signals, utilizing the fractal connectivity framework – a multivariate extension of the univariate fractional Gaussian noise model, which relies on a wavelet formulation for robust parameter estimation. We applied this framework to fMRI data acquired from healthy young adults at rest and performing a visual detection task. First, we found that scale-invariance existed beyond univariate dynamics, being present also in bivariate cross-temporal dynamics. Second, we observed that frequencies within the scale-free range do not contribute evenly to inter-regional connectivity, with a systematically stronger contribution of the lowest frequencies, both at rest and during task. Third, in addition to a decrease of the Hurst exponent and inter-regional correlations, task performance modified cross-temporal dynamics, inducing a larger contribution of the highest frequencies within the scale-free range to global correlation. Lastly, we found that across individuals, a weaker task modulation of the frequency contribution to inter-regional connectivity was associated with better task performance manifesting as shorter and less variable reaction times. These findings bring together two related fields that have hitherto been studied separately – resting-state networks and scale-free dynamics, and show that scale-free dynamics of human brain activity manifest in cross-regional interactions as well. PMID:24675649

  20. A Variable Order Fractional Differential-Based Texture Enhancement Algorithm with Application in Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiang; Vegh, Viktor; Liu, Fawang; Turner, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Texture enhancement is one of the most important techniques in digital image processing and plays an essential role in medical imaging since textures discriminate information. Most image texture enhancement techniques use classical integral order differential mask operators or fractional differential mask operators using fixed fractional order. These masks can produce excessive enhancement of low spatial frequency content, insufficient enhancement of large spatial frequency content, and retention of high spatial frequency noise. To improve upon existing approaches of texture enhancement, we derive an improved Variable Order Fractional Centered Difference (VOFCD) scheme which dynamically adjusts the fractional differential order instead of fixing it. The new VOFCD technique is based on the second order Riesz fractional differential operator using a Lagrange 3-point interpolation formula, for both grey scale and colour image enhancement. We then use this method to enhance photographs and a set of medical images related to patients with stroke and Parkinson's disease. The experiments show that our improved fractional differential mask has a higher signal to noise ratio value than the other fractional differential mask operators. Based on the corresponding quantitative analysis we conclude that the new method offers a superior texture enhancement over existing methods. PMID:26186221

  1. A Variable Order Fractional Differential-Based Texture Enhancement Algorithm with Application in Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qiang; Vegh, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Texture enhancement is one of the most important techniques in digital image processing and plays an essential role in medical imaging since textures discriminate information. Most image texture enhancement techniques use classical integral order differential mask operators or fractional differential mask operators using fixed fractional order. These masks can produce excessive enhancement of low spatial frequency content, insufficient enhancement of large spatial frequency content, and retention of high spatial frequency noise. To improve upon existing approaches of texture enhancement, we derive an improved Variable Order Fractional Centered Difference (VOFCD) scheme which dynamically adjusts the fractional differential order instead of fixing it. The new VOFCD technique is based on the second order Riesz fractional differential operator using a Lagrange 3-point interpolation formula, for both grey scale and colour image enhancement. We then use this method to enhance photographs and a set of medical images related to patients with stroke and Parkinson’s disease. The experiments show that our improved fractional differential mask has a higher signal to noise ratio value than the other fractional differential mask operators. Based on the corresponding quantitative analysis we conclude that the new method offers a superior texture enhancement over existing methods. PMID:26186221

  2. Time scales of the stick–slip dynamics of the peeling of an adhesive tape

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nachiketa; Parida, Nigam Chandra; Raha, Soumyendu

    2015-01-01

    The stick–slip dynamics of the peeling of an adhesive tape is characterized by bifurcations that have been experimentally well studied. In this work, we investigate the time scale in which the the stick–slips happen leading to the bifurcations. This is fundamental to understanding the triboluminescence and acoustic emissions associated with the bifurcations. We establish a relationship between the time scale of the bifurcations and the inherent mathematical structure of the peeling dynamics by studying a characteristic time quantity associated with the dynamics. PMID:25663802

  3. Development of low friction snake-inspired deterministic textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuervo, P.; López, D. A.; Cano, J. P.; Sánchez, J. C.; Rudas, S.; Estupiñán, H.; Toro, A.; Abdel-Aal, H. A.

    2016-06-01

    The use of surface texturization to reduce friction in sliding interfaces has proved successful in some tribological applications. However, it is still difficult to achieve robust surface texturing with controlled designer-functionalities. This is because the current existing gap between enabling texturization technologies and surface design paradigms. Surface engineering, however, is advanced in natural surface constructs especially within legless reptiles. Many intriguing features facilitate the tribology of such animals so that it is feasible to discover the essence of their surface construction. In this work, we report on the tribological behavior of a novel class of surfaces of which the spatial dimensions of the textural patterns originate from micro-scale features present within the ventral scales of pre-selected snake species. Mask lithography was used to produce implement elliptical texturizing patterns on the surface of titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) pins. To study the tribological behavior of the texturized pins, pin-on-disc tests were carried out with the pins sliding against ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene discs with no lubrication. For comparison, two non-texturized samples were also tested under the same conditions. The results show the feasibility of the texturization technique based on the coefficient of friction of the textured surfaces to be consistently lower than that of the non-texturized samples.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Of Nanometer-Scale Feature Etch

    SciTech Connect

    Vegh, J. J.; Graves, D. B.

    2008-09-23

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to examine fundamental etch limitations. Beams of Ar{sup +}, Ar{sup +}/F and CF{sub x}{sup +} (x = 2,3) with 2 nm diameter cylindrical confinement were utilized to mimic 'perfect' masks for small feature etching in silicon. The holes formed during etch exhibit sidewall damage and passivation as a result of ion-induced mixing. The MD results predict a minimum hole diameter of {approx}5 nm after post-etch cleaning of the sidewall.

  5. Scaling and optimization of the radiation temperature in dynamic hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.; DOUGLAS,MELISSA R.; LASH,JOEL S.; VESEY,ROGER A.; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; NASH,THOMAS J.; DERZON,MARK S.

    2000-04-13

    The authors have constructed a quasi-analytic model of the dynamic hohlraum. Solutions only require a numerical root solve, which can be done very quickly. Results of the model are compared to both experiments and full numerical simulations with good agreement. The computational simplicity of the model allows one to find the behavior of the hohlraum temperature as a function the various parameters of the system and thus find optimum parameters as a function of the driving current. The model is used to investigate the benefits of ablative standoff and axial convergence.

  6. Large scale molecular dynamics modeling of materials fabrication processes

    SciTech Connect

    Belak, J.; Glosli, J.N.; Boercker, D.B.; Stowers, I.F.

    1994-02-01

    An atomistic molecular dynamics model of materials fabrication processes is presented. Several material removal processes are shown to be within the domain of this simulation method. Results are presented for orthogonal cutting of copper and silicon and for crack propagation in silica glass. Both copper and silicon show ductile behavior, but the atomistic mechanisms that allow this behavior are significantly different in the two cases. The copper chip remains crystalline while the silicon chip transforms into an amorphous state. The critical stress for crack propagation in silica glass was found to be in reasonable agreement with experiment and a novel stick-slip phenomenon was observed.

  7. Dynamics of decoherence: Universal scaling of the decoherence factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Sei; Nag, Tanay; Dutta, Amit

    2016-01-01

    We study the time dependence of the decoherence factor (DF) of a qubit globally coupled to an environmental spin system (ESS) which is driven across the quantum critical point (QCP) by varying a parameter of its Hamiltonian in time t as 1 -t /τ or -t /τ , to which the qubit is coupled starting at the time t →-∞ ; here τ denotes the inverse quenching rate. In the limit of weak coupling we analyze the time evolution of the DF in the vicinity of the QCP (chosen to be at t =0 ) and define three quantities, namely, the generalized fidelity susceptibility χF(τ ) (defined right at the QCP), and the decay constants α1(τ ) and α2(τ ) which dictate the decay of the DF at a small but finite t (>0 ). Using a dimensional analysis argument based on the Kibble-Zurek healing length, we show that χF(τ ) as well as α1(τ ) and α2(τ ) indeed satisfy universal power-law scaling relations with τ and the exponents are solely determined by the spatial dimensionality of the ESS and the exponents associated with its QCP. Remarkably, using the numerical t-DMRG method, these scaling relations are shown to be valid in both the situations when the ESS is integrable and nonintegrable and also for both linear and nonlinear variation of the parameter. Furthermore, when an integrable ESS is quenched far away from the QCP, there is a predominant Gaussian decay of the DF with a decay constant which also satisfies a universal scaling relation.

  8. Scaling and gender behavior of road accidental dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tian; Zou, Xiang-Xiang; Chen, Guang; Jiang, Xiong-Fei; Zhong, Li-Xin

    2014-12-01

    The probability distribution of the time intervals between two consecutive accidents is investigated, based on the road accidental records of the Great Britain. A universal description is obtained for different roads, by rescaling the probability distribution and time intervals. The scaling curve is found to deviate from the Gaussian distribution, but it is well fitted by a stretched exponential function. Long-range time correlation is revealed for the interevent series. Moreover, gender similarity is found for the small accidental intervals, while for the large intervals, the female drivers are observed to present a higher probability than the male drivers.

  9. From Single-Cell Dynamics to Scaling Laws in Oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chignola, Roberto; Sega, Michela; Stella, Sabrina; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav; Milotti, Edoardo

    We are developing a biophysical model of tumor biology. We follow a strictly quantitative approach where each step of model development is validated by comparing simulation outputs with experimental data. While this strategy may slow down our advancements, at the same time it provides an invaluable reward: we can trust simulation outputs and use the model to explore territories of cancer biology where current experimental techniques fail. Here, we review our multi-scale biophysical modeling approach and show how a description of cancer at the cellular level has led us to general laws obeyed by both in vitro and in vivo tumors.

  10. A multilevel optimization of large-scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siljak, D. D.; Sundareshan, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    A multilevel feedback control scheme is proposed for optimization of large-scale systems composed of a number of (not necessarily weakly coupled) subsystems. Local controllers are used to optimize each subsystem, ignoring the interconnections. Then, a global controller may be applied to minimize the effect of interconnections and improve the performance of the overall system. At the cost of suboptimal performance, this optimization strategy ensures invariance of suboptimality and stability of the systems under structural perturbations whereby subsystems are disconnected and again connected during operation.

  11. Soft and Hard Scale QCD Dynamics in Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T.; Souchlas, N. A.; Tandy, P. C.

    2011-09-01

    Using a ladder-rainbow kernel previously established for light quark hadron physics, we explore the extension to masses and electroweak decay constants of ground state pseudoscalar and vector quarkonia and heavy-light mesons in the c- and b-quark regions. We make a systematic study of the effectiveness of a constituent mass concept as a replacement for a heavy quark dressed propagator for such states. The difference between vector and axial vector current correlators is explored within the same model to provide an estimate of the four quark chiral condensate and the leading distance scale for the onset of non-perturbative phenomena in QCD.

  12. Revealing sub-μm and μm-scale textures in H2O ice at megabar pressures by time-domain Brillouin scattering

    PubMed Central

    Nikitin, Sergey M.; Chigarev, Nikolay; Tournat, Vincent; Bulou, Alain; Gasteau, Damien; Castagnede, Bernard; Zerr, Andreas; Gusev, Vitalyi E.

    2015-01-01

    The time-domain Brillouin scattering technique, also known as picosecond ultrasonic interferometry, allows monitoring of the propagation of coherent acoustic pulses, having lengths ranging from nanometres to fractions of a micrometre, in samples with dimension of less than a micrometre to tens of micrometres. In this study, we applied this technique to depth-profiling of a polycrystalline aggregate of ice compressed in a diamond anvil cell to megabar pressures. The method allowed examination of the characteristic dimensions of ice texturing in the direction normal to the diamond anvil surfaces with sub-micrometre spatial resolution via time-resolved measurements of the propagation velocity of the acoustic pulses travelling in the compressed sample. The achieved imaging of ice in depth and in one of the lateral directions indicates the feasibility of three-dimensional imaging and quantitative characterisation of the acoustical, optical and acousto-optical properties of transparent polycrystalline aggregates in a diamond anvil cell with tens of nanometres in-depth resolution and a lateral spatial resolution controlled by pump laser pulses focusing, which could approach hundreds of nanometres. PMID:25790808

  13. On the spatio-temporal dynamics of soil moisture at the field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecken, H.; Huisman, J. A.; Pachepsky, Y.; Montzka, C.; van der Kruk, J.; Bogena, H.; Weihermüller, L.; Herbst, M.; Martinez, G.; Vanderborght, J.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we review the state of the art of characterizing and analyzing spatio-temporal dynamics of soil moisture content at the field scale. We discuss measurement techniques that have become available in recent years and that provide unique opportunities to characterize field scale soil moisture variability with high spatial and/or temporal resolution. These include soil moisture sensor networks, hydrogeophysical measurement techniques, novel remote sensing platforms, and cosmic ray probes. Techniques and methods to analyze soil moisture fields are briefly discussed and include temporal stability analysis, wavelet analysis and empirical orthogonal functions. We revisit local and non-local controls on field scale soil moisture dynamics and discuss approaches to model these dynamics at the field scale. Finally, we address the topic of optimal measurement design and provide an outlook and future research perspectives.

  14. Dynamic model with scale-dependent coefficients in the viscous range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneveau, C.; Lund, T. S.

    1996-01-01

    The standard dynamic procedure is based on the scale-invariance assumption that the model coefficient C is the same at the grid and test-filter levels. In many applications this condition is not met, e.g. when the filter-length, delta, approaches the Kolmogorov scale, and C(delta approaches eta) approaches O. Using a priori tests, we show that the standard dynamic model yields the coefficient corresponding to the test-filter scale (alpha delta) instead of the grid-scale (delta). Several approaches to account for scale dependence are examined and/or tested in large eddy simulation of isotropic turbulence: (a) take the limit alpha approaches 1; (b) solve for two unknown coefficients C(Delta) and C(alpha delta) in the least-square-error formulation; (c) the 'bi-dynamic model', in which two test-filters (e.g. at scales 2(delta) and 4(delta) are employed to gain additional information on possible scale-dependence of the coefficient, and an improved estimate for the grid-level coefficient is obtained by extrapolation, (d) use theoretical predictions for the ratio C(alpha delta)/C(delta) and dynamically solve for C(delta). None of these options is found to be entirely satisfactory, although the last approach appears applicable to the viscous range.

  15. Scaling dynamics of deep orbits in a periodic stochastic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowenstein, J. H.

    1991-04-01

    In a fourfold-symmetric stochastic web generated by a two-dimensional area-preserving map, those phase-space orbits that remain forever in the central part of the chaotic channels are selected by a suitable cutoff condition. By means of a horseshoe construction, these deep orbits are classified according to (i) their paths on the square lattice of hyperbolic fixed points, (ii) their transit times between successive lattice sites, and (iii) their horseshoe branch (left or ) at each lattice site. The set of initial conditions for the deep orbits can be placed on a tree that branches with infinite multiplicity at each level: level N of the tree corresponds to paths of N+1 steps on the lattice. Empirically, one finds two scaling relations, one for the level number and the other for the number of map iterations between successive saddle points. Using a transfer-matrix technique, the scaling relations are exploited to calculate the multifractal properties [Hausdorff dimension, Hausdorff measure, the f(α) curve] of the set of deep orbits, to obtain an invariant probability measure and to derive a Green function for the diffusion process on the lattice. Numerical calculations of many of these quantities are carried out for the value 0.5 of the control parameter.

  16. Effects of dynamic heterogeneity and density scaling of molecular dynamics on the relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at the glass transition

    SciTech Connect

    Koperwas, K. Grzybowski, A.; Grzybowska, K.; Wojnarowska, Z.; Paluch, M.

    2015-07-14

    In this paper, we define and experimentally verify thermodynamic characteristics of the liquid-glass transition, taking into account a kinetic origin of the process. Using the density scaling law and the four-point measure of the dynamic heterogeneity of molecular dynamics of glass forming liquids, we investigate contributions of enthalpy, temperature, and density fluctuations to spatially heterogeneous molecular dynamics at the liquid-glass transition, finding an equation for the pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature, dTg/dp. This equation combined with our previous formula for dTg/dp, derived solely from the density scaling criterion, implies a relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at Tg. Since this relationship and both the equations for dTg/dp are very well validated using experimental data at Tg, they are promising alternatives to the classical Prigogine-Defay ratio and both the Ehrenfest equations in case of the liquid-glass transition.

  17. From seconds to months: an overview of multi-scale dynamics of mobile telephone calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saramäki, Jari; Moro, Esteban

    2015-06-01

    Big Data on electronic records of social interactions allow approaching human behaviour and sociality from a quantitative point of view with unforeseen statistical power. Mobile telephone Call Detail Records (CDRs), automatically collected by telecom operators for billing purposes, have proven especially fruitful for understanding one-to-one communication patterns as well as the dynamics of social networks that are reflected in such patterns. We present an overview of empirical results on the multi-scale dynamics of social dynamics and networks inferred from mobile telephone calls. We begin with the shortest timescales and fastest dynamics, such as burstiness of call sequences between individuals, and "zoom out" towards longer temporal and larger structural scales, from temporal motifs formed by correlated calls between multiple individuals to long-term dynamics of social groups. We conclude this overview with a future outlook.

