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Sample records for dynamical force microscopy

  1. Dynamic atomic force microscopy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Ricardo; Pérez, Rubén

    2002-09-01

    In this report we review the fundamentals, applications and future tendencies of dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. Our focus is on understanding why the changes observed in the dynamic properties of a vibrating tip that interacts with a surface make possible to obtain molecular resolution images of membrane proteins in aqueous solutions or to resolve atomic-scale surface defects in ultra high vacuum (UHV). Our description of the two major dynamic AFM modes, amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) and frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) emphasises their common points without ignoring the differences in experimental set-ups and operating conditions. Those differences are introduced by the different feedback parameters, oscillation amplitude in AM-AFM and frequency shift and excitation amplitude in FM-AFM, used to track the topography and composition of a surface. The theoretical analysis of AM-AFM (also known as tapping-mode) emphasises the coexistence, in many situations of interests, of two stable oscillation states, a low and high amplitude solution. The coexistence of those oscillation states is a consequence of the presence of attractive and repulsive components in the interaction force and their non-linear dependence on the tip-surface separation. We show that key relevant experimental properties such as the lateral resolution, image contrast and sample deformation are highly dependent on the oscillation state chosen to operate the instrument. AM-AFM allows to obtain simultaneous topographic and compositional contrast in heterogeneous samples by recording the phase angle difference between the external excitation and the tip motion (phase imaging). Significant applications of AM-AFM such as high-resolution imaging of biomolecules and polymers, large-scale patterning of silicon surfaces, manipulation of single nanoparticles or the fabrication of single electron devices are also reviewed. FM-AFM (also called non

  2. Dynamic behaviour in piezoresponse force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jesse, Stephen; Baddorf, Arthur P; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2006-03-28

    Frequency-dependent dynamic behaviour in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) implemented on a beam-deflection atomic force microscope (AFM) is analysed using a combination of modelling and experimental measurements. The PFM signal is comprised of contributions from local electrostatic forces acting on the tip, distributed forces acting on the cantilever, and three components of the electromechanical response vector. These interactions result in the flexural and torsional oscillations of the cantilever, detected as vertical and lateral PFM signals. The relative magnitudes of these contributions depend on geometric parameters of the system, on the stiffnesses and frictional forces of the tip-surface junction, and on the frequency of operation. The dynamic signal formation mechanism in PFM is analysed and conditions for optimal PFM imaging are formulated. An experimental approach for probing cantilever dynamics using frequency-bias spectroscopy and deconvolution of electromechanical and electrostatic contrast is implemented. PMID:26558568

  3. Bifurcation, chaos, and scan instability in dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamical motion at any point on the cantilever of an atomic force microscope can be expressed quite generally as a superposition of simple harmonic oscillators corresponding to the vibrational modes allowed by the cantilever shape. Central to the dynamical equations is the representation of the cantilever-sample interaction force as a polynomial expansion with coefficients that account for the interaction force "stiffness," the cantilever-to-sample energy transfer, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. Renormalization of the cantilever beam model shows that for a given cantilever drive frequency cantilever dynamics can be accurately represented by a single nonlinear mass-spring model with frequency-dependent stiffness and damping coefficients [S. A. Cantrell and J. H. Cantrell, J. Appl. Phys. 110, 094314 (2011)]. Application of the Melnikov method to the renormalized dynamical equation is shown to predict a cascade of period doubling bifurcations with increasing cantilever drive force that terminates in chaos. The threshold value of the drive force necessary to initiate bifurcation is shown to depend strongly on the cantilever setpoint and drive frequency, effective damping coefficient, nonlinearity of the cantilever-sample interaction force, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. The model predicts the experimentally observed interruptions of the bifurcation cascade for cantilevers of sufficiently large stiffness. Operational factors leading to the loss of image quality in dynamic atomic force microscopy are addressed, and guidelines for optimizing scan stability are proposed using a quantitative analysis based on system dynamical parameters and choice of feedback loop parameter.

  4. Microcantilevers with embedded accelerometers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shaik, Nurul Huda; Raman, Arvind; Reifenberger, Ronald G.

    2014-02-24

    The measurement of the intermittent interaction between an oscillating nanotip and the sample surface is a key challenge in dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Accelerometers integrated onto AFM cantilevers can directly measure this interaction with minimal cantilever modification but have been difficult to realize. Here, we design and fabricate high frequency bandwidth accelerometers on AFM cantilevers to directly measure the tip acceleration in commercial AFM systems. We demonstrate a simple way of calibrating such accelerometers and present experiments using amplitude modulated AFM on freshly cleaved mica samples in water to study the response of the accelerometer.

  5. Subharmonic Oscillations and Chaos in Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of dynamic atomic force microscopy (d-AFM) for nanoscale materials characterization calls for a deeper understanding of the cantilever dynamics influencing scan stability, predictability, and image quality. Model development is critical to such understanding. Renormalization of the equations governing d- AFM provides a simple interpretation of cantilever dynamics as a single spring and mass system with frequency dependent cantilever stiffness and damping parameters. The renormalized model is sufficiently robust to predict the experimentally observed splitting of the free-space cantilever resonance into multiple resonances upon cantilever-sample contact. Central to the model is the representation of the cantilever sample interaction force as a polynomial expansion with coefficients F(sub ij) (i,j = 0, 1, 2) that account for the effective interaction stiffness parameter, the cantilever-to-sample energy transfer, and the amplitude of cantilever oscillation. Application of the Melnikov method to the model equation is shown to predict a homoclinic bifurcation of the Smale horseshoe type leading to a cascade of period doublings with increasing drive displacement amplitude culminating in chaos and loss of image quality. The threshold value of the drive displacement amplitude necessary to initiate subharmonic generation depends on the acoustic drive frequency, the effective damping coefficient, and the nonlinearity of the cantilever-sample interaction force. For parameter values leading to displacement amplitudes below threshold for homoclinic bifurcation other bifurcation scenarios can occur, some of which lead to chaos.

  6. Laser Actuation of Cantilevers for Picometre Amplitude Dynamic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Drew R.; Tayati, Ponlawat; An, Hongjie; Lam, Ping Koy; Craig, Vincent S. J.; Senden, Tim J.

    2014-01-01

    As nanoscale and molecular devices become reality, the ability to probe materials on these scales is increasing in importance. To address this, we have developed a dynamic force microscopy technique where the flexure of the microcantilever is excited using an intensity modulated laser beam to achieve modulation on the picoscale. The flexure arises from thermally induced bending through differential expansion and the conservation of momentum when the photons are reflected and absorbed by the cantilever. In this study, we investigated the photothermal and photon pressure responses of monolithic and layered cantilevers using a modulated laser in air and immersed in water. The developed photon actuation technique is applied to the stretching of single polymer chains. PMID:24993548

  7. Laser actuation of cantilevers for picometre amplitude dynamic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Evans, Drew R; Tayati, Ponlawat; An, Hongjie; Lam, Ping Koy; Craig, Vincent S J; Senden, Tim J

    2014-01-01

    As nanoscale and molecular devices become reality, the ability to probe materials on these scales is increasing in importance. To address this, we have developed a dynamic force microscopy technique where the flexure of the microcantilever is excited using an intensity modulated laser beam to achieve modulation on the picoscale. The flexure arises from thermally induced bending through differential expansion and the conservation of momentum when the photons are reflected and absorbed by the cantilever. In this study, we investigated the photothermal and photon pressure responses of monolithic and layered cantilevers using a modulated laser in air and immersed in water. The developed photon actuation technique is applied to the stretching of single polymer chains. PMID:24993548

  8. Mapping van der Waals forces with frequency modulation dynamic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polesel-Maris, J.; Guo, H.; Zambelli, T.; Gauthier, S.

    2006-08-01

    Nanometre-size gold clusters supported on MoS2(0001) are investigated by means of ultrahigh-vacuum frequency modulation dynamic force microscopy. Topography and frequency shift images are simultaneously obtained using the average tunnelling current to regulate the tip-substrate distance. Two families of clusters are observed, giving different frequency shift images. While the topographic and frequency shift profiles have similar shapes on small clusters (size \\lesssim 1 nm), they are quite different near the top of large clusters (size \\gtrsim 4 nm): the topographic profile is rounded, but the frequency shift profile exhibits rather steep edges and a depression near the centre of the island. It is demonstrated that these differences result from the finite range of van der Waals forces. On small islands, the frequency shift is dominated by the interaction of the tip with the substrate. On large islands, it is dominated by the interaction with the island. The particular observed shape results from the geometry of the island. These interpretations are comforted by analytical and numerical calculations. In particular, the characteristic shape of the frequency shift profiles on large islands can be reproduced by introducing realistic parameters and considering only the contribution of van der Waals forces.

  9. Dynamic piezoresponse force microscopy: Spatially resolved probing of polarization dynamics in time and voltage domains

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Amit; Ehara, Y; Wada, A.; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Griggio, Flavio; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2012-01-01

    An approach for probing dynamic phenomena during hysteresis loop measurements in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is developed. Dynamic PFM (D-PFM) necessitates development of 5-dimensional (5D) data acquisition protocols and associated methods for analysis and visualization of multidimensional data. Using a combination of multivariate statistical analysis and phenomenological fitting, we explore dynamic behavior during polarization switching in model ferroelectric films with dense ferroelastic domain structures and in ferroelectric capacitors. In polydomain films, multivariate analysis of the switching data suggests that ferroelectric and ferroelastic components can be decoupled and time dynamics can be explored. In capacitors, a strong correlation between polarization dynamics and microstructure is observed. The future potential of D-PFM for probing time-dependent hysteretic phenomena in ferroelectrics and ionic systems is discussed.

  10. Experimental investigation of resonance curves in dynamic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Piednoir, Agnès; Zambelli, Tomaso; Bouju, Xavier; Gauthier, Sébastien

    2003-09-01

    A precise experimental investigation of the amplitude and phase resonance curves of a driven dynamic force microscope (DFM) cantilever interacting with an Al2O3(0001) surface in ultra-high vacuum is reported. The large amplitude (a few tens of nanometres), high cantilever stiffness (25 N m-1) and high quality factor (a few 104) characterizing these experiments are typical of the frequency modulation (FM) mode of DFM. The whole range of tip-substrate distances where a stationary oscillation of the cantilever can be maintained is explored. It covers two different regimes: a large distance regime where only long range conservative van der Waals interactions contribute and a small distance regime where short range interactions play a significant role. A comparison is made with frequency shift and excitation amplitude curves as a function of the distance acquired in the FM mode. It is also shown that approach-retract amplitude and phase curves usually obtained in the amplitude modulation mode can be extracted from these data. These experimental results are compared with analytical predictions reported in the literature. An excellent agreement is found in the van der Waals domain, allowing us to evaluate the Hamaker constant for the alumina-vacuum-silicon system.

  11. Time resolved lateral dynamic force microscopy for exploring nanoscopic water bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwoo; Chang, Sungjin; Sung, Baekman; Kwon, Soyoung; Jhe, Wonho

    2010-03-01

    Lateral dynamic force microscopy based on time-resolved scheme is employed for a good understanding of dynamics of nanoscopic water bridge connecting a sharp tip with a flat sample. In its formation and stepped compression at which the tip and the sample in a true non-contact, the nanoscopic water bridge under oscillatory shear stress shows a transient response behavior for a long time ( >=10^2 ms). This observation obviously demonstrates that an inadequate fast measurement in dynamic force microscopy can lead a misunderstanding of dynamic physical properties of the nanoscopic water.

  12. Structure and Dynamics of Dinucleosomes Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Filenko, Nina A.; Palets, Dmytro B.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamics of nucleosomes and their interactions are important for understanding the mechanism of chromatin assembly. Internucleosomal interaction is required for the formation of higher-order chromatin structures. Although H1 histone is critically involved in the process of chromatin assembly, direct internucleosomal interactions contribute to this process as well. To characterize the interactions of nucleosomes within the nucleosome array, we designed a dinucleosome and performed direct AFM imaging. The analysis of the AFM data showed dinucleosomes are very dynamic systems, enabling the nucleosomes to move in a broad range along the DNA template. Di-nucleosomes in close proximity were observed, but their population was low. The use of the zwitterionic detergent, CHAPS, increased the dynamic range of the di-nucleosome, facilitating the formation of tight di-nucleosomes. The role of CHAPS and similar natural products in chromatin structure and dynamics is also discussed. PMID:22312477

  13. Structure and dynamics of dinucleosomes assessed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Filenko, Nina A; Palets, Dmytro B; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2012-01-01

    Dynamics of nucleosomes and their interactions are important for understanding the mechanism of chromatin assembly. Internucleosomal interaction is required for the formation of higher-order chromatin structures. Although H1 histone is critically involved in the process of chromatin assembly, direct internucleosomal interactions contribute to this process as well. To characterize the interactions of nucleosomes within the nucleosome array, we designed a dinucleosome and performed direct AFM imaging. The analysis of the AFM data showed dinucleosomes are very dynamic systems, enabling the nucleosomes to move in a broad range along the DNA template. Di-nucleosomes in close proximity were observed, but their population was low. The use of the zwitterionic detergent, CHAPS, increased the dynamic range of the di-nucleosome, facilitating the formation of tight di-nucleosomes. The role of CHAPS and similar natural products in chromatin structure and dynamics is also discussed. PMID:22312477

  14. Structure and Dynamics of Dinucleosomes Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Filenko, Nina A.; Palets, Dmytro B.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamics of nucleosomes and their interactions are important for understanding the mechanism of chromatin assembly. Internucleosomal interaction is required for the formation of higher-order chromatin structures. Although H1 histone is critically involved in the process of chromatin assembly, direct internucleosomal interactions contribute to this process as well. To characterize the interactions of nucleosomes within the nucleosome array, we designed a dinucleosome and performed direct AFM imaging. The analysis of the AFM data showed dinucleosomes are very dynamic systems, enabling the nucleosomes to move in a broad range along the DNA template. Di-nucleosomes in close proximity were observed, but their populationmore » was low. The use of the zwitterionic detergent, CHAPS, increased the dynamic range of the di-nucleosome, facilitating the formation of tight di-nucleosomes. The role of CHAPS and similar natural products in chromatin structure and dynamics is also discussed.« less

  15. Mechanical manifestations of rare atomic jumps in dynamic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, R.; Baratoff, A.; Hug, H. J.; Hidber, H. R.; Löhneysen, H. v.; Güntherodt, H.-J.

    2007-10-01

    The resonance frequency and the excitation amplitude of a silicon cantilever have been measured as a function of distance to a cleaved KBr(001) surface with a low-temperature scanning force microscope (SFM) in ultrahigh vacuum. We identify two regimes of tip-sample distances. Above a site-dependent critical tip-sample distance reproducible data with low noise and no interaction-induced energy dissipation are measured. In this regime reproducible SFM images can be recorded. At closer tip-sample distances, above two distinct atomic sites, the frequency values jump between two limiting curves on a timescale of tens of milliseconds. Furthermore, additional energy dissipation occurs wherever jumps are observed. We attribute both phenomena to rarely occurring changes in the tip apex configuration which are affected by short-range interactions with the sample. Their respective magnitudes are related to each other. A specific candidate two-level system is also proposed.

  16. Invited Article: VEDA: A web-based virtual environment for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, John; Hu, Shuiqing; Raman, Arvind

    2008-06-01

    We describe here the theory and applications of virtual environment dynamic atomic force microscopy (VEDA), a suite of state-of-the-art simulation tools deployed on nanoHUB (www.nanohub.org) for the accurate simulation of tip motion in dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM) over organic and inorganic samples. VEDA takes advantage of nanoHUB's cyberinfrastructure to run high-fidelity dAFM tip dynamics computations on local clusters and the teragrid. Consequently, these tools are freely accessible and the dAFM simulations are run using standard web-based browsers without requiring additional software. A wide range of issues in dAFM ranging from optimal probe choice, probe stability, and tip-sample interaction forces, power dissipation, to material property extraction and scanning dynamics over hetereogeneous samples can be addressed.

  17. Unstable amplitude and noisy image induced by tip contamination in dynamic force mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, H.-Y.; McIntyre, N. S.

    2007-02-01

    Liquid 1-decanethiol was confined on an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip apex and the effect was investigated by measuring amplitude-distance curves in dynamic force mode. Within the working distance in the dynamic force mode AFM, the thiol showed strong interactions bridging between a gold-coated probe tip and a gold-coated Si substrate, resulting in unstable amplitude and noisy AFM images. We show that under such a situation, the amplitude change is dominated by the extra forces induced by the active material loaded on the tip apex, overwhelming the amplitude change caused by the geometry of the sample surface, thus resulting in noise in the image the tip collects. We also show that such a contaminant may be removed from the apex by pushing the tip into a material soft enough to avoid damage to the tip.

  18. Dynamic tunneling force microscopy for characterizing electronic trap states in non-conductive surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic tunneling force microscopy (DTFM) is a scanning probe technique for real space mapping and characterization of individual electronic trap states in non-conductive films with atomic scale spatial resolution. The method is based upon the quantum mechanical tunneling of a single electron back and forth between a metallic atomic force microscopy tip and individual trap states in completely non-conducting surface. This single electron shuttling is measured by detecting the electrostatic force induced on the probe tip at the shuttling frequency. In this paper, the physical basis for the DTFM method is unfolded through a physical model and a derivation of the dynamic tunneling signal as a function of several experimental parameters is shown. Experimental data are compared with the theoretical simulations, showing quantitative consistency and verifying the physical model used. The experimental system is described and representative imaging results are shown.

  19. Dynamic tunneling force microscopy for characterizing electronic trap states in non-conductive surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, R.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-09-15

    Dynamic tunneling force microscopy (DTFM) is a scanning probe technique for real space mapping and characterization of individual electronic trap states in non-conductive films with atomic scale spatial resolution. The method is based upon the quantum mechanical tunneling of a single electron back and forth between a metallic atomic force microscopy tip and individual trap states in completely non-conducting surface. This single electron shuttling is measured by detecting the electrostatic force induced on the probe tip at the shuttling frequency. In this paper, the physical basis for the DTFM method is unfolded through a physical model and a derivation of the dynamic tunneling signal as a function of several experimental parameters is shown. Experimental data are compared with the theoretical simulations, showing quantitative consistency and verifying the physical model used. The experimental system is described and representative imaging results are shown.

  20. Dynamic nanoindentation by instrumented nanoindentation and force microscopy: a comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Kalfon-Cohen, Estelle

    2013-01-01

    Summary Viscoelasticity is a complex yet important phenomenon that drives material response at different scales of time and space. Burgeoning interest in nanoscale dynamic material mechanics has driven, and been driven by two key techniques: instrumented nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy. This review provides an overview of fundamental principles in nanoindentation, and compares and contrasts these two techniques as they are used for characterization of viscoelastic processes at the nanoscale. PMID:24367751

  1. Comment on 'Temperature dependence of the energy dissipation in dynamic force microscopy'.

    PubMed

    Burke, S A; Grütter, P

    2008-10-01

    A recent article in this journal by Roll et al (2008 Nanotechnology 19 045703) presents experimental results of the temperature dependence of dissipation in dynamic force microscopy which they use to elucidate the mechanisms of such a dissipation signal in the PTCDA on KBr system. We argue here that dissipation results are often highly dependent upon the tip structure, and urge caution in the interpretation of single sets of experimental data. PMID:21832607

  2. Analysis of dynamic cantilever behavior in tapping mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenqi; Zhang, Guang-Ming; Murphy, Mark F; Lilley, Francis; Harvey, David M; Burton, David R

    2015-10-01

    Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides phase images in addition to height and amplitude images. Although the behavior of tapping mode AFM has been investigated using mathematical modeling, comprehensive understanding of the behavior of tapping mode AFM still poses a significant challenge to the AFM community, involving issues such as the correct interpretation of the phase images. In this paper, the cantilever's dynamic behavior in tapping mode AFM is studied through a three dimensional finite element method. The cantilever's dynamic displacement responses are firstly obtained via simulation under different tip-sample separations, and for different tip-sample interaction forces, such as elastic force, adhesion force, viscosity force, and the van der Waals force, which correspond to the cantilever's action upon various different representative computer-generated test samples. Simulated results show that the dynamic cantilever displacement response can be divided into three zones: a free vibration zone, a transition zone, and a contact vibration zone. Phase trajectory, phase shift, transition time, pseudo stable amplitude, and frequency changes are then analyzed from the dynamic displacement responses that are obtained. Finally, experiments are carried out on a real AFM system to support the findings of the simulations. PMID:26303510

  3. Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever-Sample Interactions in Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is obtained by treating the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. The volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample that provides dynamical equilibrium for the combined systems. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any) via a basis set of set of orthogonal functions that may be generalized to account for arbitrary cantilever shapes. The basis set is extended to include nonlinear cantilever modes. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. The effects of oscillatory excitation forces applied either to the cantilever or to the sample surface (or to both) are obtained from the solution set and applied to the to the assessment of phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) modalities. The influence of bistable cantilever modes of on AFM signal generation is discussed. The effects on the cantilever-sample surface dynamics of subsurface features embedded in the sample that are perturbed by surface-generated oscillatory excitation forces and carried to the cantilever via wave propagation are accounted by the Bolef-Miller propagating wave model. Expressions pertaining to signal generation and image contrast in A-AFM are obtained and applied to amplitude modulation (intermittent contact) atomic force microscopy and resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM). The influence of phase accumulation in A-AFM on image contrast is discussed, as is the effect of hard contact and maximum nonlinearity regimes of A-AFM operation.

  4. Atomic Force Microscopy in Dynamic Mode with Displacement Current Detection in Double Cantilever Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Falk; Müller, Anne‑Dorothea; Hietschold, Michael; Gessner, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    A cantilever array for dynamic mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) is presented, the vertical displacement of which is analyzed by the detection of displacement currents in the electrodes. Each cantilever in the array consists of an actuation part that allows an independent vertical movement, and a sensor part. The lateral distance between the tips of the different cantilevers is fixed to 10 μm. When operated as an actuator, a voltage is applied between the silicon membrane and the underlaying electrode. Due to the resulting coulomb forces, the vertical position of the tip is controllable. The reaction time in this mode is shorter than the response time of a piezostack. The sensor part, on the other hand, allows the device to work in dynamic mode without a laser deflection system. The vertical resolution achieved is below 1 nm. The dependence of force distance curves on the excitation amplitude is shown.

  5. Dynamic force microscopy simulator (dForce): A tool for planning and understanding tapping and bimodal AFM experiments.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Horacio V; Garcia, Pablo D; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    We present a simulation environment, dForce, which can be used for a better understanding of dynamic force microscopy experiments. The simulator presents the cantilever-tip dynamics for two dynamic AFM methods, tapping mode AFM and bimodal AFM. It can be applied for a wide variety of experimental situations in air or liquid. The code provides all the variables and parameters relevant in those modes, for example, the instantaneous deflection and tip-surface force, velocity, virial, dissipated energy, sample deformation and peak force as a function of time or distance. The simulator includes a variety of interactions and contact mechanics models to describe AFM experiments including: van der Waals, Hertz, DMT, JKR, bottom effect cone correction, linear viscoelastic forces or the standard linear solid viscoelastic model. We have compared two numerical integration methods to select the one that offers optimal accuracy and speed. The graphical user interface has been designed to facilitate the navigation of non-experts in simulations. Finally, the accuracy of dForce has been tested against numerical simulations performed during the last 18 years. PMID:25821676

  6. Dynamic force microscopy simulator (dForce): A tool for planning and understanding tapping and bimodal AFM experiments

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Horacio V; Garcia, Pablo D

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present a simulation environment, dForce, which can be used for a better understanding of dynamic force microscopy experiments. The simulator presents the cantilever–tip dynamics for two dynamic AFM methods, tapping mode AFM and bimodal AFM. It can be applied for a wide variety of experimental situations in air or liquid. The code provides all the variables and parameters relevant in those modes, for example, the instantaneous deflection and tip–surface force, velocity, virial, dissipated energy, sample deformation and peak force as a function of time or distance. The simulator includes a variety of interactions and contact mechanics models to describe AFM experiments including: van der Waals, Hertz, DMT, JKR, bottom effect cone correction, linear viscoelastic forces or the standard linear solid viscoelastic model. We have compared two numerical integration methods to select the one that offers optimal accuracy and speed. The graphical user interface has been designed to facilitate the navigation of non-experts in simulations. Finally, the accuracy of dForce has been tested against numerical simulations performed during the last 18 years. PMID:25821676

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Atomic Force Microscopy at the Water-Muscovite Interface: Hydration Layer Structure and Force Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Satoru; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-04-19

    With the development of atomic force microscopy (AFM), it is now possible to detect the buried liquid-solid interfacial structure in three dimensions at the atomic scale. One of the model surfaces used for AFM is the muscovite surface because it is atomically flat after cleavage along the basal plane. Although it is considered that force profiles obtained by AFM reflect the interfacial structures (e.g., muscovite surface and water structure), the force profiles are not straightforward because of the lack of a quantitative relationship between the force and the interfacial structure. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the relationship between the muscovite-water interfacial structure and the measured AFM force using a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip. We provide divided force profiles, where the force contributions from each water layer at the interface are shown. They reveal that the first hydration layer is dominant in the total force from water even after destruction of the layer. Moreover, the lateral structure of the first hydration layer transcribes the muscovite surface structure. It resembles the experimentally resolved surface structure of muscovite in previous AFM studies. The local density profile of water between the tip and the surface provides further insight into the relationship between the water structure and the detected force structure. The detected force structure reflects the basic features of the atomic structure for the local hydration layers. However, details including the peak-peak distance in the force profile (force-distance curve) differ from those in the density profile (density-distance curve) because of disturbance by the tip. PMID:27018633

  8. Vertical and lateral force mapping on the Si(111)-(7×7) surface by dynamic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Namikawa, Takashi; Miki, Koutaro; Abe, Masayuki; Morita, Seizo

    2008-05-01

    The topographic image of dynamic force microscopy (DFM) keeping the frequency shift (Δfz) constant at tiny cantilever oscillation amplitudes corresponds to the constant-vertical force (Fz) gradient surface, while the interpretation becomes complicated at larger oscillation amplitudes. We discuss how Fz and the potential energy (U) act on the tip during DFM topographic scan at various cantilever oscillation amplitudes by measuring the Δfz map on the Si(111)-(7×7) surface at room temperature. The Δfz map is numerically converted into Fz and U maps. DFM topographic curves at various cantilever oscillation amplitudes are numerically derived by using the experimentally obtained Fz map. In addition, we discuss how the lateral force (Fx) acts on the tip at various tip-surface distances on various surface sites by an Fx map converted from a U map. The positions at which Fx becomes zero are identified as U minimum sites, such as the top of adatom sites, and U maximum sites (equilibrium positions of Fx ), such as the center positions among three center adatoms. The tip deviated from these sites is then laterally attracted toward the U minimum sites. It is also demonstrated that lateral force microscopy performed at 1Å cantilever oscillation enables direct measurement of the lateral force gradient by numerically deriving the frequency shift (Δfx) caused by Fx .

  9. Cutting down the forest of peaks in acoustic dynamic atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, C; Ares, P; de Pablo, P J; Gómez-Herrero, J

    2008-12-01

    Acoustic dynamic force microscopy in liquids is a fundamental technique for the investigation of biological samples under physiological conditions. However, it shows an important drawback that consists of producing a myriad of resonance peaks, known as the forest of peaks, which hides the natural resonance frequency of the cantilever and prevents an optimum operation of the microscope. In this work, we propose a simple remedy for this problem, which consists on adding a small clay damper to the dither piezoelectric. The resulting frequency spectrum exhibits a single resonance peak that is comparable with the one obtained using magnetic excitation. PMID:19123597

  10. Tracking Cytoskeletal Dynamics in Living Neurons via Combined Atomic Force and Fluorescence Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedden, Elise; Kaplan, David; Staii, Cristian

    2013-03-01

    Living cells are active mechanical structures which evolve within and in response to their local microenvironments. Various cell types possess different mechanical properties and respond uniquely to growth, environmental changes, and the application of chemical stimuli. Here we present a powerful approach which combines high resolution Atomic Force Microscopy with Fluorescence Microscopy to systematically obtain real-time micrometer and sub-micrometer resolution elasticity maps for live neuronal cells cultured on glass substrates. Through this approach we measure the topography, the elastic properties, and the dynamics of neuronal cells, and identify changes in cytoskeletal components during axonal growth, chemical modification, and changes in ambient temperature. We will also show high resolution elasticity measurements of the cell body and of axons/dendrites during growth, as well as identification of cytoskeletal components during cell growth and environmental changes.

  11. Optimization and calibration of atomic force microscopy sensitivity in terms of tip-sample interactions in high-order dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yu; Guo Qiuquan; Nie Hengyong; Lau, W. M.; Yang Jun

    2009-12-15

    The mechanism of dynamic force modes has been successfully applied to many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications, such as tapping mode and phase imaging. The high-order flexural vibration modes are recent advancement of AFM dynamic force modes. AFM optical lever detection sensitivity plays a major role in dynamic force modes because it determines the accuracy in mapping surface morphology, distinguishing various tip-surface interactions, and measuring the strength of the tip-surface interactions. In this work, we have analyzed optimization and calibration of the optical lever detection sensitivity for an AFM cantilever-tip ensemble vibrating in high-order flexural modes and simultaneously experiencing a wide range and variety of tip-sample interactions. It is found that the optimal detection sensitivity depends on the vibration mode, the ratio of the force constant of tip-sample interactions to the cantilever stiffness, as well as the incident laser spot size and its location on the cantilever. It is also found that the optimal detection sensitivity is less dependent on the strength of tip-sample interactions for high-order flexural modes relative to the fundamental mode, i.e., tapping mode. When the force constant of tip-sample interactions significantly exceeds the cantilever stiffness, the optimal detection sensitivity occurs only when the laser spot locates at a certain distance from the cantilever-tip end. Thus, in addition to the 'globally optimized detection sensitivity', the 'tip optimized detection sensitivity' is also determined. Finally, we have proposed a calibration method to determine the actual AFM detection sensitivity in high-order flexural vibration modes against the static end-load sensitivity that is obtained traditionally by measuring a force-distance curve on a hard substrate in the contact mode.

  12. Real-space mapping of dynamic phenomena during hysteresis loop measurements: Dynamic Switching Spectroscopy Piezoresponse Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Amit; Ovchinnikov, Oleg S; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic switching spectroscopy piezoresponse force microscopy is developed to separate thermodynamic and kinetic effects in local bias-induced phase transitions. The approaches for visualization and analysis of 5D data are discussed. The spatial and voltage variability of relaxation behavior of the a-c domain lead zirconate-titanate surface suggest the interpretation in terms of surface charge dynamics. This approach is applicable to local studies of dynamic behavior in any system with reversible bias-induced phase transitions ranging from ferroelectrics and multiferroics to ionic systems such as Li-ion and oxygen-ion conductors in batteries, fuel cells, and electroresistive systems.

  13. Complex force dynamics in atomic force microscopy resolved by wavelet transforms.

    PubMed

    Pukhova, Valentina; Banfi, Francesco; Ferrini, Gabriele

    2013-12-20

    The amplitude and phase evolution of the oscillations of a cantilever after a single tip-sample impact are investigated using a cross-correlation wavelet analysis. The excitation of multiple flexural modes is evidenced and the instantaneous amplitude and phase evolution is extracted from the experimental data at all frequencies simultaneously. The instantaneous total force acting on the tip during a single impact is reconstructed. This method has general relevance for the development of an atomic force spectroscopy of single tip-sample interactions, that develop in a few oscillation cycles of the interacting cantilever eigenmodes and their harmonics. PMID:24285087

  14. Molecular dynamics of DNA and nucleosomes in solution studied by fast-scanning atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuki; Higuchi, Yuji; Hizume, Kohji; Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Yoshimura, Shige H; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2010-05-01

    Nucleosome is a fundamental structural unit of chromatin, and the exposure from or occlusion into chromatin of genomic DNA is closely related to the regulation of gene expression. In this study, we analyzed the molecular dynamics of poly-nucleosomal arrays in solution by fast-scanning atomic force microscopy (AFM) to obtain a visual glimpse of nucleosome dynamics on chromatin fiber at single molecule level. The influence of the high-speed scanning probe on nucleosome dynamics can be neglected since bending elastic energy of DNA molecule showed similar probability distributions at different scan rates. In the sequential images of poly-nucleosomal arrays, the sliding of the nucleosome core particle and the dissociation of histone particle were visualized. The sliding showed limited fluctuation within approximately 50nm along the DNA strand. The histone dissociation occurs by at least two distinct ways: a dissociation of histone octamer or sequential dissociations of tetramers. These observations help us to develop the molecular mechanisms of nucleosome dynamics and also demonstrate the ability of fast-scanning AFM for the analysis of dynamic protein-DNA interaction in sub-seconds time scale. PMID:20236766

  15. Structure and activation dynamics of RBL-2H3 cells observed with scanning force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, D; Spudich, A

    1994-01-01

    Surface and subsurface dynamics of Rat Basophilic Leukemia cells, a model system of stimulated secretion, were imaged using Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) at a rate of 50-60 s/image. Cytoskeletal elements and organelles were tracked within quiescent cells and those activated after IgE receptor crosslinking. In addition, surface waves were observed moving within the plasma membrane. The structures seen in quiescent and activated cells can be correlated with those seen in electron micrographs and topographic SFM images of fixed detergent-extracted cells. Furthermore, images of the detergent-extracted nuclei reveal the presence of numerous nuclear pore complexes. High-magnification images of the nuclear pore complexes show evidence of subunit structure and exhibit dimensions consistent with those reported previously using electron microscopy. The behavior and overall change in morphology of cells observed during activation was consistent with that observed under similar conditions with Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. This study demonstrates that SFM, unlike other techniques, can be used to provide high-resolution information in both fixed and living cells. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:8061220

  16. Dynamic nano-triboelectrification using torsional resonance mode atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wei; Yao, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of charge generation, distribution, and transfer between surfaces is very important for energy harvesting applications based on triboelectric effect. Here, we demonstrate dynamic nanotriboelectrification with torsional resonance (TR) mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments on rubbing the sample surface using TR mode for the generation of triboelectric charges and in-situ characterization of the charge distribution using scanning Kelvin probe microcopy (SKPM) were performed. This method allows the tip to perform lateral oscillation and maintains the tip-sample interaction in the attractive region to ensure high efficiency of the charge generation during the rubbing process. The measured efficiency of generating triboelectric charges can achieve ~10.53 times higher than conventional static/contact mode in the triboelectrification experiments. In addition to the charge generation, local discharging experiments were also performed. This work would provide a new method to generate patterned charges and also be helpful in understanding the mechanism of nanotriboelectrification. PMID:27302624

  17. Dynamic nano-triboelectrification using torsional resonance mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei; Yao, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of charge generation, distribution, and transfer between surfaces is very important for energy harvesting applications based on triboelectric effect. Here, we demonstrate dynamic nanotriboelectrification with torsional resonance (TR) mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments on rubbing the sample surface using TR mode for the generation of triboelectric charges and in-situ characterization of the charge distribution using scanning Kelvin probe microcopy (SKPM) were performed. This method allows the tip to perform lateral oscillation and maintains the tip-sample interaction in the attractive region to ensure high efficiency of the charge generation during the rubbing process. The measured efficiency of generating triboelectric charges can achieve ~10.53 times higher than conventional static/contact mode in the triboelectrification experiments. In addition to the charge generation, local discharging experiments were also performed. This work would provide a new method to generate patterned charges and also be helpful in understanding the mechanism of nanotriboelectrification. PMID:27302624

  18. Electrothermally driven high-frequency piezoresistive SiC cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekri, R.; Cambril, E.; Couraud, L.; Bernardi, L.; Madouri, A.; Portail, M.; Chassagne, T.; Moisson, C.; Zielinski, M.; Jiao, S.; Michaud, J.-F.; Alquier, D.; Bouloc, J.; Nony, L.; Bocquet, F.; Loppacher, C.

    2014-08-07

    Cantilevers with resonance frequency ranging from 1 MHz to 100 MHz have been developed for dynamic atomic force microscopy. These sensors are fabricated from 3C-SiC epilayers grown on Si(100) substrates by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. They use an on-chip method both for driving and sensing the displacement of the cantilever. A first gold metallic loop deposited on top of the cantilever is used to drive its oscillation by electrothermal actuation. The sensing of this oscillation is performed by monitoring the resistance of a second Au loop. This metallic piezoresistive detection method has distinct advantages relative to more common semiconductor-based schemes. The optimization, design, fabrication, and characteristics of these cantilevers are discussed.

  19. Dynamic nano-triboelectrification using torsional resonance mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei; Yao, Nan

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the mechanism of charge generation, distribution, and transfer between surfaces is very important for energy harvesting applications based on triboelectric effect. Here, we demonstrate dynamic nanotriboelectrification with torsional resonance (TR) mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments on rubbing the sample surface using TR mode for the generation of triboelectric charges and in-situ characterization of the charge distribution using scanning Kelvin probe microcopy (SKPM) were performed. This method allows the tip to perform lateral oscillation and maintains the tip-sample interaction in the attractive region to ensure high efficiency of the charge generation during the rubbing process. The measured efficiency of generating triboelectric charges can achieve ~10.53 times higher than conventional static/contact mode in the triboelectrification experiments. In addition to the charge generation, local discharging experiments were also performed. This work would provide a new method to generate patterned charges and also be helpful in understanding the mechanism of nanotriboelectrification.

  20. High-resolution dynamic atomic force microscopy in liquids with different feedback architectures

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martín, David; Jaafar, Miriam; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Raman, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Summary The recent achievement of atomic resolution with dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM) [Fukuma et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 2005, 87, 034101], where quality factors of the oscillating probe are inherently low, challenges some accepted beliefs concerning sensitivity and resolution in dAFM imaging modes. Through analysis and experiment we study the performance metrics for high-resolution imaging with dAFM in liquid media with amplitude modulation (AM), frequency modulation (FM) and drive-amplitude modulation (DAM) imaging modes. We find that while the quality factors of dAFM probes may deviate by several orders of magnitude between vacuum and liquid media, their sensitivity to tip–sample forces can be remarkable similar. Furthermore, the reduction in noncontact forces and quality factors in liquids diminishes the role of feedback control in achieving high-resolution images. The theoretical findings are supported by atomic-resolution images of mica in water acquired with AM, FM and DAM under similar operating conditions. PMID:23503468

  1. Phase noise induced due to amplitude fluctuations in dynamic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rast, S.; Gysin, U.; Meyer, E.

    2009-02-01

    In dynamic force microscopy, the force sensor is driven on its resonance frequency and the amplitude of the cantilever is sustained at a constant value. The amplitude typically ranges between 0.1 and 30 nm. If a large amplitude is set, the cantilever tip senses both long-range and short-range interaction forces provided that the tip is close to the sample surface. The short-range interactions are decisive for the atomic contrast in atomic force microscopy (AFM) images. They can be separated from the long-range interactions by setting an amplitude which encompasses the typical range of the interaction force, i.e., the subangstrom regime for van der Waals contribution. It is distinctive for cantilevers operated at small driving amplitudes that the cantilever deflection can be considered as a sinusoidal signal superimposed with a quasimonochromatic random signal originating from fluctuations. If one measures experimentally the standard deviation of the phase σφ of the signal with respect to a monochromatic reference signal, a universal relationship between the standard deviation of the phase σφ and the cantilever amplitude x0 is found. The smaller the ratio of rms amplitude of the sinusoidal signal and the rms value of random signal is, the larger the phase fluctuations are. Phase fluctuations are of importance for measurements at small amplitudes, since they determine the limit of phase-sensitive measurements or the lateral imaging resolution in the so-called pendulum mode of AFM operation. In this paper we develop a heuristic model, which provides an analytical formula for the probability density of phase noise of a sinusoidal signal superimposed by a quasimonochromatic one with respect to a reference oscillator. The variance of the phase noise can be deduced from the distribution functions. The suggested model is verified experimentally and is compared with theoretical predictions. The amplitude-dependent phase fluctuations are a powerful tool to determine the

  2. Full data acquisition in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Mapping dynamic electric phenomena in real space

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Somnath, Suhas; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has provided deep insights into the local electronic, ionic and electrochemical functionalities in a broad range of materials and devices. In classical KPFM, which utilizes heterodyne detection and closed loop bias feedback, the cantilever response is down-sampled to a single measurement of the contact potential difference (CPD) per pixel. This level of detail, however, is insufficient for materials and devices involving bias and time dependent electrochemical events; or at solid-liquid interfaces, where non-linear or lossy dielectrics are present. Here, we demonstrate direct recovery of the bias dependence of the electrostatic force at high temporal resolution using General acquisition Mode (G-Mode) KPFM. G-Mode KPFM utilizes high speed detection, compression, and storage of the raw cantilever deflection signal in its entirety at high sampling rates. We show how G-Mode KPFM can be used to capture nanoscale CPD and capacitance information with a temporal resolution much faster than the cantilever bandwidth, determined by the modulation frequency of the AC voltage. In this way, G-Mode KPFM offers a new paradigm to study dynamic electric phenomena in electroactive interfaces as well as a promising route to extend KPFM to the solid-liquid interface. PMID:27514987

  3. Full data acquisition in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Mapping dynamic electric phenomena in real space.

    PubMed

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Somnath, Suhas; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has provided deep insights into the local electronic, ionic and electrochemical functionalities in a broad range of materials and devices. In classical KPFM, which utilizes heterodyne detection and closed loop bias feedback, the cantilever response is down-sampled to a single measurement of the contact potential difference (CPD) per pixel. This level of detail, however, is insufficient for materials and devices involving bias and time dependent electrochemical events; or at solid-liquid interfaces, where non-linear or lossy dielectrics are present. Here, we demonstrate direct recovery of the bias dependence of the electrostatic force at high temporal resolution using General acquisition Mode (G-Mode) KPFM. G-Mode KPFM utilizes high speed detection, compression, and storage of the raw cantilever deflection signal in its entirety at high sampling rates. We show how G-Mode KPFM can be used to capture nanoscale CPD and capacitance information with a temporal resolution much faster than the cantilever bandwidth, determined by the modulation frequency of the AC voltage. In this way, G-Mode KPFM offers a new paradigm to study dynamic electric phenomena in electroactive interfaces as well as a promising route to extend KPFM to the solid-liquid interface. PMID:27514987

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of Lorentz force microscopy in magnetic nano-disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, R. A.; Mello, E. P.; Coura, P. Z.; Leonel, S. A.; Maciel, I. O.; Toscano, D.; Rocha, J. C. S.; Costa, B. V.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we present a molecular dynamics simulation to model the Lorentz force microscopy experiment. Experimentally, this technique consists in the scattering of electrons by magnetic structures in surfaces and gases. Here, we will explore the behavior of electrons colliding with nano-magnetic disks. The computational molecular dynamics experiment allows us to follow the trajectory of individual electrons all along the experiment. In order to compare our results with the experimental one reported in literature, we model the experimental electron detectors in a simplified way: a photo-sensitive screen is simulated in such way that it counts the number of electrons that collide at a certain position. The information is organized to give in grey scale the image information about the magnetic properties of the structure in the target. Computationally, the sensor is modeled as a square matrix in which we count how many electrons collide at each specific point after being scattered by the magnetic structure. We have used several configurations of the magnetic nano-disks to understand the behavior of the scattered electrons, changing the orientation direction of the magnetic moments in the nano-disk in several ways. Our results match very well with the experiments, showing that this simulation can become a powerful technique to help to interpret experimental results.

  5. Analysis of Adhesive Characteristics of Asphalt Based on Atomic Force Microscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Yi, Junyan; Feng, Decheng; Huang, Yudong; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-05-18

    Asphalt binder is a very important building material in infrastructure construction; it is commonly mixed with mineral aggregate and used to produce asphalt concrete. Owing to the large differences in physical and chemical properties between asphalt and aggregate, adhesive bonds play an important role in determining the performance of asphalt concrete. Although many types of adhesive bonding mechanisms have been proposed to explain the interaction forces between asphalt binder and mineral aggregate, few have been confirmed and characterized. In comparison with chemical interactions, physical adsorption has been considered to play a more important role in adhesive bonding between asphalt and mineral aggregate. In this study, the silicon tip of an atomic force microscope was used to represent silicate minerals in aggregate, and a nanoscale analysis of the characteristics of adhesive bonding between asphalt binder and the silicon tip was conducted via an atomic force microscopy (AFM) test and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the measurements and simulations could help in better understanding of the bonding and debonding procedures in asphalt-aggregate mixtures during hot mixing and under traffic loading. MD simulations on a single molecule of a component of asphalt and monocrystalline silicon demonstrate that molecules with a higher atomic density and planar structure, such as three types of asphaltene molecules, can provide greater adhesive strength. However, regarding the real components of asphalt binder, both the MD simulations and AFM test indicate that the colloidal structural behavior of asphalt also has a large influence on the adhesion behavior between asphalt and silicon. A schematic model of the interaction between asphalt and silicon is presented, which can explain the effect of aging on the adhesion behavior of asphalt. PMID:27115043

  6. Full data acquisition in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Mapping dynamic electric phenomena in real space

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Somnath, Suhas

    2016-08-12

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has provided deep insights into the role local electronic, ionic and electrochemical processes play on the global functionality of materials and devices, even down to the atomic scale. Conventional KPFM utilizes heterodyne detection and bias feedback to measure the contact potential difference (CPD) between tip and sample. This measurement paradigm, however, permits only partial recovery of the information encoded in bias- and time-dependent electrostatic interactions between the tip and sample and effectively down-samples the cantilever response to a single measurement of CPD per pixel. This level of detail is insufficient for electroactive materials, devices, ormore » solid-liquid interfaces, where non-linear dielectrics are present or spurious electrostatic events are possible. Here, we simulate and experimentally validate a novel approach for spatially resolved KPFM capable of a full information transfer of the dynamic electric processes occurring between tip and sample. General acquisition mode, or G-Mode, adopts a big data approach utilising high speed detection, compression, and storage of the raw cantilever deflection signal in its entirety at high sampling rates (> 4 MHz), providing a permanent record of the tip trajectory. We develop a range of methodologies for analysing the resultant large multidimensional datasets involving classical, physics-based and information-based approaches. Physics-based analysis of G-Mode KPFM data recovers the parabolic bias dependence of the electrostatic force for each cycle of the excitation voltage, leading to a multidimensional dataset containing spatial and temporal dependence of the CPD and capacitance channels. We use multivariate statistical methods to reduce data volume and separate the complex multidimensional data sets into statistically significant components that can then be mapped onto separate physical mechanisms. Overall, G-Mode KPFM offers a new paradigm to study

  7. Graphene on SiC(0001) inspected by dynamic atomic force microscopy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Telychko, Mykola; Berger, Jan; Majzik, Zsolt; Jelínek, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Summary We investigated single-layer graphene on SiC(0001) by atomic force and tunneling current microscopy, to separate the topographic and electronic contributions from the overall landscape. The analysis revealed that the roughness evaluated from the atomic force maps is very low, in accord with theoretical simulations. We also observed that characteristic electron scattering effects on graphene edges and defects are not accompanied by any out-of-plane relaxations of carbon atoms. PMID:25977861

  8. Viewing dynamic interactions of proteins and a model lipid membrane with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Anthony S; Rand, Jacob H; Wu, Xiao-Xuan; Taatjes, Douglas J

    2013-01-01

    The information covered in this chapter will present a model homogenous membrane preparation technique and dynamic imaging procedure that can be successfully applied to more than one type of lipid study and atomic force microscope (AFM) instrument setup. The basic procedural steps have been used with an Asylum Research MFP-3D BIO and the Bruker (formerly, Veeco) BioScope. The AFM imaging protocol has been supplemented by procedures (not to be presented in this chapter) of ellipsometry, standardized western blotting, and dot-blots to verify appropriate purity and activity of all experimental molecular components; excellent purity and activity level of the lipids, proteins, and drug(s) greatly influence the success of imaging experiments in the scanning probe microscopy field. The major goal of the chapter is to provide detailed procedures for sample preparation and operation of the Asylum Research MFP-3D BIO AFM. In addition, one should be cognizant that our comprehensive description in the use of the MFP-3D BIO's functions for successful image acquisitions and analyses is greatly enhanced by Asylum Research's (AR's) accompanying extensive manual(s), technical notes, and AR's users forum. Ultimately, the stepwise protocol and information will allow novice personnel to begin acquiring quality images for processing and analysis with minimal supervision. PMID:23027007

  9. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  10. Dynamic electrical response of thin dielectric films measured by Electrostatic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Clayton; Klein, Levente

    2002-03-01

    Electrostatic Force Microscopy measurements have been performed on thin dielectric films on conducting substrates. Cantilever oscillation amplitude versus distance curves are measured as a function of the frequency of the voltage applied between tip and sample. When a DC voltage is applied, the oscillation amplitude versus distance curve is significantly different from that when a low frequency (500 Hz) AC voltage is applied (cantilever resonance at 125 kHz). The frequency dependence of the AC force response for different dielectric films (SiO2 and Al_2O_3) are studied. The frequency dependence is accounted for by the movement of charge near the sample surface with a finite response time.

  11. A high-bandwidth amplitude estimation technique for dynamic mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Karvinen, K S; Moheimani, S O R

    2014-02-01

    While often overlooked, one of the prerequisites for high-speed amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is a high-bandwidth amplitude estimation technique. Conventional techniques, such as RMS to DC conversion and the lock-in amplifier, have proven useful, but offer limited measurement bandwidth and are not suitable for high-speed imaging. Several groups have developed techniques, but many of these are either difficult to implement or lack robustness. In this contribution, we briefly outline existing amplitude estimation methods and propose a new high-bandwidth estimation technique, inspired by techniques employed in microwave and RF circuit design, which utilizes phase cancellation to significantly improve the performance of the lock-in amplifier. We conclude with the design and implementation of a custom circuit to experimentally demonstrate the improvements and discuss its application in high-speed and multifrequency atomic force microscopy. PMID:24593371

  12. A high-bandwidth amplitude estimation technique for dynamic mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Karvinen, K. S. Moheimani, S. O. R.

    2014-02-15

    While often overlooked, one of the prerequisites for high-speed amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is a high-bandwidth amplitude estimation technique. Conventional techniques, such as RMS to DC conversion and the lock-in amplifier, have proven useful, but offer limited measurement bandwidth and are not suitable for high-speed imaging. Several groups have developed techniques, but many of these are either difficult to implement or lack robustness. In this contribution, we briefly outline existing amplitude estimation methods and propose a new high-bandwidth estimation technique, inspired by techniques employed in microwave and RF circuit design, which utilizes phase cancellation to significantly improve the performance of the lock-in amplifier. We conclude with the design and implementation of a custom circuit to experimentally demonstrate the improvements and discuss its application in high-speed and multifrequency atomic force microscopy.

  13. Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of APOBEC3G Oligomerization and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Lushnikov, Alexander Y.; Miyagi, Atsushi; Li, Ming; Harris, Reuben S.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2013-01-01

    The DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3G (A3G) is a two-domain protein that binds single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) largely through its N-terminal domain and catalyzes deamination using its C-terminal domain. A3G is considered an innate immune effector protein, with a natural capacity to block the replication of retroviruses such as HIV and retrotransposons. However, knowledge about its biophysical properties and mechanism of interaction with DNA are still limited. Oligomerization is one of these unclear issues. What is the stoichiometry of the free protein? What are the factors defining the oligomeric state of the protein? How does the protein oligomerization change upon DNA binding? How stable are protein oligomers? We address these questions here using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to directly image A3G protein in a free-state and in complexes with DNA, and using time-lapse AFM imaging to characterize the dynamics of A3G oligomers. We found that the formation of oligomers is an inherent property of A3G and that the yield of oligomers depends on the protein concentration. Oligomerization of A3G in complexes with ssDNA follows a similar pattern: the higher the protein concentrations the larger oligomers sizes. The specificity of A3G binding to ssDNA does not depend on stoichiometry. The binding of large A3G oligomers requires a longer ssDNA substrate; therefore, much smaller oligomers form complexes with short ssDNA. A3G oligomers dissociate spontaneously into monomers and this process primarily occurs through a monomer dissociation pathway. PMID:24055458

  14. Finite element modeling of atomic force microscopy cantilever dynamics during video rate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Howard-Knight, J. P.; Hobbs, J. K.

    2011-04-01

    A dynamic finite element model has been constructed to simulate the behavior of low spring constant atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers used for imaging at high speed without active feedback as in VideoAFM. The model is tested against experimental data collected at 20 frame/s and good agreement is found. The complex dynamics of the cantilever, consisting of traveling waves coming from the tip sample interaction, reflecting off the cantilever-substrate junction, and interfering with new waves created at the tip, are revealed. The construction of the image from this resulting nonequilibrium cantilever deflection is also examined. Transient tip-sample forces are found to reach values up to 260 nN on a calibration grid sample, and the maximum forces do not always correspond to the position of steepest features as a result of energy stored in the cantilever.

  15. Characterization of Probe Dynamic Behaviors in Critical Dimension Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shaw C; Joung, Che Bong; Vorburger, Theodore V

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a detailed computational model of the interaction between an atomic force microscope probe tip and a sample surface. The model provides analyses of dynamic behaviors of the tip to estimate the probe deflections due to surface intermittent contact and the resulting dimensional biases and uncertainties. Probe tip and cantilever beam responses to intermittent contact between the probe tip and sample surface are computed using the finite element method. Intermittent contacts with a wall and a horizontal surface are computed and modeled, respectively. Using a 75 nm Critical Dimension (CD) tip as an example, the responses of the probe to interaction forces between the sample surface and the probe tip are shown in both time and frequency domains. In particular, interaction forces between the tip and both a vertical wall and a horizontal surface of a silicon sample are modeled using Lennard-Jones theory. The Snap-in and Snap-out of the probe tip in surface scanning are calculated and shown in the time domain. Based on the given tip-sample interaction force model, the calculation includes the compliance of the probe and dynamic forces generated by an excitation. Cantilever and probe tip deflections versus interaction forces in the time domain can be derived for both vertical contact with a plateau and horizontal contact with a side wall. Dynamic analysis using the finite element method and Lennard-Jones model provide a unique means to analyze the interaction of the probe and sample, including calculation of the deflection and the gap between the probe tip and the measured sample surface. PMID:27504222

  16. Characterization of Probe Dynamic Behaviors in Critical Dimension Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shaw C.; Joung, Che Bong; Vorburger, Theodore V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a detailed computational model of the interaction between an atomic force microscope probe tip and a sample surface. The model provides analyses of dynamic behaviors of the tip to estimate the probe deflections due to surface intermittent contact and the resulting dimensional biases and uncertainties. Probe tip and cantilever beam responses to intermittent contact between the probe tip and sample surface are computed using the finite element method. Intermittent contacts with a wall and a horizontal surface are computed and modeled, respectively. Using a 75 nm Critical Dimension (CD) tip as an example, the responses of the probe to interaction forces between the sample surface and the probe tip are shown in both time and frequency domains. In particular, interaction forces between the tip and both a vertical wall and a horizontal surface of a silicon sample are modeled using Lennard-Jones theory. The Snap-in and Snap-out of the probe tip in surface scanning are calculated and shown in the time domain. Based on the given tip-sample interaction force model, the calculation includes the compliance of the probe and dynamic forces generated by an excitation. Cantilever and probe tip deflections versus interaction forces in the time domain can be derived for both vertical contact with a plateau and horizontal contact with a side wall. Dynamic analysis using the finite element method and Lennard-Jones model provide a unique means to analyze the interaction of the probe and sample, including calculation of the deflection and the gap between the probe tip and the measured sample surface. PMID:27504222

  17. Direct visualization of triplex DNA molecular dynamics by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and atomic force microscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Ching; Lin, Po-Yen; Chen, Yen-Fu; Chang, Chia-Seng; Kan, Lou-Sing

    2007-11-01

    We have detected the dynamics of 17-mer DNA triplex dissociation mechanism at the molecular level. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used as an indicator of intermolecular interaction in nanometer range, whereas atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to address single molecule with sub-angstrom precision. The maximum rupture force of DNA triplex was found at pH 4.65, consistent with macroscopic observations. These results indicated that the FRET together with an AFM detection system could be used to reveal the DNA triplex interaction in nanometer scale unambiguously.

  18. Strength by atomic force microscopy (AFM): Molecular dynamics of water layer squeezing on magnesium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, K.; Dhir, Aman; Yong, Chin W.

