Science.gov

Sample records for dynamics calculation based

  1. Review of dynamical models for external dose calculations based on Monte Carlo simulations in urbanised areas.

    PubMed

    Eged, Katalin; Kis, Zoltán; Voigt, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    After an accidental release of radionuclides to the inhabited environment the external gamma irradiation from deposited radioactivity contributes significantly to the radiation exposure of the population for extended periods. For evaluating this exposure pathway, three main model requirements are needed: (i) to calculate the air kerma value per photon emitted per unit source area, based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations; (ii) to describe the distribution and dynamics of radionuclides on the diverse urban surfaces; and (iii) to combine all these elements in a relevant urban model to calculate the resulting doses according to the actual scenario. This paper provides an overview about the different approaches to calculate photon transport in urban areas and about several dose calculation codes published. Two types of Monte Carlo simulations are presented using the global and the local approaches of photon transport. Moreover, two different philosophies of the dose calculation, the "location factor method" and a combination of relative contamination of surfaces with air kerma values are described. The main features of six codes (ECOSYS, EDEM2M, EXPURT, PARATI, TEMAS, URGENT) are highlighted together with a short model-model features intercomparison. PMID:16095771

  2. Langevin spin dynamics based on ab initio calculations: numerical schemes and applications.

    PubMed

    Rózsa, L; Udvardi, L; Szunyogh, L

    2014-05-28

    A method is proposed to study the finite-temperature behaviour of small magnetic clusters based on solving the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations, where the effective magnetic field is calculated directly during the solution of the dynamical equations from first principles instead of relying on an effective spin Hamiltonian. Different numerical solvers are discussed in the case of a one-dimensional Heisenberg chain with nearest-neighbour interactions. We performed detailed investigations for a monatomic chain of ten Co atoms on top of a Au(0 0 1) surface. We found a spiral-like ground state of the spins due to Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interactions, while the finite-temperature magnetic behaviour of the system was well described by a nearest-neighbour Heisenberg model including easy-axis anisotropy. PMID:24806308

  3. Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The development of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics is very important in the history of physics, and it underlines the difficulty in dealing with systems involving many bodies, even if those bodies are identical. Macroscopic systems of atoms typically contain so many particles that it would be virtually impossible to follow the behavior of all of the particles involved. Therefore, the behavior of a complete system can only be described or predicted in statistical ways. Under a grant to the NASA Lewis Research Center, scientists at the Case Western Reserve University have been examining the use of modern computing techniques that may be able to investigate and find the behavior of complete systems that have a large number of particles by tracking each particle individually. This is the study of molecular dynamics. In contrast to Monte Carlo techniques, which incorporate uncertainty from the outset, molecular dynamics calculations are fully deterministic. Although it is still impossible to track, even on high-speed computers, each particle in a system of a trillion trillion particles, it has been found that such systems can be well simulated by calculating the trajectories of a few thousand particles. Modern computers and efficient computing strategies have been used to calculate the behavior of a few physical systems and are now being employed to study important problems such as supersonic flows in the laboratory and in space. In particular, an animated video (available in mpeg format--4.4 MB) was produced by Dr. M.J. Woo, now a National Research Council fellow at Lewis, and the G-VIS laboratory at Lewis. This video shows the behavior of supersonic shocks produced by pistons in enclosed cylinders by following exactly the behavior of thousands of particles. The major assumptions made were that the particles involved were hard spheres and that all collisions with the walls and with other particles were fully elastic. The animated video was voted one of two

  4. Error propagation dynamics of PIV-based pressure field calculations: How well does the pressure Poisson solver perform inherently?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhao; Whitehead, Jared; Thomson, Scott; Truscott, Tadd

    2016-08-01

    Obtaining pressure field data from particle image velocimetry (PIV) is an attractive technique in fluid dynamics due to its noninvasive nature. The application of this technique generally involves integrating the pressure gradient or solving the pressure Poisson equation using a velocity field measured with PIV. However, very little research has been done to investigate the dynamics of error propagation from PIV-based velocity measurements to the pressure field calculation. Rather than measure the error through experiment, we investigate the dynamics of the error propagation by examining the Poisson equation directly. We analytically quantify the error bound in the pressure field, and are able to illustrate the mathematical roots of why and how the Poisson equation based pressure calculation propagates error from the PIV data. The results show that the error depends on the shape and type of boundary conditions, the dimensions of the flow domain, and the flow type.

  5. POLYANA-A tool for the calculation of molecular radial distribution functions based on Molecular Dynamics trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitroulis, Christos; Raptis, Theophanes; Raptis, Vasilios

    2015-12-01

    We present an application for the calculation of radial distribution functions for molecular centres of mass, based on trajectories generated by molecular simulation methods (Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo). When designing this application, the emphasis was placed on ease of use as well as ease of further development. In its current version, the program can read trajectories generated by the well-known DL_POLY package, but it can be easily extended to handle other formats. It is also very easy to 'hack' the program so it can compute intermolecular radial distribution functions for groups of interaction sites rather than whole molecules.

  6. Dynamics study of the OH + NH3 hydrogen abstraction reaction using QCT calculations based on an analytical potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monge-Palacios, M.; Corchado, J. C.; Espinosa-Garcia, J.

    2013-06-01

    To understand the reactivity and mechanism of the OH + NH3 → H2O + NH2 gas-phase reaction, which evolves through wells in the entrance and exit channels, a detailed dynamics study was carried out using quasi-classical trajectory calculations. The calculations were performed on an analytical potential energy surface (PES) recently developed by our group, PES-2012 [Monge-Palacios et al. J. Chem. Phys. 138, 084305 (2013)], 10.1063/1.4792719. Most of the available energy appeared as H2O product vibrational energy (54%), reproducing the only experimental evidence, while only the 21% of this energy appeared as NH2 co-product vibrational energy. Both products appeared with cold and broad rotational distributions. The excitation function (constant collision energy in the range 1.0-14.0 kcal mol-1) increases smoothly with energy, contrasting with the only theoretical information (reduced-dimensional quantum scattering calculations based on a simplified PES), which presented a peak at low collision energies, related to quantized states. Analysis of the individual reactive trajectories showed that different mechanisms operate depending on the collision energy. Thus, while at high energies (Ecoll ≥ 6 kcal mol-1) all trajectories are direct, at low energies about 20%-30% of trajectories are indirect, i.e., with the mediation of a trapping complex, mainly in the product well. Finally, the effect of the zero-point energy constraint on the dynamics properties was analyzed.

  7. Static and dynamic structural-sensitivity derivative calculations in the finite-element-based Engineering Analysis Language (EAL) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camarda, C. J.; Adelman, H. M.

    1984-01-01

    The implementation of static and dynamic structural-sensitivity derivative calculations in a general purpose, finite-element computer program denoted the Engineering Analysis Language (EAL) System is described. Derivatives are calculated with respect to structural parameters, specifically, member sectional properties including thicknesses, cross-sectional areas, and moments of inertia. Derivatives are obtained for displacements, stresses, vibration frequencies and mode shapes, and buckling loads and mode shapes. Three methods for calculating derivatives are implemented (analytical, semianalytical, and finite differences), and comparisons of computer time and accuracy are made. Results are presented for four examples: a swept wing, a box beam, a stiffened cylinder with a cutout, and a space radiometer-antenna truss.

  8. Velocity Based Modulus Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, W. C.

    2007-12-01

    A new set of equations are derived for the modulus of elasticity E and the bulk modulus K which are dependent only upon the seismic wave propagation velocities Vp, Vs and the density ρ. The three elastic moduli, E (Young's modulus), the shear modulus μ (Lamé's second parameter) and the bulk modulus K are found to be simple functions of the density and wave propagation velocities within the material. The shear and elastic moduli are found to equal the density of the material multiplied by the square of their respective wave propagation-velocities. The bulk modulus may be calculated from the elastic modulus using Poisson's ratio. These equations and resultant values are consistent with published literature and values in both magnitude and dimension (N/m2) and are applicable to the solid, liquid and gaseous phases. A 3D modulus of elasticity model for the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault is presented using data from the wavespeed model of Thurber et al. [2006]. A sharp modulus gradient is observed across the fault at seismic depths, confirming that "variation in material properties play a key role in fault segmentation and deformation style" [Eberhart-Phillips et al., 1993] [EPM93]. The three elastic moduli E, μ and K may now be calculated directly from seismic pressure and shear wave propagation velocities. These velocities may be determined using conventional seismic reflection, refraction or transmission data and techniques. These velocities may be used in turn to estimate the density. This allows velocity based modulus calculations to be used as a tool for geophysical analysis, modeling, engineering and prospecting.

  9. Plane-wave based electronic structure calculations for correlated materials using dynamical mean-field theory and projected local orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadon, B.; Lechermann, F.; Georges, A.; Jollet, F.; Wehling, T. O.; Lichtenstein, A. I.

    2008-05-01

    The description of realistic strongly correlated systems has recently advanced through the combination of density functional theory in the local density approximation (LDA) and dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). This LDA+DMFT method is able to treat both strongly correlated insulators and metals. Several interfaces between LDA and DMFT have been used, such as ( Nth order) linear muffin-tin orbitals or maximally localized Wannier functions. Such schemes are, however, either complex in use or additional simplifications are often performed (i.e., the atomic sphere approximation). We present an alternative implementation of LDA+DMFT , which keeps the precision of the Wannier implementation, but which is lighter. It relies on the projection of localized orbitals onto a restricted set of Kohn-Sham states to define the correlated subspace. The method is implemented within the projector augmented wave and within the mixed-basis pseudopotential frameworks. This opens the way to electronic structure calculations within LDA+DMFT for more complex structures with the precision of an all-electron method. We present an application to two correlated systems, namely, SrVO3 and β -NiS (a charge-transfer material), including ligand states in the basis set. The results are compared to calculations done with maximally localized Wannier functions, and the physical features appearing in the orbitally resolved spectral functions are discussed.

  10. Dynamical calculations for RHEED intensity oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniluk, Andrzej

    2005-03-01

    A practical computing algorithm working in real time has been developed for calculating the reflection high-energy electron diffraction from the molecular beam epitaxy growing surface. The calculations are based on the use of a dynamical diffraction theory in which the electrons are taken to be diffracted by a potential, which is periodic in the dimension perpendicular to the surface. The results of the calculations are presented in the form of rocking curves to illustrate how the diffracted beam intensities depend on the glancing angle of the incident beam. Program summaryTitle of program: RHEED Catalogue identifier:ADUY Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUY Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Pentium-based PC Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested: Windows 9x, XP, NT, Linux Programming language used: Borland C++ Memory required to execute with typical data: more than 1 MB Number of bits in a word: 64 bits Number of processors used: 1 Distribution format:tar.gz Number of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:982 Number of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 126 051 Nature of physical problem: Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is a very useful technique for studying growth and surface analysis of thin epitaxial structures prepared by the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Nowadays, RHEED is used in many laboratories all over the world where researchers deal with the growth of materials by MBE. The RHEED technique can reveal, almost instantaneously, changes either in the coverage of the sample surface by adsorbates or in the surface structure of a thin film. In most cases the interpretation of experimental results is based on the use of dynamical diffraction approaches. Such approaches are said to be quite useful in qualitative and

  11. Diffusion and viscosity of liquid tin: Green-Kubo relationship-based calculations from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Mouas, Mohamed; Gasser, Jean-Georges; Hellal, Slimane; Grosdidier, Benoît; Makradi, Ahmed; Belouettar, Salim

    2012-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid tin between its melting point and 1600 °C have been performed in order to interpret and discuss the ionic structure. The interactions between ions are described by a new accurate pair potential built within the pseudopotential formalism and the linear response theory. The calculated structure factor that reflects the main information on the local atomic order in liquids is compared to diffraction measurements. Having some confidence in the ability of this pair potential to give a good representation of the atomic structure, we then focused our attention on the investigation of the atomic transport properties through the MD computations of the velocity autocorrelation function and stress autocorrelation function. Using the Green-Kubo formula (for the first time to our knowledge for liquid tin) we determine the macroscopic transport properties from the corresponding microscopic time autocorrelation functions. The selfdiffusion coefficient and the shear viscosity as functions of temperature are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:22401446

  12. Molecular dynamics calculations of nuclear stimulated desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Glikman, E.; Kelson, I. ); Doan, N.V. )

    1991-09-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations of nuclear stimulated desorption are carried out for a palladium crystal containing radioactive palladium atoms. The total desorption probability from various sites are computed, as well as the angular distribution of the desorbing atoms. The implications of the results to different experimental scenarios are discussed.

  13. Atomistic magnetization dynamics in nanostructures based on first principles calculations: application to Co nanoislands on Cu(111).

    PubMed

    Böttcher, D; Ernst, A; Henk, J

    2011-07-27

    The magnetization dynamics of Co nanoislands on Cu(111) is studied on the atomic scale by means of the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. The exchange and anisotropy constants of the spin Hamiltonian are computed from first principles. We focus on hysteresis loops and magnetic switching in dependence on temperature, island size, and strength of an external magnetic field. The magnetic switching of nanoislands whose magnetization is reversed on the sub-nanosecond time scale is found consistent with the Stoner-Wohlfarth theory. We separate the superparamagnetic from the ferromagnetic regime and provide evidence that nanodomains can exist at least on a sub-picosecond time scale. PMID:21715954

  14. Bias in Dynamic Monte Carlo Alpha Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sweezy, Jeremy Ed; Nolen, Steven Douglas; Adams, Terry R.; Trahan, Travis John

    2015-02-06

    A 1/N bias in the estimate of the neutron time-constant (commonly denoted as α) has been seen in dynamic neutronic calculations performed with MCATK. In this paper we show that the bias is most likely caused by taking the logarithm of a stochastic quantity. We also investigate the known bias due to the particle population control method used in MCATK. We conclude that this bias due to the particle population control method is negligible compared to other sources of bias.

  15. Structural Determinants of Improved Fluorescence in a Family of Bacteriophytochrome-Based Infrared Fluorescent Proteins: Insights from Continuum Electrostatic Calculations and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Feliks, Mikolaj; Lafaye, Céline; Shu, Xiaokun; Royant, Antoine; Field, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Using X-ray crystallography, continuum electrostatic calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the structure, protonation behavior, and dynamics of the biliverdin chromophore and its molecular environment in a series of genetically engineered infrared fluorescent proteins (IFPs) based on the chromophore-binding domain of the Deinococcus radiodurans bacteriophytochrome. Our study suggests that the experimentally observed enhancement of fluorescent properties results from the improved rigidity and planarity of the biliverdin chromophore, in particular of the first two pyrrole rings neighboring the covalent linkage to the protein. We propose that the increases in the levels of both motion and bending of the chromophore out of planarity favor the decrease in fluorescence. The chromophore-binding pocket in some of the studied proteins, in particular the weakly fluorescent parent protein, is shown to be readily accessible to water molecules from the solvent. These waters entering the chromophore region form hydrogen bond networks that affect the otherwise planar conformation of the first three rings of the chromophore. On the basis of our simulations, the enhancement of fluorescence in IFPs can be achieved either by reducing the mobility of water molecules in the vicinity of the chromophore or by limiting the interactions of the nearby protein residues with the chromophore. Finally, simulations performed at both low and neutral pH values highlight differences in the dynamics of the chromophore and shed light on the mechanism of fluorescence loss at low pH. PMID:27471775

  16. Biased Brownian dynamics for rate constant calculation.

    PubMed

    Zou, G; Skeel, R D; Subramaniam, S

    2000-08-01

    An enhanced sampling method-biased Brownian dynamics-is developed for the calculation of diffusion-limited biomolecular association reaction rates with high energy or entropy barriers. Biased Brownian dynamics introduces a biasing force in addition to the electrostatic force between the reactants, and it associates a probability weight with each trajectory. A simulation loses weight when movement is along the biasing force and gains weight when movement is against the biasing force. The sampling of trajectories is then biased, but the sampling is unbiased when the trajectory outcomes are multiplied by their weights. With a suitable choice of the biasing force, more reacted trajectories are sampled. As a consequence, the variance of the estimate is reduced. In our test case, biased Brownian dynamics gives a sevenfold improvement in central processing unit (CPU) time with the choice of a simple centripetal biasing force. PMID:10919998

  17. Reactive scattering of H2 from Cu(100): Comparison of dynamics calculations based on the specific reaction parameter approach to density functional theory with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sementa, L.; Wijzenbroek, M.; van Kolck, B. J.; Somers, M. F.; Al-Halabi, A.; Busnengo, H. F.; Olsen, R. A.; Kroes, G. J.; Rutkowski, M.; Thewes, C.; Kleimeier, N. F.; Zacharias, H.

    2013-01-01

    We present new experimental and theoretical results for reactive scattering of dihydrogen from Cu(100). In the new experiments, the associative desorption of H2 is studied in a velocity resolved and final rovibrational state selected manner, using time-of-flight techniques in combination with resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization laser detection. Average desorption energies and rotational quadrupole alignment parameters were obtained in this way for a number of (v = 0, 1) rotational states, v being the vibrational quantum number. Results of quantum dynamics calculations based on a potential energy surface computed with a specific reaction parameter (SRP) density functional, which was derived earlier for dihydrogen interacting with Cu(111), are compared with the results of the new experiments and with the results of previous molecular beam experiments on sticking of H2 and on rovibrationally elastic and inelastic scattering of H2 and D2 from Cu(100). The calculations use the Born-Oppenheimer and static surface approximations. With the functional derived semi-empirically for dihydrogen + Cu(111), a chemically accurate description is obtained of the molecular beam experiments on sticking of H2 on Cu(100), and a highly accurate description is obtained of rovibrationally elastic and inelastic scattering of D2 from Cu(100) and of the orientational dependence of the reaction of (v = 1, j = 2 - 4) H2 on Cu(100). This suggests that a SRP density functional derived for H2 interacting with a specific low index face of a metal will yield accurate results for H2 reactively scattering from another low index face of the same metal, and that it may also yield accurate results for H2 interacting with a defected (e.g., stepped) surface of that same metal, in a system of catalytic interest. However, the description that was obtained of the average desorption energies, of rovibrationally elastic and inelastic scattering of H2 from Cu(100), and of the orientational dependence of

  18. Calculation of Individual Tree Water Use in a Bornean Tropical Rain Forest Using Individual-Based Dynamic Vegetation Model SEIB-DGVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, T.; Kumagai, T.; Saito, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Kume, T.; Nakagawa, M.; Sato, H.

    2015-12-01

    Bornean tropical rain forests are among the moistest biomes of the world with abundant rainfall throughout the year, and considered to be vulnerable to a change in the rainfall regime; e.g., high tree mortality was reported in such forests induced by a severe drought associated with the ENSO event in 1997-1998. In order to assess the effect (risk) of future climate change on eco-hydrology in such tropical rain forests, it is important to understand the water use of trees individually, because the vulnerability or mortality of trees against climate change can depend on the size of trees. Therefore, we refined the Spatially Explicit Individual-Based Dynamic Global Vegetation Model (SEIB-DGVM) so that the transpiration and its control by stomata are calculated for each individual tree. By using this model, we simulated the transpiration of each tree and its DBH-size dependency, and successfully reproduced the measured data of sap flow of trees and eddy covariance flux data obtained in a Bornean lowland tropical rain forest in Lambir Hills National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia.

  19. Accurate high level ab initio-based global potential energy surface and dynamics calculations for ground state of CH{sub 2}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. Q.; Zhang, P. Y.; Han, K. L.

    2015-03-28

    A global many-body expansion potential energy surface is reported for the electronic ground state of CH{sub 2}{sup +} by fitting high level ab initio energies calculated at the multireference configuration interaction level with the aug-cc-pV6Z basis set. The topographical features of the new global potential energy surface are examined in detail and found to be in good agreement with those calculated directly from the raw ab initio energies, as well as previous calculations available in the literature. In turn, in order to validate the potential energy surface, a test theoretical study of the reaction CH{sup +}(X{sup 1}Σ{sup +})+H({sup 2}S)→C{sup +}({sup 2}P)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +}) has been carried out with the method of time dependent wavepacket on the title potential energy surface. The total integral cross sections and the rate coefficients have been calculated; the results determined that the new potential energy surface can both be recommended for dynamics studies of any type and as building blocks for constructing the potential energy surfaces of larger C{sup +}/H containing systems.

  20. Assessing the performance of the MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA methods: I. The accuracy of binding free energy calculations based on molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Tingjun; Wang, Junmei; Li, Youyong; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The Molecular Mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area (MM/PBSA) and the Molecular Mechanics/Generalized Born Surface Area (MM/GBSA) methods calculate binding free energies for macromolecules by combining molecular mechanics calculations and continuum solvation models. To systematically evaluate the performance of these methods, we report here an extensive study of 59 ligands interacting with six different proteins. First, we explored the effects of the length of the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, ranging from 400 to 4800 ps, and the solute dielectric constant (1, 2 or 4) to the binding free energies predicted by MM/PBSA. The following three important conclusions could be observed: (1). MD simulation lengths have obvious impact on the predictions, and longer MD simulations are not always necessary to achieve better predictions; (2). The predictions are quite sensitive to solute dielectric constant, and this parameter should be carefully determined according to the characteristics of the protein/ligand binding interface; (3). Conformational entropy showed large fluctuations in MD trajectories and a large number of snapshots are necessary to achieve stable predictions. Next, we evaluated the accuracy of the binding free energies calculated by three Generalized Born (GB) models. We found that the GB model developed by Onufriev and Case was the most successful model in ranking the binding affinities of the studied inhibitors. Finally, we evaluated the performance of MM/GBSA and MM/PBSA in predicting binding free energies. Our results showed that MM/PBSA performed better in calculating absolute, but not necessarily relative, binding free energies than MM/GBSA. Considering its computational efficiency, MM/GBSA can serve as a powerful tool in drug design, where correct ranking of inhibitors is often emphasized. PMID:21117705

  1. Following the molecular motion of near-resonant excited CO on Pt(111): A simulated x-ray photoelectron diffraction study based on molecular dynamics calculations

    PubMed Central

    Greif, Michael; Nagy, Tibor; Soloviov, Maksym; Castiglioni, Luca; Hengsberger, Matthias; Meuwly, Markus; Osterwalder, Jürg

    2015-01-01

    A THz-pump and x-ray-probe experiment is simulated where x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) patterns record the coherent vibrational motion of carbon monoxide molecules adsorbed on a Pt(111) surface. Using molecular dynamics simulations, the excitation of frustrated wagging-type motion of the CO molecules by a few-cycle pulse of 2 THz radiation is calculated. From the atomic coordinates, the time-resolved XPD patterns of the C 1s core level photoelectrons are generated. Due to the direct structural information in these data provided by the forward scattering maximum along the carbon-oxygen direction, the sequence of these patterns represents the equivalent of a molecular movie. PMID:26798798

  2. The three-dimensional nonadiabatic dynamics calculation of DH2+ and HD2+ systems by using the trajectory surface hopping method based on the Zhu-Nakamura theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Han, Ke-Li

    2008-03-01

    A theoretical investigation on the nonadiabatic processes of the full three-dimensional D++H2 and H++D2 reaction systems has been performed by using trajectory surface hopping (TSH) method based on the Zhu-Nakamura (ZN) theory. This ZN-TSH method refers to not only classically allowed hops but also classically forbidden hops. The potential energy surface constructed by Kamisaka et al. is employed in the calculation. A new iterative method is proposed to yield the two-dimensional seam surface from the topography of the adiabatic potential surfaces, in which the inconvenience of directly solving the first-order partial differential equation is avoided. The cross sections of these two systems are calculated for three competing channels of the reactive charge transfer, the nonreactive charge transfer, and the reactive noncharge transfer, for ground rovibrational state of H2 or D2. Also, this study provides reaction probabilities of these three processes for the total angular momentum J =0 and ground initial vibrational state of H2 or D2. The calculated results from ZN-TSH method are in good agreement with the exact quantum calculations and the experimental measurements.

  3. Enhanced stability of a naringenin/2,6-dimethyl β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex: molecular dynamics and free energy calculations based on MM- and QM-PBSA/GBSA.

    PubMed

    Sangpheak, Waratchada; Khuntawee, Wasinee; Wolschann, Peter; Pongsawasdi, Piamsook; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada

    2014-05-01

    The structure, dynamic behavior and binding affinity of the inclusion complexes between naringenin and the two cyclodextrins (CDs), β-CD and its 2,6-dimethyl derivative (DM-β-CD), were theoretically studied by multiple molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. Naringenin most likely prefers to bind with CDs through the phenyl ring. Although a lower hydrogen bond formation of naringenin with the 3-hydroxyl group of DM-β-CD (relative to β-CD) was observed, the higher cavity could encapsulate almost the whole naringenin molecule. In contrast for the naringenin/β-CD complex, the phenyl ring feasibly passed through the primary rim resulting in the chromone ring binding inside instead. MM-PBSA/GBSA and QM-PBSA/GBSA binding free energies strongly suggested a greater stability of the naringenin/DM-β-CD inclusion complex. Van der Waals force played an important role as the key guest-host interaction for the complexation between naringenin and each cyclodextrin. PMID:24681901

  4. Photoinduced reactions of both 2-formyl-2H-azirine and isoxazole: A theoretical study based on electronic structure calculations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun

    2015-06-28

    In the present work, the combined electronic structure calculations and dynamics simulations have been performed to explore photocleavages of 2-formyl-2H-azirine and isoxazole in the gas phase and the subsequent rearrangement reactions. The carbonyl n → π(*) transition induces a cleavage of the C-N single bond of 2-formyl-2H-azirine to yield β-formylvinylnitrene in open-shell singlet state. However, the n → π(*) excitation of the imine chromophore results in a cleavage of the C-C single bond, producing a nitrile ylide intermediate through an internal conversion to the ground state. β-formylvinylnitrene and nitrile ylide with the carbonyl group are easily transformed into 2-formyl-2H-azirine and oxazole, respectively. The N-O bond cleavages on both S1((1)ππ(*)) and S2((1)nNπ(*)) of isoxazole are ultrafast processes, and they give products of 2-formyl-2H-azirine, 3-formylketenimine, HCN + CHCHO, and HCO + CHCHN. Both 2H-azirines and ketenimines were suggested to be formed from the triplet vinylnitrenes by intersystem crossing in the previous studies. However, our calculations show that the singlet β-formylvinylnitrene is responsible for the formation of 2-formyl-2H-azirine and 3-formylketenimine, and the singlet vinylnitrenes can play a key role in the photoinduced reactions of both 2H-azirines and isoxazoles. PMID:26133423

  5. Photoinduced reactions of both 2-formyl-2H-azirine and isoxazole: A theoretical study based on electronic structure calculations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Jun

    2015-06-28

    In the present work, the combined electronic structure calculations and dynamics simulations have been performed to explore photocleavages of 2-formyl-2H-azirine and isoxazole in the gas phase and the subsequent rearrangement reactions. The carbonyl n → π{sup *} transition induces a cleavage of the C—N single bond of 2-formyl-2H-azirine to yield β-formylvinylnitrene in open-shell singlet state. However, the n → π{sup *} excitation of the imine chromophore results in a cleavage of the C—C single bond, producing a nitrile ylide intermediate through an internal conversion to the ground state. β-formylvinylnitrene and nitrile ylide with the carbonyl group are easily transformed into 2-formyl-2H-azirine and oxazole, respectively. The N—O bond cleavages on both S{sub 1}({sup 1}ππ{sup *}) and S{sub 2}({sup 1}n{sub N}π{sup *}) of isoxazole are ultrafast processes, and they give products of 2-formyl-2H-azirine, 3-formylketenimine, HCN + CHCHO, and HCO + CHCHN. Both 2H-azirines and ketenimines were suggested to be formed from the triplet vinylnitrenes by intersystem crossing in the previous studies. However, our calculations show that the singlet β-formylvinylnitrene is responsible for the formation of 2-formyl-2H-azirine and 3-formylketenimine, and the singlet vinylnitrenes can play a key role in the photoinduced reactions of both 2H-azirines and isoxazoles.

  6. Molecular-dynamics calculations of thermodynamic properties of metastable alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzone, G.; Rosato, V.; Pintore, M.; Delogu, F.; Demontis, P.; Suffritti, G.B.

    1997-01-01

    In order to improve our current understanding of the microscopic structure of metastable alloys of immiscible elements such as Ag-Cu and Co-Cu, the Helmholtz free energy of several microstructures based on an fcc unit cell has been calculated and compared with that of a reference state. The microstructures considered for the free energy calculations at fixed volume are (1) a structure formed by alternating layers of fixed thickness of metal 1 and metal 2 separated by coherent interfaces; (2) an atomically disordered solid solution; (3) a structure comprising a random distribution of elemental cubic grains separated by coherent interfaces. Numerical results show that the Helmholtz free energy of structure (3) decreases with increasing grain size and that its value calculated for a sufficiently large grain size approaches the free energy of structure (1). Further molecular-dynamics simulations for the Ag-Cu system have allowed the calculation of the enthalpy at the equilibrium volume of several microstructures including some of those listed above. A comparison of the calculated values of the enthalpy with the heat release observed experimentally allows the advancement of an hypothesis concerning the reaction path and the structure of the equiatomic Ag-Cu alloy obtained by ball milling.

  7. WAXSiS: a web server for the calculation of SAXS/WAXS curves based on explicit-solvent molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Christopher J.; Hub, Jochen S.

    2015-01-01

    Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SWAXS) has evolved into a powerful tool to study biological macromolecules in solution. The interpretation of SWAXS curves requires their accurate predictions from structural models. Such predictions are complicated by scattering contributions from the hydration layer and by effects from thermal fluctuations. Here, we describe the new web server WAXSiS (WAXS in solvent) that computes SWAXS curves based on explicit-solvent all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (http://waxsis.uni-goettingen.de/). The MD simulations provide a realistic model for both the hydration layer and the excluded solvent, thereby avoiding any solvent-related fitting parameters, while naturally accounting for thermal fluctuations. PMID:25855813

  8. Upper Subcritical Calculations Based on Correlated Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sobes, Vladimir; Rearden, Bradley T; Mueller, Don; Marshall, William BJ J; Scaglione, John M; Dunn, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    The American National Standards Institute and American Nuclear Society standard for Validation of Neutron Transport Methods for Nuclear Criticality Safety Calculations defines the upper subcritical limit (USL) as “a limit on the calculated k-effective value established to ensure that conditions calculated to be subcritical will actually be subcritical.” Often, USL calculations are based on statistical techniques that infer information about a nuclear system of interest from a set of known/well-characterized similar systems. The work in this paper is part of an active area of research to investigate the way traditional trending analysis is used in the nuclear industry, and in particular, the research is assessing the impact of the underlying assumption that the experimental data being analyzed for USL calculations are statistically independent. In contrast, the multiple experiments typically used for USL calculations can be correlated because they are often performed at the same facilities using the same materials and measurement techniques. This paper addresses this issue by providing a set of statistical inference methods to calculate the bias and bias uncertainty based on the underlying assumption that the experimental data are correlated. Methods to quantify these correlations are the subject of a companion paper and will not be discussed here. The newly proposed USL methodology is based on the assumption that the integral experiments selected for use in the establishment of the USL are sufficiently applicable and that experimental correlations are known. Under the assumption of uncorrelated data, the new methods collapse directly to familiar USL equations currently used. We will demonstrate our proposed methods on real data and compare them to calculations of currently used methods such as USLSTATS and NUREG/CR-6698. Lastly, we will also demonstrate the effect experiment correlations can have on USL calculations.