  18. Identification and sorting of regular textures according to their similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Mesa, Pilar; Anastasiadis, Johannes; Puente León, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    Regardless whether mosaics, material surfaces or skin surfaces are inspected their texture plays an important role. Texture is a property which is hard to describe using words but it can easily be described in pictures. Furthermore, a huge amount of digital images containing a visual description of textures already exists. However, this information becomes useless if there are no appropriate methods to browse the data. In addition, depending on the given task some properties like scale, rotation or intensity invariance are desired. In this paper we propose to analyze texture images according to their characteristic pattern. First a classification approach is proposed to separate regular from non-regular textures. The second stage will focus on regular textures suggesting a method to sort them according to their similarity. Different features will be extracted from the texture in order to describe its scale, orientation, texel and the texel's relative position. Depending on the desired invariance of the visual characteristics (like the texture's scale or the texel's form invariance) the comparison of the features between images will be weighted and combined to define the degree of similarity between them. Tuning the weighting parameters allows this search algorithm to be easily adapted to the requirements of the desired task. Not only the total invariance of desired parameters can be adjusted, the weighting of the parameters may also be modified to adapt to an application-specific type of similarity. This search method has been evaluated using different textures and similarity criteria achieving very promising results.

  19. Textured catalysts and methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2007-03-06

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  20. Damage spreading and opinion dynamics on scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, Santo

    2005-03-01

    We study damage spreading among the opinions of a system of agents, subjected to the dynamics of the Krause-Hegselmann consensus model. The damage consists in a sharp change of the opinion of one or more agents in the initial random opinion configuration, supposedly due to some external factors and/or events. This may help to understand for instance under which conditions special shocking events or targeted propaganda are able to influence the results of elections. For agents lying on the nodes of a Barabási-Albert network, there is a damage spreading transition at a low value εd of the confidence bound parameter. Interestingly, we find as well that there is some critical value εs above which the initial perturbation manages to propagate to all other agents.

  1. Multidimensional Scaling Analysis of the Dynamics of a Country Economy

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Maria Eugénia

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the Portuguese short-run business cycles over the last 150 years and presents the multidimensional scaling (MDS) for visualizing the results. The analytical and numerical assessment of this long-run perspective reveals periods with close connections between the macroeconomic variables related to government accounts equilibrium, balance of payments equilibrium, and economic growth. The MDS method is adopted for a quantitative statistical analysis. In this way, similarity clusters of several historical periods emerge in the MDS maps, namely, in identifying similarities and dissimilarities that identify periods of prosperity and crises, growth, and stagnation. Such features are major aspects of collective national achievement, to which can be associated the impact of international problems such as the World Wars, the Great Depression, or the current global financial crisis, as well as national events in the context of broad political blueprints for the Portuguese society in the rising globalization process. PMID:24294132

  2. A holistic, multi-scale dynamic downscaling framework for climate impact assessments and challenges of addressing finer-scale watershed dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongho; Ivanov, Valeriy Y.

    2015-03-01

    We present a state-of-the-art holistic, multi-scale dynamic downscaling approach suited to address climate change impacts on hydrologic metrics and hydraulic regime of surface flow at the "scale of human decisions" in ungauged basins. The framework rests on stochastic and physical downscaling techniques that permit one-way crossing 106-100 m scales, with a specific emphasis on 'nesting' hydraulic assessments within a coarser-scale hydrologic model. Future climate projections for the location of Manchester watershed (MI) are obtained from an ensemble of General Circulation Models of the 3rd phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project database and downscaled to a "point" scale using a weather generator. To represent the natural variability of historic and future climates, we generated continuous time series of 300 years for the locations of 3 meteorological stations located in the vicinity of the ungauged basin. To make such a multi-scale approach computationally feasible, we identified the months of May and August as the periods of specific interest based on ecohydrologic considerations. Analyses of historic and future simulation results for the identified periods show that the same median rainfall obtained by accounting for climate natural variability triggers hydrologically-mediated non-uniqueness in flow variables resolved at the hydraulic scale. An emerging challenge is that uncertainty initiated at the hydrologic scale is not necessarily preserved at smaller-scale flow variables, because of non-linearity of underlying physical processes, which ultimately can mask climate uncertainty. We stress the necessity of augmenting climate-level uncertainties of emission scenario, multi-model, and natural variability with uncertainties arising due to non-linearities in smaller-scale processes.

  3. Evaluation of pavement texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, J. J.; Wambold, J. C.; Huihua, X.

    1984-10-01

    A system for pavement macrotexture measurement was evaluated. The system utilizes the principle of depolarization of reflected polarized light. The output of the system, the depolarized light number (DPN), is compared with other measures of pavement texture: sand-patch mean texture depth (MTD), British pendulum number (BPN), and outflow meter time (OFT) for 22 asphalt concrete sites and 5 portland cement concrete sites. The prediction of texture data from simultaneous measurements of ribbed and blank-tire skid resistance data was investigated. Using the two-tire data, it is possible to predict sand-patch mean texture depth (MTD) and Bristish pendulum number (BPN). Comparison of the two-tire data at accident sites demonstrates the potential to screen for wet weather accident sites by means of pavement surveys with the two tires.

  4. Texture of Frozen Food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wani, Kohmei

    Quantitative determination of textural quality of frozen food due to freezing and storage conditions is complicated,since the texture is consisted of multi-dimensiona1 factors. The author reviewed the importance of texture in food quality and the factors which is proposed by a priori estimation. New classification of expression words of textural properties by subjective evaluation and an application of four elements mechanical model for analysis of physical characteristics was studied on frozen meat patties. Combination of freezing-thawing condition on the subjective properties and physiochemical characteristics of beef lean meat and hamachi fish (Yellow-tail) meat was studied. Change of the plasticity and the deformability of these samples differed by freezing-thawing rate and cooking procedure. Also optimum freezing-thawing condition was differed from specimens.

  5. Scaling effects and spatio-temporal multilevel dynamics in epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Christian; Kuehn, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are one of the most well-known dysfunctions of the nervous system. During a seizure, a highly synchronized behavior of neural activity is observed that can cause symptoms ranging from mild sensual malfunctions to the complete loss of body control. In this paper, we aim to contribute towards a better understanding of the dynamical systems phenomena that cause seizures. Based on data analysis and modelling, seizure dynamics can be identified to possess multiple spatial scales and on each spatial scale also multiple time scales. At each scale, we reach several novel insights. On the smallest spatial scale we consider single model neurons and investigate early-warning signs of spiking. This introduces the theory of critical transitions to excitable systems. For clusters of neurons (or neuronal regions) we use patient data and find oscillatory behavior and new scaling laws near the seizure onset. These scalings lead to substantiate the conjecture obtained from mean-field models that a Hopf bifurcation could be involved near seizure onset. On the largest spatial scale we introduce a measure based on phase-locking intervals and wavelets into seizure modelling. It is used to resolve synchronization between different regions in the brain and identifies time-shifted scaling laws at different wavelet scales. We also compare our wavelet-based multiscale approach with maximum linear cross-correlation and mean-phase coherence measures. PMID:22363431

  6. Scaling regimes of thermocapillarity-driven dynamics of confined long bubbles: Effects of disjoining pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Kaustav; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-03-01

    During thermocapillary transport of a confined long bubble, we unveil the existence of a contrary-to-the-conventional disjoining-pressure-dominant scaling regime characterizing the dynamics of the thin liquid film engulfed between the bubble interface and the channel surface. Such a regime is realized for the limitingly small magnitude of the Marangoni stress (surface tension gradient) when the separating liquid region reaches an ultrathin dimension. Over this regime, we witness a severe breakdown of the seemingly intuitive scaling arguments based on the balance of viscous and capillary forces. Starting from competent balance criteria, we uncover the characteristic length scales involved, leading towards obtaining the new consistent scaling laws of the disjoining-pressure-dominant regime, in a simple closed form analytical fashion. Our scaling estimations are substantiated by full-scale numerical simulations of the pertinent thin-film equations. These new scaling laws appear to be convenient for implementing as a fundamental design basis for multiphase microfluidic systems.

  7. Road surface texture and skid resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Minh-Tan; Cerezo, Veronique

    2015-12-01

    This paper deals with the relationship between road surface texture and skid resistance. Mechanisms underlying the tire/wet road friction are first described. Definitions of road surface irregularities scales are given. The rest of the paper is then focused on the macrotexture and microtexture scales and their respective roles in what happens at the tire/road interface. Existing methods to measure and characterize the road surface texture are presented. On the one hand, problems encountered when using sensors developed for machined surfaces for the measurement of road surface profiles or cartographies are discussed. On the other hand, potential improvements when applying characterization methods developed for machined surfaces to road surfaces are highlighted. The paper presents finally modeling approaches to calculate friction forces from road surface texture. The generalized form of the models is presented from which terms related respectively to the macrotexture and the microtexture are identified. Approaches used to calculate these terms, integrating eventually other variables, are presented.

  8. Simulating the Dynamics of Scale-Free Networks via Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Schieber, Tiago Alves; Ravetti, Martín Gómez

    2013-01-01

    We deal here with the issue of complex network evolution. The analysis of topological evolution of complex networks plays a crucial role in predicting their future. While an impressive amount of work has been done on the issue, very little attention has been so far devoted to the investigation of how information theory quantifiers can be applied to characterize networks evolution. With the objective of dynamically capture the topological changes of a network's evolution, we propose a model able to quantify and reproduce several characteristics of a given network, by using the square root of the Jensen-Shannon divergence in combination with the mean degree and the clustering coefficient. To support our hypothesis, we test the model by copying the evolution of well-known models and real systems. The results show that the methodology was able to mimic the test-networks. By using this copycat model, the user is able to analyze the networks behavior over time, and also to conjecture about the main drivers of its evolution, also providing a framework to predict its evolution. PMID:24353752

  9. Design and Construction of a Preparative-Scale Dynamic Field Gradient Focusing Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Noah I.; Huang, Zheng; Ivory, Cornelius F.

    2010-01-01

    A linear model is used to show that dynamic field gradient focusing (DFGF) can be scaled to preparative capacity, ~O (10 mgs). This paper explains how the preparative-scale DFGF apparatus was designed and fabricated. Scaled-down experiments and mathematical modeling guided material selection and design changes during construction to increase the probability that the prototype preparative-scale DFGF apparatus would perform as intended. The finished prototype successfully focused bovine hemoglobin from an initial concentration of 6.82 to 15 mg/mL and allowed for 86% recovery of injected protein. PMID:18225913

  10. Methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  11. Texture discriminability in monkey inferotemporal cortex predicts human texture perception

    PubMed Central

    Zhivago, Kalathupiriyan A.

    2014-01-01

    Shape and texture are both important properties of visual objects, but texture is relatively less understood. Here, we characterized neuronal responses to discrete textures in monkey inferotemporal (IT) cortex and asked whether they can explain classic findings in human texture perception. We focused on three classic findings on texture discrimination: 1) it can be easy or hard depending on the constituent elements; 2) it can have asymmetries, and 3) it is reduced for textures with randomly oriented elements. We recorded neuronal activity from monkey inferotemporal (IT) cortex and measured texture perception in humans for a variety of textures. Our main findings are as follows: 1) IT neurons show congruent selectivity for textures across array size; 2) textures that were easy for humans to discriminate also elicited distinct patterns of neuronal activity in monkey IT; 3) texture pairs with asymmetries in humans also exhibited asymmetric variation in firing rate across monkey IT; and 4) neuronal responses to randomly oriented textures were explained by an average of responses to homogeneous textures, which rendered them less discriminable. The reduction in discriminability of monkey IT neurons predicted the reduced discriminability in humans during texture discrimination. Taken together, our results suggest that texture perception in humans is likely based on neuronal representations similar to those in monkey IT. PMID:25210165

  12. Synchronizaton and causality across time-scales of observed and modelled ENSO dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajcay, Nikola; Kravtsov, Sergey; Tsonis, Anastasios A.; Paluš, Milan

    2016-04-01

    Phase-phase and phase-amplitude interactions between dynamics on different temporal scales has been observed in ENSO dynamics, captured by the NINO3.4 index, using the approach for identification of cross-scale interactions introduced recently by Paluš [1]. The most pronounced interactions across scales are phase coherence and phase-phase causality in which the annual cycle influences the dynamics on the quasibiennial scale. The phase of slower phenomena on the scale 4-6 years influences not only the combination frequencies around the period one year, but also the phase of the annual cycle and also the amplitude of the oscillations in the quasibiennial range. In order to understand these nonlinear phenomena we investigate cross-scale interactions in synthetic, modelled NINO3.4 time series. The models taken into account were a selection of 96 historic runs from CMIP5 project, and two low-dimensional models - parametric recharge oscillator (PRO) [2], which is a two-dimensional dynamical model and a data-driven model based on the idea of linear inverse models [3]. The latter is a statistical model, in our setting 25-dimensional. While the two dimensions of the PRO model are not enough to capture all the cross-scale interactions, the results from the data-driven model are more promising and they resemble the interactions found in NINO3.4 measured data set. We believe that combination of models of different complexity will help to uncover mechanisms of the cross-scale interactions which might be the key for better understanding of the irregularities in the ENSO dynamics. This study is supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic within the Program KONTAKT II, Project No. LH14001. [1] M. Palus, Phys. Rev. Let. 112 078702 (2014) [2] K. Stein et al., J. Climate, 27, 14 (2014) [3] Kondrashov et al., J. Climate, 18, 21 (2005)

  13. Dynamic scaling in entangled mean-field gelation polymers.

    PubMed

    Das, Chinmay; Read, Daniel J; Kelmanson, Mark A; McLeish, Tom C B

    2006-07-01

    We present a simple reaction kinetics model to describe the polymer synthesis used by Lusignan et al. [Phys. Rev. E 60, 5657 (1999)] to produce randomly branched polymers in the vulcanization class. Numerical solution of the rate equations gives probabilities for different connections in the final product, which we use to generate a numerical ensemble of representative molecules. All structural quantities probed in the experiments are in quantitative agreement with our results for the entire range of molecular weights considered. However, with detailed topological information available in our calculations, our estimate of the "rheologically relevant" linear segment length is smaller than that estimated from the experimental results. We use a numerical method based on a tube model of polymer melts to calculate the rheological properties of such molecules. Results are in good agreement with experiment, except that in the case of the largest molecular weight samples our estimate of the zero-shear viscosity is significantly lower than the experimental findings. Using acid concentration as an indicator for closeness to the gelation transition, we show that the high-molecular-weight polymers considered are at the limit of mean-field behavior--which possibly is the reason for this disagreement. For a truly mean-field gelation class of model polymers, we numerically calculate the rheological properties for a range of segment lengths. Our calculations show that the tube theory with dynamical dilation predicts that, very close to the gelation limit, the contribution to viscosity for this class of polymers is dominated by the contribution from constraint-release Rouse motion and the final viscosity exponent approaches a Rouse-like value. PMID:16907093

  14. Preliminary design, analysis, and costing of a dynamic scale model of the NASA space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronet, M. J.; Pinson, E. D.; Voqui, H. L.; Crawley, E. F.; Everman, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    The difficulty of testing the next generation of large flexible space structures on the ground places an emphasis on other means for validating predicted on-orbit dynamic behavior. Scale model technology represents one way of verifying analytical predictions with ground test data. This study investigates the preliminary design, scaling and cost trades for a Space Station dynamic scale model. The scaling of nonlinear joint behavior is studied from theoretical and practical points of view. Suspension system interaction trades are conducted for the ISS Dual Keel Configuration and Build-Up Stages suspended in the proposed NASA/LaRC Large Spacecraft Laboratory. Key issues addressed are scaling laws, replication vs. simulation of components, manufacturing, suspension interactions, joint behavior, damping, articulation capability, and cost. These issues are the subject of parametric trades versus the scale model factor. The results of these detailed analyses are used to recommend scale factors for four different scale model options, each with varying degrees of replication. Potential problems in constructing and testing the scale model are identified, and recommendations for further study are outlined.

  15. Decentralized receding horizon control of large scale dynamically decoupled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keviczky, Tamas

    Decentralized control techniques today can be found in a broad spectrum of applications ranging from robotics and formation flight to civil engineering. Their importance for dynamically decoupled systems arises from the abundance of networks of independently actuated systems and the necessity of avoiding centralized design when this becomes computationally prohibitive or would require unrealistic expectations regarding information exchange. A decentralized optimal control framework using distributed Receding Horizon Control (RHC) schemes is proposed to address this problem, which helps overcome drawbacks of currently available methods. Stability of the proposed scheme is analyzed in detail and a number of methodologies are enlisted to address the problem of feasibility. In particular, a feasible decentralized RHC scheme based on hierarchical decomposition and feasible set projection is developed. Another approach for guaranteed constraint fulfillment is described as well using invariant sets of emergency controllers and switching. A hybrid decentralized RHC framework is also introduced based on coordinating functions and logic rules. The proposed framework makes use of algorithms that rely on results from computational geometry, mathematical programming solvers, constrained optimal control, invariant set computation and hybrid systems. These techniques allow the formulation of constrained optimal control problems and the computation of their equivalent look-up tables which are easily implementable in real-time. A summary of relevant background material related to these underlying techniques is provided in this thesis as well. Applicability of the proposed framework is explored using the formation control problem of multiple Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) as a motivating example. This particular application problem has a wide range of envisioned applications including distributed sensing and monitoring, which appear to be the most promising ones. The challenge in UAV

  16. Event scale variability of mixed alluvial-bedrock channel dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Kristen; Turowski, Jens; Hovius, Niels

    2015-04-01

    between sediment supply, channel width, and flood characteristics on aggradation and erosion of the channel bed. Heimann, F. U. M., Rickenmann, D., Turowski, J. M., and Kirchner, J. W.: sedFlow - an efficient tool for simulating bedload transport, bed roughness, and longitudinal profile evolution in mountain streams, Earth Surf. Dynam. Discuss., 2, 733-772, doi:10.5194/esurfd-2-733-2014, 2014.