    2010-11-01

    Localised strength testing of materials is often carried out in an atomic force microscope (AFM), as foreseen by Kelly in his book Strong Solids (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1966). During AFM indentation experiments, contamination can strongly influence the observed strength and theoretical interpretation of the results is a major problem. Here, we use molecular dynamics computer modelling to describe the contact of NaCl and MgO crystal probes onto surfaces, comparable to an AFM experiment. Clean NaCl gave elastic, brittle behaviour in contact simulations at 300 K, whereas MgO was more plastic, leading to increased toughness. This paper also considers the strength of an oxide substrate contaminated by water molecules and tested by indentation with a pyramidal probe of oxide crystal. Recent theory on the effect of liquid contaminant layers on surface strength has been mainly focussed on Lennard Jones (LJ) molecules with some studies on alcohols and water, described by molecular dynamics, which allows the molecules to be squeezed out as the crystal lattice is deformed. In this work, we have focused on water by studying the forces between a magnesium oxide (MgO) atomic force microscope (AFM) probe and an MgO slab. Force versus separation has been plotted as the AFM probe was moved towards and away from the substrate. Simulation results showed that the water layers could be removed in steps, giving up to four force peaks. The last monolayer of water could not be squeezed out, even at pressures where MgO deformed plastically. Interestingly, with water present, strength was reduced, but more in tensile than compressive measurements. In conclusion, water contaminating the oxide surface in AFM strength testing is structured. Water layer squeezing removal can be predicted by molecular modelling, which may be verified by AFM experiments to show that water can influence the strength of perfect crystals at the nanometre scale.

  19. Kelvin probe force microscopy in liquid using electrochemical force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, Jason I; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, M Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V; Rodriguez, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid-liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid-liquid interface. PMID:25671164

  20. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  1. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q watermore » and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.« less

  2. Cell adhesion force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, G.; Giaever, I.; Pettersen, E. O.; Feder, J.

    1999-01-01

    The adhesion forces of cervical carcinoma cells in tissue culture were measured by using the manipulation force microscope, a novel atomic force microscope. The forces were studied as a function of time and temperature for cells cultured on hydrophilic and hydrophobic polystyrene substrates with preadsorbed proteins. The cells attached faster and stronger at 37°C than at 23°C and better on hydrophilic than on hydrophobic substrates, even though proteins adsorb much better to the hydrophobic substrates. Because cell adhesion serves to control several stages in the cell cycle, we anticipate that the manipulation force microscope can help clarify some cell-adhesion related issues. PMID:9892657

  3. Dynamic nanomagnetism characterization of individual magnetic nanoparticles by frequency-modulated magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Li, Zhenghua; Pan, Deng; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    In this study, stroboscopic imaging of an alternating magnetic field (AC magnetic field) from individual superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles was achieved using the developed frequency modulated-magnetic force microscopy (FM-MFM) technique, which enables the imaging of the vector signals of AC magnetic fields, such as a combination of in-phase and quadrature signals or that of amplitude and phase signals. FM-MFM uses the frequency modulation of cantilever oscillation, caused by the application of an off-resonant AC magnetic field to a mechanically oscillated cantilever, and visualises the vector signals of the AC magnetic field by adding a frequency demodulator and a lock-in amplifier to a conventional magnetic force microscope. Stroboscopic imaging of an AC magnetic field was carried out by varying the phase of the measured in-phase and quadrature signals via a signal processing technique. For the superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles, stroboscopic imaging of the time-variable AC magnetic field, caused by the rotation of the magnetic moments within the particles, was demonstrated. This article describes the present status of FM-MFM technology, with particular attention to the feasibility of detecting magnetic moments of individual nanoparticles, and the possible application of FM-MFM in biological imaging.

  4. Combined dynamic scanning tunneling microscopy and frequency modulation atomic force microscopy investigations on polythiophene chains on graphite with a tuning fork sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Lubin, Christophe; Thoyer, François; Cousty, Jacques

    2011-04-01

    Polythiophene molecules adsorbed on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface were studied by combined dynamic scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) with a quartz tuning fork sensor operating in Qplus mode and equipped with a Pt/Ir tip. Upon completing a careful sub-angström oscillation amplitude calibration of the probe, experiments were conducted in an ultra high vacuum at room temperature. By selecting the tip/surface distance regulation parameter, one can select the type of simultaneous information obtained in an area. For distance regulation based on the mean tunneling current, dynamic STM images together with maps of tip/surface force gradient were obtained. FM-AFM images with maps of the tunneling current were also acquired when the distance regulation was based on the frequency shift. Comparison between these images reveals interesting features. For example the tip which operates in STM mode with ultra low current (<10 pA) generates different interaction forces above molecules or graphite. Changes in energy dissipation processes as small as tens of millielectronvolts per cycle were recorded when the tip oscillates above the polymer or on the graphite surface. Hence data demonstrates that a stiff piezoelectric tuning fork of several kilonewtons/meters working as an AFM/STM probe with sub-angström amplitude can characterize weakly adsorbed molecules.

  5. Gaining insight into the physics of dynamic atomic force microscopy in complex environments using the VEDA simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiracofe, Daniel; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM) continues to grow in popularity among scientists in many different fields, and research on new methods and operating modes continues to expand the resolution, capabilities, and types of samples that can be studied. But many promising increases in capability are accompanied by increases in complexity. Indeed, interpreting modern dAFM data can be challenging, especially on complicated material systems, or in liquid environments where the behavior is often contrary to what is known in air or vacuum environments. Mathematical simulations have proven to be an effective tool in providing physical insight into these non-intuitive systems. In this article we describe recent developments in the VEDA (virtual environment for dynamic AFM) simulator, which is a suite of freely available, open-source simulation tools that are delivered through the cloud computing cyber-infrastructure of nanoHUB (www.nanohub.org). Here we describe three major developments. First, simulations in liquid environments are improved by enhancements in the modeling of cantilever dynamics, excitation methods, and solvation shell forces. Second, VEDA is now able to simulate many new advanced modes of operation (bimodal, phase-modulation, frequency-modulation, etc.). Finally, nineteen different tip-sample models are available to simulate the surface physics of a wide variety different material systems including capillary, specific adhesion, van der Waals, electrostatic, viscoelasticity, and hydration forces. These features are demonstrated through example simulations and validated against experimental data, in order to provide insight into practical problems in dynamic AFM.

  6. High-speed atomic force microscopy reveals structural dynamics of amyloid β1-42 aggregates.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Ono, Kenjiro; Itami, Masahiro; Takahashi, Ryoichi; Teplow, David B; Yamada, Masahito

    2016-05-24

    Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins into insoluble amyloid fibrils is implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases. This process involves protein assembly into oligomeric intermediates and fibrils with highly polymorphic molecular structures. These structural differences may be responsible for different disease presentations. For this reason, elucidation of the structural features and assembly kinetics of amyloidogenic proteins has been an area of intense study. We report here the results of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) studies of fibril formation and elongation by the 42-residue form of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ1-42), a key pathogenetic agent of Alzheimer's disease. Our data demonstrate two different growth modes of Aβ1-42, one producing straight fibrils and the other producing spiral fibrils. Each mode depends on initial fibril nucleus structure, but switching from one growth mode to another was occasionally observed, suggesting that fibril end structure fluctuated between the two growth modes. This switching phenomenon was affected by buffer salt composition. Our findings indicate that polymorphism in fibril structure can occur after fibril nucleation and is affected by relatively modest changes in environmental conditions. PMID:27162352

  7. Energy dissipation and dynamic response of an amplitude-modulation atomic-force microscopy subjected to a tip-sample viscous force.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shueei Muh

    2007-01-01

    In a common environment of atomic force microscopy (AFM), a damping force occurs between a tip and a sample. The influence of damping on the dynamic response of a cantilever must be significant. Moreover, accurate theory is very helpful for the interpretation of a sample's topography and properties. In this study, the effects of damping and nonlinear interatomic tip-sample forces on the dynamic response of an amplitude-formulation AFM are investigated. The damping force is simulated by using the conventional Kelvin-Voigt damping model. The interatomic tip-sample force is the attractive van der Waals force. For consistance with real measurement of a cantilever, the mathematical equations of the beam theory of an AM-AFM are built and its analytical solution is derived. Moreover, an AFM system is also simplified into a mass-spring-damper model. Its exact solution is simple and intuitive. Several relations among the damping ratio, the response ratio, the frequency shift, the energy dissipation and the Q-factor are revealed. It is found that the resonant frequencies and the phase angles determined by the two models are almost same. Significant differences in the resonant quality factors and the response ratios determined by using the two models are also found. Finally, the influences of the variations of several parameters on the error of measuring a sample's topography are investigated. PMID:16982149

  8. The emergence of multifrequency force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ricardo; Herruzo, Elena T

    2012-04-01

    In atomic force microscopy a cantilever with a sharp tip attached to it is scanned over the surface of a sample, and information about the surface is extracted by measuring how the deflection of the cantilever - which is caused by interactions between the tip and the surface - varies with position. In the most common form of atomic force microscopy, dynamic force microscopy, the cantilever is made to vibrate at a specific frequency, and the deflection of the tip is measured at this frequency. But the motion of the cantilever is highly nonlinear, and in conventional dynamic force microscopy, information about the sample that is encoded in the deflection at frequencies other than the excitation frequency is irreversibly lost. Multifrequency force microscopy involves the excitation and/or detection of the deflection at two or more frequencies, and it has the potential to overcome limitations in the spatial resolution and acquisition times of conventional force microscopes. Here we review the development of five different modes of multifrequency force microscopy and examine its application in studies of proteins, the imaging of vibrating nanostructures, measurements of ion diffusion and subsurface imaging in cells. PMID:22466857

  9. Photothermal excitation and laser Doppler velocimetry of higher cantilever vibration modes for dynamic atomic force microscopy in liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Shuhei; Kobayashi, Dai; Sakurada, Takeo; Nakazawa, Tomonori; Hoshi, Yasuo; Kawakatsu, Hideki

    2008-12-15

    The authors present an optically based method combining photothermal excitation and laser Doppler velocimetry of higher cantilever vibration modes for dynamic atomic force microscopy in liquid. The frequency spectrum of a silicon cantilever measured in water over frequencies ranging up to 10 MHz shows that the method allows us to excite and detect higher modes, from fundamental to fifth flexural, without enhancing spurious resonances. By reducing the tip oscillation amplitude using higher modes, the average tip-sample force gradient due to chemical bonds is effectively increased to achieve high-spatial-resolution imaging in liquid. The method's performance is demonstrated by atomic resolution imaging of a mica surface in water obtained using the second flexural mode with a small tip amplitude of 99 pm; individual atoms on the surface with small height differences of up to 60 pm are clearly resolved.

  10. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  11. Deep atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H.; Drake, B.; Randall, C.; Hansma, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) possesses several desirable imaging features including the ability to produce height profiles as well as two-dimensional images, in fluid or air, at high resolution. AFM has been used to study a vast selection of samples on the scale of angstroms to micrometers. However, current AFMs cannot access samples with vertical topography of the order of 100 μm or greater. Research efforts have produced AFM scanners capable of vertical motion greater than 100 μm, but commercially available probe tip lengths are still typically less than 10 μm high. Even the longest probe tips are below 100 μm and even at this range are problematic. In this paper, we present a method to hand-fabricate “Deep AFM” probes with tips of the order of 100 μm and longer so that AFM can be used to image samples with large scale vertical topography, such as fractured bone samples.

  12. Nanonet Force Microscopy for Measuring Cell Forces.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Kevin; Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wei; Kapania, Rakesh; Nain, Amrinder S

    2016-07-12

    The influence of physical forces exerted by or felt by cells on cell shape, migration, and cytoskeleton arrangement is now widely acknowledged and hypothesized to occur due to modulation of cellular inside-out forces in response to changes in the external fibrous environment (outside-in). Our previous work using the non-electrospinning Spinneret-based Tunable Engineered Parameters' suspended fibers has revealed that cells are able to sense and respond to changes in fiber curvature and structural stiffness as evidenced by alterations to focal adhesion cluster lengths. Here, we present the development and application of a suspended nanonet platform for measuring C2C12 mouse myoblast forces attached to fibers of three diameters (250, 400, and 800 nm) representing a wide range of structural stiffness (3-50 nN/μm). The nanonet force microscopy platform measures cell adhesion forces in response to symmetric and asymmetric external perturbation in single and cyclic modes. We find that contractility-based, inside-out forces are evenly distributed at the edges of the cell, and that forces are dependent on fiber structural stiffness. Additionally, external perturbation in symmetric and asymmetric modes biases cell-fiber failure location without affecting the outside-in forces of cell-fiber adhesion. We then extend the platform to measure forces of (1) cell-cell junctions, (2) single cells undergoing cyclic perturbation in the presence of drugs, and (3) cancerous single-cells transitioning from a blebbing to a pseudopodial morphology. PMID:27410747

  13. Dynamic shear force microscopy of viscosity in nanometer-confined hexadecane layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krass, Marc-Dominik; Nand Gosvami, Nitya; Carpick, Robert W.; Müser, Martin H.; Bennewitz, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Hexadecane exhibits pronounced molecular layering upon confinement to gaps of a few nanometer width which is discussed for its role in boundary lubrication. We have probed the mechanical properties of the confined layers with the help of an atomic force microscope, by quasi-static normal force measurements and by analyzing the lateral tip motion of a magnetically actuated torsional cantilever oscillation. The molecular layering is modeled by a oscillatory force curve and the tip approach is simulated assuming thermal equilibrium correlations in the liquid. The shear response of the confined layers reveals gradually increasing stiffness and viscous dissipation for a decreasing number of confined layers.

  14. Dynamic shear force microscopy of viscosity in nanometer-confined hexadecane layers.

    PubMed

    Krass, Marc-Dominik; Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Carpick, Robert W; Müser, Martin H; Bennewitz, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Hexadecane exhibits pronounced molecular layering upon confinement to gaps of a few nanometer width which is discussed for its role in boundary lubrication. We have probed the mechanical properties of the confined layers with the help of an atomic force microscope, by quasi-static normal force measurements and by analyzing the lateral tip motion of a magnetically actuated torsional cantilever oscillation. The molecular layering is modeled by a oscillatory force curve and the tip approach is simulated assuming thermal equilibrium correlations in the liquid. The shear response of the confined layers reveals gradually increasing stiffness and viscous dissipation for a decreasing number of confined layers. PMID:26931743

  15. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-15

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  16. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  17. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  18. Spatiotemporal dynamics of the nuclear pore complex transport barrier resolved by high-speed atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakiyama, Yusuke; Mazur, Adam; Kapinos, Larisa E.; Lim, Roderick Y. H.

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are biological nanomachines that mediate the bidirectional traffic of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and nucleus in eukaryotic cells. This process involves numerous intrinsically disordered, barrier-forming proteins known as phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporins (FG Nups) that are tethered inside each pore. The selective barrier mechanism has so far remained unresolved because the FG Nups have eluded direct structural analysis within NPCs. Here, high-speed atomic force microscopy is used to visualize the nanoscopic spatiotemporal dynamics of FG Nups inside Xenopus laevis oocyte NPCs at timescales of ∼100 ms. Our results show that the cytoplasmic orifice is circumscribed by highly flexible, dynamically fluctuating FG Nups that rapidly elongate and retract, consistent with the diffusive motion of tethered polypeptide chains. On this basis, intermingling FG Nups exhibit transient entanglements in the central channel, but do not cohere into a tightly crosslinked meshwork. Therefore, the basic functional form of the NPC barrier is comprised of highly dynamic FG Nups that manifest as a central plug or transporter when averaged in space and time.

  19. Study of fluid and transport properties of porous anodic aluminum membranes by dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chu; Leese, Hannah S; Mattia, Davide; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Tabor, Rico F

    2013-07-16

    Recent work on carbon nanotubes (CNT) has focused on their potential application in water treatment as a result of their predicted and observed enhanced flow rates. Recent work on the lesser-known porous anodic alumina membranes (PAAMs) has also shown flow enhancement, albeit at only a fraction of what has been observed in CNTs. Despite their potential applications, little research has been conducted on PAAMs' hydrodynamic properties, and in this Article we present experimental results and theoretical models that explore the fluid flow behavior around and through these membranes. The experiments were conducted using an atomic force microscope (AFM) that pushed a solid silica particle against PAAMs that were characterized with different pore diameters. Furthermore, the PAAMs were classified as either closed or open, with the latter allowing fluid to pass through. The theoretical model developed to describe the experimental data incorporates Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) effects, cantilever drag, and hydrodynamic forces. By using the slip boundary condition for the hydrodynamic forces, we were able to fit the model to experimental findings and also demonstrate that the difference between closed and open PAAMs was negligible. The slip lengths did not correspond to any physical feature of the PAAMs, but our model does provide a simple yet effective means of describing the hydrodynamics for not only PAAMs but for membranes in general. PMID:23750974

  20. Unraveling the Architecture and Structural Dynamics of Pathogens by High-Resolution in vitro Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Malkin, A J; Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; McPherson, A; Wheeler, K E

    2005-04-12

    Progress in structural biology very much depends upon the development of new high-resolution techniques and tools. Despite decades of study of viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores and their pressing importance in human medicine and biodefense, many of their structural properties are poorly understood. Thus, characterization and understanding of the architecture of protein surface and internal structures of pathogens is critical to elucidating mechanisms of disease, immune response, physicochemical properties, environmental resistance and development of countermeasures against bioterrorist agents. Furthermore, even though complete genome sequences are available for various pathogens, the structure-function relationships are not understood. Because of their lack of symmetry and heterogeneity, large human pathogens are often refractory to X-ray crystallographic analysis or reconstruction by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). An alternative high-resolution method to examine native structure of pathogens is atomic force microscopy (AFM), which allows direct visualization of macromolecular assemblies at near-molecular resolution. The capability to image single pathogen surfaces at nanometer scale in vitro would profoundly impact mechanistic and structural studies of pathogenesis, immunobiology, specific cellular processes, environmental dynamics and biotransformation.

  1. Fidelity imaging for atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, Sayan Salapaka, Murti

    2015-01-05

    Atomic force microscopy is widely employed for imaging material at the nanoscale. However, real-time measures on image reliability are lacking in contemporary atomic force microscopy literature. In this article, we present a real-time technique that provides an image of fidelity for a high bandwidth dynamic mode imaging scheme. The fidelity images define channels that allow the user to have additional authority over the choice of decision threshold that facilitates where the emphasis is desired, on discovering most true features on the sample with the possible detection of high number of false features, or emphasizing minimizing instances of false detections. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of fidelity imaging.

  2. Slow cellular dynamics in MDCK and R5 cells monitored by time-lapse atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Schoenenberger, C A; Hoh, J H

    1994-01-01

    We have examined dynamic events that occur on a time scale of minutes in an epithelial monolayer of Madine-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells and in ras-transformed MDCK cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cells were imaged under physiological conditions, and time-lapse movies representing approximately 60 s real time per frame were assembled. In normal MDCK cells, two types of protrusions in the apical plasma membrane exhibit dynamic behavior. First, smooth bulges formed transiently over the time scale of minutes to tens of minutes. Second, spike-like protrusions appear initially as bulges, extend well above the apical surface and, finally, seem to detach. R5, an oncogenic transformant derived from MDCK cells, grows very flat on glass. During AFM imaging, these cells sometimes round up and detach from the substrate. In light microscopic observations of parallel preparations, cells rarely detach, suggesting that this is an active response of these cells to irritation by the AFM tip. R5 cells often extend processes that are supported by actin stress fibers. During imaging with the AFM, these processes withdraw at a rate of 1-5 microns/min, similar to that observed by light microscopy. During the withdrawal, movement of the stress fibers can be clearly seen. In the flat periphery of these cells, the transport of intracellular particles along cytoskeletal elements was seen. In addition, we have observed two types of wave-like movements through the cell, which appear to be an organized rearrangement of cytoplasm. One type of wave moves radially out from center of the cell while the other moves circularly along the cell periphery. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:7948707

  3. Enhancing the optical lever sensitivity of microcantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy via integrated low frequency paddles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda Shaik, Nurul; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Raman, Arvind

    2016-05-01

    A method is presented to enhance the optical lever sensitivity in dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) by nearly an order of magnitude over a wide frequency bandwidth. This is achieved by fabricating or releasing a paddle with a soft hinge close to the free end of the AFM microcantilever such that the paddle resonance frequency is well below the fundamental resonance frequency of the microcantilever. We show a significant increase in signal to noise ratio when cantilever motion is observed at the paddle for AFM systems that are not limited by thermal noise. Also, any effects due to the excitation of the second eigenmode were decoupled by locating the paddle at the node of the second eigenmode. We use these probes for higher harmonic imaging in amplitude modulated AFM (AM–AFM) on a standard polymer blend made of polystyrene and low density polyethylene. We demonstrate significantly improved contrast in higher harmonic images when observing cantilever motion at the paddle. Thus this microcantilever design can improve significantly conventional cantilever performance for dynamic AFM and is compatible with low-cost, high yield microfabrication processes.

  4. Enhancing the optical lever sensitivity of microcantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy via integrated low frequency paddles.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Nurul Huda; Reifenberger, Ronald G; Raman, Arvind

    2016-05-13

    A method is presented to enhance the optical lever sensitivity in dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) by nearly an order of magnitude over a wide frequency bandwidth. This is achieved by fabricating or releasing a paddle with a soft hinge close to the free end of the AFM microcantilever such that the paddle resonance frequency is well below the fundamental resonance frequency of the microcantilever. We show a significant increase in signal to noise ratio when cantilever motion is observed at the paddle for AFM systems that are not limited by thermal noise. Also, any effects due to the excitation of the second eigenmode were decoupled by locating the paddle at the node of the second eigenmode. We use these probes for higher harmonic imaging in amplitude modulated AFM (AM-AFM) on a standard polymer blend made of polystyrene and low density polyethylene. We demonstrate significantly improved contrast in higher harmonic images when observing cantilever motion at the paddle. Thus this microcantilever design can improve significantly conventional cantilever performance for dynamic AFM and is compatible with low-cost, high yield microfabrication processes. PMID:27040811

  5. Coupled molecular and cantilever dynamics model for frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klocke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary A molecular dynamics model is presented, which adds harmonic potentials to the atomic interactions to mimic the elastic properties of an AFM cantilever. It gives new insight into the correlation between the experimentally monitored frequency shift and cantilever damping due to the interaction between tip atoms and scanned surface. Applying the model to ionic crystals with rock salt structure two damping mechanisms are investigated, which occur separately or simultaneously depending on the tip position. These mechanisms are adhesion hysteresis on the one hand and lateral excitations of the cantilever on the other. We find that the short range Lennard-Jones part of the atomic interaction alone is sufficient for changing the predominant mechanism. When the long range ionic interaction is switched off, the two damping mechanisms occur with a completely different pattern, which is explained by the energy landscape for the apex atom of the tip. In this case the adhesion hysteresis is always associated with a distinct lateral displacement of the tip. It is shown how this may lead to a systematic shift between the periodic patterns obtained from the frequency and from the damping signal, respectively. PMID:27335760

  6. Coupled molecular and cantilever dynamics model for frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Klocke, Michael; Wolf, Dietrich E

    2016-01-01

    A molecular dynamics model is presented, which adds harmonic potentials to the atomic interactions to mimic the elastic properties of an AFM cantilever. It gives new insight into the correlation between the experimentally monitored frequency shift and cantilever damping due to the interaction between tip atoms and scanned surface. Applying the model to ionic crystals with rock salt structure two damping mechanisms are investigated, which occur separately or simultaneously depending on the tip position. These mechanisms are adhesion hysteresis on the one hand and lateral excitations of the cantilever on the other. We find that the short range Lennard-Jones part of the atomic interaction alone is sufficient for changing the predominant mechanism. When the long range ionic interaction is switched off, the two damping mechanisms occur with a completely different pattern, which is explained by the energy landscape for the apex atom of the tip. In this case the adhesion hysteresis is always associated with a distinct lateral displacement of the tip. It is shown how this may lead to a systematic shift between the periodic patterns obtained from the frequency and from the damping signal, respectively. PMID:27335760

  7. Dynamic force microscopy and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy studies of conducting polymer thin film on nanoscale structured Al surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hitoshi; Takemura, Susumu; Ishii, Atsuro; Takarai, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Yohei; Sugiyama, Takeharu; Hiramatsu, Tomoyasu; Nanba, Noriyuki; Nishikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Masahiro

    2007-09-01

    A nanoscale linked-crater structure was fabricated on an Al surface by chemical and electrochemical combination processes. The surface of an Al plate was treated with Semi Clean and was successively processed in anodization in H IISO 4. Dynamic force microscopy image (DFM) showed that a linked-crater structure was formed on the Al surface. At the next stage, the authors conducted the thin film growth of conducting polymer polythiophene on the Al surface by an electrochemical method. The electrochemical polymerization on the Al surface was performed in acetonitrile containing thiophene monomer and (Et) 4NBF 4 as a supporting electrolyte. After being electrochemically processed, the contour image of each crater was still recognized implying that the polymer nanofilm was grown on the nanoscale structured Al surface. The cross section analysis demonstrated that the nanofilm was grown along the linked-crater structure because the contour of each crater became thick. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurement also supported the polymer nanofilm growth because C 1s and S 2p lines were detected. Furthermore, copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecules are injected into the polymer nanofilm grown on the nanoscale structured Al surface by diffusing method in order to functionalize the nanoscale hybrid material.

  8. High-Speed Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Toshio; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Kodera, Noriyuki

    2012-08-01

    The technology of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) has reached maturity. HS-AFM enables us to directly visualize the structure and dynamics of biological molecules in physiological solutions at subsecond to sub-100 ms temporal resolution. By this microscopy, dynamically acting molecules such as myosin V walking on an actin filament and bacteriorhodopsin in response to light are successfully visualized. High-resolution molecular movies reveal the dynamic behavior of molecules in action in great detail. Inferences no longer have to be made from static snapshots of molecular structures and from the dynamic behavior of optical markers attached to biomolecules. In this review, we first describe theoretical considerations for the highest possible imaging rate, then summarize techniques involved in HS-AFM and highlight recent imaging studies. Finally, we briefly discuss future challenges to explore.

  9. Energy dissipation in multifrequency atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pukhova, Valentina; Banfi, Francesco; Ferrini, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    The instantaneous displacement, velocity and acceleration of a cantilever tip impacting onto a graphite surface are reconstructed. The total dissipated energy and the dissipated energy per cycle of each excited flexural mode during the tip interaction is retrieved. The tip dynamics evolution is studied by wavelet analysis techniques that have general relevance for multi-mode atomic force microscopy, in a regime where few cantilever oscillation cycles characterize the tip-sample interaction. PMID:24778976

  10. Prototype cantilevers for quantitative lateral force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, Mark G.; Gates, Richard S.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; Cook, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    Prototype cantilevers are presented that enable quantitative surface force measurements using contact-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The ''hammerhead'' cantilevers facilitate precise optical lever system calibrations for cantilever flexure and torsion, enabling quantifiable adhesion measurements and friction measurements by lateral force microscopy (LFM). Critically, a single hammerhead cantilever of known flexural stiffness and probe length dimension can be used to perform both a system calibration as well as surface force measurements in situ, which greatly increases force measurement precision and accuracy. During LFM calibration mode, a hammerhead cantilever allows an optical lever ''torque sensitivity'' to be generated for the quantification of LFM friction forces. Precise calibrations were performed on two different AFM instruments, in which torque sensitivity values were specified with sub-percent relative uncertainty. To examine the potential for accurate lateral force measurements using the prototype cantilevers, finite element analysis predicted measurement errors of a few percent or less, which could be reduced via refinement of calibration methodology or cantilever design. The cantilevers are compatible with commercial AFM instrumentation and can be used for other AFM techniques such as contact imaging and dynamic mode measurements.

  11. High-Resolution Imaging of Plasmid DNA in Liquids in Dynamic Mode Atomic Force Microscopy Using a Carbon Nanofiber Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Masashi; Ito, Shuichi; Yagi, Akira; Sakai, Nobuaki; Uekusa, Yoshitugu; Ohta, Ryo; Inaba, Kazuhisa; Hayashi, Akari; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Tanemura, Masaki

    2011-08-01

    To understand the motion of DNA and DNA complexes, the real-time visualization of living DNA in liquids is quite important. Here, we report the high-resolution imaging of plasmid DNA in water using a rapid-scan atomic force microscopy (AFM) system equipped with a carbon nanofiber (CNF) probe. To achieve a rapid high-resolution scan, small SiN cantilevers with dimensions of 2 (width) × 0.1 (thickness) × 9 µm (length) and a bent end (tip view structure) were employed as base cantilevers onto which single CNFs were grown. The resonant frequencies of the cantilever were 1.5 MHz in air and 500 kHz in water, and the spring constant was calculated to be 0.1 N/m. Single CNFs, typically 88 nm in length, were formed on an array of the cantilevers in a batch process by the ion-irradiation method. An AFM image of a plasmid DNA taken in water at 0.2 fps (5 s/image) using a batch-fabricated CNF-tipped cantilever clearly showed the helix turns of the double strand DNA. The average helical pitch measured 3.4 nm (σ: 0.5 nm), which was in good agreement with that determined by the X-ray diffraction method, 3.4 nm. Thus, it is presumed that the combined use of the rapid-scan AFM system with the ion-induced CNF probe is promising for the dynamic analysis of biomolecules.

  12. Dynamics of Nucleic Acid/Cationic Polymer Complexation and Disassembly under Biologically Simulated Conditions Using In Situ Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Min Suk; Wang, Xi; Ragan, Regina; Kwon, Young Jik

    2010-01-01

    Elucidating dynamic morphological changes of gene-carrying vectors and their nucleic acid release under varying intracellular conditions has been a technical challenge. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to observe nucleic acid/polymer polyplexes under endosomal and reducible cytosolic conditions. Both ketalized (acid-degradable) and unmodified (non-degradable) polyethylenimine (PEI) in linear and branched forms were used to prepare plasmid DNA- or siRNA-complexing polyplexes. Then, the polyplexes’ complexation and disassembly were observed by in situ AFM in various differentially changing buffers that represent intracellular conditions. Results demonstrated obvious morphological destruction of DNA/ketalized linear PEI (KL-PEI) polyplexes under mildly acidic endosomal conditions, while no morphological changes were observed by DNA/ketalized branched PEI (KB-PEI) under the same conditions. In addition, siRNA was more efficiently dissociated from KL-PEI than KB-PEI under the same conditions. Non-degradable PEI did not show any evidence that DNA or siRNA was released. Anionic biomacromolecules (e.g., heparan sulfate), which was hypothesized to dissociate nucleic acids from cationic polymers, did not successfully disassemble polyplexes but appeared to be adsorbed on cationic polymers. The in situ AFM results combined with in vitro cellular transfection and gene silencing indicated that efficient endosomal escape of plasmid DNA in a compact polyplex form is required for efficient gene expression. On the contrary, rapid dissociation of siRNA from its cationic carrier is crucial for efficient gene silencing. The findings of this study may provide new insightful information for designing stimuli-responsive nonviral gene vectors as well as expanding tools for investigating nonviral vectors in nano scales under biologically inspired conditions. PMID:20803694

  13. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-15

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  14. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. PMID:25554301

  15. Van der Waals Forces in Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacBeth, Melissa; Garbini, Joseph; Sidles, John; Dougherty, William; Chao, Shih-Hui

    2001-03-01

    Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy detects modulated spin-gradient forces by means of a soft, high phQ cantilever. When the magnetic tip of the cantilever is brought close to the sample surface, static forces significantly change the net restoring force, altering the cantilever mechanical resonance frequency. This frequency shift can be very large compared to the width of the cantilever resonance. As previously demonstrated, active feedback control of the cantilever motion greatly improves cantilever dynamics. The control algorithm is obtained by formal optimal control techniques and implemented with a digital signal processor (DSP). We have recently enabled the DSP to continuously evaluate the frequency of the cantilever as the tip approaches the sample and seamlessly adapt control parameters for optimized performance. Tip-sample approach under adaptive control can avoid snap-in and obtain much smaller separations than uncontrolled approach, and the static potential is reliably characterized.

  16. Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-10-12

    Dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) combines the benefits of high spatial resolution electron microscopy with the high temporal resolution of ultrafast lasers. The incorporation of these two components into a single instrument provides a perfect platform for in situ observations of material processes. However, previous DTEM applications have focused on observing structural changes occurring in samples exposed to high vacuum. Therefore, in order to expand the pump-probe experimental regime to more natural environmental conditions, in situ gas and liquid chambers must be coupled with Dynamic TEM. This chapter describes the current and future applications of in situ liquid DTEM to permit time-resolved atomic scale observations in an aqueous environment, Although this chapter focuses mostly on in situ liquid imaging, the same research potential exists for in situ gas experiments and the successful integration of these techniques promises new insights for understanding nanoparticle, catalyst and biological protein dynamics with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution.

  17. An experimental investigation of resonance curves on metallic surfaces in dynamic force microscopy: the influence of frozen versus mobile charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Piednoir, Agnès; Zambelli, Tomaso; Bouju, Xavier; Gauthier, Sébastien

    2004-02-01

    Amplitude resonance curves of a driven dynamic force microscope cantilever interacting with a Cu(100) substrate in ultra high vacuum are derived and analysed, extending a previous study on Al2O3(0001) (Polesel-Maris et al 2003 Nanotechnology 14 1036). It is shown that the charges that are trapped on the oxidized n+-doped silicon tip give rise to long-range electrostatic forces that dominate the van der Waals forces, due to the metallic nature of the substrate. These electrostatic forces cannot be compensated by the usual procedure consisting of applying a constant bias voltage between the tip and the sample. Indeed, the trapped charge does not remain constant on the timescale of the experiment due to charge leakage across the tip oxide layer. Removal of this oxide by electron field emission solves this problem and allows the access of a pure van der Waals tip-substrate interaction regime.

  18. Dynamic calibration of higher eigenmode parameters of a cantilever in atomic force microscopy by using tip–surface interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Borysov, Stanislav S.; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B.

    2014-10-29

    Here we present a theoretical framework for the dynamic calibration of the higher eigenmode parameters (stiffness and optical lever inverse responsivity) of a cantilever. The method is based on the tip–surface force reconstruction technique and does not require any prior knowledge of the eigenmode shape or the particular form of the tip–surface interaction. The calibration method proposed requires a single-point force measurement by using a multimodal drive and its accuracy is independent of the unknown physical amplitude of a higher eigenmode.

  19. Single-molecule imaging of dynamic motions of biomolecules in DNA origami nanostructures using high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Direct imaging of molecular motions is one of the most fundamental issues for elucidating the physical properties of individual molecules and their reaction mechanisms. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) enables direct molecular imaging, especially for biomolecules in the physiological environment. Because AFM can visualize the molecules at nanometer-scale spatial resolution, a versatile observation scaffold is needed for the precise imaging of molecule interactions in the reactions. The emergence of DNA origami technology allows the precise placement of desired molecules in the designed nanostructures and enables molecules to be detected at the single-molecule level. In our study, the DNA origami system was applied to visualize the detailed motions of target molecules in reactions using high-speed AFM (HS-AFM), which enables the analysis of dynamic motions of biomolecules in a subsecond time resolution. In this system, biochemical properties such as the placement of various double-stranded DNAs (dsDNAs) containing unrestricted DNA sequences, modified nucleosides, and chemical functions can be incorporated. From a physical point of view, the tension and rotation of dsDNAs can be controlled by placement into the DNA nanostructures. From a topological point of view, the orientations of dsDNAs and various shapes of dsDNAs including Holliday junctions can be incorporated for studies on reaction mechanisms. In this Account, we describe the combination of the DNA origami system and HS-AFM for imaging various biochemical reactions including enzymatic reactions and DNA structural changes. To observe the behaviors and reactions of DNA methyltransferase and DNA repair enzymes, the substrate dsDNAs were incorporated into the cavity of the DNA frame, and the enzymes that bound to the target dsDNA were observed using HS-AFM. DNA recombination was also observed using the recombination substrates and Holliday junction intermediates placed in the DNA frame, and the

  20. Stability considerations and implementation of cantilevers allowing dynamic force microscopy with optimal resolution: the qPlus sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, F. J.; Hembacher, S.; Herz, M.; Schiller, Ch; Mannhart, J.

    2004-02-01

    In frequency modulation atomic force microscopy, the stiffness, quality factor and oscillation amplitude of the cantilever are important parameters. While the first atomic resolution results were obtained with amplitudes of a few hundred ångstrom, it has subsequently been shown that smaller amplitudes should result in a better signal-to-noise ratio and an increased sensitivity to the short-range components of the tip-sample interaction. Stable oscillation at small amplitudes is possible if the product of stiffness and amplitude and the energy stored in the oscillating cantilever are large enough. For small amplitudes, stability can be achieved by using stiff cantilevers. Here, we discuss the physical requirements for small amplitude operation and present design criteria and technical details of the qPlus sensor, a self-sensing cantilever with large stiffness that allows small amplitude operation.

  1. Implementation and characterization of a quartz tuning fork based probe consisted of discrete resonators for dynamic mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Terunobu; de Rooij, Nicolaas F.; Staufer, Urs; Detterbeck, Manfred; Braendlin, Dominik; Waldmeier, Simon; Scheidiger, Martin

    2010-06-01

    The quartz tuning fork based probe {e.g., Akiyama et al. [Appl. Surf. Sci. 210, 18 (2003)]}, termed "A-Probe," is a self-sensing and self-actuating (exciting) probe for dynamic mode atomic force microscope (AFM) operation. It is an oscillatory force sensor consisting of the two discrete resonators. This paper presents the investigations on an improved A-Probe: its batch fabrication and assembly, mounting on an AFM head, electrical setup, characterization, and AFM imaging. The fundamental features of the A-Probe are electrically and optically characterized in "approach-withdraw" experiments. Further investigations include the frequency response of an A-Probe to small mechanical vibrations externally applied to the tip and the effective loading force yielding between the tip and the sample during the periodic contact. Imaging of an electronic chip, a compact disk stamper, carbon nanotubes, and Si beads is demonstrated with this probe at ambient conditions in the so-called frequency modulation mode. A special probe substrate, which can snap on a receptacle fixed on an AFM head, and a special holder including a preamplifier electronic are introduced. We hope that the implementation and characterization of the A-Probe described in this paper will provide hints for new scanning probe techniques.

  2. Super-Resolved Traction Force Microscopy (STFM)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Measuring small forces is a major challenge in cell biology. Here we improve the spatial resolution and accuracy of force reconstruction of the well-established technique of traction force microscopy (TFM) using STED microscopy. The increased spatial resolution of STED-TFM (STFM) allows a greater than 5-fold higher sampling of the forces generated by the cell than conventional TFM, accessing the nano instead of the micron scale. This improvement is highlighted by computer simulations and an activating RBL cell model system. PMID:26923775

  3. Super-Resolved Traction Force Microscopy (STFM).

    PubMed

    Colin-York, Huw; Shrestha, Dilip; Felce, James H; Waithe, Dominic; Moeendarbary, Emad; Davis, Simon J; Eggeling, Christian; Fritzsche, Marco

    2016-04-13

    Measuring small forces is a major challenge in cell biology. Here we improve the spatial resolution and accuracy of force reconstruction of the well-established technique of traction force microscopy (TFM) using STED microscopy. The increased spatial resolution of STED-TFM (STFM) allows a greater than 5-fold higher sampling of the forces generated by the cell than conventional TFM, accessing the nano instead of the micron scale. This improvement is highlighted by computer simulations and an activating RBL cell model system. PMID:26923775

  4. Coffee Cup Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashkenaz, David E.; Hall, W. Paige; Haynes, Christy L.; Hicks, Erin M.; McFarland, Adam D.; Sherry, Leif J.; Stuart, Douglas A.; Wheeler, Korin E.; Yonzon, Chanda R.; Zhao, Jing; Godwin, Hilary A.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use a model created from a coffee cup or cardstock cutout to explore the working principle of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Students manipulate a model of an AFM, using it to examine various objects to retrieve topographic data and then graph and interpret results. The students observe that movement of the AFM…

  5. Robust atomic force microscopy using multiple sensors.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, Mayank; Gorugantu, Ram S; Salapaka, Srinivasa M

    2016-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy typically relies on high-resolution high-bandwidth cantilever deflection measurements based control for imaging and estimating sample topography and properties. More precisely, in amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM), the control effort that regulates deflection amplitude is used as an estimate of sample topography; similarly, contact-mode AFM uses regulation of deflection signal to generate sample topography. In this article, a control design scheme based on an additional feedback mechanism that uses vertical z-piezo motion sensor, which augments the deflection based control scheme, is proposed and evaluated. The proposed scheme exploits the fact that the piezo motion sensor, though inferior to the cantilever deflection signal in terms of resolution and bandwidth, provides information on piezo actuator dynamics that is not easily retrievable from the deflection signal. The augmented design results in significant improvements in imaging bandwidth and robustness, especially in AM-AFM, where the complicated underlying nonlinear dynamics inhibits estimating piezo motions from deflection signals. In AM-AFM experiments, the two-sensor based design demonstrates a substantial improvement in robustness to modeling uncertainties by practically eliminating the peak in the sensitivity plot without affecting the closed-loop bandwidth when compared to a design that does not use the piezo-position sensor based feedback. The contact-mode imaging results, which use proportional-integral controllers for cantilever-deflection regulation, demonstrate improvements in bandwidth and robustness to modeling uncertainties, respectively, by over 30% and 20%. The piezo-sensor based feedback is developed using H∞ control framework. PMID:27587128

  6. Atomic force microscopy characterization of cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Lahiji, Roya R; Xu, Xin; Reifenberger, Ronald; Raman, Arvind; Rudie, Alan; Moon, Robert J

    2010-03-16

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are gaining interest as a "green" nanomaterial with superior mechanical and chemical properties for high-performance nanocomposite materials; however, there is a lack of accurate material property characterization of individual CNCs. Here, a detailed study of the topography, elastic and adhesive properties of individual wood-derived CNCs is performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM experiments involving high-resolution dynamic mode imaging and jump-mode measurements were performed on individual CNCs under ambient conditions with 30% relative humidity (RH) and under a N(2) atmosphere with 0.1% RH. A procedure was also developed to calculate the CNC transverse elastic modulus (E(T)) by comparing the experimental force-distance curves measured on the CNCs with 3D finite element calculations of tip indentation on the CNC. The E(T) of an isolated CNC was estimated to be between 18 and 50 GPa at 0.1% RH; however, the associated crystallographic orientation of the CNC could not be determined. CNC properties were reasonably uniform along the entire CNC length, despite variations along the axis of 3-8 nm in CNC height. The range of RH used in this study was found to have a minimal effect on the CNC geometry, confirming the resistance of the cellulose crystals to water penetration. CNC flexibility was also investigated by using the AFM tip as a nanomanipulator. PMID:20055370

  7. The Forces at Play in Optical Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocious, Jordan

    Optical force microscopy is a novel technique where mechanical detection with a cantilevered probe replaces the detection of photons to investigate optically induced processes and states. A theoretical and experimental analysis is performed here of the forces present in optical force microscopy operated in tapping mode, which reveals two dominant optically induced forces, the gradient force and the scattering force. Force-distance curves are reconstructed from experimental amplitude and phase information for glass, gold nanowires and molecular clusters of silicon naphtalocyanine samples. The scattering force is shown to be insensitive to both nano-scale tip-sample distances and sample polarizability and is dependent on the form of the tip. The gradient force demonstrates a z-4 tip-sample distance dependence, localized to a few nanometers, and is strongly dependent on the polarizability of the sample which enables spectroscopic imaging through force detection. The different distance-dependence and polarizability-dependence of the gradient and scattering forces give rise to a complex force-distance curve which determines imaging contrast along with the cantilever set-point, knowledge of which is essential for image interpretation.

  8. System analysis of force feedback microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Mario S.; Costa, Luca; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2014-02-01

    It was shown recently that the Force Feedback Microscope (FFM) can avoid the jump-to-contact in Atomic force Microscopy even when the cantilevers used are very soft, thus increasing force resolution. In this letter, we explore theoretical aspects of the associated real time control of the tip position. We take into account lever parameters such as the lever characteristics in its environment, spring constant, mass, dissipation coefficient, and the operating conditions such as controller gains and interaction force. We show how the controller parameters are determined so that the FFM functions at its best and estimate the bandwidth of the system under these conditions.

  9. System analysis of force feedback microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Mario S.; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2014-02-07

    It was shown recently that the Force Feedback Microscope (FFM) can avoid the jump-to-contact in Atomic force Microscopy even when the cantilevers used are very soft, thus increasing force resolution. In this letter, we explore theoretical aspects of the associated real time control of the tip position. We take into account lever parameters such as the lever characteristics in its environment, spring constant, mass, dissipation coefficient, and the operating conditions such as controller gains and interaction force. We show how the controller parameters are determined so that the FFM functions at its best and estimate the bandwidth of the system under these conditions.

  10. Waveguide ultrasonic force microscopy at 60 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, K.; Kolosov, O. V.; Briggs, G. A. D.; Wright, O. B.

    2000-04-01

    We present measurements using ultrasonic force microscopy at ˜60 MHz, operating in a "waveguide" mode in which the cantilever base is vibrated and flexural ultrasonic vibrations are launched down the cantilever without exciting any particular cantilever resonance. The nonlinearity of the tip-sample force-distance curve allows the conversion of a modulated ultrasonic frequency into a low frequency vibration of the cantilever, detected in a conventional atomic force microscope. Images of Ge quantum dots on a Si substrate show contrast related to elasticity and adhesion differences, and this is interpreted with the Johnson-Kendall-Roberts model of the force-distance curve.

  11. Atomic force microscopy combined with optical tweezers (AFM/OT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierini, F.; Zembrzycki, K.; Nakielski, P.; Pawłowska, S.; Kowalewski, T. A.

    2016-02-01

    The role of mechanical properties is essential to understand molecular, biological materials, and nanostructures dynamics and interaction processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the most commonly used method of direct force evaluation, but due to its technical limitations this single probe technique is unable to detect forces with femtonewton resolution. In this paper we present the development of a combined atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers (AFM/OT) instrument. The focused laser beam, on which optical tweezers are based, provides us with the ability to manipulate small dielectric objects and to use it as a high spatial and temporal resolution displacement and force sensor in the same AFM scanning zone. We demonstrate the possibility to develop a combined instrument with high potential in nanomechanics, molecules manipulation and biological studies. AFM/OT equipment is described and characterized by studying the ability to trap dielectric objects and quantifying the detectable and applicable forces. Finally, optical tweezers calibration methods and instrument applications are given.

  12. Atomic Force Microscopy of Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushiki, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Susumu; Hitomi, Jiro; Ogura, Shigeaki; Umemoto, Takeshi; Shigeno, Masatsugu

    2000-06-01

    This paper is a review of our results of the application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to the three-dimensional observation of living cells. First, we showed AFM images of living cultured cells in fluid. Contact mode AFM of living cells provided precise information on the shape of cellular processes (such as spike-like processes or lamellipodia) at the cellular margin. The contour of cytoskeletal elements just beneath the cell membrane was also clearly observable on the upper surface of the cells. Secondly, we showed the data on the discrepancy between the AFM images of living cells and fixed cells. These findings were useful for evaluating AFM images of living cells. Finally, we described the time-lapse AFM of living cells. A fluid chamber system enabled us to obtain AFM images of living cells for over 1 h at time intervals of 2-4 min. A series of these AFM images were useful for examining the movements of cellular processes in relation to subcellular cytoskeletal elements. Time-lapse movies produced by sequential AFM images also gave a realistic view of the cellular dynamics.

  13. Stochastic noise in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Labuda, Aleksander; Lysy, Martin; Paul, William; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter; Bennewitz, Roland; Sutton, Mark

    2012-09-01

    Having reached the quantum and thermodynamic limits of detection, atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments are routinely being performed at the fundamental limit of signal to noise. A critical understanding of the statistical properties of noise leads to more accurate interpretation of data, optimization of experimental protocols, advancements in instrumentation, and new measurement techniques. Furthermore, accurate simulation of cantilever dynamics requires knowledge of stochastic behavior of the system, as stochastic noise may exceed the deterministic signals of interest, and even dominate the outcome of an experiment. In this article, the power spectral density (PSD), used to quantify stationary stochastic processes, is introduced in the context of a thorough noise analysis of the light source used to detect cantilever deflections. The statistical properties of PSDs are then outlined for various stationary, nonstationary, and deterministic noise sources in the context of AFM experiments. Following these developments, a method for integrating PSDs to provide an accurate standard deviation of linear measurements is described. Lastly, a method for simulating stochastic Gaussian noise from any arbitrary power spectral density is presented. The result demonstrates that mechanical vibrations of the AFM can cause a logarithmic velocity dependence of friction and induce multiple slip events in the atomic stick-slip process, as well as predicts an artifactual temperature dependence of friction measured by AFM. PMID:23030863

  14. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy by Dissipative Electrostatic Force Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Yoichi; Topple, Jessica; Schumacher, Zeno; Grutter, Peter

    2015-11-01

    We report an experimental technique for Kelvin probe force microscopy using the dissipation signal of frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy for bias-voltage feedback. It features a simple implementation and faster scanning as it requires no low-frequency modulation. The dissipation is caused by the oscillating electrostatic force that is coherent with the tip oscillation, which is induced by a sinusoidally oscillating voltage applied between the tip and sample. We analyze the effect of the phase of the oscillating force on the frequency shift and dissipation and found that the relative phase of 90° that causes only the dissipation is the most appropriate for Kelvin-probe-force-microscopy measurements. The present technique requires a significantly smaller ac-voltage amplitude by virtue of enhanced force detection due to the resonance enhancement and the use of fundamental flexural-mode oscillation for electrostatic force detection. This feature will be of great importance in the electrical characterizations of technically relevant materials whose electrical properties are influenced by the externally applied electric field as is the case in semiconductor electronic devices.

  15. Lateral-deflection-controlled friction force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Kenji; Hamaoka, Satoshi; Shikida, Mitsuhiro; Itoh, Shintaro; Zhang, Hedong

    2014-08-01

    Lateral-deflection-controlled dual-axis friction force microscopy (FFM) is presented. In this method, an electrostatic force generated with a probe-incorporated micro-actuator compensates for friction force in real time during probe scanning using feedback control. This equivalently large rigidity can eliminate apparent boundary width and lateral snap-in, which are caused by lateral probe deflection. The method can evolve FFM as a method for quantifying local frictional properties on the micro/nanometer-scale by overcoming essential problems to dual-axis FFM.

  16. Sensor for direct measurement of interaction forces in probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degertekin, F. L.; Onaran, A. G.; Balantekin, M.; Lee, W.; Hall, N. A.; Quate, C. F.

    2005-11-01

    We introduce a sensor for direct measurement of tip-sample interaction forces in probe microscopy. The sensor uses a micromachined membrane structure built on a transparent substrate with an integrated diffraction grating for optical interferometric detection, and a built-in electrostatic actuator. To demonstrate our concept for this sensor, we measured the force curves between an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever tip and a micromachined aluminum sensor membrane built on a quartz substrate. We also measured transient interaction forces exerted on the sensor membrane during each cycle of the vibrating AFM cantilever. These agree well with the temporal response of the sensor to a short force pulse applied by our integrated electrostatic actuator. With the addition of an integrated tip, this structure may be used for scanning probe microscopy with a bandwidth limited by the membrane dynamics.

  17. High-resolution high-speed dynamic mechanical spectroscopy of cells and other soft materials with the help of atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dokukin, M.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS), which allows measuring frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties, is important to study soft materials, tissues, biomaterials, polymers. However, the existing DMS techniques (nanoindentation) have limited resolution when used on soft materials, preventing them from being used to study mechanics at the nanoscale. The nanoindenters are not capable of measuring cells, nanointerfaces of composite materials. Here we present a highly accurate DMS modality, which is a combination of three different methods: quantitative nanoindentation (nanoDMA), gentle force and fast response of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy. This new spectroscopy (which we suggest to call FT-nanoDMA) is fast and sensitive enough to allow DMS imaging of nanointerfaces, single cells, while attaining about 100x improvements on polymers in both spatial (to 10–70 nm) and temporal resolution (to 0.7s/pixel) compared to the current art. Multiple frequencies are measured simultaneously. The use of 10 frequencies are demonstrated here (up to 300 Hz which is a rather relevant range for biological materials and polymers, in both ambient conditions and liquid). The method is quantitatively verified on known polymers and demonstrated on cells and polymers blends. Analysis shows that FT-nanoDMA is highly quantitative. The FT-nanoDMA spectroscopy can easily be implemented in the existing AFMs. PMID:26218346

  18. Gradient and scattering forces in photoinduced force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahng, Junghoon; Brocious, Jordan; Fishman, Dmitry A.; Huang, Fei; Li, Xiaowei; Tamma, Venkata Ananth; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar; Potma, Eric Olaf

    2014-10-01

    A theoretical and experimental analysis of the dominant forces measured in photoinduced force microscopy is presented. It is shown that when operated in the noncontact and soft-contact modes, the microscope is sensitive to the optically induced gradient force (Fg) and the scattering force (Fsc). The reconstructed force-distance curve reveals a tip-dependent scattering force in the 30-60 pN range. Whereas the scattering force is virtually insensitive to the nanoscopic tip-sample distance, the gradient force shows a z-4 dependence and is manifest only for tip-sample distances of a few nm. Measurements on glass, gold nanowires, and molecular clusters of silicon naphtalocyanine confirm that the gradient force is strongly dependent on the polarizability of the sample, enabling spectroscopic imaging through force detection. The nearly constant Fsc and the spatially dependent Fg give rise to a complex force-distance curve, which varies from point to point in the specimen and dictates the image contrast observed for a given set point of the cantilevered tip.

  19. Investigation of the depletion layer by scanning capacitance force microscopy with Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uruma, Takeshi; Satoh, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hidekazu

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a scanning probe microscope (SPM) that combines atomic force microscopy (AFM) with both Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM — to measure the surface potential) and scanning capacitance force microscopy (SCFM — to measure the differential capacitance). The surface physical characteristics of a commercial Si Schottky barrier diode (Si-SBD), with and without an applied reverse bias, were measured over the same area by our AFM/KFM/SCFM system. We thus investigated the discrete power device by calculating the depletion-layer width and drawing an energy-band diagram.

  20. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH).

  1. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Allison, David P; Mortensen, Ninell P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH). PMID:20672388

  2. Real-time dynamic adsorption processes of cytochrome c on an electrode observed through electrochemical high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Kouta; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Watanabe, Hiroki; Ishida, Takuya; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of dynamic processes of proteins on the electrode surface could enhance the efficiency of bioelectronics development and therefore it is crucial to gain information regarding both physical adsorption of proteins onto the electrode and its electrochemical property in real-time. We combined high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) with electrochemical device for simultaneous observation of the surface topography and electron transfer of redox proteins on an electrode. Direct electron transfer of cytochrome c (cyt c) adsorbed on a self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed electrode is very attractive subject in bioelectrochemistry. This paper reports a real-time visualization of cyt c adsorption processes on an 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid-modified Au electrode together with simultaneous electrochemical measurements. Adsorbing cyt c molecules were observed on a subsecond time resolution simultaneously with increasing redox currents from cyt c using EC-HS-AFM. The root mean square roughness (RRMS) from the AFM images and the number of the electrochemically active cyt c molecules adsorbed onto the electrode (Γ) simultaneously increased in positive cooperativity. Cyt c molecules were fully adsorbed on the electrode in the AFM images when the peak currents were steady. This use of electrochemical HS-AFM significantly facilitates understanding of dynamic behavior of biomolecules on the electrode interface and contributes to the further development of bioelectronics. PMID:25671430

  3. Real-Time Dynamic Adsorption Processes of Cytochrome c on an Electrode Observed through Electrochemical High-Speed Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Kouta; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Watanabe, Hiroki; Ishida, Takuya; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of dynamic processes of proteins on the electrode surface could enhance the efficiency of bioelectronics development and therefore it is crucial to gain information regarding both physical adsorption of proteins onto the electrode and its electrochemical property in real-time. We combined high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) with electrochemical device for simultaneous observation of the surface topography and electron transfer of redox proteins on an electrode. Direct electron transfer of cytochrome c (cyt c) adsorbed on a self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed electrode is very attractive subject in bioelectrochemistry. This paper reports a real-time visualization of cyt c adsorption processes on an 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid-modified Au electrode together with simultaneous electrochemical measurements. Adsorbing cyt c molecules were observed on a subsecond time resolution simultaneously with increasing redox currents from cyt c using EC-HS-AFM. The root mean square roughness (RRMS) from the AFM images and the number of the electrochemically active cyt c molecules adsorbed onto the electrode (Γ) simultaneously increased in positive cooperativity. Cyt c molecules were fully adsorbed on the electrode in the AFM images when the peak currents were steady. This use of electrochemical HS-AFM significantly facilitates understanding of dynamic behavior of biomolecules on the electrode interface and contributes to the further development of bioelectronics. PMID:25671430

  4. Bacterial adhesion force quantification by fluidic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2015-02-01

    Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many cells. The contact time and setpoint dependence of the adhesion forces of E. coli and Streptococcus pyogenes, as well as the sequential detachment of bacteria out of a chain, are shown, revealing distinct force patterns in the detachment curves. This study demonstrates the potential of the FluidFM technology for quantitative bacterial adhesion measurements of cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions that are relevant in biofilms and infection biology.Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many

  5. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Atsushi; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-05-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollable drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed. PMID:27250433

  6. Resonance response of scanning force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.Y.; Warmack, R.J.; Thundat, T.; Allison, D.P. ); Huang, A. )

    1994-08-01

    A variational method is used to calculate the deflection and the fundamental and harmonic resonance frequencies of commercial V-shaped and rectangular atomic force microscopy cantilevers. The effective mass of V-shaped cantilevers is roughly half that calculated for the equivalent rectangular cantilevers. Damping by environmental gases, including air, nitrogen, argon, and helium, affects the frequency of maximum response and to a much greater degree the quality factor [ital Q]. Helium has the lowest viscosity, resulting in the highest [ital Q], and thus provides the best sensitivity in noncontact force microscopy. Damping in liquids is dominated by an increase in effective mass of the cantilever due to an added mass of the liquid being dragged with that cantilever.