  9. Exact-exchange-based quasiparticle calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Aulbur, Wilfried G.; Staedele, Martin; Goerling, Andreas

    2000-09-15

    One-particle wave functions and energies from Kohn-Sham calculations with the exact local Kohn-Sham exchange and the local density approximation (LDA) correlation potential [EXX(c)] are used as input for quasiparticle calculations in the GW approximation (GWA) for eight semiconductors. Quasiparticle corrections to EXX(c) band gaps are small when EXX(c) band gaps are close to experiment. In the case of diamond, quasiparticle calculations are essential to remedy a 0.7 eV underestimate of the experimental band gap within EXX(c). The accuracy of EXX(c)-based GWA calculations for the determination of band gaps is as good as the accuracy of LDA-based GWA calculations. For the lowest valence band width a qualitatively different behavior is observed for medium- and wide-gap materials. The valence band width of medium- (wide-) gap materials is reduced (increased) in EXX(c) compared to the LDA. Quasiparticle corrections lead to a further reduction (increase). As a consequence, EXX(c)-based quasiparticle calculations give valence band widths that are generally 1-2 eV smaller (larger) than experiment for medium- (wide-) gap materials. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  10. Advancements in dynamic kill calculations for blowout wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kouba, G.E. . Production Fluids Div.); MacDougall, G.R. ); Schumacher, B.W. . Information Technology Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    This paper addresses the development, interpretation, and use of dynamic kill equations. To this end, three simple calculation techniques are developed for determining the minimum dynamic kill rate. Two techniques contain only single-phase calculations and are independent of reservoir inflow performance. Despite these limitations, these two methods are useful for bracketing the minimum flow rates necessary to kill a blowing well. For the third technique, a simplified mechanistic multiphase-flow model is used to determine a most-probable minimum kill rate.

  11. Numerical inductance calculations based on first principles.

    PubMed

    Shatz, Lisa F; Christensen, Craig W

    2014-01-01

    A method of calculating inductances based on first principles is presented, which has the advantage over the more popular simulators in that fundamental formulas are explicitly used so that a deeper understanding of the inductance calculation is obtained with no need for explicit discretization of the inductor. It also has the advantage over the traditional method of formulas or table lookups in that it can be used for a wider range of configurations. It relies on the use of fast computers with a sophisticated mathematical computing language such as Mathematica to perform the required integration numerically so that the researcher can focus on the physics of the inductance calculation and not on the numerical integration. PMID:25402467

  12. Algorithm for calculating torque base in vehicle traction control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongzhi; Li, Liang; Song, Jian; Wu, Kaihui; Qiao, Yanjuan; Liu, Xingchun; Xia, Yongguang

    2012-11-01

    Existing research on the traction control system(TCS) mainly focuses on control methods, such as the PID control, fuzzy logic control, etc, aiming at achieving an ideal slip rate of the drive wheel over long control periods. The initial output of the TCS (referred to as the torque base in this paper), which has a great impact on the driving performance of the vehicle in early cycles, remains to be investigated. In order to improve the control performance of the TCS in the first several cycles, an algorithm is proposed to determine the torque base. First, torque bases are calculated by two different methods, one based on states judgment and the other based on the vehicle dynamics. The confidence level of the torque base calculated based on the vehicle dynamics is also obtained. The final torque base is then determined based on the two torque bases and the confidence level. Hardware-in-the-loop(HIL) simulation and vehicle tests emulating sudden start on low friction roads have been conducted to verify the proposed algorithm. The control performance of a PID-controlled TCS with and without the proposed torque base algorithm is compared, showing that the proposed algorithm improves the performance of the TCS over the first several cycles and enhances about 5% vehicle speed by contrast. The proposed research provides a more proper initial value for TCS control, and improves the performance of the first several control cycles of the TCS.

  13. Quantum Parallelism as a Tool for Ensemble Spin Dynamics Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Danieli, Ernesto P.; Levstein, Patricia R.; Pastawski, Horacio M.

    2008-09-01

    Efficient simulations of quantum evolutions of spin-1/2 systems are relevant for ensemble quantum computation as well as in typical NMR experiments. We propose an efficient method to calculate the dynamics of an observable provided that the initial excitation is “local.” It resorts to a single entangled pure initial state built as a superposition, with random phases, of the pure elements that compose the mixture. This ensures self-averaging of any observable, drastically reducing the calculation time. The procedure is tested for two representative systems: a spin star (cluster with random long range interactions) and a spin ladder.

  14. Dissipative Particle Dynamics interaction parameters from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, Fatemeh; Paddison, Stephen J.

    2016-02-01

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is a commonly employed coarse-grained method to model complex systems. Presented here is a pragmatic approach to connect atomic-scale information to the meso-scale interactions defined between the DPD particles or beads. Specifically, electronic structure calculations were utilized for the calculation of the DPD pair-wise interaction parameters. An implicit treatment of the electrostatic interactions for charged beads is introduced. The method is successfully applied to derive the parameters for a hydrated perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer with absorbed vanadium cations.

  15. GPU-based fast gamma index calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xuejun; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-03-01

    The γ-index dose comparison tool has been widely used to compare dose distributions in cancer radiotherapy. The accurate calculation of γ-index requires an exhaustive search of the closest Euclidean distance in the high-resolution dose-distance space. This is a computational intensive task when dealing with 3D dose distributions. In this work, we combine a geometric method (Ju et al 2008 Med. Phys. 35 879-87) with a radial pre-sorting technique (Wendling et al 2007 Med. Phys. 34 1647-54) and implement them on computer graphics processing units (GPUs). The developed GPU-based γ-index computational tool is evaluated on eight pairs of IMRT dose distributions. The γ-index calculations can be finished within a few seconds for all 3D testing cases on one single NVIDIA Tesla C1060 card, achieving 45-75× speedup compared to CPU computations conducted on an Intel Xeon 2.27 GHz processor. We further investigated the effect of various factors on both CPU and GPU computation time. The strategy of pre-sorting voxels based on their dose difference values speeds up the GPU calculation by about 2.7-5.5 times. For n-dimensional dose distributions, γ-index calculation time on CPU is proportional to the summation of γn over all voxels, while that on GPU is affected by γn distributions and is approximately proportional to the γn summation over all voxels. We found that increasing the resolution of dose distributions leads to a quadratic increase of computation time on CPU, while less-than-quadratic increase on GPU. The values of dose difference and distance-to-agreement criteria also have an impact on γ-index calculation time.

  16. GPU-based fast gamma index calculation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xuejun; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2011-03-01

    The γ-index dose comparison tool has been widely used to compare dose distributions in cancer radiotherapy. The accurate calculation of γ-index requires an exhaustive search of the closest Euclidean distance in the high-resolution dose-distance space. This is a computational intensive task when dealing with 3D dose distributions. In this work, we combine a geometric method (Ju et al 2008 Med. Phys. 35 879-87) with a radial pre-sorting technique (Wendling et al 2007 Med. Phys. 34 1647-54) and implement them on computer graphics processing units (GPUs). The developed GPU-based γ-index computational tool is evaluated on eight pairs of IMRT dose distributions. The γ-index calculations can be finished within a few seconds for all 3D testing cases on one single NVIDIA Tesla C1060 card, achieving 45-75× speedup compared to CPU computations conducted on an Intel Xeon 2.27 GHz processor. We further investigated the effect of various factors on both CPU and GPU computation time. The strategy of pre-sorting voxels based on their dose difference values speeds up the GPU calculation by about 2.7-5.5 times. For n-dimensional dose distributions, γ-index calculation time on CPU is proportional to the summation of γ(n) over all voxels, while that on GPU is affected by γ(n) distributions and is approximately proportional to the γ(n) summation over all voxels. We found that increasing the resolution of dose distributions leads to a quadratic increase of computation time on CPU, while less-than-quadratic increase on GPU. The values of dose difference and distance-to-agreement criteria also have an impact on γ-index calculation time. PMID:21317484

  17. Calculation of exact vibration modes for plane grillages by the dynamic stiffness method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallauer, W. L., Jr.; Liu, R. Y. L.

    1982-01-01

    A dynamic stiffness method is developed for the calculation of the exact modal parameters for plane grillages which consist of straight and uniform beams with coincident elastic and inertial axes. Elementary bending-torsion beam theory is utilized, and bending translation is restricted to one direction. The exact bending-torsion dynamic stiffness matrix is obtained for a straight and uniform beam element with coincident elastic and inertial axes. The element stiffness matrices are assembled using the standard procedure of the static stiffness method to form the dynamic stiffness matrix of the complete grillage. The exact natural frequencies, mode shapes, and generalized masses of the grillage are then calculated by solving a nonlinear eigenvalue problem based on the dynamic stiffness matrix. The exact modal solutions for an example grillage are calculated and compared with the approximate solutions obtained by using the finite element method.

  18. Electronic Structure and Molecular Dynamics Calculations for KBH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios; Shabaev, Andrew; Hoang, Khang; Mehl, Michael; Kioussis, Nicholas

    2012-02-01

    In the search for hydrogen storage materials, alkali borohydrides MBH4 (M=Li, Na, K) are especially interesting because of their light weight and the high number of hydrogen atoms per metal atom. Electronic structure calculations can give insights into the properties of these complex hydrides and provide understanding of the structural properties and of the bonding of hydrogen. We have performed first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) and tight-binding (TB) calculations for KBH4 in both the high temperature (HT) and low temperature (LT) phases to understand its electronic and structural properties. Our DFT calculations were carried out using the VASP code. The results were then used as a database to develop a tight-binding Hamiltonian using the NRL-TB method. This approach allowed for computationally efficient calculations of phonon frequencies and elastic constants using the static module of the NRL-TB, and also using the molecular dynamics module to calculate mean-square displacements and formation energies of hydrogen vacancies.

  19. Free-energy calculation via mean-force dynamics using a logarithmic energy landscape.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Tetsuya; Itoh, Satoru G; Okumura, Hisashi; Mikami, Masuhiro

    2012-06-01

    A method for free-energy calculation based on mean-force dynamics (fictitious dynamics on a potential of mean force) is presented. The method utilizes a logarithmic form of free energy to enhance crossing barriers on a free-energy landscape, which results in efficient sampling of "rare" events. Invoking a conserved quantity in mean-force dynamics, free energy can be estimated on-the-fly without postprocessing. This means that an estimate of the free-energy profile can be locally made in contrast to the other methods based on mean-force dynamics such as metadynamics. The method is benchmarked against conventional methods and its high efficiency is demonstrated in the free-energy calculation for a glycine dipeptide molecule. PMID:23005238

  20. Lattice-dynamical calculations for tetracene and pentacene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippini, Giuseppe; Gramaccioli, Carlo Maria

    1984-01-01

    Lattice-dynamical, calculations for evidently non-rigid molecules of aromatic hydrocarbons have been carried out on tetracene and pentacene. In these substances, "out-of plane" vibrations mix extensively with lattice vibrations, and significant differences can be noted between results from a "rigid-body" and a "non-rigid" treatment. For tetracene crystals, whose Raman spectral data are given in the literature, the agreement with experiment is satisfactory. This confirms the validity of such procedures for interpreting and/or predicting spectroscopic behaviour, starting from empirical atom—atom potentials and valence force fields.

  1. Nonlinear damping calculation in cylindrical gear dynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbault, Raynald; Lalonde, Sébastien; Thomas, Marc

    2012-04-01

    The nonlinear dynamic problem posed by cylindrical gear systems has been extensively covered in the literature. Nonetheless, a significant proportion of the mechanisms involved in damping generation remains to be investigated and described. The main objective of this study is to contribute to this task. Overall, damping is assumed to consist of three sources: surrounding element contribution, hysteresis of the teeth, and oil squeeze damping. The first two contributions are considered to be commensurate with the supported load; for its part however, squeeze damping is formulated using expressions developed from the Reynolds equation. A lubricated impact analysis between the teeth is introduced in this study for the minimum film thickness calculation during contact losses. The dynamic transmission error (DTE) obtained from the final model showed close agreement with experimental measurements available in the literature. The nonlinear damping ratio calculated at different mesh frequencies and torque amplitudes presented average values between 5.3 percent and 8 percent, which is comparable to the constant 8 percent ratio used in published numerical simulations of an equivalent gear pair. A close analysis of the oil squeeze damping evidenced the inverse relationship between this damping effect and the applied load.

  2. Insights into photodissociation dynamics of acetaldehyde from ab initio calculations and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Shilu; Fang Weihai

    2009-08-07

    In the present paper we report a theoretical study on mechanistic photodissociation of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO). Stationary structures for H{sub 2} and CO eliminations in the ground state (S{sub 0}) have been optimized with density functional theory method, which is followed by the intrinsic reaction coordinate and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to confirm the elimination mechanism. Equilibrium geometries, transition states, and intersection structures for the C-C and C-H dissociations in excited states were determined by the complete-active-space self-consistent field (CASSCF) method. Based on the CASSCF optimized structures, the potential energy profiles for the dissociations were refined by performing the single-point calculations using the multireference configuration interaction method. Upon the low-energy irradiation of CH{sub 3}CHO (265 nm<{lambda}<318 nm), the T{sub 1} C-C bond fission following intersystem crossing from the S{sub 1} state is the predominant channel and the minor channel, the ground-state elimination to CH{sub 4}+CO after internal conversion (IC) from S{sub 1} to S{sub 0}, could not be excluded. With the photon energy increasing, another pathway of IC, achieved via an S{sub 1}/S{sub 0} intersection point resulting from the S{sub 1} C-C bond fission, becomes accessible and increases the yield of CH{sub 4}+CO.

  3. GPU-based calculations in digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrigal, R.; Acebal, P.; Blaya, S.; Carretero, L.; Fimia, A.; Serrano, F.

    2013-05-01

    In this work we are going to apply GPU (Graphical Processing Units) with CUDA environment for scientific calculations, concretely high cost computations on the field of digital holography. For this, we have studied three typical problems in digital holography such as Fourier transforms, Fresnel reconstruction of the hologram and the calculation of vectorial diffraction integral. In all cases the runtime at different image size and the corresponding accuracy were compared to the obtained by traditional calculation systems. The programs have been carried out on a computer with a graphic card of last generation, Nvidia GTX 680, which is optimized for integer calculations. As a result a large reduction of runtime has been obtained which allows a significant improvement. Concretely, 15 fold shorter times for Fresnel approximation calculations and 600 times for the vectorial diffraction integral. These initial results, open the possibility for applying such kind of calculations in real time digital holography.

  4. Ab Initio Calculations of Excited Carrier Dynamics in Gallium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhalani, Vatsal; Bernardi, Marco

    Bulk wurtzite GaN is the primary material for blue light-emission technology. The radiative processes in GaN are regulated by the dynamics of excited (or so-called ``hot'') carriers, through microscopic processes not yet completely understood. We present ab initio calculations of electron-phonon (e-ph) scattering rates for hot carriers in GaN. Our work combines density functional theory to compute the electronic states, and density functional perturbation theory to obtain the phonon dispersions and e-ph coupling matrix elements. These quantities are interpolated on fine Brillouin zone grids with maximally localized Wannier functions, to converge the e-ph scattering rates within 5 eV of the band edges. We resolve the contribution of the different phonon modes to the total scattering rate, and study the impact on the relaxation times of the long-range Fröhlich interaction due to the longitudinal-optical phonon modes.

  5. Dynamical coupled channel calculation of pion and omega meson production

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Mark

    2009-01-01

    A dynamical coupled channel approach is used to study $\\pi$ and $\\omega$--meson production induced by pions and photons scattering from the proton. Six-channels are used to fit unpolarized and polarized scattering data including $\\pi N$, $\\eta N$, $\\pi\\Delta$, $\\sigma N$, $\\rho N$, $\\omega N$. Bare parameters in an effective hadronic Lagrangian are fixed in $\\chi^2$-fits to data from $\\pi N \\to \\pi N$, $\\gamma N \\to \\pi N$, $\\pi^- p \\to \\omega n$, and $\\gamma p \\to \\omega p$ reactions at center-of-mass energies from threshold to $E < 2.0$ GeV. The $T$ matrix determined in these fits is used to calculate the photon beam asymmetry for $\\omega$-meson production and the $\\omega N \\to \\omega N$ total cross section and scattering lengths.

  6. Beam dynamics calculations and particle tracking using massively parallel processors

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.D.; Habib, S.

    1995-12-31

    During the past decade massively parallel processors (MPPs) have slowly gained acceptance within the scientific community. At present these machines typically contain a few hundred to one thousand off-the-shelf microprocessors and a total memory of up to 32 GBytes. The potential performance of these machines is illustrated by the fact that a month long job on a high end workstation might require only a few hours on an MPP. The acceptance of MPPs has been slow for a variety of reasons. For example, some algorithms are not easily parallelizable. Also, in the past these machines were difficult to program. But in recent years the development of Fortran-like languages such as CM Fortran and High Performance Fortran have made MPPs much easier to use. In the following we will describe how MPPs can be used for beam dynamics calculations and long term particle tracking.

  7. Flux-vector splitting for unsteady calculations on dynamic meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Thomas, James L.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    1989-01-01

    The method of flux vector splitting used is that of Van Leer. The fluxes split in this manner have the advantage of being continuously differentiable at eigenvalue sign changes and this allows normal shocks to be captured with at most two interior zones, although in practice only one zone is usually observed. The fluxes as originally derived, however did not include the necessary terms appropriate for calculations on a dynamic mesh. The extension of the splitting to include these terms while retaining the advantages of the original splitting is the main purpose of this investigation. In addition, the use of multiple grids to reduce the computer time is investigated. A subiterative procedure to eliminate factorization and linearization error so that larger time steps can be used is also investigated.

  8. Automating the parallel processing of fluid and structural dynamics calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arpasi, Dale J.; Cole, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is actively involved in the development of expert system technology to assist users in applying parallel processing to computational fluid and structural dynamic analysis. The goal of this effort is to eliminate the necessity for the physical scientist to become a computer scientist in order to effectively use the computer as a research tool. Programming and operating software utilities have previously been developed to solve systems of ordinary nonlinear differential equations on parallel scalar processors. Current efforts are aimed at extending these capabilties to systems of partial differential equations, that describe the complex behavior of fluids and structures within aerospace propulsion systems. This paper presents some important considerations in the redesign, in particular, the need for algorithms and software utilities that can automatically identify data flow patterns in the application program and partition and allocate calculations to the parallel processors. A library-oriented multiprocessing concept for integrating the hardware and software functions is described.

  9. Automating the parallel processing of fluid and structural dynamics calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arpasi, Dale J.; Cole, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is actively involved in the development of expert system technology to assist users in applying parallel processing to computational fluid and structural dynamic analysis. The goal of this effort is to eliminate the necessity for the physical scientist to become a computer scientist in order to effectively use the computer as a research tool. Programming and operating software utilities have previously been developed to solve systems of ordinary nonlinear differential equations on parallel scalar processors. Current efforts are aimed at extending these capabilities to systems of partial differential equations, that describe the complex behavior of fluids and structures within aerospace propulsion systems. This paper presents some important considerations in the redesign, in particular, the need for algorithms and software utilities that can automatically identify data flow patterns in the application program and partition and allocate calculations to the parallel processors. A library-oriented multiprocessing concept for integrating the hardware and software functions is described.

  10. Dynamical coupled channels calculation of pion and omega meson production

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Mark W.

    2009-02-15

    The dynamical coupled-channels approach developed at the Excited Baryon Analysis Center is extended to include the {omega}N channel to study {pi}- and {omega}-meson production induced by scattering pions and photons from the proton. Six intermediate channels, including {pi}N, {eta}N, {pi}{delta}, {sigma}N, {rho}N, and {omega}N, are employed to describe unpolarized and polarized data. Bare parameters in an effective hadronic Lagrangian are determined in a fit to the data for {pi}N{yields}{pi}N, {gamma}N{yields}{pi}N, {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{omega}n, and {gamma}p{yields}{omega}p reactions at center-of-mass energies from threshold to W<2.0 GeV. The T matrix determined in these fits is used to calculate the photon beam asymmetry for {omega}-meson production and the {omega}N{yields}{omega}N total cross section and {omega}N-scattering lengths. The calculated beam asymmetry is in good agreement with the observed in the range of energies near threshold to W < or approx. 2.0 GeV.

  11. Spreadsheet Based Scaling Calculations and Membrane Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, T D; Bourcier, W L; Speth, T F

    2000-12-28

    Many membrane element manufacturers provide a computer program to aid buyers in the use of their elements. However, to date there are few examples of fully integrated public domain software available for calculating reverse osmosis and nanofiltration system performance. The Total Flux and Scaling Program (TFSP), written for Excel 97 and above, provides designers and operators new tools to predict membrane system performance, including scaling and fouling parameters, for a wide variety of membrane system configurations and feedwaters. The TFSP development was funded under EPA contract 9C-R193-NTSX. It is freely downloadable at www.reverseosmosis.com/download/TFSP.zip. TFSP includes detailed calculations of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration system performance. Of special significance, the program provides scaling calculations for mineral species not normally addressed in commercial programs, including aluminum, iron, and phosphate species. In addition, ASTM calculations for common species such as calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}{times}2H{sub 2}O), BaSO{sub 4}, SrSO{sub 4}, SiO{sub 2}, and LSI are also provided. Scaling calculations in commercial membrane design programs are normally limited to the common minerals and typically follow basic ASTM methods, which are for the most part graphical approaches adapted to curves. In TFSP, the scaling calculations for the less common minerals use subsets of the USGS PHREEQE and WATEQ4F databases and use the same general calculational approach as PHREEQE and WATEQ4F. The activities of ion complexes are calculated iteratively. Complexes that are unlikely to form in significant concentration were eliminated to simplify the calculations. The calculation provides the distribution of ions and ion complexes that is used to calculate an effective ion product ''Q.'' The effective ion product is then compared to temperature adjusted solubility products (Ksp's) of solids in order to calculate a Saturation Index (SI) for each solid of

  12. Temperature Dependence of NMR Parameters Calculated from Path Integral Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Dračínský, Martin; Bouř, Petr; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2016-03-01

    The influence of temperature on NMR chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings in model molecular organic solids is explored using path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations of shielding and electric field gradient (EFG) tensors. An approach based on convoluting calculated shielding or EFG tensor components with probability distributions of selected bond distances and valence angles obtained from DFT-PIMD simulations at several temperatures is used to calculate the temperature effects. The probability distributions obtained from the quantum PIMD simulations, which includes nuclear quantum effects, are significantly broader and less temperature dependent than those obtained with conventional DFT molecular dynamics or with 1D scans through the potential energy surface. Predicted NMR observables for the model systems were in excellent agreement with experimental data. PMID:26857802

  13. Transition Zone Structure and Dynamics in Mantle Convection Calculations with Self-Consistently Calculated Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, P. J.; Nakagawa, T.; Deschamps, F.; Connolly, J.

    2011-12-01

    Phase diagrams of materials in Earth's transition zone (TZ) are complex and composition-dependent and phase transitions have a first-order influence on mantle dynamics, yet simulations of mantle convection typically include only one or two major phase transitions in the olivine system. In our recent work [1,2], phase assemblages of mantle rocks calculated by free energy minimization for MORB and harzburgite compositions expressed as the ratios of 5 or 6 oxides (CaO-FeO-MgO-Al2O3- SiO2-Na2O) are used to calculate the material properties density, thermal expansivity, specific heat capacity, and seismic velocity as a function of temperature and pressure, which are then incorporated into a numerical thermo-chemical mantle convection model in a 2-D spherical annulus or 3-D spherical shell. The advantage of using such an approach is that thermodynamic parameters affecting dynamics and seismic velocities are included implicitly and self-consistently, obviating the need for ad hoc parameterizations. Here we focus on the resulting thermo-chemical structures in the transition zone and their seismic signature. A robust result is some compositional stratification around 660 km depth caused by the inversion of the MORB-harzburgite density difference between ~660-740 km depth [3], with MORB enrichment in the lower TZ and depletion just below the TZ. The extent of this is quite sensitive to variations in MORB composition of the order 1-2% oxide fraction, particularly FeO and Al2O3, which influence the magnitude and depth of this effect and the density difference. The detailed structure also has a strong lateral variation. We plot radial profiles from different parts of our models, characterizing typical structures and the range of structures, and compare to local seismological profiles as well as profiles from regional inversions [4]. [1] Nakagawa, T., P.J. Tackley, F. Deschamps & J.A.D. Connolly (2009) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 10, doi:10.1029/2008GC002280. [2] Nakagawa, T., P

  14. Parellel beam dynamics calculations on high performance computers

    SciTech Connect

    Ryne, R.; Habib, S.

    1996-12-01

    Faced with a backlog of nuclear waste and weapons plutonium, as well as an ever-increasing public concern about safety and environmental issues associated with conventional nuclear reactors, many countries are studying new, accelerator-driven technologies that hold the promise of providing safe and effective solutions to these problems. Proposed projects include accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW), accelerator-based conversion of plutonium (ABC), accelerator-driven energy production (ADEP), and accelerator production of tritium (APT). Also, next-generation spallation neutron sources based on similar technology will play a major role in materials science and biological science research. The design of accelerators for these projects will require a major advance in numerical modeling capability. For example, beam dynamics simulations with approximately 100 million particles will be needed to ensure that extremely stringent beam loss requirements (less than a nanoampere per meter) can be met. Compared with typical present-day modeling using 10,000-100,000 particles, this represents an increase of 3-4 orders of magnitude. High performance computing (HPC) platforms make it possible to perform such large scale simulations, which require 10`s of GBytes of memory. They also make it possible to perform smaller simulations in a matter of hours that would require months to run on a single processor workstation. This paper will describe how HPC platforms can be used to perform the numerically intensive beam dynamics simulations required for development of these new accelerator-driven technologies.

  15. Parallel beam dynamics calculations on high performance computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryne, Robert; Habib, Salman

    1997-02-01

    Faced with a backlog of nuclear waste and weapons plutonium, as well as an ever-increasing public concern about safety and environmental issues associated with conventional nuclear reactors, many countries are studying new, accelerator-driven technologies that hold the promise of providing safe and effective solutions to these problems. Proposed projects include accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW), accelerator-based conversion of plutonium (ABC), accelerator-driven energy production (ADEP), and accelerator production of tritium (APT). Also, next-generation spallation neutron sources based on similar technology will play a major role in materials science and biological science research. The design of accelerators for these projects will require a major advance in numerical modeling capability. For example, beam dynamics simulations with approximately 100 million particles will be needed to ensure that extremely stringent beam loss requirements (less than a nanoampere per meter) can be met. Compared with typical present-day modeling using 10,000-100,000 particles, this represents an increase of 3-4 orders of magnitude. High performance computing (HPC) platforms make it possible to perform such large scale simulations, which require 10's of GBytes of memory. They also make it possible to perform smaller simulations in a matter of hours that would require months to run on a single processor workstation. This paper will describe how HPC platforms can be used to perform the numerically intensive beam dynamics simulations required for development of these new accelerator-driven technologies.

  16. Roaming dynamics in the MgH + H→Mg + H 2 reaction: Quantum dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Tomokazu

    2011-03-01

    Reaction mechanisms of the MgH + H→Mg + H 2 reaction have been investigated using quantum reactive scattering methods on a global ab initio potential energy surface. There exist two microscopic mechanisms in the dynamics of this reaction. One is a direct hydrogen abstraction reaction and the other proceeds via initial formation of a HMgH complex in the deep potential well. The result of the present quantum dynamics calculations suggests that the HMgH complex formed in the reaction mainly decays into the Mg + H 2 channel via a 'roaming mechanism' without going through the saddle point region.

  17. SPREADSHEET BASED SCALING CALCULATIONS AND MEMBRANE PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many membrane element manufacturers provide a computer program to aid buyers in the use of their elements. However, to date there are few examples of fully integrated public domain software available for calculating reverse osmosis and nanofiltration system performance. The Total...

  18. User's Manual for Computer Program ROTOR. [to calculate tilt-rotor aircraft dynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasue, M.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed description of a computer program to calculate tilt-rotor aircraft dynamic characteristics is presented. This program consists of two parts: (1) the natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes of the rotor blade and wing are developed from structural data (mass distribution and stiffness distribution); and (2) the frequency response (to gust and blade pitch control inputs) and eigenvalues of the tilt-rotor dynamic system, based on the natural frequencies and mode shapes, are derived. Sample problems are included to assist the user.

  19. Dynamic social power modulates neural basis of math calculation

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Tokiko; Bridge, Donna J.; Chiao, Joan Y.

    2013-01-01

    Both situational (e.g., perceived power) and sustained social factors (e.g., cultural stereotypes) are known to affect how people academically perform, particularly in the domain of mathematics. The ability to compute even simple mathematics, such as addition, relies on distinct neural circuitry within the inferior parietal and inferior frontal lobes, brain regions where magnitude representation and addition are performed. Despite prior behavioral evidence of social influence on academic performance, little is known about whether or not temporarily heightening a person's sense of power may influence the neural bases of math calculation. Here we primed female participants with either high or low power (LP) and then measured neural response while they performed exact and approximate math problems. We found that priming power affected math performance; specifically, females primed with high power (HP) performed better on approximate math calculation compared to females primed with LP. Furthermore, neural response within the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), a region previously associated with cognitive interference, was reduced for females in the HP compared to LP group. Taken together, these results indicate that even temporarily heightening a person's sense of social power can increase their math performance, possibly by reducing cognitive interference during math performance. PMID:23390415

  20. Preliminary result of transport properties calculation molten Ag-based superionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oztek, H. O.; Yılmaz, M.; Kavanoz, H. B.

    2016-03-01

    We studied molten Ag based superionics (AgI, Ag2S and Ag3S I) which are well defined with Vashista-Rahman potential. Molecular Dynamic simulation code is Moldy which is used for canonical ensemble (NPT). Thermal properties are obtained from Green-Kubo formalism with equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulation. These calculation results are compared with the experimentals results.

  1. Free energy calculations using dual-level Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retegan, Marius; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Ruiz-López, Manuel F.