  17. Intrinsic magnetization of antiferromagnetic textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveten, Erlend G.; Müller, Tristan; Linder, Jacob; Brataas, Arne

    2016-03-01

    Antiferromagnets (AFMs) exhibit intrinsic magnetization when the order parameter spatially varies. This intrinsic spin is present even at equilibrium and can be interpreted as a twisting of the homogeneous AFM into a state with a finite spin. Because magnetic moments couple directly to external magnetic fields, the intrinsic magnetization can alter the dynamics of antiferromagnetic textures under such influence. Starting from the discrete Heisenberg model, we derive the continuum limit of the free energy of AFMs in the exchange approximation and explicitly rederive that the spatial variation of the antiferromagnetic order parameter is associated with an intrinsic magnetization density. We calculate the magnetization profile of a domain wall and discuss how the intrinsic magnetization reacts to external forces. We show conclusively, both analytically and numerically, that a spatially inhomogeneous magnetic field can move and control the position of domain walls in AFMs. By comparing our model to a commonly used alternative parametrization procedure for the continuum fields, we show that the physical interpretations of these fields depend critically on the choice of parametrization procedure for the discrete-to-continuous transition. This can explain why a significant amount of recent studies of the dynamics of AFMs, including effective models that describe the motion of antiferromagnetic domain walls, have neglected the intrinsic spin of the textured order parameter.

  18. Temperature dynamics and velocity scaling laws for interchange driven, warm ion plasma filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Jeppe; Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Naulin, Volker

    2016-04-01

    The influence of electron and ion temperature dynamics on the radial convection of isolated structures in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated by means of numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that the maximum radial velocity of these plasma blobs roughly follows the inertial velocity scaling, which is proportional to the ion acoustic speed times the square root of the filament particle density times the sum of the electron and ion temperature perturbations. Only for small blobs the cross field convection does not follow this scaling. The influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the cross-field blob convection is shown not to depend strongly on the dynamical ion temperature field. The blob dynamics of constant finite and dynamical ion temperature blobs is similar. When the blob size is on the order of 10 times the ion Larmor radius the blobs stay coherent and decelerate slowly compared to larger blobs which dissipate faster due to fragmentation and turbulent mixing.

  19. NASTRAN analysis of the 1/8-scale space shuttle dynamic model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, M.; Mason, P. W.; Zalesak, J.; Gregory, D. J.; Levy, A.

    1973-01-01

    The space shuttle configuration has more complex structural dynamic characteristics than previous launch vehicles primarily because of the high model density at low frequencies and the high degree of coupling between the lateral and longitudinal motions. An accurate analytical representation of these characteristics is a primary means for treating structural dynamics problems during the design phase of the shuttle program. The 1/8-scale model program was developed to explore the adequacy of available analytical modeling technology and to provide the means for investigating problems which are more readily treated experimentally. The basic objectives of the 1/8-scale model program are: (1) to provide early verification of analytical modeling procedures on a shuttle-like structure, (2) to demonstrate important vehicle dynamic characteristics of a typical shuttle design, (3) to disclose any previously unanticipated structural dynamic characteristics, and (4) to provide for development and demonstration of cost effective prototype testing procedures.

  20. Pervasive influence of large-scale climate in the dynamics of a terrestrial vertebrate community

    PubMed Central

    Post, Eric; Forchhammer, Mads C

    2001-01-01

    Background Large-scale climatic variability has been implicated in the population dynamics of many vertebrates throughout the Northern Hemisphere, but has not been demonstrated to directly influence dynamics at multiple trophic levels of any single system. Using data from Isle Royale, USA, comprising time series on the long-term dynamics at three trophic levels (wolves, moose, and balsam fir), we analyzed the relative contributions of density dependence, inter-specific interactions, and climate to the dynamics of each level of the community. Results Despite differences in dynamic complexity among the predator, herbivore, and vegetation levels, large-scale climatic variability influenced dynamics directly at all three levels. The strength of the climatic influence on dynamics was, however, strongest at the top and bottom trophic levels, where density dependence was weakest. Conclusions Because of the conflicting influences of environmental variability and intrinsic processes on population stability, a direct influence of climate on the dynamics at all three levels suggests that climate change may alter stability of this community. Theoretical considerations suggest that if it does, such alteration is most likely to result from changes in stability at the top or bottom trophic levels, where the influence of climate was strongest. PMID:11782292

  1. Dynamic Arrest in Charged Colloidal Systems Exhibiting Large-Scale Structural Heterogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Haro-Perez, C.; Callejas-Fernandez, J.; Hidalgo-Alvarez, R.; Rojas-Ochoa, L. F.; Castaneda-Priego, R.; Quesada-Perez, M.; Trappe, V.

    2009-01-09

    Suspensions of charged liposomes are found to exhibit typical features of strongly repulsive fluid systems at short length scales, while exhibiting structural heterogeneities at larger length scales that are characteristic of attractive systems. We model the static structure factor of these systems using effective pair interaction potentials composed of a long-range attraction and a shorter range repulsion. Our modeling of the static structure yields conditions for dynamically arrested states at larger volume fractions, which we find to agree with the experimentally observed dynamics.

  2. Extending the time scale in molecular dynamics simulations: Propagation of ripples in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewary, V. K.

    2009-10-01

    A technique using causal Green’s function is proposed for extending and bridging multiple time scales in molecular dynamics for modeling time-dependent processes at the atomistic level in nanomaterials and other physical, chemical, and biological systems. The technique is applied to model propagation of a pulse in a one-dimensional lattice of nonlinear oscillators and ripples in graphene from femtoseconds to microseconds. It is shown that, at least in the vibration problems, the technique can accelerate the convergence of molecular dynamics and extend the time scales by eight orders of magnitude.

  3. Scaling behavior of quantum critical relaxation dynamics of a system in a heat bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuai; Lo, Chung-Yu; Chen, Pochung

    2016-05-01

    We study the scaling behavior of the relaxation dynamics to thermal equilibrium when a quantum system is near the quantum critical point. In particular, we investigate systems whose relaxation dynamics is described by a Lindblad master equation. We find that the universal scaling behavior not only appears in the equilibrium stage at the long-time limit but also manifests in the nonequilibrium relaxation process. While the critical behavior is dictated by the low-lying energy levels of the Hamiltonian, the dissipative part in the Lindblad equation also plays important roles in two aspects: First, the dissipative part makes the high-energy levels decay fast, after which the universal behavior controlled by the low-lying modes emerges. Second, the dissipation rate gives rise to a time scale that affects the scaling behavior. We confirm our theory by solving the Lindblad equation for the one-dimensional transverse-field Ising model.

  4. A dynamic subgrid-scale eddy viscosity model with a global model coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Noma; Lee, Sungwon; Lee, Jungil; Choi, Haecheon

    2006-12-01

    In the present study, a dynamic subgrid-scale eddy viscosity model is proposed for large eddy simulation of turbulent flows in complex geometry. A subgrid-scale eddy viscosity model recently proposed by Vreman [Phys. Fluids 16, 3670 (2004)] which guarantees theoretically zero subgrid-scale dissipation for various laminar shear flows, is considered as a base model. A priori tests with the original Vreman model show that it predicts the correct profile of subgrid-scale dissipation in turbulent channel flow but the optimal model coefficient is far from universal. A dynamic procedure of determining the model coefficient is proposed based on the "global equilibrium" between the subgrid-scale dissipation and the viscous dissipation. An important feature of the proposed procedure is that the model coefficient determined is globally constant in space but varies only in time. A posteriori tests of the proposed dynamic model are conducted through large eddy simulations of forced isotropic turbulence at Reλ=103, turbulent channel flows at Reτ=180 and 590, flow over a circular cylinder at Red=3900, and flows over a sphere at Red=3700 and 104. The proposed dynamic model produces excellent performance for all flows considered. As shown in the present paper, the proposed model is robust and it can be readily applied to complex flows without homogeneous direction.

  5. Spontaneous Spin Textures in Multiorbital Mott Systems.

    PubMed

    Kuneš, J; Geffroy, D

    2016-06-24

    Spin textures in k-space arising from spin-orbit coupling in noncentrosymmetric crystals find numerous applications in spintronics. We present a mechanism that leads to the appearance of k-space spin texture due to spontaneous symmetry breaking driven by electronic correlations. Using dynamical mean-field theory we show that doping a spin-triplet excitonic insulator provides a means of creating new thermodynamic phases with unique properties. The numerical results are interpreted using analytic calculations within a generalized double-exchange framework. PMID:27391736

  6. Spontaneous Spin Textures in Multiorbital Mott Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuneš, J.; Geffroy, D.

    2016-06-01

    Spin textures in k -space arising from spin-orbit coupling in noncentrosymmetric crystals find numerous applications in spintronics. We present a mechanism that leads to the appearance of k -space spin texture due to spontaneous symmetry breaking driven by electronic correlations. Using dynamical mean-field theory we show that doping a spin-triplet excitonic insulator provides a means of creating new thermodynamic phases with unique properties. The numerical results are interpreted using analytic calculations within a generalized double-exchange framework.

  7. Temporal and spatial dynamics of scaling-specific features of a gene regulatory network in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Honggang; Manu; Jiao, Renjie; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    A widely appreciated aspect of developmental robustness is pattern formation in proportion to size. But how such scaling features emerge dynamically remains poorly understood. Here we generate a data set of the expression profiles of six gap genes in Drosophila melanogaster embryos that differ significantly in size. Expression patterns exhibit size-dependent dynamics both spatially and temporally. We uncover a dynamic emergence of under-scaling in the posterior, accompanied by reduced expression levels of gap genes near the middle of large embryos. Simulation results show that a size-dependent Bicoid gradient input can lead to reduced Krüppel expression that can have long-range and dynamic effects on gap gene expression in the posterior. Thus, for emergence of scaled patterns, the entire embryo may be viewed as a single unified dynamic system where maternally derived size-dependent information interpreted locally can be propagated in space and time as governed by the dynamics of a gene regulatory network. PMID:26644070

  8. The Impact of Fine-Scale Disturbances on the Predictability of Vegetation Dynamics and Carbon Flux.

    PubMed

    Hurtt, G C; Thomas, R Q; Fisk, J P; Dubayah, R O; Sheldon, S L

    2016-01-01

    Predictions from forest ecosystem models are limited in part by large uncertainties in the current state of the land surface, as previous disturbances have important and lasting influences on ecosystem structure and fluxes that can be difficult to detect. Likewise, future disturbances also present a challenge to prediction as their dynamics are episodic and complex and occur across a range of spatial and temporal scales. While large extreme events such as tropical cyclones, fires, or pest outbreaks can produce dramatic consequences, small fine-scale disturbance events are typically much more common and may be as or even more important. This study focuses on the impacts of these smaller disturbance events on the predictability of vegetation dynamics and carbon flux. Using data on vegetation structure collected for the same domain at two different times, i.e. "repeat lidar data", we test high-resolution model predictions of vegetation dynamics and carbon flux across a range of spatial scales at an important tropical forest site at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. We found that predicted height change from a height-structured ecosystem model compared well to lidar measured height change at the domain scale (~150 ha), but that the model-data mismatch increased exponentially as the spatial scale of evaluation decreased below 20 ha. We demonstrate that such scale-dependent errors can be attributed to errors predicting the pattern of fine-scale forest disturbances. The results of this study illustrate the strong impact fine-scale forest disturbances have on forest dynamics, ultimately limiting the spatial resolution of accurate model predictions. PMID:27093157

  9. The Impact of Fine-Scale Disturbances on the Predictability of Vegetation Dynamics and Carbon Flux

    PubMed Central

    Hurtt, G. C.; Thomas, R. Q.; Fisk, J. P.; Dubayah, R. O.; Sheldon, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    Predictions from forest ecosystem models are limited in part by large uncertainties in the current state of the land surface, as previous disturbances have important and lasting influences on ecosystem structure and fluxes that can be difficult to detect. Likewise, future disturbances also present a challenge to prediction as their dynamics are episodic and complex and occur across a range of spatial and temporal scales. While large extreme events such as tropical cyclones, fires, or pest outbreaks can produce dramatic consequences, small fine-scale disturbance events are typically much more common and may be as or even more important. This study focuses on the impacts of these smaller disturbance events on the predictability of vegetation dynamics and carbon flux. Using data on vegetation structure collected for the same domain at two different times, i.e. “repeat lidar data”, we test high-resolution model predictions of vegetation dynamics and carbon flux across a range of spatial scales at an important tropical forest site at La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. We found that predicted height change from a height-structured ecosystem model compared well to lidar measured height change at the domain scale (~150 ha), but that the model-data mismatch increased exponentially as the spatial scale of evaluation decreased below 20 ha. We demonstrate that such scale-dependent errors can be attributed to errors predicting the pattern of fine-scale forest disturbances. The results of this study illustrate the strong impact fine-scale forest disturbances have on forest dynamics, ultimately limiting the spatial resolution of accurate model predictions. PMID:27093157

  10. Fractional dynamics of tracer transport in fractured media from local to regional scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Reeves, Donald M.; Pohlmann, Karl; Chapman, Jenny B.; Russell, Charles E.

    2013-06-01

    Tracer transport through fractured media exhibits concurrent direction-dependent super-diffusive spreading along high-permeability fractures and sub-diffusion caused by mass transfer between fractures and the rock matrix. The resultant complex dynamics challenge the applicability of conventional physical models based on Fick's law. This study proposes a multi-scaling tempered fractional-derivative (TFD) model to explore fractional dynamics for tracer transport in fractured media. Applications show that the TFD model can capture anomalous transport observed in small-scale single fractures, intermediate-scale fractured aquifers, and two-dimensional large-scale discrete fracture networks. Tracer transport in fractured media from local (0.255-meter long) to regional (400-meter long) scales therefore can be quantified by a general fractional-derivative model. Fractional dynamics in fractured media can be scale dependent, owning to 1) the finite length of fractures that constrains the large displacement of tracers, and 2) the increasing mass exchange capacity along the travel path that enhances sub-diffusion.

  11. Advective-diffusive motion on large scales from small-scale dynamics with an internal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Raffaele; Aurell, Erik

    2016-06-01

    We consider coupled diffusions in n -dimensional space and on a compact manifold and the resulting effective advective-diffusive motion on large scales in space. The effective drift (advection) and effective diffusion are determined as a solvability conditions in a multiscale analysis. As an example, we consider coupled diffusions in three-dimensional space and on the group manifold SO(3) of proper rotations, generalizing results obtained by H. Brenner [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 80, 548 (1981), 10.1016/0021-9797(81)90214-9]. We show in detail how the analysis can be conveniently carried out using local charts and invariance arguments. As a further example, we consider coupled diffusions in two-dimensional complex space and on the group manifold SU(2). We show that although the local operators may be the same as for SO(3), due to the global nature of the solvability conditions the resulting diffusion will differ and generally be more isotropic.

  12. Multi-Scale Compositionality: Identifying the Compositional Structures of Social Dynamics Using Deep Learning

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Huan-Kai; Marculescu, Radu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Social media exhibit rich yet distinct temporal dynamics which cover a wide range of different scales. In order to study this complex dynamics, two fundamental questions revolve around (1) the signatures of social dynamics at different time scales, and (2) the way in which these signatures interact and form higher-level meanings. Method In this paper, we propose the Recursive Convolutional Bayesian Model (RCBM) to address both of these fundamental questions. The key idea behind our approach consists of constructing a deep-learning framework using specialized convolution operators that are designed to exploit the inherent heterogeneity of social dynamics. RCBM’s runtime and convergence properties are guaranteed by formal analyses. Results Experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms the state-of-the-art approaches both in terms of solution quality and computational efficiency. Indeed, by applying the proposed method on two social network datasets, Twitter and Yelp, we are able to identify the compositional structures that can accurately characterize the complex social dynamics from these two social media. We further show that identifying these patterns can enable new applications such as anomaly detection and improved social dynamics forecasting. Finally, our analysis offers new insights on understanding and engineering social media dynamics, with direct applications to opinion spreading and online content promotion. PMID:25830775

  13. Conduit dynamics in transitional rhyolitic activity recorded by tuffisite vein textures from the 2008-2009 Chaitén eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saubin, Elodie; Tuffen, Hugh; Gurioli, Lucia; Owen, Jacqueline; Castro, Jonathan; Berlo, Kim; McGowan, Ellen; Schipper, C. Ian; Wehbe, Katia

    2016-04-01

    Conduit processes govern the mechanisms of hazardous silicic eruptions, but our understanding of complex conduit behaviour is far from complete. Observations of recent Chilean rhyolite eruptions have revealed the importance of hybrid activity, involving simultaneous explosive and effusive emissions from a common vent[1]. Such behaviour hinges upon the ability of gas to decouple from magma in the shallow conduit. Tuffisite veins are increasingly suspected to be a key facilitator of outgassing, as they repeatedly provide a transient permeable escape route for volcanic gases. However, we have limited insights into the interactions between tuffisites and foams that appear critical to efficient outgassing[2], and into how heterogeneous conduit magma responds to pressure perturbations related to repeated disruption or slip of dense magma plugs. Here we provide a detailed characterization of an exceptionally large tuffisite vein within a rhyolitic obsidian bomb ejected during transitional explosive-effusive activity at volcán Chaitén, Chile in May 2008. Vein textures and chemistry provide a time-integrated record of the invasion of a dense upper conduit plug by deeper fragmented magma. Quantitative textural analysis reveals diverse vesiculation histories of varied juvenile clast types. Using vesicle size distributions, bubble number densities, zones of diffusive water depletion, and glass H2O concentrations, we propose a multi-step degassing/fragmentation history, spanning deep degassing to explosive bomb ejection. Rapid decompression events of ~3-4 MPa are associated with fragmentation of foam and dense magma at ~200-300 metres depth in the conduit, permitting vertical gas and pyroclast mobility over >100-200 metres. Permeable pathway occlusion in the dense conduit plug by pyroclast accumulation and sintering preceded ultimate bomb ejection, which triggered a final bubble nucleation event. Our results highlight how the vesiculation response of magma to decompression