  7. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  8. Low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wago, Koichi

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a technique whose goal is to combine the three-dimensional, chemically specific imaging capability of magnetic resonance imaging with the atomic-scale spatial resolution of scanning force microscopy. MRFM relies on the detection of small oscillatory magnetic forces between spins in the sample and a magnetic tip, using a micromechanical cantilever. The force resolution is a key issue for successfully operating MRFM experiments. Operating at low temperature improves the force resolution because of the reduced thermal energy and increased mechanical Q of the cantilever. The spin polarization is also enhanced at low temperature, leading to the improved magnetic resonance sensitivity for ensemble spin samples. A low-temperature magnetic resonance force detection apparatus was built and used to demonstrate a force resolution of 8×10sp{-17}\\ N/sqrt{Hz} at 6 K with a commercial single-crystal silicon cantilever. Both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were detected in micron-size samples. Force-detection technique was also applied to a wide range of magnetic resonance measurements, including inversion recovery, nutation, and spin echoes. Force-detected EPR spectra of phosphorus-doped silicon revealed hyperfine splitting, illustrating the possibility of using the MRFM technique for spectroscopic purposes. An improved low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscope was also built, incorporating a magnetic tip mounted directly on the cantilever. This allows a much wider variety of samples to be investigated and greatly improves the convenience of the technique. Using the improved microscope, three-dimensional EPR imaging of diphenylpicrylhydrazil (DPPH) particles was accomplished by scanning the sample in two dimensions while stepping an external field. The EPR force map showed a broad response reflecting the size and shape of the sample, allowing a three-dimensional real

  9. Force reconstruction from tapping mode force microscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payam, Amir F.; Martin-Jimenez, Daniel; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    Fast, accurate, and robust nanomechanical measurements are intensely studied in materials science, applied physics, and molecular biology. Amplitude modulation force microscopy (tapping mode) is the most established nanoscale characterization technique of surfaces for air and liquid environments. However, its quantitative capabilities lag behind its high spatial resolution and robustness. We develop a general method to transform the observables into quantitative force measurements. The force reconstruction algorithm has been deduced on the assumption that the observables (amplitude and phase shift) are slowly varying functions of the tip-surface separation. The accuracy and applicability of the method is validated by numerical simulations and experiments. The method is valid for liquid and air environments, small and large free amplitudes, compliant and rigid materials, and conservative and non-conservative forces.

  10. First Steps in the Aggregation Process of Copolymers Based on Thymine Monomers: Characterization by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garay, A Sergio; Rodrigues, Daniel E; Fuselli, Antonela; Martino, Debora M; Passeggi, Mario C G

    2016-04-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamic simulations were performed to study the structure of isolated VBT-VBA (vinylbenzylthymine-vinylbenzyltriethylammonium chloride) copolymer chains in water at different monomeric species ratios (1:1 and 1:4). The geometric parameters of the structure that the copolymers form in equilibrium together with the basic interactions that stabilize them were determined. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of dried diluted concentrations of the two copolymers onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrates were carried out to study their aggregation arrangement. The experiments show that both copolymers arrange in fiber-like structures. Comparing the diameters predicted by the simulation results and those obtained by AFM, it can be concluded that individual copolymers arrange in bunches of two chains, stabilized by contra-ions-copolymer interactions for the 1:1 copolymerization ratio at the ionic strength of our samples. In contrast, for the 1:4 system the individual copolymer chains do not aggregate in bunches. These results remark the relevance of the copolymerization ratio and ionic strength of the solvent in the mesoscopic structure of these materials. PMID:26991880

  11. Atomic structure of the ultrathin alumina on NiAl(110) and its antiphase domain boundaries as seen by frequency modulation dynamic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, G. H.; König, T.; Rust, H.-P.; Heyde, M.; Freund, H.-J.

    2009-09-01

    Atomically resolved frequency modulation dynamic force microscopy (FM-DFM) images of the ultrathin alumina film on NiAl(110) are presented. Images show in detail the surface unit cell, both types of antiphase domain boundaries (translation-related domain boundaries) and lateral displacements within these types of boundaries. Due to the loss of translational symmetry at the boundary, structures of even increased complexity are revealed. Lateral models for these local arrangements have been created on the basis of adjusted unit cell structures. FM-DFM produces on this surface a contrast of extraordinarily high surface sensitivity. It matches the topmost oxygen layer even with respect to topographic height, which adds the third dimension to the analysis. With this the antiphase domain boundaries are shown to be shallow depressions. Furthermore, new symmetry aspects have been found in the topography of these boundaries. The local structure of the film surface shows evidence of substrate influence in its topography and the domain boundary network shows indications that its growth behaviour is affected by this interaction in its very details beyond sheer appearance. Presented results can be linked to the relation between growth and structure of an emerging class of structurally related ultrathin alumina films.

  12. Manipulation of gold colloidal nanoparticles with atomic force microscopy in dynamic mode: influence of particle–substrate chemistry and morphology, and of operating conditions

    PubMed Central

    Darwich, Samer; Rao, Akshata; Gnecco, Enrico; Jayaraman, Shrisudersan; Haidara, Hamidou

    2011-01-01

    Summary One key component in the assembly of nanoparticles is their precise positioning to enable the creation of new complex nano-objects. Controlling the nanoscale interactions is crucial for the prediction and understanding of the behaviour of nanoparticles (NPs) during their assembly. In the present work, we have manipulated bare and functionalized gold nanoparticles on flat and patterned silicon and silicon coated substrates with dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM). Under ambient conditions, the particles adhere to silicon until a critical drive amplitude is reached by oscillations of the probing tip. Beyond that threshold, the particles start to follow different directions, depending on their geometry, size and adhesion to the substrate. Higher and respectively, lower mobility was observed when the gold particles were coated with methyl (–CH3) and hydroxyl (–OH) terminated thiol groups. This major result suggests that the adhesion of the particles to the substrate is strongly reduced by the presence of hydrophobic interfaces. The influence of critical parameters on the manipulation was investigated and discussed viz. the shape, size and grafting of the NPs, as well as the surface chemistry and the patterning of the substrate, and finally the operating conditions (temperature, humidity and scan velocity). Whereas the operating conditions and substrate structure are shown to have a strong effect on the mobility of the particles, we did not find any differences when manipulating ordered vs random distributed particles. PMID:21977418

  13. Manipulation of gold colloidal nanoparticles with atomic force microscopy in dynamic mode: influence of particle-substrate chemistry and morphology, and of operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Darwich, Samer; Mougin, Karine; Rao, Akshata; Gnecco, Enrico; Jayaraman, Shrisudersan; Haidara, Hamidou

    2011-01-01

    One key component in the assembly of nanoparticles is their precise positioning to enable the creation of new complex nano-objects. Controlling the nanoscale interactions is crucial for the prediction and understanding of the behaviour of nanoparticles (NPs) during their assembly. In the present work, we have manipulated bare and functionalized gold nanoparticles on flat and patterned silicon and silicon coated substrates with dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM). Under ambient conditions, the particles adhere to silicon until a critical drive amplitude is reached by oscillations of the probing tip. Beyond that threshold, the particles start to follow different directions, depending on their geometry, size and adhesion to the substrate. Higher and respectively, lower mobility was observed when the gold particles were coated with methyl (-CH(3)) and hydroxyl (-OH) terminated thiol groups. This major result suggests that the adhesion of the particles to the substrate is strongly reduced by the presence of hydrophobic interfaces. The influence of critical parameters on the manipulation was investigated and discussed viz. the shape, size and grafting of the NPs, as well as the surface chemistry and the patterning of the substrate, and finally the operating conditions (temperature, humidity and scan velocity). Whereas the operating conditions and substrate structure are shown to have a strong effect on the mobility of the particles, we did not find any differences when manipulating ordered vs random distributed particles. PMID:21977418

  14. Dynamic Elastic Modulus of Porcine Articular Cartilage Determined at Two Different Levels of Tissue Organization by Indentation-Type Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stolz, Martin; Raiteri, Roberto; Daniels, A. U.; VanLandingham, Mark R.; Baschong, Werner; Aebi, Ueli

    2004-01-01

    Cartilage stiffness was measured ex vivo at the micrometer and nanometer scales to explore structure-mechanical property relationships at smaller scales than has been done previously. A method was developed to measure the dynamic elastic modulus, |E*|, in compression by indentation-type atomic force microscopy (IT AFM). Spherical indenter tips (radius = ∼2.5 μm) and sharp pyramidal tips (radius = ∼20 nm) were employed to probe micrometer-scale and nanometer-scale response, respectively. |E*| values were obtained at 3 Hz from 1024 unloading response curves recorded at a given location on subsurface cartilage from porcine femoral condyles. With the microsphere tips, the average modulus was ∼2.6 MPa, in agreement with available millimeter-scale data, whereas with the sharp pyramidal tips, it was typically 100-fold lower. In contrast to cartilage, measurements made on agarose gels, a much more molecularly amorphous biomaterial, resulted in the same average modulus for both indentation tips. From results of AFM imaging of cartilage, the micrometer-scale spherical tips resolved no fine structure except some chondrocytes, whereas the nanometer-scale pyramidal tips resolved individual collagen fibers and their 67-nm axial repeat distance. These results suggest that the spherical AFM tip is large enough to measure the aggregate dynamic elastic modulus of cartilage, whereas the sharp AFM tip depicts the elastic properties of its fine structure. Additional measurements of cartilage stiffness following enzyme action revealed that elastase digestion of the collagen moiety lowered the modulus at the micrometer scale. In contrast, digestion of the proteoglycans moiety by cathepsin D had little effect on |E*| at the micrometer scale, but yielded a clear stiffening at the nanometer scale. Thus, cartilage compressive stiffness is different at the nanometer scale compared to the overall structural stiffness measured at the micrometer and larger scales because of the fine

  15. High-Resolution Traction Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton and transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through discrete, integrin-based protein assemblies, that is, focal adhesions, are critical to developmental morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, as well as disease progression in cancer. However, quantitative mapping of these forces has been difficult since there has been no experimental technique to visualize nanonewton forces at submicrometer spatial resolution. Here, we provide detailed protocols for measuring cellular forces exerted on two-dimensional elastic substrates with a high-resolution traction force microscopy (TFM) method. We describe fabrication of polyacrylamide substrates labeled with multiple colors of fiducial markers, functionalization of the substrates with ECM proteins, setting up the experiment, and imaging procedures. In addition, we provide the theoretical background of traction reconstruction and experimental considerations important to design a high-resolution TFM experiment. We describe the implementation of a new algorithm for processing of images of fiducial markers that are taken below the surface of the substrate, which significantly improves data quality. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm and explain how to choose a regularization parameter for suppression of the measurement error. A brief discussion of different ways to visualize and analyze the results serves to illustrate possible uses of high-resolution TFM in biomedical research. PMID:24974038

  16. High-speed atomic force microscopy coming of age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Toshio

    2012-02-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) is now materialized. It allows direct visualization of dynamic structural changes and dynamic processes of functioning biological molecules in physiological solutions, at high spatiotemporal resolution. Dynamic molecular events unselectively appear in detail in an AFM movie, facilitating our understanding of how biological molecules operate to function. This review describes a historical overview of technical development towards HS-AFM, summarizes elementary devices and techniques used in the current HS-AFM, and then highlights recent imaging studies. Finally, future challenges of HS-AFM studies are briefly discussed.

  17. High-speed atomic force microscopy coming of age.

    PubMed

    Ando, Toshio

    2012-02-17

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) is now materialized. It allows direct visualization of dynamic structural changes and dynamic processes of functioning biological molecules in physiological solutions, at high spatiotemporal resolution. Dynamic molecular events unselectively appear in detail in an AFM movie, facilitating our understanding of how biological molecules operate to function. This review describes a historical overview of technical development towards HS-AFM, summarizes elementary devices and techniques used in the current HS-AFM, and then highlights recent imaging studies. Finally, future challenges of HS-AFM studies are briefly discussed. PMID:22248867

  18. Periodicity in bimodal atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Chia-Yun; Santos, Sergio Chiesa, Matteo; Barcons, Victor

    2015-07-28

    Periodicity is fundamental for quantification and the application of conservation principles of many important systems. Here, we discuss periodicity in the context of bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM). The relationship between the excited frequencies is shown to affect and control both experimental observables and the main expressions quantified via these observables, i.e., virial and energy transfer expressions, which form the basis of the bimodal AFM theory. The presence of a fundamental frequency further simplifies the theory and leads to close form solutions. Predictions are verified via numerical integration of the equation of motion and experimentally on a mica surface.

  19. Atomic Force Microscopy of Biological Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Frederix, Patrick L.T.M.; Bosshart, Patrick D.; Engel, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an ideal method to study the surface topography of biological membranes. It allows membranes that are adsorbed to flat solid supports to be raster-scanned in physiological solutions with an atomically sharp tip. Therefore, AFM is capable of observing biological molecular machines at work. In addition, the tip can be tethered to the end of a single membrane protein, and forces acting on the tip upon its retraction indicate barriers that occur during the process of protein unfolding. Here we discuss the fundamental limitations of AFM determined by the properties of cantilevers, present aspects of sample preparation, and review results achieved on reconstituted and native biological membranes. PMID:19167286

  20. Frequency Modulation Atomic Force Microscopy in Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kei; Yamada, Hirofumi

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) using frequency modulation (FM) detection has been widely used for the atomic-scale investigations of various materials. However, high-resolution imaging in liquids by FM-AFM is severely deteriorated by the extreme reduction of the Q-factor due to the hydrodynamic interaction between the cantilever and the liquid. Recently, the use of the small amplitude mode and the large noise reduction in the cantilever deflection sensor brought great progress in FM-AFM imaging in liquids. In this chapter viscous damping of the cantilever and the electric double layer force are discussed in detail. Following the detailed analysis of the frequency noise in FM-AFM, instrumentation of the optical beam deflection sensor for FM-AFM in liquid environments is described. Finally high-resolution FM-AFM images of muscovite mica, purple membranes, and isolated protein molecules in liquids are presented.

  1. Ultrastable Atomic Force Microscopy for Biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churnside, Allison B.

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a multifunctional workhorse of nanoscience and molecular biophysics, but instrumental drift remains a critical issue that limits the precision and duration of experiments. We have significantly reduced the two most important types of drift: in position and in force. The first, position drift, is defined as uncontrolled motion between the tip and the sample, which occurs in all three dimensions. By scattering a laser off the apex of a commercial AFM tip, we locally measured and thereby actively controlled its three-dimensional position above a sample surface to <0.4 A (Deltaf = 0.01--10 Hz) in air at room temperature. With this enhanced stability, we demonstrated atomic-scale (˜1 A) tip-sample stability and registration over tens of minutes with a series of AFM images. The second type of drift is force drift. We found that the primary source of force drift for a popular class of soft cantilevers is their gold coating, even though they are coated on both sides to minimize drift. When the gold coating was removed through a simple chemical etch, this drift in deflection was reduced by more than an order of magnitude over the first 2 hours after wetting the tip. Removing the gold also led to ˜ 10-fold reduction in reflected light, yet short-term (0.1--10 s) force precision improved. With both position and force drift greatly reduced, the utility of the AFM is enhanced. These improvements led to several new AFM abilities, including a five-fold increase in the image signal-to-noise ratio; tip-registered, label-free optical imaging; registered tip return to a particular point on the sample; and dual-detection force spectroscopy, which enables a new extension clamp mode. We have applied these abilities to folding of both membrane and soluble proteins. In principle, the techniques we describe can be fully incorporated into many types of scanning probe microscopy, making this work a general improvement to scanning probe techniques.

  2. Chemical identification of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Pou, Pablo; Abe, Masayuki; Jelinek, Pavel; Pérez, Rubén; Morita, Seizo; Custance, Oscar

    2007-03-01

    Scanning probe microscopy is a versatile and powerful method that uses sharp tips to image, measure and manipulate matter at surfaces with atomic resolution. At cryogenic temperatures, scanning probe microscopy can even provide electron tunnelling spectra that serve as fingerprints of the vibrational properties of adsorbed molecules and of the electronic properties of magnetic impurity atoms, thereby allowing chemical identification. But in many instances, and particularly for insulating systems, determining the exact chemical composition of surfaces or nanostructures remains a considerable challenge. In principle, dynamic force microscopy should make it possible to overcome this problem: it can image insulator, semiconductor and metal surfaces with true atomic resolution, by detecting and precisely measuring the short-range forces that arise with the onset of chemical bonding between the tip and surface atoms and that depend sensitively on the chemical identity of the atoms involved. Here we report precise measurements of such short-range chemical forces, and show that their dependence on the force microscope tip used can be overcome through a normalization procedure. This allows us to use the chemical force measurements as the basis for atomic recognition, even at room temperature. We illustrate the performance of this approach by imaging the surface of a particularly challenging alloy system and successfully identifying the three constituent atomic species silicon, tin and lead, even though these exhibit very similar chemical properties and identical surface position preferences that render any discrimination attempt based on topographic measurements impossible. PMID:17330040

  3. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-02-20

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  4. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-05-30

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  5. Atomic Force Microscopy for Soil Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    gazze, andrea; doerr, stefan; dudley, ed; hallin, ingrid; matthews, peter; quinn, gerry; van keulen, geertje; francis, lewis

    2016-04-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a high-resolution surface-sensitive technique, which provides 3-dimensional topographical information and material properties of both stiff and soft samples in their natural environments. Traditionally AFM has been applied to samples with low roughness: hence its use for soil analysis has been very limited so far. Here we report the optimization settings required for a standardization of high-resolution and artefact-free analysis of natural soil with AFM: soil immobilization, AFM probe selection, artefact recognition and minimization. Beyond topography, AFM can be used in a spectroscopic mode to evaluate nanomechanical properties, such as soil viscosity, stiffness, and deformation. In this regards, Bruker PeakForce-Quantitative NanoMechanical (QNM) AFM provides a fast and convenient way to extract physical properties from AFM force curves in real-time to obtain soil nanomechanical properties. Here we show for the first time the ability of AFM to describe the topography of natural soil at nanometre resolution, with observation of micro-components, such as clays, and of nano-structures, possibly of biotic origin, the visualization of which would prove difficult with other instrumentations. Finally, nanomechanical profiling has been applied to different wettability states in soil and the respective physical patterns are discussed.

  6. Investigating cell mechanics with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Haase, Kristina; Pelling, Andrew E

    2015-03-01

    Transmission of mechanical force is crucial for normal cell development and functioning. However, the process of mechanotransduction cannot be studied in isolation from cell mechanics. Thus, in order to understand how cells 'feel', we must first understand how they deform and recover from physical perturbations. Owing to its versatility, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a popular tool to study intrinsic cellular mechanical properties. Used to directly manipulate and examine whole and subcellular reactions, AFM allows for top-down and reconstitutive approaches to mechanical characterization. These studies show that the responses of cells and their components are complex, and largely depend on the magnitude and time scale of loading. In this review, we generally describe the mechanotransductive process through discussion of well-known mechanosensors. We then focus on discussion of recent examples where AFM is used to specifically probe the elastic and inelastic responses of single cells undergoing deformation. We present a brief overview of classical and current models often used to characterize observed cellular phenomena in response to force. Both simple mechanistic models and complex nonlinear models have been used to describe the observed cellular behaviours, however a unifying description of cell mechanics has not yet been resolved. PMID:25589563

  7. Investigating cell mechanics with atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Kristina; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of mechanical force is crucial for normal cell development and functioning. However, the process of mechanotransduction cannot be studied in isolation from cell mechanics. Thus, in order to understand how cells ‘feel’, we must first understand how they deform and recover from physical perturbations. Owing to its versatility, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a popular tool to study intrinsic cellular mechanical properties. Used to directly manipulate and examine whole and subcellular reactions, AFM allows for top-down and reconstitutive approaches to mechanical characterization. These studies show that the responses of cells and their components are complex, and largely depend on the magnitude and time scale of loading. In this review, we generally describe the mechanotransductive process through discussion of well-known mechanosensors. We then focus on discussion of recent examples where AFM is used to specifically probe the elastic and inelastic responses of single cells undergoing deformation. We present a brief overview of classical and current models often used to characterize observed cellular phenomena in response to force. Both simple mechanistic models and complex nonlinear models have been used to describe the observed cellular behaviours, however a unifying description of cell mechanics has not yet been resolved. PMID:25589563

  8. Tip characterizer for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Toshiyuki; Ichimura, Shingo

    2006-10-01

    A tip characterizer for atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed based on the fabrication of multilayer thin films. Comb-shaped line and space (LS) and wedge-shaped knife-edge structures were fabricated on a GaAs substrate. GaAs /InGaP superlattices were used to control the width of the structures precisely, and selective chemical etching was used to form sharp edges on the nanostructures. The minimum size of the LS structure was designed to be 10nm, and the radius of the knife edge was less than 5nm. These nanostructures were used as a well-defined tip characterizer to measure the shape of a tip on a cantilever from line profiles of AFM images.

  9. Recent advances in magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koblischka, M R; Hartmann, U

    2003-01-01

    During the past ten years magnetic force microscopy (MFM) has become probably the most powerful general-purpose method for magnetic imaging. MFM can be applied under various environmental conditions and requires only little sample preparation. Basic research on magnetic materials as well as the mentioned industrial applications create an increasing demand for high-resolution magnetic imaging methods. This contribution will review some new concepts which have been realized in the field of advanced probe preparation, based on electron beam methods in order to improve the spatial resolution beyond 100nm. It is shown that the advanced probes allow high-resolution imaging of magnetic fine structures within thin film permalloy elements exhibiting a complicated cooperative magnetization reversal process. These investigations are of importance for various concepts underlying modern magnetic data storage developments. Furthermore, we present some developments of MFM to suit the needs of the magnetic recording industry. PMID:12801662

  10. Atomic Force Microscopy for DNA SNP Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbusa, Ugo; Ierardi, Vincenzo

    The knowledge of the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome greatly contributes to better comprehension of the relation between genetic factors and diseases. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA in different individuals reveals positions where variations that involve individual base substitutions can occur. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms are highly abundant and can have different consequences at phenotypic level. Several attempts were made to apply atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect and map SNP sites in DNA strands. The most promising approach is the study of DNA mutations producing heteroduplex DNA strands and identifying the mismatches by means of a protein that labels the mismatches. MutS is a protein that is part of a well-known complex of mismatch repair, which initiates the process of repairing when the MutS binds to the mismatched DNA filament. The position of MutS on the DNA filament can be easily recorded by means of AFM imaging.

  11. High-frequency multimodal atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nievergelt, Adrian P; Adams, Jonathan D; Odermatt, Pascal D

    2014-01-01

    Summary Multifrequency atomic force microscopy imaging has been recently demonstrated as a powerful technique for quickly obtaining information about the mechanical properties of a sample. Combining this development with recent gains in imaging speed through small cantilevers holds the promise of a convenient, high-speed method for obtaining nanoscale topography as well as mechanical properties. Nevertheless, instrument bandwidth limitations on cantilever excitation and readout have restricted the ability of multifrequency techniques to fully benefit from small cantilevers. We present an approach for cantilever excitation and deflection readout with a bandwidth of 20 MHz, enabling multifrequency techniques extended beyond 2 MHz for obtaining materials contrast in liquid and air, as well as soft imaging of delicate biological samples. PMID:25671141

  12. Full information acquisition in piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Somnath, Suhas Belianinov, Alexei E-mail: sergei2@ornl.gov Kalinin, Sergei V. E-mail: sergei2@ornl.gov Jesse, Stephen E-mail: sergei2@ornl.gov

    2015-12-28

    The information flow from the tip-surface junction to the detector electronics during the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging is explored using the recently developed general mode (G-mode) detection. Information-theory analysis suggests that G-mode PFM in the non-switching regime, close to the first resonance mode, contains a relatively small (100–150) number of components containing significant information. The first two primary components are similar to classical PFM images, suggesting that classical lock-in detection schemes provide high veracity information in this case. At the same time, a number of transient components exhibit contrast associated with surface topography, suggesting pathway to separate the two. The number of significant components increases considerably in the non-linear and switching regimes and approaching cantilever resonances, precluding the use of classical lock-in detection and necessitating the use of band excitation or G-mode detection schemes. The future prospects of full information imaging in scanning probe microscopy are discussed.

  13. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Cell Shape Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adia-Nimuwa, Usienemfon; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Hartz, Steven; Xie, Kan; Ayres, Virginia

    2013-03-01

    Stellation is a measure of cell physiology and pathology for several cell groups including neural, liver and pancreatic cells. In the present work, we compare the results of a conventional two-dimensional shape index study of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescent microscopy images with the results obtained using a new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index similar to sphericity index. The stellation of astrocytes is investigated on nanofibrillar scaffolds composed of electrospun polyamide nanofibers that has demonstrated promise for central nervous system (CNS) repair. Recent work by our group has given us the ability to clearly segment the cells from nanofibrillar scaffolds in AFM images. The clear-featured AFM images indicated that the astrocyte processes were longer than previously identified at 24h. It was furthermore shown that cell spreading could vary significantly as a function of environmental parameters, and that AFM images could record these variations. The new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index incorporates the new information: longer stellate processes and cell spreading. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  14. Improved atomic force microscopy cantilever performance by partial reflective coating.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Zeno; Miyahara, Yoichi; Aeschimann, Laure; Grütter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection systems are widely used in cantilever based atomic force microscopy (AFM). Most commercial cantilevers have a reflective metal coating on the detector side to increase the reflectivity in order to achieve a high signal on the photodiode. Although the reflective coating is usually much thinner than the cantilever, it can still significantly contribute to the damping of the cantilever, leading to a lower mechanical quality factor (Q-factor). In dynamic mode operation in high vacuum, a cantilever with a high Q-factor is desired in order to achieve a lower minimal detectable force. The reflective coating can also increase the low-frequency force noise. In contact mode and force spectroscopy, a cantilever with minimal low-frequency force noise is desirable. We present a study on cantilevers with a partial reflective coating on the detector side. For this study, soft (≈0.01 N/m) and stiff (≈28 N/m) rectangular cantilevers were used with a custom partial coating at the tip end of the cantilever. The Q-factor, the detection and the force noise of fully coated, partially coated and uncoated cantilevers are compared and force distance curves are shown. Our results show an improvement in low-frequency force noise and increased Q-factor for the partially coated cantilevers compared to fully coated ones while maintaining the same reflectivity, therefore making it possible to combine the best of both worlds. PMID:26199849

  15. Nanoscale chemical imaging by photoinduced force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Derek; Morrison, William; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar; Jahng, Junghoon; Potma, Eric; Wan, Lei; Ruiz, Ricardo; Albrecht, Thomas R.; Schmidt, Kristin; Frommer, Jane; Sanders, Daniel P.; Park, Sung

    2016-01-01

    Correlating spatial chemical information with the morphology of closely packed nanostructures remains a challenge for the scientific community. For example, supramolecular self-assembly, which provides a powerful and low-cost way to create nanoscale patterns and engineered nanostructures, is not easily interrogated in real space via existing nondestructive techniques based on optics or electrons. A novel scanning probe technique called infrared photoinduced force microscopy (IR PiFM) directly measures the photoinduced polarizability of the sample in the near field by detecting the time-integrated force between the tip and the sample. By imaging at multiple IR wavelengths corresponding to absorption peaks of different chemical species, PiFM has demonstrated the ability to spatially map nm-scale patterns of the individual chemical components of two different types of self-assembled block copolymer films. With chemical-specific nanometer-scale imaging, PiFM provides a powerful new analytical method for deepening our understanding of nanomaterials. PMID:27051870

  16. Nanoscale chemical imaging by photoinduced force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Derek; Morrison, William; Wickramasinghe, H Kumar; Jahng, Junghoon; Potma, Eric; Wan, Lei; Ruiz, Ricardo; Albrecht, Thomas R; Schmidt, Kristin; Frommer, Jane; Sanders, Daniel P; Park, Sung

    2016-03-01

    Correlating spatial chemical information with the morphology of closely packed nanostructures remains a challenge for the scientific community. For example, supramolecular self-assembly, which provides a powerful and low-cost way to create nanoscale patterns and engineered nanostructures, is not easily interrogated in real space via existing nondestructive techniques based on optics or electrons. A novel scanning probe technique called infrared photoinduced force microscopy (IR PiFM) directly measures the photoinduced polarizability of the sample in the near field by detecting the time-integrated force between the tip and the sample. By imaging at multiple IR wavelengths corresponding to absorption peaks of different chemical species, PiFM has demonstrated the ability to spatially map nm-scale patterns of the individual chemical components of two different types of self-assembled block copolymer films. With chemical-specific nanometer-scale imaging, PiFM provides a powerful new analytical method for deepening our understanding of nanomaterials. PMID:27051870

  17. Electrochemical current-sensing atomic force microscopy in conductive solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pobelov, Ilya V.; Mohos, Miklós; Yoshida, Koji; Kolivoska, Viliam; Avdic, Amra; Lugstein, Alois; Bertagnolli, Emmerich; Leonhardt, Kelly; Denuault, Guy; Gollas, Bernhard; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Insulated atomic force microscopy probes carrying gold conductive tips were fabricated and employed as bifunctional force and current sensors in electrolyte solutions under electrochemical potential control. The application of the probes for current-sensing imaging, force and current-distance spectroscopy as well as scanning electrochemical microscopy experiments was demonstrated.

  18. Investigating bioconjugation by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnological applications increasingly exploit the selectivity and processivity of biological molecules. Integration of biomolecules such as proteins or DNA into nano-systems typically requires their conjugation to surfaces, for example of carbon-nanotubes or fluorescent quantum dots. The bioconjugated nanostructures exploit the unique strengths of both their biological and nanoparticle components and are used in diverse, future oriented research areas ranging from nanoelectronics to biosensing and nanomedicine. Atomic force microscopy imaging provides valuable, direct insight for the evaluation of different conjugation approaches at the level of the individual molecules. Recent technical advances have enabled high speed imaging by AFM supporting time resolutions sufficient to follow conformational changes of intricately assembled nanostructures in solution. In addition, integration of AFM with different spectroscopic and imaging approaches provides an enhanced level of information on the investigated sample. Furthermore, the AFM itself can serve as an active tool for the assembly of nanostructures based on bioconjugation. AFM is hence a major workhorse in nanotechnology; it is a powerful tool for the structural investigation of bioconjugation and bioconjugation-induced effects as well as the simultaneous active assembly and analysis of bioconjugation-based nanostructures. PMID:23855448

  19. Full information acquisition in piezoresponse force microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Somnath, Suhas; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-12-28

    The information flow from the tip-surface junction to the detector electronics during the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging is explored using the recently developed general mode (G-mode) detection. Information-theory analysis suggests that G-mode PFM in the non-switching regime, close to the first resonance mode, contains a relatively small (100 - 150) number of components containing significant information. The first two primary components are similar to classical PFM images, suggesting that classical lock-in detection schemes provide high veracity information in this case. At the same time, a number of transient components exhibit contrast associated with surface topography, suggesting pathway to separatemore » the two. The number of significant components increases considerably in the non-linear and switching regimes and approaching to cantilever resonances, precluding the use of classical lock-in detection and necessitating the use of band excitation or G-mode detection schemes. As a result, the future prospects of full information imaging in SPM are discussed.« less

  20. Full information acquisition in piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Somnath, Suhas; Belianinov, Alex; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-12-28

    The information flow from the tip-surface junction to the detector electronics during the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging is explored using the recently developed general mode (G-mode) detection. Information-theory analysis suggests that G-mode PFM in the non-switching regime, close to the first resonance mode, contains a relatively small (100 - 150) number of components containing significant information. The first two primary components are similar to classical PFM images, suggesting that classical lock-in detection schemes provide high veracity information in this case. At the same time, a number of transient components exhibit contrast associated with surface topography, suggesting pathway to separate the two. The number of significant components increases considerably in the non-linear and switching regimes and approaching to cantilever resonances, precluding the use of classical lock-in detection and necessitating the use of band excitation or G-mode detection schemes. As a result, the future prospects of full information imaging in SPM are discussed.

  1. Dielectrophoretic immobilization of proteins: Quantification by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Laux, Eva-Maria; Knigge, Xenia; Bier, Frank F; Wenger, Christian; Hölzel, Ralph

    2015-09-01

    The combination of alternating electric fields with nanometer-sized electrodes allows the permanent immobilization of proteins by dielectrophoretic force. Here, atomic force microscopy is introduced as a quantification method, and results are compared with fluorescence microscopy. Experimental parameters, for example the applied voltage and duration of field application, are varied systematically, and the influence on the amount of immobilized proteins is investigated. A linear correlation to the duration of field application was found by atomic force microscopy, and both microscopical methods yield a square dependence of the amount of immobilized proteins on the applied voltage. While fluorescence microscopy allows real-time imaging, atomic force microscopy reveals immobilized proteins obscured in fluorescence images due to low S/N. Furthermore, the higher spatial resolution of the atomic force microscope enables the visualization of the protein distribution on single nanoelectrodes. The electric field distribution is calculated and compared to experimental results with very good agreement to atomic force microscopy measurements. PMID:26010162

  2. Imaging and force probing RNA by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schön, Peter

    2016-07-01

    In the past 30years, the atomic force microscope (AFM) has become a true enabling platform in the life sciences opening entire novel avenues for structural and dynamic studies of biological systems. It enables visualization, probing and manipulation across the length scales, from single molecules to living cells in buffer solution under physiological conditions without the need for labeling or staining of the specimen. In particular, for structural studies of nucleic acids and assemblies thereof, the AFM has matured into a routinely used tool providing nanometer spatial resolution. This includes ssRNA, dsRNA and nucleoprotein complexes thereof, as well as RNA aggregates and 2D RNA assemblies. By AFM unique information can be obtained on RNA based assemblies which are becoming increasingly important as novel unique building blocks in the emerging field of RNA nanotechnology. In addition, the AFM is of fundamental relevance to study biological relevant RNA interactions and dynamics. In this short review first the basic functioning principles of commonly used AFM modes including AFM based force spectroscopy will be briefly described. Next a brief overview will be given on structural studies that have been done related to AFM topographic imaging of RNA, RNA assemblies and aggregates. Finally, an overview on AFM beyond imaging will be provided. This includes force spectroscopy of RNA under physiological conditions in aqueous buffer to probe RNA interaction with proteins and ligands as well as other AFM tip based RNA probing. The main intention of this short review to give the reader a flavor of what AFM contributes to RNA research and engineering. PMID:27222101

  3. Atomic force microscopy, lateral force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy investigations and adhesion force measurements for elucidation of tungsten removal mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, D.J.; Cecchi, J.L.; Hetherington, D.L.

    1999-09-01

    We investigated various interactions between alumina and tungsten films that occur during chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Atomic force microscopy surface topography measurements of post-CMP tungsten indicate that the roughness of the tungsten is independent of polish pressure and rotation rate. Pure mechanical abrasion is therefore an unlikely mechanism of material removal during CMP. Transmission electron microscopy images corroborate these results. The adhesion force between alumina and tungsten was measured in solution. The adhesive force increased with KIO{sub 3} concentration. Friction forces were measured in solution using lateral force microscopy. The friction force in buffered solutions was independent of KIO{sub 3} concentration. These results indicate that interactions other than purely mechanical interactions exist during CMP. {copyright} {ital 1999 Materials Research Society.}

  4. Interaction force microscopy based on quartz tuning fork force sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yexian

    The ability to sense small changes in the interaction force between a scanning probe microscope (SPM) tip and a substrate requires cantilevers with a sharp mechanical resonance. A typical commercially available cantilever in air is characterized by a resonance with a Q factor of 100 ˜ 300. The low Q factor can be attributed to imperfections in the cantilever itself as well as damping effects of the surrounding air. To substantially increase the Q factor, novel concepts are required. For this reason, we have performed a systematic study of quartz tuning fork resonators for possible use with SPMs. We find that tuning fork resonators operating in air are characterized by Q factors in the order of 104, thereby greatly improving the SPM's ability to measure small shifts in the interaction force. By carefully attaching commercially available SPM tips to the tuning fork, it is possible to obtain SPM images using non-contact imaging techniques and analyze the tip-sample interactions. The assembly of uniform molecular monolayers on atomically flat substrates for molecular electronics applications has received widespread attention during the past ten years. Scanning probe techniques are often used to assess substrate topography, molecular ordering and electronic properties, yet little is known about the fundamental tip-molecule interaction. To address this issue we have built an Interaction Force Microscope using a quartz tuning fork to probe tip-molecular monolayer interactions using scanning probe microscopy. The high quality factor and stable resonant frequency of a quartz tuning fork allows accurate measurement of small shifts in the resonant frequency as the tip interacts with the substrate. To permit an accurate measure of surface interaction forces, the electrical and piezomechanical properties of a tuning fork have been calibrated using a fiber optical interferometer. In prior work [1], we have studied molecular layers formed from either 4-Trifluoro

  5. Dynamic Behavior in Piezoresponse Force Microstopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Baddorf, Arthur P; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2006-01-01

    Frequency-dependent dynamic behavior in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) implemented on a beam-deflection atomic force microscope (AFM) is analysed using a combination of modelling and experimental measurements. The PFM signal is comprised of contributions from local electrostatic forces acting on the tip, distributed forces acting on the cantilever, and three components of the electromechanical response vector. These interactions result in the flexural and torsional oscillations of the cantilever, detected as vertical and lateral PFM signals. The relative magnitudes of these contributions depend on geometric parameters of the system, on the stiffnesses and frictional forces of the tip-surface junction, and on the frequency of operation. The dynamic signal formation mechanism in PFM is analysed and conditions for optimal PFM imaging are formulated. An experimental approach for probing cantilever dynamics using frequency-bias spectroscopy and deconvolution of electromechanical and electrostatic contrast is implemented

  6. Spatial spectrograms of vibrating atomic force microscopy cantilevers coupled to sample surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Proksch, Roger

    2013-12-23

    Many advanced dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques such as contact resonance, force modulation, piezoresponse force microscopy, electrochemical strain microscopy, and AFM infrared spectroscopy exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in contact with a sample to extract local material properties. Achieving quantitative results in these techniques usually requires the assumption of a certain shape of cantilever vibration. We present a technique that allows in-situ measurements of the vibrational shape of AFM cantilevers coupled to surfaces. This technique opens up unique approaches to nanoscale material property mapping, which are not possible with single point measurements alone.

  7. Structural examination of lithium niobate ferroelectric crystals by combining scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremova, P. V.; Ped'ko, B. B.; Kuznecova, Yu. V.

    2016-02-01

    The structure of lithium niobate single crystals is studied by a complex technique that combines scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. By implementing the piezoresponse force method on an atomic force microscope, the domain structure of lithium niobate crystals, which was not revealed without electron beam irradiation, is visualized

  8. Simultaneous Nanomechanical and Electrochemical Mapping: Combining Peak Force Tapping Atomic Force Microscopy with Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Peter; Mizaikoff, Boris; Kranz, Christine

    2016-06-21

    Soft electronic devices play a crucial role in, e.g., neural implants as stimulating electrodes, transducers for biosensors, or selective drug-delivery. Because of their elasticity, they can easily adapt to their environment and prevent immunoreactions leading to an overall improved long-term performance. In addition, flexible electronic devices such as stretchable displays will be increasingly used in everyday life, e.g., for so-called electronic wearables. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile tool to characterize these micro- and nanostructured devices in terms of their topography. Using advanced imaging techniques such as peak force tapping (PFT), nanomechanical properties including adhesion, deformation, and Young's modulus can be simultaneously mapped along with surface features. However, conventional AFM provides limited laterally resolved information on electrical or electrochemical properties such as the activity of an electrode array. In this study, we present the first combination of AFM with scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in PFT mode, thereby offering spatially correlated electrochemical and nanomechanical information paired with high-resolution topographical data under force control (QNM-AFM-SECM). The versatility of this combined scanning probe approach is demonstrated by mapping topographical, electrochemical, and nanomechanical properties of gold microelectrodes and of gold electrodes patterned onto polydimethylsiloxane. PMID:27203837

  9. Accurate force spectroscopy in tapping mode atomic force microscopy in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2010-01-01

    Existing force spectroscopy methods in tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) such as higher harmonic inversion [M. Stark, R. W. Stark, W. M. Heckl, and R. Guckenberger, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 8473 (2002)] or scanning probe acceleration microscopy [J. Legleiter, M. Park, B. Cusick, and T. Kowalewski, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 4813 (2006)] or integral relations [M. Lee and W. Jhe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 036104 (2006); S. Hu and A. Raman, Nanotechnology 19, 375704 (2008); H. Hölscher, Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 123109 (2006); A. J. Katan, Nanotechnology 20, 165703 (2009)] require and assume as an observable the tip dynamics in a single eigenmode of the oscillating microcantilever. We demonstrate that this assumption can distort significantly the extracted tip-sample interaction forces when applied to tapping mode AFM with soft cantilevers in liquid environments. This exception is due to the fact that under these conditions the second eigenmode is momentarily excited and the observed tip dynamics clearly contains contributions from the fundamental and second eigenmodes. To alleviate this problem, a simple experimental method is proposed to screen the second eigenmode contributions in the observed tip deflection signal to allow accurate tip-sample force reconstruction in liquids. The method is implemented experimentally to reconstruct interaction forces on polymer, bacteriorhodopsin membrane, and mica samples in buffer solutions.

  10. Chemical force microscopy of stimuli-responsive adhesive copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaussart, Audrey; Ngo, T. Chinh; Derclaye, Sylvie; Kalinova, Radostina; Mincheva, Rosica; Dubois, Philippe; Leclère, Philippe; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy with chemically sensitive tips was used to investigate the hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction forces of a stimuli-responsive adhesive polymer, and their dynamic changes in response to water immersion and salt concentration. Block copolymer-filled coatings were obtained by incorporating an amphiphilic block copolymer containing a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) block and a poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) block in a PDMS matrix. Topographic images of fresh samples revealed the presence of nanoscale domains associated with the presence of copolymers, covered by a thin layer of PDMS. Prolonged (30 days) immersion in aqueous solution led to the exposure of the hydrophilic PDMAEMA chains on the surface. Using adhesion force mapping with hydrophobic tips, we showed that fresh samples were uniformly hydrophobic, while aged samples exhibited lower surface hydrophobicity and featured nanoscale hydrophilic copolymer domains. Force mapping with negatively charged tips revealed remarkable salt-dependent force plateau signatures reflecting desorption of polyelectrolyte copolymer chains. These nanoscale experiments show how solvent-induced conformational changes of stimuli-responsive copolymers can be used to modulate surface adhesion.

  11. Low-temperature dynamics of ferroelectric domains in PbZr0.3Ti0.7O3 epitaxial thin films studied by piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, N. V.; Vakulenko, A. F.; Petraru, A.; Soni, R.; Kohlstedt, H.; Filimonov, A. V.; Rudskoy, A. I.; Vakhrushev, S. B.; Pertsev, N. A.

    2015-10-01

    Dynamics of domain boundaries is expected to change drastically at low absolute temperatures but direct experimental information for this temperature range is still lacking. To clarify the mechanism of low-temperature domain dynamics, we studied the growth of ferroelectric domains in the temperature range 4.2-295 K using the out-of-plane piezoresponse mode of a cryogenic atomic force microscope (AFM). Nanoscale 180° domains were created in epitaxial PbZr0.3Ti0.7O3 films by applying short voltage pulses between the conductive AFM tip brought into contact with the bare film surface and the bottom LaSr0.7Mn0.3O3 electrode. A quantitative analysis of acquired piezoresponse images enabled us to determine the in-plane domain size as a function of the writing voltage and pulse duration. It is found that at all studied temperatures the dependence of this size on the pulse duration can be fitted by a logarithmic function, which indicates that the domain-wall velocity exponentially depends on the driving electric field. The theoretical analysis of experimental data shows that the observed low-temperature domain dynamics is consistent with the creep of domain boundaries occurring in the presence of defects and structural nanoheterogeneities.

  12. In-situ piezoresponse force microscopy cantilever mode shape profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Proksch, R.

    2015-08-21

    The frequency-dependent amplitude and phase in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements are shown to be a consequence of the Euler-Bernoulli (EB) dynamics of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beams used to make the measurements. Changes in the cantilever mode shape as a function of changes in the boundary conditions determine the sensitivity of cantilevers to forces between the tip and the sample. Conventional PFM and AFM measurements are made with the motion of the cantilever measured at one optical beam detector (OBD) spot location. A single OBD spot location provides a limited picture of the total cantilever motion, and in fact, experimentally observed cantilever amplitude and phase are shown to be strongly dependent on the OBD spot position for many measurements. In this work, the commonly observed frequency dependence of PFM response is explained through experimental measurements and analytic theoretical EB modeling of the PFM response as a function of both frequency and OBD spot location on a periodically poled lithium niobate sample. One notable conclusion is that a common choice of OBD spot location—at or near the tip of the cantilever—is particularly vulnerable to frequency dependent amplitude and phase variations stemming from dynamics of the cantilever sensor rather than from the piezoresponse of the sample.

  13. Force feedback microscopy based on an optical beam deflection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitorino, Miguel V.; Carpentier, Simon; Costa, Luca; Rodrigues, Mario S.

    2014-07-01

    Force feedback microscopy circumvents the jump to contact in atomic force microscopy when using soft cantilevers and quantitatively measures the interaction properties at the nanoscale by simultaneously providing force, force gradient, and dissipation. The force feedback microscope developed so far used an optical cavity to measure the tip displacement. In this Letter, we show that the more conventional optical beam deflection scheme can be used to the same purpose. With this instrument, we have followed the evolution of the Brownian motion of the tip under the influence of a water bridge.

  14. Force feedback microscopy based on an optical beam deflection scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Vitorino, Miguel V.; Rodrigues, Mario S.; Carpentier, Simon; Costa, Luca

    2014-07-07

    Force feedback microscopy circumvents the jump to contact in atomic force microscopy when using soft cantilevers and quantitatively measures the interaction properties at the nanoscale by simultaneously providing force, force gradient, and dissipation. The force feedback microscope developed so far used an optical cavity to measure the tip displacement. In this Letter, we show that the more conventional optical beam deflection scheme can be used to the same purpose. With this instrument, we have followed the evolution of the Brownian motion of the tip under the influence of a water bridge.

  15. Advances in Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Thomas Robert

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and the more recently developed atomic force microscope (AFM) are high resolution scanning probe microscopes capable of three dimensional atomic-scale surface profiling. In the AFM, minute forces acting between the tip of a flexible cantilever stylus and the surface of the sample cause deflections of the cantilever which are detected by a tunneling or optical sensor with subangstrom sensitivity. The AFM work presented here involves surface profiling via repulsive contact forces between 10^{-6} and 10^{-9} N in magnitude. In this contact profiling (repulsive) mode the AFM is capable of atomic resolution on both electrically conducting and insulating surfaces (unlike the STM). AFM instrumentation for room temperature and low temperature operation is discussed. The critical component of the AFM is the cantilever stylus assembly, which should have a small mass. Several microfabrication processes have been developed to produce thin film SiO_2 and Si_3N_4 microcantilevers with integrated sharp tips. Atomic resolution has been achieved with the AFM in air on a number of samples, including graphite, MoS _2, TaSe_2, WTe_2, TaS_2, and BN (the first insulator imaged with atomic resolution by any means). Various organic and molecular samples have been imaged with nanometer resolution. The difference between STM and AFM response is shown in images of TaS _2 (a charge density wave material), and in simultaneous STM/AFM images of lattice defects and adsorbates on graphite and MoS_2. A number of artifacts make STM and AFM image interpretation subtle, such as tip shape effects, frictional effects, and tracking in atomic grooves. STM images of moire patterns near grain boundaries confirm the importance of tip shape effects. Various surface modification and lithography techniques have been demonstrated with the STM and AFM, including an STM voltage pulse technique which reproducibly creates 40 A diameter holes on the surface of graphite, and a

  16. Neuron Biomechanics Probed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spedden, Elise; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interactions play a key role in many processes associated with neuronal growth and development. Over the last few years there has been significant progress in our understanding of the role played by the substrate stiffness in neuronal growth, of the cell-substrate adhesion forces, of the generation of traction forces during axonal elongation, and of the relationships between the neuron soma elastic properties and its health. The particular capabilities of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), such as high spatial resolution, high degree of control over the magnitude and orientation of the applied forces, minimal sample damage, and the ability to image and interact with cells in physiologically relevant conditions make this technique particularly suitable for measuring mechanical properties of living neuronal cells. This article reviews recent advances on using the AFM for studying neuronal biomechanics, provides an overview about the state-of-the-art measurements, and suggests directions for future applications. PMID:23921683

  17. Neuron biomechanics probed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Spedden, Elise; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interactions play a key role in many processes associated with neuronal growth and development. Over the last few years there has been significant progress in our understanding of the role played by the substrate stiffness in neuronal growth, of the cell-substrate adhesion forces, of the generation of traction forces during axonal elongation, and of the relationships between the neuron soma elastic properties and its health. The particular capabilities of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), such as high spatial resolution, high degree of control over the magnitude and orientation of the applied forces, minimal sample damage, and the ability to image and interact with cells in physiologically relevant conditions make this technique particularly suitable for measuring mechanical properties of living neuronal cells. This article reviews recent advances on using the AFM for studying neuronal biomechanics, provides an overview about the state-of-the-art measurements, and suggests directions for future applications. PMID:23921683

  18. Brown algal morphogenesis: atomic force microscopy as a tool to study the role of mechanical forces

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Benoit; Charrier, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, a growing interest has been directed toward the use of macroalgae as a source of energy, food and molecules for the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Besides this, macroalgal development remains poorly understood compared to other multicellular organisms. Brown algae (Phaeophyceae) form a monophyletic lineage of usually large multicellular algae which evolved independently from land plants. In their environment, they are subjected to strong mechanical forces (current, waves, and tide), in response to which they modify rapidly and reversibly their morphology. Because of their specific cellular features (cell wall composition, cytoskeleton organization), deciphering how they cope with these forces might help discover new control mechanisms of cell wall softening and cellulose synthesis. Despite the current scarcity in knowledge on brown algal cell wall dynamics and protein composition, we will illustrate, in the light of methods adapted to Ectocarpus siliculosus, to what extent atomic force microscopy can contribute to advance this field of investigation. PMID:25278949

  19. Fast and gentle side approach for atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, W. A.; Broekmaat, J. J.; Koster, G.; Rijnders, G.; Beerends, R. J. L.

    2013-12-15

    Atomic force microscopy is one of the most popular imaging tools with atomic resolution in different research fields. Here, a fast and gentle side approach for atomic force microscopy is proposed to image the same surface location and to reduce the time delay between modification and imaging without significant tip degradation. This reproducible approach to image the same surface location using atomic force microscopy shortly after, for example, any biological, chemical, or physical modification on a geometrically separated position has the potential to become widely used.

  20. Combined scanning electrochemical atomic force microscopy for tapping mode imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueng, A.; Kranz, C.; Mizaikoff, B.; Lugstein, A.; Bertagnolli, E.

    2003-03-01

    With the integration of submicro- and nanoelectrodes into atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips using microfabrication techniques, an elegant approach combining scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) with atomic force microscopy has recently been demonstrated. Simultaneous imaging of topography and electrochemistry at a sample surface in AFM tapping mode with integrated SECM-AFM cantilevers oscillated at or near their resonance frequency is shown. In contrast to contact mode AFM imaging frictional forces at the sample surface are minimized. Hence, topographical and electrochemical information of soft surfaces (e.g., biological species) can be obtained.

  1. Nanometrology of delignified Populus using mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Farahi, R H; Davison, Brian H; Jung, S; Ragauskas, A J; Lereu, Aude; Thundat, Thomas George

    2011-01-01

    The study of the spatially resolved physical and compositional properties of materials at the nanoscale is increasingly challenging due to the level of complexity of biological specimens such as those of interest in bioenergy production. Mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) has emerged as a promising metrology tool for such studies. It is shown that, by tuning the mechanical excitation of the probe-sample system, MSAFM can be used to dynamically investigate the multifaceted complexity of plant cells. The results are argued to be of importance both for the characteristics of the invoked synthesized modes and for accessing new features of the samples. As a specific system to investigate, we present images of Populus, before and after a holopulping treatment, a crucial step in the biomass delignification process.

  2. Unlocking higher harmonics in atomic force microscopy with gentle interactions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sergio; Barcons, Victor; Font, Josep; Verdaguer, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In dynamic atomic force microscopy, nanoscale properties are encoded in the higher harmonics. Nevertheless, when gentle interactions and minimal invasiveness are required, these harmonics are typically undetectable. Here, we propose to externally drive an arbitrary number of exact higher harmonics above the noise level. In this way, multiple contrast channels that are sensitive to compositional variations are made accessible. Numerical integration of the equation of motion shows that the external introduction of exact harmonic frequencies does not compromise the fundamental frequency. Thermal fluctuations are also considered within the detection bandwidth of interest and discussed in terms of higher-harmonic phase contrast in the presence and absence of an external excitation of higher harmonics. Higher harmonic phase shifts further provide the means to directly decouple the true topography from that induced by compositional heterogeneity. PMID:24778948

  3. Unlocking higher harmonics in atomic force microscopy with gentle interactions

    PubMed Central

    Font, Josep; Verdaguer, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Summary In dynamic atomic force microscopy, nanoscale properties are encoded in the higher harmonics. Nevertheless, when gentle interactions and minimal invasiveness are required, these harmonics are typically undetectable. Here, we propose to externally drive an arbitrary number of exact higher harmonics above the noise level. In this way, multiple contrast channels that are sensitive to compositional variations are made accessible. Numerical integration of the equation of motion shows that the external introduction of exact harmonic frequencies does not compromise the fundamental frequency. Thermal fluctuations are also considered within the detection bandwidth of interest and discussed in terms of higher-harmonic phase contrast in the presence and absence of an external excitation of higher harmonics. Higher harmonic phase shifts further provide the means to directly decouple the true topography from that induced by compositional heterogeneity. PMID:24778948

  4. Phase contrast and operation regimes in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Sergio

    2014-04-07

    In amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy the attractive and the repulsive force regimes induce phase shifts above and below 90°, respectively. In the more recent multifrequency approach, however, multiple operation regimes have been reported and the theory should be revisited. Here, a theory of phase contrast in multifrequency atomic force microscopy is developed and discussed in terms of energy transfer between modes, energy dissipation and the kinetic energy and energy transfer associated with externally driven harmonics. The single frequency virial that controls the phase shift might undergo transitions in sign while the average force (modal virial) remains positive (negative)

  5. Calibration of frictional forces in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ogletree, D.F.; Carpick, R.W.; Salmeron, M.