    2010-08-01

    We describe an efficient and accurate method to compute free energy changes in complex chemical systems that cannot be described through classical molecular dynamics simulations, examples of which are chemical and photochemical reactions in solution, enzymes, interfaces, etc. It is based on the use of dual-level Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations. A low-level quantum mechanical method is employed to calculate the potential of mean force through the umbrella sampling technique. Then, a high-level quantum mechanical method is used to estimate a free energy correction on selected points of the reaction coordinate using perturbation theory. The precision of the results is comparable to that of ab initio molecular dynamics methods such as the Car-Parrinello approach but the computational cost is much lower, roughly by two to three orders of magnitude. The method is illustrated by discussing the association free energy of simple organometallic compounds, although the field of application is very broad.

  2. Error propagation in PIV-based Poisson pressure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhao; Whitehead, Jared; Thomson, Scott; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    After more than 20 years of development, PIV has become a standard non-invasive velocity field measurement technique, and promises to make PIV-based pressure calculations possible. However, the errors inherent in PIV velocity fields propagate through integration and contaminate the calculated pressure field. We propose an analysis that shows how the uncertainties in the velocity field propagate to the pressure field through the Poisson equation. First we model the dynamics of error propagation using boundary value problems (BVPs). Next, L2-norm and/or L∞-norm are utilized as the measure of error in the velocity and pressure field. Finally, using analysis techniques including the maximum principle, the Poincare inequality pressure field can be bounded by the error level of the data by considering the well-posedness of the BVPs. Specifically, we exam if and how the error in the pressure field depend continually on the BVP data. Factors such as flow field geometry, boundary conditions, and velocity field noise levels will be discussed analytically.

  3. The three-dimensional nonadiabatic dynamics calculation of DH{sub 2}{sup +} and HD{sub 2}{sup +} systems by using the trajectory surface hopping method based on the Zhu-Nakamura theory

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bin; Han Keli

    2008-03-21

    A theoretical investigation on the nonadiabatic processes of the full three-dimensional D{sup +}+H{sub 2} and H{sup +}+D{sub 2} reaction systems has been performed by using trajectory surface hopping (TSH) method based on the Zhu-Nakamura (ZN) theory. This ZN-TSH method refers to not only classically allowed hops but also classically forbidden hops. The potential energy surface constructed by Kamisaka et al. is employed in the calculation. A new iterative method is proposed to yield the two-dimensional seam surface from the topography of the adiabatic potential surfaces, in which the inconvenience of directly solving the first-order partial differential equation is avoided. The cross sections of these two systems are calculated for three competing channels of the reactive charge transfer, the nonreactive charge transfer, and the reactive noncharge transfer, for ground rovibrational state of H{sub 2} or D{sub 2}. Also, this study provides reaction probabilities of these three processes for the total angular momentum J=0 and ground initial vibrational state of H{sub 2} or D{sub 2}. The calculated results from ZN-TSH method are in good agreement with the exact quantum calculations and the experimental measurements.

  4. Calculation of the lateral-dynamic stability of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raikh, A

    1952-01-01

    Graphs and formulas are given with the aid of which all the aerodynamic coefficients required for computing the lateral dynamic stability can be determined. A number of numerical examples are given for obtaining the stability derivatives and solving the characteristic-stability equation. Approximate formulas are derived with the aid of which rapid preliminary computations may be made and the stability coefficients corrected for certain modifications of the airplane. A derivation of the lateral-dynamic-stability equations is included.

  5. Zinc finger protein binding to DNA: an energy perspective using molecular dynamics simulation and free energy calculations on mutants of both zinc finger domains and their specific DNA bases.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mazen Y; Arya, Gaurav

    2016-05-01

    Energy calculations based on MM-GBSA were employed to study various zinc finger protein (ZF) motifs binding to DNA. Mutants of both the DNA bound to their specific amino acids were studied. Calculated energies gave evidence for a relationship between binding energy and affinity of ZF motifs to their sites on DNA. ΔG values were -15.82(12), -3.66(12), and -12.14(11.6) kcal/mol for finger one, finger two, and finger three, respectively. The mutations in the DNA bases reduced the value of the negative energies of binding (maximum value for ΔΔG = 42Kcal/mol for F1 when GCG mutated to GGG, and ΔΔG = 22 kcal/mol for F2, the loss in total energy of binding originated in the loss in electrostatic energies upon mutation (r = .98). The mutations in key amino acids in the ZF motif in positions-1, 2, 3, and 6 showed reduced binding energies to DNA with correlation coefficients between total free energy and electrostatic was .99 and with Van der Waal was .93. Results agree with experimentally found selectivity which showed that Arginine in position-1 is specific to G, while Aspartic acid (D) in position 2 plays a complicated role in binding. There is a correlation between the MD calculated free energies of binding and those obtained experimentally for prepared ZF motifs bound to triplet bases in other reports (), our results may help in the design of ZF motifs based on the established recognition codes based on energies and contributing energies to the total energy. PMID:26196228

  6. An image-guidance system for dynamic dose calculation in prostate brachytherapy using ultrasound and fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Nathanael; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Mian, Omar Y.; Le, Yi; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor; Prince, Jerry L.; Song, Danny Y.; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is a standard option of care for prostate cancer patients but may be improved by dynamic dose calculation based on localized seed positions. The American Brachytherapy Society states that the major current limitation of intraoperative treatment planning is the inability to localize the seeds in relation to the prostate. An image-guidance system was therefore developed to localize seeds for dynamic dose calculation. Methods: The proposed system is based on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and mobile C-arm fluoroscopy, while using a simple fiducial with seed-like markers to compute pose from the nonencoded C-arm. Three or more fluoroscopic images and an ultrasound volume are acquired and processed by a pipeline of algorithms: (1) seed segmentation, (2) fiducial detection with pose estimation, (3) seed matching with reconstruction, and (4) fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration. Results: The system was evaluated on ten phantom cases, resulting in an overall mean error of 1.3 mm. The system was also tested on 37 patients and each algorithm was evaluated. Seed segmentation resulted in a 1% false negative rate and 2% false positive rate. Fiducial detection with pose estimation resulted in a 98% detection rate. Seed matching with reconstruction had a mean error of 0.4 mm. Fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration had a mean error of 1.3 mm. Moreover, a comparison of dose calculations between the authors’ intraoperative method and an independent postoperative method shows a small difference of 7% and 2% forD90 and V100, respectively. Finally, the system demonstrated the ability to detect cold spots and required a total processing time of approximately 1 min. Conclusions: The proposed image-guidance system is the first practical approach to dynamic dose calculation, outperforming earlier solutions in terms of robustness, ease of use, and functional completeness. PMID:25186387

  7. An image-guidance system for dynamic dose calculation in prostate brachytherapy using ultrasound and fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Nathanael Prince, Jerry L.; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Mian, Omar Y.; Le, Yi; Song, Danny Y.; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is a standard option of care for prostate cancer patients but may be improved by dynamic dose calculation based on localized seed positions. The American Brachytherapy Society states that the major current limitation of intraoperative treatment planning is the inability to localize the seeds in relation to the prostate. An image-guidance system was therefore developed to localize seeds for dynamic dose calculation. Methods: The proposed system is based on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and mobile C-arm fluoroscopy, while using a simple fiducial with seed-like markers to compute pose from the nonencoded C-arm. Three or more fluoroscopic images and an ultrasound volume are acquired and processed by a pipeline of algorithms: (1) seed segmentation, (2) fiducial detection with pose estimation, (3) seed matching with reconstruction, and (4) fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration. Results: The system was evaluated on ten phantom cases, resulting in an overall mean error of 1.3 mm. The system was also tested on 37 patients and each algorithm was evaluated. Seed segmentation resulted in a 1% false negative rate and 2% false positive rate. Fiducial detection with pose estimation resulted in a 98% detection rate. Seed matching with reconstruction had a mean error of 0.4 mm. Fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration had a mean error of 1.3 mm. Moreover, a comparison of dose calculations between the authors’ intraoperative method and an independent postoperative method shows a small difference of 7% and 2% forD{sub 90} and V{sub 100}, respectively. Finally, the system demonstrated the ability to detect cold spots and required a total processing time of approximately 1 min. Conclusions: The proposed image-guidance system is the first practical approach to dynamic dose calculation, outperforming earlier solutions in terms of robustness, ease of use, and functional completeness.

  8. Calculational investigation of impact cratering dynamics - Early time material motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, J. M.; Austin, M. G.; Ruhl, S. F.; Schultz, P. H.; Orphal, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    Early time two-dimensional finite difference calculations of laboratory-scale hypervelocity (6 km/sec) impact of 0.3 g spherical 2024 aluminum projectiles into homogeneous plasticene clay targets were performed and the resulting material motions analyzed. Results show that the initial jetting of vaporized target material is qualitatively similar to experimental observation. The velocity flow field developed within the target is shown to have features quite similar to those found in calculations of near-surface explosion cratering. Specific application of Maxwell's analytic Z-Model (developed to interpret the flow fields of near-surface explosion cratering calculations), shows that this model can be used to describe the flow fields resulting from the impact cratering calculations, provided that the flow field center is located beneath the target surface, and that application of the model is made late enough in time that most of the projectile momentum has been dissipated.

  9. Calculation of structural dynamic forces and stresses using mode acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blelloch, Paul

    1989-01-01

    While the standard mode acceleration formulation in structural dynamics has often been interpreted to suggest that the reason for improved convergence obtainable is that the dynamic correction factor is divided by the modal frequencies-squared, an alternative formulation is presented which clearly indicates that the only difference between mode acceleration and mode displacement data recovery is the addition of a static correction term. Attention is given to the advantages in numerical implementation associated with this alternative, as well as to an illustrative example.

  10. Algorithms for calculating the dynamics of biocapacity and ecological footprint for natural and artificial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuvaev, Andrey; Pechurkin, Nickolay

    Calculations of the dynamics of biological capacity (BC) and the ecological footprint (EF) is necessary to quantify the predictions and options to both natural and artificial ecosystems at different levels of the hierarchy. The magnitude of the BC as characteristic of the potential possibilities of the system is determined according to the integrated monitoring of physiological state, or photosynthetic activity, "green area" of the ecosystem. The quantity of the EF is defined as the amount required in the functioning of the system, including the production of the required products and degradation disposal unit. In our study we consider an example of the algorithm for calculating the dynamics of BC and EF for the quantification of the Krasnoyarsk Territory loaded as the natural ecosystem. The main burden was determined by EF, non-utilized emissions of carbon dioxide in the operation of energy businesses in the region. To verify the relevant calculations for BC processed data to ground and space monitor vegetation core areas of the province. In particular, the net primary production is calculated on the basis of the relative normalized vegetation index - NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) based on satellite data A comparative evaluation of the contribution of each of the ways to generate energy (thermal and hydro ) in environmental load was made. A comparison of natural ecosystems and loaded specially created life-support systems in space and on the dynamics of BC/EF gives perspective to quantify the predictions and options for development of systems of different levels of the hierarchy. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project number 13-06-00060.

  11. New Approach for Investigating Reaction Dynamics and Rates with Ab Initio Calculations.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Kelly L; Tiwary, Pratyush; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2016-01-21

    Herein, we demonstrate a convenient approach to systematically investigate chemical reaction dynamics using the metadynamics (MetaD) family of enhanced sampling methods. Using a symmetric SN2 reaction as a model system, we applied infrequent metadynamics, a theoretical framework based on acceleration factors, to quantitatively estimate the rate of reaction from biased and unbiased simulations. A systematic study of the algorithm and its application to chemical reactions was performed by sampling over 5000 independent reaction events. Additionally, we quantitatively reweighed exhaustive free-energy calculations to obtain the reaction potential-energy surface and showed that infrequent metadynamics works to effectively determine Arrhenius-like activation energies. Exact agreement with unbiased high-temperature kinetics is also shown. The feasibility of using the approach on actual ab initio molecular dynamics calculations is then presented by using Car-Parrinello MD+MetaD to sample the same reaction using only 10-20 calculations of the rare event. Owing to the ease of use and comparatively low-cost of computation, the approach has extensive potential applications for catalysis, combustion, pyrolysis, and enzymology. PMID:26690335

  12. Cryptosystems based on chaotic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    McNees, R.A.; Protopopescu, V.; Santoro, R.T.; Tolliver, J.S.

    1993-08-01

    An encryption scheme based on chaotic dynamics is presented. This scheme makes use of the efficient and reproducible generation of cryptographically secure pseudo random numbers from chaotic maps. The result is a system which encrypts quickly and possesses a large keyspace, even in small precision implementations. This system offers an excellent solution to several problems including the dissemination of key material, over the air rekeying, and other situations requiring the secure management of information.

  13. Fast plane wave density functional theory molecular dynamics calculations on multi-GPU machines

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Weile; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing ; Fu, Jiyun; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing ; Cao, Zongyan; Wang, Long; Chi, Xuebin; Gao, Weiguo; MOE Key Laboratory of Computational Physical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai ; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-10-15

    Plane wave pseudopotential (PWP) density functional theory (DFT) calculation is the most widely used method for material simulations, but its absolute speed stagnated due to the inability to use large scale CPU based computers. By a drastic redesign of the algorithm, and moving all the major computation parts into GPU, we have reached a speed of 12 s per molecular dynamics (MD) step for a 512 atom system using 256 GPU cards. This is about 20 times faster than the CPU version of the code regardless of the number of CPU cores used. Our tests and analysis on different GPU platforms and configurations shed lights on the optimal GPU deployments for PWP-DFT calculations. An 1800 step MD simulation is used to study the liquid phase properties of GaInP.

  14. Absolute Binding Free Energy Calculations Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Restraining Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiyao; Deng, Yuqing; Roux, Benoît

    2006-01-01

    The absolute (standard) binding free energy of eight FK506-related ligands to FKBP12 is calculated using free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulations with explicit solvent. A number of features are implemented to improve the accuracy and enhance the convergence of the calculations. First, the absolute binding free energy is decomposed into sequential steps during which the ligand-surrounding interactions as well as various biasing potentials restraining the translation, orientation, and conformation of the ligand are turned “on” and “off.” Second, sampling of the ligand conformation is enforced by a restraining potential based on the root mean-square deviation relative to the bound state conformation. The effect of all the restraining potentials is rigorously unbiased, and it is shown explicitly that the final results are independent of all artificial restraints. Third, the repulsive and dispersive free energy contribution arising from the Lennard-Jones interactions of the ligand with its surrounding (protein and solvent) is calculated using the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen separation. This separation also improves convergence of the FEP/MD calculations. Fourth, to decrease the computational cost, only a small number of atoms in the vicinity of the binding site are simulated explicitly, while all the influence of the remaining atoms is incorporated implicitly using the generalized solvent boundary potential (GSBP) method. With GSBP, the size of the simulated FKBP12/ligand systems is significantly reduced, from ∼25,000 to 2500. The computations are very efficient and the statistical error is small (∼1 kcal/mol). The calculated binding free energies are generally in good agreement with available experimental data and previous calculations (within ∼2 kcal/mol). The present results indicate that a strategy based on FEP/MD simulations of a reduced GSBP atomic model sampled with conformational, translational, and orientational restraining

  15. Molecular-dynamics calculations of energetic displacement cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Guinan, M.W.; Kinney, J.H.

    1981-08-07

    The results of fully dynamic computer simulations of collision cascades show an abrupt decrease in defect production efficiency beginning at energies about 10 times the minimum threshold energy in agreement with experimental results on resistivity damage rates at 4.2 K. A detailed analysis of the time development of a typical cascade reveals that this drop in efficiency is primarily due to recombination by defect transport during the cascade cooling phase. This transport is an order of magnitude larger than that predicted from equilibrium transport theory.

  16. Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation studied by surface hopping classical trajectory calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Andrey K.; Domcke, Wolfgang; Lasser, Caroline Trigila, Giulio

    2015-03-14

    The Landau–Zener (LZ) type classical-trajectory surface-hopping algorithm is applied to the nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation after photoionization of the ground-state neutral molecule to the excited states of the cation. The algorithm employs a recently proposed formula for nonadiabatic LZ transition probabilities derived from the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The evolution of the populations of the ground state and the two lowest excited adiabatic states is calculated up to 200 fs. The results agree well with quantum simulations available for the first 100 fs based on the same potential energy surfaces. Three different time scales are detected for the nuclear dynamics: Ultrafast Jahn–Teller dynamics between the excited states on a 5 fs time scale; fast transitions between the excited state and the ground state within a time scale of 20 fs; and relatively slow partial conversion of a first-excited-state population to the ground state within a time scale of 100 fs. Beyond 100 fs, the adiabatic electronic populations are nearly constant due to a dynamic equilibrium between the three states. The ultrafast nonradiative decay of the excited-state populations provides a qualitative explanation of the experimental evidence that the ammonia cation is nonfluorescent.

  17. Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation studied by surface hopping classical trajectory calculations.

    PubMed

    Belyaev, Andrey K; Domcke, Wolfgang; Lasser, Caroline; Trigila, Giulio

    2015-03-14

    The Landau-Zener (LZ) type classical-trajectory surface-hopping algorithm is applied to the nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation after photoionization of the ground-state neutral molecule to the excited states of the cation. The algorithm employs a recently proposed formula for nonadiabatic LZ transition probabilities derived from the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The evolution of the populations of the ground state and the two lowest excited adiabatic states is calculated up to 200 fs. The results agree well with quantum simulations available for the first 100 fs based on the same potential energy surfaces. Three different time scales are detected for the nuclear dynamics: Ultrafast Jahn-Teller dynamics between the excited states on a 5 fs time scale; fast transitions between the excited state and the ground state within a time scale of 20 fs; and relatively slow partial conversion of a first-excited-state population to the ground state within a time scale of 100 fs. Beyond 100 fs, the adiabatic electronic populations are nearly constant due to a dynamic equilibrium between the three states. The ultrafast nonradiative decay of the excited-state populations provides a qualitative explanation of the experimental evidence that the ammonia cation is nonfluorescent. PMID:25770540

  18. Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation studied by surface hopping classical trajectory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Andrey K.; Domcke, Wolfgang; Lasser, Caroline; Trigila, Giulio

    2015-03-01

    The Landau-Zener (LZ) type classical-trajectory surface-hopping algorithm is applied to the nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation after photoionization of the ground-state neutral molecule to the excited states of the cation. The algorithm employs a recently proposed formula for nonadiabatic LZ transition probabilities derived from the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The evolution of the populations of the ground state and the two lowest excited adiabatic states is calculated up to 200 fs. The results agree well with quantum simulations available for the first 100 fs based on the same potential energy surfaces. Three different time scales are detected for the nuclear dynamics: Ultrafast Jahn-Teller dynamics between the excited states on a 5 fs time scale; fast transitions between the excited state and the ground state within a time scale of 20 fs; and relatively slow partial conversion of a first-excited-state population to the ground state within a time scale of 100 fs. Beyond 100 fs, the adiabatic electronic populations are nearly constant due to a dynamic equilibrium between the three states. The ultrafast nonradiative decay of the excited-state populations provides a qualitative explanation of the experimental evidence that the ammonia cation is nonfluorescent.

  19. Proton dose calculation based on in-air fluence measurements.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Barbara

    2008-03-21

    Proton dose calculation algorithms--as well as photon and electron algorithms--are usually based on configuration measurements taken in a water phantom. The exceptions to this are proton dose calculation algorithms for modulated scanning beams. There, it is usual to measure the spot profiles in air. We use the concept of in-air configuration measurements also for scattering and uniform scanning (wobbling) proton delivery techniques. The dose calculation includes a separate step for the calculation of the in-air fluence distribution per energy layer. The in-air fluence calculation is specific to the technique and-to a lesser extent-design of the treatment machine. The actual dose calculation uses the in-air fluence as input and is generic for all proton machine designs and techniques. PMID:18367787

  20. Proton dose calculation based on in-air fluence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffner, Barbara

    2008-03-01

    Proton dose calculation algorithms—as well as photon and electron algorithms—are usually based on configuration measurements taken in a water phantom. The exceptions to this are proton dose calculation algorithms for modulated scanning beams. There, it is usual to measure the spot profiles in air. We use the concept of in-air configuration measurements also for scattering and uniform scanning (wobbling) proton delivery techniques. The dose calculation includes a separate step for the calculation of the in-air fluence distribution per energy layer. The in-air fluence calculation is specific to the technique and—to a lesser extent—design of the treatment machine. The actual dose calculation uses the in-air fluence as input and is generic for all proton machine designs and techniques.

  1. Some dynamic A-n, S-2n analytic calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Coppa, G.; Ravetto, P.; Sumini, M.

    1987-11-01

    A-n, S-2n dynamic equations in neutron transport theory are given an analytic solution, suitable for numerical safety code validation. Some numerical results are presented for plane geometry with periodic boundary conditions, within the monokinetic isotropic scattering case. They turn out to be very interesting and physically well interpretable and seem to give a deep insight into the transport effects connected with the finite velocity space migration of localized neutron signals. Balance equations are solved by means of a space Helmholtz series expansion connected to a time-variable Laplace transformation technique. The equations that are to be solved for the considered slab geometry, although perfectly equivalent to S-2n equations, are actually the ones corresponding to the typical second-order A-n model. The given fully analytic solution can be used to yield standard reference results for peculiar space transients, against which any numerical safety code exploiting the same discrete ordinate model can be validated.

  2. Computational methods. [Calculation of dynamic loading to offshore platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, H. . Inst. of Industrial Science)

    1993-02-01

    With regard to the computational methods for hydrodynamic forces, first identification of marine hydrodynamics in offshore technology is discussed. Then general computational methods, the state of the arts and uncertainty on flow problems in offshore technology in which developed, developing and undeveloped problems are categorized and future works follow. Marine hydrodynamics consists of water surface and underwater fluid dynamics. Marine hydrodynamics covers, not only hydro, but also aerodynamics such as wind load or current-wave-wind interaction, hydrodynamics such as cavitation, underwater noise, multi-phase flow such as two-phase flow in pipes or air bubble in water or surface and internal waves, and magneto-hydrodynamics such as propulsion due to super conductivity. Among them, two key words are focused on as the identification of marine hydrodynamics in offshore technology; they are free surface and vortex shedding.

  3. A basic insight to FEM_based temperature distribution calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwaningsih, A.; Khairina

    2012-06-01

    A manual for finite element method (FEM)-based temperature distribution calculation has been performed. The code manual is written in visual basic that is operated in windows. The calculation of temperature distribution based on FEM has three steps namely preprocessor, processor and post processor. Therefore, three manuals are produced namely a preprocessor to prepare the data, a processor to solve the problem, and a post processor to display the result. In these manuals, every step of a general procedure is described in detail. It is expected, by these manuals, the understanding of calculating temperature distribution be better and easier.

  4. Calculating Free Energies Using Scaled-Force Molecular Dynamics Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darve, Eric; Wilson, Micahel A.; Pohorille, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    One common objective of molecular simulations in chemistry and biology is to calculate the free energy difference between different states of the system of interest. Examples of problems that have such an objective are calculations of receptor-ligand or protein-drug interactions, associations of molecules in response to hydrophobic, and electrostatic interactions or partition of molecules between immiscible liquids. Another common objective is to describe evolution of the system towards a low energy (possibly the global minimum energy), 'native' state. Perhaps the best example of such a problem is folding of proteins or short RNA molecules. Both types of problems share the same difficulty. Often, different states of the system are separated by high energy barriers, which implies that transitions between these states are rare events. This, in turn, can greatly impede exploration of phase space. In some instances this can lead to 'quasi non-ergodicity', whereby a part of phase space is inaccessible on timescales of the simulation. A host of strategies has been developed to improve efficiency of sampling the phase space. For example, some Monte Carlo techniques involve large steps which move the system between low-energy regions in phase space without the need for sampling the configurations corresponding to energy barriers (J-walking). Most strategies, however, rely on modifying probabilities of sampling low and high-energy regions in phase space such that transitions between states of interest are encouraged. Perhaps the simplest implementation of this strategy is to increase the temperature of the system. This approach was successfully used to identify denaturation pathways in several proteins, but it is clearly not applicable to protein folding. It is also not a successful method for determining free energy differences. Finally, the approach is likely to fail for systems with co-existing phases, such as water-membrane systems, because it may lead to spontaneous

  5. Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations of ion hydration free energies

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kevin; Rempe, Susan B.; Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von

    2009-05-28

    We apply ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) methods in conjunction with the thermodynamic integration or '{lambda}-path' technique to compute the intrinsic hydration free energies of Li{sup +}, Cl{sup -}, and Ag{sup +} ions. Using the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional, adapting methods developed for classical force field applications, and with consistent assumptions about surface potential ({phi}) contributions, we obtain absolute AIMD hydration free energies ({Delta}G{sub hyd}) within a few kcal/mol, or better than 4%, of Tissandier et al.'s [J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 7787 (1998)] experimental values augmented with the SPC/E water model {phi} predictions. The sums of Li{sup +}/Cl{sup -} and Ag{sup +}/Cl{sup -} AIMD {Delta}G{sub hyd}, which are not affected by surface potentials, are within 2.6% and 1.2 % of experimental values, respectively. We also report the free energy changes associated with the transition metal ion redox reaction Ag{sup +}+Ni{sup +}{yields}Ag+Ni{sup 2+} in water. The predictions for this reaction suggest that existing estimates of {Delta}G{sub hyd} for unstable radiolysis intermediates such as Ni{sup +} may need to be extensively revised.

  6. Transmission Loss Calculation using A and B Loss Coefficients in Dynamic Economic Dispatch Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jethmalani, C. H. Ram; Dumpa, Poornima; Simon, Sishaj P.; Sundareswaran, K.

    2016-04-01

    This paper analyzes the performance of A-loss coefficients while evaluating transmission losses in a Dynamic Economic Dispatch (DED) Problem. The performance analysis is carried out by comparing the losses computed using nominal A loss coefficients and nominal B loss coefficients in reference with load flow solution obtained by standard Newton-Raphson (NR) method. Density based clustering method based on connected regions with sufficiently high density (DBSCAN) is employed in identifying the best regions of A and B loss coefficients. Based on the results obtained through cluster analysis, a novel approach in improving the accuracy of network loss calculation is proposed. Here, based on the change in per unit load values between the load intervals, loss coefficients are updated for calculating the transmission losses. The proposed algorithm is tested and validated on IEEE 6 bus system, IEEE 14 bus, system IEEE 30 bus system and IEEE 118 bus system. All simulations are carried out using SCILAB 5.4 (www.scilab.org) which is an open source software.

  7. Nonlinear dynamics based digital logic and circuits

    PubMed Central

    Kia, Behnam; Lindner, John. F.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the role and importance of dynamics in the brain and biological neural networks and argue that dynamics is one of the main missing elements in conventional Boolean logic and circuits. We summarize a simple dynamics based computing method, and categorize different techniques that we have introduced to realize logic, functionality, and programmability. We discuss the role and importance of coupled dynamics in networks of biological excitable cells, and then review our simple coupled dynamics based method for computing. In this paper, for the first time, we show how dynamics can be used and programmed to implement computation in any given base, including but not limited to base two. PMID:26029096

  8. Nonlinear dynamics based digital logic and circuits.

    PubMed

    Kia, Behnam; Lindner, John F; Ditto, William L

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the role and importance of dynamics in the brain and biological neural networks and argue that dynamics is one of the main missing elements in conventional Boolean logic and circuits. We summarize a simple dynamics based computing method, and categorize different techniques that we have introduced to realize logic, functionality, and programmability. We discuss the role and importance of coupled dynamics in networks of biological excitable cells, and then review our simple coupled dynamics based method for computing. In this paper, for the first time, we show how dynamics can be used and programmed to implement computation in any given base, including but not limited to base two. PMID:26029096

  9. Numerical calculations of coastal flow with turbulent dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Pijush K.

    1984-01-01

    A two-dimensional numerical model of coastal flow, in which the eddy fluxes are computed by a second-order turbulence model, has been developed. The behaviour of the inertial oscillations due to an impulsive start is in excellent agreement with the analytical solution of KUNDUet al. ( Deep-Sea Research, 30, 1059-1082, 1983). Much of the inertial energy gain in the deep ocean is due to the downward leakage from the coast-surface corner and is accompanied by an upward phase propagation. The low-frequency upwelling solutions develop gravitationally unstable regions in the surface layer, even in the presence of realistic surface heating. But the thickness of the surface layer without surface cooling is never very large, so the analytical models driven by a sink at the coast-surface corner give realistic subsurface solutions. The upwelling solutions generate flow reversal across a strong thermocline, but no 'closed' double cells. Frictional turning, as suggested by several workers, is responsible for the flow reversal. These open double cell persist in the presence of surface heating but not in the presence of an alongshore pressure gradient, p γ = τ γ/( maximum depth) . The imposition of pγ creates a poleward undercurrent on a flat shelf but not on a sloping shelf. The alongshore jet moves offshore due to the nonlinear advection of the thermocline, so that the width of the jet is larger than the Rossby radius. An approximate expression has been derived for predicting the offshore frontal location; the numerical calculation is in fair agreement with it.

  10. Calculated dynamical evolution of the nucleus of comet Hartley 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomality, Leonid

    2013-04-01

    The nucleus of comet Hartley 2 has a relatively regular dumbbell shape with unequal heads. The narrow part of elongated shape contains a relatively smooth region whose covering material is highly different in its shallow structure compared to other parts of this celestial body. The surface of crudely spherical parts of the nucleus is different from the surface of the "neck", which implies a hypothesis that the shape of the nucleus of Hartley 2 is indicative of destruction of this celestial body occurring in our days. The nucleus rotates around its axis passing through the center of mass, and centrifugal forces arise. This process is hindered by gravitation between parts of the nucleus and gradual slowing of rotation due to body lengthening because of the increase in the moment of inertia (proportional to R2) and due to friction losses in the neck material. We posed the task to determine centrifugal and gravitational forces in the neck (and, respectively, the strains of stretching and compression), the moment of inertia of the body and supply of its rotational energy E, the volume of the nucleus and its average density, and the position of the barycenter and center of rotation. It can be assumed that these forces cause slow but progressive lengthening of the neck which should eventually result in fragmentation of the nucleus. Centrifugal forces can be found as a result of summation of forces produced by parts of the body. According to the calculation model, the total stretching forces in the section passing through the narrowest cut of the neck are 1.21E6 N. The corresponding compression forces in the section passing through the narrow section are 1.04E6 N. The comparison of these values indicates a paradoxical result: stretching strains dominate in the neck, while compressions are dominant in the section passing through the common center of mass. The excess of stretching strains in the neck is 11%. The inference is as follows: the right part of the neck and the

  11. Fluorescent color factor calculation using dBASE-II.

    PubMed

    King, R L; Carter, H A; Birckbichler, P J

    1986-06-01

    A software system utilizing dBASE-II operating on a dual-drive Apple II+ computer is described. Color factors and retention times for 15 amino acids and epsilon-(gamma-glutamyl)lysine dipeptide are calculated following high performance liquid chromatography. The software package produces a listing of acceptable limits for these parameters calculated as plus and minus 2 standard deviations of the mean. The code is distributed in source form. PMID:3450360

  12. Code System to Calculate Transient 2-Dimensional 2-Fluid Flow Dynamics.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-07-19

    Version 00 The transient dynamics of two-dimensional, two-phase flow with interfacial exchange are calculated at all flow speeds. Each phase is described in terms of its own density, velocity, and temperature. Separate sets of field equations govern the gas and liquid phase dynamics. The six field equations for the two phases couple through mass, momentum, and energy exchange.