  14. Conduit dynamics in transitional rhyolitic activity recorded by tuffisite vein textures from the 2008-2009 Chaitén eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saubin, Elodie; Tuffen, Hugh; Gurioli, Lucia; Owen, Jacqueline; Castro, Jonathan; Berlo, Kim; McGowan, Ellen; Schipper, C.; Wehbe, Katia

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms of hazardous silicic eruptions are controlled by complex, poorly-understood conduit processes. Observations of recent Chilean rhyolite eruptions have revealed the importance of hybrid activity, involving simultaneous explosive and effusive emissions from a common vent. Such behaviour hinges upon the ability of gas to decouple from magma in the shallow conduit. Tuffisite veins are increasingly suspected to be a key facilitator of outgassing, as they repeatedly provide a transient permeable escape route for volcanic gases. Intersection of foam domains by tuffisite veins appears critical to efficient outgassing. However, knowledge is currently lacking into textural heterogeneities within shallow conduits, their relationship with tuffisite vein propagation, and the implications for fragmentation and degassing processes. Similarly, the magmatic vesiculation response to upper conduit pressure perturbations, such as those related to the slip of dense magma plugs, remains largely undefined. Here we provide a detailed characterization of an exceptionally large tuffisite vein within a rhyolitic obsidian bomb ejected during transitional explosive-effusive activity at Chaitén, Chile in May 2008. Vein textures and chemistry provide a time-integrated record of the invasion of a dense upper conduit plug by deeper fragmented magma. Quantitative textural analysis reveals diverse vesiculation histories of various juvenile clast types. Using vesicle size distributions, bubble number densities, zones of diffusive water depletion, and glass H2O concentrations, we propose a multi-step degassing/fragmentation history, spanning deep degassing to explosive bomb ejection. Rapid decompression events of ~3-4 MPa are associated with fragmentation of foam and dense magma at ~200-350 metres depth in the conduit, permitting vertical gas and pyroclast mobility over hundreds of metres. Permeable pathway occlusion in the dense conduit plug by pyroclast accumulation and sintering

  15. Parallel Molecular Dynamics Stencil : a new parallel computing environment for a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Futoshi; Kimizuka, Hajime; Kaburaki, Hideo

    2002-08-01

    A new parallel computing environment, called as ``Parallel Molecular Dynamics Stencil'', has been developed to carry out a large-scale short-range molecular dynamics simulation of solids. The stencil is written in C language using MPI for parallelization and designed successfully to separate and conceal parts of the programs describing cutoff schemes and parallel algorithms for data communication. This has been made possible by introducing the concept of image atoms. Therefore, only a sequential programming of the force calculation routine is required for executing the stencil in parallel environment. Typical molecular dynamics routines, such as various ensembles, time integration methods, and empirical potentials, have been implemented in the stencil. In the presentation, the performance of the stencil on parallel computers of Hitachi, IBM, SGI, and PC-cluster using the models of Lennard-Jones and the EAM type potentials for fracture problem will be reported.

  16. EEG microstate sequences in healthy humans at rest reveal scale-free dynamics.

    PubMed

    Van de Ville, Dimitri; Britz, Juliane; Michel, Christoph M

    2010-10-19

    Recent findings identified electroencephalography (EEG) microstates as the electrophysiological correlates of fMRI resting-state networks. Microstates are defined as short periods (100 ms) during which the EEG scalp topography remains quasi-stable; that is, the global topography is fixed but strength might vary and polarity invert. Microstates represent the subsecond coherent activation within global functional brain networks. Surprisingly, these rapidly changing EEG microstates correlate significantly with activity in fMRI resting-state networks after convolution with the hemodynamic response function that constitutes a strong temporal smoothing filter. We postulate here that microstate sequences should reveal scale-free, self-similar dynamics to explain this remarkable effect and thus that microstate time series show dependencies over long time ranges. To that aim, we deploy wavelet-based fractal analysis that allows determining scale-free behavior. We find strong statistical evidence that microstate sequences are scale free over six dyadic scales covering the 256-ms to 16-s range. The degree of long-range dependency is maintained when shuffling the local microstate labels but becomes indistinguishable from white noise when equalizing microstate durations, which indicates that temporal dynamics are their key characteristic. These results advance the understanding of temporal dynamics of brain-scale neuronal network models such as the global workspace model. Whereas microstates can be considered the "atoms of thoughts," the shortest constituting elements of cognition, they carry a dynamic signature that is reminiscent at characteristic timescales up to multiple seconds. The scale-free dynamics of the microstates might be the basis for the rapid reorganization and adaptation of the functional networks of the brain. PMID:20921381

  17. Solitonlike magnetization textures in noncollinear antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulloa, Camilo; Nunez, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    We show that proper control of magnetization textures can be achieved in noncollinear antiferromagnets. This opens the versatile toolbox of domain-wall manipulation in the context of a different family of materials. In this way, we show that noncollinear antiferromagnets are a good prospect for applications in the context of antiferromagnetic spintronics. As in many noncollinear antiferromagnets, the order parameter field takes values in SO(3). By performing a gradient expansion in the energy functional we derive an effective theory that accounts for the physics of the magnetization of long-wavelength excitations. We apply our formalism to static and dynamic textures such as domain walls and localized oscillations, and identify topologically protected textures that are spatially localized. Our results are applicable to the exchange-bias materials Mn3X , with X =Ir,Rh,Pt .

  18. Plasma Texturing of Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, Mohan; Roy, Madhu; Ruby, Douglas S.; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    1999-07-20

    Surface texture promotes enhanced light absorption in Si solar cells. The quality of lower cost multicrystalline-silicon (mc-Si) has increased to the point that its cell performance is close to that of single c-Si cells, with the major difference resulting from the inability to texture mc-Si affordably. This has reduced the cost-per-watt advantage of mc-Si. Surface texturing aimed at enhanced absorption in Si has been historically obtained by creating multimicrometer-sized pyramids using anisotropic wet etchants on single-crystalline silicon that take advantage of its single crystalline orientation. Since the surface feature sizes are several times the length of the incident solar wavelengths involved, the optical analysis of the reflected and absorbed light can be understood using geometrical optics. Geometrical textures reduce reflection and improve absorption by double-bounce and oblique light coupling into the semiconductor. However, geometrical texturing suffers from several disadvantages that limit its effectiveness. Some of these are listed below: (a) Wet-chemical anisotropic etching used to form random pyramids on <100> crystal orientation is not effective in the texturing of low-cost multicrystalline wafers, (b) Anti-reflection films deposited on random features to reduce reflection have a resonant structure limiting their effectiveness to a narrow range of angles and wavelengths. Various forms of surface texturing have been applied to mc-Si in research, including laser-structuring, mechanical grinding, porous-Si etching, and photolithographically defined etching. However, these may be too costly to ever be used in large-scale production. A Japanese firm has reported the development of an RIE process using Cl{sub 2} gas, which textures multiple wafers per batch, making it attractive for mass-production [1]. Using this process, they have produced a 17.1% efficient 225-cm{sup 2} mc-Si cell, which is the highest efficiency mc-Si cell of its size ever reported

  19. Planetary-scale waves and the cyclic nature of cloud top dynamics on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Genio, A. D.; Rossow, W. B.

    1990-02-01

    Quantitative data on the properties of the planetary scale wave modes at the Venus cloud tops have been derived from eight years of Pioneer Venus UV images. At least four planetary-scale wave modes are established on this basis; it is suggested that all play an important role in the maintenance of the equatorial winds. The evidence obtained suggests that the equatorial dynamics of Venus is cyclic, with an apparent time-scale of 5-10 yr. The long-term evolution and maintenance of the Venus cloud-top superrotation reflects a complex balance among at least four eddy momentum transport equations.

  20. A theory of forest dynamics: Spatially explicit models and issues of scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pacala, S.

    1990-01-01

    Good progress has been made in the first year of DOE grant (number sign) FG02-90ER60933. The purpose of the project is to develop and investigate models of forest dynamics that apply across a range of spatial scales. The grant is one third of a three-part project. The second third was funded by the NSF this year and is intended to provide the empirical data necessary to calibrate and test small-scale (less than or equal to 1000 ha) models. The final third was also funded this year (NASA), and will provide data to calibrate and test the large-scale features of the models.

  1. Thermodynamic scaling of dynamics in polymer melts: predictions from the generalized entropy theory.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Freed, Karl F

    2013-06-21

    Many glass-forming fluids exhibit a remarkable thermodynamic scaling in which dynamic properties, such as the viscosity, the relaxation time, and the diffusion constant, can be described under different thermodynamic conditions in terms of a unique scaling function of the ratio ρ(γ)∕T, where ρ is the density, T is the temperature, and γ is a material dependent constant. Interest in the scaling is also heightened because the exponent γ enters prominently into considerations of the relative contributions to the dynamics from pressure effects (e.g., activation barriers) vs. volume effects (e.g., free volume). Although this scaling is clearly of great practical use, a molecular understanding of the scaling remains elusive. Providing this molecular understanding would greatly enhance the utility of the empirically observed scaling in assisting the rational design of materials by describing how controllable molecular factors, such as monomer structures, interactions, flexibility, etc., influence the scaling exponent γ and, hence, the dynamics. Given the successes of the generalized entropy theory in elucidating the influence of molecular details on the universal properties of glass-forming polymers, this theory is extended here to investigate the thermodynamic scaling in polymer melts. The predictions of theory are in accord with the appearance of thermodynamic scaling for pressures not in excess of ~50 MPa. (The failure at higher pressures arises due to inherent limitations of a lattice model.) In line with arguments relating the magnitude of γ to the steepness of the repulsive part of the intermolecular potential, the abrupt, square-well nature of the lattice model interactions lead, as expected, to much larger values of the scaling exponent. Nevertheless, the theory is employed to study how individual molecular parameters affect the scaling exponent in order to extract a molecular understanding of the information content contained in the exponent. The chain

  2. Thermodynamic scaling of dynamics in polymer melts: Predictions from the generalized entropy theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Freed, Karl F.

    2013-06-01

    Many glass-forming fluids exhibit a remarkable thermodynamic scaling in which dynamic properties, such as the viscosity, the relaxation time, and the diffusion constant, can be described under different thermodynamic conditions in terms of a unique scaling function of the ratio ργ/T, where ρ is the density, T is the temperature, and γ is a material dependent constant. Interest in the scaling is also heightened because the exponent γ enters prominently into considerations of the relative contributions to the dynamics from pressure effects (e.g., activation barriers) vs. volume effects (e.g., free volume). Although this scaling is clearly of great practical use, a molecular understanding of the scaling remains elusive. Providing this molecular understanding would greatly enhance the utility of the empirically observed scaling in assisting the rational design of materials by describing how controllable molecular factors, such as monomer structures, interactions, flexibility, etc., influence the scaling exponent γ and, hence, the dynamics. Given the successes of the generalized entropy theory in elucidating the influence of molecular details on the universal properties of glass-forming polymers, this theory is extended here to investigate the thermodynamic scaling in polymer melts. The predictions of theory are in accord with the appearance of thermodynamic scaling for pressures not in excess of ˜50 MPa. (The failure at higher pressures arises due to inherent limitations of a lattice model.) In line with arguments relating the magnitude of γ to the steepness of the repulsive part of the intermolecular potential, the abrupt, square-well nature of the lattice model interactions lead, as expected, to much larger values of the scaling exponent. Nevertheless, the theory is employed to study how individual molecular parameters affect the scaling exponent in order to extract a molecular understanding of the information content contained in the exponent. The chain

  3. Capturing dynamics on multiple time scales: a multilevel fusion approach for cluttered electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumby, Steven P.; Myers, Kary L.; Pawley, Norma H.

    2010-04-01

    Many problems in electromagnetic signal analysis exhibit dynamics on a wide range of time scales. Further, these dynamics may involve both continuous source generation processes and discrete source mode dynamics. These rich temporal characteristics can present challenges for standard modeling approaches, particularly in the presence of nonstationary noise and clutter sources. Here we demonstrate a hybrid algorithm designed to capture the dynamic behavior at all relevant time scales while remaining robust to clutter and noise at each time scale. We draw from techniques of adaptive feature extraction, statistical machine learning, and discrete process modeling to construct our hybrid algorithm. We describe our approach and present results applying our hybrid algorithm to a simulated dataset based on an example radio beacon identification problem: civilian air traffic control. This application illustrates the multi-scale complexity of the problems we wish to address. We consider a multi-mode air traffic control radar emitter operating against a cluttered background of competing radars and continuous-wave communications signals (radios, TV broadcasts). Our goals are to find a compact representation of the radio frequency measurements, identify which pulses were emitted by the target source, and determine the mode of the source.

  4. On the dynamics underlying the emergence of large scale structures in barotropic beta-plane turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakas, Nikolaos; Constantinou, Navid; Ioannou, Petros

    2016-04-01

    Planetary turbulent flows are observed to self-organize into large scale structures such as zonal jets and coherent vortices. In this work, the eddy-mean flow dynamics underlying the formation of both zonal and nonzonal coherent structures in a barotropic turbulent flow is investigated within the statistical framework of stochastic structural stability theory (S3T). Previous studies have shown that the coherent structures emerge due to the instability of the homogeneous turbulent flow in the statistical dynamical S3T system and that the statistical predictions of S3T are reflected in direct numerical simulations. In this work, the dynamics underlying this S3T statistical instability are studied. It is shown that, for weak planetary vorticity gradient beta, both zonal jets and non-zonal large-scale structures form from upgradient momentum fluxes due to shearing of the eddies by the emerging flow. For large beta, the dynamics of the S3T instability differs for zonal and non-zonal flows. Shearing of the eddies by the mean flow continues to be the mechanism for the emergence of zonal jets while non-zonal large-scale flows emerge from resonant and near-resonant triad interactions between the large-scale flow and the stochastically forced eddies.

  5. A two-scale finite element formulation for the dynamic analysis of heterogeneous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ionita, Axinte

    2008-01-01

    In the analysis of heterogeneous materials using a two-scale Finite Element Method (FEM) the usual assumption is that the Representative Volume Element (RVE) of the micro-scale is much smaller than the finite element discretization of the macro-scale. However there are situations in which the RVE becomes comparable with, or even bigger than the finite element. These situations are considered in this article from the perspective of a two-scale FEM dynamic analysis. Using the principle of virtual power, new equations for the fluctuating fields are developed in terms of velocities rather than displacements. To allow more flexibility in the analysis, a scaling deformation tensor is introduced together with a procedure for its determination. Numerical examples using the new approach are presented.

  6. Scaling of dynamic thermoelectric harvesting devices in the 1-100 cm3 range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiziroglou, M. E.; Elefsiniotis, A.; Kokorakis, N.; Wright, S. W.; Toh, T. T.; Mitcheson, P. D.; Schmid, U.; Becker, Th.; Yeatman, E. M.

    2015-05-01

    Aircraft sensors are typically cable powered, imposing a significant weight overhead. The exploitation of temperature variations during flight by a phase change material (PCM) based heat storage thermoelectric energy harvester, as an alternative power source in aeronautical applications, has recently been flight tested. In this work, a scaled-down and a scaled-up prototype are presented. Output energy of 4.1 J per gram of PCM from a typical flight cycle is demonstrated for the scaled-down device, and 3.2 J per gram of PCM for the scaled-up device. The observed performance improvement with scaling down is attributed to the reduction in temperature inhomogeneity inside the PCM. As an application demonstrator for dynamic thermoelectric harvesting devices, the output of a thermoelectric module is used to directly power a microcontroller for the generation of a pulse width modulation signal.

  7. Synaptic Scaling Enables Dynamically Distinct Short- and Long-Term Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    Tetzlaff, Christian; Kolodziejski, Christoph; Timme, Marc; Tsodyks, Misha; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2013-01-01

    Memory storage in the brain relies on mechanisms acting on time scales from minutes, for long-term synaptic potentiation, to days, for memory consolidation. During such processes, neural circuits distinguish synapses relevant for forming a long-term storage, which are consolidated, from synapses of short-term storage, which fade. How time scale integration and synaptic differentiation is simultaneously achieved remains unclear. Here we show that synaptic scaling – a slow process usually associated with the maintenance of activity homeostasis – combined with synaptic plasticity may simultaneously achieve both, thereby providing a natural separation of short- from long-term storage. The interaction between plasticity and scaling provides also an explanation for an established paradox where memory consolidation critically depends on the exact order of learning and recall. These results indicate that scaling may be fundamental for stabilizing memories, providing a dynamic link between early and late memory formation processes. PMID:24204240

  8. Modeling dynamic functional information flows on large-scale brain networks.

    PubMed

    Lv, Peili; Guo, Lei; Hu, Xintao; Li, Xiang; Jin, Changfeng; Han, Junwei; Li, Lingjiang; Liu, Tianming

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence from the functional neuroimaging field suggests that human brain functions are realized via dynamic functional interactions on large-scale structural networks. Even in resting state, functional brain networks exhibit remarkable temporal dynamics. However, it has been rarely explored to computationally model such dynamic functional information flows on large-scale brain networks. In this paper, we present a novel computational framework to explore this problem using multimodal resting state fMRI (R-fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data. Basically, recent literature reports including our own studies have demonstrated that the resting state brain networks dynamically undergo a set of distinct brain states. Within each quasi-stable state, functional information flows from one set of structural brain nodes to other sets of nodes, which is analogous to the message package routing on the Internet from the source node to the destination. Therefore, based on the large-scale structural brain networks constructed from DTI data, we employ a dynamic programming strategy to infer functional information transition routines on structural networks, based on which hub routers that most frequently participate in these routines are identified. It is interesting that a majority of those hub routers are located within the default mode network (DMN), revealing a possible mechanism of the critical functional hub roles played by the DMN in resting state. Also, application of this framework on a post trauma stress disorder (PTSD) dataset demonstrated interesting difference in hub router distributions between PTSD patients and healthy controls. PMID:24579202

  9. Continuation and bifurcation analysis of large-scale dynamical systems with LOCA.

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Phipps, Eric Todd; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

    2010-06-01

    Dynamical systems theory provides a powerful framework for understanding the behavior of complex evolving systems. However applying these ideas to large-scale dynamical systems such as discretizations of multi-dimensional PDEs is challenging. Such systems can easily give rise to problems with billions of dynamical variables, requiring specialized numerical algorithms implemented on high performance computing architectures with thousands of processors. This talk will describe LOCA, the Library of Continuation Algorithms, a suite of scalable continuation and bifurcation tools optimized for these types of systems that is part of the Trilinos software collection. In particular, we will describe continuation and bifurcation analysis techniques designed for large-scale dynamical systems that are based on specialized parallel linear algebra methods for solving augmented linear systems. We will also discuss several other Trilinos tools providing nonlinear solvers (NOX), eigensolvers (Anasazi), iterative linear solvers (AztecOO and Belos), preconditioners (Ifpack, ML, Amesos) and parallel linear algebra data structures (Epetra and Tpetra) that LOCA can leverage for efficient and scalable analysis of large-scale dynamical systems.