    1996-09-01

    The atomic force microscope can provide information on the atomic-level frictional properties of surfaces, but reproducible quantitative measurements are difficult to obtain. Parameters that are either unknown or difficult to precisely measure include the normal and lateral cantilever force constants (particularly with microfabricated cantilevers), the tip height, the deflection sensor response, and the tip structure and composition at the tip-surface contact. We present an {ital in} {ital situ} experimental procedure to determine the response of a cantilever to lateral forces in terms of its normal force response. This procedure is quite general. It will work with any type of deflection sensor and does not require the knowledge or direct measurement of the lever dimensions or the tip height. In addition, the shape of the tip apex can be determined. We also discuss a number of specific issues related to force and friction measurements using optical lever deflection sensing. We present experimental results on the lateral force response of commercially available V-shaped cantilevers. Our results are consistent with estimates of lever mechanical properties using continuum elasticity theory. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Tracing Poly(ethylene-oxide) Crystallization using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaldi, Xavier; Amanuel, Samuel

    The early stages of nucleation and crystallization of Poly(ethylene-oxide) have been studied using Atomic Force Microscopy equipped with a heating and cooling stage. Effects of molecular weight and sample preparation techniques were studied using amplitude and frequency modulation. Mapping the viscoelastic behavior at different temperatures and has enabled the development of a relatively new technique for following the evolution of crystallization and melting of a semi-crystalline polymer. Tracing Poly(ethylene-oxide) Crystallization using Atomic Force Microscopy.

  7. Atomic force microscopy of hydrated phosphatidylethanolamine bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Zasadzinski, J A; Helm, C A; Longo, M L; Weisenhorn, A L; Gould, S A; Hansma, P K

    1991-01-01

    We present images of the polar or headgroup regions of bilayers of dimyristoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE), deposited by Langmuir-Blodgett deposition onto mica substrates at high surface pressures and imaged under water at room temperature with the optical lever atomic force microscope. The lattice structure of DMPE is visualized with sufficient resolution that the location of individual headgroups can be determined. The forces are sufficiently small that the same area can be repeatedly imaged with a minimum of damage. The DMPE molecules in the bilayer appear to have relatively good long-range orientational order, but rather short-range and poor positional order. These results are in good agreement with x-ray measurements of unsupported lipid monolayers on the water surface, and with electron diffraction of adsorbed monolayers. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:2049529

  8. Combined scanning electrochemical-atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, J V; Unwin, P R

    2000-01-15

    A combined scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM)-atomic force microscope (AFM) is described. The instrument permits the first simultaneous topographical and electrochemical measurements at surfaces, under fluid, with high spatial resolution. Simple probe tips suitable for SECM-AFM, have been fabricated by coating flattened and etched Pt microwires with insulating, electrophoretically deposited paint. The flattened portion of the probe provides a flexible cantilever (force sensor), while the coating insulates the probe such that only the tip end (electrode) is exposed to the solution. The SECM-AFM technique is illustrated with simultaneous electrochemical-probe deflection approach curves, simultaneous topographical and electrochemical imaging studies of track-etched polycarbonate ultrafiltration membranes, and etching studies of crystal surfaces. PMID:10658320

  9. Comparison of Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy for Live Cell Imaging.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Jan; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Novak, Pavel; Korchev, Yuri E; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2015-06-23

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) are excellent and commonly used techniques for imaging the topography of living cells with high resolution. We present a direct comparison of AFM and SICM for imaging microvilli, which are small features on the surface of living cells, and for imaging the shape of whole cells. The imaging quality on microvilli increased significantly after cell fixation for AFM, whereas for SICM it remained constant. The apparent shape of whole cells in the case of AFM depended on the imaging force, which deformed the cell. In the case of SICM, cell deformations were avoided, owing to the contact-free imaging mechanism. We estimated that the lateral resolution on living cells is limited by the cell's elastic modulus for AFM, while it is not for SICM. By long-term, time-lapse imaging of microvilli dynamics, we showed that the imaging quality decreased with time for AFM, while it remained constant for SICM. PMID:26011471

  10. Evaluation of Polymer-Filler Interaction Characteristics by Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratto, T; Saab, A

    2007-04-23

    Silicone polymers are frequently used as cushions and inserts between load bearing parts. In this capacity, they must act to position their associated parts and distribute mechanical force as appropriate. One type of failure is specific to silicones that are filled with high surface area particulates for purposes of tailoring the polymer compressive properties. Additives such as fumed silicon oxide are presumed to have a high degree of surface interaction with the polymer matrix, thus causing the polymer to stiffen and to display greater dimensional stability as a function of temperature. However, it has been observed that the compressive behavior of these materials is not always invariant over long times. There is evidence that suggests changes in humidity and temperature can irreversibly alter the silicone-filler interaction, thereby changing the overall characteristics of parts made from such materials. As before, changes in compressive or shear stability can have serious effects on the ability of these materials to effectively position precision parts or distribute high mechanical loads. We approach the analysis of the filled systems by creating controlled layers of silicone polymers attached to silicon oxide substrates. Straight chain vinyl-silicone polymers identical to those used in the formulation of pads for stockpile systems are chemically appended to a substrate surface, and cross-linked to form a three dimensional network. This type of structure serves as a model of silicone polymer coating a silicon oxide filler particle. We study these model systems first by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to image the samples with nanometer resolution, and then by measuring the forces of interactions between single model silica filler particles and polymer-coated surfaces. We use normal longitudinal force AFM to measure adhesion, and a relatively newly developed technique, lateral force AFM, to determine the frictional forces between the silica particles and the

  11. The Dynamic Force Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, John B.; Black, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    We examine an experimental apparatus that is used to motivate the connections between the basic properties of vectors, potential functions, systems of nonlinear equations, and Newton's method for nonlinear systems of equations. The apparatus is an adaptation of a force table where we remove the center-pin and allow the center-ring to move freely.…

  12. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  13. Microfluidics, Chromatography, and Atomic-Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A Raman-and-atomic-force microscope (RAFM) has been shown to be capable of performing several liquid-transfer and sensory functions essential for the operation of a microfluidic laboratory on a chip that would be used to perform rapid, sensitive chromatographic and spectro-chemical analyses of unprecedentedly small quantities of liquids. The most novel aspect of this development lies in the exploitation of capillary and shear effects at the atomic-force-microscope (AFM) tip to produce shear-driven flow of liquids along open microchannels of a microfluidic device. The RAFM can also be used to perform such functions as imaging liquids in microchannels; removing liquid samples from channels for very sensitive, tip-localized spectrochemical analyses; measuring a quantity of liquid adhering to the tip; and dip-pen deposition from a chromatographic device. A commercial Raman-spectroscopy system and a commercial AFM were integrated to make the RAFM so as to be able to perform simultaneous topographical AFM imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) at the AFM tip. The Raman-spectroscopy system includes a Raman microprobe attached to an optical microscope, the translation stage of which is modified to accommodate the AFM head. The Raman laser excitation beam, which is aimed at the AFM tip, has a wavelength of 785 nm and a diameter of about 5 m, and its power is adjustable up to 10 mW. The AFM is coated with gold to enable tip-localized SERS.

  14. Image force microscopy of molecular resonance: A microscope principle

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksa, I.; Uenal, K.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique in microscopy which extends the domain of atomic force microscopy to optical spectroscopy at the nanometer scale. We show that molecular resonance of feature sizes down to the single molecular level can be detected and imaged purely by mechanical detection of the force gradient between the interaction of the optically driven molecular dipole and its mirror image in a platinum coated scanning probe tip. This microscopy and spectroscopy technique is extendable to frequencies ranging from radio to infrared and the ultraviolet. PMID:20859536

  15. Numerical study of the hydrodynamic drag force in atomic force microscopy measurements undertaken in fluids.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Méndez, J V; Alonso-Rasgado, M T; Faria, E Correia; Flores-Johnson, E A; Snook, R D

    2014-11-01

    When atomic force microscopy (AFM) is employed for in vivo study of immersed biological samples, the fluid medium presents additional complexities, not least of which is the hydrodynamic drag force due to viscous friction of the cantilever with the liquid. This force should be considered when interpreting experimental results and any calculated material properties. In this paper, a numerical model is presented to study the influence of the drag force on experimental data obtained from AFM measurements using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The model provides quantification of the drag force in AFM measurements of soft specimens in fluids. The numerical predictions were compared with experimental data obtained using AFM with a V-shaped cantilever fitted with a pyramidal tip. Tip velocities ranging from 1.05 to 105 μm/s were employed in water, polyethylene glycol and glycerol with the platform approaching from a distance of 6000 nm. The model was also compared with an existing analytical model. Good agreement was observed between numerical results, experiments and analytical predictions. Accurate predictions were obtained without the need for extrapolation of experimental data. In addition, the model can be employed over the range of tip geometries and velocities typically utilized in AFM measurements. PMID:25080275

  16. Surface Biology of DNA by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansma, Helen G.

    2001-10-01

    The atomic force microscope operates on surfaces. Since surfaces occupy much of the space in living organisms, surface biology is a valid and valuable form of biology that has been difficult to investigate in the past owing to a lack of good technology. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of DNA has been used to investigate DNA condensation for gene therapy, DNA mapping and sizing, and a few applications to cancer research and to nanotechnology. Some of the most exciting new applications for atomic force microscopy of DNA involve pulling on single DNA molecules to obtain measurements of single-molecule mechanics and thermodynamics.

  17. Carbon nanotube atomic force microscopy probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Shigenobu; Okawa, Takashi; Akita, Seiji; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a carbon nanotube atomic force microscope probe. Because the carbon nanotube are well known to have high aspect ratios, small tip radii and high stiffness, carbon nanotube probes have a long lifetime and can be applied for the observation deep trenches. Carbon nanotubes were synthesized by a well-controlled DC arc discharge method, because this method can make nanotubes to have straight shape and high crystalline. The nanotubes were aligned on the knife-edge using an alternating current electrophoresis technique. A commercially available Si probe was used for the base of the nanotube probe. The nanotube probe was fabricated by the SEM manipulation method. The nanotube was then attached tightly to the Si probe by deposition of amorphous carbon. We demonstrate the measurement of a fine pith grating that has vertical walls. However, a carbon nanotube has a problem that is called "Sticking". The sticking is a chatter image on vertical like region in a sample. We solved this problem by applying 2 methods, 1. a large cantilever vibration amplitude in tapping mode, 2. an attractive mode measurement. We demonstrate the non-sticking images by these methods.

  18. Observation of DNA Molecules Using Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes experiments for an undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory that aim to observe individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). dsDNA molecules are observed under several different conditions to discuss their chemical and physical properties. In…

  19. Pump-probe Kelvin-probe force microscopy: Principle of operation and resolution limits

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, J.; Graupner, T.; Milde, P. Raupach, R.; Zerweck-Trogisch, U.; Eng, L. M.

    2015-10-21

    Knowledge on surface potential dynamics is crucial for understanding the performance of modern-type nanoscale devices. We describe an electrical pump-probe approach in Kelvin-probe force microscopy that enables a quantitative measurement of dynamic surface potentials at nanosecond-time and nanometer-length scales. Also, we investigate the performance of pump-probe Kelvin-probe force microscopy with respect to the relevant experimental parameters. We exemplify a measurement on an organic field effect transistor that verifies the undisturbed functionality of our pump-probe approach in terms of simultaneous and quantitative mapping of topographic and electronic information at a high lateral and temporal resolution.

  20. Force microscopy of layering and friction in an ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoth, Judith; Hausen, Florian; Müser, Martin H.; Bennewitz, Roland

    2014-07-01

    The mechanical properties of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl) trifluorophosphate ([Py1,4][FAP]) in confinement between a SiOx and a Au(1 1 1) surface are investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) under electrochemical control. Up to 12 layers of ion pairs can be detected through force measurements while approaching the tip of the AFM to the surface. The particular shape of the force versus distance curve is explained by a model for the interaction between tip, gold surface and ionic liquid, which assumes an exponentially decaying oscillatory force originating from bulk liquid density correlations. Jumps in the tip-sample distance upon approach correspond to jumps of the compliant force sensor between branches of the oscillatory force curve. Frictional force between the laterally moving tip and the surface is detected only after partial penetration of the last double layer between tip and surface.

  1. Force microscopy of layering and friction in an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Hoth, Judith; Hausen, Florian; Müser, Martin H; Bennewitz, Roland

    2014-07-16

    The mechanical properties of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl) trifluorophosphate ([Py1,4][FAP]) in confinement between a SiOx and a Au(1 1 1) surface are investigated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) under electrochemical control. Up to 12 layers of ion pairs can be detected through force measurements while approaching the tip of the AFM to the surface. The particular shape of the force versus distance curve is explained by a model for the interaction between tip, gold surface and ionic liquid, which assumes an exponentially decaying oscillatory force originating from bulk liquid density correlations. Jumps in the tip-sample distance upon approach correspond to jumps of the compliant force sensor between branches of the oscillatory force curve. Frictional force between the laterally moving tip and the surface is detected only after partial penetration of the last double layer between tip and surface. PMID:24919549

  2. Magnetic resonance force microscopy combined with surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, S.; Yoshinari, Y.; Kawai, E.; Nakajima, K.; Park, H. S.; Shindo, D.

    2007-10-01

    A new method of surface microscopy is proposed, which combines three-dimensional electron spin resonance imaging by magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) and topographic imaging of the sample surface by scanning force microscopy (SFM). In order to demonstrate its potential for the identification of microscale objects, the individual and combined images are used to provide the locations, shapes and spin density distributions of target phantom objects. We report spatial resolution in MRFM of 2.8 × 2.8 × 2.0μm 3. This could be improved to the theoretical limit of 0.08 × 0.08 × 0.04μm 3 through reduction of the thermal noise by cooling to cryogenic temperatures ˜0.5 K. We believe that this type of microscopy will become a very useful tool for the investigation of anomalies induced in surfaces by materials buried below the surface.

  3. Microrheology of cells with magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rebêlo, L M; de Sousa, J S; Mendes Filho, J; Schäpe, J; Doschke, H; Radmacher, M

    2014-04-01

    We propose a magnetic force modulation method to measure the stiffness and viscosity of living cells using a modified AFM apparatus. An oscillating magnetic field makes a magnetic cantilever oscillate in contact with the sample, producing a small AC indentation. By comparing the amplitude of the free cantilever motion (A0) with the motion of the cantilever in contact with the sample (A1), we determine the sample stiffness and viscosity. To test the method, the frequency-dependent stiffness of 3T3 fibroblasts was determined as a power law k(s)(f) = α + β(f/f¯)(γ) (α = 7.6 × 10(-4) N m(-1), β = 1.0 × 10(-4) N m(-1), f¯ = 1 Hz, γ = 0.6), where the coefficient γ = 0.6 is in good agreement with rheological data of actin solutions with concentrations similar to those in cells. The method also allows estimation of the internal friction of the cells. In particular we found an average damping coefficient of 75.1 μN s m(-1) for indentation depths ranging between 1.0 μm and 2.0 μm. PMID:24651941

  4. Surface modifications with Lissajous trajectories using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Wei; Yao, Nan

    2015-09-14

    In this paper, we report a method for atomic force microscopy surface modifications with single-tone and multiple-resolution Lissajous trajectories. The tip mechanical scratching experiments with two series of Lissajous trajectories were carried out on monolayer films. The scratching processes with two scan methods have been illustrated. As an application, the tip-based triboelectrification phenomenon on the silicon dioxide surface with Lissajous trajectories was investigated. The triboelectric charges generated within the tip rubbed area on the surface were characterized in-situ by scanning Kelvin force microscopy. This method would provide a promising and cost-effective approach for surface modifications and nanofabrication.

  5. Lead zirconate titanate cantilever for noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Y.; Fujii, T.; Watanabe, S.; Tonoli, A.; Carabelli, S.; Yamada, H.; Bleuler, H.

    1999-02-01

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy with frequency modulation detection is a promising technique for surface observation with true atomic resolution. The piezoelectric material itself can be an actuator and sensor of the oscillating probe simultaneously, without the need for additional electro-mechanical transducers or other measurement systems. A vertical resolution of 0.01 nm rms has been achieved using a microfabricated cantilever with lead zirconate titanate thin film in noncontact mode frequency modulation detection. The cantilever also has a sharpened pyramidal stylus with a radius of about 10 nm for noncontact atomic force microscopy.

  6. Vacuum Shear Force Microscopy Application to High Resolution Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonski, Vitali; Yamamoto, Yoh; White, Jonathon; Kourogi, Motonobu; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    1999-07-01

    A new technique—Vacuum Shear Force Microscopy (VSFM)—is introduced as a reliable method for maintaining a constant separation between a probe and sample. Elimination of many of the instabilities observed when applying the shear force mechanism to imaging under ambient conditions, allows for routine nanometer lateral and sub-nanometer normal resolution. In this paper this technique is applied, firstly, to the imaging of microtubules (biology) and, secondly, to the patterning and subsequent imaging of nanoscale metal lines (nanofabrication).

  7. Silicon Carbide Epitaxial Films Studied by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    imaged. Away from local defects, step bunching was observed to yield step heights of hundreds of angstroms, with possible implications for the uniformity of dopants incorporated in SiC devices during fabrication. The quantitative topographic data from the AFM allow the relevant defect information to be extracted, such as the size and distribution of step bunching and the Burgers vector of screw dislocations. These atomic force microscopy results have furthered the understanding of the dynamic epitaxial SiC growth process. A model describing the observed hillock step bunching has been proposed. This cooperation between researchers involved in crystal growth, electronic device fabrication, and surface structural characterization is likely to continue as atomic force microscopy is used to improve SiC films for high-temperature electronic devices for NASA's advanced turbine engines and space power devices, as well as for future applications in the automotive industry.

  8. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models.

  9. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Joseph L; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models. PMID:25964997

  10. Atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy on the cytoskeleton of permeabilised and embedded cells.

    PubMed

    Meller, Karl; Theiss, Carsten

    2006-03-01

    We describe a technical method of cell permeabilisation and embedding to study the organisation and distribution of intracellular proteins with aid of atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy in identical areas. While confocal laser scanning microscopy is useful for the identification of certain proteins subsequent labelling with markers or antibodies, atomic force microscopy allows the observation of macromolecular structures in fixed and living cells. To demonstrate the field of application of this preparatory technique, cells were permeabilised, fixed, and the actin cytoskeleton was stained with phalloidin-rhodamine. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to show the organisation of these microfilaments, e.g. geodesic dome structures. Thereafter, cells were embedded in Durcupan water-soluble resin, followed by UV-polymerisation of resin at 4 degrees C. This procedure allowed intracellular visualisation of the cell nucleus or cytoskeletal elements by atomic force microscopy, for instance to analyse the globular organisation of actin filaments. Therefore, this method offers a great potential to combine both microscopy techniques in order to understand and interpret intracellular protein relations, for example, the biochemical and morphological interaction of the cytoskeleton. PMID:16360280

  11. Microbially influenced corrosion visualized by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telegdi, J.; Keresztes, Z.; Pálinkás, G.; Kálmán, E.; Sand, W.

    Corrosion, biofilm formation and the adsorption of different, corrosion-enhancing microbes (such as Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, Thiobacillus intermedius, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, and mixed cultures) to different surfaces (iron, copper, pyrite) have been studied in aqueous environment by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It is one of the most effective on-line techniques for imaging surfaces (bacterial, metallic, etc.) with high resolution.

  12. Low temperature magnetic force microscopy on ferromagnetic and superconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirohi, Anshu; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-05-01

    We report the observation of complex ferromagnetic domain structures on thin films of SrRuO3 and superconducting vortices in high temperature superconductors through low temperature magnetic force microscopy. Here we summarize the experimental details and results of magnetic imaging at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. We discuss these data in the light of existing theoretical concepts.

  13. Force modulation microscopy of multilayered porous silicon samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbrana, F.; Ghulinyan, M.; Pavesi, L.

    2005-06-01

    In this paper we report on Force Modulation Microscopy (FMM) study and force-distance curve analysis of porous silicon layers grown on silicon. The characterization has been carried out on the cross section of porous silicon. The FMM images allowed us to investigate the morphological thickness of the layers through local elasticity differences resolving both between porous silicon layers of different porosities and between porous silicon and silicon itself. Force-distance curves showed different adhesion behaviour: porous silicon is more hydrophobic than bulk silicon in cross sectional view.

  14. Quantitative measurement of tip sample forces by dynamic force spectroscopy in ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, H.; Anczykowski, B.

    2005-03-01

    We introduce a dynamic force spectroscopy technique enabling the quantitative measurement of conservative and dissipative tip-sample forces in ambient conditions. In difference to the commonly detected force-vs-distance curves dynamic force microscopy allows to measure the full range of tip-sample forces without hysteresis effects caused by a jump-to-contact. The approach is based on the specific behavior of a self-driven cantilever (frequency-modulation technique). Experimental applications on different samples (Fischer-sample, silicon wafer) are presented.

  15. Resolving amorphous solid-liquid interfaces by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burson, Kristen M.; Gura, Leonard; Kell, Burkhard; Büchner, Christin; Lewandowski, Adrian L.; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Recent advancements in liquid atomic force microscopy make it an ideal technique for probing the structure of solid-liquid interfaces. Here, we present a structural study of a two-dimensional amorphous silica bilayer immersed in an aqueous solution utilizing liquid atomic force microscopy with sub-nanometer resolution. Structures show good agreement with atomically resolved ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy images obtained on the same sample system, owing to the structural stability of the silica bilayer and the imaging clarity from the two-dimensional sample system. Pair distance histograms of ring center positions are utilized to develop quantitative metrics for structural comparison, and the physical origin of pair distance histogram peaks is addressed by direct assessment of real space structures.

  16. Enhanced functionality of nanotube modified atomic force microscopy tips.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Amol; Rinzler, Andrew G.

    2003-03-01

    Nanotube modified atomic force microscopy tips have demonstrated advantages in reduced tip wear, imaging with high resolution, and imaging of deep topographic features. We have further enhanced the utility and functionality of nanotube modified AFM tips by the application of a variety of coatings to these probes. Such coatings stabilize the nanotubes against Euler buckling and make the binding of the nanotubes to the AFM cantilevers extremely robust (even contact mode imaging becomes possible). In terms of new functionality, magnetic metal coating permits their use as improved resolution, magnetic force microscopy probes, while insulating coatings (with the coating removed from the very tip) should permit their use in scanning electrochemical microscopy (with anticipated applications in bio-electrochemistry). We will discuss the coating methods used and the tip exposure processes developed for the latter applications.

  17. Elasticity measurement of breast cancer cells by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chaoxian; Wang, Yuhua; Jiang, Ningcheng; Yang, Hongqin; Lin, Juqiang; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Mechanical properties of living cells play an important role in understanding various cells' function and state. Therefore cell biomechanics is expected to become a useful tool for cancer diagnosis. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a square pyramid probe was performed to investigate cancerous (MCF-7) and benign (MCF-10A) human breast epithelial cells. The new QITM mode was used to acquire high-resolution topographic images and elasticity of living cells. Furthermore, individual force curves were recorded at maximum loads of 0.2, 0.5 and 1 nN, and the dependence of cell's elasticity with loading force was discussed. It was showed that the cancerous cells exhibited smaller elasticity modulus in comparison to non-cancerous counterparts. The elasticity modulus increased as the loading force increased from 0.2 nN to 1 nN. This observation indicates that loading force affects the cell's apparent elasticity and it is important to choose the appropriate force applied to cells in order to distinguish normal and cancer cells. The results reveal that the mechanical properties of living cells measured by atomic force microscopy may be a useful indicator of cell type and disease.

  18. Non-contact atomic-level interfacial force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J.E.; Fleming, J.G.

    1997-02-01

    The scanning force microscopies (notably the Atomic Force Microscope--AFM), because of their applicability to nearly all materials, are presently the most widely used of the scanning-probe techniques. However, the AFM uses a deflection sensor to measure sample/probe forces which suffers from an inherent mechanical instability that occurs when the rate of change of the force with respect to the interfacial separation becomes equal to the spring constant of the deflecting member. This instability dramatically limits the breadth of applicability of AFM-type techniques to materials problems. In the course of implementing a DOE sponsored basic research program in interfacial adhesion, a self-balancing force sensor concept has been developed and incorporated into an Interfacial Force Microscopy (IFM) system by Sandia scientists. This sensor eliminates the instability problem and greatly enhances the applicability of the scanning force-probe technique to a broader range of materials and materials parameters. The impact of this Sandia development was recognized in 1993 by a Department of Energy award for potential impact on DOE programs and by an R and D 100 award for one of the most important new products of 1994. However, in its present stage of development, the IFM is strictly a research-level tool and a CRADA was initiated in order to bring this sensor technology into wide-spread availability by making it accessible in the form of a commercial instrument. The present report described the goals, approach and results of this CRADA effort.

  19. Note: Spring constant calibration of nanosurface-engineered atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Ergincan, O. Palasantzas, G.; Kooi, B. J.

    2014-02-15

    The determination of the dynamic spring constant (k{sub d}) of atomic force microscopy cantilevers is of crucial importance for converting cantilever deflection to accurate force data. Indeed, the non-destructive, fast, and accurate measurement method of the cantilever dynamic spring constant by Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 103705 (2012)] is confirmed here for plane geometry but surface modified cantilevers. It is found that the measured spring constants (k{sub eff}, the dynamic one k{sub d}), and the calculated (k{sub d,1}) are in good agreement within less than 10% error.

  20. Novel scanning force microscopy methods for investigation of transcription complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthold, Martin

    1997-11-01

    Scanning force microscopy (SFM) methods were developed to investigate the structure and the dynamics of E. coli transcription complexes. The described techniques will also be applicable to the study of other protein-nucleic acid complexes. First, the deposition process of DNA molecules onto a mica surface was investigated using polymer chain statistics. Conditions were found in which DNA molecules, and also protein-DNA complexes, are able to equilibrate on the surface. These findings imply that DNA and protein-DNA complexes attain a lowest energy state on the surface, and that meaningful structural information can, therefore, be obtained from the corresponding SFM images. Using these imaging conditions, SFM was then used to investigate various transcription complexes. The structures of crucial intermediates in the transcriptional activation of RNA polymeraseċsigma54 by NtrC were visualized and analyzed. Moreover, a new method was pioneered to identify the position of specific subunits in multi- protein assemblies. In this method, a specific subunit is tagged with a short piece of DNA which renders it easily recognizable in SFM images. This technique was employed to determine the positions of the two α subunits and the βsp/prime subunit in RNA polymerase-DNA complexes. Finally, SFM imaging in liquid was used to investigate the dynamics of the specific and non-specific interactions between RNA polymerase and DNA. Image sequences of an RNA polymerase actively transcribing a DNA template were obtained and analyzed. Image sequences of non-specific complexes were also obtained, and showed the RNA polymerase moving along the DNA in a one- dimensional random walk. The latter experiments provide some of the first direct evidence that RNA polymerase diffuses along DNA to facilitate promoter location. Chapters II, III, V and VI of this dissertation include material which has been previously published with co- authors. The co-authors are acknowledged at the beginning of

  1. Drive frequency dependent phase imaging in piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bo Huifeng; Kan Yi; Lu Xiaomei; Liu Yunfei; Peng Song; Wang Xiaofei; Cai Wei; Xue Ruoshi; Zhu Jinsong

    2010-08-15

    The drive frequency dependent piezoresponse (PR) phase signal in near-stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals is studied by piezoresponse force microscopy. It is clearly shown that the local and nonlocal electrostatic forces have a great contribution to the PR phase signal. The significant PR phase difference of the antiparallel domains are observed at the contact resonances, which is related to the electrostatic dominated electromechanical interactions of the cantilever and tip-sample system. Moreover, the modulation voltage induced frequency shift at higher eigenmodes could be attributed to the change of indention force depending on the modulation amplitude with a piezoelectric origin. The PR phase of the silicon wafer is also measured for comparison. It is certificated that the electrostatic interactions are universal in voltage modulated scanning probe microscopy and could be extended to other phase imaging techniques.

  2. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A.

    2015-09-15

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate.

  3. Dark-field differential dynamic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bayles, Alexandra V; Squires, Todd M; Helgeson, Matthew E

    2016-02-28

    Differential dynamic microscopy (DDM) is an emerging technique to measure the ensemble dynamics of colloidal and complex fluid motion using optical microscopy in systems that would otherwise be difficult to measure using other methods. To date, DDM has successfully been applied to linear space invariant imaging modes including bright-field, fluorescence, confocal, polarised, and phase-contrast microscopy to study diverse dynamic phenomena. In this work, we show for the first time how DDM analysis can be extended to dark-field imaging, i.e. a linear space variant (LSV) imaging mode. Specifically, we present a particle-based framework for describing dynamic image correlations in DDM, and use it to derive a correction to the image structure function obtained by DDM that accounts for scatterers with non-homogeneous intensity distributions as they move within the imaging plane. To validate the analysis, we study the Brownian motion of gold nanoparticles, whose plasmonic structure allows for nanometer-scale particles to be imaged under dark-field illumination, in Newtonian liquids. We find that diffusion coefficients of the nanoparticles can be reliably measured by dark-field DDM, even under optically dense concentrations where analysis via multiple-particle tracking microrheology fails. These results demonstrate the potential for DDM analysis to be applied to linear space variant forms of microscopy, providing access to experimental systems unavailable to other imaging modes. PMID:26822331

  4. Probing fibronectin–antibody interactions using AFM force spectroscopy and lateral force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kulik, Andrzej J; Lee, Kyumin; Pyka-Fościak, Grazyna; Nowak, Wieslaw

    2015-01-01

    Summary The first experiment showing the effects of specific interaction forces using lateral force microscopy (LFM) was demonstrated for lectin–carbohydrate interactions some years ago. Such measurements are possible under the assumption that specific forces strongly dominate over the non-specific ones. However, obtaining quantitative results requires the complex and tedious calibration of a torsional force. Here, a new and relatively simple method for the calibration of the torsional force is presented. The proposed calibration method is validated through the measurement of the interaction forces between human fibronectin and its monoclonal antibody. The results obtained using LFM and AFM-based classical force spectroscopies showed similar unbinding forces recorded at similar loading rates. Our studies verify that the proposed lateral force calibration method can be applied to study single molecule interactions. PMID:26114080

  5. Open-loop Band excitation Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Senli; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A multidimensional scanning probe microscopy approach for quantitative, cross-talk free mapping of surface electrostatic properties is demonstrated. Open-loop band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy (OL BE KPFM) probes the full response-frequency-potential surface at each pixel at standard imaging rates. The subsequent analysis reconstructs work function, tip surface capacitance gradient and resonant frequency maps, obviating feedback-related artifacts. OL BE KPFM imaging is demonstrated for several materials systems with topographic, potential and combined contrast. This approach combines the features of both frequency and amplitude KPFM and allows complete decoupling of topographic and voltage contributions to the KPFM signal.

  6. Implementation of NMR pulse sequences for Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, Bradley; Eichler, Alexander; Degen, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a scanning microscopy technique that allows measuring nuclear spin densities with a resolution of a few nanometers. Ongoing efforts are aiming at improving this resolution, which might ultimately facilitate non-destructive 3D scans of complex molecules or solid state systems with atomic resolution. Here, we review our current efforts to utilize in an MRFM experiment pulsing techniques borrowed from the nuclear magnetic resonance community. The use of advanced pulsing schemes may improve signal-to-noise ratio, imaging resolution, and allow the investigation of novel phenomena.

  7. Protrusion force microscopy reveals oscillatory force generation and mechanosensing activity of human macrophage podosomes.

    PubMed

    Labernadie, Anna; Bouissou, Anaïs; Delobelle, Patrick; Balor, Stéphanie; Voituriez, Raphael; Proag, Amsha; Fourquaux, Isabelle; Thibault, Christophe; Vieu, Christophe; Poincloux, Renaud; Charrière, Guillaume M; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Podosomes are adhesion structures formed in monocyte-derived cells. They are F-actin-rich columns perpendicular to the substrate surrounded by a ring of integrins. Here, to measure podosome protrusive forces, we designed an innovative experimental setup named protrusion force microscopy (PFM), which consists in measuring by atomic force microscopy the deformation induced by living cells onto a compliant Formvar sheet. By quantifying the heights of protrusions made by podosomes onto Formvar sheets, we estimate that a single podosome generates a protrusion force that increases with the stiffness of the substratum, which is a hallmark of mechanosensing activity. We show that the protrusive force generated at podosomes oscillates with a constant period and requires combined actomyosin contraction and actin polymerization. Finally, we elaborate a model to explain the mechanical and oscillatory activities of podosomes. Thus, PFM shows that podosomes are mechanosensing cell structures exerting a protrusive force. PMID:25385672

  8. Protrusion force microscopy reveals oscillatory force generation and mechanosensing activity of human macrophage podosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labernadie, Anna; Bouissou, Anaïs; Delobelle, Patrick; Balor, Stéphanie; Voituriez, Raphael; Proag, Amsha; Fourquaux, Isabelle; Thibault, Christophe; Vieu, Christophe; Poincloux, Renaud; Charrière, Guillaume M.; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle

    2014-11-01

    Podosomes are adhesion structures formed in monocyte-derived cells. They are F-actin-rich columns perpendicular to the substrate surrounded by a ring of integrins. Here, to measure podosome protrusive forces, we designed an innovative experimental setup named protrusion force microscopy (PFM), which consists in measuring by atomic force microscopy the deformation induced by living cells onto a compliant Formvar sheet. By quantifying the heights of protrusions made by podosomes onto Formvar sheets, we estimate that a single podosome generates a protrusion force that increases with the stiffness of the substratum, which is a hallmark of mechanosensing activity. We show that the protrusive force generated at podosomes oscillates with a constant period and requires combined actomyosin contraction and actin polymerization. Finally, we elaborate a model to explain the mechanical and oscillatory activities of podosomes. Thus, PFM shows that podosomes are mechanosensing cell structures exerting a protrusive force.

  9. Submolecular Resolution Imaging of Molecules by Atomic Force Microscopy: The Influence of the Electrostatic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Lit, Joost; Di Cicco, Francesca; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Swart, Ingmar

    2016-03-01

    The forces governing the contrast in submolecular resolution imaging of molecules with atomic force microscopy (AFM) have recently become a topic of intense debate. Here, we show that the electrostatic force is essential to understand the contrast in atomically resolved AFM images of polar molecules. Specifically, we image strongly polarized molecules with negatively and positively charged tips. A contrast inversion is observed above the polar groups. By taking into account the electrostatic forces between tip and molecule, the observed contrast differences can be reproduced using a molecular mechanics model. In addition, we analyze the height dependence of the various force components contributing to the high-resolution AFM contrast.

  10. Self-oscillating tapping mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, L.; Rogers, B.; Jones, M.; Adams, J. D.; Fuste, J. L.; Minne, S. C.

    2003-09-01

    A piezoelectric microcantilever probe is demonstrated as a self-oscillator used for tapping mode atomic force microscopy. The integrated piezoelectric film on the cantilever serves as the frequency-determining component of an oscillator circuit; oscillation near the cantilever's resonant frequency is maintained by applying positive feedback to the film via this circuit. This new mode, which is a step towards more compact and parallel tapping mode AFM imaging, is demonstrated by imaging an evaporated gold film on a silicon substrate. A self-oscillating frequency spectrum and a force-distance curve are also presented.

  11. A relationship between three-dimensional surface hydration structures and force distribution measured by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Naritaka; Watkins, Matthew; Shluger, Alexander L.; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    Hydration plays important roles in various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. Very recently, three-dimensional scanning force microscopy (3D-SFM) has been proposed as a tool to visualise solvated surfaces and their hydration structures with lateral and vertical (sub) molecular resolution. However, the relationship between the 3D force map obtained and the equilibrium water density, ρ(r), distribution above the surface remains an open question. Here, we investigate this relationship at an interface of an inorganic mineral, fluorite, and water. The force maps measured in pure water are directly compared to force maps generated using the solvent tip approximation (STA) model and from explicit molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the simulated STA force map describes the major features of the experimentally obtained force image. The agreement between the STA data and the experiment establishes the correspondence between the water density used as an input to the STA model and the experimental hydration structure and thus provides a tool to bridge the experimental force data and atomistic solvation structures. Further applications of this method should improve the accuracy and reliability of both interpretation of 3D-SFM force maps and atomistic simulations in a wide range of solid-liquid interfacial phenomena.Hydration plays important roles in various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. Very recently, three-dimensional scanning force microscopy (3D-SFM) has been proposed as a tool to visualise solvated surfaces and their hydration structures with lateral and vertical (sub) molecular resolution. However, the relationship between the 3D force map obtained and the equilibrium water density, ρ(r), distribution above the surface remains an open question. Here, we investigate this relationship at an interface of an inorganic mineral, fluorite, and water. The force maps measured in pure water are directly compared to force maps generated using the solvent

  12. Mechanical Forces Governing Tissue Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Glenn

    2002-10-01

    We have refined a UV-laser microbeam to investigate the forces at play during morphogenesis, i.e. early biological development, in the fruit fly Drosophila (1). While the microbeam typically is used to ablate tissue with cellular spatial resolution, it has the capability for submicron and thus subcellular spatial resolution. The microbeam can be steered in two-dimensions and UV-laser dissection occurred in vivo while the tissue was imaged in real time using a (visible) laser-scanning confocal microscope. We investigated a morphogenic process, known as dorsal closure, in a genetically engineered strain of Drosophila where green fluorescent protein has been fused to a fragment of a native structural protein (2). This allowed us to visualize the fluorescing contours of two opposing, outer sheets of tissue closing over an inner tissue sheet. Time-lapse imaging captured the contours in native closure as well as in response to UV-laser dissection. Specific patterns of dissection essentially eliminated a selected force: by tracking the changes in contour geometry we estimated the relative magnitude of that force (mechanical jump). Using this approach we identified and characterized a set of forces governing tissue dynamics. We have developed a mechanical model for the dynamics of dorsal closure based on this data set. This model provides a theoretical framework for investigating defective closure in mutant flies. Dorsal closure is a model system for various aspects of cell movement in wound healing and vertebrate development. This research has been supported by the DoD MFEL Program as administered by the AFOSR and by the NIH. 1. M.S. Hutson, Y. Tokutake, M-S. Chang, J.W. Bloor, S. Venakides, D.P. Kiehart, and G.S. Edwards. "Laser dissection of morphogenetic dynamics in Drosophila dorsal closure." In preparation. 2. D.P. Kiehart, et al, J. Cell Biol. 149, 471 (2000).

  13. Intermodulation electrostatic force microscopy for imaging surface photo-voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Borgani, Riccardo Forchheimer, Daniel; Thorén, Per-Anders; Haviland, David B.; Bergqvist, Jonas; Inganäs, Olle

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate an alternative to Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for imaging surface potential. The open-loop, single-pass technique applies a low-frequency AC voltage to the atomic force microscopy tip while driving the cantilever near its resonance frequency. Frequency mixing due to the nonlinear capacitance gives intermodulation products of the two drive frequencies near the cantilever resonance, where they are measured with high signal to noise ratio. Analysis of this intermodulation response allows for quantitative reconstruction of the contact potential difference. We derive the theory of the method, validate it with numerical simulation and a control experiment, and we demonstrate its utility for fast imaging of the surface photo-voltage on an organic photo-voltaic material.

  14. Intermolecular and interfacial forces: Elucidating molecular mechanisms using chemical force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, Paul David

    Investigation into the origin of forces dates to the early Greeks. Yet, only in recent decades have techniques for elucidating the molecular origin of forces been developed. Specifically, Chemical Force Microscopy uses the high precision and nanometer scale probe of Atomic Force Microscopy to measure molecular and interfacial interactions. This thesis presents the development of many novel Chemical Force Microscopy techniques for measuring equilibrium and time-dependant force profiles of molecular interactions, which led to a greater understanding of the origin of interfacial forces in solution. In chapter 2, Magnetic Feedback Chemical Force Microscopy stiffens the cantilever for measuring force profiles between self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces. Hydroxyl and carboxyl terminated SAMs produce long-range interactions that extend one or three nanometers into the solvent, respectively. In chapter 3, an ultra low noise AFM is produced through multiple modifications to the optical deflection detection system and signal processing electronics. In chapter 4, Brownian Force Profile Reconstruction is developed for accurate measurement of steep attractive interactions. Molecular ordering is observed for OMCTS, 1-nonanol, and water near flat surfaces. The molecular ordering of the solvent produces structural or solvation forces, providing insight into the orientation and possible solidification of the confined solvent. Seven molecular layers of OMCTS are observed but the oil remains fluid to the last layer. 1-nonanol strongly orders near the surface and becomes quasi-crystalline with four layers. Water is oriented by the surface and symmetry requires two layers of water (3.7 A) to be removed simultaneously. In chapter 5, electronic control of the cantilever Q (Q-control) is used to obtain the highest imaging sensitivity. In chapter 6, Energy Dissipation Chemical Force Microscopy is developed to investigate the time dependence and dissipative characteristics of SAM

  15. Lateral force calibration: accurate procedures for colloidal probe friction measurements in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Pratt, Jon R; Reitsma, Mark G

    2010-01-19

    The colloidal probe technique for atomic force microscopy (AFM) has allowed the investigation of an extensive range of surface force phenomena, including the measurement of frictional (lateral) forces between numerous materials. The quantitative accuracy of such friction measurements is often debated, in part due to a lack of confidence in existing calibration strategies. Here we compare three in situ AFM lateral force calibration techniques using a single colloidal probe, seeking to establish a foundation for quantitative measurement by linking these techniques to accurate force references available at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. We introduce a procedure for calibrating the AFM lateral force response to known electrostatic forces applied directly to the conductive colloidal probe. In a second procedure, we apply known force directly to the colloidal probe using a precalibrated piezo-resistive reference cantilever. We found agreement between these direct methods on the order of 2% (within random uncertainty for both measurements). In a third procedure, we performed a displacement-based calibration using the piezo-resistive reference cantilever as a stiffness reference artifact. The method demonstrated agreement on the order of 7% with the direct force methods, with the difference attributed to an expected systematic uncertainty, caused by in-plane deflection in the cantilever during loading. The comparison establishes the existing limits of instrument accuracy and sets down a basis for selection criteria for materials and methods in colloidal probe friction (lateral) force measurements via atomic force microscopy. PMID:19827782

  16. Intermittent contact mode piezoresponse force microscopy in a liquid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Brian; Jesse, Stephen; Habelitz, S.; Proksch, Roger; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2009-01-01

    Probing electromechanical coupling in biological systems and electroactive molecules requires high resolution functional imaging. Here, we investigate the feasibility of intermittent contact mode piezoresponse force microscopy based on simultaneous mechanical and electrical probe modulation. It is shown that imaging at frequencies corresponding to the first contact resonance in liquid allows contrast consistent with the electromechanical signal to be obtained for model ferroelectric systems and piezoelectric tooth dentin

  17. Intermittent-contact mode piezoresponse force microscopy in liquid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Brian J; Jesse, Stephen; Habelitz, S.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2009-01-01

    Probing electromechanical coupling in biological systems and electroactive molecules requires high-resolution imaging. Here, we investigate the feasibility of intermittent contact mode piezoresponse force microscopy based on simultaneous mechanical and electrical probe modulation. It is shown that the combination of (a) imaging at frequencies corresponding to the first contact resonance in (b) liquid allows contrast consistent with electromechanical signal to be obtained on model ferroelectric perovskites and tooth dentin.

  18. Probing starch-iodine interaction by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiongwei; An, Hongjie; Liu, Zhongdong; Yang, Hongshun; Wei, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    We explored the interaction of iodine with three crystalline type starches, corn, potato, and sweet potato starches using atomic force microscopy. Results revealed that starch molecules aggregated through interaction with iodine solution as well as iodine vapor. Detailed fine structures such as networks, chains, and super-helical structures were found in iodide solution tests. The nanostructures formed due to iodine adsorption could help to understand the formation and properties of the starch-iodine complex. PMID:24338992

  19. Transient response of tapping scanning force microscopy in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.Y.; Warmack, R.J. |; Oden, P.I.; Thundat, T.

    1996-03-01

    Tapping-mode scanning force microscopy in liquids is usually accomplished by acoustic excitation of the cantilever because of the strong viscous damping. Contact of the tip with the sample surface results in a damping of the cantilever amplitude with an anharmonic response. This interaction is modeled as a viscous-damped, one-dimensional harmonic oscillator periodically perturbed by an exponential surface potential. Experimental results verify the validity of the model. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  20. Quantification of dissipation and deformation in ambient atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Sergio; Gadelrab, Karim R.; Barcons, Victor; Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo

    2012-07-01

    A formalism to extract and quantify unknown quantities such as sample deformation, the viscosity of the sample and surface energy hysteresis in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is presented. Recovering the unknowns only requires the cantilever to be accurately calibrated and the dissipative processes occurring during sample deformation to be well modeled. The theory is validated by comparison with numerical simulations and shown to be able to provide, in principle, values of sample deformation with picometer resolution.

  1. Probing the duplex stainless steel phases via magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheno, S. M.; Santos, F. S.; Kuri, S. E.

    2008-03-01

    Duplex stainless steels are austenitic-ferritic alloys used in many applications, thanks to their excellent mechanical properties and high corrosion resistance. In this work, chemical analyses, x-ray diffraction, and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) were employed to characterize the solution annealed and aged duplex stainless steel. The samples exhibited no changes in lattice parameters and the MFM technique proved successful in clearly imaging the magnetic domain structure of the ferrite phase.

  2. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Shi, Xuetao; Ostrovidov, Serge; Wu, Hongkai; Nakajima, Ken

    2016-03-01

    A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  3. Multifrequency Force Microscopy of Helical Protein Assembly on a Virus.

    PubMed

    Calò, Annalisa; Eleta-Lopez, Aitziber; Stoliar, Pablo; De Sancho, David; Santos, Sergio; Verdaguer, Albert; Bittner, Alexander M

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution microscopy techniques have been extensively used to investigate the structure of soft, biological matter at the nanoscale, from very thin membranes to small objects, like viruses. Electron microscopy techniques allow for obtaining extraordinary resolution by averaging signals from multiple identical structures. In contrast, atomic force microscopy (AFM) collects data from single entities. Here, it is possible to finely modulate the interaction with the samples, in order to be sensitive to their top surface, avoiding mechanical deformations. However, most biological surfaces are highly curved, such as fibers or tubes, and ultimate details of their surface are in the vicinity of steep height variations. This limits lateral resolution, even when sharp probes are used. We overcome this problem by using multifrequency force microscopy on a textbook example, the Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV). We achieved unprecedented resolution in local maps of amplitude and phase shift of the second excited mode, recorded together with sample topography. Our data, which combine multifrequency imaging and Fourier analysis, confirm the structure deduced from averaging techniques (XRD, cryoEM) for surface features of single virus particles, down to the helical pitch of the coat protein subunits, 2.3 nm. Remarkably, multifrequency AFM images do not require any image postprocessing. PMID:26915629

  4. Multifrequency Force Microscopy of Helical Protein Assembly on a Virus

    PubMed Central

    Calò, Annalisa; Eleta-Lopez, Aitziber; Stoliar, Pablo; De Sancho, David; Santos, Sergio; Verdaguer, Albert; Bittner, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution microscopy techniques have been extensively used to investigate the structure of soft, biological matter at the nanoscale, from very thin membranes to small objects, like viruses. Electron microscopy techniques allow for obtaining extraordinary resolution by averaging signals from multiple identical structures. In contrast, atomic force microscopy (AFM) collects data from single entities. Here, it is possible to finely modulate the interaction with the samples, in order to be sensitive to their top surface, avoiding mechanical deformations. However, most biological surfaces are highly curved, such as fibers or tubes, and ultimate details of their surface are in the vicinity of steep height variations. This limits lateral resolution, even when sharp probes are used. We overcome this problem by using multifrequency force microscopy on a textbook example, the Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV). We achieved unprecedented resolution in local maps of amplitude and phase shift of the second excited mode, recorded together with sample topography. Our data, which combine multifrequency imaging and Fourier analysis, confirm the structure deduced from averaging techniques (XRD, cryoEM) for surface features of single virus particles, down to the helical pitch of the coat protein subunits, 2.3 nm. Remarkably, multifrequency AFM images do not require any image postprocessing. PMID:26915629

  5. Bitumen morphologies by phase-detection atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Masson, J-F; Leblond, V; Margeson, J

    2006-01-01

    Summary Bitumen is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons for which microstructural knowledge is incomplete. In an effort to detail this microstructure, 13 bitumens were analysed by phase-detection atomic force microscopy. Based on morphology, the bitumens could be classified into three distinct groups. One group showed fine domains down to 0.1 microm, another showed domains of about 1 microm, and a third group showed up to four different domains or phases of different sizes and shapes. No correlation was found between the atomic force microscopy morphology and the composition based on asphaltenes, polar aromatics, naphthene aromatics and saturates. A high correlation was found between the area of the 'bee-like' structures and the vanadium and nickel content in bitumen, and between the atomic force microscopy groups and the average size of molecular planes made of fused aromatics. The morphology and the molecular arrangements in bitumen thus appear to be partly governed by the molecular planes and the polarity defined by metallic cations. PMID:16438686

  6. Polymer Filler Aging and Failure Studied by Lateral Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratto, T; Saab, A P

    2009-05-27

    In the present work, we study, via force microscopy, the basic physical interactions of a single bead of silica filler with a PDMS matrix both before and after exposure to gamma radiation. Our goal was to confirm our results from last year, and to explore force microscopy as a means of obtaining particle-scale polymer/filler interactions suitable for use as empirical inputs to a computational model consisting of an ensemble of silica beads embedded in a PDMS matrix. Through careful calibration of a conventional atomic force microscope, we obtained both normal and lateral force data that was fitted to yield adhesion, surface shear modulus, and friction of a 1 {micro}m silica bead in contact with PDMS layers of various thickness. Comparison of these terms before and after gamma exposure indicated that initially, radiation exposure lead to softening of the PDMS, but eventually resulted in stiffening. Simultaneously, adhesion between the polymer and silica decreased. This could indicate a serious failure path for filled PDMS exposed to radiation, whereby stiffening of the bulk polymer leads to loss of compressive elastic behavior, while a decrease in polymer filler adhesion results in an increased likelihood of stress failure under load. In addition to further testing of radiation damaged polymers, we also performed FEA modeling of silica beads in a silicone matrix using the shear modulus and adhesion values isolated from the force microscopy experiments as model inputs. The resulting simulation indicated that as a polymer stiffens due to impinging radiation, it also undergoes weakening of adhesion to the filler. The implication is that radiation induces a compound failure mode in filled polymer systems.

  7. Chemical Force Microscopy: Probing Chemical Origin of Interfacial Forces and Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Vezenov, D V; Noy, A; Ashby, P

    2005-03-21

    Experimental methods of measuring intermolecular interactions have had several recent developments which have improved our understanding of chemical forces. First, they allowed direct exploration of the role that different functionalities, solvents and environmental variables play in shaping the strength of intermolecular interactions. Chemical force microscopy approach, in particular, became an extremely effective tool for exploring the contributions of each of these factors. Second, CFM studies clearly debunked the naive notion that intermolecular interaction strength is determined only by the nature of the interacting groups. These studies showed that the interaction strength between two chemical species must always considered in context of the environment surrounding these species. Third, CFM studies highlighted the critical role solvent plays in shaping intermolecular interactions in condensed phases. Emerging kinetic view of the intermolecular interactions introduced a completely new paradigm for understanding these interactions. Kinetic modeling showed that the measured interactions strength depends not only on the energy landscape of the system, but also on the loading history prior to the bond break-up. This new paradigm refocused our attention to the energy landscape as a fundamental characteristic of the interaction. Moreover, dynamic force spectroscopy, derived from kinetic models, allowed direct characterization of the geometry of the potential energy barrier, while some other methods attempt to probe the equilibrium energy landscape directly. Further investigations of the interactions in different systems, especially interactions between biomolecules, will uncover many interesting characteristics of intermolecular potentials. These studies have the potential to reveal, for the first time, a true picture of the energy landscapes of adhesion processes in complex chemical and biological systems.

  8. Photothermally excited force modulation microscopy for broadband nanomechanical property measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Killgore, Jason P.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate photothermally excited force modulation microscopy (PTE FMM) for mechanical property characterization across a broad frequency range with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Photothermal excitation allows for an AFM cantilever driving force that varies smoothly as a function of drive frequency, thus avoiding the problem of spurious resonant vibrations that hinder piezoelectric excitation schemes. A complication of PTE FMM is that the sub-resonance cantilever vibration shape is fundamentally different compared to piezoelectric excitation. By directly measuring the vibrational shape of the cantilever, we show that PTE FMM is an accurate nanomechanical characterization method. PTE FMM is a pathway towards the characterization of frequency sensitive specimens such as polymers and biomaterials with frequency range limited only by the resonance frequency of the cantilever and the low frequency limit of the AFM.

  9. Photothermally excited force modulation microscopy for broadband nanomechanical property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan Killgore, Jason P.

    2015-11-16

    We demonstrate photothermally excited force modulation microscopy (PTE FMM) for mechanical property characterization across a broad frequency range with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Photothermal excitation allows for an AFM cantilever driving force that varies smoothly as a function of drive frequency, thus avoiding the problem of spurious resonant vibrations that hinder piezoelectric excitation schemes. A complication of PTE FMM is that the sub-resonance cantilever vibration shape is fundamentally different compared to piezoelectric excitation. By directly measuring the vibrational shape of the cantilever, we show that PTE FMM is an accurate nanomechanical characterization method. PTE FMM is a pathway towards the characterization of frequency sensitive specimens such as polymers and biomaterials with frequency range limited only by the resonance frequency of the cantilever and the low frequency limit of the AFM.

  10. Magnetic force microscopy using tip magnetization modulated by ferromagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arima, Eiji; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Nomura, Hikaru; Nakatani, Ryoichi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-01

    In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the tip-sample distance should be reduced to analyze the microscopic magnetic domain structure with high spatial resolution. However, achieving a small tip-sample distance has been difficult because of superimposition of interaction forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces induced by the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of MFM using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to extract only the magnetic field near the sample surface. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by FMR to separate the magnetic field and topographic structure. We demonstrate the modulation of the magnetization of the cantilever and the identification of the polarities of a perpendicular magnetic medium.

  11. Magnetic force microscopy using tip magnetization modulated by ferromagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Arima, Eiji; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Nomura, Hikaru; Nakatani, Ryoichi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-27

    In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the tip-sample distance should be reduced to analyze the microscopic magnetic domain structure with high spatial resolution. However, achieving a small tip-sample distance has been difficult because of superimposition of interaction forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces induced by the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of MFM using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to extract only the magnetic field near the sample surface. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by FMR to separate the magnetic field and topographic structure. We demonstrate the modulation of the magnetization of the cantilever and the identification of the polarities of a perpendicular magnetic medium. PMID:25736463

  12. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Black, Jennifer M; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained. PMID:27587276

  13. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained. PMID:27587276

  14. Detection of secondary phases in duplex stainless steel by magnetic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez-Salgado, J.; Domínguez-Aguilar, M.A.; Castro-Domínguez, B.; Hernández-Hernández, P.; Newman, R.C.

    2013-12-15

    The secondary phase transformations in a commercial super duplex stainless steel were investigated by micro-chemical analyses and high resolution scanning probe microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray and electron probe detected ferrite and austenite as well as secondary phases in unetched aged duplex stainless steel type 25Cr-7Ni-3Mo. Volta potential indicated that nitride and sigma appeared more active than ferrite, while secondary austenite and austenite presented a nobler potential. Reversal order in nobility is thought to be attributable to the potential ranking provided by oxide nature diversity as a result of secondary phase surface compositions on steel. After eutectoid transformation, secondary austenite was detected by electron probe microanalysis, whereas atomic force microscopy distinguished this phase from former austenite by image contrast. Magnetic force microscopy revealed a “ghosted” effect on the latter microstructure probably derived from metal memory reminiscence of mechanical polishing at passivity and long range magnetic forces of ferrite phase. - Highlights: • Nobility detection of secondary phases by SKPFM in DSS particles is not a straightforward procedure. • As Volta potential and contrast are not always consistent SKPFM surface oxides is thought played an important role in detection. • AFM distinguished secondary austenite from former austenite by image contrast though SEM required EPMA.