  13. Combining molecular dynamics and an electrodiffusion model to calculate ion channel conductance.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael A; Nguyen, Thuy Hien; Pohorille, Andrew

    2014-12-14

    Establishing the relation between the structures and functions of protein ion channels, which are protein assemblies that facilitate transmembrane ion transport through water-filled pores, is at the forefront of biological and medical sciences. A reliable way to determine whether our understanding of this relation is satisfactory is to reproduce the measured ionic conductance over a broad range of applied voltages. This can be done in molecular dynamics simulations by way of applying an external electric field to the system and counting the number of ions that traverse the channel per unit time. Since this approach is computationally very expensive we develop a markedly more efficient alternative in which molecular dynamics is combined with an electrodiffusion equation. This alternative approach applies if steady-state ion transport through channels can be described with sufficient accuracy by the one-dimensional diffusion equation in the potential given by the free energy profile and applied voltage. The theory refers only to line densities of ions in the channel and, therefore, avoids ambiguities related to determining the surface area of the channel near its endpoints or other procedures connecting the line and bulk ion densities. We apply the theory to a simple, model system based on the trichotoxin channel. We test the assumptions of the electrodiffusion equation, and determine the precision and consistency of the calculated conductance. We demonstrate that it is possible to calculate current/voltage dependence and accurately reconstruct the underlying (equilibrium) free energy profile, all from molecular dynamics simulations at a single voltage. The approach developed here applies to other channels that satisfy the conditions of the electrodiffusion equation. PMID:25494790

  14. Combining molecular dynamics and an electrodiffusion model to calculate ion channel conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Nguyen, Thuy Hien; Pohorille, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    Establishing the relation between the structures and functions of protein ion channels, which are protein assemblies that facilitate transmembrane ion transport through water-filled pores, is at the forefront of biological and medical sciences. A reliable way to determine whether our understanding of this relation is satisfactory is to reproduce the measured ionic conductance over a broad range of applied voltages. This can be done in molecular dynamics simulations by way of applying an external electric field to the system and counting the number of ions that traverse the channel per unit time. Since this approach is computationally very expensive we develop a markedly more efficient alternative in which molecular dynamics is combined with an electrodiffusion equation. This alternative approach applies if steady-state ion transport through channels can be described with sufficient accuracy by the one-dimensional diffusion equation in the potential given by the free energy profile and applied voltage. The theory refers only to line densities of ions in the channel and, therefore, avoids ambiguities related to determining the surface area of the channel near its endpoints or other procedures connecting the line and bulk ion densities. We apply the theory to a simple, model system based on the trichotoxin channel. We test the assumptions of the electrodiffusion equation, and determine the precision and consistency of the calculated conductance. We demonstrate that it is possible to calculate current/voltage dependence and accurately reconstruct the underlying (equilibrium) free energy profile, all from molecular dynamics simulations at a single voltage. The approach developed here applies to other channels that satisfy the conditions of the electrodiffusion equation.

  15. Optimal caching algorithm based on dynamic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Changjie; Xiang, Zhe; Zhong, Yuzhuo; Long, Jidong

    2001-07-01

    With the dramatic growth of multimedia streams, the efficient distribution of stored videos has become a major concern. There are two basic caching strategies: the whole caching strategy and the caching strategy based on layered encoded video, the latter can satisfy the requirement of the highly heterogeneous access to the Internet. Conventional caching strategies assign each object a cache gain by calculating popularity or density popularity, and determine which videos and which layers should be cached. In this paper, we first investigate the delivery model of stored video based on proxy, and propose two novel caching algorithms, DPLayer (for layered encoded caching scheme) and DPWhole (for whole caching scheme) for multimedia proxy caching. The two algorithms are based on the resource allocation model of dynamic programming to select the optimal subset of objects to be cached in proxy. Simulation proved that our algorithms achieve better performance than other existing schemes. We also analyze the computational complexity and space complexity of the algorithms, and introduce a regulative parameter to compress the states space of the dynamic programming problem and reduce the complexity of algorithms.

  16. Austrian Carbon Calculator (ACC) - modelling soil carbon dynamics in Austrian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedy, Katrin; Freudenschuss, Alexandra; Zethner, Gehard; Spiegel, Heide; Franko, Uwe; Gründling, Ralf; Xaver Hölzl, Franz; Preinstorfer, Claudia; Haslmayr, Hans Peter; Formayer, Herbert

    2014-05-01

    Austrian Carbon Calculator (ACC) - modelling soil carbon dynamics in Austrian soils. The project funded by the Klima- und Energiefonds, Austrian Climate Research Programme, 4th call Authors: Katrin Sedy, Alexandra Freudenschuss, Gerhard Zethner (Environment Agency Austria), Heide Spiegel (Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety), Uwe Franko, Ralf Gründling (Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research) Climate change will affect plant productivity due to weather extremes. However, adverse effects could be diminished and satisfying production levels may be maintained with proper soil conditions. To sustain and optimize the potential of agricultural land for plant productivity it will be necessary to focus on preserving and increasing soil organic carbon (SOC). Carbon sequestration in agricultural soils is strongly influenced by management practice. The present management is affected by management practices that tend to speed up carbon loss. Crop rotation, soil cultivation and the management of crop residues are very important measures to influence carbon dynamics and soil fertility. For the future it will be crucial to focus on practical measures to optimize SOC and to improve soil structure. To predict SOC turnover the existing humus balance model the application of the "Carbon Candy Balance" was verified by results from Austrian long term field experiments and field data of selected farms. Thus the main aim of the project is to generate a carbon balancing tool box that can be applied in different agricultural production regions to assess humus dynamics due to agricultural management practices. The toolbox will allow the selection of specific regional input parameters for calculating the C-balance at field level. However farmers or other interested user can also apply their own field data to receive the result of C-dynamics under certain management practises within the next 100 years. At regional level the impact of predefined changes in agricultural management

  17. Dynamic Digital Channelizer Based on Spectrum Sensing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junpeng; Zuo, Zhen; Huang, Zhiping; Dong, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    The ability to efficiently channelize a received signal with dynamic sub-channel bandwidths is a key requirement of software defined radio (SDR) systems. The digital channelizer, which is used to split the received signal into a number of sub-channels, plays an important role in SDR systems. In this paper, a design of dynamic digital channelizer is presented. The proposed method is novel in that it employs a cosine modulated filter bank (CMFB) to divide the received signal into multiple frequency sub-bands and a spectrum sensing technique, which is mostly used in cognitive radio, is introduced to detect the presence of signal of each sub-band. The method of spectrum sensing is carried out based on the eigenvalues of covariance matrix of received signal. The ratio of maximum-minimum eigenvalue of each sub-band is vulnerable to noise fluctuation. This paper suggests an optimized method to calculate the ratio of maximum-minimum eigenvalue. The simulation results imply that the design of digital channelizer can effectively separate the received signal with dynamically changeable sub-channel signals. PMID:26308210

  18. Skyrmion-Based Dynamic Magnonic Crystal.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fusheng; Zhou, Yan; Braun, H B; Lew, W S

    2015-06-10

    A linear array of periodically spaced and individually controllable skyrmions is introduced as a magnonic crystal. It is numerically demonstrated that skyrmion nucleation and annihilation can be accurately controlled by a nanosecond spin polarized current pulse through a nanocontact. Arranged in a periodic array, such nanocontacts allow the creation of a skyrmion lattice that causes a periodic modulation of the waveguide's magnetization, which can be dynamically controlled by changing either the strength of an applied external magnetic field or the density of the injected spin current through the nanocontacts. The skyrmion diameter is highly dependent on both the applied field and the injected current. This implies tunability of the lowest band gap as the skyrmion diameter directly affects the strength of the pinning potential. The calculated magnonic spectra thus exhibit tunable allowed frequency bands and forbidden frequency bandgaps analogous to that of conventional magnonic crystals where, in contrast, the periodicity is structurally induced and static. In the dynamic magnetic crystal studied here, it is possible to dynamically turn on and off the artificial periodic structure, which allows switching between full rejection and full transmission of spin waves in the waveguide. These findings should stimulate further research activities on multiple functionalities offered by magnonic crystals based on periodic skyrmion lattices. PMID:25989181

  19. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yajiang; Inhester, Ludger; Hanasaki, Kota; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2015-07-01

    We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging. PMID:26798806

  20. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yajiang; Inhester, Ludger; Hanasaki, Kota; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2015-01-01

    We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging. PMID:26798806

  1. Putting Math in Motion with Calculator-Based Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerr, Helen M.; Rieff, Cathieann; Tabor, Jason

    1999-01-01

    Many students have difficulties in interpreting position versus time graphs. Presents an activity involving calculator-based motion labs that allows students to bring these graphs to life by turning their own motion into a graph that can be analyzed, investigated, and interpreted in terms of how they actually moved. (ASK)

  2. Software-Based Visual Loan Calculator For Banking Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isizoh, A. N.; Anazia, A. E.; Okide, S. O. 3; Onyeyili, T. I.; Okwaraoka, C. A. P.

    2012-03-01

    industry is very necessary in modern day banking system using many design techniques for security reasons. This paper thus presents the software-based design and implementation of a Visual Loan calculator for banking industry using Visual Basic .Net (VB.Net). The fundamental approach to this is to develop a Graphical User Interface (GUI) using VB.Net operating tools, and then developing a working program which calculates the interest of any loan obtained. The VB.Net programming was done, implemented and the software proved satisfactory.

  3. Extra precision docking, free energy calculation and molecular dynamics simulation studies of CDK2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Sunil Kumar; Muttineni, Ravikumar; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2013-10-01

    Molecular docking, free energy calculation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies have been performed, to explore the putative binding modes of 3,5-diaminoindazoles, imidazo(1,2-b)pyridazines and triazolo(1,5-a) pyridazines series of Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK2) inhibitors. To evaluate the effectiveness of docking protocol in flexible docking, we have selected crystallographic bound compound to validate our docking procedure as evident from root mean square deviations (RMSDs). We found different binding sites namely catalytic, inhibitory phosphorylation, cyclin binding and CKS-binding site of the CDK2 contributing towards the binding of these compounds. Moreover, correlation between free energy of binding and biological activity yielded a statistically significant correlation coefficient. Finally, three representative protein-ligand complexes were subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to determine the stability of the predicted conformations. The low value of the RMSDs between the initial complex structure and the energy minimized final average complex structure suggests that the derived docked complexes are close to equilibrium. We suggest that the phenylacetyl type of substituents and cyclohexyl moiety make the favorable interactions with a number of residues in the active site, and show better inhibitory activity to improve the pharmacokinetic profile of compounds against CDK2. The structure-based drug design strategy described in this study will be highly useful for the development of new inhibitors with high potency and selectivity. PMID:23727278

  4. Gamma Knife radiosurgery with CT image-based dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Andy Yuanguang; Bhatnagar, Jagdish; Bednarz, Greg; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John; Lunsford, L Dade; Huq, M Saiful

    2015-01-01

    The Leksell GammaPlan software version 10 introduces a CT image-based segmentation tool for automatic skull definition and a convolution dose calculation algorithm for tissue inhomogeneity correction. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the impact of these new approaches on routine clinical Gamma Knife treatment planning. Sixty-five patients who underwent CT image-guided Gamma Knife radiosurgeries at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in recent years were retrospectively investigated. The diagnoses for these cases include trigeminal neuralgia, meningioma, acoustic neuroma, AVM, glioma, and benign and metastatic brain tumors. Dose calculations were performed for each patient with the same dose prescriptions and the same shot arrangements using three different approaches: 1) TMR 10 dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 2) convolution dose calculation with imaging skull definition; 3) TMR 10 dose calculation with conventional measurement-based skull definition. For each treatment matrix, the total treatment time, the target coverage index, the selectivity index, the gradient index, and a set of dose statistics parameters were compared between the three calculations. The dose statistics parameters investigated include the prescription isodose volume, the 12 Gy isodose volume, the minimum, maximum and mean doses on the treatment targets, and the critical structures under consideration. The difference between the convolution and the TMR 10 dose calculations for the 104 treatment matrices were found to vary with the patient anatomy, location of the treatment shots, and the tissue inhomogeneities around the treatment target. An average difference of 8.4% was observed for the total treatment times between the convolution and the TMR algorithms. The maximum differences in the treatment times, the prescription isodose volumes, the 12 Gy isodose volumes, the target coverage indices, the selectivity indices, and the gradient indices from the convolution

  5. Calculation of the coefficient and dynamics of water diffusion in graphite joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2006-06-01

    The coefficient and dynamics of water diffusion in adhesive-graphite joints were calculated insitu with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, a method that is significantly simpler than elemental analysis. Water diffusion coefficient and dynamics of adhesive-graphite joints treated by different surface treatment menthods were also investigated. Calculation results indicated that the water diffusion rate in adhesive-graphite joints treated by sandpaper was higher than that treated by chemical oxidation or by silane couple agent. Also the durability of graphite joints treated by coupling agent is superior to that treated by chemical oxidation or sandpaper burnishing.

  6. Efficient Use of an Adapting Database of Ab Initio Calculations To Generate Accurate Newtonian Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, M C; Jones, R E

    2016-02-01

    We develop and demonstrate a method to efficiently use density functional calculations to drive classical dynamics of complex atomic and molecular systems. The method has the potential to scale to systems and time scales unreachable with current ab initio molecular dynamics schemes. It relies on an adapting dataset of independently computed Hellmann-Feynman forces for atomic configurations endowed with a distance metric. The metric on configurations enables fast database lookup and robust interpolation of the stored forces. We discuss mechanisms for the database to adapt to the needs of the evolving dynamics, while maintaining accuracy, and other extensions of the basic algorithm. PMID:26669825

  7. Summary of methods for calculating dynamic lateral stability and response and for estimating aerodynamic stability derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, John P; Mckinney, Marion O

    1952-01-01

    A summary of methods for making dynamic lateral stability and response calculations and for estimating the aerodynamic stability derivatives required for use in these calculations is presented. The processes of performing calculations of the time histories of lateral motions, of the period and damping of these motions, and of the lateral stability boundaries are presented as a series of simple straightforward steps. Existing methods for estimating the stability derivatives are summarized and, in some cases, simple new empirical formulas are presented. Detailed estimation methods are presented for low-subsonic-speed conditions but only a brief discussion and a list of references are given for transonic and supersonic speed conditions.

  8. 40 CFR 1066.610 - Mass-based and molar-based exhaust emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR 86.144 or 40 CFR part 1065, subpart G. (b) For composite emission calculations over... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mass-based and molar-based exhaust... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations § 1066.610 Mass-based and...

  9. 40 CFR 1066.610 - Mass-based and molar-based exhaust emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... specified in 40 CFR 86.144 or 40 CFR part 1065, subpart G. (b) For composite emission calculations over... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mass-based and molar-based exhaust... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS VEHICLE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations § 1066.610 Mass-based and...

  10. Electronic Structure Calculations of delta-Pu Based Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Landa, A; Soderlind, P; Ruban, A

    2003-11-13

    First-principles methods are employed to study the ground-state properties of {delta}-Pu-based alloys. The calculations show that an alloy component larger than {delta}-Pu has a stabilizing effect. Detailed calculations have been performed for the {delta}-Pu{sub 1-c}Am{sub c} system. Calculated density of Pu-Am alloys agrees well with the experimental data. The paramagnetic {yields} antiferromagnetic transition temperature (T{sub c}) of {delta}-Pu{sub 1-c}Am{sub c} alloys is calculated by a Monte-Carlo technique. By introducing Am into the system, one could lower T{sub c} from 548 K (pure Pu) to 372 K (Pu{sub 70}Am{sub 30}). We also found that, contrary to pure Pu where this transition destabilizes {delta}-phase, Pu{sub 3}Am compound remains stable in the antiferromagnetic phase that correlates with the recent discovery of a Curie-Weiss behavior of {delta}-Pu{sub 1-c}Am{sub c} at c {approx} 24 at. %.

  11. Mechanical and dynamical stability of TiAsTe compound from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligoz, E.; Ozisik, H.

    2015-07-01

    The first-principles calculations are employed to provide a fundamental understanding of the structural features and relative thermodynamical, mechanical and phonon stability of TiAsTe compound. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with available experimental results. We have computed elastic constants, its derived moduli and ratios that characterize mechanical properties for the first time. The calculated elastic constants indicate that these materials are mechanically stable at ambient condition. The minimum thermal conductivities of TiAsTe are calculated using both Clarke's model and Cahill's model. Furthermore, the elastic anisotropy has been visualized in detail by plotting the directional dependence of compressibility, Young's modulus and shear modulus. Our results suggest strong elastic anisotropy for this compound. Additionally, the phonon spectra and phonon density of states are also obtained and discussed. The full phonon dispersion calculations confirm the dynamic stability of TiAsTe.

  12. Thermodynamic Properties of Selected Homologous Series of Ionic Liquids Calculated Using Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Červinka, Ctirad; Pádua, Agilio A H; Fulem, Michal

    2016-03-10

    This work presents a molecular dynamics simulation study concerning the thermodynamic data of ionic liquids (ILs) including phase change enthalpies, liquid phase densities, radial and spatial distribution functions, and diffusive properties. Three homologous series of ILs were selected for this study, namely, 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborates, hexafluorophosphates, and 1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethanesulfonates, so that properties of 36 ILs are calculated in total. The trends of calculated properties are compared to available experimental data and thoroughly discussed in context of the homologous series. The calculated trends of the vaporization enthalpies within the series are supported by analyzing the structural properties of the ILs. An excellent agreement of calculated structural properties (liquid phase density) with the experimental counterparts is reached. The calculated enthalpic properties are overestimated considerably; thus, further development of the force fields for ILs is required. PMID:26848831

  13. Modeling of the Electro-Mechanical Response of Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Dynamics and Transport Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svizhenko, Alexel; Anantram, M. P.; Maiti, Amitesh

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on the modeling of the electromechanical response of carbon nanotubes, utilizing molecular dynamics and transport calculations. The topics include: 1) Simulations of the experiment; 2) Effect of diameter, length and temperature; and 3) Study of sp3 coordination-"The Table experiment".

  14. Predicting First Graders' Development of Calculation versus Word-Problem Performance: The Role of Dynamic Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seethaler, Pamela M.; Fuchs, Lynn S.; Fuchs, Douglas; Compton, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of dynamic assessment (DA; degree of scaffolding required to learn unfamiliar mathematics content) for predicting 1st-grade calculations (CAs) and word problems (WPs) development, while controlling for the role of traditional assessments. Among 184 1st graders, predictors (DA, Quantity…

  15. Comparison of computer codes for calculating dynamic loads in wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1978-01-01

    The development of computer codes for calculating dynamic loads in horizontal axis wind turbines was examined, and a brief overview of each code was given. The performance of individual codes was compared against two sets of test data measured on a 100 KW Mod-0 wind turbine. All codes are aeroelastic and include loads which are gravitational, inertial and aerodynamic in origin.

  16. Calculating track-based observables for the LHC.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsi-Ming; Procura, Massimiliano; Thaler, Jesse; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-09-01

    By using observables that only depend on charged particles (tracks), one can efficiently suppress pileup contamination at the LHC. Such measurements are not infrared safe in perturbation theory, so any calculation of track-based observables must account for hadronization effects. We develop a formalism to perform these calculations in QCD, by matching partonic cross sections onto new nonperturbative objects called track functions which absorb infrared divergences. The track function Ti(x) describes the energy fraction x of a hard parton i which is converted into charged hadrons. We give a field-theoretic definition of the track function and derive its renormalization group evolution, which is in excellent agreement with the pythia parton shower. We then perform a next-to-leading order calculation of the total energy fraction of charged particles in e+ e-→ hadrons. To demonstrate the implications of our framework for the LHC, we match the pythia parton shower onto a set of track functions to describe the track mass distribution in Higgs plus one jet events. We also show how to reduce smearing due to hadronization fluctuations by measuring dimensionless track-based ratios. PMID:25166657

  17. Vertical emission profiles for Europe based on plume rise calculations.

    PubMed

    Bieser, J; Aulinger, A; Matthias, V; Quante, M; Denier van der Gon, H A C

    2011-10-01

    The vertical allocation of emissions has a major impact on results of Chemistry Transport Models. However, in Europe it is still common to use fixed vertical profiles based on rough estimates to determine the emission height of point sources. This publication introduces a set of new vertical profiles for the use in chemistry transport modeling that were created from hourly gridded emissions calculated by the SMOKE for Europe emission model. SMOKE uses plume rise calculations to determine effective emission heights. Out of more than 40,000 different vertical emission profiles 73 have been chosen by means of hierarchical cluster analysis. These profiles show large differences to those currently used in many emission models. Emissions from combustion processes are released in much lower altitudes while those from production processes are allocated to higher altitudes. The profiles have a high temporal and spatial variability which is not represented by currently used profiles. PMID:21561695

  18. Helium diffusion in olivine based on first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Brodholt, John; Lu, Xiancai

    2015-05-01

    As a key trace element involved in mantle evolution, the transport properties of helium in the mantle are important for understanding the thermal and chemical evolution of the Earth. However, the mobility of helium in the mantle is still unclear due to the scarcity of measured diffusion data from minerals under mantle conditions. In this study, we used first principles calculations based on density functional theory to calculate the absolute diffusion coefficients of the helium in olivine. Using the climbing images nudged elastic band method, we defined the diffusion pathways, the activation energies (Ea), and the prefactors. Our results demonstrate that the diffusion of helium has moderate anisotropy. The directionally dependent diffusion of helium in olivine can be written in Arrhenius form as follows.

  19. Excited-state dynamics of oxazole: A combined electronic structure calculations and dynamic simulations study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jun; Xie, Zhi-Zhong; Yu, Xiaodong

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, the combined electronic structure calculations and surface hopping simulations have been performed to investigate the excited-state decay of the parent oxazole in the gas phase. Our calculations show that the S2 state decay of oxazole is an ultrafast process characterized by the ring-opening and ring-closure of the five-membered oxazole ring, in which the triplet contribution is minor. The ring-opening involves the Osbnd C bond cleavage affording the nitrile ylide and airine intermediates, while the ring-closure gives rise to a bicyclic species through a 2sbnd 5 bond formation. The azirine and bicyclic intermediates in the S0 state are very likely involved in the phototranspositions of oxazoles. This is different from the previous mechanism in which these intermediates in the T1 state have been proposed for these phototranspositions.

  20. Advancing QCD-based calculations of energy loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tywoniuk, Konrad

    2013-08-01

    We give a brief overview of the basics and current developments of QCD-based calculations of radiative processes in medium. We put an emphasis on the underlying physics concepts and discuss the theoretical uncertainties inherently associated with the fundamental parameters to be extracted from data. An important area of development is the study of the single-gluon emission in medium. Moreover, establishing the correct physical picture of multi-gluon emissions is imperative for comparison with data. We will report on progress made in both directions and discuss perspectives for the future.

  1. Supersampling method for efficient grid-based electronic structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Seongok; Choi, Sunghwan; Hong, Kwangwoo; Kim, Woo Youn

    2016-03-01

    The egg-box effect, the spurious variation of energy and force due to the discretization of continuous space, is an inherent vexing problem in grid-based electronic structure calculations. Its effective suppression allowing for large grid spacing is thus crucial for accurate and efficient computations. We here report that the supersampling method drastically alleviates it by eliminating the rapidly varying part of a target function along both radial and angular directions. In particular, the use of the sinc filtering function performs best because as an ideal low pass filter it clearly cuts out the high frequency region beyond allowed by a given grid spacing.

  2. Supersampling method for efficient grid-based electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seongok; Choi, Sunghwan; Hong, Kwangwoo; Kim, Woo Youn

    2016-03-01

    The egg-box effect, the spurious variation of energy and force due to the discretization of continuous space, is an inherent vexing problem in grid-based electronic structure calculations. Its effective suppression allowing for large grid spacing is thus crucial for accurate and efficient computations. We here report that the supersampling method drastically alleviates it by eliminating the rapidly varying part of a target function along both radial and angular directions. In particular, the use of the sinc filtering function performs best because as an ideal low pass filter it clearly cuts out the high frequency region beyond allowed by a given grid spacing. PMID:26957151

  3. Sensor Based Engine Life Calculation: A Probabilistic Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Ten-Huei; Chen, Philip

    2003-01-01

    It is generally known that an engine component will accumulate damage (life usage) during its lifetime of use in a harsh operating environment. The commonly used cycle count for engine component usage monitoring has an inherent range of uncertainty which can be overly costly or potentially less safe from an operational standpoint. With the advance of computer technology, engine operation modeling, and the understanding of damage accumulation physics, it is possible (and desirable) to use the available sensor information to make a more accurate assessment of engine component usage. This paper describes a probabilistic approach to quantify the effects of engine operating parameter uncertainties on the thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) life of a selected engine part. A closed-loop engine simulation with a TMF life model is used to calculate the life consumption of different mission cycles. A Monte Carlo simulation approach is used to generate the statistical life usage profile for different operating assumptions. The probabilities of failure of different operating conditions are compared to illustrate the importance of the engine component life calculation using sensor information. The results of this study clearly show that a sensor-based life cycle calculation can greatly reduce the risk of component failure as well as extend on-wing component life by avoiding unnecessary maintenance actions.

  4. Combined treatment of relaxation and fluctuation dynamics in the calculation of two-dimensional electronic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Seibt, Joachim; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2014-09-21

    While the theoretical description of population transfer subsequent to electronic excitation in combination with a line shape function description of vibrational dynamics in the context of 2D-spectroscopy is well-developed under the assumption of different timescales of population transfer and fluctuation dynamics, the treatment of the interplay between both kinds of processes lacks a comprehensive description. To bridge this gap, we use the cumulant expansion approach to derive response functions, which account for fluctuation dynamics and population transfer simultaneously. We compare 2D-spectra of a model system under different assumptions about correlations between fluctuations and point out under which conditions a simplified treatment is justified. Our study shows that population transfer and dissipative fluctuation dynamics cannot be described independent of each other in general. Advantages and limitations of the proposed calculation method and its compatibility with the modified Redfield description are discussed.

  5. MRNet-based Dynamic Probe Class Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-12-19

    The Dynamic Probe Class Library (DPCL) is an API that allows for the modification of running code, or dynamic instrumentation. Dynamic instruction is an attractive technique for implementing performance analysis tools, debugging, or process steering because this method doesn't require the modification of the application's source code and hence avoids recompiling, re-linking, and restarting the application. The DPCL API is machine independent; hence DPCL-based tools built on one platform will work on another platform

  6. Calculations of dynamical properties of skutterudites: Thermal conductivity, thermal expansivity, and atomic mean-square displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, N.; Feldman, J. L.; Singh, David J.

    2010-04-05

    While the thermal conductivity of the filled skutterudites has been of great interest it had not been calculated within a microscopic theory. Here a central force, Guggenheim-McGlashen, model with parameters largely extracted from first-principles calculations and from spectroscopic data, specific to LaFe{sub 4} Sb{sub 12} or CoSb{sub 3} , is employed in a Green-Kubo/molecular dynamics calculation of thermal conductivity as a function of temperature. We find that the thermal conductivity of a filled solid is more than a factor of two lower than that of an unfilled solid, assuming the “framework” interatomic force parameters are the same between filled and unfilled solids, and that this decrease is almost entirely due to the cubic anharmonic interaction between filling and framework atoms. In addition, partially as a test of our models, we calculate thermal expansivity and isotropic atomic mean-square displacements using both molecular dynamics and lattice dynamics methods. These quantities are in reasonable agreement with experiment, increasing our confidence in the anharmonic parameters of our models. We also find an anomalously large filling-atom mode Gruneisen parameter that is apparently observed for a filled skutterudite and is observed in a clathrate.

  7. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Okazaki, S.; Fujimoto, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.

    2014-10-28

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 10{sup 6} all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  8. Coupled molecular-dynamics and first-principle transport calculations of metal/oxide/metal heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapol, Peter; Karpeyev, Dmitry; Maheshwari, Ketan; Zhong, Xiaoliang; Narayanan, Badri; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian; Wilde, Michael; Heinonen, Olle; Rungger, Ivan

    2015-03-01

    The electronic conduction in Hf-oxide heterostructures for use in, e.g., resistive switching devices, depends sensitively on local oxygen stoichiometry and interactions at interfaces with metal electrodes. In order to model the electronic structure of different disordered configurations near interfaces, we have combined molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with first-principle based non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) methods, including self-interaction corrections. We have developed an approach to generating automated workflows that combine MD and NEGF computations over many parameter values using the Swift parallel scripting language. A sequence of software tools transforms the result of one calculation into the input of the next allowing for a high-throughput concurrent parameter sweep. MD simulations generate systems with quenched disorder, which are then directly fed to NEGF and on to postprocessing. Different computations can be run on different computer platforms matching the computational load to the hardware resources. We will demonstrate results for metal-HfO2-metal heterostructures obtained using this workflow. Argonne National Laboratory's work was supported under U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  9. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Fujimoto, K.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2014-10-01

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 106 all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  10. Probabilistic Study Conducted on Sensor-Based Engine Life Calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Ten-Huei

    2004-01-01

    Turbine engine life management is a very complicated process to ensure the safe operation of an engine subjected to complex usage. The challenge of life management is to find a reasonable compromise between the safe operation and the maximum usage of critical parts to reduce maintenance costs. The commonly used "cycle count" approach does not take the engine operation conditions into account, and it oversimplifies the calculation of the life usage. Because of the shortcomings, many engine components are regularly pulled for maintenance before their usable life is over. And, if an engine has been running regularly under more severe conditions, components might not be taken out of service before they exceed their designed risk of failure. The NASA Glenn Research Center and its industrial and academic partners have been using measurable parameters to improve engine life estimation. This study was based on the Monte Carlo simulation of 5000 typical flights under various operating conditions. First a closed-loop engine model was developed to simulate the engine operation across the mission profile and a thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) damage model was used to calculate the actual damage during takeoff, where the maximum TMF accumulates. Next, a Weibull distribution was used to estimate the implied probability of failure for a given accumulated cycle count. Monte Carlo simulations were then employed to find the profiles of the TMF damage under different operating assumptions including parameter uncertainties. Finally, probabilities of failure for different operating conditions were analyzed to demonstrate the importance of a sensor-based damage calculation in order to better manage the risk of failure and on-wing life.