  10. Micro-scale simulation of dynamic compaction of oxide and metal powder mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamegai, M.; Walton, Otis R.; Taylor, A. G.

    1989-10-01

    Many features of the dynamic compaction of powders are potentially favorable for use in processing high T(sub c) oxide superconductors. Conventional sintering methods tend to produce unwanted impurities, voids, and oxygen-deficient grain boundaries and have, thus, failed to form bulk oxide superconductors with high critical current. One proposed approach for a dynamic process is to compress a mixture of high purity single crystallite particles and fine silver particles. Computer modeling of dynamic compaction has thus far been limited to bulk simulation of the process by continuum mechanics codes. Results of compaction experiments are not reliably predicted with such techniques because the micro-scale dynamics of powder compaction are only modeled by phenomenological approximation. A micro-scale simulation technique was developed and applied to computer models similar to those of molecular dynamics, which were originally designed to simulate the flow behavior of inelastic, frictional particles. In this method, the oxide grain is represented by a nearly elastic sphere while an individual silver grain is modeled by an aggregate of effective inelastic-frictional particles bound by a prescribed interparticle force. The first 2-D simulation results for a simple configuration (a single aggregate silver grain crushed between two nearly elastic ceramic spheres) are compared with the continuum calculations for the same configuration. This micro-scale simulation technique can be extended to study an assembly of dissimilar grains in 3-D space.

  11. Textural segmentation, second-order statistics, and textural elements.

    PubMed

    Beck, J

    1983-01-01

    Beck (1972, 1973) hypothesized that textural segmentation occurs strongly on the basis of simple properties such as brightness, color, size, and the slopes of contours and lines of the elemental descriptors of a texture or textural elements. The experiment reported supports the hypothesis that specific stimulus features, rather than second-order statistics, account for textural segmentation. The results agree with Julesz (1981a,b) who has reported evidence disproving his original conjecture of the importance of second-order statistics. Julesz (1981a,b) now hypothesizes textural segmentation to be a function of local features which he called textons. Textons are features that give textural segmentation when textures have identical second-order statistics. The two hypotheses are to date in complete agreement on the stimulus features producing textural segmentation, and the experiment reported is consistent with both. PMID:6626590

  12. Exploring the Relationship between Static and Dynamic Vertical Scaling from Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Design Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Shudong; Jiao, Hong; Jiang, Yanming

    2009-01-01

    The concept of dynamic vertical scaling (DVS) from longitudinal point of view has been proposed as comparing to traditional vertical scaling or static vertical scaling (SVS) from cross-sectional perspective. The effects of differences between DVS and SVS on large-scale student achievements have been investigated. The potential application of DVS…

  13. Scale-Free and Multifractal Time Dynamics of fMRI Signals during Rest and Task

    PubMed Central

    Ciuciu, P.; Varoquaux, G.; Abry, P.; Sadaghiani, S.; Kleinschmidt, A.

    2012-01-01

    Scaling temporal dynamics in functional MRI (fMRI) signals have been evidenced for a decade as intrinsic characteristics of ongoing brain activity (Zarahn et al., 1997). Recently, scaling properties were shown to fluctuate across brain networks and to be modulated between rest and task (He, 2011): notably, Hurst exponent, quantifying long memory, decreases under task in activating and deactivating brain regions. In most cases, such results were obtained: First, from univariate (voxelwise or regionwise) analysis, hence focusing on specific cognitive systems such as Resting-State Networks (RSNs) and raising the issue of the specificity of this scale-free dynamics modulation in RSNs. Second, using analysis tools designed to measure a single scaling exponent related to the second order statistics of the data, thus relying on models that either implicitly or explicitly assume Gaussianity and (asymptotic) self-similarity, while fMRI signals may significantly depart from those either of those two assumptions (Ciuciu et al., 2008; Wink et al., 2008). To address these issues, the present contribution elaborates on the analysis of the scaling properties of fMRI temporal dynamics by proposing two significant variations. First, scaling properties are technically investigated using the recently introduced Wavelet Leader-based Multifractal formalism (WLMF; Wendt et al., 2007). This measures a collection of scaling exponents, thus enables a richer and more versatile description of scale invariance (beyond correlation and Gaussianity), referred to as multifractality. Also, it benefits from improved estimation performance compared to tools previously used in the literature. Second, scaling properties are investigated in both RSN and non-RSN structures (e.g., artifacts), at a broader spatial scale than the voxel one, using a multivariate approach, namely the Multi-Subject Dictionary Learning (MSDL) algorithm (Varoquaux et al., 2011) that produces a set of spatial components that

  14. Fast Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging of Crystalline Materials and Dynamic Phase Transformations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Yuan, Ren Liang; Ihlefeld, Jon F; Spoerke, Erik David; Pan, Wei; Zuo, Jian Min

    2016-04-13

    Atomic-scale phenomena fundamentally influence materials form and function that makes the ability to locally probe and study these processes critical to advancing our understanding and development of materials. Atomic-scale chemical imaging by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) is a powerful approach to investigate solid crystal structures. Inefficient X-ray emission and collection, however, require long acquisition times (typically hundreds of seconds), making the technique incompatible with electron-beam sensitive materials and study of dynamic material phenomena. Here we describe an atomic-scale STEM-EDS chemical imaging technique that decreases the acquisition time to as little as one second, a reduction of more than 100 times. We demonstrate this new approach using LaAlO3 single crystal and study dynamic phase transformation in beam-sensitive Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 (LNMO) lithium ion battery cathode material. By capturing a series of time-lapsed chemical maps, we show for the first time clear atomic-scale evidence of preferred Ni-mobility in LNMO transformation, revealing new kinetic mechanisms. These examples highlight the potential of this approach toward temporal, atomic-scale mapping of crystal structure and chemistry for investigating dynamic material phenomena. PMID:26943670

  15. Effective dynamics, big bounces, and scaling symmetry in Bianchi type I loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, D.-W.

    2007-12-15

    The detailed formulation for loop quantum cosmology (LQC) in the Bianchi I model with a scalar massless field has been constructed. In this paper, its effective dynamics is studied in two improved strategies for implementing the LQC discreteness corrections. Both schemes show that the big bang is replaced by the big bounces, which take place up to 3 times, once in each diagonal direction, when the area or volume scale factor approaches the critical values in the Planck regime measured by the reference of the scalar field momentum. These two strategies give different evolutions: In one scheme, the effective dynamics is independent of the choice of the finite sized cell prescribed to make Hamiltonian finite; in the other, the effective dynamics reacts to the macroscopic scales introduced by the boundary conditions. Both schemes reveal interesting symmetries of scaling, which are reminiscent of the relational interpretation of quantum mechanics and also suggest that the fundamental spatial scale (area gap) may give rise to a temporal scale.

  16. Nanoflares, Spicules, and Other Small-Scale Dynamic Phenomena on the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimchuk, James

    2010-01-01

    There is abundant evidence of highly dynamic phenomena occurring on very small scales in the solar atmosphere. For example, the observed pr operties of many coronal loops can only be explained if the loops are bundles of unresolved strands that are heated impulsively by nanoflares. Type II spicules recently discovered by Hinode are an example of small-scale impulsive events occurring in the chromosphere. The exist ence of these and other small-scale phenomena is not surprising given the highly structured nature of the magnetic field that is revealed by photospheric observations. Dynamic phenomena also occur on much lar ger scales, including coronal jets, flares, and CMEs. It is tempting to suggest that these different phenomena are all closely related and represent a continuous distribution of sizes and energies. However, this is a dangerous over simplification in my opinion. While it is tru e that the phenomena all involve "magnetic reconnection" (the changin g of field line connectivity) in some form, how this occurs depends s trongly on the magnetic geometry. A nanoflare resulting from the interaction of tangled magnetic strands within a confined coronal loop is much different from a major flare occurring at the current sheet form ed when a CME rips open an active region. I will review the evidence for ubiquitous small-scale dynamic phenomena on the Sun and discuss wh y different phenomena are not all fundamentally the same.

  17. Generalized Scaling and the Master Variable for Brownian Magnetic Nanoparticle Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Daniel B.; Shi, Yipeng; Weaver, John B.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of magnetic particles can help to advance several biomedical nanotechnologies. Previously, scaling relationships have been used in magnetic spectroscopy of nanoparticle Brownian motion (MSB) to measure biologically relevant properties (e.g., temperature, viscosity, bound state) surrounding nanoparticles in vivo. Those scaling relationships can be generalized with the introduction of a master variable found from non-dimensionalizing the dynamical Langevin equation. The variable encapsulates the dynamical variables of the surroundings and additionally includes the particles’ size distribution and moment and the applied field’s amplitude and frequency. From an applied perspective, the master variable allows tuning to an optimal MSB biosensing sensitivity range by manipulating both frequency and field amplitude. Calculation of magnetization harmonics in an oscillating applied field is also possible with an approximate closed-form solution in terms of the master variable and a single free parameter. PMID:26959493

  18. On the formulation of the dynamic mixed subgrid-scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreman, Bert; Geurts, Bernard; Kuerten, Hans

    1994-12-01

    The dynamic mixed subgrid-scale model of Zang et al. [Phys. Fluids A 5, 3186 (1993)] (DMM1) is modified with respect to the incorporation of the similarity model in order to remove a mathematical inconsistency. Compared to DMM1, the magnitude of the dynamic model coefficient of the modified model (DMM2) is increased considerably, while it is still significantly smaller than as occurs in the dynamic subgrid-scale eddy-viscosity model of Germano [J. Fluid Mech. 238, 325 (1992)] (DSM). Large eddy simulations (LES) for the weakly compressible mixing layer are conducted using these three models and results are compared with direct numerical simulation (DNS) data. LES based on DMM1 gives a significant improvement over LES using DSM, while even better agreement is achieved with DMM2.

  19. Small parametric model for nonlinear dynamics of large scale cyclogenesis with wind speed variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhin, Nikolay; Shkevov, Rumen; Zolnikova, Nadezhda; Mikhailovskaya, Ludmila

    2016-07-01

    It is performed a numerical investigation of a self consistent small parametric model (SPM) for large scale cyclogenesis (RLSC) by usage of connected nonlinear equations for mean wind speed and ocean surface temperature in the tropical cyclone (TC). These equations may describe the different scenario of temporal dynamics of a powerful atmospheric vortex during its full life cycle. The numerical calculations have shown that relevant choice of SPMTs incoming parameters allows to describe the seasonal behavior of regional large scale cyclogenesis dynamics for a given number of TC during the active season. It is shown that SPM allows describe also the variable wind speed variations inside the TC. Thus by usage of the nonlinear small parametric model it is possible to study the features of RLSCTs temporal dynamics during the active season in the region given and to analyze the relationship between regional cyclogenesis parameters and different external factors like the space weather including the solar activity level and cosmic rays variations.

  20. Dynamical scaling behavior of the one-dimensional conserved directed-percolation universality class.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sungchul; Kim, Yup

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the dynamical scaling behavior of the static diffusive epidemic process and a fixed-energy Manna sandpile model, undergoing nonequilibrium absorbing phase transitions in one dimension. These models belong to the so-called conserved directed-percolation or Manna universality class characterized by the conservation of the total particle number, activity coupled to a nondiffusive conserved field and infinitely many absorbing states. We measure the dynamical exponents of these models in one dimension by using the critical spreading simulation of a localized activity in absorbing configurations. In the spreading simulations, boundaries are never touched, so the results are free from the finite-size effects. In contrast to the scattered results for the different models from the previous finite-size scaling analyses, we obtain consistent estimates of the dynamical exponents for both models. PMID:23004715

  1. Physics and Dynamics Coupling Across Scales in the Next Generation CESM. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bacmeister, Julio T.

    2015-06-12

    This project examines physics/dynamics coupling, that is, exchange of meteorological profiles and tendencies between an atmospheric model’s dynamical core and its various physics parameterizations. Most model physics parameterizations seek to represent processes that occur on scales smaller than the smallest scale resolved by the dynamical core. As a consequence a key conceptual aspect of parameterizations is an assumption about the subgrid variability of quantities such as temperature, humidity or vertical wind. Most existing parameterizations of processes such as turbulence, convection, cloud, and gravity wave drag make relatively ad hoc assumptions about this variability and are forced to introduce empirical parameters, i.e., “tuning knobs” to obtain realistic simulations. These knobs make systematic dependences on model grid size difficult to quantify.

  2. A new dynamics of electroweak symmetry breaking with classically scale invariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Kitazawa, Noriaki; Yamaguchi, Yuya

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new dynamics of the electroweak symmetry breaking in a classically scale invariant version of the standard model. The scale invariance is broken by the condensations of additional fermions under a strong coupling dynamics. The electroweak symmetry breaking is triggered by negative mass squared of the elementary Higgs doublet, which is dynamically generated through the bosonic seesaw mechanism. We introduce a real pseudo-scalar singlet field interacting with additional fermions and Higgs doublet in order to avoid massless Nambu-Goldstone bosons from the chiral symmetry breaking in a strong coupling sector. We investigate the mass spectra and decay rates of these pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons, and show they can decay fast enough without cosmological problems. We further show that our model can make the electroweak vacuum stable.

  3. What can we learn about a dynamical length scale in glasses from measurements of surface mobility?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, J. A.

    2013-08-01

    We consider the ability of recent measurements on the size of a liquid-like mobile surface region in glasses to provide direct information on the length scale of enhanced surface mobility. While these quantities are strongly related there are important distinctions that limit the ability of measurements to quantify the actual length over which the surface properties change from surface to bulk-like. In particular, we show that for temperatures near the bulk glass transition, measurements of a liquid-like mobile layer may have very limited predictive power when it comes to determining the temperature dependent length scale of enhanced surface mobility near the glass transition temperature. This places important limitations on the ability of measurements of such enhanced surface dynamics to contribute to discussion on the length scale for dynamical correlation in glassy materials.

  4. Scaling of Directed Dynamical Small-World Networks with Random Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen-Ping; Xiong, Shi-Jie; Tian, Ying-Jie; Li, Nan; Jiang, Ke-Sheng

    2004-05-01

    A dynamical model of small-world networks, with directed links which describe various correlations in social and natural phenomena, is presented. Random responses of sites to the input message are introduced to simulate real systems. The interplay of these ingredients results in the collective dynamical evolution of a spinlike variable S(t) of the whole network. The global average spreading length s and average spreading time s are found to scale as p-αln(N with different exponents. Meanwhile, S(t) behaves in a duple scaling form for N≫N*: S˜f(p-βqγt˜), where p and q are rewiring and external parameters, α, β, and γ are scaling exponents, and f(t˜) is a universal function. Possible applications of the model are discussed.

  5. Scale and size effects in dynamic fracture of concretes and rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Y.; Selyutina, N.

    2015-09-01

    Structural-temporal approach based on the notion of incubation time is used for interpretation of strain-rate effects in the fracture process of concretes and rocks. It is established that temporal dependences of concretes and rocks are calculated by the incubation time criterion. Experimentally observed different relations between ultimate stresses of concrete and mortar in static and dynamic conditions are explained. It is obtained that compressive strength of mortar at a low strain rate is greater than that of concrete, but at a high strain rate the opposite is true. Influence of confinement pressure on the mechanism of dynamic strength for concretes and rocks is discussed. Both size effect and scale effect for concrete and rocks samples subjected to impact loading are analyzed. Statistical nature of a size effect contrasts to a scale effect that is related to the definition of a spatio-temporal representative volume determining the fracture event on the given scale level.