  15. Adhesion Forces between Lewis(X) Determinant Antigens as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tromas, C; Rojo, J; de la Fuente, J M; Barrientos, A G; García, R; Penadés, S

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion forces between individual molecules of Lewis(X) trisaccharide antigen (Le(X) ) have been measured in water and in calcium solution by using atomic force microscopy (AFM, see graph). These results demonstrate the self-recognition capability of this antigen, and reinforce the hypothesis that carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction could be considered as the first step in the cell-adhesion process in nature. PMID:12203646

  16. Tissue Contraction Force Microscopy for Optimization of Engineered Cardiac Tissue.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jeremy A; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    We developed a high-throughput screening assay that allows for relative comparison of the twitch force of millimeter-scale gel-based cardiac tissues. This assay is based on principles taken from traction force microscopy and uses fluorescent microspheres embedded in a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate. A gel-forming cell suspension is simply pipetted onto the PDMS to form hemispherical cardiac tissue samples. Recordings of the fluorescent bead movement during tissue pacing are used to determine the maximum distance that the tissue can displace the elastic PDMS substrate. In this study, fibrin gel hemispheres containing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes were formed on the PDMS and allowed to culture for 9 days. Bead displacement values were measured and compared to direct force measurements to validate the utility of the system. The amplitude of bead displacement correlated with direct force measurements, and the twitch force generated by the tissues was the same in 2 and 4 mg/mL fibrin gels, even though the 2 mg/mL samples visually appear more contractile if the assessment were made on free-floating samples. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this assay as a screening tool that allows for rapid sample preparation, data collection, and analysis in a simple and cost-effective platform. PMID:26538167

  17. Local Mechanical Properties by Atomic Force Microscopy Nanoindentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranchida, Davide; Piccarolo, Stefano

    The analysis of mechanical properties on a nanometer scale is a useful tool for combining information concerning texture organization obtained by microscopy with the properties of individual components. Moreover, this technique promotes the understanding of the hierarchical arrangement in complex natural materials as well in the case of simpler morphologies arising from industrial processes. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) can bridge morphological information, obtained with outstanding resolution, to local mechanical properties. When performing an AFM nanoindentation, the rough force curve, i.e., the plot of the voltage output from the photodiode vs. the voltage applied to the piezo-scanner, can be translated into a curve of the applied load vs. the penetration depth after a series of preliminary determinations and calibrations. However, the analysis of the unloading portion of the force curves collected for polymers does not lead to a correct evaluation of Young's modulus. The high slope of the unloading curves is not linked to an elastic behavior, as would be expected, but rather to a viscoelastic effect. This can be argued on the basis that the unloading curves are superimposed on the loading curves in the case of an ideal elastic behavior, as for rubbers, or generally in the case of materials with very short relaxation times. In contrast, when the relaxation time of the sample is close to or even much larger than the indentation time scale, very high slopes are recorded.

  18. Quantitative electrostatic force microscopy with sharp silicon tips.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, L; Edwards, M A; Gomila, G

    2014-12-12

    Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) probes are typically coated in either metal (radius ∼ 30 nm) or highly-doped diamond (radius ∼ 100 nm). Highly-doped silicon probes, which offer a sharpened and stable tip apex (radius ∼ 1-10 nm) and are usually used only in standard atomic force microscopy, have been recently shown to allow enhanced lateral resolution in quantitative EFM and its application for dielectric constant measurement. Here we present the theoretical modelling required to quantitatively interpret the electrostatic force between these sharpened tips and samples. In contrast to a sphere-capped cone geometry used to describe metal/diamond-coated tips, modelling a sharpened silicon tip requires a geometry comprised of a cone with two different angles. Theoretical results are supported by experimental measurements of metallic substrates and ∼10 nm radius dielectric nanoparticles. This work is equally applicable to EFM and other electrical scanned probe techniques, where it allows quantifying electrical properties of nanomaterials and 3D nano-objects with higher resolution. PMID:25407683

  19. Characterization of new drug delivery nanosystems using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyratou, Ellas; Mourelatou, Elena A.; Demetzos, C.; Makropoulou, Mersini; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Liposomes are the most attractive lipid vesicles for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine, behaving also as cell models in biophotonics research. The characterization of the micro-mechanical properties of drug carriers is an important issue and many analytical techniques are employed, as, for example, optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. In this work, polyol hyperbranched polymers (HBPs) have been employed along with liposomes for the preparation of new chimeric advanced drug delivery nanosystems (Chi-aDDnSs). Aliphatic polyester HBPs with three different pseudogenerations G2, G3 and G4 with 16, 32, and 64 peripheral hydroxyl groups, respectively, have been incorporated in liposomal formulation. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique was used for the comparative study of the morphology and the mechanical properties of Chi-aDDnSs and conventional DDnS. The effects of both the HBPs architecture and the polyesters pseudogeneration number in the stability and the stiffness of chi-aDDnSs were examined. From the force-distance curves of AFM spectroscopy, the Young's modulus was calculated.

  20. An atomic force microscopy study of Eurofer-97 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamopoulos, D.; Aristomenopoulou, E.; Sandim, M. J. R.; Sandim, H. R. Z.; Pissas, M.

    2014-07-01

    In recent years the microstructure, mechanical and magnetic properties of Eurofer-97 steel are studied intensively due to its application in nuclear fusion power plants. Its microstructure is usually accessed by means of electron microscopy. Here we present an alternative approach utilizing Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to study as-received Eurofer-97 steel. We recorded both the Height Signal (HS) and Phase Signal (PS) that provided information on the morphologic and inelastic topography, respectively. With the HS we detected spherical particles (SPs) of size 50-2000 nm. Interestingly, micrometer SPs (0.1-2.0 μm) are randomly distributed, while nanometer SPs (50-100 nm) are sometimes arranged in correlation to grain boundaries. The PS clearly revealed that the micrometer SPs exhibit inelastic properties. Though we cannot identify the elemental composition of the SPs with AFM, based on relevant electron microscopy data we ascribe the nanometer ones to the TaC, TiN and VN and the coarse micrometer ones to M23C6 (M=Cr, Fe). The latter class of SPs can probably be active sites that influence the mechanical properties of Eurofer-97 steel upon annealing as observed in relevant electron microscopy based studies.

  1. Peering at Brain Polysomes with Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lunelli, Lorenzo; Bernabò, Paola; Bolner, Alice; Vaghi, Valentina; Marchioretto, Marta; Viero, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The translational machinery, i.e., the polysome or polyribosome, is one of the biggest and most complex cytoplasmic machineries in cells. Polysomes, formed by ribosomes, mRNAs, several proteins and non-coding RNAs, represent integrated platforms where translational controls take place. However, while the ribosome has been widely studied, the organization of polysomes is still lacking comprehensive understanding. Thus much effort is required in order to elucidate polysome organization and any novel mechanism of translational control that may be embedded. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a type of scanning probe microscopy that allows the acquisition of 3D images at nanoscale resolution. Compared to electron microscopy (EM) techniques, one of the main advantages of AFM is that it can acquire thousands of images both in air and in solution, enabling the sample to be maintained under near physiological conditions without any need for staining and fixing procedures. Here, a detailed protocol for the accurate purification of polysomes from mouse brain and their deposition on mica substrates is described. This protocol enables polysome imaging in air and liquid with AFM and their reconstruction as three-dimensional objects. Complementary to cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), the proposed method can be conveniently used for systematically analyzing polysomes and studying their organization. PMID:27023752

  2. Recognizing nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, Nadine J.; Smith, Daniël; Calogero, Gaetano; Koster, Rik S.; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; van Huis, Marijn A.; Swart, Ingmar

    2016-06-01

    Doping graphene by heteroatoms such as nitrogen presents an attractive route to control the position of the Fermi level in the material. We prepared N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111) surfaces via chemical vapor deposition of two different molecules. Using scanning tunneling microscopy images as a benchmark, we show that the position of the dopant atoms can be determined using atomic force microscopy. Specifically, the frequency shift-distance curves Δ f (z ) acquired above a N atom are significantly different from the curves measured over a C atom. Similar behavior was found for N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111). The results are corroborated by density functional theory calculations employing a van der Waals functional.

  3. Atom inlays performed at room temperature using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Abe, Masayuki; Hirayama, Shinji; Oyabu, Noriaki; Custance, Óscar; Morita, Seizo

    2005-02-01

    The ability to manipulate single atoms and molecules laterally for creating artificial structures on surfaces is driving us closer to the ultimate limit of two-dimensional nanoengineering. However, experiments involving this level of manipulation have been performed only at cryogenic temperatures. Scanning tunnelling microscopy has proved, so far, to be a unique tool with all the necessary capabilities for laterally pushing, pulling or sliding single atoms and molecules, and arranging them on a surface at will. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to perform well-controlled lateral manipulations of single atoms using near-contact atomic force microscopy even at room temperature. We report the creation of 'atom inlays', that is, artificial atomic patterns formed from a few embedded atoms in the plane of a surface. At room temperature, such atomic structures remain stable on the surface for relatively long periods of time.

  4. Unraveling the Molecular Structures of Asphaltenes by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Bruno; Meyer, Gerhard; Peña, Diego; Mullins, Oliver C; Gross, Leo

    2015-08-12

    Petroleum is one of the most precious and complex molecular mixtures existing. Because of its chemical complexity, the solid component of crude oil, the asphaltenes, poses an exceptional challenge for structure analysis, with tremendous economic relevance. Here, we combine atomic-resolution imaging using atomic force microscopy and molecular orbital imaging using scanning tunnelling microscopy to study more than 100 asphaltene molecules. The complexity and range of asphaltene polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are established in detail. Identifying molecular structures provides a foundation to understand all aspects of petroleum science from colloidal structure and interfacial interactions to petroleum thermodynamics, enabling a first-principles approach to optimize resource utilization. Particularly, the findings contribute to a long-standing debate about asphaltene molecular architecture. Our technique constitutes a paradigm shift for the analysis of complex molecular mixtures, with possible applications in molecular electronics, organic light emitting diodes, and photovoltaic devices. PMID:26170086

  5. Amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, is acoustic driving in liquid quantitatively reliable?

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Zhao, Cunlu; Mugele, Frieder; van den Ende, Dirk

    2015-09-25

    Measuring quantitative tip-sample interaction forces in dynamic atomic force microscopy in fluids is challenging because of the strong damping of the ambient viscous medium and the fluid-mediated driving forces. This holds in particular for the commonly used acoustic excitation of the cantilever oscillation. Here we present measurements of tip-sample interactions due to conservative DLVO and hydration forces and viscous dissipation forces in aqueous electrolytes using tips with radii varying from typical 20 nm for the DLVO and hydration forces, to 1 μm for the viscous dissipation. The measurements are analyzed using a simple harmonic oscillator model, continuous beam theory with fluid-mediated excitation and thermal noise spectroscopy (TNS). In all cases consistent conservative forces, deviating less than 40% from each other, are obtained for all three approaches. The DLVO forces are even within 5% of the theoretical expectations for all approaches. Accurate measurements of dissipative forces within 15% of the predictions of macroscopic fluid dynamics require the use of TNS or continuous beam theory including fluid-mediated driving. Taking this into account, acoustic driving in liquid is quantitatively reliable. PMID:26335613

  6. Amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy, is acoustic driving in liquid quantitatively reliable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Zhao, Cunlu; Mugele, Frieder; van den Ende, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Measuring quantitative tip-sample interaction forces in dynamic atomic force microscopy in fluids is challenging because of the strong damping of the ambient viscous medium and the fluid-mediated driving forces. This holds in particular for the commonly used acoustic excitation of the cantilever oscillation. Here we present measurements of tip-sample interactions due to conservative DLVO and hydration forces and viscous dissipation forces in aqueous electrolytes using tips with radii varying from typical 20 nm for the DLVO and hydration forces, to 1 μm for the viscous dissipation. The measurements are analyzed using a simple harmonic oscillator model, continuous beam theory with fluid-mediated excitation and thermal noise spectroscopy (TNS). In all cases consistent conservative forces, deviating less than 40% from each other, are obtained for all three approaches. The DLVO forces are even within 5% of the theoretical expectations for all approaches. Accurate measurements of dissipative forces within 15% of the predictions of macroscopic fluid dynamics require the use of TNS or continuous beam theory including fluid-mediated driving. Taking this into account, acoustic driving in liquid is quantitatively reliable.

  7. Modifications of the structure of the pericellular matrix measured via optical force probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLane, Louis; Kramer, Anthony; Chang, Patrick; Curtis, Jennifer

    2013-03-01

    The pericellular matrix is a large protein and polysaccharide rich polymer layer attached to the surface of many cells, and which often extends several microns out from the cell surface into the surrounding extracellular space. Here we study the intrinsic nature and modifications of the structure of the pericellular coat on rat chondrocytes with the use of optical force probe microscopy. Optical force probe studies allow us to make both dynamic force measurements as well as equilibrium force measurements throughout the coat. These force measurements are used to observe the structural change in the coat with the addition of exogenous aggrecan. Not only does addition of exogenous aggrecan dramatically swell our coat to well over twice in size, our analysis indicates that the addition of exogenous aggrecan decreases the mesh size throughout the coat. We speculate that the added aggrecan binds to available binding sites along the hyaluronan chain, both enlarging the coat's size as well as tightening up the opening within the coat. We further suggest that the available binding sites for the exogenous aggrecan are abundant in the outer edges of the coat, as both the dynamic and equilibrium forces in this region are changed. Here, both force measurements show that forces closest to the cell membrane remain relatively unchanged, while the forces in the outer region of the coat are increased. These results are consistent with those obtained with complementary measurements using quantitative particle exclusion assays.

  8. Local rheology of human neutrophils investigated using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong J; Patel, Dipika; Park, Soyeun

    2011-01-01

    During the immune response, neutrophils display localized mechanical events by interacting with their environment through the micro-vascular transit, trans-endothelial, and trans-epithelial migration. Nano-mechanical studies of human neutrophils on localized nano-domains could provide the essential information for understanding their immune responsive functions. Using the Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)-based micro-rheology, we have investigated rheological properties of the adherent human neutrophils on local nano-domains. We have applied the modified Hertz model to obtain the viscoelastic moduli from the relatively thick body regions of the neutrophils. In addition, by using more advanced models to account for the substrate effects, we have successfully characterized the rheological properties of the thin leading and tail regions as well. We found a regional difference in the mechanical compliances of the adherent neutrophils. The central regions of neutrophils were significantly stiffer (1,548 ± 871 Pa) than the regions closer to the leading edge (686 ± 801 Pa), while the leading edge and the tail (494 ± 537 Pa) regions were mechanically indistinguishable. The frequency-dependent elastic and viscous moduli also display a similar regional difference. Over the studied frequency range (100 to 300 Hz), the complex viscoelastic moduli display the partial rubber plateau behavior where the elastic moduli are greater than the viscous moduli for a given frequency. The non-disparaging viscous modulus indicates that the neutrophils display a viscoelastic dynamic behavior rather than a perfect elastic behavior like polymer gels. In addition, we found no regional difference in the structural damping coefficient between the leading edge and the cell body. Thus, we conclude that despite the lower loss and storage moduli, the leading edges of the human neutrophils display partially elastic properties similar to the cell body. These results suggest that the lower elastic moduli

  9. Nanoscale Characterization of Mock Explosive Materials Using Advanced Atomic Force Microscopy Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin; Mares, Jesus; Groven, Lori J.; Son, Steven F.; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Raman, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    Most explosives are micro- and nanoscale composite material systems consisting of energetic crystals, amorphous particles, binders, and additives whose response to mechanical, thermal, or electromagnetic insults is often controlled by submicrometer-scale heterogeneities and interfaces. Several advanced dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques, including phase imaging, force volume mode, and Kelvin probe force microscopy with resonance enhancement for dielectric property mapping, have been used to map the local physical properties of mock explosive materials systems, allowing the identification of submicrometer heterogeneities in electrical and mechanical properties that could lead to the formation of hotspots under electromagnetic or mechanical stimuli. The physical interpretation of the property maps and the methods of image formation are presented. Possible interpretations of the results and future applications to energetic material systems are also discussed.

  10. CO tip functionalization in subatomic resolution atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Minjung; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2015-10-19

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) employing a CO-functionalized tip displays dramatically enhanced resolution wherein covalent bonds of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon can be imaged. Employing real-space pseudopotential first-principles calculations, we examine the role of CO in functionalizing the nc-AFM tip. Our calculations allow us to simulate full AFM images and ascertain the enhancement mechanism of the CO molecule. We consider two approaches: one with an explicit inclusion of the CO molecule and one without. By comparing our simulations to existing experimental images, we ascribe the enhanced resolution of the CO functionalized tip to the special orbital characteristics of the CO molecule.

  11. Visualisation of xanthan conformation by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Jonathan; Morris, Victor J; Al-Assaf, Saphwan; Gunning, A Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Direct visual evidence obtained by atomic force microscopy demonstrates that when xanthan is adsorbed from aqueous solution onto the heterogeneously charged substrate mica, its helical conformation is distorted. Following adsorption it requires annealing for several hours to restore its ordered helical state. Once the helix state reforms, the AFM images obtained showed clear resolution of the periodicity with a value of 4.7nm consistent with the previously predicted models. In addition, the images also reveal evidence that the helix is formed by a double strand, a clarification of an ambiguity of the xanthan ultrastructure that has been outstanding for many years. PMID:27185152

  12. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Xu, Zhe; Gandee, Leah; Du, Yingjie; Lu, Hongbing; Zimmern, Philippe; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model.

  13. Measuring the elasticity of plant cells with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Braybrook, Siobhan A

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of biological materials impact their functions. This is most evident in plants where the cell wall contains each cell's contents and connects each cell to its neighbors irreversibly. Examining the physical properties of the plant cell wall is key to understanding how plant cells, tissues, and organs grow and gain the shapes important for their respective functions. Here, we present an atomic force microscopy-based nanoindentation method for examining the elasticity of plant cells at the subcellular, cellular, and tissue level. We describe the important areas of experimental design to be considered when planning and executing these types of experiments and provide example data as illustration. PMID:25640432

  14. Nanoscale resolution microchannel flow velocimetry by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piorek, Brian; Mechler, Ádám; Lal, Ratnesh; Freudenthal, Patrick; Meinhart, Carl; Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2006-10-01

    The velocity of a microchannel flow was determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a 50nm wide "whisker," which was partially submerged and scanned transverse to the flow while drag was recorded. A peaked, near parabolic, flow velocity profile was found. Particle image velocity (PIV) measurements using 70nm diameter quantum-dot-coated polystyrene spheres confirmed the shape of the AFM-measured velocity profile. AFM-based nanometer resolution velocimetry confirms that the drag-velocity relationship for the whisker remains consistent over a wide range of shear values and appears to successfully resolve submicron scale flows, which are beyond the limits of conventional PIV measurements.

  15. Image contrast reversals in contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Chengfu; Chen, Yuhang Wang, Tian

    2015-02-15

    Multiple image contrast inversions are observed along with the increase of modulation frequency for contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) imaging of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) specimen. Analysis of the contact vibrational spectra indicates that the inversions can be attributed to structure-induced variations of tip-sample contact mechanics. Contact stiffness and damping at HOPG step edges exhibit significant increases relative to those in the flat regions. For quantitative evaluation of mechanical properties in CR-AFM, coupling effects of the surface geometry must be considered.

  16. Chemical Force Microscopy of Chemical and Biological Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, A

    2006-01-02

    Interactions between chemical functionalities define outcomes of the vast majority of important events in chemistry, biology and materials science. Chemical Force Microscopy (CFM)--a technique that uses direct chemical functionalization of AFM probes with specific functionalities--allows researchers to investigate these important interactions directly. We review the basic principles of CFM, some examples of its application, and theoretical models that provide the basis for understanding the experimental results. We also emphasize application of modern kinetic theory of non-covalent interactions strength to the analysis of CFM data.

  17. Atomic force microscopy to detect internal live processes in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokukin, M. E.; Guz, N. V.; Vasilyev, S.; Sokolov, I.

    2010-01-01

    Here we report on the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study surface oscillations coming from internal live processes of insects. With a specially designed AFM stage to keep an insect motion partially restricted, the AFM can record internal oscillations on different parts of the insect. We demonstrate the method for a fly, mosquito, and lady beetle. We show that AFM can provide information about the spectral behavior that has not been studied so far, 10-600 Hz range, detecting amplitudes down to subnanometer level.

  18. Microstructural Characterization of Hierarchical Structured Surfaces by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomareva, A. A.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Suchaneck, G.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we evaluate the hierarchical surface topography of reactively sputtered nanocrystalline Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and TiO2 thin films as well as plasma-treated antireflective PET films by means of determining the fractal dimension and power spectral density (PSD) of surface topography recorded by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Local fractal dimension was obtained using the triangulation method. The PSDs of all samples were fitted to the k-correlation model (also called ABC model) valid for a self-affine surface topography. Fractal analysis of AFM images was shown to be an appropriate and easy to use tool for the characterization of hierarchical nanostructures.

  19. Note: On the deconvolution of Kelvin probe force microscopy data.

    PubMed

    Blümel, A; Plank, H; Klug, A; Fisslthaler, E; Sezen, M; Grogger, W; List, E J W

    2010-05-01

    In Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) proper interpretation of the data is often difficult because the measured surface potential is affected by the interaction of the cantilever with the sample. In this work, the tip's interaction with a modeled surface potential distribution was simulated, leading to a calculated KPFM image. Although simplified, the calculation is capable of showing the influence of the cantilever in the correct qualitative manner, proven by a comparison with experimental data. Additionally, a deconvolution was performed on the simulated image, showing that for simple geometries revealing the "real" surface potential data is possible in principle. PMID:20515184

  20. Atomic force microscopy on phase-control pulsed force mode in water: Imaging and force analysis on a rhodium-octaethylporphyrin layer on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Shin-ichi; Kohyama, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    We developed phase-control pulsed force mode (p-PFM) as the operation mode for atomic force microscopy (AFM). The p-PFM allowed us to observe soft or weakly adsorbed materials in a liquid environment using a conventional AFM apparatus, and allowed for force curve mapping (FCM) after offline data processing. We applied the p-PFM to a rhodium-octaethylporphyrin (RhOEP) layer on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is applicable to anode catalysts of fuel cells. The RhOEP/HOPG system was stably observed in water by this mode. In the p-PFM image, we found both large and small protrusions, which were not observed in the dynamic force mode, in air. The detailed force analysis suggested that these protrusions are nanobubbles located on the HOPG substrate exposed in holes or pits of the RhOEP layer.

  1. Band Excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Wisinger, Nina Balke; Rodriguez, Brian; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian

    2015-01-01

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standardmore » ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. Finally, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.« less

  2. Potential Role of Atomic Force Microscopy in Systems Biology

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Arce, Fernando Teran; Lal, Ratnesh

    2011-01-01

    Systems biology is a quantitative approach for understanding a biological system at its global level through systematic perturbation and integrated analysis of all its components. Simultaneous acquisition of information datasets pertaining to the system components (e.g., genome, proteome) is essential to implement this approach. There are limitations to such an approach in measuring gene expression levels and accounting for all proteins in the system. The success of genomic studies is critically dependent on PCR for its amplification, but PCR is very uneven in amplifying the samples, ineffective in scarce samples and unreliable in low copy number transcripts. On the other hand, lack of amplifying techniques for proteins critically limits their identification to only a small fraction of high concentration proteins. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), AFM cantilever sensors and AFM force spectroscopy in particular, could address these issues directly. In this article, we reviewed and assessed their potential role in systems biology. PMID:21766465

  3. Band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian

    2015-03-01

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standard ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. Finally, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.

  4. Band excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam E-mail: liq1@ORNL.gov; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian E-mail: liq1@ORNL.gov

    2015-03-09

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standard ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. Finally, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.

  5. Potential role of atomic force microscopy in systems biology.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Teran Arce, Fernando; Lal, Ratnesh

    2011-01-01

    Systems biology is a quantitative approach for understanding a biological system at its global level through systematic perturbation and integrated analysis of all its components. Simultaneous acquisition of information data sets pertaining to the system components (e.g., genome, proteome) is essential to implement this approach. There are limitations to such an approach in measuring gene expression levels and accounting for all proteins in the system. The success of genomic studies is critically dependent on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for its amplification, but PCR is very uneven in amplifying the samples, ineffective in scarce samples and unreliable in low copy number transcripts. On the other hand, lack of amplifying techniques for proteins critically limits their identification to only a small fraction of high concentration proteins. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), AFM cantilever sensors, and AFM force spectroscopy in particular, could address these issues directly. In this article, we reviewed and assessed their potential role in systems biology. PMID:21766465

  6. Atomic force microscopy images of lyotropic lamellar phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza, C.; Thieghi, L. T.; Castillo, R.

    2007-02-01

    For the very first time, atomic force microscope images of lamellar phases were observed combined with a freeze fracture technique that does not involve the use of replicas. Samples are rapidly frozen, fractured, and scanned directly with atomic force microscopy, at liquid nitrogen temperature and in high vacuum. This procedure can be used to investigate micro-structured liquids. The lamellar phases in Sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)/water and in C12E5/water systems were used to asses this new technique. Our observations were compared with x-ray diffraction measurements and with other freeze fracture methods reported in the literature. Our results show that this technique is useful to image lyotropic lamellar phases and the estimated repeat distances for lamellar periodicity are consistent with those obtained by x-ray diffraction.

  7. Automated manipulation of carbon nanotubes using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Wu, Sen; Fu, Xing

    2013-01-01

    The manipulation of carbon nanotubes is an important and essential step for carbon-based nanodevice or nanocircuit assembly. However, the conventional push-and-image approach of manipulating carbon nanotubes using atomic force microscopy has low efficiency on account of the reduplicated scanning process during manipulation. In this article, an automated manipulation system is designed and tested. This automated manipulation system, which includes an atomic force microscope platform and a self-developed computer program for one-dimensional manipulation, is capable of automatically moving any assigned individual carbon nanotube to a defined target location without any intermediate scanning procedure. To demonstrate the high-efficiency of this automated manipulation system and its potential applications in nanoassembly, two experiments were conducted. The first experiment used this system to manipulate a carbon nanotube to a defined target location. In the second experiment, this system was used to automatically manipulate several carbon nanotubes for generating and translating a defined pattern of nanotubes. PMID:23646781

  8. Atomic force microscopy images of lyotropic lamellar phases.

    PubMed

    Garza, C; Thieghi, L T; Castillo, R

    2007-02-01

    For the very first time, atomic force microscope images of lamellar phases were observed combined with a freeze fracture technique that does not involve the use of replicas. Samples are rapidly frozen, fractured, and scanned directly with atomic force microscopy, at liquid nitrogen temperature and in high vacuum. This procedure can be used to investigate micro-structured liquids. The lamellar phases in Sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)/water and in C12E5/water systems were used to asses this new technique. Our observations were compared with x-ray diffraction measurements and with other freeze fracture methods reported in the literature. Our results show that this technique is useful to image lyotropic lamellar phases and the estimated repeat distances for lamellar periodicity are consistent with those obtained by x-ray diffraction. PMID:17302467

  9. Taking Nanomedicine Teaching into Practice with Atomic Force Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Filomena A.; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic…

  10. Imaging stability in force-feedback high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung I; Boehm, Ryan D

    2013-02-01

    We studied the stability of force-feedback high-speed atomic force microscopy (HSAFM) by imaging soft, hard, and biological sample surfaces at various applied forces. The HSAFM images showed sudden topographic variations of streaky fringes with a negative applied force when collected on a soft hydrocarbon film grown on a grating sample, whereas they showed stable topographic features with positive applied forces. The instability of HSAFM images with the negative applied force was explained by the transition between contact and noncontact regimes in the force-distance curve. When the grating surface was cleaned, and thus hydrophilic by removing the hydrocarbon film, enhanced imaging stability was observed at both positive and negative applied forces. The higher adhesive interaction between the tip and the surface explains the improved imaging stability. The effects of imaging rate on the imaging stability were tested on an even softer adhesive Escherichia coli biofilm deposited onto the grating structure. The biofilm and planktonic cell structures in HSAFM images were reproducible within the force deviation less than ∼0.5 nN at the imaging rate up to 0.2s per frame, suggesting that the force-feedback HSAFM was stable for various imaging speeds in imaging softer adhesive biological samples. PMID:23274682

  11. Quantifying mineral surface energy by scanning force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sauerer, Bastian; Stukan, Mikhail; Abdallah, Wael; Derkani, Maryam H; Fedorov, Maxim; Buiting, Jan; Zhang, Zhenyu J

    2016-06-15

    Fundamental understanding of the wettability of carbonate formations can potentially be applied to the development of oil recovery strategies in a complex carbonate reservoir. In the present study, surface energies of representative carbonate samples were evaluated by direct quantitative force measurements, using scanning force microscopy (SFM) at sub-micron scale, to develop a reliable method to predict reservoir wettability. Local adhesion force measurements were conducted on appropriate calcite and dolomite samples and performed in air as well as in the presence of polar and nonpolar fluids. This study demonstrated that, by comparing measurements of adhesion forces between samples of the same mineral in different fluids, it is feasible to determine the surface energy of a given mineral as well as its polar and nonpolar components. The derived values are in agreement with literature. A proof-of-principle protocol has been established to quantify surface energy using SFM-based adhesion measurements. This novel methodology complements the conventional contact angle measurement technique, where surface energy can only be examined at large length scale. The reported methodology has great potential for further optimization into a new standard method for fast and accurate surface energy determination, and hence provides a new tool for reservoir rock wettability characterization. PMID:27054773

  12. Comparative study of clinical pulmonary surfactants using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Fan, Qihui; Wang, Yi E.; Neal, Charles R.; Zuo, Yi Y.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical pulmonary surfactant is routinely used to treat premature newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, and has shown great potential in alleviating a number of neonatal and adult respiratory diseases. Despite extensive study of chemical composition, surface activity, and clinical performance of various surfactant preparations, a direct comparison of surfactant films is still lacking. In this study, we use atomic force microscopy to characterize and compare four animal-derived clinical surfactants currently used throughout the world, i.e., Survanta, Curosurf, Infasurf and BLES. These modified-natural surfactants are further compared to dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a synthetic model surfactant of DPPC:palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) (7:3), and endogenous bovine natural surfactant. Atomic force microscopy reveals significant differences in the lateral structure and molecular organization of these surfactant preparations. These differences are discussed in terms of DPPC and cholesterol contents. We conclude that all animal-derived clinical surfactants assume a similar structure of multilayers of fluid phospholipids closely attached to an interfacial monolayer enriched in DPPC, at physiologically relevant surface pressures. This study provides the first comprehensive survey of the lateral structure of clinical surfactants at various surface pressures. It may have clinical implications on future application and development of surfactant preparations. PMID:21439262

  13. Low temperature scanning force microscopy using piezoresistive cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiser, P.; Koblischka, M. R.; Hartmann, U.

    2015-08-01

    A low temperature dynamic scanning force microscope has been constructed using commercially available piezoresistive cantilevers that can be coated with a ferromagnetic material for MFM application. The setup is able to work in a temperature range from room temperature down to 1.5 K. The performance of the piezoresistive cantilevers has been investigated under different working conditions. Topographic as well as magnetic images of a magnetite thin film sample have been taken at 50 and 4.2 K confirming the proper operation of the microscope at cryogenic temperatures. Furthermore, force-distance-curves taken on thin lead films at 4.2 K demonstrate the levitation forces between the magnetized cantilever tip and the superconducting films. Flux lines were generated by the magnetized cantilever tip itself when approaching the sample. It has also been shown that the microscope is sensitive to the detection of single magnetic flux lines penetrating the lead films.

  14. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M.; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex.Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to

  15. Imaging of DNA and Protein–DNA Complexes with Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of DNA structure and dynamics and protein–DNA complexes, including recent advances in the visualization of protein–DNA complexes with the use of cutting-edge, high-speed AFM. Special emphasis is given to direct nanoscale visualization of dynamics of protein–DNA complexes. In the area of DNA structure and dynamics, structural studies of local non-B conformations of DNA and the interplay of local and global DNA conformations are reviewed. The application of time-lapse AFM nanoscale imaging of DNA dynamics is illustrated by studies of Holliday junction branch migration. Structure and dynamics of protein–DNA interactions include problems related to site-specific DNA recombination, DNA replication, and DNA mismatch repair. Studies involving the structure and dynamics of chromatin are also described. PMID:27278886

  16. Enhanced quality factors and force sensitivity by attaching magnetic beads to cantilevers for atomic force microscopy in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoof, Sebastian; Nand Gosvami, Nitya; Hoogenboom, Bart W.

    2012-12-01

    Dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid remains complicated due to the strong viscous damping of the cantilever resonance. Here, we show that a high-quality resonance (Q >20) can be achieved in aqueous solution by attaching a microgram-bead at the end of the nanogram-cantilever. The resulting increase in cantilever mass causes the resonance frequency to drop significantly. However, the force sensitivity—as expressed via the minimum detectable force gradient—is hardly affected, because of the enhanced quality factor. Through the enhancement of the quality factor, the attached bead also reduces the relative importance of noise in the deflection detector. It can thus yield an improved signal-to-noise ratio when this detector noise is significant. We describe and analyze these effects for a set-up that includes magnetic actuation of the cantilevers and that can be easily implemented in any AFM system that is compatible with an inverted optical microscope.

  17. Characterizing atomic force microscopy tip shape in use.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunmei; Itoh, Hiroshi; Sun, Jielin; Hu, Jun; Shen, Dianhong; Ichimura, Shingo

    2009-02-01

    A new tip characterizer based on the fabrication of multilayer thin films for atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to analyze the effective tip shape while in use. The precise structure of this tip characterizer was measured by transmission electron microscopy. Four different types of commercial tips with various radii were characterized by the tip characterizer and by conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results were compared to obtain a relationship between the actual and effective tip shapes. A quantitative analysis was performed of apex radii measured from line profiles of comb-shaped patterns and nanometer-scale knife-edges without the problem of edge uncertainty in the SEM image. Degradation of the AFM tip induced by electron-beam irradiation was studied by using SEM and the tip characterizer. A potential technique for fabricating symmetric AFM tips based on irradiation by an electron beam and a quantitative analysis of changing the tip apex in SEM were examined with AFM using the tip characterizer. PMID:19441396

  18. Atomic Force Microscopy to Study Mechanics of Living Mitotic Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Hyman, Anthony A.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2011-08-01

    While biochemical pathways within mitotic cells have been intensively studied, the mechanics of dividing cells is only poorly understood. In our recent report, an experimental system combining fluorescence and atomic force microscopy was set up to study dynamics of mitotic rounding of mammalian cells. We show that cells have a rounding pressure that increases upon mitotic entry. Using specific inhibitors or perturbations, we revealed biological processes required for force generation that underpin the cell rounding shape change during mitosis. The significance of the finding and an outlook are discussed.

  19. Dynamic Force Measurement with Strain Gauges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bruce E.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of four strain gauges, a Wheatstone bridge, and an oscilloscope to measure forces dynamically. Included is an example of determining the centripetal force of a pendulum in a general physics laboratory. (CC)

  20. Exploring Local Electrostatic Effects with Scanning Probe Microscopy: Implications for Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Triboelectricity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Balke, Nina; Maksymovych, Petro; Jesse, Stephen; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Li, Qian; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-09-25

    The implementation of contact mode Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) utilizes the electrostatic interactions between tip and sample when the tip and sample are in contact with each other. Surprisingly, the electrostatic forces in contact are large enough to be measured even with tips as stiff as 4.5 N/m. As for traditional non-contact KPFM, the signal depends strongly on electrical properties of the sample, such as the dielectric constant, and the tip-properties, such as the stiffness. Since the tip is in contact with the sample, bias-induced changes in the junction potential between tip and sample can be measured with highermore » lateral and temporal resolution compared to traditional non-contact KPFM. Significant and reproducible variations of tip-surface capacitance are observed and attributed to surface electrochemical phenomena. Lastly, observations of significant surface charge states at zero bias and strong hysteretic electromechanical responses at non-ferroelectric surface have significant implications for fields such as triboelectricity and piezoresponse force microscopy.« less

  1. Exploring Local Electrostatic Effects with Scanning Probe Microscopy: Implications for Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Triboelectricity

    SciTech Connect

    Balke, Nina; Maksymovych, Petro; Jesse, Stephen; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Li, Qian; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-09-25

    The implementation of contact mode Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) utilizes the electrostatic interactions between tip and sample when the tip and sample are in contact with each other. Surprisingly, the electrostatic forces in contact are large enough to be measured even with tips as stiff as 4.5 N/m. As for traditional non-contact KPFM, the signal depends strongly on electrical properties of the sample, such as the dielectric constant, and the tip-properties, such as the stiffness. Since the tip is in contact with the sample, bias-induced changes in the junction potential between tip and sample can be measured with higher lateral and temporal resolution compared to traditional non-contact KPFM. Significant and reproducible variations of tip-surface capacitance are observed and attributed to surface electrochemical phenomena. Lastly, observations of significant surface charge states at zero bias and strong hysteretic electromechanical responses at non-ferroelectric surface have significant implications for fields such as triboelectricity and piezoresponse force microscopy.

  2. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-01

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations. PMID:26684144

  3. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-01

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations.

  4. Probing physical properties at the nanoscale using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditzler, Lindsay Rachel

    Techniques that measure physical properties at the nanoscale with high sensitivity are significantly limited considering the number of new nanomaterials being developed. The development of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has lead to significant advancements in the ability to characterize physical properties of materials in all areas of science: chemistry, physics, engineering, and biology have made great scientific strides do to the versatility of the AFM. AFM is used for quantification of many physical properties such as morphology, electrical, mechanical, magnetic, electrochemical, binding interactions, and protein folding. This work examines the electrical and mechanical properties of materials applicable to the field of nano-electronics. As electronic devices are miniaturized the demand for materials with unique electrical properties, which can be developed and exploited, has increased. For example, discussed in this work, a derivative of tetrathiafulvalene, which exhibits a unique loss of conductivity upon compression of the self-assembled monolayer could be developed into a molecular switch. This work also compares tunable organic (tetraphenylethylene tetracarboxylic acid and bis(pyridine)s assemblies) and metal-organic (Silver-stilbizole coordination compounds) crystals which show high electrical conductivity. The electrical properties of these materials vary depending on their composition allowing for the development of compositionally tunable functional materials. Additional work was done to investigate the effects of molecular environment on redox active 11-ferroceneyl-1 undecanethiol (Fc) molecules. The redox process of mixed monolayers of Fc and decanethiol was measured using conductive probe atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy. As the concentration of Fc increased large, variations in the force were observed. Using these variations the number of oxidized molecules in the monolayer was determined. AFM is additionally capable of investigating

  5. Atomic Force Microscopy of Asymmetric Membranes from Turtle Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yongmei; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Ding, Bohua; Hao, Xian; Jiang, Junguang; Sun, Yingchun; Wang, Hongda

    2014-01-01

    The cell membrane provides critical cellular functions that rely on its elaborate structure and organization. The structure of turtle membranes is an important part of an ongoing study of erythrocyte membranes. Using a combination of atomic force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy, we characterized the turtle erythrocyte membrane structure with molecular resolution in a quasi-native state. High-resolution images both leaflets of turtle erythrocyte membranes revealed a smooth outer membrane leaflet and a protein covered inner membrane leaflet. This asymmetry was verified by single-molecule force spectroscopy, which detects numerous exposed amino groups of membrane proteins in the inner membrane leaflet but much fewer in the outer leaflet. The asymmetric membrane structure of turtle erythrocytes is consistent with the semi-mosaic model of human, chicken and fish erythrocyte membrane structure, making the semi-mosaic model more widely applicable. From the perspective of biological evolution, this result may support the universality of the semi-mosaic model. PMID:25134535

  6. Atomic Force Microscopy Application in Biological Research: A Review Study

    PubMed Central

    Vahabi, Surena; Nazemi Salman, Bahareh; Javanmard, Anahita

    2013-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a three-dimensional topographic technique with a high atomic resolution to measure surface roughness. AFM is a kind of scanning probe microscope, and its near-field technique is based on the interaction between a sharp tip and the atoms of the sample surface. There are several methods and many ways to modify the tip of the AFM to investigate surface properties, including measuring friction, adhesion forces and viscoelastic properties as well as determining the Young modulus and imaging magnetic or electrostatic properties. The AFM technique can analyze any kind of samples such as polymers, adsorbed molecules, films or fibers, and powders in the air whether in a controlled atmosphere or in a liquid medium. In the past decade, the AFM has emerged as a powerful tool to obtain the nanostructural details and biomechanical properties of biological samples, including biomolecules and cells. The AFM applications, techniques, and -in particular- its ability to measure forces, are not still familiar to most clinicians. This paper reviews the literature on the main principles of the AFM modality and highlights the advantages of this technique in biology, medicine, and- especially- dentistry. This literature review was performed through E-resources, including Science Direct, PubMed, Blackwell Synergy, Embase, Elsevier, and Scholar Google for the references published between 1985 and 2010. PMID:23825885

  7. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex. PMID:26876486

  8. Atomic force microscopy-based shape analysis of heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become an important medical and biological tool for the noninvasive imaging of cells and biomaterials in medical, biological, and biophysical research. The major advantages of AFM over conventional optical and electron microscopes for bio-imaging include the facts that no special coating is required and that imaging can be done in all environments-air, vacuum, or aqueous conditions. In addition, it can also precisely determine pico-nano Newton force interactions between the probe tip and the sample surface from force-distance curve measurements.It is widely known that mitochondrial swelling is one of the most important indicators of the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. As mitochondrial swelling is an ultrastructural change, quantitative analysis of this change requires high-resolution microscopic methods such as AFM. Here, we describe the use of AFM-based shape analysis for the characterization of nanostructural changes in heart mitochondria resulting from myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25634291

  9. High Resolution, Large Deformation 3D Traction Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    López-Fagundo, Cristina; Reichner, Jonathan; Hoffman-Kim, Diane; Franck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) is a powerful approach for quantifying cell-material interactions that over the last two decades has contributed significantly to our understanding of cellular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. In addition, recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) imaging and traction force analysis (3D TFM) have highlighted the significance of the third dimension in influencing various cellular processes. Yet irrespective of dimensionality, almost all TFM approaches have relied on a linear elastic theory framework to calculate cell surface tractions. Here we present a new high resolution 3D TFM algorithm which utilizes a large deformation formulation to quantify cellular displacement fields with unprecedented resolution. The results feature some of the first experimental evidence that cells are indeed capable of exerting large material deformations, which require the formulation of a new theoretical TFM framework to accurately calculate the traction forces. Based on our previous 3D TFM technique, we reformulate our approach to accurately account for large material deformation and quantitatively contrast and compare both linear and large deformation frameworks as a function of the applied cell deformation. Particular attention is paid in estimating the accuracy penalty associated with utilizing a traditional linear elastic approach in the presence of large deformation gradients. PMID:24740435

  10. Nanoscale dielectric microscopy of non-planar samples by lift-mode electrostatic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Van Der Hofstadt, M; Fabregas, R; Biagi, M C; Fumagalli, L; Gomila, G

    2016-10-01

    Lift-mode electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) is one of the most convenient imaging modes to study the local dielectric properties of non-planar samples. Here we present the quantitative analysis of this imaging mode. We introduce a method to quantify and subtract the topographic crosstalk from the lift-mode EFM images, and a 3D numerical approach that allows for extracting the local dielectric constant with nanoscale spatial resolution free from topographic artifacts. We demonstrate this procedure by measuring the dielectric properties of micropatterned SiO2 pillars and of single bacteria cells, thus illustrating the wide applicability of our approach from materials science to biology. PMID:27597315

  11. Elastic Properties of Clay Minerals Determined by Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopycinska-Müller, M.; Prasad, M.; Rabe, U.; Arnold, W.

    Seismic wave propagation in geological formations is altered by the presence of clay minerals. Knowledge about the elastic properties of clay is therefore essential for the interpretation and modeling of the seismic response of clay-bearing formations. However, due to the layered structure of clay, it is very difficult to investigate its elastic properties. We measured elastic properties of clay using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM). The forces applied during the experiments were not higher than 50 nN. The adhesion forces were measured from the pull-off forces and included into our calculations by means of the Derjaguin-Mueller-Toporov model for contact mechanics. The obtained values of the elastic modulus for clay varied from 10 to 17 GPa depending on various parameters that describe the dynamics of a vibrating beam

  12. Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging and Force Spectroscopy of Supported Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Unsay, Joseph D; Cosentino, Katia; García-Sáez, Ana J

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile, high-resolution imaging technique that allows visualization of biological membranes. It has sufficient magnification to examine membrane substructures and even individual molecules. AFM can act as a force probe to measure interactions and mechanical properties of membranes. Supported lipid bilayers are conventionally used as membrane models in AFM studies. In this protocol, we demonstrate how to prepare supported bilayers and characterize their structure and mechanical properties using AFM. These include bilayer thickness and breakthrough force. The information provided by AFM imaging and force spectroscopy help define mechanical and chemical properties of membranes. These properties play an important role in cellular processes such as maintaining cell hemostasis from environmental stress, bringing membrane proteins together, and stabilizing protein complexes. PMID:26273958

  13. Combined atomic force microscopy and voltage pulse technique to accurately measure electrostatic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new method of extracting electrostatic force. The technique is based on frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) combined with a voltage pulse. In this method, the work that the electrostatic field does on the oscillating tip is measured through the cantilever energy dissipation. This allows us to directly extract capacitive forces including the longer range part, to which the conventional FM-AFM is insensitive. The distance-dependent contact potential difference, which is modulated by local charges distributed on the surfaces of the tip and/or sample, could also be correctly obtained. In the absence of local charges, our method can perfectly reproduce the electrostatic force as a function of the distance and the bias voltage. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the system serves as a sensitive sensor enabling us to check the existence of the local charges such as trapped charges and patch charges.

  14. Sub-Angstrom oscillation amplitude non-contact atomic force microscopy for lateral force gradient measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atabak, Mehrdad; Ünverdi, Özhan; Özer, H. Özgür; Oral, Ahmet

    2009-12-01

    We report the first results from novel sub-Angstrom oscillation amplitude non-contact atomic force microscopy developed for lateral force gradient measurements. Quantitative lateral force gradients between a tungsten tip and Si(1 1 1)-(7 × 7) surface can be measured using this microscope. Simultaneous lateral force gradient and scanning tunnelling microscope images of single and multi atomic steps are obtained. In our measurement, tunnel current is used as feedback. The lateral stiffness contrast has been observed to be 2.5 N/m at single atomic step, in contrast to 13 N/m at multi atomic step on Si(1 1 1) surface. We also carried out a series of lateral stiffness-distance spectroscopy. We observed lateral stiffness-distance curves exhibit sharp increase in the stiffness as the sample is approached towards the surface. We usually observed positive stiffness and sometimes going into slightly negative region.

  15. Easy and direct method for calibrating atomic force microscopy lateral force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenhua; Bonin, Keith; Guthold, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We have designed and tested a new, inexpensive, easy-to-make and easy-to-use calibration standard for atomic force microscopy (AFM) lateral force measurements. This new standard simply consists of a small glass fiber of known dimensions and Young’s modulus, which is fixed at one end to a substrate and which can be bent laterally with the AFM tip at the other end. This standard has equal or less error than the commonly used method of using beam mechanics to determine a cantilever’s lateral force constant. It is transferable, thus providing a universal tool for comparing the calibrations of different instruments. It does not require knowledge of the cantilever dimensions and composition or its tip height. This standard also allows direct conversion of the photodiode signal to force and, thus, circumvents the requirement for a sensor response (sensitivity) measurement. PMID:17614616

  16. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M.

    2015-04-15

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H{sub ∞} control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  17. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H(∞) control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments. PMID:25933864

  18. Interactive forces between lignin and cellulase as determined by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lignin is a complex polymer which inhibits the enzymatic conversion of cellulose to glucose in lignocellulose biomass for biofuel production. Cellulase enzymes irreversibly bind to lignin, deactivating the enzyme and lowering the overall activity of the hydrolyzing reaction solution. Within this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to compare the adhesion forces between cellulase and lignin with the forces between cellulase and cellulose, and to study the moiety groups involved in binding of cellulase to lignin. Results Trichoderma reesei, ATCC 26921, a commercial cellulase system, was immobilized onto silicon wafers and used as a substrate to measure forces involved in cellulase non-productive binding to lignin. Attraction forces between cellulase and lignin, and between cellulase and cellulose were compared using kraft lignin- and hydroxypropyl cellulose-coated tips with the immobilized cellulase substrate. The measured adhesion forces between kraft lignin and cellulase were on average 45% higher than forces between hydroxypropyl cellulose and cellulase. Specialized AFM tips with hydrophobic, -OH, and -COOH chemical characteristics were used with immobilized cellulase to represent hydrophobic, H-bonding, and charge-charge interactions, respectively. Forces between hydrophobic tips and cellulase were on average 43% and 13% higher than forces between cellulase with tips exhibiting OH and COOH groups, respectively. A strong attractive force during the AFM tip approach to the immobilized cellulase was observed with the hydrophobic tip. Conclusions This work shows that there is a greater overall attraction between kraft lignin and cellulase than between hydroxypropyl cellulose and cellulase, which may have implications during the enzymatic reaction process. Furthermore, hydrophobic interactions appear to be the dominating attraction force in cellulase binding to lignin, while a number of other interactions may establish the irreversible binding

  19. Surface properties and interaction forces of biopolymer-doped conductive polypyrrole surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pelto, Jani M; Haimi, Suvi P; Siljander, Aliisa S; Miettinen, Susanna S; Tappura, Kirsi M; Higgins, Michael J; Wallace, Gordon G

    2013-05-21

    Surface properties and electrical charges are critical factors elucidating cell interactions on biomaterial surfaces. The surface potential distribution and the nanoscopic and microscopic surface elasticity of organic polypyrrole-hyaluronic acid (PPy-HA) were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in a fluid environment in order to explain the observed enhancement in the attachment of human adipose stem cells on positively charged PPy-HA films. The electrostatic force between the AFM tip and a charged PPy-HA surface, the tip-sample adhesion force, and elastic moduli were estimated from the AFM force curves, and the data were fitted to electrostatic double-layer and elastic contact models. The surface potential of the charged and dried PPy-HA films was assessed with Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), and the KPFM data were correlated to the fluid AFM data. The surface charge distribution and elasticity were both found to correlate well with the nodular morphology of PPy-HA and to be sensitive to the electrochemical charging conditions. Furthermore, a significant change in the adhesion was detected when the surface was electrochemically charged positive. The results highlight the potential of positively charged PPy-HA as a coating material to enhance the stem cell response in tissue-engineering scaffolds. PMID:23621360

  20. Calibration of lateral force measurements in atomic force microscopy with a piezoresistive force sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Hui; Vitard, Julien; Haliyo, Sinan; Regnier, Stephane

    2008-03-15

    We present here a method to calibrate the lateral force in the atomic force microscope. This method makes use of an accurately calibrated force sensor composed of a tipless piezoresistive cantilever and corresponding signal amplifying and processing electronics. Two ways of force loading with different loading points were compared by scanning the top and side edges of the piezoresistive cantilever. Conversion factors between the lateral force and photodiode signal using three types of atomic force microscope cantilevers with rectangular geometries (normal spring constants from 0.092 to 1.24 N/m and lateral stiffness from 10.34 to 101.06 N/m) were measured in experiments using the proposed method. When used properly, this method calibrates the conversion factors that are accurate to {+-}12.4% or better. This standard has less error than the commonly used method based on the cantilever's beam mechanics. Methods such of this allow accurate and direct conversion between lateral forces and photodiode signals without any knowledge of the cantilevers and the laser measuring system.

  1. NMR Spectroscopy for Thin Films by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Won, Soonho; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Lee, SangGap; Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Yunseok

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental research tool that is widely used in many fields. Despite its powerful applications, unfortunately the low sensitivity of conventional NMR makes it difficult to study thin film or nano-sized samples. In this work, we report the first NMR spectrum obtained from general thin films by using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). To minimize the amount of imaging information inevitably mixed into the signal when a gradient field is used, we adopted a large magnet with a flat end with a diameter of 336 μm that generates a homogeneous field on the sample plane and a field gradient in a direction perpendicular to the plane. Cyclic adiabatic inversion was used in conjunction with periodic phase inversion of the frequency shift to maximize the SNR. In this way, we obtained the 19F NMR spectrum for a 34 nm-thick CaF2 thin film. PMID:24217000

  2. A Decade of Piezoresponse Force Microscopy: Progress, Challenges, and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Rar, Andrei; Jesse, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena is a near-universal characteristic of inorganic and biological systems alike, with examples ranging from piezoelectricity in ferroelectric perovskites to complex, electromechanical couplings in electromotor proteins in cellular membranes. Understanding electromechanical functionality in materials such as ferroelectric nanocrystals and thin films, relaxor ferroelectrics, and biosystems requires probing these properties on the nanometer level of individual grain, domain, or protein fibril. In the last decade, piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) was established as a powerful tool for nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and manipulation of ferroelectric materials. Here, we present principles and recent advances in PFM, including vector and frequency-dependent imaging of piezoelectric materials, briefly review applications for ferroelectric materials, discuss prospects for electromechanical imaging of local crystallographic and molecular orientations and disorder, and summarize future challenges and opportunities for PFM emerging in the second decade since its invention.

  3. Atomic force microscopy analysis of rat pulmonary surfactant films.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiujun; Keating, Eleonora; Tadayyon, Seyed; Possmayer, Fred; Zuo, Yi Y; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2011-10-01

    Pulmonary surfactant facilitates breathing by forming a surface tension reducing film at the air-liquid interface of the alveoli. The objective was to characterize the structure of surfactant films using endogenous rat surfactant. Solid-support surfactant films, at different surface pressures, were obtained using a Langmuir balance and were analyzed using atomic force microscopy. The results showed a lipid film structure with three distinct phases: liquid expanded, liquid ordered and liquid condensed. The area covered by the liquid condensed domains increased as surface pressure increased. The presence of liquid ordered phase within these structures correlated with the cholesterol content. At a surface pressure of 50 mN/m, stacks of bilayers appeared. Several structural details of these films differ from previous observations made with goat and exogenous surfactants. Overall, the data indicate that surfactant films demonstrate phase separation at low surface pressures and multilayer formation at higher pressure, features likely important for normal surfactant function. PMID:21704443

  4. Measuring viscoelasticity of soft samples using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, S; Berger, E J

    2009-09-01

    Relaxation indentation experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to obtain viscoelastic material properties of soft samples. The quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) model formulated by Fung (1972, "Stress Strain History Relations of Soft Tissues in Simple Elongation," in Biomechanics, Its Foundation and Objectives, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, pp. 181-207) for uniaxial compression data was modified for the indentation test data in this study. Hertz contact mechanics was used for the instantaneous deformation, and a reduced relaxation function based on continuous spectrum is used for the time-dependent part in the model. The modified QLV indentation model presents a novel method to obtain viscoelastic properties from indentation data independent of relaxation times of the test. The major objective of the present study is to develop the QLV indentation model and implement the model on AFM indentation data for 1% agarose gel and a viscoelastic polymer using spherical indenter. PMID:19725704

  5. Atomic force microscopy spring constant determination in viscous liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Pirzer, Tobias; Hugel, Thorsten

    2009-03-15

    The spring constant of cantilever in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is often calibrated from thermal noise spectra. Essential for accurate implementation of this 'thermal noise method' is an appropriate fitting function and procedure. Here, we survey the commonly used fitting functions and examine their applicability in a range of environments. We find that viscous liquid environments are extremely problematic due to the frequency dependent nature of the damping coefficient. The deviations from the true spring constant were sometimes more than 100% when utilizing the fit routines built into the three investigated commercial AFM instruments; similar problems can arise with homebuilt AFMs. We discuss the reasons for this problem, especially the limits of the fitting process. Finally, we present a thermal noise based procedure and an improved fit function to determine the spring constant with AFMs in fluids of various viscosities.

  6. Atomic force microscopy spring constant determination in viscous liquids.

    PubMed

    Pirzer, Tobias; Hugel, Thorsten

    2009-03-01

    The spring constant of cantilever in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is often calibrated from thermal noise spectra. Essential for accurate implementation of this "thermal noise method" is an appropriate fitting function and procedure. Here, we survey the commonly used fitting functions and examine their applicability in a range of environments. We find that viscous liquid environments are extremely problematic due to the frequency dependent nature of the damping coefficient. The deviations from the true spring constant were sometimes more than 100% when utilizing the fit routines built into the three investigated commercial AFM instruments; similar problems can arise with homebuilt AFMs. We discuss the reasons for this problem, especially the limits of the fitting process. Finally, we present a thermal noise based procedure and an improved fit function to determine the spring constant with AFMs in fluids of various viscosities. PMID:19334955

  7. Atomic-force microscopy of submicron films of electroactive polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamov, D. D.; Kornilov, V. M.; Lachinov, A. N.; Kraikin, V. A.; Ionova, I. A.

    2016-07-01

    Atomic-force microscopy is used to study the supramolecular structure of submicron films of electroactive thermally stable polymer (polydiphenylenephthalide (PDP)). It has been demonstrated that PDP films produced using centrifuging are solid homogeneous films with thicknesses down to several nanometers, which correspond to two or three monomolecular layers. The film volume is structurized at thicknesses greater than 100 nm. The study of the rheological properties of solutions used for film production yields a crossover point that separates the domains of strongly diluted and semidiluted solutions. A transition from the globular structure to the associate structure is observed in films that are produced using solutions with a boundary concentration. A model of the formation of polymer film that involves the presence of associates in the original solution is discussed.