  11. Dynamics and Structure of Point Defects in Forsterite: ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churakov, S.; Khisina, N.; Urusov, V.; Wirth, R.

    2001-12-01

    OH-bearing fluid inclusions in Fo92 forsterite samples from peridotite nodule 9206 (Udachnaja kimberlite pipe)[1] were documented recently based on TEM and IR studies. The Fourier transform of diffraction pattern from the inclusions exhibited a pattern, which is interpreted as ordered planar (2H)xMg defects. In this study the structure and dynamics of protons associated with Mg(1), Mg(2) vacancies and interstitial polyhedrons ordered in a (100) plane corresponding to double unite cell periodicity of the forsterite lattice has been investigated by ab initio quantum mechanic calculations. Static structure optimizations and ab-initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed using the CPMD density functional code[2]. The calculations were accomplished with the BLYP-functional utilizing the generalized gradient approximation. Non-local Goedecker-type pseudopotentials[3] have been applied to account for core electrons. Valence electron orbitals were approximated by plane wave expansion up to 70 Ry energy cutoff. The energy of static structures was sampled on 2x2x2 Monkhorst-Pack mesh[4]. During the structure relaxation parameters of an orthorhombic 2x1x2 supercell contaning 116 atoms corresponding to Mg28Si16O64H8 hydrous olivine was fixed at experimental values of a=9.524Å b=10.225Å and c=11.988Å relative to the Pbnm space group. Series of NVT-MD calculations were performed at 1000 K on 2x1x1 supercell with 58 atoms using four chain Nose thermostat. Randomly disturbed optimized structures were used as initial configuration for MD runs. The 1ps system equilibration is followed by trajectory production over 5 ps interval. A point energy sampling was applied in all MD calculations. A series of geometry optimizations, starting with various initial position of protons in Mg(1), Mg(2) and interstitial sites were carried out to obtain a structure with the lowest lattice energy. It was found that structures with protons completely located within the M1

  12. Application of Dynamic Grey-Linear Auto-regressive Model in Time Scale Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, H. T.; Don, S. W.

    2009-01-01

    Because of the influence of different noise and the other factors, the running of an atomic clock is very complex. In order to forecast the velocity of an atomic clock accurately, it is necessary to study and design a model to calculate its velocity in the near future. By using the velocity, the clock could be used in the calculation of local atomic time and the steering of local universal time. In this paper, a new forecast model called dynamic grey-liner auto-regressive model is studied, and the precision of the new model is given. By the real data of National Time Service Center, the new model is tested.

  13. A 3-dimensional finite-difference method for calculating the dynamic coefficients of seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietzen, F. J.; Nordmann, R.

    1989-01-01

    A method to calculate the dynamic coefficients of seals with arbitrary geometry is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations are used in conjunction with the k-e turbulence model to describe the turbulent flow. These equations are solved by a full 3-dimensional finite-difference procedure instead of the normally used perturbation analysis. The time dependence of the equations is introduced by working with a coordinate system rotating with the precession frequency of the shaft. The results of this theory are compared with coefficients calculated by a perturbation analysis and with experimental results.

  14. Born Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics calculation of the νO-H IR spectra for acetic acid cyclic dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Amine Benmalti, Mohamed; Krallafa, Abdelghani; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Both ab initio molecular dynamics simulations based on the Born-Oppenheimer approach calculations and a quantum theoretical model are used in order to study the IR spectrum of the acetic acid dimer in the gas phase. The theoretical model is taking into account the strong anharmonic coupling, Davydov coupling, multiple Fermi resonances between the first harmonics of some bending modes and the first excited state of the symmetric combination of the two vO-H modes and the quantum direct and indirect relaxation. The IR spectra obtained from DFT-based molecular dynamics is compared with our theoretical lineshape and with experiment. Note that in a previous work we have shown that our approach reproduces satisfactorily the main futures of the IR experimental lineshapes of the acetic acid dimer [Mohamed el Amine Benmalti, Paul Blaise, H. T. Flakus, Olivier Henri-Rousseau, Chem Phys, 320(2006) 267-274.].

  15. Calculational investigation of impact cratering dynamics - Material motions during the crater growth period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, M. G.; Thomsen, J. M.; Ruhl, S. F.; Orphal, D. L.; Schultz, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    The considered investigation was conducted in connection with studies which are to provide a better understanding of the detailed dynamics of impact cratering processes. Such an understanding is vital for a comprehension of planetary surfaces. The investigation is the continuation of a study of impact dynamics in a uniform, nongeologic material at impact velocities achievable in laboratory-scale experiments conducted by Thomsen et al. (1979). A calculation of a 6 km/sec impact of a 0.3 g spherical 2024 aluminum projectile into low strength (50 kPa) homogeneous plasticene clay has been continued from 18 microseconds to past 600 microseconds. The cratering flow field, defined as the material flow field in the target beyond the transient cavity but well behind the outgoing shock wave, has been analyzed in detail to see how applicable the Maxwell Z-Model, developed from analysis of near-surface explosion cratering calculations, is to impact cratering

  16. Calculation of Dynamic Loads Due to Random Vibration Environments in Rocket Engine Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Eric R.; Brown, Andrew M.; Frady, Greg P.

    2007-01-01

    An important part of rocket engine design is the calculation of random dynamic loads resulting from internal engine "self-induced" sources. These loads are random in nature and can greatly influence the weight of many engine components. Several methodologies for calculating random loads are discussed and then compared to test results using a dynamic testbed consisting of a 60K thrust engine. The engine was tested in a free-free condition with known random force inputs from shakers attached to three locations near the main noise sources on the engine. Accelerations and strains were measured at several critical locations on the engines and then compared to the analytical results using two different random response methodologies.

  17. Method of calculating gas dynamics and heat transfer in single stage refrigeration units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhitomirskiy, I. S.; Popolskiy, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    A generalized mathematical model of gas-dynamic and heat transfer processes in single-stage regenerative installations operating in Stirling, MacMahon, Gifford-MacMahon, and pulsating tube cycles is proposed. A numerical method os solving initial equations on a digital computer is given. This makes it possible to calculate the change in the thermodynamic parameters in the working cycle in different machine components, as well as the dependence of cold productivity on the temperature level in the steady regime.

  18. Revealing Dissociative Electron Attachment Dynamics in Polyatomic Molecules Using Momentum Imaging Experiments and Electron Scattering Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, Ali; Slaughter, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Understanding electron-driven chemical reactions is important for improving a variety of technological applications such as materials processing and the important role they play in the radiation damage in bulk matter. Furthermore, dissociative electron attachment often exhibits site-selective bond cleavage, which holds promise for prediction and precise control of electron-driven chemical reactions. Recent dynamical studies of these reactions have demonstrated that an understanding of anion dissociation dynamics beyond simple one-dimensional models is crucial in interpreting the measured fragment angular distributions. We combine ion fragment momentum imaging experiments with electron attachment entrance amplitude calculations to interrogate the non-Born-Oppenheimer dynamics of dissociative electron attachment in polyatomic molecules. We will report recent experimental developments in molecules of technological interest including methanol, methane and uracil. Work supported by Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences division of BES/DOE.

  19. Water on the sun: line assignments based on variational calculations.

    PubMed

    Polyansky, O L; Zobov, N F; Viti, S; Tennyson, J; Bernath, P F; Wallace, L

    1997-07-18

    The infrared spectrum of hot water observed in a sunspot has been assigned. The high temperature of the sunspot (3200 K) gave rise to a highly congested pure rotational spectrum in the 10-micrometer region that involved energy levels at least halfway to dissociation. Traditional spectroscopy, based on perturbation theory, is inadequate for this problem. Instead, accurate variational solutions of the vibration-rotation Schrödinger equation were used to make assignments, revealing unexpected features, including rotational difference bands and fewer degeneracies than anticipated. These results indicate that a shift away from perturbation theory to first principles calculations is necessary in order to assign spectra of hot polyatomic molecules such as water. PMID:9219686

  20. Wavelet-Based DFT calculations on Massively Parallel Hybrid Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, Luigi

    2011-03-01

    In this contribution, we present an implementation of a full DFT code that can run on massively parallel hybrid CPU-GPU clusters. Our implementation is based on modern GPU architectures which support double-precision floating-point numbers. This DFT code, named BigDFT, is delivered within the GNU-GPL license either in a stand-alone version or integrated in the ABINIT software package. Hybrid BigDFT routines were initially ported with NVidia's CUDA language, and recently more functionalities have been added with new routines writeen within Kronos' OpenCL standard. The formalism of this code is based on Daubechies wavelets, which is a systematic real-space based basis set. As we will see in the presentation, the properties of this basis set are well suited for an extension on a GPU-accelerated environment. In addition to focusing on the implementation of the operators of the BigDFT code, this presentation also relies of the usage of the GPU resources in a complex code with different kinds of operations. A discussion on the interest of present and expected performances of Hybrid architectures computation in the framework of electronic structure calculations is also adressed.

  1. Ion Transport through Membrane-Spanning Nanopores Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Continuum Electrostatics Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Christine; Hummer, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    Narrow hydrophobic regions are a common feature of biological channels, with possible roles in ion-channel gating. We study the principles that govern ion transport through narrow hydrophobic membrane pores by molecular dynamics simulation of model membranes formed of hexagonally packed carbon nanotubes. We focus on the factors that determine the energetics of ion translocation through such nonpolar nanopores and compare the resulting free-energy barriers for pores with different diameters corresponding to the gating regions in closed and open forms of potassium channels. Our model system also allows us to compare the results from molecular dynamics simulations directly to continuum electrostatics calculations. Both simulations and continuum calculations show that subnanometer wide pores pose a huge free-energy barrier for ions, but a small increase in the pore diameter to ∼1 nm nearly eliminates that barrier. We also find that in those wider channels the ion mobility is comparable to that in the bulk phase. By calculating local electrostatic potentials, we show that the long range Coulomb interactions of ions are strongly screened in the wide water-filled channels. Whereas continuum calculations capture the overall energetics reasonably well, the local water structure, which is not accounted for in this model, leads to interesting effects such as the preference of hydrated ions to move along the pore wall rather than through the center of the pore. PMID:16006629

  2. Summary of Methods for Calculating Dynamic Lateral Stability and Response and for Estimating Lateral Stability Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, John P; Mckinney, Marion O

    1951-01-01

    A summary of methods for making dynamic lateral stability and response calculations and for estimating the aerodynamic stability derivatives required for use in these calculations is presented. The processes of performing calculations of the time histories of lateral motions, of the period and damping of these motions, and of the lateral stability boundaries are presented as a series of simple straightforward steps. Existing methods for estimating the stability derivatives are summarized and, in some cases, simple new empirical formulas are presented. Reference is also made to reports presenting experimental data that should be useful in making estimates of the derivatives. Detailed estimating methods are presented for low-subsonic-speed conditions but only a brief discussion and a list of references are given for transonic- and supersonic-speed conditions.

  3. Windows based computer program for gasket determination based on two different calculation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, F.; Borovnicar, I.; Ghirlanda, M.

    1996-12-01

    The windows based computer program for gasket calculation was presented. C++ computer language was used. On the basis of experimental results and data sets available in the literature and calculated with the help of FSA and PVRC method, the assembly parameters were determined. The result is DONIT TESNITI Diskette, a smart tool to select gaskets on the basis of service conditions and tightness requirements.

  4. The effect of molecular dynamics sampling on the calculated observable gas-phase structures.

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, Denis S; Otlyotov, Arseniy A; Rybkin, Vladimir V

    2016-07-21

    In this study, we compare the performance of various ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) sampling methods for the calculation of the observable vibrationally-averaged gas-phase structures of benzene, naphthalene and anthracene molecules. Nose-Hoover (NH), canonical and quantum generalized-Langevin-equation (GLE) thermostats as well as the a posteriori quantum correction to the classical trajectories have been tested and compared to the accurate path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD), static anharmonic vibrational calculations as well as to the experimental gas electron diffraction data. Classical sampling methods neglecting quantum effects (NH and canonical GLE thermostats) dramatically underestimate vibrational amplitudes for the bonded atom pairs, both C-H and C-C, the resulting radial distribution functions exhibit nonphysically narrow peaks. This deficiency is almost completely removed by taking the quantum effects on the nuclei into account. The quantum GLE thermostat and a posteriori correction to the canonical GLE and NH thermostatted trajectories capture most vibrational quantum effects and closely reproduce computationally expensive PIMD and experimental radial distribution functions. These methods are both computationally feasible and accurate and are therefore recommended for calculations of the observable gas-phase structures. A good performance of the quantum GLE thermostat for the gas-phase calculations is encouraging since its parameters have been originally fitted for the condensed-phase calculations. Very accurate molecular structures can be predicted by combining the equilibrium geometry obtained at a high level of electronic structure theory with vibrational amplitudes and corrections calculated using MD driven by a lower level of electronic structure theory. PMID:27331660

  5. Calculation of the entropy and free energy of peptides by molecular dynamics simulations using the hypothetical scanning molecular dynamics method.

    PubMed

    Cheluvaraja, Srinath; Meirovitch, Hagai

    2006-07-14

    Hypothetical scanning (HS) is a method for calculating the absolute entropy S and free energy F from a sample generated by any simulation technique. With this approach each sample configuration is reconstructed with the help of transition probabilities (TPs) and their product leads to the configuration's probability, hence to the entropy. Recently a new way for calculating the TPs by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations has been suggested, where all system interactions are taken into account. Therefore, this method--called HSMC--is in principle exact where the only approximation is due to insufficient sampling. HSMC has been applied very successfully to liquid argon, TIP3P water, self-avoiding walks on a lattice, and peptides. Because molecular dynamics (MD) is considered to be significantly more efficient than MC for a compact polymer chain, in this paper HSMC is extended to MD simulations as applied to peptides. Like before, we study decaglycine in vacuum but for the first time also a peptide with side chains, (Val)(2)(Gly)(6)(Val)(2). The transition from MC to MD requires implementing essential changes in the reconstruction process of HSMD. Results are calculated for three microstates, helix, extended, and hairpin. HSMD leads to very stable differences in entropy TDeltaS between these microstates with small errors of 0.1-0.2 kcal/mol (T=100 K) for a wide range of calculation parameters with extremely high efficiency. Various aspects of HSMD and plans for future work are discussed. PMID:16848609

  6. Eradication of Ebola Based on Dynamic Programming.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia-Ming; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jia-Bao

    2016-01-01

    This paper mainly studies the eradication of the Ebola virus, proposing a scientific system, including three modules for the eradication of Ebola virus. Firstly, we build a basic model combined with nonlinear incidence rate and maximum treatment capacity. Secondly, we use the dynamic programming method and the Dijkstra Algorithm to set up M-S (storage) and several delivery locations in West Africa. Finally, we apply the previous results to calculate the total cost, production cost, storage cost, and shortage cost. PMID:27313655

  7. Eradication of Ebola Based on Dynamic Programming

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jia-Ming; Wang, Lu; Liu, Jia-Bao

    2016-01-01

    This paper mainly studies the eradication of the Ebola virus, proposing a scientific system, including three modules for the eradication of Ebola virus. Firstly, we build a basic model combined with nonlinear incidence rate and maximum treatment capacity. Secondly, we use the dynamic programming method and the Dijkstra Algorithm to set up M-S (storage) and several delivery locations in West Africa. Finally, we apply the previous results to calculate the total cost, production cost, storage cost, and shortage cost. PMID:27313655

  8. Using molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations to model fluorescence observables

    PubMed Central

    Speelman, Amy L.; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Hinkle, Katie L.; VanBeek, Darren B.; Mennucci, Benedetta; Krueger, Brent P.

    2011-01-01

    We provide a critical examination of two different methods for generating a donor-acceptor electronic coupling trajectory from a molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory and three methods for sampling that coupling trajectory, allowing the modeling of experimental observables directly from the MD simulation. In the first coupling method we perform a single quantum-mechanical (QM) calculation to characterize the excited state behavior, specifically the transition dipole moment, of the fluorescent probe, which is then mapped onto the configuration space sampled by MD. We then utilize these transition dipoles within the ideal dipole approximation (IDA) to determine the electronic coupling between the probes that mediates the transfer of energy. In the second method we perform a QM calculation on each snapshot and use the complete transition densities to calculate the electronic coupling without need for the IDA. The resulting coupling trajectories are then sampled using three methods ranging from an independent sampling of each trajectory point (the Independent Snapshot Method) to a Markov chain treatment that accounts for the dynamics of the coupling in determining effective rates. The results show that the IDA significantly overestimates the energy transfer rate (by a factor of 2.6) during the portions of the trajectory in which the probes are close to each other. Comparison of the sampling methods shows that the Markov chain approach yields more realistic observables at both high and low FRET efficiencies. Differences between the three sampling methods are discussed in terms of the different mechanisms for averaging over structural dynamics in the system. Convergence of the Markov chain method is carefully examined. Together, the methods for estimating coupling and for sampling the coupling provide a mechanism for directly connecting the structural dynamics modeled by MD with fluorescence observables determined through FRET experiments. PMID:21417498

  9. Calculating gravitationally self-consistent sea level changes driven by dynamic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austermann, J.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2015-12-01

    We present a generalized formalism for computing gravitationally self-consistent sea level changes driven by the combined effects of dynamic topography, geoid perturbations due to mantle convection, ice mass fluctuations and sediment redistribution on a deforming Earth. Our mathematical treatment conserves mass of the surface (ice plus ocean) load and the solid Earth. Moreover, it takes precise account of shoreline migration and the associated ocean loading. The new formalism avoids a variety of approximations adopted in previous models of sea level change driven by dynamic topography, including the assumption that a spatially fixed isostatic amplification of `air-loaded' dynamic topography accurately accounts for ocean loading effects. While our approach is valid for Earth models of arbitrary complexity, we present numerical results for a set of simple cases in which a pattern of dynamic topography is imposed, the response to surface mass loading assumes that Earth structure varies only with depth and that isostatic equilibrium is maintained at all times. These calculations, involving fluid Love number theory, indicate that the largest errors in previous predictions of sea level change driven by dynamic topography occur in regions of shoreline migration, and thus in the vicinity of most geological markers of ancient sea level. We conclude that a gravitationally self-consistent treatment of long-term sea level change is necessary in any effort to use such geological markers to estimate ancient ice volumes.

  10. Photophysics of Auramine-O: electronic structure calculations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bin-Bin; Xia, Shu-Hua; Chang, Xue-Ping; Cui, Ganglong

    2016-01-01

    Diphenylmethane dyes are very useful photoinduced molecular rotors; however, their photophysical mechanisms are still elusive until now. In this work, we adopted combined static electronic structure calculations (MS-CASPT2//CASSCF) and trajectory-based surface-hopping dynamics simulations (OM2/MRCI) to study the S1 excited-state relaxation mechanism of a representative diphenylmethane dye Auramine-O. On the basis of the optimized S1 minima and the computed emission bands, we have for the first time assigned experimentally proposed three transient states (i.e. S1-LE, S1-I1 or S1-I2, and S1-II). Mechanistically, upon irradiation to the S1 state, the system first relaxes to the locally excited S1 minimum (S1-LE). Starting from this point, there exist two kinds of relaxation paths to S1-II. In the sequential path, the system first evolves into S1-I1 or S1-I2 and then runs into S1-II; in the concerted one, the system, bypassing S1-I1 and S1-I2, directly runs into S1-II. In addition, the system can decay to the S0 state in the vicinity of three S1/S0 conical intersections i.e. S1S0-I1, S1S0-I2, and S1S0-II. In the S1 dynamic simulations, 54% trajectories decay to the S0 state via S1S0-II; the remaining trajectories are de-excited to the S0 state via S1S0-I1 (11%) and S1S0-I2 (35%). Our present theoretical investigation does not support the experimentally proposed S1 excited-state hypothesis that the intramolecular rotation of the two dimethyl groups around the C-N bond is responsible for the rapid decay of the emission band at about 500 nm; instead, it should be heavily interrelated with the rotation of the two dimethylanilino groups. Finally, this work provides important mechanistic insights into similar diphenylmethane dyes. PMID:26615798

  11. Equilibrium and Dynamics Properties of Poly(oxyethylene) Melts and Related Poly(alkylethers) from Simulations and Ab Initio Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Grant D.; Jaffe, R. L.; Yoon, D. Y.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of POE melts have been performed utilizing a potential force field parameterized to reproduce conformer energies and rotational energy barriers in dimethoxyethane as determined from ab initio electronic structure calculations. Chain conformations and dimensions of POE from the simulations were found to be in good agreement with predictions of a rotational isomeric state (RIS) model based upon the ab initio conformational. energies. The melt chains were found to be somewhat extended relative to chains at theta conditions. This effect will be discussed in light of neutron scattering experiments which indicate that POE chains are extended in the melt relative to theta solutions. The conformational characteristics of POE chains will also be compared with those of other poly (alkylethers), namely poly(oxymethylene), poly(oxytrimethylene) and poly(oxytetramethylene). Local conformational dynamics were found to be more rapid than in polymethylene. Calculated C-H vector correlation times were found to be in reasonable agreement with experimental values from C-13 NMR spin-lattice relaxation times. The influence of ionic salts on local conformations and dynamics will also be discussed.

  12. Map-based models in neuronal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarz, B.; Casado, J. M.; Sanjuán, M. A. F.

    2011-04-01

    Ever since the pioneering work of Hodgkin and Huxley, biological neuron models have consisted of ODEs representing the evolution of the transmembrane voltage and the dynamics of ionic conductances. It is only recently that discrete dynamical systems-also known as maps-have begun to receive attention as valid phenomenological neuron models. The present review tries to provide a coherent perspective of map-based biological neuron models, describing their dynamical properties; stressing the similarities and differences, both among them and in relation to continuous-time models; exploring their behavior in networks; and examining their wide-ranging possibilities of application in computational neuroscience.

  13. Code System to Calculate Three-Dimensional Extension Two-Phase Flow Dynamics.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-04-28

    Version 00 This package consists of two programs K-FIX(3D) and K-FIX(3D, FLX) which extend the transient, two-dimensional, two-fluid program K-FIX to perform three-dimensional calculations. The transient dynamics of three-dimensional, two-phase flow with interfacial exchange are calculated at all flow speeds. Each phase is described in terms of its own density, velocity, and temperature. The application is to flow in the annulus between two cylinders where the inner cylinder moves periodically perpendicular to its axis. K-FIX(3D)more » is easily adaptable to a variety of two phase flow problems while K-FIX (3D,FLX) combines KFIX(3D), the three-dimensional version of the KFIX code, with the three-dimensional, elastic shell code FLX for application to a very specific class of problems. KFIX(3D,FLX) was developed specifically to calculate the coupled fluid-structure dynamics of a light water reactor core support barrel under accident conditions. Motion may be induced by blowdown, prescribed displacement, or seismic action. This package was released by NESC in 1982 then transferred to ESTSC and then to RSICC in January 1999. Files were not retrievable from the media, but the NEA Data Bank in France graciously submitted their package which was obtained from NESC. Hence, the files in this package are from the NEADB NESC-0877/01 package.« less

  14. Rapid Parallel Calculation of shell Element Based On GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanga, Jian Hua; Lia, Guang Yao; Lib, Sheng; Li, Guang Yao

    2010-06-01

    Long computing time bottlenecked the application of finite element. In this paper, an effective method to speed up the FEM calculation by using the existing modern graphic processing unit and programmable colored rendering tool was put forward, which devised the representation of unit information in accordance with the features of GPU, converted all the unit calculation into film rendering process, solved the simulation work of all the unit calculation of the internal force, and overcame the shortcomings of lowly parallel level appeared ever before when it run in a single computer. Studies shown that this method could improve efficiency and shorten calculating hours greatly. The results of emulation calculation about the elasticity problem of large number cells in the sheet metal proved that using the GPU parallel simulation calculation was faster than using the CPU's. It is useful and efficient to solve the project problems in this way.

  15. Fast calculation of object infrared spectral scattering based on CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang-chao; Niu, Wu-bin; Wu, Zhen-sen

    2010-11-01

    Computational unified device architecture (CUDA) is used for paralleling the spectral scattering calculation from non-Lambertian object of sky and earth background irradiation. The bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of five parameter model is utilized in object surface element scattering calculation. The calculation process is partitioned into many threads running in GPU kernel and each thread computes a visible surface element infrared spectral scattering intensity in a specific incident direction, all visible surface elements' intensity are weighted and averaged to obtain the object surface scattering intensity. The comparison of results of the CPU calculation and CUDA parallel calculation of a cylinder shows that the CUDA parallel calculation speed improves more than two hundred times in meeting the accuracy, with a high engineering value.

  16. Efficient Error Calculation for Multiresolution Texture-Based Volume Visualization

    SciTech Connect

    LaMar, E; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

    2001-10-16

    Multiresolution texture-based volume visualization is an excellent technique to enable interactive rendering of massive data sets. Interactive manipulation of a transfer function is necessary for proper exploration of a data set. However, multiresolution techniques require assessing the accuracy of the resulting images, and re-computing the error after each change in a transfer function is very expensive. They extend their existing multiresolution volume visualization method by introducing a method for accelerating error calculations for multiresolution volume approximations. Computing the error for an approximation requires adding individual error terms. One error value must be computed once for each original voxel and its corresponding approximating voxel. For byte data, i.e., data sets where integer function values between 0 and 255 are given, they observe that the set of error pairs can be quite large, yet the set of unique error pairs is small. instead of evaluating the error function for each original voxel, they construct a table of the unique combinations and the number of their occurrences. To evaluate the error, they add the products of the error function for each unique error pair and the frequency of each error pair. This approach dramatically reduces the amount of computation time involved and allows them to re-compute the error associated with a new transfer function quickly.

  17. Trajectory Based Heating and Ablation Calculations for MESUR Pathfinder Aeroshell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. K.; Henline, W. D.; Tauber, M. E.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Based on the geometry of Mars Environment Survey (MESUR) Pathfinder aeroshell and an estimated Mars entry trajectory, two-dimensional axisymmetric time dependent calculations have been obtained using GIANTS (Gauss-Siedel Implicit Aerothermodynamic Navier-Stokes code with Thermochemical Surface Conditions) code and CMA (Charring Material Thermal Response and Ablation) Program for heating analysis and heat shield material sizing. These two codes are interfaced using a loosely coupled technique. The flowfield and convective heat transfer coefficients are computed by the GIANTS code with a species balance condition for an ablating surface, and the time dependent in-depth conduction with surface blowing is simulated by the CMA code with a complete surface energy balance condition. In this study, SLA-561V has been selected as heat shield material. The solutions, including the minimum heat shield thicknesses over aeroshell forebody, pyrolysis gas blowing rates, surface heat fluxes and temperature distributions, flowfield, and in-depth temperature history of SLA-561V, are presented and discussed in detail.

  18. Nonideal thermoequilibrium calculations using a large product species data base

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.; Baer, M.R.

    1992-06-01

    Thermochemical data fits for approximately 900 gaseous and 600 condensed species found in the JANAF tables (Chase et al., 1985) have been completed for use with the TIGER nonideal thermoequilibrium code (Cowperthwaite and Zwisler, 1973). The TIGER code has been modified to allow systems containing up to 400 gaseous and 100 condensed constituents composed of up to 50 elements. Gaseous covolumes have been estimated following the procedure outlined by Mader (1979) using estimates of van der Waals radii for 48 elements and three-dimensional molecular mechanics. Molecular structures for all gaseous components were explicitly defined in terms of atomic coordinates in {Angstrom}. The Becker-Kistiakowsky-Wilson equation of state (BKW-EOS) has been calibrated near C-J states using detonation temperatures measured in liquid and solid explosives and a large product species data base. Detonation temperatures for liquid and solid explosives were predicted adequately with a single set of BKW parameters. Values for the empirical BKW constants {alpha}, {beta}, k, and {theta} were 0.5, 0.174, 11.85, and 5160, respectively. Values for the covolume factors, k{sub i}, were assumed to be invariant. The liquid explosives included mixtures of hydrazine nitrate with hydrazine, hydrazine hydrate, and water; mixtures of tetranitromethane with nitromethane; liquid isomers ethyl nitrate and 2-nitroethanol; and nitroglycerine. The solid explosives included HMX, RDX, PETN, Tetryl, and TNT. Color contour plots of HMX equilibrium products as well as thermodynamic variables are shown in pressure and temperature space. Similar plots for a pyrotechnic reaction composed of TiH{sub 2} and KC1O{sub 4} are also reported. Calculations for a typical HMX-based propellant are also discussed.

  19. Photoisomerization mechanism of 4-methylpyridine explored by electronic structure calculations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Jun; Fang Weihai; Fang Qiu

    2011-01-28

    In the present paper, different electronic structure methods have been used to determine stationary and intersection structures on the ground (S{sub 0}) and {sup 1}{pi}{pi}* (S{sub 2}) states of 4-methylpyridine, which is followed by adiabatic and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations to explore the mechanistic photoisomerization of 4-methylpyridine. Photoisomerization starts from the S{sub 2}({sup 1}{pi}{pi}*) state and overcomes a small barrier, leading to formation of the prefulvene isomer in the S{sub 0} state via a S{sub 2}/S{sub 0} conical intersection. The ultrafast S{sub 2}{yields} S{sub 0} nonradiative decay and low quantum yield for the photoisomerization reaction were well reproduced by the combined electronic structure calculation and dynamics simulation. The prefulvene isomer was assigned as a long-lived intermediate and suggested to isomerize to 4-methylpyridine directly in the previous study, which is not supported by the present calculation. The nonadiabatic dynamics simulation and electronic structure calculation reveal that the prefulvene isomer is a short-lived intermediate and isomerizes to benzvalene form very easily. The benzvalene form was predicted as the stable isomer in the present study and is probably the long-lived intermediate observed experimentally. A consecutive light and thermal isomerization cycle via Dewar isomer was determined and this cycle mechanism is different from that reported in the previous study. It should be pointed out that formation of Dewar isomer from the S{sub 2}({sup 1}{pi}{pi}*) state is not in competition with the isomerization to the prefulvene form. The Dewar structure observed experimentally may originate from other excited states.

  20. Structure and dynamics of nanofluids: Theory and simulations to calculate viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozhar, Liudmila A.

    2000-02-01

    The simplified expression of the Pozhar-Gubbins (PG) rigorous, nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory of dense, strongly inhomogeneous fluids is used to calculate the viscosity of model fluids confined in a slit pore of several molecular diameters in width in terms of the equilibrium structure factors (i.e., the number density and pair correlation functions) of these nanofluids obtained by means of the equilibrium molecular dynamic simulations. These results are compared to those obtained by means of the nonequilibrium molecular dynamic simulations of the planar Poiseuille flow of the model nanofluids, and to the results supplied by several heuristic expressions for the nanofluid viscosity. This comparison proves that the PG transport theory provides a reliable, quantitatively accurate description of the viscosity coefficients of the model nanofluids while all the heauristic approaches fail. This success of the PG prediction of the nanofluid viscosity is because the theoretical expression accounts accurately for the nanofluid structure.