  6. Anomalous dynamical scaling in anharmonic chains and plasma models with multiparticle collisions.

    PubMed

    Di Cintio, Pierfrancesco; Livi, Roberto; Bufferand, Hugo; Ciraolo, Guido; Lepri, Stefano; Straka, Mika J

    2015-12-01

    We study the anomalous dynamical scaling of equilibrium correlations in one-dimensional systems. Two different models are compared: the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain with cubic and quartic nonlinearity and a gas of point particles interacting stochastically through multiparticle collision dynamics. For both models-that admit three conservation laws-by means of detailed numerical simulations we verify the predictions of nonlinear fluctuating hydrodynamics for the structure factors of density and energy fluctuations at equilibrium. Despite this, violations of the expected scaling in the currents correlation are found in some regimes, hindering the observation of the asymptotic scaling predicted by the theory. In the case of the gas model this crossover is clearly demonstrated upon changing the coupling constant. PMID:26764633

  7. Steganography using reversible texture synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Chung-Ming

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for steganography using a reversible texture synthesis. A texture synthesis process resamples a smaller texture image, which synthesizes a new texture image with a similar local appearance and an arbitrary size. We weave the texture synthesis process into steganography to conceal secret messages. In contrast to using an existing cover image to hide messages, our algorithm conceals the source texture image and embeds secret messages through the process of texture synthesis. This allows us to extract the secret messages and source texture from a stego synthetic texture. Our approach offers three distinct advantages. First, our scheme offers the embedding capacity that is proportional to the size of the stego texture image. Second, a steganalytic algorithm is not likely to defeat our steganographic approach. Third, the reversible capability inherited from our scheme provides functionality, which allows recovery of the source texture. Experimental results have verified that our proposed algorithm can provide various numbers of embedding capacities, produce a visually plausible texture images, and recover the source texture. PMID:25415988

  8. Contrast Negation and Texture Synthesis Differentially Disrupt Natural Texture Appearance

    PubMed Central

    Balas, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Natural textures have characteristic image statistics that make them discriminable from unnatural textures. For example, both contrast negation and texture synthesis alter the appearance of natural textures even though each manipulation preserves some features while disrupting others. Here, we examined the extent to which contrast negation and texture synthesis each introduce or remove critical perceptual features for discriminating unnatural textures from natural textures. We find that both manipulations remove information that observers use for distinguishing natural textures from transformed versions of the same patterns, but do so in different ways. Texture synthesis removes information that is relevant for discrimination in both abstract patterns and ecologically valid textures, and we also observe a category-dependent asymmetry for identifying an “oddball” real texture among synthetic distractors. Contrast negation exhibits no such asymmetry, and also does not impact discrimination performance in abstract patterns. We discuss our results in the context of the visual system’s tuning to ecologically relevant patterns and other results describing sensitivity to higher-order statistics in texture patterns. PMID:23181049

  9. Textured Sling Pots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skophammer, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Clay is one of the most satisfying mediums for children to work with. It's relatively inexpensive, and the texture and changes that take place with the clay during firing make it irresistible. Molding clay from rolled-out slabs of clay is an easy way to make simple, shallow vessels or display pots. In this article, the author describes how her…

  10. Shape and texture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, A.

    1982-01-01

    Methods used to measure the geometrical properties of regions in a segmented image are discussed including the use of centroids, moments, and principle axes. In addition, statistical picture properties, particularly those which describe visual texture, are discussed. Gray level statistics, local property statistics, and autocorrelation and power spectrum are addressed.

  11. Chameleons: Reptilian Texture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an art project inspired by a drawing of a chameleon the author saw in an art-supply catalog. Chameleons prove to be a good subject to highlight shape, color and texture with eigth-graders. In this project, middle- and high-school students draw a chameleon, learn how to use shapes to add to their chameleon drawing, learn how…

  12. Texture & Textiles, Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhin, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Creating a painting with texture is easy, although using heavy gel medium or modeling paste may be pricey ways to go about it. High school artists generally like making collages and mixed-media. In this article, the author suggests ways to capitalize on that interest with inexpensive fabric in a painting project.

  13. Toward a dynamic representation of hydrological connectivity at the hillslope scale in semiarid areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mark W.; Bracken, Louise J.; Cox, Nicholas J.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrological connectivity has emerged as an effective means to understand and manage fluxes of water and transport of nutrients and sediment at the catchment scale, especially as fluxes are modified by changing climate and land use. However, hydrology has not yet adopted it as a unifying concept given uncertainties regarding different conceptions and gaps in understanding of how connectivity functions at different temporal and spatial scales. This paper outlines a conceptual model of hydrological connectivity for semiarid hillslopes and highlights the direction that future attempts to quantify dynamic hydrological connectivity might take. Rainfall-runoff analysis emphasizes the influence of antecedent moisture and temporal storm structure on hillslope-scale flood generation. Plot-scale field flume experiments demonstrate the spatial and temporal variability of flow resistance. The morphological runoff zone framework is presented as a method to upscale such results to the hillslope and incorporate the broader-scale issue of hillslope form. The need to design field experiments to inform attempts to model feedbacks between runoff depth and flow resistance forms the central argument of this paper. Patterns of infiltration and resistance across entire flow paths and their variability throughout a storm event are the key to understanding dynamic hydrological connectivity at the hillslope scale.

  14. The dynamics of two-dimensional turbulence excited at two scales using electromagnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habchi, Charbel; Antar, Ghassan

    2016-05-01

    Several forcing scales can co-exist in nature leading and affecting turbulent flows. This is not critical in three-dimensional systems where only a direct cascade of energy exists, but it is a concern in two dimensions where the direct and inverse cascades lead to different statistical properties of turbulence. The effect of forcing at two different scales on turbulence is studied here using numerical simulation inspired by a recent experiment [L. M. Moubarak and G. Y. Antar, "Dynamics of a two-dimensional flow subject to steady electromagnetic forces," Exp. Fluids 53, 1627-1636 (2012)] where a thin layer of electrolyte is stirred using electromagnetic forces. The small scale eddies are generated by the Lorentz force near the domain edge while the large scale motion is produced by the magnetic field gradient. We compare the case of one to two forcing scales for steady state turbulence to show that the addition of two forcing scales leads to the onset of turbulence at low Reynolds numbers due to the co-existence and thus the interaction of small and large structures. By determining the k-spectra as well as the energy transfer function, it is established that the dynamics of turbulence change from being dominated by an inverse cascade process, with one forcing scale, to one dominated by a direct cascade process when two scales are present. We believe that these results are important in understanding two- and quasi-two-dimensional turbulence phenomena occurring in nature where several excitation scales co-exist.

  15. The role of external fluid in the Shanggusi dynamic granitic magma system, East Qinling, China: Quantitative integration of textural and chemical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zong-Feng; Luo, Zhao-Hua; Lu, Xin-Xiang; Huang, Fan; Chen, Bi-He; Zhou, Jiu-Long; Cheng, Li-Lu

    2014-11-01

    It is well recognized that various degrees of mantle-derived materials are incorporated in the formation of granite, and mantle-derived mafic melts are generally considered to mix with crustal felsic melt. Here, however, we provide an example of the Shanggusi leucocratic granite where external mantle-derived hydrous fluid, rather than mafic melt, might be incorporated into a nearly pure crustal granitic melt system. Field observations suggest that the Shanggusi granite consists of granite porphyry, granite dyke and granitic pegmatite and they have consistent zircon U-Pb ages and molybdenite Re-Os ages. The marginal pegmatite, interconnected miarolitic cavities, heterogeneous molybdenite mineralization and significant variation of micro-texture of the Shanggusi granite physically indicate that strong fluid activities occurred in the granitic system. Accumulation of quartz and K-feldspar and bulk-rock major element data imply that fractional crystallization played an important role in the evolution of the granitic system which, however, cannot reasonably explain the significant trace elements fractionation, non-CHARAC trace elements behavior and simultaneous concave and convex REE tetrad effect of the Shanggusi granite, but which can be best explained by the influence of external fluorine-rich hydrous fluid. Importantly, the chemical fractionation, including bulk-rock trace elements and isotopes, is closely correlated with quantitative textural parameter Lmax (the average length of the four largest quartz crystals in each sample), indicating that the vast majority of physical and chemical characteristics of the granitic system were most likely controlled by the wholesale fluid flow. The Shanggusi granite is highly siliceous (SiO2 = 74.91-79.50 wt.%, except granitic pegmatite with SiO2 = 67.41 wt.%), extremely poor in mafic minerals, and with relative homogeneous bulk-rock major element chemistry and mineralogy, which approximate experimentally pure crustal melt that

  16. Examining early-type galaxy scaling relations using simple dynamical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huanian; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    We use dynamical models that include bulk rotation, velocity dispersion anisotropy and both stars and dark matter to explore the conditions that give rise to the early-type galaxy scaling relations referred to as the Fundamental Plane (FP) and Manifold (FM). The modelled scaling relations generally match the observed relations and are remarkably robust to all changes allowed within these models. The empirical relationships can fail beyond the parameter ranges where they were calibrated and we discuss the nature of those failures. Because the location of individual models relative to the FP and FM is sensitive to the adopted physical scaling of the models, unconstrained rescaling produces a much larger scatter about the scaling relations than that observed. We conclude that only certain combinations of scaling values, which define the physical radial and kinematic scale of the model, produce low scatter versions of the FP and FM. These combinations further result in reproducing a condition observed previously for galaxies, rcρ0 = constant, where rc is the scaling radius and ρ0 is the central density. As such, we conclude that this empirical finding and global galaxy scaling relations are not independent and that finding the physical cause of one should lead to the solution to the other. Although our models are strictly for pressure supported galaxies, these results may well hold generally because the central density constraint was first identified in dwarf spheroidals but later extended to rotating giant galaxies and the FM applies to galaxies of any morphological type and luminosity class.

  17. Dynamic and Thermal Turbulent Time Scale Modelling for Homogeneous Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwab, John R.; Lakshminarayana, Budugur

    1994-01-01

    A new turbulence model, based upon dynamic and thermal turbulent time scale transport equations, is developed and applied to homogeneous shear flows with constant velocity and temperature gradients. The new model comprises transport equations for k, the turbulent kinetic energy; tau, the dynamic time scale; k(sub theta), the fluctuating temperature variance; and tau(sub theta), the thermal time scale. It offers conceptually parallel modeling of the dynamic and thermal turbulence at the two equation level, and eliminates the customary prescription of an empirical turbulent Prandtl number, Pr(sub t), thus permitting a more generalized prediction capability for turbulent heat transfer in complex flows and geometries. The new model also incorporates constitutive relations, based upon invariant theory, that allow the effects of nonequilibrium to modify the primary coefficients for the turbulent shear stress and heat flux. Predictions of the new model, along with those from two other similar models, are compared with experimental data for decaying homogeneous dynamic and thermal turbulence, homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient, and homogeneous turbulence with constant temperature gradient and constant velocity gradient. The new model offers improvement in agreement with the data for most cases considered in this work, although it was no better than the other models for several cases where all the models performed poorly.

  18. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulation and laboratory-scale experiments of complex flow dynamics in unsaturated fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordilla, J.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Pan, W.; Shigorina, E.; Noffz, T.; Geyer, T.

    2015-12-01

    Unsaturated flow in fractured porous media exhibits highly complex flow dynamics and a wide range of intermittent flow processes. Especially in wide aperture fractures, flow processes may be dominated by gravitational instead of capillary forces leading to a deviation from the classical volume effective approaches (Richard's equation, Van Genuchten type relationships). The existence of various flow modes such as droplets, rivulets, turbulent and adsorbed films is well known, however, their spatial and temporal distribution within fracture networks is still an open question partially due to the lack of appropriate modeling tools. With our work we want to gain a deeper understanding of the underlying flow and transport dynamics in unsaturated fractured media in order to support the development of more refined upscaled methods, applicable on catchment scales. We present fracture-scale flow simulations obtained with a parallelized Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model. The model allows us to simulate free-surface flow dynamics including the effect of surface tension for a wide range of wetting conditions in smooth and rough fractures. Due to the highly efficient generation of surface tension via particle-particle interaction forces the dynamic wetting of surfaces can readily be obtained. We validated the model via empirical and semi-analytical solutions and conducted laboratory-scale percolation experiments of unsaturated flow through synthetic fracture systems. The setup allows us to obtain travel time distributions and identify characteristic flow mode distributions on wide aperture fractures intercepted by horizontal fracture elements.

  19. Designed microstructures in textured barium hexaferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovis, David Brian

    It is a fundamental principle of materials science that the microstructure of a material defines its properties and ultimately its performance for a given application. A prime example of this can be found in the large conch shell Strombus gigas, which has an intricate microstructure extending across five distinct length scales. This microstructure gives extraordinary damage tolerance to the shell. The structure of Strombus gigas cannot be replicated in a modern engineering ceramic with any existing processing technique, so new processing techniques must be developed to apply this structure to a model material. Barium hexaferrite was chosen as a model material to create microstructures reminiscent of Strombus gigas and evaluate its structure-property relations. This work describes novel processing methods to produce textured barium hexaferrite with no coupling between the sample geometry and the texture direction. This technique, combining magnetic field-assisted gelcasting with templated grain growth, also allows multilayer samples to be fabricated with different texture directions in adjacent layers. The effects of adding either B2O3 or excess BaCO 3 on the densification and grain growth of barium hexaferrite was studied. The texture produced using this technique was assessed using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These measurements showed peak textures as high as 60 MRD and sharp interfaces between layers cast with different texture directions. The effect of oxygen on the quality of gelcasting is also discussed, and it is shown that with proper mold design, it is possible to gelcast multiple layers with differing texture directions without delamination. Monolithic and multilayer samples were produced and tested in four point bending to measure the strength and work of fracture. Modulus measurements, made with the ultrasonic pulse-echo technique, show clear signs of microcracking in both the isotropic and textured samples

  20. Development of a Dynamically Scaled Generic Transport Model Testbed for Flight Research Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas; Langford, William; Belcastro, Christine; Foster, John; Shah, Gautam; Howland, Gregory; Kidd, Reggie

    2004-01-01

    This paper details the design and development of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) test-bed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The aircraft is a 5.5% dynamically scaled, remotely piloted, twin-turbine, swept wing, Generic Transport Model (GTM) which will be used to provide an experimental flight test capability for research experiments pertaining to dynamics modeling and control beyond the normal flight envelope. The unique design challenges arising from the dimensional, weight, dynamic (inertial), and actuator scaling requirements necessitated by the research community are described along with the specific telemetry and control issues associated with a remotely piloted subscale research aircraft. Development of the necessary operational infrastructure, including operational and safety procedures, test site identification, and research pilots is also discussed. The GTM is a unique vehicle that provides significant research capacity due to its scaling, data gathering, and control characteristics. By combining data from this testbed with full-scale flight and accident data, wind tunnel data, and simulation results, NASA will advance and validate control upset prevention and recovery technologies for transport aircraft, thereby reducing vehicle loss-of-control accidents resulting from adverse and upset conditions.

  1. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Pacific Oyster Hemolymph Microbiota across Multiple Scales

    PubMed Central

    Lokmer, Ana; Goedknegt, M. Anouk; Thieltges, David W.; Fiorentino, Dario; Kuenzel, Sven; Baines, John F.; Wegner, K. Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Unveiling the factors and processes that shape the dynamics of host associated microbial communities (microbiota) under natural conditions is an important part of understanding and predicting an organism's response to a changing environment. The microbiota is shaped by host (i.e., genetic) factors as well as by the biotic and abiotic environment. Studying natural variation of microbial community composition in multiple host genetic backgrounds across spatial as well as temporal scales represents a means to untangle this complex interplay. Here, we combined a spatially-stratified with a longitudinal sampling scheme within differentiated host genetic backgrounds by reciprocally transplanting Pacific oysters between two sites in the Wadden Sea (Sylt and Texel). To further differentiate contingent site from host genetic effects, we repeatedly sampled the same individuals over a summer season to examine structure, diversity and dynamics of individual hemolymph microbiota following experimental removal of resident microbiota by antibiotic treatment. While a large proportion of microbiome variation could be attributed to immediate environmental conditions, we observed persistent effects of antibiotic treatment and translocation suggesting that hemolymph microbial community dynamics is subject to within-microbiome interactions and host population specific factors. In addition, the analysis of spatial variation revealed that the within-site microenvironmental heterogeneity resulted in high small-scale variability, as opposed to large-scale (between-site) stability. Similarly, considerable within-individual temporal variability was in contrast with the overall temporal stability at the site level. Overall, our longitudinal, spatially-stratified sampling design revealed that variation in hemolymph microbiota is strongly influenced by site and immediate environmental conditions, whereas internal microbiome dynamics and oyster-related factors add to their long-term stability

  2. Quantum dynamics via Planck-scale-stepped action-carrying 'Graph Paths'

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, Geoffrey F.

    2003-05-05

    A divergence-free, parameter-free, path-based discrete-time quantum dynamics is designed to not only enlarge the achievements of general relativity and the standard particle model, by approximations at spacetime scales far above Planck scale while far below Hubble scale, but to allow tackling of hitherto inaccessible questions. ''Path space'' is larger than and precursor to Hilbert-space basis. The wave-function-propagating paths are action-carrying structured graphs-cubic and quartic structured vertices connected by structured ''fermionic'' or ''bosonic'' ''particle'' and ''nonparticle'' arcs. A Planck-scale path step determines the gravitational constant while controlling all graph structure. The basis of the theory's (zero-rest-mass) elementary-particle Hilbert space (which includes neither gravitons nor scalar bosons) resides in particle arcs. Nonparticle arcs within a path are responsible for energy and rest mass.

  3. Can mechanistic explanation be reconciled with scale-free constitution and dynamics?

    PubMed

    Bechtel, William

    2015-10-01

    This paper considers two objections to explanations that appeal to mechanisms to explain biological phenomena. Marom argues that the time-scale on which many phenomena occur is scale-free. There is also reason to suspect that the network of interacting entities is scale-free. The result is that mechanisms do not have well-delineated boundaries in nature. I argue that bounded mechanisms should be viewed as entities scientists posit in advancing scientific hypotheses. In positing such entities, scientists idealize. Such idealizations can be highly productive in developing and improving scientific explanations even if the hypothesized mechanisms never precisely correspond to bounded entities in nature. Mechanistic explanations can be reconciled with scale-free constitution and dynamics even if mechanisms as bounded entities don't exist. PMID:25977254

  4. Dynamic aspects of the Southern-Hemisphere medium-scale waves during the southern summer season

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Yen, Ming-Cheng; Nune, Durga P.