  8. Shear force microscopy using piezoresistive cantilevers in surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotszalk, Teodor; Kopiec, Daniel; Sierakowski, Andrzej; Janus, Paweł; Grabiec, Piotr; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2014-09-01

    In this article we describe application of piezoresistive cantilevers in surface investigations carried out with the use of shear force microscopy (ShFM). The novel piezoresistive cantilevers integrate a Wheatstone piezoresistive bridge was used to detect the cantilever deflection, thermal deflection detector and planar tip protruding out of the spring beam. Because the planar tip deflection can be detected and controlled electronically the described technology is very flexible and can be applied in many surface investigations. In this article we will present operation theory of the described solution, experimental setup, methods for calibration of the tip deflection detection and actuation The analysis will be illustrated with example results of topography measurements performed using the described technology.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy Combined with Surface Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Shigenori; Yoshinari, Yohsuke

    2007-03-01

    In this presentation, we will show magnetic resonance force microscopy imaging combined with surface topography. The individual and combined images taken in the same coordinate are presented for extraction of the position, shapes and spin density distribution of target phantoms. This imaging technique is useful applied when the surface needs to be investigated in relation to the influence of a material buried below the surface. In our method, the surface topography was observed by the AFM with tapping mode. The spin density distribution was measured by the MRFM with the cyclic saturation technique. The AFM and MRFM experiments were made one after another by using the same experimental set-up, and their images were merged together afterwards. The sample consists of two kind of materials, one is DPPH containing unpaird spins and the other is a glass bead. DPPH particles with the size of 5˜8 micrometer and a 8.8 micrometer single bead were glued on a commercial cantilever.

  10. Nanoscale imaging of Bacillus thuringiensis flagella using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Annika; Dupres, Vincent; Delestrait, Guillaume; Mahillon, Jacques; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2012-02-01

    Because bacterial flagella play essential roles in various processes (motility, adhesion, host interactions, secretion), studying their expression in relation to function is an important challenge. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain insight into the nanoscale surface properties of two wild-type and four mutant strains of Bacillus thuringiensis exhibiting various levels of flagellation. We show that, unlike AFM in liquid, AFM in air is a simple and reliable approach to observe the morphological details of the bacteria, and to quantify the density and dimensions of their flagella. We found that the amount of flagella expressed by the six strains, as observed at the nanoscale, correlates with their microscopic swarming motility. These observations provide novel information on flagella expression in Gram-positive bacteria and demonstrate the power of AFM in genetic studies for the fast assessment of the phenotypic characteristics of bacterial strains altered in cell surface appendages.Because bacterial flagella play essential roles in various processes (motility, adhesion, host interactions, secretion), studying their expression in relation to function is an important challenge. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain insight into the nanoscale surface properties of two wild-type and four mutant strains of Bacillus thuringiensis exhibiting various levels of flagellation. We show that, unlike AFM in liquid, AFM in air is a simple and reliable approach to observe the morphological details of the bacteria, and to quantify the density and dimensions of their flagella. We found that the amount of flagella expressed by the six strains, as observed at the nanoscale, correlates with their microscopic swarming motility. These observations provide novel information on flagella expression in Gram-positive bacteria and demonstrate the power of AFM in genetic studies for the fast assessment of the phenotypic characteristics of bacterial strains altered in

  11. A novel self-sensing technique for tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppert, Michael G.; Moheimani, S. O. Reza

    2013-12-15

    This work proposes a novel self-sensing tapping-mode atomic force microscopy operation utilizing charge measurement. A microcantilever coated with a single piezoelectric layer is simultaneously used for actuation and deflection sensing. The cantilever can be batch fabricated with existing micro electro mechanical system processes. The setup enables the omission of the optical beam deflection technique which is commonly used to measure the cantilever oscillation amplitude. Due to the high amount of capacitive feedthrough in the measured charge signal, a feedforward control technique is employed to increase the dynamic range from less than 1 dB to approximately 35 dB. Experiments show that the conditioned charge signal achieves excellent signal-to-noise ratio and can therefore be used as a feedback signal for atomic force microscopy imaging.

  12. A novel self-sensing technique for tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruppert, Michael G.; Moheimani, S. O. Reza

    2013-12-01

    This work proposes a novel self-sensing tapping-mode atomic force microscopy operation utilizing charge measurement. A microcantilever coated with a single piezoelectric layer is simultaneously used for actuation and deflection sensing. The cantilever can be batch fabricated with existing micro electro mechanical system processes. The setup enables the omission of the optical beam deflection technique which is commonly used to measure the cantilever oscillation amplitude. Due to the high amount of capacitive feedthrough in the measured charge signal, a feedforward control technique is employed to increase the dynamic range from less than 1 dB to approximately 35 dB. Experiments show that the conditioned charge signal achieves excellent signal-to-noise ratio and can therefore be used as a feedback signal for atomic force microscopy imaging.

  13. A novel self-sensing technique for tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, Michael G; Moheimani, S O Reza

    2013-12-01

    This work proposes a novel self-sensing tapping-mode atomic force microscopy operation utilizing charge measurement. A microcantilever coated with a single piezoelectric layer is simultaneously used for actuation and deflection sensing. The cantilever can be batch fabricated with existing micro electro mechanical system processes. The setup enables the omission of the optical beam deflection technique which is commonly used to measure the cantilever oscillation amplitude. Due to the high amount of capacitive feedthrough in the measured charge signal, a feedforward control technique is employed to increase the dynamic range from less than 1 dB to approximately 35 dB. Experiments show that the conditioned charge signal achieves excellent signal-to-noise ratio and can therefore be used as a feedback signal for atomic force microscopy imaging. PMID:24387461

  14. Analysis of environmental particles by atomic force microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mavrocordatos, D; Pronk, W; Boiler, M

    2004-01-01

    Due to their large specific surface and their abundance, micro and nano particles play an important role in the transport of micropollutants in the environment. Natural particles are usually composed of a mixture of inorganic amorphous or crystalline material (mainly FeOOH, Fe(x)Oy, Mn(x)Oy and clays) and organic material (humics and polysaccharides). They all tend to occur as very small particles (1-1,000 nm in diameter). Most natural amorphous particles are unstable and tend to transform with time towards more crystalline forms, either by aging or possibly, by dissolution and re-crystallization. Such transformations affect the fate of sorbed micropollutants and the scavenging properties are therefore changed. As these entities are sensitive to dehydration (aggregation, changes in the morphology), it is highly important to observe their morphology in their natural environment and understand their composition at the scale of the individual particles. Also for the understanding and optimization of water treatment technologies, the knowledge of the occurrence and behavior of nano-particles is of high importance. Some of the possible particle analysis methods are presented: aggregation processes, biomineralization, bacterial adhesion, biofilms in freshwaters, ferrihydrite as heavy metals remover from storm water. These examples demonstrate the capabilities and focus of the microscopes. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows to analyze the particles in their own environment, meaning in air or in the water. Thus, native aspects of particles can be observed. As well, forces of interactions between particles or between particles and other surfaces such as membranes will be highly valuable data. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and for higher lateral resolution, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allow measurement of the morphology and composition. Especially, TEM coupled with Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (TEM-EELS) is a powerful technique for elemental analysis

  15. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy–magnetic force microscopy combination

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Iglesias-Freire, Oscar; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; de Teresa, Jose Maria

    2011-01-01

    Summary The most outstanding feature of scanning force microscopy (SFM) is its capability to detect various different short and long range interactions. In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures. It is a usual procedure to separate the topography and the magnetic signal by scanning at a lift distance of 25–50 nm such that the long range tip–sample interactions dominate. Nowadays, MFM is becoming a valuable technique to detect weak magnetic fields arising from low dimensional complex systems such as organic nanomagnets, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, carbon-based materials, etc. In all these cases, the magnetic nanocomponents and the substrate supporting them present quite different electronic behavior, i.e., they exhibit large surface potential differences causing heterogeneous electrostatic interaction between the tip and the sample that could be interpreted as a magnetic interaction. To distinguish clearly the origin of the tip–sample forces we propose to use a combination of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and MFM. The KPFM technique allows us to compensate in real time the electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample by minimizing the electrostatic contribution to the frequency shift signal. This is a great challenge in samples with low magnetic moment. In this work we studied an array of Co nanostructures that exhibit high electrostatic interaction with the MFM tip. Thanks to the use of the KPFM/MFM system we were able to separate the electric and magnetic interactions between the tip and the sample. PMID:22003461

  16. Enhanced efficiency in the excitation of higher modes for atomic force microscopy and mechanical sensors operated in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Penedo, M. Hormeño, S.; Fernández-Martínez, I.; Luna, M.; Briones, F.; Raman, A.

    2014-10-27

    Recent developments in dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy where several eigenmodes are simultaneously excited in liquid media are proving to be an excellent tool in biological studies. Despite its relevance, the search for a reliable, efficient, and strong cantilever excitation method is still in progress. Herein, we present a theoretical modeling and experimental results of different actuation methods compatible with the operation of Atomic Force Microscopy in liquid environments: ideal acoustic, homogeneously distributed force, distributed applied torque (MAC Mode™), photothermal and magnetostrictive excitation. From the analysis of the results, it can be concluded that magnetostriction is the strongest and most efficient technique for higher eigenmode excitation when using soft cantilevers in liquid media.

  17. Introduction to Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in Biology.

    PubMed

    Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has the unique capability of imaging biological samples with molecular resolution in buffer solution over a wide range of time scales from milliseconds to hours. In addition to providing topographical images of surfaces with nanometer- to angstrom-scale resolution, forces between single molecules and mechanical properties of biological samples can be investigated from the nano-scale to the micro-scale. Importantly, the measurements are made in buffer solutions, allowing biological samples to "stay alive" within a physiological-like environment while temporal changes in structure are measured-e.g., before and after addition of chemical reagents. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, e.g., electron microscopy (EM). This unit provides an introduction to AFM on biological systems and describes specific examples of AFM on proteins, cells, and tissues. The physical principles of the technique and methodological aspects of its practical use and applications are also described. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479503

  18. Jumping mode atomic force microscopy on grana membranes from spinach.

    PubMed

    Sznee, Kinga; Dekker, Jan P; Dame, Remus T; van Roon, Henny; Wuite, Gijs J L; Frese, Raoul N

    2011-11-11

    The thylakoid membrane system is a complex membrane system that organizes and reorganizes itself to provide plants optimal chemical energy from sunlight under different and varying environmental conditions. Grana membranes are part of this system and contain the light-driven water-splitting enzyme Photosystem II (PSII) and light-harvesting antenna complexes. Here, we present a direct visualization of PSII complexes within grana membranes from spinach. By means of jumping mode atomic force microscopy in liquid, minimal forces were applied between the scanning tip and membrane or protein, allowing complexes to be imaged with high detail. We observed four different packing arrangements of PSII complexes, which occur primarily as dimers: co-linear crystalline rows, nanometric domains of straight or skewed rows, and disordered domains. Upon storing surface-adhered membranes at low temperature prior to imaging, large-scale reorganizations of supercomplexes between PSII and light-harvesting complex II could be induced. The highest resolution images show the existence of membrane domains without obvious topography extending beyond supercomplexes. These observations illustrate the possibility for diffusion of proteins and smaller molecules within these densely packed membranes. PMID:21911498

  19. Cross-talk compensation in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Onal, Cagdas D.; Suemer, Bilsay; Sitti, Metin

    2008-10-15

    In this work, calibration and correction of cross-talk in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated. Several reasons and effects of this inherent problem on experimental results are discussed. We propose a general procedure that can be used on most AFM systems to compensate for cross-talk on the cantilever bending and twisting signals. The method utilizes two initial experiments on a flat surface to achieve an affine transformation between the measured signals and the actual signals. Using this transformation directly on the voltage signals allows us to remove the detrimental effects of cross-talk on AFM-based force measurement experiments. The achieved transformation matrix can be turned into a simple circuit and applied online, by users who have access to the raw signals in the AFM head. As a case study, a lateral deflection based mechanical characterization test for a poly(methyl methacrylate) microfiber that is suspended on a trench is investigated in terms of the effectiveness of the cross-talk compensation.

  20. Single layer and multilayer tip coatings in magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, S. M.; Lord, D. G.; Grundy, P. J.; Slade, M.; Lambrick, D.

    1999-04-01

    Interactions between the imaging tip and the sample in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) have been investigated by studying the magnetic microstructure of a range of epitaxial garnet films. Etched silicon cantilever probes, coated with CoPt alloy films and Co/Pt multilayers, provided a range of MFM probes for this study. Resonant torque magnetometry was used to characterize their magnetic properties. Phase change images were found to vary considerably in terms of relative "domain volumes" at the surface depending on which probe was used. Decreasing the moment of the alloy coated tips by using thinner layers reduces the "magnetizing" interaction of the tip field but also reduced the signal to noise ratio. By coating the tip with a multilayer a good signal to noise ratio could be obtained with very little interaction. Force-distance curves were used to study the response of the tips at various lift heights. The tips coated with alloy films gave a significant decrease in signal to noise ratio as the lift height increased whereas the multilayer tips maintained a signal which varied little with lift height.

  1. Single-Crystal Diamond Nanowire Tips for Ultrasensitive Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y; Degen, C L

    2015-12-01

    We report the fabrication, integration, and assessment of sharp diamond tips for ultrasensitive force microscopy experiments. Two types of tips, corresponding to the upper and lower halves of a diamond nanowire, were fabricated by top-down plasma etching from a single-crystalline substrate. The lower, surface-attached halves can be directly integrated into lithographically defined nanostructures, like cantilevers. The upper, detachable halves result in diamond nanowires with a tunable diameter (50-500 nm) and lengths of a few microns. Tip radii were around 10 nm and tip apex angles around 15°. We demonstrate the integration of diamond nanowires for use as scanning tips onto ultrasensitive pendulum-style silicon cantilevers. We find the noncontact friction and frequency jitter to be exceptionally low, with no degradation in the intrinsic mechanical quality factor (Q ≈ 130,000) down to tip-to-surface distances of about 10 nm. Our results are an encouraging step toward further improvement of the sensitivity and resolution of force-detected magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26517172

  2. Nanomechanical cutting of boron nitride nanotubes by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Meng; Chen, Xiaoming; Park, Cheol; Fay, Catharine C.; Pugno, Nicola M.; Ke, Changhong

    2013-12-01

    The length of nanotubes is a critical structural parameter for the design and manufacture of nanotube-based material systems and devices. High-precision length control of nanotubes by means of mechanical cutting using a scriber has not materialized due to the lack of the knowledge of the appropriate cutting conditions and the tube failure mechanism. In this paper, we present a quantitative nanomechanical study of the cutting of individual boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes. In our nanotube cutting measurements, a nanotube standing still on a flat substrate was laterally scribed by an AFM tip. The tip-tube collision force deformed the tube, and eventually fractured the tube at the collision site by increasing the cutting load. The mechanical response of nanotubes during the tip-tube collision process and the roles of the scribing velocity and the frictional interaction on the tip-tube collision contact in cutting nanotubes were quantitatively investigated by cutting double-walled BNNTs of 2.26-4.28 nm in outer diameter. The fracture strength of BNNTs was also quantified based on the measured collision forces and their structural configurations using contact mechanics theories. Our analysis reports fracture strengths of 9.1-15.5 GPa for the tested BNNTs. The nanomechanical study presented in this paper demonstrates that the AFM-based nanomechanical cutting technique not only enables effective control of the length of nanotubes with high precision, but is also promising as a new nanomechanical testing technique for characterizing the mechanical properties of tubular nanostructures.

  3. Physical mechanisms of megahertz vibrations and nonlinear detection in ultrasonic force and related microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Bosse, J. L.; Huey, B. D.; Tovee, P. D.; Kolosov, O. V.

    2014-04-14

    Use of high frequency (HF) vibrations at MHz frequencies in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) advanced nanoscale property mapping to video rates, allowed use of cantilever dynamics for mapping nanomechanical properties of stiff materials, sensing μs time scale phenomena in nanostructures, and enabled detection of subsurface features with nanoscale resolution. All of these methods critically depend on the generally poor characterized HF behaviour of AFM cantilevers in contact with a studied sample, spatial and frequency response of piezotransducers, and transfer of ultrasonic vibrations between the probe and a specimen. Focusing particularly on Ultrasonic Force Microscopy (UFM), this work is also applicable to waveguide UFM, heterodyne force microscopy, and near-field holographic microscopy, all methods that exploit nonlinear tip-surface force interactions at high frequencies. Leveraging automated multidimensional measurements, spectroscopic UFM (sUFM) is introduced to investigate a range of common experimental parameters, including piezotransducer excitation frequency, probed position, ultrasonic amplitude, cantilever geometry, spring constant, and normal force. Consistent with studies of influence of each of these factors, the data-rich sUFM signatures allow efficient optimization of ultrasonic-AFM based measurements, leading to best practices recommendations of using longer cantilevers with lower fundamental resonance, while at the same time increasing the central frequency of HF piezo-actuators, and only comparing results within areas on the order of few μm{sup 2} unless calibrated directly or compared with in-the-imaged area standards. Diverse materials such as Si, Cr, and photoresist are specifically investigated. This work thereby provides essential insight into the reliable use of MHz vibrations with AFM and provides direct evidence substantiating phenomena such as sensitivity to adhesion, diminished friction for certain ultrasonic conditions, and the

  4. Atomic species identification at the (101) anatase surface by simultaneous scanning tunnelling and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Todorović, Milica; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Moreno, César; Ryan, James William; León, Carmen Pérez; Sagisaka, Keisuke; Palomares, Emilio; Matolín, Vladimír; Fujita, Daisuke; Perez, Ruben; Custance, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Anatase is a pivotal material in devices for energy-harvesting applications and catalysis. Methods for the accurate characterization of this reducible oxide at the atomic scale are critical in the exploration of outstanding properties for technological developments. Here we combine atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), supported by first-principles calculations, for the simultaneous imaging and unambiguous identification of atomic species at the (101) anatase surface. We demonstrate that dynamic AFM-STM operation allows atomic resolution imaging within the material's band gap. Based on key distinguishing features extracted from calculations and experiments, we identify candidates for the most common surface defects. Our results pave the way for the understanding of surface processes, like adsorption of metal dopants and photoactive molecules, that are fundamental for the catalytic and photovoltaic applications of anatase, and demonstrate the potential of dynamic AFM-STM for the characterization of wide band gap materials. PMID:26118408

  5. Force interactions between magnetite, silica, and bentonite studied with atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobryden, I.; Potapova, E.; Holmgren, A.; Weber, H.; Hedlund, J.; Almqvist, N.

    2015-04-01

    Iron ore pellets consist of variety of mineral particles and are an important refined product used in steel manufacturing. Production of high-quality pellets requires good understanding of interactions between different constituents, such as magnetite, gangue residues, bentonite, and additives. Much research has been reported on magnetite, silica, and bentonite surface properties and their effect on pellet strength but more scant with a focus on a fundamental particle-particle interaction. To probe such particle interaction, atomic force microscopy (AFM) using colloidal probe technique has proven to be a suitable tool. In this work, the measurements were performed between magnetite-magnetite, bentonite-magnetite, silica-bentonite, and silica-magnetite particles in 1 mM CaCl2 solution at various pH values. The interaction character, i.e., repulsion or attraction, was determined by measuring and analyzing AFM force curves. The observed quantitative changes in interaction forces were in good agreement with the measured zeta-potentials for the particles at the same experimental conditions. Particle aggregation was studied by measuring the adhesion force. Absolute values of adhesion forces for different systems could not be compared due to the difference in particle size and contact geometry. Therefore, the relative change of adhesion force between pH 6 and 10 was used for comparison. The adhesion force decreased for the magnetite-magnetite and bentonite-silica systems and slightly increased for the magnetite-bentonite system at pH 10 as compared to pH 6, whereas a pronounced decrease in adhesion force was observed in the magnetite-silica system. Thus, the presence of silica particles on the magnetite surface could have a negative impact on the interaction between magnetite and bentonite in balling due to the reduction of the adhesion force.

  6. On averaging force curves over heterogeneous surfaces in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, I; Kalaparthi, V; Kreshchuk, M; Dokukin, M E

    2012-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be used to study mechanics at the nanoscale. Biological surfaces and nanocomposites have typically heterogeneous surfaces, both mechanically and chemically. When studying such surfaces with AFM, one needs to collect a large amount of data to make statistically sound conclusions. It is time- and resource-consuming to process each force curve separately. The analysis of an averaged raw force data is a simple and time saving option, which also averages out the noise and measurement artifacts of the force curves being analyzed. Moreover, some biomedical applications require just an average number per biological cell. Here we investigate such averaging, study the possible artifacts due to the averaging, and demonstrate how to minimize or even to avoid them. We analyze two ways of doing the averaging: over the force data for each particular distance (method 1, the most commonly used way), and over the distances for each particular force (method 2). We derive the errors of the methods in finding to the true average rigidity modulus. We show that both methods are accurate (the error is <2%) when the heterogeneity of the surface rigidity is small (<50%). When the heterogeneity is large (>100×), method 2 underestimates the average rigidity modulus by a factor of 2, whereas the error of method 1 is only 15%. However, when analyzing the different surface chemistry, which reveals itself in the changing long-range forces, the accuracy of the methods behave oppositely: method 1 can produce a noticeable averaging artifact in the deriving of the long-range forces; whereas method 2 can be successfully used to derive the averaged long-range force parameters without artifacts. We exemplify our conclusions by the study of human cervical cancer and normal epithelial cells, which demonstrate different degrees of heterogeneity. PMID:22917859

  7. Multimodal microscopy using ‘half and half’ contact mode and ultrasonic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilbeck, M. S.; Marsden, A. J.; Cao, G.; Kinloch, I. A.; Young, R. J.; Edwards, R. S.; Wilson, N. R.

    2014-08-01

    Advances in the design and fabrication of multifunctional nanostructured materials require characterization techniques capable of simultaneously mapping multiple material properties with nanoscale resolution. We show that this can be achieved by combining nanomechanical information from ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM) with simultaneously acquired friction force and conductivity measurements from contact mode scanning. This utilizes a ‘half and half’ approach, where the AFM is operated alternatively in UFM and contact mode, with the switching rate sufficiently fast that simultaneous contact mode and UFM information is acquired at each pixel of an image. We demonstrate the potential of such a multimodal approach through its application to composite systems consisting of graphene islands on a copper surface, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on a silicon oxide substrate, and a graphene epoxy composite. The half and half approach enables the friction force to be measured without topographical cross-talk. Application to the SWNT sample reveals a further advantage; due to the superlubricity of UFM it enables standard contact mode imaging techniques to be applied to delicate samples.

  8. Localization and force analysis at the single virus particle level using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Horng, Jim-Tong; Chang, Jeng-Shian; Hsieh, Chung-Fan; Tseng, You-Chen; Lin, Shiming

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Localization of single virus particle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force mapping. -- Abstract: Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a vital instrument in nanobiotechnology. In this study, we developed a method that enables AFM to simultaneously measure specific unbinding force and map the viral glycoprotein at the single virus particle level. The average diameter of virus particles from AFM images and the specificity between the viral surface antigen and antibody probe were integrated to design a three-stage method that sets the measuring area to a single virus particle before obtaining the force measurements, where the influenza virus was used as the object of measurements. Based on the purposed method and performed analysis, several findings can be derived from the results. The mean unbinding force of a single virus particle can be quantified, and no significant difference exists in this value among virus particles. Furthermore, the repeatability of the proposed method is demonstrated. The force mapping images reveal that the distributions of surface viral antigens recognized by antibody probe were dispersed on the whole surface of individual virus particles under the proposed method and experimental criteria; meanwhile, the binding probabilities are similar among particles. This approach can be easily applied to most AFM systems without specific components or configurations. These results help understand the force-based analysis at the single virus particle level, and therefore, can reinforce the capability of AFM to investigate a specific type of viral surface protein and its distributions.

  9. Computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy: energy dissipation of cantilever.

    PubMed

    Senda, Yasuhiro; Blomqvist, Janne; Nieminen, Risto M

    2016-09-21

    We propose a computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) in which the atomic force between the cantilever tip and the surface is calculated using a molecular dynamics method, and the macroscopic motion of the cantilever is modeled by an oscillating spring. The movement of atoms in the tip and surface is connected with the oscillating spring using a recently developed coupling method. In this computational model, the oscillation energy is dissipated, as observed in AFM experiments. We attribute this dissipation to the hysteresis and nonconservative properties of the interatomic force that acts between the atoms in the tip and sample surface. The dissipation rate strongly depends on the parameters used in the computational model. PMID:27420398

  10. Drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy: From vacuum to liquids

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Cuenca, Mariano; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Summary We introduce drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy as a dynamic mode with outstanding performance in all environments from vacuum to liquids. As with frequency modulation, the new mode follows a feedback scheme with two nested loops: The first keeps the cantilever oscillation amplitude constant by regulating the driving force, and the second uses the driving force as the feedback variable for topography. Additionally, a phase-locked loop can be used as a parallel feedback allowing separation of the conservative and nonconservative interactions. We describe the basis of this mode and present some examples of its performance in three different environments. Drive-amplutide modulation is a very stable, intuitive and easy to use mode that is free of the feedback instability associated with the noncontact-to-contact transition that occurs in the frequency-modulation mode. PMID:22563531

  11. Computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy: energy dissipation of cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senda, Yasuhiro; Blomqvist, Janne; Nieminen, Risto M.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) in which the atomic force between the cantilever tip and the surface is calculated using a molecular dynamics method, and the macroscopic motion of the cantilever is modeled by an oscillating spring. The movement of atoms in the tip and surface is connected with the oscillating spring using a recently developed coupling method. In this computational model, the oscillation energy is dissipated, as observed in AFM experiments. We attribute this dissipation to the hysteresis and nonconservative properties of the interatomic force that acts between the atoms in the tip and sample surface. The dissipation rate strongly depends on the parameters used in the computational model.

  12. Long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy for nanometer-scale imaging in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of morphological dynamics of live cells with nanometer resolution under physiological conditions is highly desired, but challenging. It has been demonstrated that high-speed atomic force microscopy is a powerful technique for visualizing dynamics of biomolecules under physiological conditions. However, application of high-speed atomic force microscopy for imaging larger objects such as live mammalian cells has been complicated because of the collision between the cantilever and samples. Here, we demonstrate that attaching an extremely long (~3 μm) and thin (~5 nm) tip by amorphous carbon to the cantilever allows us to image the surface structure of live cells with the spatiotemporal resolution of nanometers and seconds. We demonstrate that long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy is capable of imaging morphogenesis of filopodia, membrane ruffles, pit formation, and endocytosis in COS-7, HeLa cells and hippocampal neurons. PMID:25735540

  13. Long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy for nanometer-scale imaging in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2015-03-01

    Visualization of morphological dynamics of live cells with nanometer resolution under physiological conditions is highly desired, but challenging. It has been demonstrated that high-speed atomic force microscopy is a powerful technique for visualizing dynamics of biomolecules under physiological conditions. However, application of high-speed atomic force microscopy for imaging larger objects such as live mammalian cells has been complicated because of the collision between the cantilever and samples. Here, we demonstrate that attaching an extremely long (~3 μm) and thin (~5 nm) tip by amorphous carbon to the cantilever allows us to image the surface structure of live cells with the spatiotemporal resolution of nanometers and seconds. We demonstrate that long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy is capable of imaging morphogenesis of filopodia, membrane ruffles, pit formation, and endocytosis in COS-7, HeLa cells and hippocampal neurons.

  14. Analysis of force-deconvolution methods in frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Illek, Esther; Giessibl, Franz J

    2012-01-01

    Summary In frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy the direct observable is the frequency shift of an oscillating cantilever in a force field. This frequency shift is not a direct measure of the actual force, and thus, to obtain the force, deconvolution methods are necessary. Two prominent methods proposed by Sader and Jarvis (Sader–Jarvis method) and Giessibl (matrix method) are investigated with respect to the deconvolution quality. Both methods show a nontrivial dependence of the deconvolution quality on the oscillation amplitude. The matrix method exhibits spikelike features originating from a numerical artifact. By interpolation of the data, the spikelike features can be circumvented. The Sader–Jarvis method has a continuous amplitude dependence showing two minima and one maximum, which is an inherent property of the deconvolution algorithm. The optimal deconvolution depends on the ratio of the amplitude and the characteristic decay length of the force for the Sader–Jarvis method. However, the matrix method generally provides the higher deconvolution quality. PMID:22496997

  15. Carrier density distribution in silicon nanowires investigated by scanning thermal microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wielgoszewski, Grzegorz; Pałetko, Piotr; Tomaszewski, Daniel; Zaborowski, Michał; Jóźwiak, Grzegorz; Kopiec, Daniel; Gotszalk, Teodor; Grabiec, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    The use of scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) to investigate silicon nanowires (SiNWs) is presented. SThM allows imaging of temperature distribution at the nanoscale, while KPFM images the potential distribution with AFM-related ultra-high spatial resolution. Both techniques are therefore suitable for imaging the resistance distribution. We show results of experimental examination of dual channel n-type SiNWs with channel width of 100 nm, while the channel was open and current was flowing through the SiNW. To investigate the carrier distribution in the SiNWs we performed SThM and KPFM scans. The SThM results showed non-symmetrical temperature distribution along the SiNWs with temperature maximum shifted towards the contact of higher potential. These results corresponded to those expressed by the distribution of potential gradient along the SiNWs, obtained using the KPFM method. Consequently, non-uniform distribution of resistance was shown, being a result of non-uniform carrier density distribution in the structure and showing the pinch-off effect. Last but not least, the results were also compared with results of finite-element method modeling. PMID:26381074

  16. Engineering and Characterization of Collagen Networks Using Wet Atomic Force Microscopy and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, Jenna; Coffey, Tonya; Conrad, Brad; Burris, Jennifer; Hester, Brooke

    2014-03-01

    Collagen is an abundant protein and its monomers covalently crosslink to form fibrils which form fibers which contribute to forming macrostructures like tendon or bone. While the contribution is well understood at the macroscopic level, it is not well known at the fibril level. We wish to study the mechanical properties of collagen for networks of collagen fibers that vary in size and density. We present here a method to synthesize collagen networks from monomers and that allows us to vary the density of the networks. By using biotynilated collagen and a surface that is functionalized with avidin, we generate two-dimensional collagen networks across the surface of a silicon wafer. During network synthesis, the incubation time is varied from 30 minutes to 3 hours or temperature is varied from 25°C to 45°C. The two-dimensional collagen network created in the process is characterized using environmental atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The network density is measured by the number of strands in one frame using SPIP software. We expect that at body temperature (37°C) and with longer incubation times, the network density should increase.

  17. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  18. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-15

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  19. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications.

    PubMed

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations. PMID:26724038

  20. Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: Theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction

    SciTech Connect

    Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A.; Loring, Roger F.

    2013-11-14

    An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers.

  1. Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction.

    PubMed

    Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A; Loring, Roger F

    2013-11-14

    An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers. PMID:24320286

  2. Combined X-ray Microfluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of Mg Distribution in Whole Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lagomarsino, S.; Farruggia, G.; Trapani, V.; Mastrototaro, L.; Wolf, F.; Cedola, A.; Fratini, M.; Notargiacomo, A.; Bukreeva, I.; McNulty, I.; Vogt, S.; Kim, S.; Legnini, D.; Maier, J. A. M.

    2011-09-09

    We present in this paper a novel methodology that combines scanning x-ray fluorescencee microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The combination of these two techniques allows the determination of a concentration map of Mg in whole (not sectioned) cells.

  3. Conductive-probe atomic force microscopy characterization of silicon nanowire

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The electrical conduction properties of lateral and vertical silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were investigated using a conductive-probe atomic force microscopy (AFM). Horizontal SiNWs, which were synthesized by the in-plane solid-liquid-solid technique, are randomly deployed into an undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer. Local current mapping shows that the wires have internal microstructures. The local current-voltage measurements on these horizontal wires reveal a power law behavior indicating several transport regimes based on space-charge limited conduction which can be assisted by traps in the high-bias regime (> 1 V). Vertical phosphorus-doped SiNWs were grown by chemical vapor deposition using a gold catalyst-driving vapor-liquid-solid process on higly n-type silicon substrates. The effect of phosphorus doping on the local contact resistance between the AFM tip and the SiNW was put in evidence, and the SiNWs resistivity was estimated. PMID:21711623

  4. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of Atherosclerosis Progression in Arterial Walls.

    PubMed

    Timashev, Peter S; Kotova, Svetlana L; Belkova, Galina V; Gubar'kova, Ekaterina V; Timofeeva, Lidia B; Gladkova, Natalia D; Solovieva, Anna B

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Here we suggest a novel approach for tracking atherosclerosis progression based on the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using AFM, we studied cross-sections of coronary arteries with the following types of lesions: Type II-thickened intima; Type III-thickened intima with a lipid streak; Type IV-fibrotic layer over a lipid core; Type Va-unstable fibrotic layer over a lipid core; Type Vc-very thick fibrotic layer. AFM imaging revealed that the fibrotic layer of an atherosclerotic plaque is represented by a basket-weave network of collagen fibers and a subscale network of fibrils that become looser with atherosclerosis progression. In an unstable plaque (Type Va), packing of the collagen fibers and fibrils becomes even less uniform than that at the previous stages, while a stable fibrotic plaque (Vc) has significantly tighter packing. Such alterations of the collagen network morphology apparently, led to deterioration of the Type Va plaque mechanical properties, that, in turn, resulted in its instability and propensity to rupture. Thus, AFM may serve as a useful tool for tracking atherosclerosis progression in the arterial wall tissue. PMID:26843417

  5. Atomic force microscopy investigation of the giant mimivirus

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Yuri G.; Xiao Chuan; Sun Siyang; Raoult, Didier; Rossmann, Michael; McPherson, Alexander

    2010-08-15

    Mimivirus was investigated by atomic force microscopy in its native state following serial degradation by lysozyme and bromelain. The 750-nm diameter virus is coated with a forest of glycosylated protein fibers of lengths about 140 nm with diameters 1.4 nm. Fibers are capped with distinctive ellipsoidal protein heads of estimated Mr = 25 kDa. The surface fibers are attached to the particle through a layer of protein covering the capsid, which is in turn composed of the major capsid protein (MCP). The latter is organized as an open network of hexagonal rings with central depressions separated by 14 nm. The virion exhibits an elaborate apparatus at a unique vertex, visible as a star shaped depression on native particles, but on defibered virions as five arms of 50 nm width and 250 nm length rising above the capsid by 20 nm. The apparatus is integrated into the capsid and not applied atop the icosahedral lattice. Prior to DNA release, the arms of the star disengage from the virion and it opens by folding back five adjacent triangular faces. A membrane sac containing the DNA emerges from the capsid in preparation for fusion with a membrane of the host cell. Also observed from disrupted virions were masses of distinctive fibers of diameter about 1 nm, and having a 7-nm periodicity. These are probably contained within the capsid along with the DNA bearing sac. The fibers were occasionally observed associated with toroidal protein clusters interpreted as processive enzymes modifying the fibers.

  6. Lipid domains in supported lipid bilayer for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wan-Chen; Blanchette, Craig D; Ratto, Timothy V; Longo, Marjorie L

    2007-01-01

    Phase-separated supported lipid bilayers have been widely used to study the phase behavior of multicomponent lipid mixtures. One of the primary advantages of using supported lipid bilayers is that the two-dimensional platform of this model membrane system readily allows lipid-phase separation to be characterized by high-resolution imaging techniques such as atomic force microscopy (AFM). In addition, when supported lipid bilayers have been functionalized with a specific ligand, protein-membrane interactions can also be imaged and characterized through AFM. It has been recently demonstrated that when the technique of vesicle fusion is used to prepare supported lipid bilayers, the thermal history of the vesicles before deposition and the supported lipid bilayers after formation will have significant effects on the final phase-separated domain structures. In this chapter, three methods of vesicle preparations as well as three deposition conditions will be presented. Also, the techniques and strategies of using AFM to image multicomponent phase-separated supported lipid bilayers and protein binding will be discussed. PMID:17951756

  7. Actuation of atomic force microscopy microcantilevers using contact acoustic nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Torello, D.; Degertekin, F. Levent

    2013-11-15

    A new method of actuating atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers is proposed in which a high frequency (>5 MHz) wave modulated by a lower frequency (∼300 kHz) wave passes through a contact acoustic nonlinearity at the contact interface between the actuator and the cantilever chip. The nonlinearity converts the high frequency, modulated signal to a low frequency drive signal suitable for actuation of tapping-mode AFM probes. The higher harmonic content of this signal is filtered out mechanically by the cantilever transfer function, providing for clean output. A custom probe holder was designed and constructed using rapid prototyping technologies and off-the-shelf components and was interfaced with an Asylum Research MFP-3D AFM, which was then used to evaluate the performance characteristics with respect to standard hardware and linear actuation techniques. Using a carrier frequency of 14.19 MHz, it was observed that the cantilever output was cleaner with this actuation technique and added no significant noise to the system. This setup, without any optimization, was determined to have an actuation bandwidth on the order of 10 MHz, suitable for high speed imaging applications. Using this method, an image was taken that demonstrates the viability of the technique and is compared favorably to images taken with a standard AFM setup.

  8. Magnetic resonance force microscopy and a solid state quantum computer.

    SciTech Connect

    Pelekhov, D. V.; Martin, I.; Suter, A.; Reagor, D. W.; Hammel, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    A Quantum Computer (QC) is a device that utilizes the principles of Quantum Mechanics to perform computations. Such a machine would be capable of accomplishing tasks not achievable by means of any conventional digital computer, for instance factoring large numbers. Currently it appears that the QC architecture based on an array of spin quantum bits (qubits) embedded in a solid-state matrix is one of the most promising approaches to fabrication of a scalable QC. However, the fabrication and operation of a Solid State Quantum Computer (SSQC) presents very formidable challenges; primary amongst these are: (1) the characterization and control of the fabrication process of the device during its construction and (2) the readout of the computational result. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM)--a novel scanning probe technique based on mechanical detection of magnetic resonance-provides an attractive means of addressing these requirements. The sensitivity of the MRFM significantly exceeds that of conventional magnetic resonance measurement methods, and it has the potential for single electron spin detection. Moreover, the MRFM is capable of true 3D subsurface imaging. These features will make MRFM an invaluable tool for the implementation of a spin-based QC. Here we present the general principles of MRFM operation, the current status of its development and indicate future directions for its improvement.

  9. Actuation of atomic force microscopy microcantilevers using contact acoustic nonlinearities.

    PubMed

    Torello, D; Degertekin, F Levent

    2013-11-01

    A new method of actuating atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers is proposed in which a high frequency (>5 MHz) wave modulated by a lower frequency (~300 kHz) wave passes through a contact acoustic nonlinearity at the contact interface between the actuator and the cantilever chip. The nonlinearity converts the high frequency, modulated signal to a low frequency drive signal suitable for actuation of tapping-mode AFM probes. The higher harmonic content of this signal is filtered out mechanically by the cantilever transfer function, providing for clean output. A custom probe holder was designed and constructed using rapid prototyping technologies and off-the-shelf components and was interfaced with an Asylum Research MFP-3D AFM, which was then used to evaluate the performance characteristics with respect to standard hardware and linear actuation techniques. Using a carrier frequency of 14.19 MHz, it was observed that the cantilever output was cleaner with this actuation technique and added no significant noise to the system. This setup, without any optimization, was determined to have an actuation bandwidth on the order of 10 MHz, suitable for high speed imaging applications. Using this method, an image was taken that demonstrates the viability of the technique and is compared favorably to images taken with a standard AFM setup. PMID:24289402

  10. Atomic Force Microscopy Investigation of Vaccinia Virus Structure▿

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Y.; Gershon, P. D.; McPherson, A.

    2008-01-01

    Vaccinia virus was treated in a controlled manner with various combinations of nonionic detergents, reducing agents, and proteolytic enzymes, and successive products of the reactions were visualized using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Following removal of the outer lipid/protein membrane, a layer 20 to 40 nm in thickness was encountered that was composed of fibrous elements which, under reducing conditions, rapidly decomposed into individual monomers on the substrate. Beneath this layer was the virus core and its prominent lateral bodies, which could be dissociated or degraded with proteases. The core, in addition to the lateral bodies, was composed of a thick, multilayered shell of proteins of diverse sizes and shapes. The shell, which was readily etched with proteases, was thoroughly permeated with pores, or channels. Prolonged exposure to proteases and reductants produced disgorgement of the viral DNA from the remainders of the cores and also left residual, flattened, protease-resistant sacs on the imaging substrate. The DNA was readily visualized by AFM, which revealed some regions to be “soldered” by proteins, others to be heavily complexed with protein, and yet other parts to apparently exist as bundled, naked DNA. Prolonged exposure to proteases deproteinized the DNA, leaving masses of extended, free DNA. Estimates of the interior core volume suggest moderate but not extreme compaction of the genome. PMID:18508898

  11. Biofunctionalization of carbon nanotubes for atomic force microscopy imaging.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Adam T

    2004-01-01

    The study of biological processes relies increasingly on methods for probing structure and function of biochemical machinery (proteins, nucleic acids, and so on) with submolecular resolution. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has recently emerged as a promising approach for imaging biological structures with resolution approaching the nanometer scale. Two important limitations of AFM in biological imaging are (1) resolution is constrained by probe tip dimensions, and (2) typical probe tips lack chemical specificity to differentiate between functional groups in biological structures. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) offer an intriguing possibility for providing both high resolution and chemical selectivity in AFM imaging, thus overcoming the enumerated limitations. Procedures for generating SWNT tips for AFM will be described. Carboxylic acid functional groups at the SWNT ends can be functionalized using covalent coupling chemistry to attach biological moieties via primary amine groups. Herein, the focus will be on describing methods for attaching biotin to SWNT tips and probing streptavidin on surfaces; importantly, this same coupling chemistry can also be applied to other biomolecules possessing primary amine groups. Underivatized SWNT tips can also provide high-resolution AFM images of DNA. Biofunctionalization of SWNT AFM tips offers great potential to enable high-resolution, chemically selective imaging of biological structures. PMID:15197321

  12. Atomic Force Microscopy of Arrays of Asymmetrical DNA Motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, W.B.; Mudalige, T.K.

    2012-03-21

    DNA can easily be assembled into wide and relatively flat nanostructures that lend themselves to study via Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). It is often important to know which side of an assembly the AFM is imaging. This is particularly crucial for characterizing nanomachines, where the movement must be measured relative to fiducial features visible to the AFM. We have developed a cheap and simple technique for building DNA arrays with distinguishable sides, a technique requiring 10 or fewer strands - dozens or hundreds of strands fewer than used for these purposes previously. Our approach involves constructing arrays out of DNA tiles that have low apparent symmetry when imaged via AFM. We have surveyed the effects of varying degrees of motif asymmetry in AFM micrographs. Even at resolutions where the individual tiles cannot be resolved (either because of sub-optimal tip quality, or very gentle tapping by the AFM tip) the larger scale features of the arrays have predictable structures that allow the determination of which side of the array is facing up. We have used this information to verify that DNA hairpins attached to either the up- or down-facing side of an array on mica can be detected in AFM height scans. We have also characterized differences in appearance between hairpins attached to different sides of the arrays.

  13. Atomic force microscopy of differential weathering in real time

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, J.S.; Engstrom, R.C. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-04-01

    Differential weathering of a rock sample was observed in-situ using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The sample contained fayalite intergrown with veins of magnetite and serpentine. Analyses consisted of polishing the sample with alumina and recording AFM scans periodically during subsequent exposure to nitric acid. Immediately after polishing, serpentine areas were recessed compared to fayalite and magnetite, which were similar in height. As weathering proceeded, both serpentine and magnetite areas protruded from the fayalite surface, and no significant change in the relative heights of magnetite and serpentine features was observed. This suggests that serpentine is less resistant to mechanical weathering than fayalite or magnetite but that serpentine and magnetite are both more resistant to chemical weathering than fayalite. Differential weathering rates between fayalite and magnetite, on the order of a few unit cells per minute, were determined in various nitric acid concentrations by measuring the difference in height between the two minerals as a function of time. A dissolution rate law for fayalite was determined by comparing the rates for different concentrations of nitric acid and assuming the dissolution of magnetite was negligible compared to that of fayalite. The rate law from this study is Rate = 7.7* [HNO[sub 3

  14. Simulating photoconductive atomic-force microscopy on disordered photovoltaic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakesley, James C.; Castro, Fernando A.

    2015-04-01

    We present a tool for simulating photoconductive atomic-force microscopy (Pc-AFM) on bulk heterojunction (BHJ) materials with a minimal set of empirical parameters. The simulation is a master-equation solution of a three-dimensional hopping charge transport model which includes donor-acceptor domain morphology, energetic and spatial disorder, exciton transport and splitting, charge-pair generation and recombination, and tip-substrate electrostatics. A simplifying aspect of the model is that electron transport, hole transport, and electron-hole recombination are treated as the same electron-transfer process. The model recreates realistic bulk recombination rates, without requiring short-range Coulombic effects to be calculated. We demonstrate the tool by simulating line scans of a Pc-AFM tip passing over the surface of a buried or exposed acceptor cluster in a BHJ film. The simulations confirm experimental observations that such defects can be detected by open-circuit mode Pc-AFM imaging, even when the clusters are buried below the surface.

  15. Recent Progress in Molecular Recognition Imaging Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Subhadip; Lindsay, Stuart

    2016-03-15

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an extremely powerful tool in the field of bionanotechnology because of its ability to image single molecules and make measurements of molecular interaction forces with piconewton sensitivity. It works in aqueous media, enabling studies of molecular phenomenon taking place under physiological conditions. Samples can be imaged in their near-native state without any further modifications such as staining or tagging. The combination of AFM imaging with the force measurement added a new feature to the AFM technique, that is, molecular recognition imaging. Molecular recognition imaging enables mapping of specific interactions between two molecules (one attached to the AFM tip and the other to the imaging substrate) by generating simultaneous topography and recognition images (TREC). Since its discovery, the recognition imaging technique has been successfully applied to different systems such as antibody-protein, aptamer-protein, peptide-protein, chromatin, antigen-antibody, cells, and so forth. Because the technique is based on specific binding between the ligand and receptor, it has the ability to detect a particular protein in a mixture of proteins or monitor a biological phenomenon in the native physiological state. One key step for recognition imaging technique is the functionalization of the AFM tips (generally, silicon, silicon nitrides, gold, etc.). Several different functionalization methods have been reported in the literature depending on the molecules of interest and the material of the tip. Polyethylene glycol is routinely used to provide flexibility needed for proper binding as a part of the linker that carries the affinity molecule. Recently, a heterofunctional triarm linker has been synthesized and successfully attached with two different affinity molecules. This novel linker, when attached to AFM tip, helped to detect two different proteins simultaneously from a mixture of proteins using a so-called "two

  16. Mechanical properties of poly(dimethylsiloxane)-block-poly(2-methyloxazoline) polymersomes probed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jaskiewicz, Karmena; Makowski, Marcin; Kappl, Michael; Landfester, Katharina; Kroeger, Anja

    2012-08-28

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane)-block-poly(2-methyloxazoline) (PDMS-b-PMOXA) vesicles were characterized by a combination of dynamic light scattering (DLS), cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy (AFM). From DLS data, a hydrodynamic radius of ~150 nm was determined, and cryo-TEM micrographs revealed a bilayer thickness of ~16 nm. In AFM experiments on a silicon wafer substrate, adsorption led to a stable spherical caplike conformation of the polymersomes, whereas on mica, adsorption resulted also in vesicle fusion and formation of bilayer patches or multilayer stacks. This indicates a delicate balance between the mechanical stability of PDMS-b-PMOXA polymersomes on one hand and the driving forces for spreading on the other. A Young's modulus of 17 ± 11 MPa and a bending modulus of 7 ± 5 × 10(-18) J were derived from AFM force spectroscopy measurements. Therefore, the elastic response of the PDMS-b-PMOXA polymersomes to external stimuli is much closer to that of lipid vesicles compared to other types of polymersomes, such as polystyrene-block-poly(acrylic acid) (PS-b-PAA). PMID:22860888

  17. Preparation and Friction Force Microscopy Measurements of Immiscible, Opposing Polymer Brushes

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, Sissi; Kutnyanszky, Edit; Müser, Martin H.; Vancso, G. Julius

    2014-01-01

    Solvated polymer brushes are well known to lubricate high-pressure contacts, because they can sustain a positive normal load while maintaining low friction at the interface. Nevertheless, these systems can be sensitive to wear due to interdigitation of the opposing brushes. In a recent publication, we have shown via molecular dynamics simulations and atomic force microscopy experiments, that using an immiscible polymer brush system terminating the substrate and the slider surfaces, respectively, can eliminate such interdigitation. As a consequence, wear in the contacts is reduced. Moreover, the friction force is two orders of magnitude lower compared to traditional miscible polymer brush systems. This newly proposed system therefore holds great potential for application in industry. Here, the methodology to construct an immiscible polymer brush system of two different brushes each solvated by their own preferred solvent is presented. The procedure how to graft poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) from a flat surface and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) from an atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe is described. PNIPAM is solvated in water and PMMA in acetophenone. Via friction force AFM measurements, it is shown that the friction for this system is indeed reduced by two orders of magnitude compared to the miscible system of PMMA on PMMA solvated in acetophenone. PMID:25590429

  18. Preparation and friction force microscopy measurements of immiscible, opposing polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Sissi; Kutnyanszky, Edit; Müser, Martin H; Vancso, G Julius

    2014-01-01

    Solvated polymer brushes are well known to lubricate high-pressure contacts, because they can sustain a positive normal load while maintaining low friction at the interface. Nevertheless, these systems can be sensitive to wear due to interdigitation of the opposing brushes. In a recent publication, we have shown via molecular dynamics simulations and atomic force microscopy experiments, that using an immiscible polymer brush system terminating the substrate and the slider surfaces, respectively, can eliminate such interdigitation. As a consequence, wear in the contacts is reduced. Moreover, the friction force is two orders of magnitude lower compared to traditional miscible polymer brush systems. This newly proposed system therefore holds great potential for application in industry. Here, the methodology to construct an immiscible polymer brush system of two different brushes each solvated by their own preferred solvent is presented. The procedure how to graft poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) from a flat surface and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) from an atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe is described. PNIPAM is solvated in water and PMMA in acetophenone. Via friction force AFM measurements, it is shown that the friction for this system is indeed reduced by two orders of magnitude compared to the miscible system of PMMA on PMMA solvated in acetophenone. PMID:25590429

  19. Robust high-resolution imaging and quantitative force measurement with tuned-oscillator atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dagdeviren, Omur E; Götzen, Jan; Hölscher, Hendrik; Altman, Eric I; Schwarz, Udo D

    2016-02-12

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy are based on locally detecting the interactions between a surface and a sharp probe tip. For highest resolution imaging, noncontact modes that avoid tip-sample contact are used; control of the tip's vertical position is accomplished by oscillating the tip and detecting perturbations induced by its interaction with the surface potential. Due to this potential's nonlinear nature, however, achieving reliable control of the tip-sample distance is challenging, so much so that despite its power vacuum-based noncontact AFM has remained a niche technique. Here we introduce a new pathway to distance control that prevents instabilities by externally tuning the oscillator's response characteristics. A major advantage of this operational scheme is that it delivers robust position control in both the attractive and repulsive regimes with only one feedback loop, thereby providing an easy-to-implement route to atomic resolution imaging and quantitative tip-sample interaction force measurement. PMID:26754332

  20. Small cantilevers for atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viani, M. B.; Schaffer, T. E.; Chand, A.; Smith, B. L.; Hansma, P. K.; Wendman, M.

    1998-03-01

    Small cantilevers offer new possibilities for high speed/low noise atomic force microscopy of soft, biological samples. We have used a novel process to fabricate metallic cantilevers that should maximize reflectivity and minimize thermal bending. We have fabricated and measured the properties of aluminum, nickel, silver, and 14-karat gold cantilevers that are 3-12 um long, 1-4 um wide, and 60-300 nm thick and have resonant frequencies of 0.5-2 MHz and spring constants of 0.1-3 N/m. We also have fabricated small cantilevers with ultra-low spring constants (1-10 mN/m) out of silicon nitride and used them for force spectroscopy of DNA. This work was supported by grant numbers NSF-DMR9622169 and NSF-DMR9632716 from the Materials Research Division of the National Science Foundation and by grant number DAAH04-96-1-004 from the Army Research Office.

  1. Local Force Interactions and Image Contrast Reversal on Graphite Observed with Noncontact Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdeviren, Omur; Goetzen, Jan; Altman, Eric; Schwarz, Udo

    Surface interactions of graphene-based nanostructures remain a topic of considerable interest in nanotechnology. Similarly, tip-dependent imaging contrasts have attracted attention as they allow conclusions to be made about the surface's chemical structure and local reactivity. In this talk, we present noncontact atomic force microscopy data recorded in the attractive regime on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite that reveals image contrast reversal for the first time. While larger tip-sample separations feature bright spots on atomic sites, the maximum of the tip-sample interaction flips to the hollow site positions upon further approach, which represents the contrast predominantly observed in previous studies during attractive-mode imaging. This cross over of the local chemical interaction is confirmed in force spectroscopy experiments. The results will be discussed in light of recent theoretical simulations that have predicted the occurrence of such contrast reversal for specific tip terminations.

  2. Atomic force microscopy imaging of viscoelastic properties in toughened polypropylene resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nysten, Bernard; Legras, Roger; Costa, Jean-Louis

    1995-11-01

    The bulk morphology of two toughened polypropylene/(ethylene propylene)copolymer resins (PP/EP) presenting different impact resistances has been studied by means of different atomic force microscopy techniques: contact atomic force microscopy, lateral force microscopy (LFM), and force modulation microscopy (FMM). The three techniques reveal two different morphologies as observed in transmission electronic microscopy. In LFM, a higher friction force is observed on the rubbery phase which has the lower Young's modulus confirming the relationship between friction force and elastic properties. In force modulation, the elastic moduli is found to be much lower on the EP nodules in both resins. FMM also reveals that the difference of viscous response between the PP matrix and the EP nodules is much lower in the resin which is less impact resistant.

  3. Fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy: Achieving sub-cycle time resolution.

    PubMed

    Karatay, Durmus U; Harrison, Jeffrey S; Glaz, Micah S; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Ginger, David S

    2016-05-01

    The ability to measure microsecond- and nanosecond-scale local dynamics below the diffraction limit with widely available atomic force microscopy hardware would enable new scientific studies in fields ranging from biology to semiconductor physics. However, commercially available scanning-probe instruments typically offer the ability to measure dynamics only on time scales of milliseconds to seconds. Here, we describe in detail the implementation of fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy using an oscillating cantilever as a means to measure fast local dynamics following a perturbation to a sample. We show how the phase of the oscillating cantilever relative to the perturbation event is critical to achieving reliable sub-cycle time resolution. We explore how noise affects the achievable time resolution and present empirical guidelines for reducing noise and optimizing experimental parameters. Specifically, we show that reducing the noise on the cantilever by using photothermal excitation instead of piezoacoustic excitation further improves time resolution. We demonstrate the discrimination of signal rise times with time constants as fast as 10 ns, and simultaneous data acquisition and analysis for dramatically improved image acquisition times. PMID:27250430

  4. Fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy: Achieving sub-cycle time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatay, Durmus U.; Harrison, Jeffrey S.; Glaz, Micah S.; Giridharagopal, Rajiv; Ginger, David S.

    2016-05-01

    The ability to measure microsecond- and nanosecond-scale local dynamics below the diffraction limit with widely available atomic force microscopy hardware would enable new scientific studies in fields ranging from biology to semiconductor physics. However, commercially available scanning-probe instruments typically offer the ability to measure dynamics only on time scales of milliseconds to seconds. Here, we describe in detail the implementation of fast time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy using an oscillating cantilever as a means to measure fast local dynamics following a perturbation to a sample. We show how the phase of the oscillating cantilever relative to the perturbation event is critical to achieving reliable sub-cycle time resolution. We explore how noise affects the achievable time resolution and present empirical guidelines for reducing noise and optimizing experimental parameters. Specifically, we show that reducing the noise on the cantilever by using photothermal excitation instead of piezoacoustic excitation further improves time resolution. We demonstrate the discrimination of signal rise times with time constants as fast as 10 ns, and simultaneous data acquisition and analysis for dramatically improved image acquisition times.

  5. Scanning force microscopy as a tool for fracture studies

    SciTech Connect

    Thome, F.; Goeken, M.; Grosse Gehling, M.; Vehoff, H.