  1. Thermal transport in porous Si nanowires from approach-to-equilibrium molecular dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartoixà, Xavier; Dettori, Riccardo; Melis, Claudio; Colombo, Luciano; Rurali, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    We study thermal transport in porous Si nanowires (SiNWs) by means of approach-to-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the presence of pores greatly reduces the thermal conductivity, κ, of the SiNWs as long mean free path phonons are suppressed. We address explicitly the dependence of κ on different features of the pore topology—such as the porosity and the pore diameter—and on the nanowire (NW) geometry—diameter and length. We use the results of the molecular dynamics calculations to tune an effective model, which is capable of capturing the dependence of κ on porosity and NW diameter. The model illustrates the failure of Matthiessen's rule to describe the coupling between boundary and pore scattering, which we account for by the inclusion of an additional empirical term.

  2. Application of computational fluid dynamics and fluid structure interaction techniques for calculating the 3D transient flow of journal bearings coupled with rotor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Yu, Guichang; Liu, Shulian; Zheng, Shuiying

    2012-09-01

    Journal bearings are important parts to keep the high dynamic performance of rotor machinery. Some methods have already been proposed to analysis the flow field of journal bearings, and in most of these methods simplified physical model and classic Reynolds equation are always applied. While the application of the general computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-fluid structure interaction (FSI) techniques is more beneficial for analysis of the fluid field in a journal bearing when more detailed solutions are needed. This paper deals with the quasi-coupling calculation of transient fluid dynamics of oil film in journal bearings and rotor dynamics with CFD-FSI techniques. The fluid dynamics of oil film is calculated by applying the so-called "dynamic mesh" technique. A new mesh movement approach is presented while the dynamic mesh models provided by FLUENT are not suitable for the transient oil flow in journal bearings. The proposed mesh movement approach is based on the structured mesh. When the journal moves, the movement distance of every grid in the flow field of bearing can be calculated, and then the update of the volume mesh can be handled automatically by user defined function (UDF). The journal displacement at each time step is obtained by solving the moving equations of the rotor-bearing system under the known oil film force condition. A case study is carried out to calculate the locus of the journal center and pressure distribution of the journal in order to prove the feasibility of this method. The calculating results indicate that the proposed method can predict the transient flow field of a journal bearing in a rotor-bearing system where more realistic models are involved. The presented calculation method provides a basis for studying the nonlinear dynamic behavior of a general rotor-bearing system.

  3. Calculation of dynamic electric dipole polarizability, nuclear electric shieldings, and their Cauchy moments in benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeretti, P.; Malagoli, M.; Turci, L.; Zanasi, R.

    1993-10-01

    Theoretical methods based on the random-phase approximation have been applied to evaluate near Hartree-Fock dynamic electric polarizability and shielding tensors of carbon and hydrogen nuclei in the benzene molecule. Cauchy moments of the various properties have been determined. The results obtained in different gauges (dipole length, velocity, and acceleration) are reported.

  4. An easy implementation of displacement calculations in 3D discrete dislocation dynamics codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fivel, Marc; Depres, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Barnett's coordinate-free expression of the displacement field of a triangular loop in an isotropic media is revisited in a view to be implemented in 3D discrete dislocation dynamics codes. A general meshing procedure solving the problems of non-planar loops is presented. The method is user-friendly and can be used in numerical simulations since it gives the contribution of each dislocation segment to the global displacement field without defining the connectivity of closed loops. Easy to implement in parallel calculations, this method is successfully applied to large-scale simulations.

  5. Diffusion Rates for Hydrogen on Pd(111) from Molecular Quantum Dynamics Calculations.

    PubMed

    Firmino, Thiago; Marquardt, Roberto; Gatti, Fabien; Dong, Wei

    2014-12-18

    The van Hove formula for the dynamical structure factor (DSF) related to particle scattering at mobile adsorbates is extended to include the relaxation of the adsorbates' vibrational states. The total rate obtained from the DSF is assumed to be the sum of a diffusion and a relaxation rate. A simple kinetic model to support this assumption is presented. To illustrate its potential applicability, the formula is evaluated using wave functions, energies, and lifetimes of vibrational states obtained for H/Pd(111) from first-principle calculations. Results show that quantum effects can be expected to be important even at room temperature. PMID:26273973

  6. First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Calculations of the Equation of State for Tantalum

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Shigeaki

    2009-01-01

    The equation of state of tantalum (Ta) has been investigated to 100 GPa and 3,000 K using the first-principles molecular dynamics method. A large volume dependence of the thermal pressure of Ta was revealed from the analysis of our data. A significant temperature dependence of the calculated effective Grüneisen parameters was confirmed at high pressures. This indicates that the conventional approach to analyze thermal properties using the Mie-Grüneisen approximation is likely to have a significant uncertainty in determining the equation of state for Ta, and that an intrinsic anharmonicity should be considered to analyze the equation of state. PMID:20057949

  7. Kirkwood-Buff Thermodynamics Derived from Grand Canonical Molecular Dynamics and DRISM Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Gillian C.; Perkyns, John S.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    1999-05-01

    The grand canonical ensemble techniques—both Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics—have become very popular in recent years, but no direct link between the number fluctuation results from these simulation methods and a Kirkwood-Buff theory has been established. In this article we look at Kirkwood-Buff integrals computed using thermodynamic averages derived from grand canonical ensemble molecular dynamics simulations and compare them to similar quantities derived from the dielectrically consistent reference interaction site model many-body theory. These calculations will be carried out for three different water models, SPC, SPC/E, and TIP3P.

  8. Simulating Picosecond X-ray Diffraction from shocked crystals by Post-processing Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kimminau, G; Nagler, B; Higginbotham, A; Murphy, W; Park, N; Hawreliak, J; Kadau, K; Germann, T C; Bringa, E M; Kalantar, D; Lorenzana, H; Remington, B; Wark, J

    2008-06-19

    Calculations of the x-ray diffraction patterns from shocked crystals derived from the results of Non-Equilibrium-Molecular-Dynamics (NEMD) simulations are presented. The atomic coordinates predicted by the NEMD simulations combined with atomic form factors are used to generate a discrete distribution of electron density. A Fast-Fourier-Transform (FFT) of this distribution provides an image of the crystal in reciprocal space, which can be further processed to produce quantitative simulated data for direct comparison with experiments that employ picosecond x-ray diffraction from laser-irradiated crystalline targets.

  9. Method of characteristics - Based sensitivity calculations for international PWR benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Suslov, I. R.; Tormyshev, I. V.; Komlev, O. G.

    2013-07-01

    Method to calculate sensitivity of fractional-linear neutron flux functionals to transport equation coefficients is proposed. Implementation of the method on the basis of MOC code MCCG3D is developed. Sensitivity calculations for fission intensity for international PWR benchmark are performed. (authors)

  10. An Analysis of Differential Item Functioning Based on Calculator Type.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarz, Richard; Rich, Changhua; Arenson, Ethan; Podrabsky, Tracy; Cook, Gary

    The effect of calculator type on student performance on a mathematics examination was studied. Differential item functioning (DIF) methodology was applied to examine group differences (calculator use) on item performance while conditioning on the relevant ability. Other survey questions were developed to ask students the extent to which they used…

  11. Theoretical calculations and experimental verification for the pumping effect caused by the dynamic micro-tapered angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yufei; Zhang, Jianhui; Zhu, Chunling; Huang, Jun; Jiang, Feng

    2016-05-01

    The atomizer with micro cone apertures has advantages of ultra-fine atomized droplets, low power consumption and low temperature rise. The current research of this kind of atomizer mainly focuses on the performance and its application while there is less research of the principle of the atomization. Under the analysis of the dispenser and its micro-tapered aperture's deformation, the volume changes during the deformation and vibration of the micro-tapered aperture on the dispenser are calculated by coordinate transformation. Based on the characters of the flow resistance in a cone aperture, it is found that the dynamic cone angle results from periodical changes of the volume of the micro-tapered aperture of the atomizer and this change drives one-way flows. Besides, an experimental atomization platform is established to measure the atomization rates with different resonance frequencies of the cone aperture atomizer. The atomization performances of cone aperture and straight aperture atomizers are also measured. The experimental results show the existence of the pumping effect of the dynamic tapered angle. This effect is usually observed in industries that require low dispersion and micro- and nanoscale grain sizes, such as during production of high-pressure nozzles and inhalation therapy. Strategies to minimize the pumping effect of the dynamic cone angle or improve future designs are important concerns. This research proposes that dynamic micro-tapered angle is an important cause of atomization of the atomizer with micro cone apertures.

  12. Fluorescence spectra shape based dynamic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liwang; Creten, Sebastiaan; Firdaus, Yuliar; Agustin Flores Cuautle, Jose Jesus; Kouyaté, Mansour; Van der Auweraer, Mark; Glorieux, Christ

    2014-01-01

    An entirely optical, dynamic thermometry technique based on the temperature dependence of a fluorescence spectrum is presented. Different from conventional intensity-based fluorescence thermometry, in this work, neural network recognition is employed to extract the sample temperature from the magnitude and shape of recorded fluorescence spectra. As a demonstration to determine the depth profile of dynamical temperature variations and of the thermal and optical properties of semitransparent samples, in-depth photothermally induced periodical temperature oscillations of a rhodamine B and copper chloride dyed glycerol sample were measured with an accuracy of 4.2 mK.Hz-1/2 and fitted well by a 1D thermal diffusion model.

  13. Calculation of the neutron electric dipole moment with two dynamical flavors of domain wall fermions

    SciTech Connect

    F. Berruto; T. Blum; K. Orginos; A. Soni

    2005-12-08

    We present a study of the neutron electric dipole moment ({rvec d}{sub N}) within the framework of lattice QCD with two flavors of dynamical light quarks. The dipole moment is sensitive to the topological structure of the gauge fields, and accuracy can only be achieved by using dynamical, or sea quark, calculations. However, the topological charge evolves slowly in these calculations, leading to a relatively large uncertainty in {rvec d}{sub N}. It is shown, using quenched configurations, that a better sampling of the charge distribution reduces this problem, but because the CP even part of the fermion determinant is absent, both the topological charge distribution and {rvec d}{sub N} are pathological in the chiral limit. We discuss the statistical and systematic uncertainties arising from the topological charge distribution and unphysical size of the quark mass in our calculations and prospects for eliminating them. Our calculations employ the RBC collaboration two flavor domain wall fermion and DBW2 gauge action lattices with inverse lattice spacing a{sup -1} {approx} 1.7 GeV, physical volume V {approx} (2 fm){sup 3}, and light quark mass roughly equal to the strange quark mass (m{sub sea} = 0.03 and 0.04). We determine a value of the electric dipole moment that is zero within (statistical) errors, |{rvec d}{sub N}| = -0.04(20) e-{theta}-fm at the smaller sea quark mass. Satisfactory results for the magnetic and electric form factors of the proton and neutron are also obtained and presented.

  14. Calculating the free energy of nearly jammed hard-particle packings using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donev, Aleksandar; Stillinger, Frank H.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2007-07-01

    We present a new event-driven molecular dynamics (MD) algorithm for measuring the free energy of nearly jammed packings of spherical and non-spherical hard particles. This Bounding Cell Molecular Dynamics (BCMD) algorithm exactly calculates the free-energy of a single-occupancy cell (SOC) model in which each particle is restricted to a neighborhood of its initial position using a hard-wall bounding cell. Our MD algorithm generalizes previous ones in the literature by enabling us to study non-spherical particles as well as to measure the free-energy change during continuous irreversible transformations. Moreover, we make connections to the well-studied problem of computing the volume of convex bodies in high dimensions using random walks. We test and verify the numerical accuracy of the method by comparing against rigorous asymptotic results for the free energy of jammed and isostatic disordered packings of both hard spheres and ellipsoids, for which the free energy can be calculated directly as the volume of a high-dimensional simplex. We also compare our results to previously published Monte Carlo results for hard-sphere crystals near melting and jamming and find excellent agreement. We have successfully used the BCMD algorithm to determine the configurational and free-volume contributions to the free energy of glassy states of binary hard disks [A. Donev, F.H. Stillinger, S. Torquato, Do binary hard disks exhibit an ideal glass transition? Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (22) (2006) 225502]. The algorithm can also be used to determine phases with locally- or globally-minimal free energy, to calculate the free-energy cost of point and extended crystal defects, or to calculate the elastic moduli of glassy or crystalline solids, among other potential applications.

  15. Haptics-based dynamic implicit solid modeling.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jing; Qin, Hong

    2004-01-01

    This paper systematically presents a novel, interactive solid modeling framework, Haptics-based Dynamic Implicit Solid Modeling, which is founded upon volumetric implicit functions and powerful physics-based modeling. In particular, we augment our modeling framework with a haptic mechanism in order to take advantage of additional realism associated with a 3D haptic interface. Our dynamic implicit solids are semi-algebraic sets of volumetric implicit functions and are governed by the principles of dynamics, hence responding to sculpting forces in a natural and predictable manner. In order to directly manipulate existing volumetric data sets as well as point clouds, we develop a hierarchical fitting algorithm to reconstruct and represent discrete data sets using our continuous implicit functions, which permit users to further design and edit those existing 3D models in real-time using a large variety of haptic and geometric toolkits, and visualize their interactive deformation at arbitrary resolution. The additional geometric and physical constraints afford more sophisticated control of the dynamic implicit solids. The versatility of our dynamic implicit modeling enables the user to easily modify both the geometry and the topology of modeled objects, while the inherent physical properties can offer an intuitive haptic interface for direct manipulation with force feedback. PMID:15794139

  16. Calculation of transport properties of liquid metals and their alloys via molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherne, Frank Joseph, III

    The advanced casting modeler requires accurate viscosity and diffusivity data of liquid metals and their alloys. The present work discusses the use of equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics techniques to obtain such data without having to rely on oversimplified phenomenological expressions or difficult and expensive experiments. Utilizing the embedded atom method (EAM), the viscosities and diffusivities for a series of equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of nickel, aluminum, and nickel-aluminum alloys are presented. A critical comparison between the equilibrium and non-equilibrium methods is presented. Besides the transport properties, structural data for the liquids are also evaluated. EAM does a poor job of describing the transport properties of nickel-aluminum alloys, particularly near the equiatomic concentration. It has been suggested that charge transfer between nickel and aluminum atoms is responsible for the discrepancy between numerical calculations and available experimental data. A modified electronic distribution function has been developed to simulate the charge transfer associated with compound formation. The effects of such a "charge transfer" modification to the embedded atom method are evaluated. The results of these simulations indicate that the embedded atom method combined with molecular dynamics may be used as a method to predict reasonably the transport properties.

  17. Quantification of the impact of MLC modeling and tissue heterogeneities on dynamic IMRT dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaylov, I. B.; Lerma, F. A.; Fatyga, M.; Siebers, J. V.

    2007-04-15

    This study quantifies the dose prediction errors (DPEs) in dynamic IMRT dose calculations resulting from (a) use of an intensity matrix to estimate the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) modulated photon fluence (DPE{sub IGfluence}) instead of an explicit MLC particle transport, and (b) handling of tissue heterogeneities (DPE{sub hetero}) by superposition/convolution (SC) and pencil beam (PB) dose calculation algorithms. Monte Carlo (MC) computed doses are used as reference standards. Eighteen head-and-neck dynamic MLC IMRT treatment plans are investigated. DPEs are evaluated via comparing the dose received by 98% of the GTV (GTV D{sub 98%}), the CTV D{sub 95%}, the nodal D{sub 90%}, the cord and the brainstem D{sub 02%}, the parotid D{sub 50%}, the parotid mean dose (D{sub Mean}), and generalized equivalent uniform doses (gEUDs) for the above structures. For the MC-generated intensity grids, DPE{sub IGfluence} is within {+-}2.1% for all targets and critical structures. The SC algorithm DPE{sub hetero} is within {+-}3% for 98.3% of the indices tallied, and within {+-}3.4% for all of the tallied indices. The PB algorithm DPE{sub hetero} is within {+-}3% for 92% of the tallied indices. Statistical equivalence tests indicate that PB DPE{sub hetero} requires a {+-}3.6% interval to state equivalence with the MC standard, while the intervals are <1.5% for SC DPE{sub hetero} and DPE{sub IGfluence}. Overall, these results indicate that SC and MC IMRT dose calculations which use MC-derived intensity matrices for fluence prediction do not introduce significant dose errors compared with full Monte Carlo dose computations; however, PB algorithms may result in clinically significant dose deviations.

  18. Molecular dynamics calculation of rotational diffusion coefficient of a carbon nanotube in fluid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Bing-Yang; Dong, Ruo-Yu

    2014-01-21

    Rotational diffusion processes are correlated with nanoparticle visualization and manipulation techniques, widely used in nanocomposites, nanofluids, bioscience, and so on. However, a systematical methodology of deriving this diffusivity is still lacking. In the current work, three molecular dynamics (MD) schemes, including equilibrium (Green-Kubo formula and Einstein relation) and nonequilibrium (Einstein-Smoluchowski relation) methods, are developed to calculate the rotational diffusion coefficient, taking a single rigid carbon nanotube in fluid argon as a case. We can conclude that the three methods produce same results on the basis of plenty of data with variation of the calculation parameters (tube length, diameter, fluid temperature, density, and viscosity), indicative of the validity and accuracy of the MD simulations. However, these results have a non-negligible deviation from the theoretical predictions of Tirado et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 2047 (1984)], which may come from several unrevealed factors of the theory. The three MD methods proposed in this paper can also be applied to other situations of calculating rotational diffusion coefficient. PMID:25669403

  19. Lattice dynamics and electron-phonon coupling calculations using nondiagonal supercells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd-Williams, Jonathan H.; Monserrat, Bartomeu

    2015-11-01

    We study the direct calculation of total energy derivatives for lattice dynamics and electron-phonon coupling calculations using supercell matrices with nonzero off-diagonal elements. We show that it is possible to determine the response of a periodic system to a perturbation characterized by a wave vector with reduced fractional coordinates (m1/n1,m2/n2,m3/n3) using a supercell containing a number of primitive cells equal to the least common multiple of n1,n2, and n3. If only diagonal supercell matrices are used, a supercell containing n1n2n3 primitive cells is required. We demonstrate that the use of nondiagonal supercells significantly reduces the computational cost of obtaining converged zero-point energies and phonon dispersions for diamond and graphite. We also perform electron-phonon coupling calculations using the direct method to sample the vibrational Brillouin zone with grids of unprecedented size, which enables us to investigate the convergence of the zero-point renormalization to the thermal and optical band gaps of diamond.

  20. Molecular modeling study of dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors. Molecular dynamics simulations, quantum mechanical calculations, and experimental corroboration.

    PubMed

    Tosso, Rodrigo D; Andujar, Sebastian A; Gutierrez, Lucas; Angelina, Emilio; Rodríguez, Ricaurte; Nogueras, Manuel; Baldoni, Héctor; Suvire, Fernando D; Cobo, Justo; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2013-08-26

    A molecular modeling study on dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitors was carried out. By combining molecular dynamics simulations with semiempirical (PM6), ab initio, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, a simple and generally applicable procedure to evaluate the binding energies of DHFR inhibitors interacting with the human enzyme is reported here, providing a clear picture of the binding interactions of these ligands from both structural and energetic viewpoints. A reduced model for the binding pocket was used. This approach allows us to perform more accurate quantum mechanical calculations as well as to obtain a detailed electronic analysis using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) technique. Thus, molecular aspects of the binding interactions between inhibitors and the DHFR are discussed in detail. A significant correlation between binding energies obtained from DFT calculations and experimental IC₅₀ values was obtained, predicting with an acceptable qualitative accuracy the potential inhibitor effect of nonsynthesized compounds. Such correlation was experimentally corroborated synthesizing and testing two new inhibitors reported in this paper. PMID:23834278

  1. Molecular dynamics calculation of rotational diffusion coefficient of a carbon nanotube in fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Bing-Yang; Dong, Ruo-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Rotational diffusion processes are correlated with nanoparticle visualization and manipulation techniques, widely used in nanocomposites, nanofluids, bioscience, and so on. However, a systematical methodology of deriving this diffusivity is still lacking. In the current work, three molecular dynamics (MD) schemes, including equilibrium (Green-Kubo formula and Einstein relation) and nonequilibrium (Einstein-Smoluchowski relation) methods, are developed to calculate the rotational diffusion coefficient, taking a single rigid carbon nanotube in fluid argon as a case. We can conclude that the three methods produce same results on the basis of plenty of data with variation of the calculation parameters (tube length, diameter, fluid temperature, density, and viscosity), indicative of the validity and accuracy of the MD simulations. However, these results have a non-negligible deviation from the theoretical predictions of Tirado et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 81, 2047 (1984)], which may come from several unrevealed factors of the theory. The three MD methods proposed in this paper can also be applied to other situations of calculating rotational diffusion coefficient.

  2. Magnetic materials at finite temperatures: thermodynamics and combined spin and molecular dynamics derived from first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenbach, Markus; Perera, Meewanage Dilina N.; Landau, David P; Nicholson, Don M.; Yin, Junqi; Brown, Greg

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified approach to describe the combined behavior of the atomic and magnetic degrees of freedom in magnetic materials. Using Monte Carlo simulations directly combined with first principles the Curie temperature can be obtained ab initio in good agreement with experimental values. The large scale constrained first principles calculations have been used to construct effective potentials for both the atomic and magnetic degrees of freedom that allow the unified study of influence of phonon-magnon coupling on the thermodynamics and dynamics of magnetic systems. The MC calculations predict the specific heat of iron in near perfect agreement with experimental results from 300K to above Tc and allow the identification of the importance of the magnon-phonon interaction at the phase-transition. Further Molecular Dynamics and Spin Dynamics calculations elucidate the dynamics of this coupling and open the potential for quantitative and predictive descriptions of dynamic structure factors in magnetic materials using first principles-derived simulations.

  3. Internal conversion and intersystem crossing in α,β-enones: a combination of electronic structure calculations and dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Xie, Zhi-Zhong

    2016-03-01

    The ab initio electronic structure calculations and CASSCF-based nonadiabatic dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the internal conversion and intersystem crossing process of both trans-acrolein and 2-cyclopentenone in the gas phase. Our calculation results show that relaxation from the Franck-Condon region to an S1 minimum is ultrafast and that the S1 state will dominantly undergo intersystem crossing to triplet states due to the existence of significant barriers to access the S1/S0 intersection points and of energetically close-lying triplet states. The S1/T2/T1 three-state intersection is observed in our dynamics simulations to play an important role in the population of the lowest triplet state, which is consistent with previous suggestions. Although the evolution into triplet states involves a similar path and gives rise to a similar triplet quantum yield for these two molecules, the intersystem crossing rate of 2-cyclopentenone is lower owing to the ring constraint that results in a smaller spin-orbital coupling in the singlet-triplet crossing region. The present theoretical study reproduces the experimental results and gives an explanation about the structural factors that govern the excited-state decay of some types of α,β-enones. PMID:26882275

  4. Calculating excess chemical potentials using dynamic simulations in the fourth dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Pomes, R.; Eisenmesser, E.; Post, C.B.; Roux, B.

    1999-08-01

    A general method for computing excess chemical potentials is presented. The excess chemical potential of a solute or ligand molecule is estimated from the potential of mean-force (PMF) calculated along a nonphysical fourth spatial dimension, {ital w}, into which the molecule is gradually inserted or from which it is gradually abstracted. According to this {open_quotes}4D-PMF{close_quotes} (four dimensional) scheme, the free energy difference between two limiting states defines the excess chemical potential: At w={plus_minus}{infinity}, the molecule is not interacting with the rest of the system, whereas at w=0, it is fully interacting. Use of a fourth dimension avoids the numerical instability in the equations of motion encountered upon growing or shrinking solute atoms in conventional free energy perturbation simulations performed in three dimensions, while benefiting from the efficient sampling of configurational space afforded by PMF calculations. The applicability and usefulness of the method are illustrated with calculations of the hydration free energy of simple Lennard-Jones (LJ) solutes, a water molecule, and camphor, using molecular dynamics simulations and umbrella sampling. Physical insight into the nature of the PMF profiles is gained from a continuum treatment of short- and long-range interactions. The short-range barrier for dissolution of a LJ solute in the added dimension provides an apparent surface tension of the solute. An approximation to the long-range behavior of the PMF profiles is made in terms of a continuum treatment of LJ dispersion and electrostatic interactions. Such an analysis saves the need for configurational sampling in the long-range limit of the fourth dimension. The 4D-PMF method of calculating excess chemical potentials should be useful for neutral solute and ligand molecules with a wide range of sizes, shapes, and polarities. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Procedure for calculating general aircraft noise based on ISO 3891

    SciTech Connect

    Hediger, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The standard ISO-3891 specifies the presentation of aircraft noise heard on the ground or of noise exposure by succession of aircraft, without giving any details on different parameters required to their calculation. The following study provides some of these parameters considering acoustic measurements as well as laboratory analysis realized in co-operation with the Swiss Federal Office for Civil Aviation.

  6. Independent calculation-based verification of IMRT plans using a 3D dose-calculation engine

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Goozee, Gary; Holloway, Lois

    2013-01-01

    Independent monitor unit verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans requires detailed 3-dimensional (3D) dose verification. The aim of this study was to investigate using a 3D dose engine in a second commercial treatment planning system (TPS) for this task, facilitated by in-house software. Our department has XiO and Pinnacle TPSs, both with IMRT planning capability and modeled for an Elekta-Synergy 6 MV photon beam. These systems allow the transfer of computed tomography (CT) data and RT structures between them but do not allow IMRT plans to be transferred. To provide this connectivity, an in-house computer programme was developed to convert radiation therapy prescription (RTP) files as generated by many planning systems into either XiO or Pinnacle IMRT file formats. Utilization of the technique and software was assessed by transferring 14 IMRT plans from XiO and Pinnacle onto the other system and performing 3D dose verification. The accuracy of the conversion process was checked by comparing the 3D dose matrices and dose volume histograms (DVHs) of structures for the recalculated plan on the same system. The developed software successfully transferred IMRT plans generated by 1 planning system into the other. Comparison of planning target volume (TV) DVHs for the original and recalculated plans showed good agreement; a maximum difference of 2% in mean dose, − 2.5% in D95, and 2.9% in V95 was observed. Similarly, a DVH comparison of organs at risk showed a maximum difference of +7.7% between the original and recalculated plans for structures in both high- and medium-dose regions. However, for structures in low-dose regions (less than 15% of prescription dose) a difference in mean dose up to +21.1% was observed between XiO and Pinnacle calculations. A dose matrix comparison of original and recalculated plans in XiO and Pinnacle TPSs was performed using gamma analysis with 3%/3 mm criteria. The mean and standard deviation of pixels passing

  7. Independent calculation-based verification of IMRT plans using a 3D dose-calculation engine.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Goozee, Gary; Holloway, Lois

    2013-01-01

    Independent monitor unit verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans requires detailed 3-dimensional (3D) dose verification. The aim of this study was to investigate using a 3D dose engine in a second commercial treatment planning system (TPS) for this task, facilitated by in-house software. Our department has XiO and Pinnacle TPSs, both with IMRT planning capability and modeled for an Elekta-Synergy 6MV photon beam. These systems allow the transfer of computed tomography (CT) data and RT structures between them but do not allow IMRT plans to be transferred. To provide this connectivity, an in-house computer programme was developed to convert radiation therapy prescription (RTP) files as generated by many planning systems into either XiO or Pinnacle IMRT file formats. Utilization of the technique and software was assessed by transferring 14 IMRT plans from XiO and Pinnacle onto the other system and performing 3D dose verification. The accuracy of the conversion process was checked by comparing the 3D dose matrices and dose volume histograms (DVHs) of structures for the recalculated plan on the same system. The developed software successfully transferred IMRT plans generated by 1 planning system into the other. Comparison of planning target volume (TV) DVHs for the original and recalculated plans showed good agreement; a maximum difference of 2% in mean dose, - 2.5% in D95, and 2.9% in V95 was observed. Similarly, a DVH comparison of organs at risk showed a maximum difference of +7.7% between the original and recalculated plans for structures in both high- and medium-dose regions. However, for structures in low-dose regions (less than 15% of prescription dose) a difference in mean dose up to +21.1% was observed between XiO and Pinnacle calculations. A dose matrix comparison of original and recalculated plans in XiO and Pinnacle TPSs was performed using gamma analysis with 3%/3mm criteria. The mean and standard deviation of pixels passing gamma

  8. Quantum dynamics calculations using symmetrized, orthogonal Weyl-Heisenberg wavelets with a phase space truncation scheme. III. Representations and calculations.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Bill; Salam, A

    2004-07-22

    In a previous paper [J. Theo. Comput. Chem. 2, 65 (2003)], one of the authors (B.P.) presented a method for solving the multidimensional Schrodinger equation, using modified Wilson-Daubechies wavelets, and a simple phase space truncation scheme. Unprecedented numerical efficiency was achieved, enabling a ten-dimensional calculation of nearly 600 eigenvalues to be performed using direct matrix diagonalization techniques. In a second paper [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1690 (2004)], and in this paper, we extend and elaborate upon the previous work in several important ways. The second paper focuses on construction and optimization of the wavelength functions, from theoretical and numerical viewpoints, and also examines their localization. This paper deals with their use in representations and eigenproblem calculations, which are extended to 15-dimensional systems. Even higher dimensionalities are possible using more sophisticated linear algebra techniques. This approach is ideally suited to rovibrational spectroscopy applications, but can be used in any context where differential equations are involved. PMID:15260721

  9. Monte Carlo calculation of dynamical properties of the two-dimensional Hubbard model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. R.; Scalapino, D. J.; Sugar, R. L.; Bickers, N. E.

    1989-01-01

    A new method is introduced for analytically continuing imaginary-time data from quantum Monte Carlo calculations to the real-frequency axis. The method is based on a least-squares-fitting procedure with constraints of positivity and smoothness on the real-frequency quantities. Results are shown for the single-particle spectral-weight function and density of states for the half-filled, two-dimensional Hubbard model.

  10. Characterizing Loop Dynamics and Ligand Recognition in Human- and Avian-Type Influenza Neuraminidases via Generalized Born Molecular Dynamics and End-Point Free Energy Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Amaro, Rommie E; Cheng, Xiaolin; Ivanov, Ivaylo N; Xu, Dong; McCammon, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The comparative dynamics and inhibitor binding free energies of group-1 and group-2 pathogenic influenza A subtype neuraminidase (NA) enzymes are of fundamental biological interest and relevant to structure-based drug design studies for antiviral compounds. In this work, we present seven generalized Born molecular dynamics simulations of avian (N1)- and human (N9)-type NAs in order to probe the comparative flexibility of the two subtypes, both with and without the inhibitor oseltamivir bound. The enhanced sampling obtained through the implicit solvent treatment suggests several provocative insights into the dynamics of the two subtypes, including that the group-2 enzymes may exhibit similar motion in the 430-binding site regions but different 150-loop motion. End-point free energy calculations elucidate the contributions to inhibitor binding free energies and suggest that entropic considerations cannot be neglected when comparing across the subtypes. We anticipate the findings presented here will have broad implications for the development of novel antiviral compounds against both seasonal and pandemic influenza strains.