    1987-01-01

    The role of medium-scale waves on three dynamic aspects of the Southern-Hemisphere general circulation is examined using data generated by the FGGE analyses of the ECMWF. The momentum and sensible heat transports by the medium-scale waves are discussed. The effects of medium-scale waves on atmospheric circulation of the Southern Hemisphere during the summer, in particular the vacillation of atmospheric energetics, are investigated. The horizontal and vertical structures and the transport properties of this wave regime and their relation to downstream development in the Southern Hemisphere are analyzed. It is observed that medium-scale waves supply about a half of the total eddy transport of sensible heat and momentum; the wave regime contributes to the time average of various energy contents and energetic components of atmospheric motion during the southern summer; and the wave regime is amplified during the developing stages of downstream development.

  5. Sequence-dependent nanometer-scale conformational dynamics of individual RecBCD-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Carter, Ashley R; Seaberg, Maasa H; Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Sun, Gang; Wilds, Christopher J; Li, Hung-Wen; Perkins, Thomas T

    2016-07-01

    RecBCD is a multifunctional enzyme that possesses both helicase and nuclease activities. To gain insight into the mechanism of its helicase function, RecBCD unwinding at low adenosine triphosphate (ATP) (2-4 μM) was measured using an optical-trapping assay featuring 1 base-pair (bp) precision. Instead of uniformly sized steps, we observed forward motion convolved with rapid, large-scale (∼4 bp) variations in DNA length. We interpret this motion as conformational dynamics of the RecBCD-DNA complex in an unwinding-competent state, arising, in part, by an enzyme-induced, back-and-forth motion relative to the dsDNA that opens and closes the duplex. Five observations support this interpretation. First, these dynamics were present in the absence of ATP. Second, the onset of the dynamics was coupled to RecBCD entering into an unwinding-competent state that required a sufficiently long 5' strand to engage the RecD helicase. Third, the dynamics were modulated by the GC-content of the dsDNA. Fourth, the dynamics were suppressed by an engineered interstrand cross-link in the dsDNA that prevented unwinding. Finally, these dynamics were suppressed by binding of a specific non-hydrolyzable ATP analog. Collectively, these observations show that during unwinding, RecBCD binds to DNA in a dynamic mode that is modulated by the nucleotide state of the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:27220465

  6. The crude oil price bubbling and universal scaling dynamics of price volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Carranco, Sergio M.; Bory-Reyes, Juan; Balankin, Alexander S.

    2016-06-01

    The main goal of this paper is to reveal the effect of crude oil price bubbling on the price volatility dynamics. For this purpose, the time series of volatility at different horizons are mapped into a model of kinetic roughening of interface growing in a stochastic environment. In this way, we found that the volatility dynamics obeys the Family-Viscek dynamic scaling ansatz. Although during the period from January 2, 1986 to July 25, 2014 the volatility remains a slightly anti-persistent, the dynamic exponent is found to be quite different during different regimes of price evolution. Accordingly, we define the intrinsic time of price volatility and metric of volatility horizons. This allows us to construct the Langevin-type equation governing the volatility dynamics during bubble and non-bubble periods. The data analysis indicates that the bubbling does not affect the intrinsic time of volatility, but strongly affect the metric of volatility horizons. In this regard, numerical data suggest the existence of two universal metrics characterizing the volatility dynamics during the bubble and non-bubble regimes of crude oil price evolution, respectively. The results of this work help us to get a further insight into the dynamics of crude oil price volatility.

  7. Sequence-dependent nanometer-scale conformational dynamics of individual RecBCD–DNA complexes

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Ashley R.; Seaberg, Maasa H.; Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Sun, Gang; Wilds, Christopher J.; Li, Hung-Wen; Perkins, Thomas T.

    2016-01-01

    RecBCD is a multifunctional enzyme that possesses both helicase and nuclease activities. To gain insight into the mechanism of its helicase function, RecBCD unwinding at low adenosine triphosphate (ATP) (2–4 μM) was measured using an optical-trapping assay featuring 1 base-pair (bp) precision. Instead of uniformly sized steps, we observed forward motion convolved with rapid, large-scale (∼4 bp) variations in DNA length. We interpret this motion as conformational dynamics of the RecBCD–DNA complex in an unwinding-competent state, arising, in part, by an enzyme-induced, back-and-forth motion relative to the dsDNA that opens and closes the duplex. Five observations support this interpretation. First, these dynamics were present in the absence of ATP. Second, the onset of the dynamics was coupled to RecBCD entering into an unwinding-competent state that required a sufficiently long 5′ strand to engage the RecD helicase. Third, the dynamics were modulated by the GC-content of the dsDNA. Fourth, the dynamics were suppressed by an engineered interstrand cross-link in the dsDNA that prevented unwinding. Finally, these dynamics were suppressed by binding of a specific non-hydrolyzable ATP analog. Collectively, these observations show that during unwinding, RecBCD binds to DNA in a dynamic mode that is modulated by the nucleotide state of the ATP-binding pocket. PMID:27220465

  8. Texture synthesis and transfer from multiple samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yue; Zhao, Qinping

    2003-09-01

    Texture Mapping plays a very important role in Computer Graphics. Texture Synthesis is one of the main methods to obtain textures, it makes use of sample textures to generate new textures. Texture Transfer is based on Texture Synthesis, it renders objects with textures taken from different objects. Currently, most of Texture Synthesis and Transfer methods use a single sample texture. A method for Texture Synthesis adn Transfer from multi samples was presented. For texture synthesis, the L-shaped neighborhood seaching approach was used. Users specify the proportion of each sample, the number of seed points, and these seed points are scattered randomly according to their samples in horizontal and vertical direction synchronously to synthesize textures. The synthesized textures are very good. For texture transfer, the luminance of the target image and the sample textures are analyzed. This procedure is from coarse to fine, and can produce a visually pleasing result.

  9. Modeling ramp compression experiments using large-scale molecular dynamics simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Grest, Gary Stephen; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Baskes, Michael I.; Winey, J. Michael; Gupta, Yogendra Mohan; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Ditmire, Todd; Quevedo, Hernan J.

    2011-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation (MD) is an invaluable tool for studying problems sensitive to atomscale physics such as structural transitions, discontinuous interfaces, non-equilibrium dynamics, and elastic-plastic deformation. In order to apply this method to modeling of ramp-compression experiments, several challenges must be overcome: accuracy of interatomic potentials, length- and time-scales, and extraction of continuum quantities. We have completed a 3 year LDRD project with the goal of developing molecular dynamics simulation capabilities for modeling the response of materials to ramp compression. The techniques we have developed fall in to three categories (i) molecular dynamics methods (ii) interatomic potentials (iii) calculation of continuum variables. Highlights include the development of an accurate interatomic potential describing shock-melting of Beryllium, a scaling technique for modeling slow ramp compression experiments using fast ramp MD simulations, and a technique for extracting plastic strain from MD simulations. All of these methods have been implemented in Sandia's LAMMPS MD code, ensuring their widespread availability to dynamic materials research at Sandia and elsewhere.

  10. Dynamic competition between large-scale functional networks differentiates fear conditioning and extinction in humans.

    PubMed

    Marstaller, Lars; Burianová, Hana; Reutens, David C

    2016-07-01

    The high evolutionary value of learning when to respond to threats or when to inhibit previously learned associations after changing threat contingencies is reflected in dedicated networks in the animal and human brain. Recent evidence further suggests that adaptive learning may be dependent on the dynamic interaction of meta-stable functional brain networks. However, it is still unclear which functional brain networks compete with each other to facilitate associative learning and how changes in threat contingencies affect this competition. The aim of this study was to assess the dynamic competition between large-scale networks related to associative learning in the human brain by combining a repeated differential conditioning and extinction paradigm with independent component analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging data. The results (i) identify three task-related networks involved in initial and sustained conditioning as well as extinction, and demonstrate that (ii) the two main networks that underlie sustained conditioning and extinction are anti-correlated with each other and (iii) the dynamic competition between these two networks is modulated in response to changes in associative contingencies. These findings provide novel evidence for the view that dynamic competition between large-scale functional networks differentiates fear conditioning from extinction learning in the healthy brain and suggest that dysfunctional network dynamics might contribute to learning-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27079532

  11. Coarse-graining to the meso and continuum scales with molecular-dynamics-like models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plimpton, Steve

    Many engineering-scale problems that industry or the national labs try to address with particle-based simulations occur at length and time scales well beyond the most optimistic hopes of traditional coarse-graining methods for molecular dynamics (MD), which typically start at the atomic scale and build upward. However classical MD can be viewed as an engine for simulating particles at literally any length or time scale, depending on the models used for individual particles and their interactions. To illustrate I'll highlight several coarse-grained (CG) materials models, some of which are likely familiar to molecular-scale modelers, but others probably not. These include models for water droplet freezing on surfaces, dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) models of explosives where particles have internal state, CG models of nano or colloidal particles in solution, models for aspherical particles, Peridynamics models for fracture, and models of granular materials at the scale of industrial processing. All of these can be implemented as MD-style models for either soft or hard materials; in fact they are all part of our LAMMPS MD package, added either by our group or contributed by collaborators. Unlike most all-atom MD simulations, CG simulations at these scales often involve highly non-uniform particle densities. So I'll also discuss a load-balancing method we've implemented for these kinds of models, which can improve parallel efficiencies. From the physics point-of-view, these models may be viewed as non-traditional or ad hoc. But because they are MD-style simulations, there's an opportunity for physicists to add statistical mechanics rigor to individual models. Or, in keeping with a theme of this session, to devise methods that more accurately bridge models from one scale to the next.

  12. Scaling of dynamics in 2d semi-dilute polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuta, P.; Hopkinson, I.

    2004-10-01

    We consider the dynamics of thermal concentration fluctuations in polymer Langmuir monolayers, probed with surface light scattering. We present data on the proteins β-lactoglobulin and β-casein and on the synthetic polymers Poly(vinyl acetate) and Poly(4-hydroxystyrene). We show that for all these systems, in the semi-dilute concentration regime, there is a power law dependency of both the elastic and viscous components of the dilational modulus on the concentration. We find that for all the systems considered, the viscosity scales with a power that is double that of the elasticity. A simple explanation for this universal dynamical behavior in semidilute polymer monolayers is suggested.

  13. Length Scale Dependence of the Dynamic Properties of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Horkay, Ferenc; Falus, Peter; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2010-12-07

    In solutions of the charged semirigid biopolymer hyaluronic acid in salt-free conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub NSE} measured at high transfer momentum q by neutron spin echo is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by dynamic light scattering, D{sub DLS}. This behavior contrasts with neutral polymer solutions. With increasing salt content, D{sub DLS} approaches D{sub NSE}, which is independent of ionic strength. Contrary to theoretical expectation, the ion-polymer coupling, which dominates the low q dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions, already breaks down at distance scales greater than the Debye-Hueckel length.

  14. Investigation of the small-scale structure and dynamics of Uranus' atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eshleman, Von R.; Hinson, David P.

    1991-01-01

    This document constitutes the final technical report of the Uranus Analysis Program. Papers and/or abstracts resulting from this research are presented. The following topics are covered: (1) past and future of radio occultation studies of planetary atmospheres; (2) equatorial waves in the stratosphere of Uranus; (3) the atmosphere of Uranus- results of radio occultation measurements with Voyager 2; (4) Uranus' atmospheric dynamics and circulation; (5) small-scale structure and dynamics in the atmosphere of Uranus; (6) evidence for inertia-gravity waves in the stratosphere of Uranus derived from Voyager 2 radio occultation data; and (7) planetary waves in the equatorial stratosphere of Uranus.

  15. Correlation of ground tests and analyses of a dynamically scaled space station model configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javeed, Mehzad; Edighoffer, Harold H.; Mcgowan, Paul E.

    1993-01-01

    Verification of analytical models through correlation with ground test results of a complex space truss structure is demonstrated. A multi-component, dynamically scaled space station model configuration is the focus structure for this work. Previously established test/analysis correlation procedures are used to develop improved component analytical models. Integrated system analytical models, consisting of updated component analytical models, are compared with modal test results to establish the accuracy of system-level dynamic predictions. Design sensitivity model updating methods are shown to be effective for providing improved component analytical models. Also, the effects of component model accuracy and interface modeling fidelity on the accuracy of integrated model predictions is examined.

  16. Correlation of ground tests and analyses of a dynamically scaled Space Station model configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javeed, Mehzad; Edighoffer, Harold H.; Mcgowan, Paul E.

    1993-01-01

    Verification of analytical models through correlation with ground test results of a complex space truss structure is demonstrated. A multi-component, dynamically scaled space station model configuration is the focus structure for this work. Previously established test/analysis correlation procedures are used to develop improved component analytical models. Integrated system analytical models, consisting of updated component analytical models, are compared with modal test results to establish the accuracy of system-level dynamic predictions. Design sensitivity model updating methods are shown to be effective for providing improved component analytical models. Also, the effects of component model accuracy and interface modeling fidelity on the accuracy of integrated model predictions is examined.

  17. Some notions of decentralization and coordination in large-scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chong, C. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Some notions of decentralization and coordination in the control of large-scale dynamic systems are discussed. Decentralization and coordination have always been important concepts in the study of large systems. Roughly speaking decentralization is the process of dividing a large problem into subproblems so that it can be handled more easily. Coordination is the manipulation of the subproblem so that the original problem is solved. The various types of decentralization and coordination that have been used to control dynamic systems are discussed. The emphasis was to distinguish between on-line and off-line operations to understand the results available by indicating the aspects of the problem which are decentralized.

  18. Competition-Driven Network Dynamics: Emergence of a Scale-Free Leadership Structure and Collective Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghel, M.; Toroczkai, Zoltán; Bassler, Kevin E.; Korniss, G.

    2004-02-01

    Using the minority game as a model for competition dynamics, we investigate the effects of interagent communications across a network on the global evolution of the game. Agent communication across this network leads to the formation of an influence network, which is dynamically coupled to the evolution of the game, and it is responsible for the information flow driving the agents' actions. We show that the influence network spontaneously develops hubs with a broad distribution of in-degrees, defining a scale-free robust leadership structure. Furthermore, in realistic parameter ranges, facilitated by information exchange on the network, agents can generate a high degree of cooperation making the collective almost maximally efficient.

  19. DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF CONCRETE GRAVITY DAM ON JOINTED ROCK FOUNDATION DURING LARGE-SCALE EARTHQUAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Yutaka; Horii, Hideyuki; Yazdani, Mahmoud

    Dynamic cracking analysis of concrete gravity dam has been carried out during large-scale earthquake, considering the progressive failure of jointed rock foundation. Firstly, in order to take into account the progressive failure of rock foundation, the constitutive law of jointed rock is assumed and its validity is evaluated by simulation analysis based on the past experimental model. Finally, dynamic cracking analysis of 100-m high dam model is performed, using the previously proposed approach with tangent stiffness-proportional damping to express the propagation behavior of crack and the constitutive law of jointed rock. The crack propagation behavior of dam body and the progressive failure of jointed rock foundation are investigated.

  20. Dynamic subfilter-scale stress model for large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhi, A.; Piomelli, U.; Geurts, B. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a modification of the integral length-scale approximation (ILSA) model originally proposed by Piomelli et al. [Piomelli et al., J. Fluid Mech. 766, 499 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2015.29] and apply it to plane channel flow and a backward-facing step. In the ILSA models the length scale is expressed in terms of the integral length scale of turbulence and is determined by the flow characteristics, decoupled from the simulation grid. In the original formulation the model coefficient was constant, determined by requiring a desired global contribution of the unresolved subfilter scales (SFSs) to the dissipation rate, known as SFS activity; its value was found by a set of coarse-grid calculations. Here we develop two modifications. We de-fine a measure of SFS activity (based on turbulent stresses), which adds to the robustness of the model, particularly at high Reynolds numbers, and removes the need for the prior coarse-grid calculations: The model coefficient can be computed dynamically and adapt to large-scale unsteadiness. Furthermore, the desired level of SFS activity is now enforced locally (and not integrated over the entire volume, as in the original model), providing better control over model activity and also improving the near-wall behavior of the model. Application of the local ILSA to channel flow and a backward-facing step and comparison with the original ILSA and with the dynamic model of Germano et al. [Germano et al., Phys. Fluids A 3, 1760 (1991), 10.1063/1.857955] show better control over the model contribution in the local ILSA, while the positive properties of the original formulation (including its higher accuracy compared to the dynamic model on coarse grids) are maintained. The backward-facing step also highlights the advantage of the decoupling of the model length scale from the mesh.

  1. Numerical study of dynamic behavior of contact line approaching a micro-scale particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Yusuke; Tsukahara, Takahiro; Ueno, Ichiro

    2014-11-01

    The behavior of contact line (CL) the boundary line of solid-liquid-gas interface is one of the important topics regarding the dynamic wetting. Many experimental and theoretical approaches have been performed about static and axisymmetric systems: e.g., Ally et al. (Langmuir 2010 vol. 26, 11797) measured the capillary force on a micro-scale particle attached to a liquid surface and they compared with their physical model. However, there are few numerical simulations of the dynamic and asymmetric systems Focusing on the CL passing micro-scale solid particles, we simulated solid-liquid-gas flows. Gas-liquid interface is captured by a VOF method and the surface tension model is the CSF model. Solid-fluid interaction is treated by an immersed boundary method. We studied the broken-dam problem with a fixed sphere in either macro or micro scale. Our results of the macro scale agree reasonably with the experimental result. In the micro scale, where the domain is of 2.0 × 2.0 × 2.0 μm3 and the sphere diameter is 0.5 μm, we tested two types of sphere surface: hydrophobic and hydrophilic solids. We demonstrated that, as the liquid touches the hydrophilic sphere, the velocity of CL is higher than the hydrophobic case.

  2. Observation of Optical Pulse and Material Dynamics on the Femtosecond Time-Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Omenetto, F.; Luce, B.; Siders, C.W.; Taylor, A.J.