    1999-08-01

    Dynamic simulations of the fracture toughness as a function of the orientation and temperature were carried out and compared with experimental results obtained by in-situ loading pre-cracked NiAl single crystals inside a scanning force microscope (SFM). In order to compare the simulations with the experiments the problem of the short crack with dislocations was solved for general loading and arbitrary slip line directions. The stress and strain field obtained could be directly connected to FEM calculations which allowed the examination of the stability of micro cracks at notches. The effect of different fracture conditions for biaxial loading were studied in detail. The dynamic simulation yielded predictions of K{sub IC}, slip line length and dislocation distributions as a function of loading rate, temperature and orientation. These predictions were tested by in-situ loading NiAl single crystals inside a SFM at various temperatures. The local COD, slip line length and apparent dislocation distribution at the surface were measured as a function of the applied load and the temperature. The experiments clearly demonstrated that dislocations emit from the crack tip before unstable crack jumps occur. The local COD could be directly related to the number of dislocations emitted from the crack tip. With increasing temperature the number of dislocations and the local COD increased before unstable crack jumps or final fracture occurred.

  6. Stochastic friction force mechanism of energy dissipation in noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantorovich, L. N.

    2001-12-01

    The tip-surface interaction in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) leads to energy dissipation, which has been used as another imaging mechanism of surface topography with atomic resolution. In this paper, using a rigorous approach based on the coarse graining method of (classical) nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, we derive the Fokker-Planck equation for the tip distribution function and then the Langevin equation (equation of motion) for the tip. We show that the latter equation contains a friction force leading to the energy dissipation. The friction force is related to the correlation function of the fluctuating tip-surface force in agreement with earlier treatments by other methods. Using a simple model of a plane surface in which only one surface atom interacts directly with the tip (it, however, interacts with other surface atoms), we calculate the friction coefficient and the corresponding dissipation energy as a function of the tip position. In our model all surface atoms are allowed to relax. Nevertheless, our calculations qualitatively agree with a previous much simpler treatment by Gauthier and Tsukada [Phys. Rev. B 60, 11 716 (1999)] that, at least for the plain terraces, the calculated dissipation energies appear to be much smaller than observed in experiments. We also demonstrate the validity of the Markovian approximation in studying the NC-AFM system.

  7. Taking nanomedicine teaching into practice with atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Filomena A; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C

    2015-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic force microscope by performing AFM scanning images of human blood cells and force spectroscopy measurements of the fibrinogen-platelet interaction. Since the beginning of this course, in 2008, the overall rating by the students was 4.7 (out of 5), meaning a good to excellent evaluation. Students were very enthusiastic and produced high-quality AFM images and force spectroscopy data. The implementation of the hands-on AFM course was a success, giving to the students the opportunity of contact with a technique that has a wide variety of applications on the nanomedicine field. In the near future, nanomedicine will have remarkable implications in medicine regarding the definition, diagnosis, and treatment of different diseases. AFM enables students to observe single molecule interactions, enabling the understanding of molecular mechanisms of different physiological and pathological processes at the nanoscale level. Therefore, the introduction of nanomedicine courses in bioscience and medical school curricula is essential. PMID:26628660

  8. Calculation of the effect of tip geometry on noncontact atomic force microscopy using a qPlus sensor

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Gordon A

    2013-01-01

    Summary In qPlus atomic force microscopy the tip length can in principle approach the length of the cantilever. We present a detailed mathematical model of the effects this has on the dynamic properties of the qPlus sensor. The resulting, experimentally confirmed motion of the tip apex is shown to have a large lateral component, raising interesting questions for both calibration and force-spectroscopy measurements. PMID:23400392

  9. Magnetic Force Microscopy of Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocera, Tanya M.

    In recent years, both synthetic as well as naturally occurring superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNs) have become increasingly important in biomedicine. For instance, iron deposits in many pathological tissues are known to contain an accumulation of the superparamagnetic protein, ferritin. Additionally, man-made SPNs have found biomedical applications ranging from cell-tagging in vitro to contrast agents for in vivo diagnostic imaging. Despite the widespread use and occurrence of SPNs, detection and characterization of their magnetic properties, especially at the single-particle level and/or in biological samples, remains a challenge. Magnetic signals arising from SPNs can be complicated by factors such as spatial distribution, magnetic anisotropy, particle aggregation and magnetic dipolar interaction, thereby confounding their analysis. Techniques that can detect SPNs at the single particle level are therefore highly desirable. The goal of this thesis was to develop an analytical microscopy technique, namely magnetic force microscopy (MFM), to detect and spatially localize synthetic and natural SPNs for biomedical applications. We aimed to (1) increase MFM sensitivity to detect SPNs at the single-particle level and (2) quantify and spatially localize iron-ligated proteins (ferritin) in vitro and in biological samples using MFM. Two approaches were employed to improve MFM sensitivity. First, we showed how exploitation of magnetic anisotropy could produce a higher, more uniform MFM signal from single SPNs. Second, we showed how an increase in probe magnetic moment increased both the magnitude and range up to which the MFM signal could be detected from a single SPN. We further showed how MFM could enable accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin-apoferritin mixtures. Finally, we demonstrated how MFM could be used to detect iron/ferritin in serum and animal tissue with spatial resolution and sensitivity surpassing that obtained using

  10. Nanocharacterization of bio-silica using atomic force and ultrasonic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Vinaypreet S.; Hallinan, Kevin P.; Brar, N. S.

    2005-04-01

    Nanotechnology has become central to our research efforts to fabricate relatively smaller size devices, which are more versatile than their older and larger predecessors. Silica is a very important material in this regard. Recently, a new biomimetically inspired path to silica production has been demonstrated. This processing technique was inspired from biological organisms, such as marine diatoms, which produce silica at ambient conditions and almost neutral ph with beautiful control over location and structure. Recently, several researchers have demonstrated that positional control of silica formed could be achieved by application of an electric field to locate charged enzymes responsible for the bio catalytic condensation of silica from solution. Secondly, chemical and physical controls of silica structural morphology were achievable. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Ultrasonic Force Microscopy (UFM) techniques are employed for the first time to provide both substantially improved resolution of the morphology and relative measurement of the modulus of elasticity of the structures. In particular, these measurements reveal the positive impact of a shear flow field present during the silica formation on both the "ordering" of the structure and the mechanical properties.

  11. Structural and nanomechanical properties of paperboard coatings studied by peak force tapping atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sababi, Majid; Kettle, John; Rautkoski, Hille; Claesson, Per M; Thormann, Esben

    2012-10-24

    Paper coating formulations containing starch, latex, and clay were applied to paperboard and have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy and Peak Force tapping atomic force microscopy. A special focus has been on the measurement of the variation of the surface topography and surface material properties with a nanometer scaled spatial resolution. The effects of coating composition and drying conditions were investigated. It is concluded that the air-coating interface of the coating is dominated by close-packed latex particles embedded in a starch matrix and that the spatial distribution of the different components in the coating can be identified due to their variation in material properties. Drying the coating at an elevated temperature compared to room temperature changes the surface morphology and the surface material properties due to partial film formation of latex. However, it is evident that the chosen elevated drying temperature and exposure time is insufficient to ensure complete film formation of the latex which in an end application will be needed. PMID:22974234

  12. Characterization and Detection of Biological Weapons with Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Malkin, A J; Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; McPherson, A

    2006-09-25

    Critical gaps exist in our capabilities to rapidly characterize threat agents which could be used in attacks on facilities and military forces. DNA-based PCR and immunoassay-based techniques provide unique identification of species, strains and protein signatures of pathogens. However, differentiation between naturally occurring and weaponized bioagents and the identification of formulation signatures are beyond current technologies. One of the most effective and often the only definitive means to identify a threat agent is by its direct visualization. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a rapid imaging technique that covers the size range of most biothreat agents (several nanometers to tens of microns), is capable of resolving pathogen morphology and structure, and could be developed into a portable device for biological weapons (BW) field characterization. AFM can detect pathogens in aerosol, liquid, surface and soil samples while concomitantly acquiring their weaponization and threat agent digital signatures. BW morphological and structural signatures, including modifications to pathogen microstructural architecture and topology that occur during formulation and weaponization, provide the means for their differentiation from crude or purified unformulated agent, processing signatures, as well as assessment of their potential for dispersion, inhalation and environmental persistence. AFM visualization of pathogen morphology and architecture often provides valuable digital signatures and allows direct detection and identification of threat agents. We have demonstrated that pathogens, spanning the size range from several nanometers for small agricultural satellite viruses to almost half micron for pox viruses, and to several microns for bacteria and bacterial spores, can be visualized by AFM under physiological conditions to a resolution of {approx}20-30 {angstrom}. We have also demonstrated that viruses from closely related families could be differentiated by AFM on

  13. Thin-foil magnetic force system for high-numerical-aperture microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J K; Cribb, J; Desai, K V; Vicci, L; Wilde, B; Keller, K; Taylor, R M; Haase, J; Bloom, K; O'Brien, E Timothy; Superfine, R

    2006-02-01

    Forces play a key role in a wide range of biological phenomena from single-protein conformational dynamics to transcription and cell division, to name a few. The majority of existing microbiological force application methods can be divided into two categories: those that can apply relatively high forces through the use of a physical connection to a probe and those that apply smaller forces with a detached probe. Existing magnetic manipulators utilizing high fields and high field gradients have been able to reduce this gap in maximum applicable force, but the size of such devices has limited their use in applications where high force and high-numerical-aperture (NA) microscopy must be combined. We have developed a magnetic manipulation system that is capable of applying forces in excess of 700 pN on a 1 mum paramagnetic particle and 13 nN on a 4.5 mum paramagnetic particle, forces over the full 4pi sr, and a bandwidth in excess of 3 kHz while remaining compatible with a commercially available high-NA microscope objective. Our system design separates the pole tips from the flux coils so that the magnetic-field geometry at the sample is determined by removable thin-foil pole plates, allowing easy change from experiment to experiment. In addition, we have combined the magnetic manipulator with a feedback-enhanced, high-resolution (2.4 nm), high-bandwidth (10 kHz), long-range (100 mum xyz range) laser tracking system. We demonstrate the usefulness of this system in a study of the role of forces in higher-order chromosome structure and function. PMID:16858495

  14. Thin-foil magnetic force system for high-numerical-aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, J. K.; Cribb, J.; Desai, K. V.; Vicci, L.; Wilde, B.; Keller, K.; Taylor, R. M.; Haase, J.; Bloom, K.; O'Brien, E. Timothy; Superfine, R.

    2006-01-01

    Forces play a key role in a wide range of biological phenomena from single-protein conformational dynamics to transcription and cell division, to name a few. The majority of existing microbiological force application methods can be divided into two categories: those that can apply relatively high forces through the use of a physical connection to a probe and those that apply smaller forces with a detached probe. Existing magnetic manipulators utilizing high fields and high field gradients have been able to reduce this gap in maximum applicable force, but the size of such devices has limited their use in applications where high force and high-numerical-aperture (NA) microscopy must be combined. We have developed a magnetic manipulation system that is capable of applying forces in excess of 700 pN on a 1 μm paramagnetic particle and 13 nN on a 4.5 μm paramagnetic particle, forces over the full 4π sr, and a bandwidth in excess of 3 kHz while remaining compatible with a commercially available high-NA microscope objective. Our system design separates the pole tips from the flux coils so that the magnetic-field geometry at the sample is determined by removable thin-foil pole plates, allowing easy change from experiment to experiment. In addition, we have combined the magnetic manipulator with a feedback-enhanced, high-resolution (2.4 nm), high-bandwidth (10 kHz), long-range (100 μm xyz range) laser tracking system. We demonstrate the usefulness of this system in a study of the role of forces in higher-order chromosome structure and function. PMID:16858495

  15. α-amylase crystal growth investigated by in situ atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astier, J. P.; Bokern, D.; Lapena, L.; Veesler, S.

    2001-06-01

    The growth behavior of porcine pancreatic α-amylase at defined supersaturation has been investigated by means of temperature controlled in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The step velocities measured by AFM were in overall agreement with the normal growth rates of an individual face measured by optical microscopy. In addition, highly local growth dynamics could be visualized. Imaging in tapping mode revealed crystalline amylase aggregates attached to the basal face and their subsequent incorporation into growing terraces producing a macrodefect. At high supersaturation ( β=1.6) 2-D nucleation was found to be the dominating growth mechanism, whereas at lower supersaturation ( β=1.3) the growth process appears to be defect controlled (spiral growth). The analysis of step heights on 2-D nucleation islands (monomolecular protein layers) and growth steps (two molecules in height) in combination with results from light scattering experiments suggest that a single protein molecule is the basic growth unit.

  16. Multifrequency imaging in the intermittent contact mode of atomic force microscopy: beyond phase imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Senli; Santiago, Solares D; Mochalin, Vadym; Neitzel, Ioannis; Gogotsi, Yury G.; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Force-based scanning probe microscopies have emerged as a mainstay for probing structural and mechanical properties of materials on the nanometer and molecular scales. Despite tremendous progress achieved to date, the cantilever dynamics in single frequency scanning probe microscopies (SPM) is undefined due to having only two output variables. Here we demonstrate on diamond nanoparticles with different functionalization layers that the use of broad band detection by multiple frequency SPM allows complete information on tip-surface interactions in intermittent contact SPM to be acquired. The obtained data allows sub-3nm resolution even in ambient environment. By tuning the strength of tip-surface interaction, the information on surface state can be obtained.

  17. Immobilization of different biomolecules by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Micrometer resolution placement and immobilization of probe molecules is an important step in the preparation of biochips and a wide range of lab-on-chip systems. Most known methods for such a deposition of several different substances are costly and only suitable for a limited number of probes. In this article we present a flexible procedure for simultaneous spatially controlled immobilization of functional biomolecules by molecular ink lithography. Results For the bottom-up fabrication of surface bound nanostructures a universal method is presented that allows the immobilization of different types of biomolecules with micrometer resolution. A supporting surface is biotinylated and streptavidin molecules are deposited with an AFM (atomic force microscope) tip at distinct positions. Subsequent incubation with a biotinylated molecule species leads to binding only at these positions. After washing streptavidin is deposited a second time with the same AFM tip and then a second biotinylated molecule species is coupled by incubation. This procedure can be repeated several times. Here we show how to immobilize different types of biomolecules in an arbitrary arrangement whereas most common methods can deposit only one type of molecules. The presented method works on transparent as well as on opaque substrates. The spatial resolution is better than 400 nm and is limited only by the AFM's positional accuracy after repeated z-cycles since all steps are performed in situ without moving the supporting surface. The principle is demonstrated by hybridization to different immobilized DNA oligomers and was validated by fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions The immobilization of different types of biomolecules in high-density microarrays is a challenging task for biotechnology. The method presented here not only allows for the deposition of DNA at submicrometer resolution but also for proteins and other molecules of biological relevance that can be coupled to biotin. PMID

  18. Characterization of photodeposited selenium planar structures by scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peled, A.; Baranauskas, V.; Rodrigues, C.; Art-Weisman, D.; Grantman, L.; Friesem, A. A.

    1995-06-01

    This article describes the results of a surface morphology study of photodeposited thin film devices of Selenium by scanning force microscopy (SFM). First, the structures of the photodeposited films were investigated at device level dimensions of the order of visible wavelength. Specifically, ultrathin sinusoidal holographic gratings with spatial periods in the range 480-514 nm were visually identified from SFM nanograph images. Second, grain level structural investigation was performed using image processing techniques such as filtering and one- and two-dimensional Fourier transforms analysis. The variation of the surface grain structure was sampled across the Gaussian profiles of the laser photodeposited patterns. It was found that the random amorphous clustering at the perimeter of the deposited structures becomes progressively grainy towards the center, creating protrusions above the surface with trigonal Selenium (t-Se) crystalline features. Third, performing image enhancement analysis at high magnification—the nanometer level structure was investigated for amorphous Selenium (a-Se) and the laser thermally induced structural transformations of the a-Se films. It was found that the atomic solid-state structure of a-Se films, previously deduced only by indirect methods, consists mainly of a random mixture of Sex branched chains containing also a small concentration of imperfect ring structures characteristic of the α- and β-monoclinic phases. The triclinic crystalline phase (t-Se) was identified in the center of the laser overheated regions of the film Gaussian profile. The results enable us to conclude about the debate in the literature regarding the crystalline and amorphous structure of Selenium thin films.

  19. Surface potential measurement of fullerene derivative/copper phthalocyanine on indium tin oxide electrode by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Nobuo; Yamaki, Michio; Noda, Kei; Katori, Shigetaka; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2015-08-01

    We have investigated the organic semiconductor thin films deposited by vacuum evaporation deposition using intersecting metal shadow masks on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode/glass substrates to simulate organic solar cells by simultaneous observation with dynamic force microscopy (DFM)/Kelvin-probe force microscopy (KFM). The energy band diagram was depicted by simultaneously obtaining topographic and surface potential images of the same area using DFM/KFM. We considered the charge behavior at the interface having band bending in the phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) film.

  20. Probing biofouling resistant polymer brush surfaces by atomic force microscopy based force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schön, Peter; Kutnyanszky, Edit; ten Donkelaar, Bas; Santonicola, M Gabriella; Tecim, Tugba; Aldred, Nick; Clare, Anthony S; Vancso, G Julius

    2013-02-01

    The protein repellency and biofouling resistance of zwitterionic poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)(pSBMA) brushes grafted via surface initiated polymerization (SIP) from silicon and glass substrata was assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) adherence experiments. Laboratory settlement assays were conducted with cypris larvae of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite. AFM adherence includes the determination of contact rupture forces when AFM probe tips are withdrawn from the substratum. When the surface of the AFM tip is modified, adherence can be assessed with chemical specifity using a method known as chemical force microscopy (CFM). In this study, AFM tips were chemically functionalized with (a) fibronectin- here used as model for a nonspecifically adhering protein - and (b) arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide motifs covalently attached to poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes as biomimics of cellular adhesion receptors. Fibronectin functionalized tips showed significantly reduced nonspecific adhesion to pSBMA-modified substrata compared to bare gold (2.3±0.75 nN) and octadecanethiol (ODT) self-assembled monolayers (1.3±0.75 nN). PMAA and PMAA-RGD modified probes showed no significant adhesion to pSBMA modified silicon substrata. The results gathered through AFM protein adherence studies were complemented by laboratory fouling studies, which showed no adhesion of cypris larvae of Balanus amphitrite on pSBMA. With regard to its unusually high non-specific adsorption to a wide variety of materials the behavior of fibronectin is analogous to the barnacle cyprid temporary adhesive that also binds well to surfaces differing in polarity, charge and free energy. The antifouling efficacy of pSBMA may, therefore, be directly related to the ability of this surface to resist nonspecific protein adsorption. PMID:23138001

  1. Improvements in fundamental performance of liquid-environment atomic force microscopy with true atomic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kazuki; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Akrami, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    Recently, there have been significant advancements in liquid-environment atomic force microscopy (AFM) with true atomic resolution. The technical advancements are followed by a rapid expansion of its application area. Examples include subnanometer-scale imaging of biological systems and three-dimensional measurements of water distributions (i.e., hydration structures) and fluctuating surface structures. However, to continue this progress, we should improve the fundamental performance of liquid-environment dynamic-mode AFM. The present AFM technique does not allow real-time imaging of atomic-scale dynamic phenomena at a solid-liquid interface. This has hindered atomic-level understanding of crystal growth and dissolution, catalytic reactions and metal corrosion processes. Improvement in force sensitivity is required not only for such a high-speed imaging but also for various surface property measurements using a high-resolution AFM technique. In this review, we summarize recent works on the improvements in the force sensitivity and operation speed of atomic-resolution dynamic-mode AFM for liquid-environment applications.

  2. Enhanced atomic corrugation in dynamic force microscopy—The role of repulsive forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenstein, L.; Büchner, C.; Stuckenholz, S.; Heyde, M.; Freund, H.-J.

    2012-03-01

    Full range two dimensional (2D) force mapping was performed by means of low temperature dynamic force microscopy (DFM) on a highly complex surface structure. For this purpose, we used a thin film of vitreous silica on a Ru(0001)-support, which is a 2D structural equivalent to silica glass. The 2D spectroscopy shows that the contrast generating shift in vertical distance between two sites on the surface is twice as large on the repulsive branch of the frequency shift-distance curve as compared to the attractive branch. The results give insight into the origin of the formation of atomic resolution in DFM.

  3. Resonance frequency-retuned quartz tuning fork as a force sensor for noncontact atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ooe, Hiroaki; Sakuishi, Tatsuya; Arai, Toyoko; Nogami, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko

    2014-07-28

    Based on a two-prong type quartz tuning fork, a force sensor with a high Q factor, which we call a retuned fork sensor, was developed for non-contact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) with atomic resolution. By cutting a small notch and attaching an AFM tip to one prong, its resonance frequency can be retuned to that of the other intact prong. In balancing the two prongs in this manner, a high Q factor (>50 000 in ultrahigh vacuum) is obtained for the sensor. An atomic resolution image of the Si(111)-7 × 7 surface was demonstrated using an nc-AFM with the sensor. The dependence of the Q factor on resonance frequency of the sensor and the long-range force between tip and sample were measured and analyzed in view of the various dissipation channels. Dissipation in the signal detection circuit turned out to be mainly limited by the total Q factor of the nc-AFM system.

  4. Periodic Charging of Individual Molecules Coupled to the Motion of an Atomic Force Microscopy Tip.

    PubMed

    Kocić, N; Weiderer, P; Keller, S; Decurtins, S; Liu, S-X; Repp, J

    2015-07-01

    Individual molecules at the edges of self-assembled islands grown on Ag(111) can be deliberately switched in their charge state with the electric field from a scanning-probe tip. Close to the threshold voltage for a charge state transition, periodic switching of the charge is directly driven by the cantilever motion in frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM), as can be deduced from the signature in the measured frequency shift. In this regime, the integrated frequency shift yields the tip-sample force that is due to a single additional electron. Further, the signature of the dynamic charging response provides information on the electronic coupling of the molecule to the substrate. In analogy to previous experiments on quantum dots, this may also be used in the future to access excited state properties of single molecules from AFM experiments. PMID:26039575

  5. Fast, high-resolution surface potential measurements in air with heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2016-06-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) adapts an atomic force microscope to measure electric potential on surfaces at nanometer length scales. Here we demonstrate that Heterodyne-KPFM enables scan rates of several frames per minute in air, and concurrently maintains spatial resolution and voltage sensitivity comparable to frequency-modulation KPFM, the current spatial resolution standard. Two common classes of topography-coupled artifacts are shown to be avoidable with H-KPFM. A second implementation of H-KPFM is also introduced, in which the voltage signal is amplified by the first cantilever resonance for enhanced sensitivity. The enhanced temporal resolution of H-KPFM can enable the imaging of many dynamic processes, such as such as electrochromic switching, phase transitions, and device degredation (battery, solar, etc), which take place over seconds to minutes and involve changes in electric potential at nanometer lengths.

  6. Fast, high-resolution surface potential measurements in air with heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Joseph L; Munday, Jeremy N

    2016-06-17

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) adapts an atomic force microscope to measure electric potential on surfaces at nanometer length scales. Here we demonstrate that Heterodyne-KPFM enables scan rates of several frames per minute in air, and concurrently maintains spatial resolution and voltage sensitivity comparable to frequency-modulation KPFM, the current spatial resolution standard. Two common classes of topography-coupled artifacts are shown to be avoidable with H-KPFM. A second implementation of H-KPFM is also introduced, in which the voltage signal is amplified by the first cantilever resonance for enhanced sensitivity. The enhanced temporal resolution of H-KPFM can enable the imaging of many dynamic processes, such as such as electrochromic switching, phase transitions, and device degredation (battery, solar, etc), which take place over seconds to minutes and involve changes in electric potential at nanometer lengths. PMID:27159082

  7. High Resolution Electromechanical Imaging of Ferroelectric Materials in a Liquid Environment by Piezoresponse Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Brian J; Jesse, Stephen; Baddorf, Arthur P; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution imaging of ferroelectric materials using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is demonstrated in an aqueous environment. The elimination of both long-range electrostatic forces and capillary interactions results in a localization of the ac field to the tip-surface junction and allows the tip-surface contact area to be controlled. This approach results in spatial resolutions approaching the limit of the intrinsic domain-wall width. Imaging at frequencies corresponding to high-order cantilever resonances minimizes the viscous damping and added mass effects on cantilever dynamics and allows sensitivities comparable to ambient conditions. PFM in liquids will provide novel opportunities for high-resolution studies of ferroelectric materials, imaging of soft polymer materials, and imaging of biological systems in physiological environments on, ultimately, the molecular level.

  8. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis of daily disposable limbal ring contact lenses

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kathrine Osborn; Kakkassery, Joseph; Boree, Danielle; Pinto, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Limbal ring (also known as ‘circle’) contact lenses are becoming increasingly popular, especially in Asian markets because of their eye-enhancing effects. The pigment particles that give the eye-enhancing effects of these lenses can be found on the front or back surface of the contact lens or ‘enclosed’ within the lens matrix. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the pigment location and surface roughness of seven types of ‘circle’ contact lenses. Methods Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis was performed using a variable pressure Hitachi S3400N instrument to discern the placement of lens pigments. Atomic force microscopy (Dimension Icon AFM from Bruker Nano) was used to determine the surface roughness of the pigmented regions of the contact lenses. Atomic force microscopic analysis was performed in fluid phase under contact mode using a Sharp Nitride Lever probe (SNL-10) with a spring constant of 0.06 N/m. Root mean square (RMS) roughness values were analysed using a generalised linear mixed model with a log-normal distribution. Least square means and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals were estimated for each brand, location and pigment combination. Results SEM cross-sectional images at 500× and 2,000× magnification showed pigment on the surface of six of the seven lens types tested. The mean depth of pigment for 1-DAY ACUVUE DEFINE (1DAD) lenses was 8.1 μm below the surface of the lens, while the remaining lens types tested had pigment particles on the front or back surface. Results of the atomic force microscopic analysis indicated that 1DAD lenses had significantly lower root mean square roughness values in the pigmented area of the lens than the other lens types tested. Conclusions SEM and AFM analysis revealed pigment on the surface of the lens for all types tested with the exception of 1DAD. Further research is required to determine if the difference in pigment location influences on-eye performance. PMID

  9. Probing Membrane Order and Topography in Supported Lipid Bilayers by Combined Polarized Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence-Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Oreopoulos, John; Yip, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    Determining the local structure, dynamics, and conformational requirements for protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions in membranes is critical to understanding biological processes ranging from signaling to the translocating and membranolytic action of antimicrobial peptides. We report here the application of a combined polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy-in situ atomic force microscopy platform. This platform's ability to image membrane orientational order was demonstrated on DOPC/DSPC/cholesterol model membranes containing the fluorescent membrane probe, DiI-C20 or BODIPY-PC. Spatially resolved order parameters and fluorophore tilt angles extracted from the polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images were in good agreement with the topographical details resolved by in situ atomic force microscopy, portending use of this technique for high-resolution characterization of membrane domain structures and peptide-membrane interactions. PMID:19254557

  10. Tracking mechanics and volume of globular cells with atomic force microscopy using a constant-height clamp.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Martin P; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hyman, Anthony A; Müller, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    To understand the role of physical forces at a cellular level, it is necessary to track mechanical properties during cellular processes. Here we present a protocol that uses flat atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers clamped at constant height, and light microscopy to measure the resistance force, mechanical stress and volume of globular animal cells under compression. We describe the AFM and cantilever setup, live cell culture in the AFM, how to ensure stability of AFM measurements during medium perfusion, integration of optical microscopy to measure parameters such as volume and track intracellular dynamics, and interpretation of the physical parameters measured. Although we use this protocol on trypsinized interphase and mitotic HeLa cells, it can also be applied to other cells with a relatively globular shape, especially animal cells in a low-adhesive environment. After a short setup phase, the protocol can be used to investigate approximately one cell per hour. PMID:22222789

  11. Structure and stability of semiconductor tip apexes for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pou, P.; Ghasemi, S. A.; Jelinek, P.; Lenosky, T.; Goedecker, S.; Perez, R.

    2009-07-01

    The short range force between the tip and the surface atoms, that is responsible for atomic-scale contrast in atomic force microscopy (AFM), is mainly controlled by the tip apex. Thus, the ability to image, manipulate and chemically identify single atoms in semiconductor surfaces is ultimately determined by the apex structure and its composition. Here we present a detailed and systematic study of the most common structures that can be expected at the apex of the Si tips used in experiments. We tackle the determination of the structure and stability of Si tips with three different approaches: (i) first principles simulations of small tip apexes; (ii) simulated annealing of a Si cluster; and (iii) a minima hopping study of large Si tips. We have probed the tip apexes by making atomic contacts between the tips and then compared force-distance curves with the experimental short range forces obtained with dynamic force spectroscopy. The main conclusion is that although there are multiple stable solutions for the atomically sharp tip apexes, they can be grouped into a few types with characteristic atomic structures and properties. We also show that the structure of the last atomic layers in a tip apex can be both crystalline and amorphous. We corroborate that the atomically sharp tips are thermodynamically stable and that the tip-surface interaction helps to produce the atomic protrusion needed to get atomic resolution.

  12. Geometric Characterization of Carbon Nanotubes by Atomic Force Microscopy in Conjunction with a Tip Characterizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunmei; Itoh, Hiroshi; Homma, Yoshikazu; Sun, Jielin; Hu, Jun; Ichimura, Shingo

    2008-07-01

    An atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tip characterizer with 14 line and space structures and two knife edges was fabricated by means of a superlattice technique. The shape of a probe tip both before and after AFM imaging was acquired by this tip characterizer with general variations <1.5 nm; depending on imaging conditions. The geometric structures of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on a SiO2 substrate were studied by dynamic mode AFM in conjunction with this tip characterizer. Contact points between the tip and the CNTs were detected by observing changes in the AFM phase images. A modified CNT width correction model was established to calculate the estimated and upper-limit widths of two CNTs. The experimental results showed that imaging under a weak attractive force was suitable for obtaining accurate CNT height measurements, whereas a weak repulsive force provided the most accurate widths. Differing heights and widths between the two CNTs suggested that one CNT was double-walled, whereas the other had more than two walls; these results agree with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements of the CNTs.

  13. Undulator with dynamic compensation of magnetic forces

    DOEpatents

    Gluskin, Efim; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Xu, Joseph Z.

    2016-05-31

    A method and apparatus for implementing dynamic compensation of magnetic forces for undulators are provided. An undulator includes a respective set of magnet arrays, each attached to a strongback, and placed on horizontal slides and positioned parallel relative to each other with a predetermined gap. Magnetic forces are compensated by a set of compensation springs placed along the strongback. The compensation springs are conical springs having exponential-force characteristics that substantially match undulator magnetic forces independently of the predetermined gap. The conical springs are positioned along the length of the magnets.

  14. Distributed force probe bending model of critical dimension atomic force microscopy bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukraintsev, Vladimir A.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Vorburger, Theodore V.; Dixson, Ronald G.; Fu, Joseph; Silver, Rick M.

    2013-04-01

    Critical dimension atomic force microscopy (CD-AFM) is a widely used reference metrology technique. To characterize modern semiconductor devices, small and flexible probes, often 15 to 20 nm in diameter, are used. Recent studies have reported uncontrolled and significant probe-to-probe bias variation during linewidth and sidewall angle measurements. To understand the source of these variations, tip-sample interactions between high aspect ratio features and small flexible probes, and their influence on measurement bias, should be carefully studied. Using theoretical and experimental procedures, one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) models of cylindrical probe bending relevant to carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM probes were developed and tested. An earlier 1-D bending model was refined, and a new 2-D distributed force (DF) model was developed. Contributions from several factors were considered, including: probe misalignment, CNT tip apex diameter variation, probe bending before snapping, and distributed van der Waals-London force. A method for extracting Hamaker probe-surface interaction energy from experimental probe-bending data was developed. Comparison of the new 2-D model with 1-D single point force (SPF) model revealed a difference of about 28% in probe bending. A simple linear relation between biases predicted by the 1-D SPF and 2-D DF models was found. The results suggest that probe bending can be on the order of several nanometers and can partially explain the observed CD-AFM probe-to-probe variation. New 2-D and three-dimensional CD-AFM data analysis software is needed to take full advantage of the new bias correction modeling capabilities.

  15. Exploring the electronic and mechanical properties of protein using conducting atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianwei; Davis, Jason J; Sansom, Mark S P; Hung, Andrew

    2004-05-01

    In interfacing man-made electronic components with specifically folded biomacromolecules, the perturbative effects of junction structure on any signal generated should be considered. We report herein on the electron-transfer characteristics of the blue copper metalloprotein, azurin, as characterized at a refined level by conducting atomic force microscopy (C-AFM). Specifically, the modulation of current-voltage (I-V) behavior with compressional force has been examined. In the absence of assignable resonant electron tunneling within the confined bias region, from -1 to 1 V, the I-V behavior was analyzed with a modified Simmons formula. To interpret the variation of tunneling barrier height and barrier length obtained by fitting with the modified Simmons formula, an atom packing density model associated with protein mechanical deformation was proposed and simulated by molecular dynamics. The barrier heights determined at the minimum forces necessary for stable electrical contact correlate reasonably well with those estimated from bulk biophysical (electroanalytical and photochemical) experiments previously reported. At higher forces, the tunnel barrier decreases to fall within the range observed with saturated organic systems. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed changes in secondary structure and atomic density of the protein with respect to compression. At low compression, where transport measurements are made, secondary structure is retained, and atomic packing density is observed to increase linearly with force. These predictions, and those made at higher compression, are consistent with both experimentally observed modulations of tunneling barrier height with applied force and the applicability of the atom packing density model of electron tunneling in proteins to molecular-level analyses. PMID:15113232

  16. Surface microstructure of bitumen characterized by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaokong; Burnham, Nancy A; Tao, Mingjiang

    2015-04-01

    Bitumen, also called asphalt binder, plays important roles in many industrial applications. It is used as the primary binding agent in asphalt concrete, as a key component in damping systems such as rubber, and as an indispensable additive in paint and ink. Consisting of a large number of hydrocarbons of different sizes and polarities, together with heteroatoms and traces of metals, bitumen displays rich surface microstructures that affect its rheological properties. This paper reviews the current understanding of bitumen's surface microstructures characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microstructures of bitumen develop to different forms depending on crude oil source, thermal history, and sample preparation method. While some bitumens display surface microstructures with fine domains, flake-like domains, and dendrite structuring, 'bee-structures' with wavy patterns several micrometers in diameter and tens of nanometers in height are commonly seen in other binders. Controversy exists regarding the chemical origin of the 'bee-structures', which has been related to the asphaltene fraction, the metal content, or the crystallizing waxes in bitumen. The rich chemistry of bitumen can result in complicated intermolecular associations such as coprecipitation of wax and metalloporphyrins in asphaltenes. Therefore, it is the molecular interactions among the different chemical components in bitumen, rather than a single chemical fraction, that are responsible for the evolution of bitumen's diverse microstructures, including the 'bee-structures'. Mechanisms such as curvature elasticity and surface wrinkling that explain the rippled structures observed in polymer crystals might be responsible for the formation of 'bee-structures' in bitumen. Despite the progress made on morphological characterization of bitumen using AFM, the fundamental question whether the microstructures observed on bitumen surfaces represent its bulk structure remains to be addressed. In addition

  17. Low-temperature dynamics of ferroelectric domains in PbZr{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 3} epitaxial thin films studied by piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, N. V.; Vakulenko, A. F.; Filimonov, A. V.; Rudskoy, A. I.; Petraru, A.; Soni, R.; Kohlstedt, H.; Vakhrushev, S. B.; Pertsev, N. A.

    2015-10-12

    Dynamics of domain boundaries is expected to change drastically at low absolute temperatures but direct experimental information for this temperature range is still lacking. To clarify the mechanism of low-temperature domain dynamics, we studied the growth of ferroelectric domains in the temperature range 4.2–295 K using the out-of-plane piezoresponse mode of a cryogenic atomic force microscope (AFM). Nanoscale 180° domains were created in epitaxial PbZr{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 3} films by applying short voltage pulses between the conductive AFM tip brought into contact with the bare film surface and the bottom LaSr{sub 0.7}Mn{sub 0.3}O{sub 3} electrode. A quantitative analysis of acquired piezoresponse images enabled us to determine the in-plane domain size as a function of the writing voltage and pulse duration. It is found that at all studied temperatures the dependence of this size on the pulse duration can be fitted by a logarithmic function, which indicates that the domain-wall velocity exponentially depends on the driving electric field. The theoretical analysis of experimental data shows that the observed low-temperature domain dynamics is consistent with the creep of domain boundaries occurring in the presence of defects and structural nanoheterogeneities.

  18. Tip-bias-induced domain evolution in PMN-PT transparent ceramics via piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, K. Y.; Zhao, W.; Zeng, H. R.; Yu, H. Z.; Ruan, W.; Xu, K. Q.; Li, G. R.

    2015-05-01

    Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) was employed to investigate ferroelectric domain structures and their dynamic behavior of lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate [Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-xPbTiO3 (PMN-PT)] transparent ceramics under an tip-bias-induced electric field. A remarkable effect of fluctuation of PT content on the domain configurations and domain dynamic response in PMN-PT transparent ferroelectric ceramics were found by PFM. Comparing with PMN-10%PT and PMN-20%PT, the reversed polarization of macrodomain area in PMN-35%PT and PMN-25%PT exhibits a relatively higher response behavior and better polarization retention performance under the PFM tip-bias-induced electric field, which correspond to their unique macroscopic electro-optic properties.

  19. Atomic force microscopy measurements reveal multiple bonds between Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen binding adhesin and Lewis b ligand

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, P.; Shi, Q.; Magalhaes, A.; Reis, C. A.; Bugaytsova, J.; Borén, T.; Leckband, D.; Martins, M. C. L.

    2014-01-01

    The strength of binding between the Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen-binding adhesin (BabA) and its cognate glycan receptor, the Lewis b blood group antigen (Leb), was measured by means of atomic force microscopy. High-resolution measurements of rupture forces between single receptor–ligand pairs were performed between the purified BabA and immobilized Leb structures on self-assembled monolayers. Dynamic force spectroscopy revealed two similar but statistically different bond populations. These findings suggest that the BabA may form different adhesive attachments to the gastric mucosa in ways that enhance the efficiency and stability of bacterial adhesion. PMID:25320070

  20. Robust high-resolution imaging and quantitative force measurement with tuned-oscillator atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdeviren, Omur E.; Götzen, Jan; Hölscher, Hendrik; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2016-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy are based on locally detecting the interactions between a surface and a sharp probe tip. For highest resolution imaging, noncontact modes that avoid tip–sample contact are used; control of the tip’s vertical position is accomplished by oscillating the tip and detecting perturbations induced by its interaction with the surface potential. Due to this potential’s nonlinear nature, however, achieving reliable control of the tip–sample distance is challenging, so much so that despite its power vacuum-based noncontact AFM has remained a niche technique. Here we introduce a new pathway to distance control that prevents instabilities by externally tuning the oscillator’s response characteristics. A major advantage of this operational scheme is that it delivers robust position control in both the attractive and repulsive regimes with only one feedback loop, thereby providing an easy-to-implement route to atomic resolution imaging and quantitative tip–sample interaction force measurement.

  1. Interaction forces between talc and pitch probed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wallqvist, Viveca; Claesson, Per M; Swerin, Agne; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Gane, Patrick A C

    2007-04-10

    Colloidal wood resin components present in pulp are collectively called "pitch". The presence of pitch may cause severe problems due to deposits in and on the paper machine. There is thus a need for controlling pitch aggregation and adsorption. To be able to develop more efficient pitch control systems, one needs to develop the understanding of pitch-pitch interactions and of the interactions between pitch and other materials. With this general goal in mind, we present methods for preparing geometrically well-defined pitch particles attached to atomic force microscopy tips. This has enabled us to investigate the interactions between pitch and talc, an additive commonly used for pitch control. We have used model pitch particles consisting of one component only (abietic acid), a mixture of components (collophonium), and particles prepared from real pitch deposits. We show that the forces acting between pitch and talc are attractive and, once the initial approach is made, exert this attraction out to large distances of separation. We present evidence that the formation of bridging air bubbles or cavities is responsible for this interaction. PMID:17352501

  2. A calibration method for lateral forces for use with colloidal probe force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Quintanilla, M. A. S.; Goddard, D. T.

    2008-02-15

    A calibration method is described for colloidal probe cantilevers that enables friction force measurements obtained using lateral force microscopy (LFM) to be quantified. The method is an adaptation of the lever method of Feiler et al. [A. Feiler, P. Attard, and I. Larson, Rev. Sci. Instum. 71, 2746 (2000)] and uses the advantageous positioning of probe particles that are usually offset from the central axis of the cantilever. The main sources of error in the calibration method are assessed, in particular, the potential misalignment of the long axis of the cantilever that ideally should be perpendicular to the photodiode detector. When this is not taken into account, the misalignment is shown to have a significant effect on the cantilever torsional stiffness but not on the lateral photodiode sensitivity. Also, because the friction signal is affected by the topography of the substrate, the method presented is valid only against flat substrates. Two types of particles, 20 {mu}m glass beads and UO{sub 3} agglomerates attached to silicon tapping mode cantilevers were used to test the method against substrates including glass, cleaved mica, and UO{sub 2} single crystals. Comparisons with the lateral compliance method of Cain et al. [R. G. Cain, S. Biggs, and N. W. Page, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 227, 55 (2000)] are also made.

  3. High-resolution atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy of native membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bippes, Christian A.; Muller, Daniel J.

    2011-08-01

    Membranes confining cells and cellular compartments are essential for life. Membrane proteins are molecular machines that equip cell membranes with highly sophisticated functionality. Examples of such functions are signaling, ion pumping, energy conversion, molecular transport, specific ligand binding, cell adhesion and protein trafficking. However, it is not well understood how most membrane proteins work and how the living cell regulates their function. We review how atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be applied for structural and functional investigations of native membrane proteins. High-resolution time-lapse AFM imaging records membrane proteins at work, their oligomeric state and their dynamic assembly. The AFM stylus resembles a multifunctional toolbox that allows the measurement of several chemical and physical parameters at the nanoscale. In the single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) mode, AFM quantifies and localizes interactions in membrane proteins that stabilize their folding and modulate their functional state. Dynamic SMFS discloses fascinating insights into the free energy landscape of membrane proteins. Single-cell force spectroscopy quantifies the interactions of live cells with their environment to single-receptor resolution. In the future, technological progress in AFM-based approaches will enable us to study the physical nature of biological interactions in more detail and decipher how cells control basic processes.

  4. Modeling and boundary force control of microcantilevers utilized in atomic force microscopy for cellular imaging and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Sohrab

    This dissertation undertakes the theoretical and experimental developments microcantilevers utilized in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) with applications to cellular imaging and characterization. The capability of revealing the inhomogeneties or interior of ultra-small materials has been of most interest to many researchers. However, the fundamental concept of signal and image formation remains unexplored and not fully understood. For his, a semi-empirical nonlinear force model is proposed to show that virtual frequency generation, regarded as the simplest synthesized subsurface probe, occurs optimally when the force is tuned to the van der Waals form. This is the first-time observation of a novel theoretical dynamic multi-frequency force microscopy that has not been already reported. Owing to the broad applications of microcantilevers in the nanoscale imaging and microscopic techniques, there is an essential feeling to study and propose a comprehensive model of such systems. Therefore, in the theoretical part of this dissertation, a distributed-parameters representation modeling of the microcantilever along with a general interaction force comprising of two attractive and repulsive components with general amplitude and power terms is studied. This model is investigated in a general 2D Cartesian coordinate to consider the motions of the probe with a tip mass. There is an excitation at the microcantilever's base such that the end of the beam is subject to the proposed general force. These forces are very sensitive to the amplitude and power terms of these parts; on the other hand, atomic intermolecular force is a function of the distance such that this distance itself is also a function of the interaction force that will result in a nonlinear implicit equation. From a parametric study in the probe-sample excitation, it is shown that the predicted behavior of the generated difference-frequency oscillation amplitude agrees well with experimental measurements. Following

  5. Carbon Nanotube Atomic Force Microscopy for Proteomics and Biological Forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Noy, A; De Yoreo, J J; Malkin, A J

    2002-01-01

    The Human Genome Project was focused on mapping the complete genome. Yet, understanding the structure and function of the proteins expressed by the genome is the real end game. But there are approximately 100,000 proteins in the human body and the atomic structure has been determined for less than 1% of them. Given the current rate at which structures are being solved, it will take more than one hundred years to complete this task. The rate-limiting step in protein structure determination is the growth of high-quality single crystals for X-ray diffraction. Synthesis of the protein stock solution as well as X-ray diffraction and analysis can now often be done in a matter of weeks, but developing a recipe for crystallization can take years and, especially in the case of membrane proteins, is often completely unsuccessful. Consequently, techniques that can either help to elucidate the factors controlling macromolecular crystallization, increase the amount of structural information obtained from crystallized macromolecules or eliminate the need for crystallization altogether are of enormous importance. In addition, potential applications for those techniques extend well beyond the challenges of proteomics. The global spread of modern technology has brought with it an increasing threat from biological agents such as viruses. As a result, developing techniques for identifying and understanding the operation of such agents is becoming a major area of forensic research for DOE. Previous to this project, we have shown that we can use in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image the surfaces of growing macromolecular crystals with molecular resolution (1-5) In addition to providing unprecedented information about macromolecular nucleation, growth and defect structure, these results allowed us to obtain low-resolution phase information for a number of macromolecules, providing structural information that was not obtainable from X-ray diffraction(3). For some virus systems

  6. Noncontact scanning force microscopy based on a modified tuning fork sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göttlich, Hagen; Stark, Robert W.; Pedarnig, Johannes D.; Heckl, Wolfgang M.

    2000-08-01

    Distance control using a tuning fork setup for the detection of shear forces is a standard configuration in scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). Based on this concept, a modified sensor was developed, where a standard silicon tip for atomic force microscopy (AFM) is attached to the front end of one prong of a 100 kHz quartz tuning fork oscillator. Comparison of force curves of a standard tapping-mode AFM cantilever, a conventional fiber tip SNOM sensor and the novel AFM tip shear force sensor demonstrate an enhanced stability and sensitivity of the new sensor. Due to the rigid sensor design the force curves of the AFM tip shear force sensor indicate a perfect noncontact behavior under normal conditions in air. Noncontact images show a comparable resolution to conventional force microscopy.

  7. Research on new dynamic force calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li

    2008-06-01

    Sinusoidal force calibration method based on electrodynamic shaker and interferometric system was studied several years before at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). In that system a load mass are screwed on the top of force transducer, the sinusoidal forces realized by accelerated load masses are traceable to acceleration and mass according to the force definition F(t) = ma(t), where m is the total mass acting on the sensing element of the force transducer and a is the time and spatial-dependent acceleration of the mass, which is directly measured by a laser interferometer. This paper will introduce a new dynamic force calibration system developed at Changcheng Institute of Metrology and Measurement (CIMM). It uses electrodynamic shakers to generate dynamic force in the range from 1N to 20kN, and heterodyne laser interferometers are used for acceleration measurement. A new air bearing system is developed to increase the performance of shakers and an active vibration isolator is used to reduce enviromental disturbance to the interferometric system.

  8. Monitoring ligand-receptor interactions by photonic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jeney, Sylvia; Mor, Flavio; Koszali, Roland; Forró, László; Moy, Vincent T.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a method for the acquisition of single molecule force measurements of ligand —receptor interactions using the photonic force microscope (PFM). Biotin-functionalized beads, manipulated with an optical trap, and a streptavidin-functionalized coverslip were used to measure the effect of different pulling forces on the lifetime of individual streptavidin-biotin complexes. By optimizing the design of the optical trap and selection of the appropriate bead size, pulling forces in excess of 50 pN were achieved. Based on the amplitude of three dimensional (3D) thermal position fluctuations of the attached bead, we were able to select for a bead-coverslip interaction that was mediated by a single streptavidin-biotin complex. Moreover, the developed experimental system was greatly accelerated by automation of data acquisition and analysis. In force-dependent kinetic measurements carried out between streptavidin and biotin, we observed that the streptavidin-biotin complex exhibited properties of a catch bond with the lifetime increasing 10 fold when the pulling force increased from 10 to 20 pN. We also show that silica beads were more appropriate than polystyrene beads for the force measurements as polystyrene tethers, longer than 200 nm, could be extracted from the beads. PMID:20516583

  9. Low Temperature Force Microscopy on a Deeply Embedded Two Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedberg, James Augustin

    2011-12-01

    Experimental physics in the low temperature limit has consistently produced major advances for condensed matter research. Likewise, scanning probe microscopy offers a unique view of the nanometer scale features that populate the quantum landscape. This work discusses the merger of the two disciplines via the development of the Ultra Low Temperature Scanning Probe Microscope, the ULT-SPM. We focus on the novel characterization of an exotic condensed matter system: a deeply buried two dimensional electron gas with a cleaved edge overgrowth geometry. By coupling the dynamics of the force sensing probe microscope to the electrostatics of the electron gas, we can remotely and non-invasively measure charge transport features which are normally only observable using physically contacted electrodes. Focusing on the quantum Hall regime, we can exploit the high sensitivity of the local force sensor to study spatially dependent phenomena associated with electronic potential distributions. The instrument shows promise for many exciting experiments in which low temperatures, high magnetic fields, and local measurements are critical. Designed for operation at 50 mK, in magnetic fields reaching 16 T, many components of the instrument are not commercially available and were therefore designed and constructed in- house. As such, the intricate details of its design, construction and operation are documented thoroughly. This includes: the microscope assembly, the modular components such as the scan head and coarse motors, the electronics developed for controlling the instrument, and the general integration into the low temperature infrastructure. A quartz tuning fork is used as the force sensor in this instrument, enabling a wide selection between different modes of operation, the most relevant being electrostatic force microscopy. Noise limits are investigated and matched sources of experimental noise are identified. Detailed schematics of the instrument are also included.

  10. Piezoelectric force microscopy of crystalline oxide-semiconductor heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, M. S. J.; Kumah, D. P.; Reiner, J. W.; Ahn, C. H.; Walker, F. J.; Baddorf, A. P.

    2012-09-03

    Thin films of epitaxial SrTiO{sub 3} grown on silicon exhibit compressive in-plane strain that may stabilize ferroelectricity in this normally non-ferroelectric material. We investigate this possibility by using an ultra-high vacuum atomic force microscope to measure the local force response of coherently strained SrTiO{sub 3} films on silicon to an applied ac electric field. The observed cantilever response is different in regions that were previously written with positive and negative voltages, but the frequency dependence of this response indicates that the dominant forces are related to electrostatic charging rather than ferroelectricity.

  11. G-mode magnetic force microscopy: Separating magnetic and electrostatic interactions using big data analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Proksch, Roger; Zuo, Tingting; Zhang, Yong; Liaw, Peter K.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we develop a full information capture approach for Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM), referred to as generalized mode (G-Mode) MFM. G-Mode MFM acquires and stores the full data stream from the photodetector, captured at sampling rates approaching the intrinsic photodiode limit. The data can be subsequently compressed, denoised, and analyzed, without information loss. Here, G-Mode MFM is implemented and compared to the traditional heterodyne-based MFM on model systems, including domain structures in ferromagnetic Yttrium Iron Garnet and the electronically and magnetically inhomogeneous high entropy alloy, CoFeMnNiSn. We investigate the use of information theory to mine the G-Mode MFM data and demonstrate its usefulness for extracting information which may be hidden in traditional MFM modes, including signatures of nonlinearities and mode-coupling phenomena. Finally, we demonstrate detection and separation of magnetic and electrostatic tip-sample interactions from a single G-Mode image, by analyzing the entire frequency response of the cantilever. G-Mode MFM is immediately implementable on any atomic force microscopy platform and as such is expected to be a useful technique for probing spatiotemporal cantilever dynamics and mapping material properties, as well as their mutual interactions.

  12. Universal aspects of brittle fracture, adhesion, and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1989-01-01

    This universal relation between binding energy and interatomic separation was originally discovered for adhesion at bimetallic interfaces involving the simple metals Al, Zn, Mg, and Na. It is shown here that the same universal relation extends to adhesion at transition-metal interfaces. Adhesive energies have been computed for the low-index interfaces of Al, Ni, Cu, Ag, Fe, and W, using the equivalent-crystal theory (ECT) and keeping the atoms in each semiinfinite slab fixed rigidly in their equilibrium positions. These adhesive energy curves can be scaled onto each other and onto the universal adhesion curve. The effect of tip shape on the adhesive forces in the atomic-force microscope (AFM) is studied by computing energies and forces using the ECT. While the details of the energy-distance and force-distance curves are sensitive to tip shape, all of these curves can be scaled onto the universal adhesion curve.

  13. Conducting atomic force microscopy of alkane layers on graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, D.L.; McEuen, P.L.

    1995-05-08

    We have used an atomic force microscope with a conducting tip to investigate the layering of hexadecane on graphite. Discrete jumps were observed in both the tip--sample conductance and separation as individual liquid layers are penetrated. These conductance measurements extend solvation studies to higher force scales than have been previously achieved, and can be used to determine when the tip makes contact with the substrate. The layering also enables the formation of stable tunneling junctions.

  14. Structural defect-dependent resistive switching in Cu-O/Si studied by Kelvin probe force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mohit; Som, Tapobrata

    2015-08-28

    In this study, we show structural defect-dependent presence or absence of resistive switching in Cu-O films. We use Kelvin probe force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy to show the presence of resistive switching. In addition, local current mapping provides direct evidence on the formation of nanoscale filament. These findings match well with the existing theoretical model on resistive switching. In particular, understanding the role of structural defects in resistive switching can be considered as critically important to take a step forward for designing advanced nanoscale memory devices. PMID:26243354

  15. An Undergraduate Nanotechnology Engineering Laboratory Course on Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, D.; Fagan, R. D.; Hesjedal, T.

    2011-01-01

    The University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada, is home to North America's first undergraduate program in nanotechnology. As part of the Nanotechnology Engineering degree program, a scanning probe microscopy (SPM)-based laboratory has been developed for students in their fourth year. The one-term laboratory course "Nanoprobing and Lithography"…

  16. Force modulation atomic force microscopy: background, development and application to electrodeposited cerium oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng-Bin; Thompson, G. E.; Newman, R. C.

    1998-04-01

    In force modulation atomic force microscopy (FMAFM), vertical oscillation of the scanning tip of the AFM is added purposely and the deflection of the tip, which is influenced by surface features of the sample, is used as the z dimension to construct images. FMAFM represents a powerful technique for scientific research, but its merit has not been realized adequately to date. In this paper, the basic principles and particular features, as well as potential drawbacks of the technique, are presented and demonstrated systematically, through its application to electrochemically deposited cerium oxide films. Comparisons are also made with the more familiar contact mode AFM (CMAFM) and tapping mode AFM (TMAFM). It is shown that FMAFM reveals the major topographic features of CMAFM, but affords (i) greater resolution for sample features that are difficult in CMAFM, and (ii) continuous two-dimensional mapping of local mechanical properties on a scale of nanometres that the CMAFM, TMAFM and any other techniques, are not capable of sensing. This information can be used to elucidate other properties of the investigated surface, such as crystallinity variation, phase separation and distribution, and mechanisms of formation of deposited films. Major artifacts associated with the technique include `wedge cavity effect' and `tip slip effect', for which a geometric model is proposed to elucidate their origins. The cerium oxide films are shown to be composed of relatively hard crystalline grains, of well-defined individual geometry and comparatively regular packing, alongside relatively soft amorphous patches, devoid of distinct geometry and assembled disorderly. These features are consistent with a nucleation and growth mechanism of the deposition, in which crystalline nuclei arise and grow from an intermediate cerium gel mass, produced in the interfacial region during deposition.

  17. Boosting the local anodic oxidation of silicon through carbon nanofiber atomic force microscopy probes

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzoni, Matteo; Matsui, Soichiro; Tanemura, Masaki; Perez-Murano, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many nanofabrication methods based on scanning probe microscopy have been developed during the last decades. Local anodic oxidation (LAO) is one of such methods: Upon application of an electric field between tip and surface under ambient conditions, oxide patterning with nanometer-scale resolution can be performed with good control of dimensions and placement. LAO through the non-contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proven to yield a better resolution and tip preservation than the contact mode and it can be effectively performed in the dynamic mode of AFM. The tip plays a crucial role for the LAO-AFM, because it regulates the minimum feature size and the electric field. For instance, the feasibility of carbon nanotube (CNT)-functionalized tips showed great promise for LAO-AFM, yet, the fabrication of CNT tips presents difficulties. Here, we explore the use of a carbon nanofiber (CNF) as the tip apex of AFM probes for the application of LAO on silicon substrates in the AFM amplitude modulation dynamic mode of operation. We show the good performance of CNF-AFM probes in terms of resolution and reproducibility, as well as demonstration that the CNF apex provides enhanced conditions in terms of field-induced, chemical process efficiency. PMID:25671165

  18. Noninvasive determination of optical lever sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.J.; Proksch, R.; Sader, J.E.; Polcik, M.; Mc Endoo, S.; Cleveland, J.P.; Jarvis, S.P.