  11. Improving Patient Prostate Cancer Risk Assessment: Moving From Static, Globally-Applied to Dynamic, Practice-Specific Cancer Risk Calculators

    PubMed Central

    Strobl, Andreas N.; Vickers, Andrew J.; Van Calster, Ben; Steyerberg, Ewout; Leach, Robin J.; Thompson, Ian M.; Ankerst, Donna P.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical risk calculators are now widely available but have generally been implemented in a static and one-size-fits-all fashion. The objective of this study was to challenge these notions and show via a case study concerning risk-based screening for prostate cancer how calculators can be dynamically and locally tailored to improve on-site patient accuracy. Yearly data from five international prostate biopsy cohorts (3 in the US, 1 in Austria, 1 in England) were used to compare 6 methods for annual risk prediction: static use of the online US-developed Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial Risk Calculator (PCPTRC); recalibration of the PCPTRC; revision of the PCPTRC; building a new model each year using logistic regression, Bayesian prior-to-posterior updating, or random forests. All methods performed similarly with respect to discrimination, except for random forests, which were worse. All methods except for random forests greatly improved calibration over the static PCPTRC in all cohorts except for Austria, where the PCPTRC had the best calibration followed closely by recalibration. The case study shows that a simple annual recalibration of a general online risk tool for prostate cancer can improve its accuracy with respect to the local patient practice at hand. PMID:25989018

  12. Classification of CMEs Based on Their Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicewicz, J.; Michalek, G.

    2016-05-01

    A large set of coronal mass ejections CMEs (6621) has been selected to study their dynamics seen with the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) field of view (LFOV). These events were selected based on having at least six height-time measurements so that their dynamic properties, in the LFOV, can be evaluated with reasonable accuracy. Height-time measurements (in the SOHO/LASCO catalog) were used to determine the velocities and accelerations of individual CMEs at successive distances from the Sun. Linear and quadratic functions were fitted to these data points. On the basis of the best fits to the velocity data points, we were able to classify CMEs into four groups. The types of CMEs do not only have different dynamic behaviors but also different masses, widths, velocities, and accelerations. We also show that these groups of events are initiated by different onset mechanisms. The results of our study allow us to present a consistent classification of CMEs based on their dynamics.

  13. Towards a dynamical approach to the calculation of the figure of merit of thermoelectric nanoscale devices.

    PubMed

    D'Agosta, Roberto

    2013-02-14

    Research on thermoelectrical energy conversion, the reuse of waste heat produced by some mechanical or chemical processes to generate electricity, has recently gained some momentum. The calculation of the electronic parameters entering the figure of merit of this energy conversion, and therefore the discovery of efficient materials, is usually performed starting from Landauer's approach to quantum transport coupled with Onsager's linear response theory. As it is well known, this approach suffers from certain serious drawbacks. Here, we discuss alternative dynamical methods that can go beyond the validity of Landauer's/Onsager's approach for electronic transport. They can be used to validate the predictions of Landauer's/Onsager's approach and to investigate systems for which this approach has been shown to be unsatisfactory. PMID:23212579

  14. E-beam dynamics calculations and comparison with measurements of a high duty accelerator at Boeing

    SciTech Connect

    Parazzoli, C.G.; Dowell, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    The electron dynamics in the photoinjector cavities and through the beamline for a high duty factor electron accelerator are computed. The particle in a cell code ARGUS, is first used in the low energy (< 2 MeV) region of the photoinjector, then the ARGUS-generated phase space at the photoinjector exit is used as input in the standard particle pusher code PARMELA, and the electron beam properties at the end of the beamline computed. Comparisons between the calculated and measured electron bea mradial profiles and emittances are presented for different values of the electron pulse charge. A discussion of the methodology used and on the accuracy of PARMELA in the low energy region of the photoinjector is given.

  15. Dynamic aperture calculation for the RHIC 2010 100 GeV Au-Au run lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Brown, K.; Fischer, W.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2010-08-01

    In this note we summarize the dynamic aperture calculation with the 2010 RHIC 100 GeV Au-Au run lattices. This study was initiated to understand the observed large beam decay in the Yellow ring after rf re-bucketing in the beginning of this run. The off-line linear lattice models and the interaction region non-linearity models are used. The large beam decay in the Yellow ring after re-bucketing was eventually eliminated by lowering the Yellow tunes to 0.21 from 0.235 with {beta}* = 0.7m lattice. In this note we only focus on the numeric simulation instead of the beam experiments.

  16. Free Energy Calculations using a Swarm-Enhanced Sampling Molecular Dynamics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Burusco, Kepa K; Bruce, Neil J; Alibay, Irfan; Bryce, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Free energy simulations are an established computational tool in modelling chemical change in the condensed phase. However, sampling of kinetically distinct substates remains a challenge to these approaches. As a route to addressing this, we link the methods of thermodynamic integration (TI) and swarm-enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (sesMD), where simulation replicas interact cooperatively to aid transitions over energy barriers. We illustrate the approach by using alchemical alkane transformations in solution, comparing them with the multiple independent trajectory TI (IT-TI) method. Free energy changes for transitions computed by using IT-TI grew increasingly inaccurate as the intramolecular barrier was heightened. By contrast, swarm-enhanced sampling TI (sesTI) calculations showed clear improvements in sampling efficiency, leading to more accurate computed free energy differences, even in the case of the highest barrier height. The sesTI approach, therefore, has potential in addressing chemical change in systems where conformations exist in slow exchange. PMID:26418190

  17. Ranking protein-protein docking results using steered molecular dynamics and potential of mean force calculations.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, Laura J; Esquivel-Rodríguez, Juan; Yang, Ying; Kihara, Daisuke; Lill, Markus A

    2016-07-01

    Crystallization of protein-protein complexes can often be problematic and therefore computational structural models are often relied on. Such models are often generated using protein-protein docking algorithms, where one of the main challenges is selecting which of several thousand potential predictions represents the most near-native complex. We have developed a novel technique that involves the use of steered molecular dynamics (sMD) and umbrella sampling to identify near-native complexes among protein-protein docking predictions. Using this technique, we have found a strong correlation between our predictions and the interface RMSD (iRMSD) in ten diverse test systems. On two of the systems, we investigated if the prediction results could be further improved using potential of mean force calculations. We demonstrated that a near-native (<2.0 Å iRMSD) structure could be identified in the top-1 ranked position for both systems. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27232548

  18. Quantitative calculation of reaction performance in sonochemical reactor by bubble dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zheng; Yasuda, Keiji; Liu, Xiao-Jun

    2015-10-01

    In order to design a sonochemical reactor with high reaction efficiency, it is important to clarify the size and intensity of the sonochemical reaction field. In this study, the reaction field in a sonochemical reactor is estimated from the distribution of pressure above the threshold for cavitation. The quantitation of hydroxide radical in a sonochemical reactor is obtained from the calculation of bubble dynamics and reaction equations. The distribution of the reaction field of the numerical simulation is consistent with that of the sonochemical luminescence. The sound absorption coefficient of liquid in the sonochemical reactor is much larger than that attributed to classical contributions which are heat conduction and shear viscosity. Under the dual irradiation, the reaction field becomes extensive and intensive because the acoustic pressure amplitude is intensified by the interference of two ultrasonic waves. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11404245, 11204129, and 11211140039).

  19. Calculations of NMR chemical shifts with APW-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskowski, Robert; Blaha, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present a full potential, all electron augmented plane wave (APW) implementation of first-principles calculations of NMR chemical shifts. In order to obtain the induced current we follow a perturbation approach [Pickard and Mauri, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.63.245101 63, 245101 (2001)] and extended the common APW + local orbital (LO) basis by several LOs at higher energies. The calculated all-electron current is represented in traditional APW manner as Fourier series in the interstitial region and with a spherical harmonics representation inside the nonoverlapping atomic spheres. The current is integrated using a “pseudocharge” technique. The implementation is validated by comparison of the computed chemical shifts with some “exact” results for spherical atoms and for a set of solids and molecules with available published data.

  20. Using a laser vibrometer for monitoring dynamic strain, modal analysis, and calculating damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camden, Michael P.; Simmons, Larry W.

    1998-07-01

    With the renewed interest in hypervelocity vehicles, component testing in extreme thermoacoustic and thermovibration environments is now required. This requires new test facilities and new instrumentation techniques be developed to test and evaluate these new structures, components and sub- components. To collect data in these extreme environments new instrumentation is needed. In a dynamic test environment use of strain gages is limited to low temperature testing. This paper describes how room temperature and high temperature (greater than 2000 degrees F) strain data is collected, using a laser vibrometer, on cantilevered coupons. This paper also describes the use of a laser vibrometer to obtain mode shapes and damping information. With new structural components, many manufactured from new composite materials such as ceramic matrix composites (CMC), there is a need to acquire accurate mode shapes and damping information. Traditionally modal analysis is done using accelerometers to map out the responses of a structure. This is time consuming, expensive and on small structures the weight of the accelerometers could affect the results. Through the use of a laser vibrometer accurate mode shapes can be obtained quickly. This information can be used to validate finite element models and to determine instrumentation locations on test components. With complex structures it is essential to determine the correct locations to install instrumentation when performing high level dynamic testing, the vibrometer is ideally suited for this. While the mode shapes are being mapped using a vibrometer it is an easy and logical step to calculate the damping of the structural component. Damping is calculated using the half-power bandwidth method that provides accurate results when using a vibrometer.

  1. Keystroke Dynamics-Based Credential Hardening Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlow, Nick; Cukic, Bojan

    abstract Keystroke dynamics are becoming a well-known method for strengthening username- and password-based credential sets. The familiarity and ease of use of these traditional authentication schemes combined with the increased trustworthiness associated with biometrics makes them prime candidates for application in many web-based scenarios. Our keystroke dynamics system uses Breiman’s random forests algorithm to classify keystroke input sequences as genuine or imposter. The system is capable of operating at various points on a traditional ROC curve depending on application-specific security needs. As a username/password authentication scheme, our approach decreases the system penetration rate associated with compromised passwords up to 99.15%. Beyond presenting results demonstrating the credential hardening effect of our scheme, we look into the notion that a user’s familiarity to components of a credential set can non-trivially impact error rates.

  2. Toward extending photosynthetic biosignatures: quantum dynamics calculation of light harvesting complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Yu; Umemura, Masayuki; Shoji, Mitsuo; Kayanuma, Megumi; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Kenji

    For detecting life from reflectance spectra on extrasolar planets, several indicators called surface biosignatures have been proposed. One of them is the vegetation red edge (VRE) which derives from surface vegetation. VRE is observed in 700-750 nm on the Earth, but there is no guarantee that exovegetation show the red edge in this wavelength. Therefore it is necessary to check the validity of current standards of VRE as the signatures. In facts, M stars (cooler than Sun) will be the main targets in future missions, it is significantly important to know on the fundamental mechanisms in photosynthetic organism such as purple bacteria which absorb longer wavelength radiation. We investigated light absorptions and excitation energy transfers (EETs) in light harvesting complexes in purple bacteria (LH2s) by using quantum dynamics simulations. In LH2, effective EET is accomplished by corporative electronic excitation of the pigments. In our theoretical model, a dipole-dipole approximation was used for the electronic interactions between pigment excitations. Quantum dynamics simulations were performed according to Liouville equation to examine the EET process. The calculated oscillator strength and the transfer time between LH2 were good agreement with the experimental values. As the system size increases, the absorption bands shifted longer and the transfer velocities became larger. When two pigments in a LHC were exchanged to another pigments with lower excitation energy, faster and intensive light collection were observed.

  3. Calculating Rotating Hydrodynamic and Magnetohydrodynamic Waves to Understand Magnetic Effects on Dynamical Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xing

    2016-09-01

    To understand magnetic effects on dynamical tides, we study the rotating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow driven by harmonic forcing. The linear responses are analytically derived in a periodic box under the local WKB approximation. Both the kinetic and Ohmic dissipations at the resonant frequencies are calculated, and the various parameters are investigated. Although magnetic pressure may be negligible compared to thermal pressure, the magnetic field can be important for the first-order perturbation, e.g., dynamical tides. It is found that the magnetic field splits the resonant frequency, namely the rotating hydrodynamic flow has only one resonant frequency, but the rotating MHD flow has two, one positive and the other negative. In the weak field regime the dissipations are asymmetric around the two resonant frequencies and this asymmetry is more striking with a weaker magnetic field. It is also found that both the kinetic and Ohmic dissipations at the resonant frequencies are inversely proportional to the Ekman number and the square of the wavenumber. The dissipation at the resonant frequency on small scales is almost equal to the dissipation at the non-resonant frequencies, namely the resonance takes its effect on the dissipation at intermediate length scales. Moreover, the waves with phase propagation that is perpendicular to the magnetic field are much more damped. It is also interesting to find that the frequency-averaged dissipation is constant. This result suggests that in compact objects, magnetic effects on tidal dissipation should be considered.

  4. Polymorphic Ab protofilaments exhibit distinct conformational dynamics as calculated by normal mode analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Matthew; Soto, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    This project proposes to test the hypothesis that the physicochemical milieu modulates the conformational dynamics of synthetic Alzheimer's Ab protofilament structures, the main component of Alzheimer's senile plaques. To this end, 3D solid-state NMR structures of Ab protofilaments were used as initial structures for molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water and a water/hexane environment. The initial structures of the simulations and representative structures from the simulation-generated trajectories were taken to perform computational normal mode analysis. We developed a code in python with a graphical user-friendly interface. The program incorporated the ProDy (0.7.1) package. With the application, we examined cross-correlation plots of Ca positions of the 2-fold Ab protofilaments along the most collective mode and the slowest mode. The protofilament structures were highly correlated in the water environment. We hypothesized the protofilament would move as one in water because of the viscosity. The square fluctuation of Ca positions was calculated for the slowest mode for the hexane model and the MD generated ensemble. The two plots match up until midway through the structure. At the midway point a phase shift emerged between the two structures most likely where the surrounding changes. The in-house developed code made it easy to perform analysis and will be used by other students in the research group.

  5. Photodissociation dynamics of ethanethiol in clusters: complementary information from velocity map imaging, mass spectrometry and calculations.

    PubMed

    Svrčková, Pavla; Pysanenko, Andriy; Lengyel, Jozef; Rubovič, Peter; Kočišek, Jaroslav; Poterya, Viktoriya; Slavíček, Petr; Fárník, Michal

    2015-10-21

    We investigate the solvent effects on photodissociation dynamics of the S-H bond in ethanethiol CH3CH2SH (EtSH). The H fragment images are recorded by velocity map imaging (VMI) at 243 nm in various expansion regimes ranging from isolated molecules to clusters of different sizes and compositions. The VMI experiment is accompanied by electron ionization mass spectrometry using a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOFMS). The experimental data are interpreted using ab initio calculations. The direct S-H bond fission results in a peak of fast fragments at Ekin(H) ≈ 1.25 eV with a partly resolved structure corresponding to vibrational levels of the CH3CH2S cofragment. Clusters of different nature ranging from dimers to large (EtSH)N, N ≥ 10, clusters and to ethanethiol clusters embedded in larger argon "snowballs" are investigated. In the clusters a sharp peak of near-zero kinetic energy fragments occurs due to the caging. The dynamics of the fragment caging is pictured theoretically, using multi-reference ab initio theory for the ethanethiol dimer. The larger cluster character is revealed by the simultaneous analysis of the VMI and RTOFMS experiments; none of these tools alone can provide the complete picture. PMID:25743944

  6. Acceleration of Semiempirical Quantum Mechanical Calculations by Extended Lagrangian Molecular Dynamics Approach.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kwangho

    2013-08-13

    The implementation and performance of the atom-centered density matrix propagation (ADMP) [J. Chem. Phys. 2001, 114, 9758] and the curvy-steps (CURV) methods [J. Chem. Phys. 2004, 121, 1152] are described. These methods solve the electronic Schrödinger equation approximately by propagating the electronic degrees of freedom using the extended Lagrangian molecular dynamics (ELMD) simulation approach. The ADMP and CURV methods are implemented and parallelized to accelerate semiempirical quantum mechanical (QM) methods (such as the MNDO, AM1, PM3, MNDO/d, and AM1/d methods). Test calculations show that both the ADMP and the CURV methods are 2∼4 times faster than the Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) method and conserve the total energy well. The accuracy of the ADMP and CURV simulations is comparable to the BOMD simulations. The parallel implementation accelerates the MD simulation by up to 28 fold for the ADMP method and 25 fold for the CURV method, respectively, relative to the speed of the single core BOMD. In addition, a multiple time scale (MTS) approach is introduced to further speed up the semiempirical QM and QM/MM ELMD simulations. Since a larger integration time step is used for the propagation of the nuclear coordinates than that for the electronic degrees of freedom, the MTS approach allows the ELMD simulation to be carried out with a time step that is larger than the time step accessible by the original ADMP and CURV methods. It renders MD simulation to be carried out about 20 times faster than the BOMD simulation, and yields results that are comparable to the single time scale simulation results. The use of the methods introduced in the present work provides an efficient way to extend the length of the QM and QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations beyond the length accessible by BOMD simulation. PMID:26584095

  7. Rovibrational bound states of neon trimer: quantum dynamical calculation of all eigenstate energy levels and wavefunctions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Benhui; Chen, Wenwu; Poirier, Bill

    2011-09-01

    Exact quantum dynamics calculations of the eigenstate energy levels and wavefunctions for all bound rovibrational states of the Ne(3) trimer (J = 0-18) have been performed using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. These codes employ a combination of highly efficient methods, including phase-space optimized discrete variable representation, optimal separable basis, and preconditioned inexact spectral transform methods, together with an effective massive parallelization scheme. The Ne(3) energy levels and wavefunctions were computed using a pair-wise Lennard-Jones potential. Jacobi coordinates were used for the calculations, but to identify just those states belonging to the totally symmetric irreducible representation of the G(12) complete nuclear permutation-inversion group, wavefunctions were plotted in hyperspherical coordinates. "Horseshoe" states were observed above the isomerization barrier, but the horseshoe localization effect is weaker than in Ar(3). The rigid rotor model is found to be applicable for only the ground and first excited vibrational states at low J; fitted rotational constant values are presented. PMID:21913762

  8. Adaptive Multilevel Splitting Method for Molecular Dynamics Calculation of Benzamidine-Trypsin Dissociation Time.

    PubMed

    Teo, Ivan; Mayne, Christopher G; Schulten, Klaus; Lelièvre, Tony

    2016-06-14

    Adaptive multilevel splitting (AMS) is a rare event sampling method that requires minimal parameter tuning and allows unbiased sampling of transition pathways of a given rare event. Previous simulation studies have verified the efficiency and accuracy of AMS in the calculation of transition times for simple systems in both Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Now, AMS is applied for the first time to an MD simulation of protein-ligand dissociation, representing a leap in complexity from the previous test cases. Of interest is the dissociation rate, which is typically too low to be accessible to conventional MD. The present study joins other recent efforts to develop advanced sampling techniques in MD to calculate dissociation rates, which are gaining importance in the pharmaceutical field as indicators of drug efficacy. The system investigated here, benzamidine bound to trypsin, is an example common to many of these efforts. The AMS estimate of the dissociation rate was found to be (2.6 ± 2.4) × 10(2) s(-1), which compares well with the experimental value. PMID:27159059

  9. Accurate quantum dynamics calculations using symmetrized Gaussians on a doubly dense Von Neumann lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, Thomas; Poirier, Bill

    2012-12-14

    In a series of earlier articles [B. Poirier, J. Theor. Comput. Chem. 2, 65 (2003); B. Poirier and A. Salam, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1690 (2004); and ibid. 121, 1704 (2004)], a new method was introduced for performing exact quantum dynamics calculations. The method uses a 'weylet' basis set (orthogonalized Weyl-Heisenberg wavelets) combined with phase space truncation, to defeat the exponential scaling of CPU effort with system dimensionality-the first method ever able to achieve this long-standing goal. Here, we develop another such method, which uses a much more convenient basis of momentum-symmetrized Gaussians. Despite being non-orthogonal, symmetrized Gaussians are collectively local, allowing for effective phase space truncation. A dimension-independent code for computing energy eigenstates of both coupled and uncoupled systems has been created, exploiting massively parallel algorithms. Results are presented for model isotropic uncoupled harmonic oscillators and coupled anharmonic oscillators up to 27 dimensions. These are compared with the previous weylet calculations (uncoupled harmonic oscillators up to 15 dimensions), and found to be essentially just as efficient. Coupled system results are also compared to corresponding exact results obtained using a harmonic oscillator basis, and also to approximate results obtained using first-order perturbation theory up to the maximum dimensionality for which the latter may be feasibly obtained (four dimensions).

  10. Comparison of molecular dynamics methods and interatomic potentials for calculating the thermal conductivity of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, P. C.

    2012-12-01

    We compare the molecular dynamics Green-Kubo and direct methods for calculating thermal conductivity κ, using as a test case crystalline silicon at temperatures T in the range 500-1000 K (classical regime). We pay careful attention to the convergence with respect to simulation size and duration and to the procedures used to fit the simulation data. We show that in the Green-Kubo method the heat current autocorrelation function is characterized by three decay processes, of which the slowest lasts several tens of picoseconds so that convergence requires several tens of nanoseconds of data. Using the Stillinger-Weber potential we find excellent agreement between the two methods. We also use the direct method to calculate κ(T) for the Tersoff potential and find that the magnitude and the temperature-dependence are different for the two potentials and that neither potential agrees with experimental data. We argue that this implies that using the Stillinger-Weber or Tersoff potentials to predict trends in kappa as some system parameter is varied may yield results which are specific to the potential but not intrinsic to Si.

  11. Comparison of molecular dynamics methods and interatomic potentials for calculating the thermal conductivity of silicon.

    PubMed

    Howell, P C

    2012-12-14

    We compare the molecular dynamics Green-Kubo and direct methods for calculating thermal conductivity κ, using as a test case crystalline silicon at temperatures T in the range 500-1000 K (classical regime). We pay careful attention to the convergence with respect to simulation size and duration and to the procedures used to fit the simulation data. We show that in the Green-Kubo method the heat current autocorrelation function is characterized by three decay processes, of which the slowest lasts several tens of picoseconds so that convergence requires several tens of nanoseconds of data. Using the Stillinger-Weber potential we find excellent agreement between the two methods. We also use the direct method to calculate κ(T) for the Tersoff potential and find that the magnitude and the temperature-dependence are different for the two potentials and that neither potential agrees with experimental data. We argue that this implies that using the Stillinger-Weber or Tersoff potentials to predict trends in kappa as some system parameter is varied may yield results which are specific to the potential but not intrinsic to Si. PMID:23248991

  12. Molecular Dynamics Calculation of Carbon/Hydrocarbon Reflection Coefficients on a Graphite Surface Employing Distributed Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alman, D. A.; Ruzic, D. N.; Brooks, J. N.

    2001-10-01

    Reflection coefficients of carbon and hydrocarbon molecules have been calculated with a molecular dynamics code. The code uses the Brenner hydrocarbon potential, an empirical many-body potential that can model the chemical bonding in small hydrocarbon molecules and graphite surfaces. A variety of incident energies and angles have been studied. Typical results for carbon show reflection coefficients 0.4 at thermal energy, decreasing to a minimum of 0.15 at 10-20 eV, and then increasing again. Distributed computing is used to distribute the work among 10-20 desktop PCs in the laboratory. The system consists of a client application run on all of the PCs and a single server machine that distributes work and compiles the results sent back from the clients. The client-server software is written in Java and requires no commercial software packages. Thus, the MD code benefits from multiprocessor-like speed-up at no additional cost by using the idle CPU cycles that would otherwise be wasted. These calculations represent an important improvement to the WBC code, which has been used to model surface erosion, core plasma contamination, and tritium codeposition in many fusion design studies and experiments.

  13. Accurate quantum dynamics calculations using symmetrized Gaussians on a doubly dense Von Neumann lattice.

    PubMed

    Halverson, Thomas; Poirier, Bill

    2012-12-14

    In a series of earlier articles [B. Poirier, J. Theor. Comput. Chem. 2, 65 (2003); B. Poirier and A. Salam, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1690 (2004); and ibid. 121, 1704 (2004)], a new method was introduced for performing exact quantum dynamics calculations. The method uses a "weylet" basis set (orthogonalized Weyl-Heisenberg wavelets) combined with phase space truncation, to defeat the exponential scaling of CPU effort with system dimensionality--the first method ever able to achieve this long-standing goal. Here, we develop another such method, which uses a much more convenient basis of momentum-symmetrized Gaussians. Despite being non-orthogonal, symmetrized Gaussians are collectively local, allowing for effective phase space truncation. A dimension-independent code for computing energy eigenstates of both coupled and uncoupled systems has been created, exploiting massively parallel algorithms. Results are presented for model isotropic uncoupled harmonic oscillators and coupled anharmonic oscillators up to 27 dimensions. These are compared with the previous weylet calculations (uncoupled harmonic oscillators up to 15 dimensions), and found to be essentially just as efficient. Coupled system results are also compared to corresponding exact results obtained using a harmonic oscillator basis, and also to approximate results obtained using first-order perturbation theory up to the maximum dimensionality for which the latter may be feasibly obtained (four dimensions). PMID:23248981

  14. Accurate quantum dynamics calculations using symmetrized Gaussians on a doubly dense Von Neumann lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Thomas; Poirier, Bill

    2012-12-01

    In a series of earlier articles [B. Poirier, J. Theor. Comput. Chem. 2, 65 (2003);, 10.1142/S0219633603000380 B. Poirier and A. Salam, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1690 (2004);, 10.1063/1.1767511 B. Poirier and A. Salam, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 1704 (2004), 10.1063/1.1767512], a new method was introduced for performing exact quantum dynamics calculations. The method uses a "weylet" basis set (orthogonalized Weyl-Heisenberg wavelets) combined with phase space truncation, to defeat the exponential scaling of CPU effort with system dimensionality—the first method ever able to achieve this long-standing goal. Here, we develop another such method, which uses a much more convenient basis of momentum-symmetrized Gaussians. Despite being non-orthogonal, symmetrized Gaussians are collectively local, allowing for effective phase space truncation. A dimension-independent code for computing energy eigenstates of both coupled and uncoupled systems has been created, exploiting massively parallel algorithms. Results are presented for model isotropic uncoupled harmonic oscillators and coupled anharmonic oscillators up to 27 dimensions. These are compared with the previous weylet calculations (uncoupled harmonic oscillators up to 15 dimensions), and found to be essentially just as efficient. Coupled system results are also compared to corresponding exact results obtained using a harmonic oscillator basis, and also to approximate results obtained using first-order perturbation theory up to the maximum dimensionality for which the latter may be feasibly obtained (four dimensions).

  15. Mathematical simulation and calculation of the soil compaction under dynamic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotarevskaya, D. I.

    2011-04-01

    The deformation and compaction of loamy sandy soddy-podzolic soils under linear dynamic changes in the compressive stresses and in the course of the soil creeping were studied in field experiments. The rheological properties of these soils occurring in the viscoelastic state were described by a first-order differential equation relating the compressive stresses, the rates of their changes, and the velocities of the relative vertical compressive deformation. Regression equations were derived for the viscoelastic properties of the studied soil as functions of its density, moisture, and linear compaction velocity. Methods were proposed for the calculation of indices of the stress-strain state and the compaction of soils under specified conditions of changes in their compressive stresses with time and in the course of the soil creeping after the initial linear increase in load. Corresponding computer programs were developed. The effect of the main factors due to the linear increase in the compressive loads and in the course of the soil creeping on the rheological properties, the stress-strain state, and the density of soils was quantitatively estimated. The calculation showed that the values of the soil deformation and the density under compressive stresses lower than the ultimate strength were stabilized with time, and the properties of the viscoelastic soil approached elastic ones.

  16. DYGABCD: A program for calculating linear A, B, C, and D matrices from a nonlinear dynamic engine simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geyser, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    A digital computer program, DYGABCD, was developed that generates linearized, dynamic models of simulated turbofan and turbojet engines. DYGABCD is based on an earlier computer program, DYNGEN, that is capable of calculating simulated nonlinear steady-state and transient performance of one- and two-spool turbojet engines or two- and three-spool turbofan engines. Most control design techniques require linear system descriptions. For multiple-input/multiple-output systems such as turbine engines, state space matrix descriptions of the system are often desirable. DYGABCD computes the state space matrices commonly referred to as the A, B, C, and D matrices required for a linear system description. The report discusses the analytical approach and provides a users manual, FORTRAN listings, and a sample case.

  17. Self-consistency based control scheme for magnetization dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Albuquerque, G.; Miltat, J.; Thiaville, A.

    2001-06-01

    A numerical framework is presented for the solution of the Landau{endash}Lifshitz{endash}Gilbert equation of magnetization motion using a semi-implicit Crank{endash}Nicholson integration scheme. Along with the details of both space and time domain discretizations, we report on the development of a physically based self-consistency criterion that allows for a quantitative measurement of error in dynamic micromagnetic simulations. In essence, this criterion relies in recalculating from actual magnetization motion the imposed phenomenological damping constant. Test calculations were performed with special attention paid to the determination of suitable integration time steps. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-05-14

    The directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In our paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We also demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also result in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMAS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel (R) Xeon Phi (TM) coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs: The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-05-14

    The directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In our paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We also demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also resultmore » in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMAS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel (R) Xeon Phi (TM) coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs: The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.« less

  20. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-10-01

    Directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In this paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also result in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMPS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel®  Xeon Phi™ coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs. The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS.

  1. Space resection model calculation based on Random Sample Consensus algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinzhu; Kang, Zhizhong

    2016-03-01

    Resection has been one of the most important content in photogrammetry. It aims at the position and attitude information of camera at the shooting point. However in some cases, the observed values for calculating are with gross errors. This paper presents a robust algorithm that using RANSAC method with DLT model can effectually avoiding the difficulties to determine initial values when using co-linear equation. The results also show that our strategies can exclude crude handicap and lead to an accurate and efficient way to gain elements of exterior orientation.