    1999-09-13

    The widespread availability of lasers that generate pulses on the femtosecond scale has opened new realms of investigation in the basic and applied sciences, rendering available excitations delivering intensities well in excess of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}, and furnishing probes capable of resolving molecular relaxation timescales. As a consequence and a necessity, sophisticated techniques to examine the pulse behavior on the femtosecond scale have been developed and are of crucial importance to gain insight on the behavior of physical systems. These techniques will be discussed with specific application to guided pulse propagation and ionization dynamics of noble gases.

  3. Application of a dynamic subgrid-scale model to turbulent recirculating flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, Y.; Street, R. L.; Koseff, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic subgrid-scale model of Germano et al. is implemented in a finite volume formulation and applied to the simulation of turbulent flow in a three-dimensional lid-driven cavity at Reynolds number of 7500. The filtering operation is carried out in physical space, and the model coefficient is calculated locally. The computed mean and rms velocities as well as the Reynolds stress are compared with experimental data. It is shown that backscatter from small to large scales is necessary to sustain turbulent fluctuations. The model is being applied to the simulation of turbulent flows in a stratified and rotating environment in complex geometries.

  4. Complexity on a small scale: Emplacement dynamics and evolution of the Doros layered mafic intrusion, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen-Smith, Trishya; Ashwal, Lewis

    2014-05-01

    The Doros Complex in Namibia is a relatively small (~8 km x 4 km), shallow-level layered mafic intrusion that forms part of the ~132 Ma Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Province. It consists of a ~500 m-thick preserved sequence of roughly concordant, sill-like gabbro layers dipping in towards the centre of the intrusion, cut by syenitic (bostonite) dykes. The fundamental mineralogy is essentially the same throughout the main package (plagioclase + calcic clinopyroxene + oxy-exsolved Fe-Ti oxides ± olivine), and hence the layering is defined by variations in the modal proportions of these minerals, and in the mineral and rock textures. A detailed petrographic, whole-rock and mineral major and trace element, and Sr-, Nd- and Pb-isotopic study, combined with major element modelling, has shown that the stratigraphic order of appearance of cumulus minerals and overall trends in rock compositions are consistent with fractional crystallisation and accumulation from an uncontaminated basaltic parental magma. However, these data also reveal considerable complexity and stratigraphic trends in mineralogy, chemistry and physical properties incongruent with a simple progressive differentiation path. Based on a comprehensive set of field, petrographic, geochemical and geophysical evidence, we put forward a compelling argument in favour of an origin for the Doros intrusion by multiple, closely-spaced influxes of crystal-bearing magmas (magma mushes), rather than from the post-emplacement differentiation of a single batch of crystal-free melt. This evidence includes intrusive layer relations, textural evidence for primocrysts, disequilibrium features, and stratigraphic reversals in mineral and whole-rock chemistry and magnetic properties. At least seven distinct major injections of magma have been identified in the stratigraphy, as well as several smaller pulses. These findings represent a departure from the traditional single-pulse liquid magma model for the formation of such

  5. Scaling of Sediment Dynamics in a Reach-Scale Laboratory Model of a Sand-Bed Stream with Riparian Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorrick, S.; Rodriguez, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    A movable bed physical model was designed in a laboratory flume to simulate both bed and suspended load transport in a mildly sinuous sand-bed stream. Model simulations investigated the impact of different vegetation arrangements along the outer bank to evaluate rehabilitation options. Preserving similitude in the 1:16 laboratory model was very important. In this presentation the scaling approach, as well as the successes and challenges of the strategy are outlined. Firstly a near-bankfull flow event was chosen for laboratory simulation. In nature, bankfull events at the field site deposit new in-channel features but cause only small amounts of bank erosion. Thus the fixed banks in the model were not a drastic simplification. Next, and as in other studies, the flow velocity and turbulence measurements were collected in separate fixed bed experiments. The scaling of flow in these experiments was simply maintained by matching the Froude number and roughness levels. The subsequent movable bed experiments were then conducted under similar hydrodynamic conditions. In nature, the sand-bed stream is fairly typical; in high flows most sediment transport occurs in suspension and migrating dunes cover the bed. To achieve similar dynamics in the model equivalent values of the dimensionless bed shear stress and the particle Reynolds number were important. Close values of the two dimensionless numbers were achieved with lightweight sediments (R=0.3) including coal and apricot pips with a particle size distribution similar to that of the field site. Overall the moveable bed experiments were able to replicate the dominant sediment dynamics present in the stream during a bankfull flow and yielded relevant information for the analysis of the effects of riparian vegetation. There was a potential conflict in the strategy, in that grain roughness was exaggerated with respect to nature. The advantage of this strategy is that although grain roughness is exaggerated, the similarity of

  6. Gas cushion model and hydrodynamic boundary conditions for superhydrophobic textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizkaya, Tatiana V.; Asmolov, Evgeny S.; Vinogradova, Olga I.

    2014-10-01

    Superhydrophobic Cassie textures with trapped gas bubbles reduce drag, by generating large effective slip, which is important for a variety of applications that involve a manipulation of liquids at the small scale. Here we discuss how the dissipation in the gas phase of textures modifies their friction properties. We propose an operator method, which allows us to map the flow in the gas subphase to a local slip boundary condition at the liquid-gas interface. The determined uniquely local slip length depends on the viscosity contrast and underlying topography, and can be immediately used to evaluate an effective slip of the texture. Besides superlubricating Cassie surfaces, our approach is valid for rough surfaces impregnated by a low-viscosity "lubricant," and even for Wenzel textures, where a liquid follows the surface relief. These results provide a framework for the rational design of textured surfaces for numerous applications.

  7. Textural changes in metallurgical coke prepared with polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornostayev, Stanislav S.; Heino, Jyrki J.; Kokkonen, Tommi M. T.; Makkonen, Hannu T.; Huttunen, Satu M. M.; Fabritius, Timo M. J.

    2014-10-01

    The effect of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) on the textural features of experimental coke was investigated using polarized-light optical microscopy and wavelet-based image analysis. Metallurgical coke samples were prepared in a laboratory-scale furnace with 2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5%, 10.0%, and 12.5% HDPE by mass, and one sample was prepared by 100% coal. The amounts and distribution of textures (isotropic, mosaic and banded) and pores were obtained. The calculations reveal that the addition of HDPE results in a decrease of mosaic texture and an increase of isotropic texture. Ethylene formed from the decomposition of HDPE is considered as a probable reason for the texture modifications. The approach used in this study can be applied to indirect evaluation for the reactivity and strength of coke.

  8. Spatiotemporal scaling of hydrological and agrochemical export dynamics in a tile-drained Midwestern watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, K.; Thompson, S. E.; Harman, C. J.; Basu, N. B.; Rao, P. S. C.; Sivapalan, M.; Packman, A. I.; Kalita, P. K.

    2011-10-01

    Conceptualizing catchments as physicochemical filters is an appealing way to link streamflow discharge and concentration time series to hydrological and biogeochemical processing in hillslopes and drainage networks. Making these links explicit is challenging in complex watersheds but may be possible in highly modified catchments where hydrological and biogeochemical processes are simplified. Linking hydrological and biogeochemical filtering in highly modified watersheds is appealing from a water quality perspective in order to identify the major controls on chemical export at different spatial and temporal scales. This study investigates filtering using a 10 year data set of hydrological and biogeochemical export from a small (<500 km2) agricultural watershed in Illinois, the Little Vermilion River (LVR) Watershed. A number of distinct scaling regimes were identified in the Fourier power spectrum of discharge and nitrate, phosphate, and atrazine concentrations. These scaling regimes were related to different runoff pathways and spatial scales throughout the catchment (surface drainage, tile drains, and channel flow in the river). Wavelet analysis indicated increased coupling between discharge and in-stream concentrations at seasonal-annual time scales. Using a multiresolution analysis, nitrate, phosphate, and atrazine loads exported at annual scales were found to exhibit near-linear scaling with annual streamflow, suggesting that at these scales the export dynamics could be approximated as chemostatic responses. This behavior was pronounced for nitrate and less so for phosphate and atrazine. The analysis suggests that biogeochemical inputs built up legacy loads, leading to the emergence of chemostatic behavior at annual time scales, even at the relatively small scale of the LVR.

  9. Dynamics of Water Confined on a Nanometer Length Scale in Reverse Micelles: Ultrafast Infrared Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Howe-Siang; Piletic, Ivan R.; Riter, Ruth E.; Levinger, Nancy E.; Fayer, M. D.

    2005-02-01

    The dynamics of water, confined on a nanometer length scale (1.7 to 4.0 nm) in sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate reverse micelles, is directly investigated using frequency resolved infrared vibrational echo experiments. The data are compared to bulk water and salt solution data. The experimentally determined frequency-frequency correlation functions show that the confined water dynamics is substantially slower than bulk water dynamics and is size dependent. The fastest dynamics (˜50 fs) is more similar to bulk water, while the slowest time scale dynamics is much slower than water, and, in analogy to bulk water, reflects the making and breaking of hydrogen bonds.

  10. Dynamics of water confined on a nanometer length scale in reverse micelles: ultrafast infrared vibrational echo spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tan, Howe-Siang; Piletic, Ivan R; Riter, Ruth E; Levinger, Nancy E; Fayer, M D

    2005-02-11

    The dynamics of water, confined on a nanometer length scale (1.7 to 4.0 nm) in sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate reverse micelles, is directly investigated using frequency resolved infrared vibrational echo experiments. The data are compared to bulk water and salt solution data. The experimentally determined frequency-frequency correlation functions show that the confined water dynamics is substantially slower than bulk water dynamics and is size dependent. The fastest dynamics (approximately 50 fs) is more similar to bulk water, while the slowest time scale dynamics is much slower than water, and, in analogy to bulk water, reflects the making and breaking of hydrogen bonds. PMID:15783696

  11. Lacunarity as a texture measure for a tropical forest landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Haiping; Krummel, J.

    1996-01-01

    Fragmentation and loss of tropical forest cover alters terrestrial plant and animal population dynamics, reduces biodiversity and carbon storage capacity, and, as a global phenomenon could affect regional and global climate patterns. Lacunarity as a texture measure can offer a simple solution to characterize the texture of tropical forest landscape and determine spatial patterns associated with ecological processes. Lacunarity quantifies the deviation from translational invariance by describing the distribution of gaps within a binary image at multiple scales. As lacunarity increases, the spatial arrangement of tropical forest gaps will also increase. In this study, we used the Spatial Modeler in Imagine as a graphic programming tool to calculate lacunarity indices for a tropical forest landscape in Southern Mexico and Northern Guatemala. Lacunarity indices were derived from classified Landsat MSS images acquired in 1974 and 1984. Random-generated binary images were also used to derive lacunarity indices and compared with the lacunarity of forest patterns derived from the classified MSS images. Tropical forest area declined about 17%, with most of the forest areas converted into pasture/grassland for grazing. During this period, lacunarity increased about 25%. Results of this study suggest that tropical forest fragmentation could be quantified with lacunarity measures. The study also demonstrated that the Spatial Modeler can be useful as a programming tool to quantify spatial patterns of tropical forest landscape by using remotely sensed data.

  12. Mechanical behavior comparison of spider and silkworm silks using molecular dynamics at atomic scale.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeongsang; Kwon, Junpyo; Na, Sungsoo

    2016-02-14

    Spider and silkworm silk proteins have received much attention owing to their inherent structural stability, biodegradability, and biocompatibility. These silk protein materials have various mechanical characteristics such as elastic modulus, ultimate strength and fracture toughness. While the considerable mechanical characteristics of the core crystalline regions of spider silk proteins at the atomistic scale have been investigated through several experimental techniques and computational studies, there is a lack of comparison between spider and silkworm fibroins in the atomistic scale. In this study, we investigated the differences between the mechanical characteristics of spider and silkworm fibroin structures by applying molecular dynamics and steered molecular dynamics. We found that serine amino acids in silkworm fibroins not only increased the number of hydrogen bonds, but also altered their structural characteristics and mechanical properties. PMID:26806791

  13. Role of trap-induced scales in non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly interacting trapped bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Anirban; Sensarma, Rajdeep; Sengupta, K.

    2016-08-01

    We use a time-dependent hopping expansion technique to study the non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly interacting bosons in an optical lattice in the presence of a harmonic trap characterized by a force constant K. We show that after a sudden quench of the hopping amplitude J across the superfluid (SF)-Mott insulator (MI) transition, the SF order parameter |{{Δ }\\mathbf{r}}(t)| and the local density fluctuation δ {{n}\\mathbf{r}}(t) exhibit sudden decoherence beyond a trap-induced time scale {{T}0}∼ {{K}-1/2} . We also show that after a slow linear ramp down of J, |{{Δ }\\mathbf{r}}| and the boson defect density {{P}\\mathbf{r}} display a novel non-monotonic spatial profile. Both these phenomena can be explained as consequences of trap-induced time and length scales affecting the dynamics and can be tested by concrete experiments.

  14. Role of trap-induced scales in non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly interacting trapped bosons.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anirban; Sensarma, Rajdeep; Sengupta, K

    2016-08-01

    We use a time-dependent hopping expansion technique to study the non-equilibrium dynamics of strongly interacting bosons in an optical lattice in the presence of a harmonic trap characterized by a force constant K. We show that after a sudden quench of the hopping amplitude J across the superfluid (SF)-Mott insulator (MI) transition, the SF order parameter [Formula: see text] and the local density fluctuation [Formula: see text] exhibit sudden decoherence beyond a trap-induced time scale [Formula: see text]. We also show that after a slow linear ramp down of J, [Formula: see text] and the boson defect density [Formula: see text] display a novel non-monotonic spatial profile. Both these phenomena can be explained as consequences of trap-induced time and length scales affecting the dynamics and can be tested by concrete experiments. PMID:27270447

  15. Structure, dynamics and multiple length-scales in network-forming materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Relationships between the structural and dynamical properties of network-forming materials are investigated. A generic model is utilised for systems of stoichiometry MX2 which are linked in the sense that they can all be usefully considered as constructed from linked MX4 tetrahedra. A single model parameter (the anion polarizability) is varied systematically to control the mean MXM bond angles (and hence the network topologies). The networks evolve from those dominated by corner-sharing units to those dominated by edge-sharing structural motifs. These changes are accompanied by changes in the characteristic length-scales, with the emergence of ordering on intermediate length-scales. Key dynamical properties (the liquid relaxation just above the melting point and the liquid fragility) are studied and their relationship to the underlying static structure analysed.

  16. Self-consistent field theory based molecular dynamics with linear system-size scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Richters, Dorothee; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved field-theoretic approach to the grand-canonical potential suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is circumvented by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of the present approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions.

  17. Dynamical Mass Determinations and Scaling Relations of Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellari, Michele

    2015-04-01

    I review our understanding of classic dynamical scaling relations, relating luminosity, size and kinematics of early-type galaxies. Using unbiased determinations of galaxy mass profiles from stellar dynamical models, a simple picture has emerged in which scaling relations are driven by virial equilibrium, accompanied by a trend in the stellar mass-to-light ratio (M/L). This picture confirms the earliest insights. The trend is mainly due to the combined variation of age, metallicity and the stellar initial mass function (IMF). The systematic variations best correlate with the galaxy velocity dispersion, which traces the bulge mass fraction. This indicates a link between bulge growth and quenching of star formation. Dark matter is unimportant within the half-light radius, where the total mass profile is close to isothermal (ρ ~ r -2).

  18. Flow visualization using moving textures

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Becker, B.

    1995-04-01

    An intuitive way to visualize a flow is to watch particles or textures move in the flow. In this paper, the authors show how texture mapping hardware can produce near-real-time texture motion, using a polygon grid, and one fixed texture. However, the authors make no attempt to indicate the flow direction in a still frame. As discussed here, any anisotropic stretching comes from the velocity gradient, not the velocity itself. The basic idea is to advect the texture by the flow field. In a cited paper, they gave an indication of the wind velocity by advecting the 3D texture coordinates on the polygon vertices of a cloudiness contour surface in a climate simulation. This was slow, because the 3D texture was rendered in software, and because advecting the texture was difficult for time-varying flows. In this paper, they replace the 3D textures by 2D texture maps compatible with hardware rendering, and give techniques for handling time-varying flows more efficiently. The next section gives their technique for the case of 2D steady flows, and the following one discusses the problems of texture distortion. Then they discuss the problems with extending method to time-varying flows, and two solutions. Next they develop compositing methods for visualizing 3D flows. The final section gives their results and conclusions.

  19. Texton-based texture synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Peng; Meng, Xiangxu; Tu, Changhe; Yang, Chenglei

    2004-03-01

    A texton-based texture synthesis algorithm is presented in this paper. Based on the Markov Random Field (MRF) model, the algorithm takes a block randomly from a given sample texture to form a seed area in the center of the synthesized output texture, then synthesizes the output image pixel by pixel spirally along the edge of the seed area. When sampling a pixel from the sample texture in the synthesis procedure, the algorithm adopts so-called candidate search, global search and central search to preserve the integralities of textons in the synthesized output texture. It was practically improved that the algorithm does better than the existing methods in quality for synthesizing most kinds of textures, especially for synthesizing the complex textures.

  20. Two reference time scales for studying the dynamic cavitation of liquid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Brewe, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Two formulas, one for the characteristic time of filling a void with the vapor of the surrounding liquid, and one of filling the void by diffusion of the dissolved gas in the liquid, are derived. By comparing these time scales with that of the dynamic operation of oil film bearings, it is concluded that the evaporation process is usually fast enough to fill the cavitation bubble with oil vapor; whereas the diffusion process is much too slow for the dissolved air to liberate itself and enter the cavitation bubble. These results imply that the formation of a two phase fluid in dynamically loaded bearings, as often reported in the literature, is caused by air entrainment. They further indicate a way to simplify the treatment of the dynamic problem of bubble evolution.