    2006-01-15

    Atomic force microscopes typically require knowledge of the cantilever spring constant and optical lever sensitivity in order to accurately determine the force from the cantilever deflection. In this study, we investigate a technique to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of rectangular cantilevers that does not require contact to be made with a surface. This noncontact approach utilizes the method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] to calibrate the spring constant of the cantilever in combination with the equipartition theorem [J. L. Hutter and J. Bechhoefer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1868 (1993)] to determine the optical lever sensitivity. A comparison is presented between sensitivity values obtained from conventional static mode force curves and those derived using this noncontact approach for a range of different cantilevers in air and liquid. These measurements indicate that the method offers a quick, alternative approach for the calibration of the optical lever sensitivity.

  19. Kelvin probe force microscopy of metallic surfaces used in Casimir force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behunin, R. O.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Decca, R. S.; Genet, C.; Jung, I. W.; Lambrecht, A.; Liscio, A.; López, D.; Reynaud, S.; Schnoering, G.; Voisin, G.; Zeng, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy at normal pressure was performed by two different groups on the same Au-coated planar sample used to measure the Casimir interaction in a sphere-plane geometry. The obtained voltage distribution was used to calculate the separation dependence of the electrostatic pressure Pres(D ) in the configuration of the Casimir experiments. In the calculation it was assumed that the potential distribution in the sphere has the same statistical properties as the measured one, and that there are no correlation effects on the potential distributions due to the presence of the other surface. The result of this calculation, using the currently available knowledge, is that Pres(D ) does not explain the magnitude or the separation dependence of the difference Δ P (D ) between the measured Casimir pressure and the one calculated using a Drude model for the electromagnetic response of Au. We discuss in the conclusions the points which have to be checked out by future work, including the influence of pressure and a more accurate determination of the patch distribution, in order to confirm these results.

  20. Surface force measurements at kaolinite edge surfaces using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Sandaklie-Nikolova, Linda; Wang, Xuming; Miller, Jan D

    2014-04-15

    Fundamental results obtained from research on the properties of the edge surfaces of kaolinite particles (~500 nm) are reported. Of particular significance was the development of the experimental protocol. Well-ordered kaolinite edge surfaces were prepared as an epoxy resin sandwich structure having layered kaolinite particles in the center of the epoxy resin sandwich. Images of the sectioned kaolinite edge surfaces were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the average thickness of kaolinite particles in this study was determined to be 38.3 nm±11.7 nm. Furthermore, the surface charge of the kaolinite edge surfaces was evaluated with a super sharp Si tip. The point of zero charge (PZC) of the kaolinite edge surface was determined to be below pH 4, in contrast to the traditional view that the edge surfaces of kaolinite particles may carry a positive charge at pH 4. This lower PZC of the kaolinite edge surface was attributed to the lack of isomorphous substitution in the silica tetrahedral layer when compared to the PZC for the muscovite edge surface. Our results are consistent with the particle aggregation and flotation behavior of kaolinite, and should provide the basis for improved flotation strategies leading to the efficient recovery and utilization of mineral and energy resources. PMID:24559697

  1. Atomic Force Microscopy on Its Way to Adolescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessibl, Franz J.

    2003-12-01

    When the atomic force microscope (AFM) was introduced in 1986, its potential to resolve surfaces with true atomic resolution was already proposed. However, substantial problems had to be overcome before atomic resolution became possible by AFM. Today, true atomic resolution by AFM is standard practice. This article discusses the influence of the cantilever stiffness and — amplitude on noise and short-range force sensitivity and introduces a sensor operating at near optimal conditions (qPlus sensor). The data achieved with this optimized sensing technology show substructures within single atom images, attributed to atomic orbitals.

  2. Probe-rotating atomic force microscopy for determining material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Heon

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we propose a probe-rotating atomic force microscope that enables scan in an arbitrary direction in the contact imaging mode, which is difficult to achieve using a conventional atomic force microscope owing to the orientation-dependent probe and the inability to rotate the probe head. To enable rotation of the probe about its vertical axis, we employed a compact and light probe head, the sensor of which is made of an optical disk drive pickup unit. Our proposed mechanical configuration, operating principle, and control system enables axial and lateral scan in various directions.

  3. Forced synchronization of autonomous dynamical Boolean networks

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Durón, R. R. Campos-Cantón, E.; Campos-Cantón, I.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2015-08-15

    We present the design of an autonomous time-delay Boolean network realized with readily available electronic components. Through simulations and experiments that account for the detailed nonlinear response of each circuit element, we demonstrate that a network with five Boolean nodes displays complex behavior. Furthermore, we show that the dynamics of two identical networks display near-instantaneous synchronization to a periodic state when forced by a common periodic Boolean signal. A theoretical analysis of the network reveals the conditions under which complex behavior is expected in an individual network and the occurrence of synchronization in the forced networks. This research will enable future experiments on autonomous time-delay networks using readily available electronic components with dynamics on a slow enough time-scale so that inexpensive data collection systems can faithfully record the dynamics.

  4. Photonic Torque Microscopy of the Nonconservative Force Field for Optically Trapped Silicon Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Irrera, Alessia; Magazzù, Alessandro; Artoni, Pietro; Simpson, Stephen H; Hanna, Simon; Jones, Philip H; Priolo, Francesco; Gucciardi, Pietro Giuseppe; Maragò, Onofrio M

    2016-07-13

    We measure, by photonic torque microscopy, the nonconservative rotational motion arising from the transverse components of the radiation pressure on optically trapped, ultrathin silicon nanowires. Unlike spherical particles, we find that nonconservative effects have a significant influence on the nanowire dynamics in the trap. We show that the extreme shape of the trapped nanowires yields a transverse component of the radiation pressure that results in an orbital rotation of the nanowire about the trap axis. We study the resulting motion as a function of optical power and nanowire length, discussing its size-scaling behavior. These shape-dependent nonconservative effects have implications for optical force calibration and optomechanics with levitated nonspherical particles. PMID:27280642

  5. Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging of SWI/SNF Action: Mapping the Nucleosome Remodeling and Sliding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montel, F.; Fontaine, E.; Stjean, P.; Castelnovo, M.; Faivremoskalenko, C.

    2007-07-01

    We propose a combined experimental (Atomic Force Microscopy) and theoretical study of the structural and dynamical properties of nucleosomes. In contrast to biochemical approaches, this method allows to determine simultaneously the DNA complexed length distribution and nucleosome position in various contexts. First, we show that differences in the nucleo-proteic structure observed between conventional H2A and H2A.Bbd variant nucleosomes induce quantitative changes in the in the length distribution of DNA complexed with histones. Then, the sliding action of remodeling complex SWI/SNF is characterized through the evolution of the nucleosome position and wrapped DNA length mapping. Using a linear energetic model for the distribution of DNA complexed length, we extract the net wrapping energy of DNA onto the histone octamer, and compare it to previous studies.

  6. Current status and perspectives in atomic force microscopy-based identification of cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chenbo; Hu, Xiao; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the complex interplay between cells and their biomechanics and how the interplay is influenced by the extracellular microenvironment, as well as how the transforming potential of a tissue from a benign to a cancerous one is related to the dynamics of both the cell and its surroundings, holds promise for the development of targeted translational therapies. This review provides a comprehensive overview of atomic force microscopy-based technology and its applications for identification of cellular progression to a cancerous phenotype. The review also offers insights into the advancements that are required for the next user-controlled tool to allow for the identification of early cell transformation and thus potentially lead to improved therapeutic outcomes. PMID:27274238

  7. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Woehl, T. J.; Keller, R. R.; Killgore, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  8. Magnetically-modulated atomic force microscopy for analysis of soft matter systems.

    PubMed

    Kageshima, Masami

    2012-11-01

    Experimental method of studying viscoelasticity, a common idea to understand properties of microscopic biological soft matter systems, especially single biopolymer chains, using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with magnetically- driven cantilever is surveyed. The experimental setup of applying well-characterized excitation to the cantilever and the analysis method to derive the viscoelasticity of the system under study are briefly introduced. Examples of measuring viscoelasticity of single peptide molecule and single titin molecule are shown. Considering the close relation of viscoelasticity and the time-scale for nonequilibrium dynamics in soft matter, extension of the method to a frequency-resolved analysis is attempted. A result of measuring viscoelasticity spectrum of a single dextran chain is shown. Challenges in further progress of the method are also described. PMID:22039807

  9. Local raster scanning for high-speed imaging of biopolymers in atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Peter I.; Huang, Peng; Maeng, Jungyeoul; Andersson, Sean B.

    2011-06-01

    A novel algorithm is described and illustrated for high speed imaging of biopolymers and other stringlike samples using atomic force microscopy. The method uses the measurements in real-time to steer the tip of the instrument to localize the scanning area over the sample of interest. Depending on the sample, the scan time can be reduced by an order of magnitude or more while maintaining image resolution. Images are generated by interpolating the non-raster data using a modified Kriging algorithm. The method is demonstrated using physical simulations that include actuator and cantilever dynamics, nonlinear tip-sample interactions, and measurement noise as well as through scanning experiments in which a two-axis nanopositioning stage is steered by the algorithm using simulated height data.

  10. Elastic modulus measurements at variable temperature: Validation of atomic force microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, Marco; Reggente, Melania; Passeri, Daniele; Rossi, Marco

    2016-06-01

    The development of polymer-based nanocomposites to be used in critical thermal environments requires the characterization of their mechanical properties, which are related to their chemical composition, size, morphology and operating temperature. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been proven to be a useful tool to develop techniques for the mechanical characterization of these materials, thanks to its nanometer lateral resolution and to the capability of exerting ultra-low loads, down to the piconewton range. In this work, we demonstrate two techniques, one quasi-static, i.e., AFM-based indentation (I-AFM), and one dynamic, i.e., contact resonance AFM (CR-AFM), for the mechanical characterization of compliant materials at variable temperature. A cross-validation of I-AFM and CR-AFM has been performed by comparing the results obtained on two reference materials, i.e., low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and polycarbonate (PC), which demonstrated the accuracy of the techniques.

  11. Nanoscale monitoring of drug actions on cell membrane using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mi; Liu, Lian-qing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yue-chao

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the nanoscale changes that take place in individual cells in response to a drug is useful for understanding the drug action. However, due to the lack of adequate techniques, such knowledge was scarce until the advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM), which is a multifunctional tool for investigating cellular behavior with nanometer resolution under near-physiological conditions. In the past decade, researchers have applied AFM to monitor the morphological and mechanical dynamics of individual cells following drug stimulation, yielding considerable novel insight into how the drug molecules affect an individual cell at the nanoscale. In this article we summarize the representative applications of AFM in characterization of drug actions on cell membrane, including topographic imaging, elasticity measurements, molecular interaction quantification, native membrane protein imaging and manipulation, etc. The challenges that are hampering the further development of AFM for studies of cellular activities are aslo discussed. PMID:26027658

  12. Simulation-based Extraction of Key Material Parameters from Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsafi, Huseen; Peninngton, Gray

    Models for the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and sample interaction contain numerous material parameters that are often poorly known. This is especially true when dealing with novel material systems or when imaging samples that are exposed to complicated interactions with the local environment. In this work we use Monte Carlo methods to extract sample material parameters from the experimental AFM analysis of a test sample. The parameterized theoretical model that we use is based on the Virtual Environment for Dynamic AFM (VEDA) [1]. The extracted material parameters are then compared with the accepted values for our test sample. Using this procedure, we suggest a method that can be used to successfully determine unknown material properties in novel and complicated material systems. We acknowledge Fisher Endowment Grant support from the Jess and Mildred Fisher College of Science and Mathematics,Towson University.

  13. Tightening the knot in phytochrome by single-molecule atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bornschlögl, Thomas; Anstrom, David M; Mey, Elisabeth; Dzubiella, Joachim; Rief, Matthias; Forest, Katrina T

    2009-02-18

    A growing number of proteins have been shown to adopt knotted folds. Yet the biological roles and biophysical properties of these knots remain poorly understood. We used protein engineering and atomic force microscopy to explore the single-molecule mechanics of the figure-eight knot in the chromophore-binding domain of the red/far-red photoreceptor, phytochrome. Under load, apo phytochrome unfolds at forces of approximately 47 pN, whereas phytochrome carrying its covalently bound tetrapyrrole chromophore unfolds at approximately 73 pN. These forces are not unusual in mechanical protein unfolding, and thus the presence of the knot does not automatically indicate a superstable protein. Our experiments reveal a stable intermediate along the mechanical unfolding pathway, reflecting the sequential unfolding of two distinct subdomains in phytochrome, potentially the GAF and PAS domains. For the first time (to the best of our knowledge), our experiments allow a direct determination of knot size under load. In the unfolded chain, the tightened knot is reduced to 17 amino acids, resulting in apparent shortening of the polypeptide chain by 6.2 nm. Steered molecular-dynamics simulations corroborate this number. Finally, we find that covalent phytochrome dimers created for these experiments retain characteristic photoreversibility, unexpectedly arguing against a dramatic rearrangement of the native GAF dimer interface upon photoconversion. PMID:19217867

  14. Applications of atomic force microscopy to the studies of biomaterials in biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiang

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a unique tool for the studies of nanoscale structures and interactions. In this dissertation, I applied AFM to study transitions among multiple states of biomaterials in three different microscopic biomolecular systems: MukB-dependent DNA condensation, holdfast adhesion, and virus elasticity. To elucidate the mechanism of MukB-dependent DNA condensation, I have studied the conformational changes of MukB proteins as indicators for the strength of interactions between MukB, DNA and other molecular factors, such as magnesium and ParC proteins, using high-resolution AFM imaging. To determine the physical origins of holdfast adhesion, I have investigated the dynamics of adhesive force development of the holdfast, employing AFM force spectroscopy. By measuring rupture forces between the holdfast and the substrate, I showed that the holdfast adhesion is strongly time-dependent and involves transformations at multiple time scales. Understanding the mechanisms of adhesion force development of the holdfast will be critical for future engineering of holdfasts properties for various applications. Finally, I have examined the elasticity of self-assembled hepatitis B virus-like particles (HBV VLPs) and brome mosaic virus (BMV) in response to changes of pH and salinity, using AFM nanoindentation. The distributions of elasticity were mapped on a single particle level and compared between empty, RNA- and gold-filled HBV VLPs. I found that a single HBV VLP showed heterogeneous distribution of elasticity and a two-step buckling transition, suggesting a discrete property of HBV capsids. For BMV, I have showed that viruses containing different RNA molecules can be distinguished by mechanical measurements, while they are indistinguishable by morphology. I also studied the effect of pH on the elastic behaviors of three-particle BMV and R3/4 BMV. This study can yield insights into RNA presentation/release mechanisms, and could help us to design novel drug

  15. The Effects of Orthophosphate in Drinking Water on the Initial Copper Corrosion Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Corroding of copper piping used in household drinking water plumbing may potentially impacts consumer’s health and economics. Copper corrosion studies conducted on newly corroding material with atomic force microscopy (AFM) may be particularly useful in understanding the impact ...

  16. The Use of Contact Mode Atomic Force Microscopy in Aqueous Medium for Structural Analysis of Spinach Photosynthetic Complexes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Phuthong, Witchukorn; Huang, Zubin; Wittkopp, Tyler M.; Sznee, Kinga; Heinnickel, Mark L.; Dekker, Jan P.; Frese, Raoul N.; Prinz, Fritz B.; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the dynamics of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes in vascular plants at high resolution in an aqueous environment, membrane-protruding oxygen-evolving complexes (OECs) associated with photosystem II (PSII) on spinach (Spinacia oleracea) grana membranes were examined using contact mode atomic force microscopy. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first use of atomic force microscopy to distinguish the putative large extrinsic loop of Photosystem II CP47 reaction center protein (CP47) from the putative oxygen-evolving enhancer proteins 1, 2, and 3 (PsbO, PsbP, and PsbQ) and large extrinsic loop of Photosystem II CP43 reaction center protein (CP43) in the PSII-OEC extrinsic domains of grana membranes under conditions resulting in the disordered arrangement of PSII-OEC particles. Moreover, we observed uncharacterized membrane particles that, based on their physical characteristics and electrophoretic analysis of the polypeptides associated with the grana samples, are hypothesized to be a domain of photosystem I that protrudes from the stromal face of single thylakoid bilayers. Our results are interpreted in the context of the results of others that were obtained using cryo-electron microscopy (and single particle analysis), negative staining and freeze-fracture electron microscopy, as well as previous atomic force microscopy studies. PMID:26220954

  17. Microtensile Tests Using In Situ Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Udo; Dual, Jurg

    In recent years a new field in the micromechanical characterization of materials has emerged. Researchers started to integrate atomic force microscopes (AFM) into microtensile tests. This allowed to investigate surface deformation of layers with thicknesses in the range of micrometers. In the first part of this article experiments on organic samples are presented followed by developments on anorganic specimens. In the second part of the paper latest developments at the Center of Mechanics of ETH Zurich are presented. The setup allows to monitor crack growth with micrometer resolution. At the same time forces can be measured in the millinewton range. Specimens are made from photodefinable polyimide. The stress-crack- length diagrams of two experiments are presented which enables to identify different stages of crack growth and therefore of fracture behaviour. Finally, possible extensions of the setup employing digital image correlation (DIC) are envisioned by analyzing the displacement field around the crack tip.

  18. Universal aspects of adhesion and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjea, Amitava; Smith, John R.; Ferrante, John

    1990-01-01

    Adhesive energies are computed for flat and atomically sharp tips as a function of the normal distance to the substrate. The dependence of binding energies on tip shape is investigated. The magnitudes of the binding energies for the atomic force microscope are found to depend sensitively on tip material, tip shape and the sample site being probed. The form of the energy-distance curve, however, is universal and independent of these variables, including tip shape.

  19. Multifunctional hydrogel nano-probes for atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Seol; Song, Jungki; Kim, Seong Oh; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Wooju; Jackman, Joshua A.; Kim, Dongchoul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) three decades ago, there have been numerous advances in its measurement capabilities. Curiously, throughout these developments, the fundamental nature of the force-sensing probe—the key actuating element—has remained largely unchanged. It is produced by long-established microfabrication etching strategies and typically composed of silicon-based materials. Here, we report a new class of photopolymerizable hydrogel nano-probes that are produced by bottom-up fabrication with compressible replica moulding. The hydrogel probes demonstrate excellent capabilities for AFM imaging and force measurement applications while enabling programmable, multifunctional capabilities based on compositionally adjustable mechanical properties and facile encapsulation of various nanomaterials. Taken together, the simple, fast and affordable manufacturing route and multifunctional capabilities of hydrogel AFM nano-probes highlight the potential of soft matter mechanical transducers in nanotechnology applications. The fabrication scheme can also be readily utilized to prepare hydrogel cantilevers, including in parallel arrays, for nanomechanical sensor devices. PMID:27199165

  20. Multifunctional hydrogel nano-probes for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Seol; Song, Jungki; Kim, Seong Oh; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Wooju; Jackman, Joshua A.; Kim, Dongchoul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-05-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) three decades ago, there have been numerous advances in its measurement capabilities. Curiously, throughout these developments, the fundamental nature of the force-sensing probe--the key actuating element--has remained largely unchanged. It is produced by long-established microfabrication etching strategies and typically composed of silicon-based materials. Here, we report a new class of photopolymerizable hydrogel nano-probes that are produced by bottom-up fabrication with compressible replica moulding. The hydrogel probes demonstrate excellent capabilities for AFM imaging and force measurement applications while enabling programmable, multifunctional capabilities based on compositionally adjustable mechanical properties and facile encapsulation of various nanomaterials. Taken together, the simple, fast and affordable manufacturing route and multifunctional capabilities of hydrogel AFM nano-probes highlight the potential of soft matter mechanical transducers in nanotechnology applications. The fabrication scheme can also be readily utilized to prepare hydrogel cantilevers, including in parallel arrays, for nanomechanical sensor devices.

  1. Multifunctional hydrogel nano-probes for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Seol; Song, Jungki; Kim, Seong Oh; Kim, Seokbeom; Lee, Wooju; Jackman, Joshua A; Kim, Dongchoul; Cho, Nam-Joon; Lee, Jungchul

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the atomic force microscope (AFM) three decades ago, there have been numerous advances in its measurement capabilities. Curiously, throughout these developments, the fundamental nature of the force-sensing probe-the key actuating element-has remained largely unchanged. It is produced by long-established microfabrication etching strategies and typically composed of silicon-based materials. Here, we report a new class of photopolymerizable hydrogel nano-probes that are produced by bottom-up fabrication with compressible replica moulding. The hydrogel probes demonstrate excellent capabilities for AFM imaging and force measurement applications while enabling programmable, multifunctional capabilities based on compositionally adjustable mechanical properties and facile encapsulation of various nanomaterials. Taken together, the simple, fast and affordable manufacturing route and multifunctional capabilities of hydrogel AFM nano-probes highlight the potential of soft matter mechanical transducers in nanotechnology applications. The fabrication scheme can also be readily utilized to prepare hydrogel cantilevers, including in parallel arrays, for nanomechanical sensor devices. PMID:27199165

  2. Characterization of gold nanoparticle films: Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy with image analysis, and atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lansåker, Pia C. Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes G.; Hallén, Anders

    2014-10-15

    Gold nanoparticle films are of interest in several branches of science and technology, and accurate sample characterization is needed but technically demanding. We prepared such films by DC magnetron sputtering and recorded their mass thickness by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The geometric thickness d{sub g}—from the substrate to the tops of the nanoparticles—was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with image analysis as well as by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The various techniques yielded an internally consistent characterization of the films. In particular, very similar results for d{sub g} were obtained by SEM with image analysis and by AFM.

  3. Force field dependence of riboswitch dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hanke, Christian A; Gohlke, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Riboswitches are noncoding regulatory elements that control gene expression in response to the presence of metabolites, which bind to the aptamer domain. Metabolite binding appears to occur through a combination of conformational selection and induced fit mechanism. This demands to characterize the structural dynamics of the apo state of aptamer domains. In principle, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can give insights at the atomistic level into the dynamics of the aptamer domain. However, it is unclear to what extent contemporary force fields can bias such insights. Here, we show that the Amber force field ff99 yields the best agreement with detailed experimental observations on differences in the structural dynamics of wild type and mutant aptamer domains of the guanine-sensing riboswitch (Gsw), including a pronounced influence of Mg2+. In contrast, applying ff99 with parmbsc0 and parmχOL modifications (denoted ff10) results in strongly damped motions and overly stable tertiary loop-loop interactions. These results are based on 58 MD simulations with an aggregate simulation time>11 μs, careful modeling of Mg2+ ions, and thorough statistical testing. Our results suggest that the moderate stabilization of the χ-anti region in ff10 can have an unwanted damping effect on functionally relevant structural dynamics of marginally stable RNA systems. This suggestion is supported by crystal structure analyses of Gsw aptamer domains that reveal χ torsions with high-anti values in the most mobile regions. We expect that future RNA force field development will benefit from considering marginally stable RNA systems and optimization toward good representations of dynamics in addition to structural characteristics. PMID:25726465

  4. Tapping mode quartz crystal resonator based scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Yongho; Jhe, Wonho

    2005-01-01

    We have built a high-speed, tapping mode scanning force microscope using a high frequency quartz crystal resonator. In our design, a cantilever tip was attached to the end of an optical fiber which was glued to a thickness shear mode, AT-cut quartz crystal resonator so as to vibrate in the longitudinal direction. This design allows the microscope to be operated in tapping mode with the flexibility of shear mode operation, which leads to an expected improvement of image quality. Furthermore, combining this geometry with an optical microscope leads to the possibility of commercial applications.

  5. Characterization of the motion of membrane proteins using high-speed atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casuso, Ignacio; Khao, Jonathan; Chami, Mohamed; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Husain, Mohamed; Duneau, Jean-Pierre; Stahlberg, Henning; Sturgis, James N.; Scheuring, Simon

    2012-08-01

    For cells to function properly, membrane proteins must be able to diffuse within biological membranes. The functions of these membrane proteins depend on their position and also on protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. However, so far, it has not been possible to study simultaneously the structure and dynamics of biological membranes. Here, we show that the motion of unlabelled membrane proteins can be characterized using high-speed atomic force microscopy. We find that the molecules of outer membrane protein F (OmpF) are widely distributed in the membrane as a result of diffusion-limited aggregation, and while the overall protein motion scales roughly with the local density of proteins in the membrane, individual protein molecules can also diffuse freely or become trapped by protein-protein interactions. Using these measurements, and the results of molecular dynamics simulations, we determine an interaction potential map and an interaction pathway for a membrane protein, which should provide new insights into the connection between the structures of individual proteins and the structures and dynamics of supramolecular membranes.

  6. Characterization of the motion of membrane proteins using high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Casuso, Ignacio; Khao, Jonathan; Chami, Mohamed; Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Husain, Mohamed; Duneau, Jean-Pierre; Stahlberg, Henning; Sturgis, James N; Scheuring, Simon

    2012-08-01

    For cells to function properly, membrane proteins must be able to diffuse within biological membranes. The functions of these membrane proteins depend on their position and also on protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. However, so far, it has not been possible to study simultaneously the structure and dynamics of biological membranes. Here, we show that the motion of unlabelled membrane proteins can be characterized using high-speed atomic force microscopy. We find that the molecules of outer membrane protein F (OmpF) are widely distributed in the membrane as a result of diffusion-limited aggregation, and while the overall protein motion scales roughly with the local density of proteins in the membrane, individual protein molecules can also diffuse freely or become trapped by protein-protein interactions. Using these measurements, and the results of molecular dynamics simulations, we determine an interaction potential map and an interaction pathway for a membrane protein, which should provide new insights into the connection between the structures of individual proteins and the structures and dynamics of supramolecular membranes. PMID:22772862

  7. High-speed atomic force microscopy shows that annexin V stabilizes membranes on the second timescale.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Atsushi; Chipot, Christophe; Rangl, Martina; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-09-01

    Annexins are abundant cytoplasmic proteins that can bind to negatively charged phospholipids in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, and are known to play a role in the storage of Ca(2+) and membrane healing. Little is known, however, about the dynamic processes of protein-Ca(2+)-membrane assembly and disassembly. Here we show that high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) can be used to repeatedly induce and disrupt annexin assemblies and study their structure, dynamics and interactions. Our HS-AFM set-up is adapted for such biological applications through the integration of a pumping system for buffer exchange and a pulsed laser system for uncaging caged compounds. We find that biochemically identical annexins (annexin V) display different effective Ca(2+) and membrane affinities depending on the assembly location, providing a wide Ca(2+) buffering regime while maintaining membrane stabilization. We also show that annexin is membrane-recruited and forms stable supramolecular assemblies within ∼5 s in conditions that are comparable to a membrane lesion in a cell. Molecular dynamics simulations provide atomic detail of the role played by Ca(2+) in the reversible binding of annexin to the membrane surface. PMID:27271964

  8. Mapping power-law rheology of living cells using multi-frequency force modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Okajima, Takaharu

    2015-10-26

    We present multi-frequency force modulation atomic force microscopy (AFM) for mapping the complex shear modulus G* of living cells as a function of frequency over the range of 50–500 Hz in the same measurement time as the single-frequency force modulation measurement. The AFM technique enables us to reconstruct image maps of rheological parameters, which exhibit a frequency-dependent power-law behavior with respect to G{sup *}. These quantitative rheological measurements reveal a large spatial variation in G* in this frequency range for single cells. Moreover, we find that the reconstructed images of the power-law rheological parameters are much different from those obtained in force-curve or single-frequency force modulation measurements. This indicates that the former provide information about intracellular mechanical structures of the cells that are usually not resolved with the conventional force measurement methods.

  9. Advanced atomic force microscopy studies of ferroelectric domains and domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruch, Patrycja

    2010-03-01

    The nanoscale resolution of atomic force microscopy (AFM) makes it a powerful tool for local studies of ferroelectric domain nucleation and growth. In particular, domain walls provide a useful model elastic disordered system: their behavior is governed by the competition between their elastic energy, which tends to minimize the domain wall surface, and the randomly varying potential landscape due to disorder present in the samples, which allows pinning. The domain walls present a characteristic static roughness, and a complex dynamic response when subjected to a driving force (electric field), with non-linear creep observed for small forces [1]. In addition, as a result of different symmetries and electronic structure, as well as possible defect migration, these intrinsically nanoscale interfaces often show additional properties, beyond those of their already multifunctional parent material, opening new perspectives for device applications. I will present results of our AFM studies of the static and dynamic behavior of domain walls in epitaxially grown thin films of Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 focusing in particular on thermal effects, and on the observation of a lateral piezoresponse signal specifically due to the shear displacement of 180^o domain walls in this purely out-of-plane-polarized material [2], potentially useful for surface acoustic wave devices. I will also show how this same response can be more generally observed, necessitating care in the interpretation of lateral piezoresponse imaging in materials such as BiFeO3, where it is superimposed on signal due to the in-plane polarization components. Finally, I will present our studies of the switching mechanisms in this latter material under the influence of the electric field applied by the AFM tip. [4pt] [1] P. Paruch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 94, 197601 (2005); J. Appl. Phys. 100, 051608 (2006); T. Tybell et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 097601 (2002)[0pt] [2] J. Guyonnet et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 95 132902 (2009)

  10. Probing effective slippage on superhydrophobic stripes by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nizkaya, Tatiana V; Dubov, Alexander L; Mourran, Ahmed; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2016-08-17

    While the effective slippage of water past superhydrophobic surfaces has been studied over a decade, theoretical predictions have never been properly confirmed by experiments. Here we measure a drag force on a sphere approaching a plane decorated by superhydrophobic grooves and compare the results with the predictions of semi-analytical theory developed here, which employs the gas cushion model to calculate the local slip length at the gas sectors. We demonstrate that at intermediate and large (compared to a texture period) separations the half-sum of longitudinal and transverse effective slip lengths can be deduced from the force-distance curve by using the known analytical theory of hydrodynamic interaction of a sphere with a homogeneous slipping plane. This half-sum is shown to depend on the fraction of gas sectors and its value is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. At small distances the half-sum of effective longitudinal and transverse slip lengths becomes separation-dependent, and is in quantitative agreement with the predictions of our semi-analytical theory. PMID:27476481

  11. Theoretical Models for Surface Forces and Adhesion and Their Measurement Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Fabio L.; Bueno, Carolina C.; Da Róz, Alessandra L.; Ziemath, Ervino C.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of AFS, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution. PMID:23202925

  12. Note: Artificial neural networks for the automated analysis of force map data in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2014-05-15

    Force curves recorded with the atomic force microscope on structured samples often show an irregular force versus indentation behavior. An analysis of such curves using standard contact models (e.g., the Sneddon model) would generate inaccurate Young's moduli. A critical inspection of the force curve shape is therefore necessary for estimating the reliability of the generated Young's modulus. We used a trained artificial neural network to automatically recognize curves of “good” and of “bad” quality. This is especially useful for improving the analysis of force maps that consist of a large number of force curves.

  13. Applications of Traction Force Microscopy in Measuring Adhesion Molecule Dependent Cell Contractility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Cynthia Marie

    2009-01-01

    This work describes the use of polyacrylamide hydrogels as controlled elastic modulus substrates for single cell traction force microscopy studies. The first section describes the use of EDC/NHS chemistry to convalently link microbeads to the hydrogel matrix for the purpose of performing long-term traction force studies (7 days). The final study…

  14. Combining nanoscale optical phenomena with atomic force microscopy for cellular studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Sina; Sun, Zhe; Meininger, Gerald A.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2012-03-01

    Evanescent Waves (EWs) and Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) concepts combined with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) have been used for imaging and sensing. For the proposed EW microscopy system, Quantum Dot (QD) embedded Polystyrene microspheres are mounted on AFM cantilevers. When excited by laser, QDs luminescence couples to the Whispering Gallery Modes (WGMs) in the periphery of the microsphere. The resultant EWs extend on the order of 100 nm from the surface of the microsphere. These EWs decay exponentially and are explored as a tool to excite fluorescent labeled trans-membrane and near-membrane proteins. For the FRET system, QD coated silica microspheres are conjugated with fibronectin and mounted on AFM cantilevers. Moving the sphere down to the surface of the RFP-αv integrin tagged cells, fibronectins on the microsphere surface bind to integrins on the cell surface and FRET is observed between the QDs (donor) and RFP (acceptor). The detected fluorescence for the imaging system and the FRET efficiency for the sensing system are both functions of cell surface protein density. These innovative nanoscale imaging and sensing systems can be used to obtain unique dynamic data from living cells to improve understanding of cell adhesion and mechanobiology in cells.

  15. Riboswitch Structure and Dynamics by smFRET Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Suddala, Krishna C.; Walter, Nils G.

    2016-01-01

    Riboswitches are structured non-coding RNA elements that control the expression of their embedding messenger RNAs by sensing the intracellular concentration of diverse metabolites. As the name suggests, riboswitches are dynamic in nature so that studying their inherent conformational dynamics and ligand-mediated folding is important for understanding their mechanism of action. Single molecule fluorescence energy transfer (smFRET) microscopy is a powerful and versatile technique for studying the folding pathways and intra- and intermolecular dynamics of biological macromolecules, especially RNA. The ability of smFRET to monitor intramolecular distances and their temporal evolution make it a particularly insightful tool for probing the structure and dynamics of riboswitches. Here, we detail the general steps for using prism-based total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy for smFRET studies of the structure, dynamics and ligand binding mechanisms of riboswitches. PMID:25432756

  16. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, C.; Leon Swisher, C.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Giedt, R. J.; Rousso, D. L.; Stapleton, S.; Weissleder, R.

    2016-01-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging. PMID:27032979

  17. Nonlinear dynamic phase contrast microscopy for microfluidic and microbiological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denz, C.; Holtmann, F.; Woerdemann, M.; Oevermann, M.

    2008-08-01

    In live sciences, the observation and analysis of moving living cells, molecular motors or motion of micro- and nano-objects is a current field of research. At the same time, microfluidic innovations are needed for biological and medical applications on a micro- and nano-scale. Conventional microscopy techniques are reaching considerable limits with respect to these issues. A promising approach for this challenge is nonlinear dynamic phase contrast microscopy. It is an alternative full field approach that allows to detect motion as well as phase changes of living unstained micro-objects in real-time, thereby being marker free, without contact and non destructive, i.e. fully biocompatible. The generality of this system allows it to be combined with several other microscope techniques such as conventional bright field or fluorescence microscopy. In this article we will present the dynamic phase contrast technique and its applications in analysis of micro organismic dynamics, micro flow velocimetry and micro-mixing analysis.

  18. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinegoni, C.; Leon Swisher, C.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Giedt, R. J.; Rousso, D. L.; Stapleton, S.; Weissleder, R.

    2016-04-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging.

  19. Investigation of the Elasticity of Polymer Nanoparticle by Vibrating Scanning Polarization Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Juan; Wang, Hua-Bin

    2006-08-01

    The elasticity of an individual polymer nanoparticle may be greatly different from that of the bulk one. Understanding the properties of individual particles such as elasticity and deformation under external forces is of great importance in controlling the final structures and functions of bulk materials. We study the compression properties of single polyethylenimine (PEI) particles using vibrating scanning polarization force microscopy. By controllably imaging PEI particles at different vibration amplitude set-point values, it is demonstrated that we can compress the single PEI nanoparticle with an atomic force microscopy tip in different loads. Based on the force-height and force-strain curves obtained, Young's moduli of PEI (5-160 MPa) in three force regions are estimated according to the Hertz model. The results indicate that PEI has excellent elasticity, which may contribute to its high efficiency as vectors in gene transfection.

  20. Nanolithography on thin layers of PMMA using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, Cristina; Rius, Gemma; Borrisé, Xavier; Pérez-Murano, Francesc

    2005-08-01

    A new technique for producing nanometre scale patterns on thin layers (<30 nm thick) of PMMA on silicon is described. The method consists of inducing the local modification of the PMMA by applying a positive voltage between the silicon and an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. At voltages larger than 28 V, it is observed that a hole is directly produced on the PMMA. The silicon surface is simultaneously oxidized even in the case where a hole has not been created. Monitoring of the electrical current through the AFM tip during the application of the voltage allows elucidating the mechanism of the PMMA removal. The process is used to define nanometre scale electrodes by combining the AFM lithography with electron beam lithography, metal deposition and lift-off processes.

  1. Elastic properties of epithelial cells probed by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Bastian R; Janshoff, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Cellular mechanics plays a crucial role in many biological processes such as cell migration, cell growth, embryogenesis, and oncogenesis. Epithelia respond to environmental cues comprising biochemical and physical stimuli through defined changes in cell elasticity. For instance, cells can differentiate between certain properties such as viscoelasticity or topography of substrates by adapting their own elasticity and shape. A living cell is a complex viscoelastic body that not only exhibits a shell architecture composed of a membrane attached to a cytoskeleton cortex but also generates contractile forces through its actomyosin network. Here we review cellular mechanics of single cells in the context of epithelial cell layers responding to chemical and physical stimuli. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:26193077

  2. Electrostatic Force Microscopy of Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottaghizadeh, A.; Lang, P. L.; Cui, L.; Lesueur, J.; Zimmers, A.; Aubin, H.; Li, J.; Zheng, D. N.; Rebuttini, V.; Pinna, N.

    2012-02-01

    The electronic compressibility is a fundamental property that characterizes the electronic properties of materials submitted to an external electric field. In metals (insulators), the electronic compressibility is large (small) and leads to a small (large) screening length. Variations of the screening length can be observed through measurements of the ``quantum'' capacitance between one material and a metallic counter-electrode. Using an Electrostatic Force Microscope (EFM), we measured maps of the local capacitance of 8 nm magnetite nanoparticles synthesized following the ``benzyl alcohol route'' deposited on a metallic substrate. Magnetite, an inverse spinel structure of composition Fe3O4, is a material with strongly correlated electronic properties and presents a metal-insulator transition at 120 K, the so-called Verwey transition. We present EFM measurements of these nanoparticles as a function of tip-sample distance and temperature.

  3. Cross-talk correction in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, A; Jungk, T; Soergel, E

    2007-01-01

    Commercial atomic force microscopes usually use a position-sensitive photodiode to detect the motion of the cantilever via laser beam deflection. This readout technique makes it possible to measure bending and torsion of the cantilever separately. A slight angle between the orientation of the photodiode and the plane of the readout laser beam, however, causes false signals in both readout channels. This cross-talk may lead to misinterpretation of the acquired data. We demonstrate this fault with images recorded in contact mode on periodically poled ferroelectric crystals and present a simple electronic circuit to compensate for it. This circuit can correct for cross-talk with a bandwidth of approximately 1 MHz suppressing the the false signal to <1%. PMID:17503950

  4. Exploiting cantilever curvature for noise reduction in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Labuda, Aleksander; Grütter, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    Optical beam deflection is a widely used method for detecting the deflection of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers. This paper presents a first order derivation for the angular detection noise density which determines the lower limit for deflection sensing. Surprisingly, the cantilever radius of curvature, commonly not considered, plays a crucial role and can be exploited to decrease angular detection noise. We demonstrate a reduction in angular detection shot noise of more than an order of magnitude on a home-built AFM with a commercial 450 μm long cantilever by exploiting the optical properties of the cantilever curvature caused by the reflective gold coating. Lastly, we demonstrate how cantilever curvature can be responsible for up to 45% of the variability in the measured sensitivity of cantilevers on commercially available AFMs. PMID:21280834

  5. The Applications of Atomic Force Microscopy to Vision Science

    PubMed Central

    Last, Julie A.; Russell, Paul; Nealey, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used in materials science and has found many applications in biological sciences but has been limited in use in vision science. The AFM can be used to image the topography of soft biological materials in their native environments. It can also be used to probe the mechanical properties of cells and extracellular matrices, including their intrinsic elastic modulus and receptor-ligand interactions. In this review, the operation of the AFM is described along with a review of how it has been thus far used in vision science. It is hoped that this review will serve to stimulate vision scientists to consider incorporating AFM as part of their research toolkit. PMID:21123767

  6. Nano Scale Mechanical Analysis of Biomaterials Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Diganta

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a probe-based microscope that uses nanoscale and structural imaging where high resolution is desired. AFM has also been used in mechanical, electrical, and thermal engineering applications. This unique technique provides vital local material properties like the modulus of elasticity, hardness, surface potential, Hamaker constant, and the surface charge density from force versus displacement curve. Therefore, AFM was used to measure both the diameter and mechanical properties of the collagen nanostraws in human costal cartilage. Human costal cartilage forms a bridge between the sternum and bony ribs. The chest wall of some humans is deformed due to defective costal cartilage. However, costal cartilage is less studied compared to load bearing cartilage. Results show that there is a difference between chemical fixation and non-chemical fixation treatments. Our findings imply that the patients' chest wall is mechanically weak and protein deposition is abnormal. This may impact the nanostraws' ability to facilitate fluid flow between the ribs and the sternum. At present, AFM is the only tool for imaging cells' ultra-structure at the nanometer scale because cells are not homogeneous. The first layer of the cell is called the cell membrane, and the layer under it is made of the cytoskeleton. Cancerous cells are different from normal cells in term of cell growth, mechanical properties, and ultra-structure. Here, force is measured with very high sensitivity and this is accomplished with highly sensitive probes such as a nano-probe. We performed experiments to determine ultra-structural differences that emerge when such cancerous cells are subject to treatments such as with drugs and electric pulses. Jurkat cells are cancerous cells. These cells were pulsed at different conditions. Pulsed and non-pulsed Jurkat cell ultra-structures were investigated at the nano meter scale using AFM. Jurkat cell mechanical properties were measured under

  7. Automated parallel high-speed atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minne, S. C.; Yaralioglu, G.; Manalis, S. R.; Adams, J. D.; Zesch, J.; Atalar, A.; Quate, C. F.

    1998-05-01

    An expandable system has been developed to operate multiple probes for the atomic force microscope in parallel at high speeds. The combined improvements from parallelism and enhanced tip speed in this system represent an increase in throughput by over two orders of magnitude. A modular cantilever design has been replicated to produce an array of 50 cantilevers with a 200 μm pitch. This design contains a dedicated integrated sensor and integrated actuator where the cells can be repeated indefinitely. Electrical shielding within the array virtually eliminates coupling between the actuators and sensors. The reduced coupling simplifies the control electronics, facilitating the design of a computer system to automate the parallel high-speed arrays. This automated system has been applied to four cantilevers within the array of 50 cantilevers, with a 20 kHz bandwidth and a noise level of less than 50 Å. For typical samples, this bandwidth allows us to scan the probes at 4 mm/s.

  8. Nano-rheology of hydrogels using direct drive force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nalam, Prathima C; Gosvami, Nitya N; Caporizzo, Matthew A; Composto, Russell J; Carpick, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    We present a magnetic force-based direct drive modulation method to measure local nano-rheological properties of soft materials across a broad frequency range (10 Hz to 2 kHz) using colloid-attached atomic force microscope (AFM) probes in liquid. The direct drive method enables artefact-free measurements over several decades of excitation frequency, and avoids the need to evaluate medium-induced hydrodynamic drag effects. The method was applied to measure the local mechanical properties of polyacrylamide hydrogels. The frequency-dependent storage stiffness, loss stiffness, and loss tangent (tan δ) were quantified for hydrogels having high and low crosslinking densities by measuring the amplitude and the phase response of the cantilever while the colloid was in contact with the hydrogel. The frequency bandwidth was further expanded to lower effective frequencies (0.1 Hz to 10 Hz) by obtaining force-displacement (FD) curves. Slow FD measurements showed a recoverable but highly hysteretic response, with the contact mechanical behaviour dependent on the loading direction: approach curves showed Hertzian behaviour while retraction curves fit the JKR contact mechanics model well into the adhesive regime, after which multiple detachment instabilities occurred. Using small amplitude dynamic modulation to explore faster rates, the load dependence of the storage stiffness transitioned from Hertzian to a dynamic punch-type (constant contact area) model, indicating significant influence of material dissipation coupled with adhesion. Using the appropriate contact model across the full frequency range measured, the storage moduli were found to remain nearly constant until an increase began near ∼100 Hz. The softer gels' storage modulus increased from 7.9 ± 0.4 to 14.5 ± 2.1 kPa (∼85%), and the stiffer gels' storage modulus increased from 16.3 ± 1.1 to 31.7 ± 5.0 kPa (∼95%). This increase at high frequencies may be attributed to a contribution from solvent

  9. Study of surface forces dependence on pH by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gavoille, J; Takadoum, J

    2002-06-01

    We used an atomic force microscope to investigate silicon nitride tip interactions with various materials (copper, nickel, silicon carbide) as a function of pH. The electrolyte used was 10(-3) M NaCl and the interactions observed through force versus distance curves (attraction or repulsion) depended on the pH value. Interaction forces calculation was derived from force versus distance curve data and the results are discussed in terms of electrostatic interactions using Zeta potential theory. PMID:16290640

  10. Debye Entropic Force and Modified Newtonian Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Chang, Zhe

    2011-04-01

    Verlinde has suggested that the gravity has an entropic origin, and a gravitational system could be regarded as a thermodynamical system. It is well-known that the equipartition law of energy is invalid at very low temperature. Therefore, entropic force should be modified while the temperature of the holographic screen is very low. It is shown that the modified entropic force is proportional to the square of the acceleration, while the temperature of the holographic screen is much lower than the Debye temperature TD. The modified entropic force returns to the Newton's law of gravitation while the temperature of the holographic screen is much higher than the Debye temperature. The modified entropic force is connected with modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND). The constant a0 involved in MOND is linear in the Debye frequency ωD, which can be regarded as the largest frequency of the bits in screen. We find that there do have a strong connection between MOND and cosmology in the framework of Verlinde's entropic force, if the holographic screen is taken to be bound of the Universe. The Debye frequency is linear in the Hubble constant H0.

  11. Assessment of Polarity in GaN Self-Assembled Nanowires by Electrical Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Minj, A; Cros, A; Garro, N; Colchero, J; Auzelle, T; Daudin, B

    2015-10-14

    In this work, we demonstrate the capabilities of atomic force microscopies (AFMs) for the nondestructive determination of the polarity of GaN nanowires (NWs). Three complementary AFMs are analyzed here: Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), light-assisted KPFM, and piezo-force microscopy (PFM). These techniques allow us to assess the polarity of individual NWs over an area of tens of μm(2) and provide statistics on the polarity of the ensemble with an accuracy hardly reachable by other methods. The precise quantitative analysis of the tip-sample interaction by multidimensional spectroscopic measurements, combined with advanced data analysis, has allowed the separate characterization of electrostatic and van der Waals forces as a function of tip-sample distance. Besides their polarity, the net surface charge density of individual NWs was estimated. PMID:26380860

  12. Nanobiogeochemistry of Microbe/Mineral Interactions: A Force Microscopy and Bioinformatics Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Steven, K.

    2005-11-18

    In the original proposal (section 5, General Approach and Hypotheses, and Section 6, Research Plan), the planned research program for this three-year project was divided into three major tasks. These included research involving (1) biological force microscopy to study intermolecular forces between whole bacterial cells and minerals, (2) chemical force microscopy to study interactions between discrete biomolecules and mineral surfaces, and (3) molecular modeling of interactions between functional groups on biological and mineralogical surfaces. Dr. Lower was in charge of task 1, biological force microscopy. Dr. Lower has been involved in tasks 2 and 3 but, as these are under the supervision of Dr. Hochella, these tasks will not be discussed herein.

  13. Tracking speed bumps in organic field-effect transistors via pump-probe Kelvin-probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murawski, J.; Mönch, T.; Milde, P.; Hein, M. P.; Nicht, S.; Zerweck-Trogisch, U.; Eng, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    One of the great challenges in designing modern organic field-effect transistors is lowering the injection barriers that arise at the interfaces between the metallic electrodes and the semiconducting transport channel. Currently, these barriers are quantified mostly by time-independent and external inspection, techniques lacking temporal insight into the most relevant switching dynamics. We address this problem here by pump-probe Kelvin-probe force microscopy, which combines the high spatial resolution of standard Kelvin-probe force microscopy with a pump-probe, enabling time resolution down to nanoseconds. When investigating a dynamically operated pentacene-based organic field-effect transistor, pump-probe Kelvin-probe force microscopy is capable of in-situ probing the temporal charge evolution at any sample spot within the device. Thus, Schottky-barriers arising at the boundaries between electrodes and transport channel are identified as speed bumps for high-speed organic field-effect transistor operation, manifested by residual charges that are retained within the organic film upon switching the device.

  14. Characterization of the surface charge distribution on kaolinite particles using high resolution atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naveen; Zhao, Cunlu; Klaassen, Aram; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder; Siretanu, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Most solid surfaces, in particular clay minerals and rock surfaces, acquire a surface charge upon exposure to an aqueous environment due to adsorption and/or desorption of ionic species. Macroscopic techniques such as titration and electrokinetic measurements are commonly used to determine the surface charge and ζ -potential of these surfaces. However, because of the macroscopic averaging character these techniques cannot do justice to the role of local heterogeneities on the surfaces. In this work, we use dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine the distribution of surface charge on the two (gibbsite-like and silica-like) basal planes of kaolinite nanoparticles immersed in aqueous electrolyte with a lateral resolution of approximately 30 nm. The surface charge density is extracted from force-distance curves using DLVO theory in combination with surface complexation modeling. While the gibbsite-like and the silica-like facet display on average positive and negative surface charge values as expected, our measurements reveal lateral variations of more than a factor of two on seemingly atomically smooth terraces, even if high resolution AFM images clearly reveal the atomic lattice on the surface. These results suggest that simple surface complexation models of clays that attribute a unique surface chemistry and hence homogeneous surface charge densities to basal planes may miss important aspects of real clay surfaces.

  15. Multi-eigenmode control for high material contrast in bimodal and higher harmonic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Andreas; Bozchalooi, Iman Soltani; Rangelow, Ivo W; Youcef-Toumi, Kamal

    2015-06-12

    High speed imaging and mapping of nanomechanical properties in atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows the observation and characterization of dynamic sample processes. Recent developments involve several cantilever frequencies in a multifrequency approach. One method actuates the first eigenmode for topography imaging and records the excited higher harmonics to map nanomechanical properties of the sample. To enhance the higher frequencies' response two or more eigenmodes are actuated simultaneously, where the higher eigenmode(s) are used to quantify the nanomechanics. In this paper, we combine each imaging methodology with a novel control approach. It modifies the Q factor and resonance frequency of each eigenmode independently to enhance the force sensitivity and imaging bandwidth. It allows us to satisfy the different requirements for the first and higher eigenmode. The presented compensator is compatible with existing AFMs and can be simply attached with minimal modifications. Different samples are used to demonstrate the improvement in nanomechanical contrast mapping and imaging speed of tapping mode AFM in air. The experiments indicate most enhanced nanomechanical contrast with low Q factors of the first and high Q factors of the higher eigenmode. In this scenario, the cantilever topography imaging rate can also be easily improved by a factor of 10. PMID:25994333

  16. Fast Stiffness Mapping of Cells Using High-Bandwidth Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew; Vijayraghavan, Karthik; Solgaard, Olav; Butte, Manish J

    2016-01-26

    The cytoskeleton controls cellular morphology and mediates the mechanical interactions between a cell and its environment. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has the unique capability to map cytoskeletal mechanics and structures with nanometer resolution. However, whole-cell cytomechanical imaging with conventional AFM techniques is limited by low imaging speed. Here, we present fast nanomechanical mapping of cells using high-bandwidth AFM (HB-AFM), where >10(6) nanoindentation measurements were acquired in ∼10 min-a task that would take weeks to finish using conventional AFM. High-bandwidth measurements enabled capture of the entire tip-sample interaction for each tap on cells, engendering a new measurement ("force phase") that exceeds the contrast of conventional tapping mode and enabling spectral visualization of >10 harmonics. The abundance of measurements allowed discovery of subtle cytomechanical features, including the stiffness of fibers of the cellular spectrin network in situ. This approach bridges HB-AFM and high-harmonic imaging and opens future opportunities for measuring the dynamic mechanical properties of living cells. PMID:26554581

  17. Correlation of Force Production with Apoptosis in Tissue Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, Yusuke; Peralta, Xomalin; Venakides, Stephanos; Kiehart, Daniel; Edwards, Glenn

    2007-03-01

    To understand embryo morphogenesis, it is necessary to know the force distribution in the various tissues. Since cells are largely inaccessible to mechanical probes in vivo, measurements of the net forces exerted by cells are challenging. The combination of experimental and theoretical approaches has proven to improve our understanding of these forces. A steerable UV-laser microbeam was used to probe the forces and the resulting kinematics were monitored with confocal microscopy. Dorsal closure is a developmental stage in Drosophila embryogenesis, where the dynamics are a consequence of four biological processes [1]. During this stage, cells that have outlived their usefulness undergo apoptosis, a biological process also known as programmed cell death for cells. Apoptotic events were decreased with genetic techniques or increased by irradiation with a UV-C lamp. We present experimental evidence for force generation correlating with apoptosis. This research has been supported by the NIH (GM33830 and GM61240). [1] M. S. Hutson, et al. Science, 300, 145 (2003).

  18. Friction measurements using force versus distance friction loops in force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, G. S.; Dinte, B. P.; Blach-Watson, J. A.; Myhra, S.

    2004-07-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) allows investigation of the properties of surfaces and interfaces at atomic scale resolution. However, several different operational modes (imaging, force versus distance and lateral force), need to be deployed in order to gain insight into the structure, tribiological and mechanical properties. A new method, based on a variation of the force versus distance mode, has been developed. In essence, a coupling of the deformational modes of the probe is exploited whereby the tip is induced to undergo lateral travel in response to application of an out-of-plane force (and thus normal bending of the force-sensing lever). The lateral travel induces in-plane forces that are then measurable as a consequence of stimulation of the 'buckling' deformational mode of the lever. Outcomes will be demonstrated for atomically flat surfaces of WTe 2 and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  19. Measurements of elastic modulus for human anterior lens capsule with atomic force microscopy: the effect of loading force.

    PubMed

    Tsaousis, Konstantinos T; Karagiannidis, Panagiotis G; Kopsachilis, Nikolaos; Symeonidis, Chrysanthos; Tsinopoulos, Ioannis T; Karagkiozaki, Varvara; Lamprogiannis, Lampros P; Logothetidis, Stergios

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to appraise the effect of loading force magnitude on the determination of the elastic modulus of the anterior lens capsule through atomic force microscopy. Four human anterior lens capsules taken during phacoemulsification cataract surgery were studied, free of epithelial cells, with atomic force microscopy. For the experiment, five different indentation loading forces were applied to near areas of the specimen. Experimental data was exported and analyzed according to the Hertz model to obtain the Young's modulus with regards to the elastic behavior of the material. Force-distance curves were acquired by applying a load of 2, 5, 10, 20 and 30 nN. When examining the results it was evident that determination of Young's modulus of the anterior lens capsule is dependent on the loading force concerning the examined range. Loading forces of 10 and 20 nN led to results without significant difference (p > 0.05) and more reproducible (coefficients of variation 12.4 and 11.7 %, respectively). PMID:24037592

  20. Atomic force microscopy study of the secretory granule lumen.

    PubMed Central

    Parpura, V; Fernandez, J M

    1996-01-01

    We have used an atomic force microscope to study the mechanical properties of the matrix found in the lumen of secretory granules isolated from mast cells. The matrices were insoluble and had an average height of 474 +/- 197 nm. The volume of these matrices increased reversibly about tenfold by decreasing the valency of the bathing external cation (La3+ < Ca2+ < Na+). The elastic (Young's) modulus was found to decrease by about 100-fold (4.3 MPa in La3+ to 37 kPa in Na+) upon a tenfold increase in the matrix volume. A swollen granule matrix had an elastic modulus similar to that of gelatin in water. The elastic modulus was inversely related to the change in the volume of the matrix, following a relationship similar to that predicted for the elasticity of weakly cross-linked polymers. Our results show that the matrix of these secretory granules have the mechanical properties of weak ion exchange resins, lending strong support to an ion exchange mechanism for the storage and release of cationic secretory products. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 9 PMID:8913576