  2. A probability-based formula for calculating interobserver agreement1

    PubMed Central

    Yelton, Ann R.; Wildman, Beth G.; Erickson, Marilyn T.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of observer agreement are necessary to assess the acceptability of interval data. A common method for assessing observer agreement, per cent agreement, includes several major weaknesses and varies as a function of the frequency of behavior recorded and the inclusion or exclusion of agreements on nonoccurrences. Also, agreements that might be expected to occur by chance are not taken into account. An alternative method for assessing observer agreement that determines the exact probability that the obtained number of agreements or better would have occurred by chance is presented and explained. Agreements on both occurrences and nonoccurrences of behavior are considered in the calculation of this probability. PMID:16795541

  3. Prediction of topological insulators in supercubane-like materials based on first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Xiang; Dong, Shuai; Hou, Jing-Min

    2016-03-31

    The lattice structures and topological properties of [Formula: see text] (X  =  C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) under hydrostatic strain have been investigated based on first-principle calculations. Among the materials, [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] are dynamically stable with negative formation energy and no imaginary phonon frequency. We find that the hydrostatic strain cannot induce a quantum phase transition between topological trivial and nontrivial state for both [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], while for [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] the tensile strain can play a unique role in tuning the band topology, which will lead to a topological nontrivial state with Z 2 invariants (1;111). Although the topological transition occurs above the Fermi level, the Fermi level can be tuned by applying electrostatic gating voltage. PMID:26932939

  4. Freeway Travel Speed Calculation Model Based on ETC Transaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Jiancheng; Yuan, Rongliang; Wang, Ru; Wang, Chang

    2014-01-01

    Real-time traffic flow operation condition of freeway gradually becomes the critical information for the freeway users and managers. In fact, electronic toll collection (ETC) transaction data effectively records operational information of vehicles on freeway, which provides a new method to estimate the travel speed of freeway. First, the paper analyzed the structure of ETC transaction data and presented the data preprocess procedure. Then, a dual-level travel speed calculation model was established under different levels of sample sizes. In order to ensure a sufficient sample size, ETC data of different enter-leave toll plazas pairs which contain more than one road segment were used to calculate the travel speed of every road segment. The reduction coefficient α and reliable weight θ for sample vehicle speed were introduced in the model. Finally, the model was verified by the special designed field experiments which were conducted on several freeways in Beijing at different time periods. The experiments results demonstrated that the average relative error was about 6.5% which means that the freeway travel speed could be estimated by the proposed model accurately. The proposed model is helpful to promote the level of the freeway operation monitoring and the freeway management, as well as to provide useful information for the freeway travelers. PMID:25580107

  5. Freeway travel speed calculation model based on ETC transaction data.

    PubMed

    Weng, Jiancheng; Yuan, Rongliang; Wang, Ru; Wang, Chang

    2014-01-01

    Real-time traffic flow operation condition of freeway gradually becomes the critical information for the freeway users and managers. In fact, electronic toll collection (ETC) transaction data effectively records operational information of vehicles on freeway, which provides a new method to estimate the travel speed of freeway. First, the paper analyzed the structure of ETC transaction data and presented the data preprocess procedure. Then, a dual-level travel speed calculation model was established under different levels of sample sizes. In order to ensure a sufficient sample size, ETC data of different enter-leave toll plazas pairs which contain more than one road segment were used to calculate the travel speed of every road segment. The reduction coefficient α and reliable weight θ for sample vehicle speed were introduced in the model. Finally, the model was verified by the special designed field experiments which were conducted on several freeways in Beijing at different time periods. The experiments results demonstrated that the average relative error was about 6.5% which means that the freeway travel speed could be estimated by the proposed model accurately. The proposed model is helpful to promote the level of the freeway operation monitoring and the freeway management, as well as to provide useful information for the freeway travelers. PMID:25580107

  6. Calculating Nozzle Side Loads using Acceleration Measurements of Test-Based Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Ruf, Joe

    2007-01-01

    As part of a NASA/MSFC research program to evaluate the effect of different nozzle contours on the well-known but poorly characterized "side load" phenomena, we attempt to back out the net force on a sub-scale nozzle during cold-flow testing using acceleration measurements. Because modeling the test facility dynamics is problematic, new techniques for creating a "pseudo-model" of the facility and nozzle directly from modal test results are applied. Extensive verification procedures were undertaken, resulting in a loading scale factor necessary for agreement between test and model based frequency response functions. Side loads are then obtained by applying a wide-band random load onto the system model, obtaining nozzle response PSD's, and iterating both the amplitude and frequency of the input until a good comparison of the response with the measured response PSD for a specific time point is obtained. The final calculated loading can be used to compare different nozzle profiles for assessment during rocket engine nozzle development and as a basis for accurate design of the nozzle and engine structure to withstand these loads. The techniques applied within this procedure have extensive applicability to timely and accurate characterization of all test fixtures used for modal test.A viewgraph presentation on a model-test based pseudo-model used to calculate side loads on rocket engine nozzles is included. The topics include: 1) Side Loads in Rocket Nozzles; 2) Present Side Loads Research at NASA/MSFC; 3) Structural Dynamic Model Generation; 4) Pseudo-Model Generation; 5) Implementation; 6) Calibration of Pseudo-Model Response; 7) Pseudo-Model Response Verification; 8) Inverse Force Determination; 9) Results; and 10) Recent Work.

  7. A Dynamic Attitude Measurement System Based on LINS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hanzhou; Pan, Quan; Wang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Juanni; Li, Jiang; Jiang, Xiangjun

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic attitude measurement system (DAMS) is developed based on a laser inertial navigation system (LINS). Three factors of the dynamic attitude measurement error using LINS are analyzed: dynamic error, time synchronization and phase lag. An optimal coning errors compensation algorithm is used to reduce coning errors, and two-axis wobbling verification experiments are presented in the paper. The tests indicate that the attitude accuracy is improved 2-fold by the algorithm. In order to decrease coning errors further, the attitude updating frequency is improved from 200 Hz to 2000 Hz. At the same time, a novel finite impulse response (FIR) filter with three notches is designed to filter the dither frequency of the ring laser gyro (RLG). The comparison tests suggest that the new filter is five times more effective than the old one. The paper indicates that phase-frequency characteristics of FIR filter and first-order holder of navigation computer constitute the main sources of phase lag in LINS. A formula to calculate the LINS attitude phase lag is introduced in the paper. The expressions of dynamic attitude errors induced by phase lag are derived. The paper proposes a novel synchronization mechanism that is able to simultaneously solve the problems of dynamic test synchronization and phase compensation. A single-axis turntable and a laser interferometer are applied to verify the synchronization mechanism. The experiments results show that the theoretically calculated values of phase lag and attitude error induced by phase lag can both match perfectly with testing data. The block diagram of DAMS and physical photos are presented in the paper. The final experiments demonstrate that the real-time attitude measurement accuracy of DAMS can reach up to 20″ (1σ) and the synchronization error is less than 0.2 ms on the condition of three axes wobbling for 10 min. PMID:25177802

  8. A dynamic attitude measurement system based on LINS.

    PubMed

    Li, Hanzhou; Pan, Quan; Wang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Juanni; Li, Jiang; Jiang, Xiangjun

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic attitude measurement system (DAMS) is developed based on a laser inertial navigation system (LINS). Three factors of the dynamic attitude measurement error using LINS are analyzed: dynamic error, time synchronization and phase lag. An optimal coning errors compensation algorithm is used to reduce coning errors, and two-axis wobbling verification experiments are presented in the paper. The tests indicate that the attitude accuracy is improved 2-fold by the algorithm. In order to decrease coning errors further, the attitude updating frequency is improved from 200 Hz to 2000 Hz. At the same time, a novel finite impulse response (FIR) filter with three notches is designed to filter the dither frequency of the ring laser gyro (RLG). The comparison tests suggest that the new filter is five times more effective than the old one. The paper indicates that phase-frequency characteristics of FIR filter and first-order holder of navigation computer constitute the main sources of phase lag in LINS. A formula to calculate the LINS attitude phase lag is introduced in the paper. The expressions of dynamic attitude errors induced by phase lag are derived. The paper proposes a novel synchronization mechanism that is able to simultaneously solve the problems of dynamic test synchronization and phase compensation. A single-axis turntable and a laser interferometer are applied to verify the synchronization mechanism. The experiments results show that the theoretically calculated values of phase lag and attitude error induced by phase lag can both match perfectly with testing data. The block diagram of DAMS and physical photos are presented in the paper. The final experiments demonstrate that the real-time attitude measurement accuracy of DAMS can reach up to 20″ (1σ) and the synchronization error is less than 0.2 ms on the condition of three axes wobbling for 10 min. PMID:25177802

  9. Develop and test a solvent accessible surface area-based model in conformational entropy calculations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2012-05-25

    It is of great interest in modern drug design to accurately calculate the free energies of protein-ligand or nucleic acid-ligand binding. MM-PBSA (molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area) and MM-GBSA (molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area) have gained popularity in this field. For both methods, the conformational entropy, which is usually calculated through normal-mode analysis (NMA), is needed to calculate the absolute binding free energies. Unfortunately, NMA is computationally demanding and becomes a bottleneck of the MM-PB/GBSA-NMA methods. In this work, we have developed a fast approach to estimate the conformational entropy based upon solvent accessible surface area calculations. In our approach, the conformational entropy of a molecule, S, can be obtained by summing up the contributions of all atoms, no matter they are buried or exposed. Each atom has two types of surface areas, solvent accessible surface area (SAS) and buried SAS (BSAS). The two types of surface areas are weighted to estimate the contribution of an atom to S. Atoms having the same atom type share the same weight and a general parameter k is applied to balance the contributions of the two types of surface areas. This entropy model was parametrized using a large set of small molecules for which their conformational entropies were calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G* level taking the solvent effect into account. The weighted solvent accessible surface area (WSAS) model was extensively evaluated in three tests. For convenience, TS values, the product of temperature T and conformational entropy S, were calculated in those tests. T was always set to 298.15 K through the text. First of all, good correlations were achieved between WSAS TS and NMA TS for 44 protein or nucleic acid systems sampled with molecular dynamics simulations (10 snapshots were collected for postentropy calculations): the mean correlation coefficient squares (R²) was 0.56. As to the 20 complexes, the TS

  10. Dynamic based damage detection in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sauvik; Ricci, Fabrizio; Baid, Harsh; Mal, Ajit K.

    2009-03-01

    Advanced composites are being used increasingly in state-of-the-art aircraft and aerospace structures. In spite of their many advantages, composite materials are highly susceptible to hidden flaws that may occur at any time during the life cycle of a structure, and if undetected, may cause sudden and catastrophic failure of the entire structure. This paper is concerned with the detection and characterization of hidden defects in composite structures before they grow to a critical size. A methodology for automatic damage identification and localization is developed using a combination of vibration and wave propagation data. The structure is assumed to be instrumented with an array of actuators and sensors to excite and record its dynamic response, including vibration and wave propagation effects. A damage index, calculated from the measured dynamical response of the structure in a previous (reference) state and the current state, is introduced as a determinant of structural damage. The indices are used to identify low velocity impact damages in increasingly complex composite structural components. The potential application of the approach in developing health monitoring systems in defects-critical structures is indicated.

  11. Integral-transport-based deterministic brachytherapy dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanyu; Inanc, Feyzi

    2003-01-01

    We developed a transport-equation-based deterministic algorithm for computing three-dimensional brachytherapy dose distributions. The deterministic algorithm has been based on the integral transport equation. The algorithm provided us with the capability of computing dose distributions for multiple isotropic point and/or volumetric sources in a homogenous/heterogeneous medium. The algorithm results have been benchmarked against the results from the literature and MCNP results for isotropic point sources and volumetric sources.

  12. The calculation of the dynamics of interaction between intense electron beams and dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Milyavskii, V.V.; Skvortsov, V.A.

    1995-09-01

    A mathematical model is constructed and a numerical investigation performed of the interaction between an intense relativistic electron beam and a solid high-molecular dielectric. The model is based on the equations of mechanics of continuum, electrodynamics, and kinetics, describing the accumulation and relaxation of space charge and shock-wave processes, as well as the evolution of electric field in the sample. A semiempirical procedure is proposed for the calculation of energy deposition by an electron beam in a target in the presence of a nonuniform electric field.

  13. Grid-based electronic structure calculations: The tensor decomposition approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhuba, M. V.; Oseledets, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    We present a fully grid-based approach for solving Hartree-Fock and all-electron Kohn-Sham equations based on low-rank approximation of three-dimensional electron orbitals. Due to the low-rank structure the total complexity of the algorithm depends linearly with respect to the one-dimensional grid size. Linear complexity allows for the usage of fine grids, e.g. 81923 and, thus, cheap extrapolation procedure. We test the proposed approach on closed-shell atoms up to the argon, several molecules and clusters of hydrogen atoms. All tests show systematical convergence with the required accuracy.

  14. Dynamical properties measurements for asteroid, comet and meteorite material applicable to impact modeling and mitigation calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, M.D.; Boslough, M.B.; Gray, G.T. III; Remo, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    We describe methods for measuring dynamical properties for two material categories of interest in understanding large-scale extraterrestrial impacts: iron-nickel and underdense materials (e.g. snow). Particular material properties measured by the present methods include Hugoniot release paths and constitutive properties (stress vs. strain). The iron-nickel materials lend themselves well to conventional shock and quasi-static experiments. As examples, a suite of experiments is described including six impact tests (wave profile compression/release) over the stress range 2--20 GPa, metallography, quasi-static and split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) mechanical testing, and ultrasonic mapping and sound velocity measurements. Temperature sensitivity of the dynamic behavior was measured at high and low strain rates. Among the iron-nickel materials tested, an octahedrite was found to have behavior close to that of Armco iron under shock and quasi-static conditions, while an ataxite exhibited a significantly larger quasi-static yield strength than did the octahedrite or a hexahedrite. The underdense materials pose three primary experimental difficulties. First, the samples are friable; they can melt or sublimate during storage, preparation and testing. Second, they are brittle and crushable; they cannot withstand such treatment as traditional machining or launch in a gun system. Third, with increasing porosity the calculated Hugoniot density becomes rapidly more sensitive to errors in wave time-of-arrival measurements. Carefully chosen simulants eliminate preservation (friability) difficulties, but the other difficulties remain. A family of 36 impact tests was conducted on snow and snow simulants at Sandia, yielding reliable Hugoniot and reshock states, but limited release property information. Other methods for characterizing these materials are discussed.

  15. Formation flying benefits based on vortex lattice calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskew, B.

    1977-01-01

    A quadrilateral vortex-lattice method was applied to a formation of three wings to calculate force and moment data for use in estimating potential benefits of flying aircraft in formation on extended range missions, and of anticipating the control problems which may exist. The investigation led to two types of formation having virtually the same overall benefits for the formation as a whole, i.e., a V or echelon formation and a double row formation (with two staggered rows of aircraft). These formations have unequal savings on aircraft within the formation, but this allows large longitudinal spacings between aircraft which is preferable to the small spacing required in formations having equal benefits for all aircraft. A reasonable trade-off between a practical formation size and range benefit seems to lie at about three to five aircraft with corresponding maximum potential range increases of about 46 percent to 67 percent. At this time it is not known what fraction of this potential range increase is achievable in practice.

  16. Coupled-cluster based basis sets for valence correlation calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudino, Daniel; Gargano, Ricardo; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2016-03-01

    Novel basis sets are generated that target the description of valence correlation in atoms H through Ar. The new contraction coefficients are obtained according to the Atomic Natural Orbital (ANO) procedure from CCSD(T) (coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples correction) density matrices starting from the primitive functions of Dunning et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 90, 1007 (1989); ibid. 98, 1358 (1993); ibid. 100, 2975 (1993)] (correlation consistent polarized valence X-tuple zeta, cc-pVXZ). The exponents of the primitive Gaussian functions are subject to uniform scaling in order to ensure satisfaction of the virial theorem for the corresponding atoms. These new sets, named ANO-VT-XZ (Atomic Natural Orbital Virial Theorem X-tuple Zeta), have the same number of contracted functions as their cc-pVXZ counterparts in each subshell. The performance of these basis sets is assessed by the evaluation of the contraction errors in four distinct computations: correlation energies in atoms, probing the density in different regions of space via (-3 ≤ n ≤ 3) in atoms, correlation energies in diatomic molecules, and the quality of fitting potential energy curves as measured by spectroscopic constants. All energy calculations with ANO-VT-QZ have contraction errors within "chemical accuracy" of 1 kcal/mol, which is not true for cc-pVQZ, suggesting some improvement compared to the correlation consistent series of Dunning and co-workers.

  17. Coupled-cluster based basis sets for valence correlation calculations.

    PubMed

    Claudino, Daniel; Gargano, Ricardo; Bartlett, Rodney J

    2016-03-14

    Novel basis sets are generated that target the description of valence correlation in atoms H through Ar. The new contraction coefficients are obtained according to the Atomic Natural Orbital (ANO) procedure from CCSD(T) (coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples correction) density matrices starting from the primitive functions of Dunning et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 90, 1007 (1989); ibid. 98, 1358 (1993); ibid. 100, 2975 (1993)] (correlation consistent polarized valence X-tuple zeta, cc-pVXZ). The exponents of the primitive Gaussian functions are subject to uniform scaling in order to ensure satisfaction of the virial theorem for the corresponding atoms. These new sets, named ANO-VT-XZ (Atomic Natural Orbital Virial Theorem X-tuple Zeta), have the same number of contracted functions as their cc-pVXZ counterparts in each subshell. The performance of these basis sets is assessed by the evaluation of the contraction errors in four distinct computations: correlation energies in atoms, probing the density in different regions of space via ⟨r(n)⟩ (-3 ≤ n ≤ 3) in atoms, correlation energies in diatomic molecules, and the quality of fitting potential energy curves as measured by spectroscopic constants. All energy calculations with ANO-VT-QZ have contraction errors within "chemical accuracy" of 1 kcal/mol, which is not true for cc-pVQZ, suggesting some improvement compared to the correlation consistent series of Dunning and co-workers. PMID:26979680

  18. Ray-Based Calculations of Backscatter in Laser Fusion Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, D J; Williams, E A; Hinkel, D E; Froula, D H; London, R A; Callahan, D A

    2008-02-26

    A steady-state model for Brillouin and Raman backscatter along a laser ray path is presented. The daughter plasma waves are treated in the strong damping limit, and have amplitudes given by the (linear) kinetic response to the ponderomotive drive. Pump depletion, inverse-bremsstrahlung damping, bremsstrahlung emission, Thomson scattering off density fluctuations, and whole-beam focusing are included. The numerical code deplete, which implements this model, is described. The model is compared with traditional linear gain calculations, as well as 'plane-wave' simulations with the paraxial propagation code pf3d. Comparisons with Brillouin-scattering experiments at the OMEGA Laser Facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, p. 495 (1997)] show that laser speckles greatly enhance the reflectivity over the deplete results. An approximate upper bound on this enhancement, motivated by phase conjugation, is given by doubling the deplete coupling coefficient. Analysis with deplete of an ignition design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. A. Paisner, E. M. Campbell, and W. J. Hogan, Fusion Technol. 26, p. 755 (1994)], with a peak radiation temperature of 285 eV, shows encouragingly low reflectivity. Doubling the coupling to bound the speckle enhancement suggests a less optimistic picture. Re-absorption of Raman light is seen to be significant in this design.

  19. Calculation of protein heat capacity from replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations with different implicit solvent models.

    PubMed

    Yeh, In-Chul; Lee, Michael S; Olson, Mark A

    2008-11-27

    The heat capacity has played a major role in relating microscopic and macroscopic properties of proteins and their disorder-order phase transition of folding. Its calculation by atomistic simulation methods remains a significant challenge due to the complex and dynamic nature of protein structures, their solvent environment, and configurational averaging. To better understand these factors on calculating a protein heat capacity, we provide a comparative analysis of simulation models that differ in their implicit solvent description and force-field resolution. Our model protein system is the src Homology 3 (SH3) domain of alpha-spectrin, and we report a series of 10 ns replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations performed at temperatures ranging from 298 to 550 K, starting from the SH3 native structure. We apply the all-atom CHARMM22 force field with different modified analytical generalized Born solvent models (GBSW and GBMV2) and compare these simulation models with the distance-dependent dielectric screening of charge-charge interactions. A further comparison is provided with the united-atom CHARMM19 plus a pairwise GB model. Unfolding-folding transition temperatures of SH3 were estimated from the temperature-dependent profiles of the heat capacity, root-mean-square distance from the native structure, and the fraction of native contacts, each calculated from the density of states by using the weighted histogram analysis method. We observed that, for CHARMM22, the unfolding transition and energy probability density were quite sensitive to the implicit solvent description, in particular, the treatment of the protein-solvent dielectric boundary in GB models and their surface-area-based hydrophobic term. Among the solvent models tested, the calculated melting temperature varied in the range 353-438 K and was higher than the experimental value near 340 K. A reformulated GBMV2 model of employing a smoother molecular-volume dielectric interface was the most accurate

  20. Computational model for calculating the dynamical behaviour of generators caused by unbalanced magnetic pull and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennacchi, Paolo

    2008-04-01

    The modelling of the unbalanced magnetic pull (UMP) in generators and the experimental validation of the proposed method are presented in this paper. The UMP is one of the most remarkable effects of electromechanical interactions in rotating machinery. As a consequence of the rotor eccentricity, the imbalance of the electromagnetic forces acting between rotor and stator generates a net radial force. This phenomenon can be avoided by means of a careful assembly and manufacture in small and stiff machines, like electrical motors. On the contrary, the eccentricity of the active part of the rotor with respect to the stator is unavoidable in big generators of power plants, because they operate above their first critical speed and are supported by oil-film bearings. In the first part of the paper, a method aimed to calculate the UMP force is described. This model is more general than those available in literature, which are limited to circular orbits. The model is based on the actual position of the rotor inside the stator, therefore on the actual air-gap distribution, regardless of the orbit type. The closed form of the nonlinear UMP force components is presented. In the second part, the experimental validation of the proposed model is presented. The dynamical behaviour in the time domain of a steam turbo-generator of a power plant is considered and it is shown that the model is able to reproduce the dynamical effects due to the excitation of the magnetic field in the generator.

  1. Dynamics-based centrality for directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Naoki; Kori, Hiroshi

    2010-11-01

    Determining the relative importance of nodes in directed networks is important in, for example, ranking websites, publications, and sports teams, and for understanding signal flows in systems biology. A prevailing centrality measure in this respect is the PageRank. In this work, we focus on another class of centrality derived from the Laplacian of the network. We extend the Laplacian-based centrality, which has mainly been applied to strongly connected networks, to the case of general directed networks such that we can quantitatively compare arbitrary nodes. Toward this end, we adopt the idea used in the PageRank to introduce global connectivity between all the pairs of nodes with a certain strength. Numerical simulations are carried out on some networks. We also offer interpretations of the Laplacian-based centrality for general directed networks in terms of various dynamical and structural properties of networks. Importantly, the Laplacian-based centrality defined as the stationary density of the continuous-time random walk with random jumps is shown to be equivalent to the absorption probability of the random walk with sinks at each node but without random jumps. Similarly, the proposed centrality represents the importance of nodes in dynamics on the original network supplied with sinks but not with random jumps.

  2. On one-dimensional stretching functions for finite-difference calculations. [computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinokur, M.

    1979-01-01

    The class of one-dimensional stretching functions used in finite-difference calculations is studied. For solutions containing a highly localized region of rapid variation, simple criteria for a stretching function are derived using a truncation error analysis. These criteria are used to investigate two types of stretching functions. One is an interior stretching function, for which the location and slope of an interior clustering region are specified. The simplest such function satisfying the criteria is found to be one based on the inverse hyperbolic sine. The other type of function is a two-sided stretching function, for which the arbitrary slopes at the two ends of the one-dimensional interval are specified. The simplest such general function is found to be one based on the inverse tangent.

  3. Molecular Dynamics and Energy Minimization Based on Embedded Atom Method

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-03-01

    This program performs atomic scale computer simulations of the structure and dynamics of metallic system using energetices based on the Embedded Atom Method. The program performs two types of calculations. First, it performs local energy minimization of all atomic positions to determine ground state and saddle point energies and structures. Second, it performs molecular dynamics simulations to determine thermodynamics or miscroscopic dynamics of the system. In both cases, various constraints can be applied to themore » system. The volume of the system can be varied automatically to achieve any desired external pressure. The temperature in molecular dynamics simulations can be controlled by a variety of methods. Further, the temperature control can be applied either to the entire system or just a subset of the atoms that would act as a thermal source/sink. The motion of one or more of the atoms can be constrained to either simulate the effects of bulk boundary conditions or to facilitate the determination of saddle point configurations. The simulations are performed with periodic boundary conditions.« less

  4. Finite-temperature elastic constants of paramagnetic materials within the disordered local moment picture from ab initio molecular dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozafari, E.; Shulumba, N.; Steneteg, P.; Alling, B.; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a theoretical scheme to calculate the elastic constants of magnetic materials in the high-temperature paramagnetic state. Our approach is based on a combination of disordered local moments picture and ab initio molecular dynamics (DLM-MD). Moreover, we investigate a possibility to enhance the efficiency of the simulations of elastic properties using the recently introduced method: symmetry imposed force constant temperature-dependent effective potential (SIFC-TDEP). We have chosen cubic paramagnetic CrN as a model system. This is done due to its technological importance and its demonstrated strong coupling between magnetic and lattice degrees of freedom. We have studied the temperature-dependent single-crystal and polycrystalline elastic constants of paramagentic CrN up to 1200 K. The obtained results at T = 300 K agree well with the experimental values of polycrystalline elastic constants as well as the Poisson ratio at room temperature. We observe that the Young's modulus is strongly dependent on temperature, decreasing by ˜14 % from T = 300 K to 1200 K. In addition we have studied the elastic anisotropy of CrN as a function of temperature and we observe that CrN becomes substantially more isotropic as the temperature increases. We demonstrate that the use of Birch law may lead to substantial errors for calculations of temperature induced changes of elastic moduli. The proposed methodology can be used for accurate predictions of mechanical properties of magnetic materials at temperatures above their magnetic order-disorder phase transition.

  5. Long Dynamics Simulations of Proteins Using Atomistic Force Fields and a Continuum Representation of Solvent Effects: Calculation of Structural and Dynamic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianfeng; Hassan, Sergio A.; Mehler, Ernest L.

    2006-01-01

    Long dynamics simulations were carried out on the B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (ProtG) and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) using atomistic descriptions of the proteins and a continuum representation of solvent effects. To mimic frictional and random collision effects, Langevin dynamics (LD) were used. The main goal of the calculations was to explore the stability of tens-of-nanosecond trajectories as generated by this molecular mechanics approximation and to analyze in detail structural and dynamical properties. Conformational fluctuations, order parameters, cross correlation matrices, residue solvent accessibilities, pKa values of titratable groups, and hydrogen-bonding (HB) patterns were calculated from all of the trajectories and compared with available experimental data. The simulations comprised over 40 ns per trajectory for ProtG and over 30 ns per trajectory for BPTI. For comparison, explicit water molecular dynamics simulations (EW/MD) of 3 ns and 4 ns, respectively, were also carried out. Two continuum simulations were performed on each protein using the CHARMM program, one with the all-atom PAR22 representation of the protein force field (here referred to as PAR22/LD simulations) and the other with the modifications introduced by the recently developed CMAP potential (CMAP/LD simulations). The explicit solvent simulations were performed with PAR22 only. Solvent effects are described by a continuum model based on screened Coulomb potentials (SCP) reported earlier, i.e., the SCP-based implicit solvent model (SCP–ISM). For ProtG, both the PAR22/LD and the CMAP/LD 40-ns trajectories were stable, yielding Cα root mean square deviations (RMSD) of about 1.0 and 0.8 Å respectively along the entire simulation time, compared to 0.8 Å for the EW/MD simulation. For BPTI, only the CMAP/LD trajectory was stable for the entire 30-ns simulation, with a Cα RMSD of ≈ 1.4 Å, while the PAR22/LD trajectory became unstable

  6. Equilibrium Limit of Boundary Scattering in Carbon Nanostructures: Molecular Dynamics Calculations of Thermal Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskins, Justin; Kinaci, Alper; Sevik, Cem; Cagin, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    It is widely known that graphene and many of its derivative nanostructures have exceedingly high reported thermal conductivities (up to 4000 W/mK at 300 K). Such attractive thermal properties beg the use of these structures in practical devices; however, to implement these materials while preserving transport quality, the influence of structure on thermal conductivity should be thoroughly understood. For graphene nanostructures, having average phonon mean free paths on the order of one micron, a primary concern is how size influences the potential for heat conduction. To investigate this, we employ a novel technique to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity from the Green-Kubo relations and equilibrium molecular dynamics in systems where phonon-boundary scattering dominates heat flow. Specifically, the thermal conductivities of graphene nanoribbons and carbon nanotubes are calculated in sizes up to 3 microns, and the relative influence of boundary scattering on thermal transport is determined to be dominant at sizes less than 1 micron, after which the thermal transport largely depends on the quality of the nanostructure interface. The method is also extended to carbon nanostructures (fullerenes) where phonon confinement, as opposed to boundary scattering, dominates, and general trends related to the influence of curvature on thermal transport in these materials are discussed.

  7. Calculation of substrate binding affinities for a bacterial GH78 rhamnosidase through molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Grandits, Melanie; Michlmayr, Herbert; Sygmund, Christoph; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Ram2 from Pediococcus acidilactici is a rhamnosidase from the glycoside hydrolase family 78. It shows remarkable selectivity for rutinose rather than para-nitrophenyl-alpha-l-rhamnopyranoside (p-NPR). Molecular dynamics simulations were performed using a homology model of this enzyme, in complex with both substrates. Free energy calculations lead to predicted binding affinities of −34.4 and −30.6 kJ mol−1 respectively, agreeing well with an experimentally estimated relative free energy of 5.4 kJ mol−1. Further, the most relevant binding poses could be determined. While p-NPR preferably orients its rhamnose moiety toward the active site, rutinose interacts most strongly with its glucose moiety. A detailed hydrogen bond analysis confirms previously implicated residues in the active site (Asp217, Asp222, Trp226, Asp229 and Glu488) and quantifies the importance of individual residues for the binding. The most important amino acids are Asp229 and Phe339 which are involved in many interactions during the simulations. While Phe339 was observed in more simulations, Asp229 was involved in more persistent interactions (forming an average of at least 2 hydrogen bonds during the simulation). These analyses directly suggest mutations that could be used in a further experimental characterization of the enzyme. This study shows once more the strength of computer simulations to rationalize and guide experiments at an atomic level. PMID:23914137

  8. Adaptation of GEANT4 to Monte Carlo dose calculations based on CT data.

    PubMed

    Jiang, H; Paganetti, H

    2004-10-01

    The GEANT4 Monte Carlo code provides many powerful functions for conducting particle transport simulations with great reliability and flexibility. However, as a general purpose Monte Carlo code, not all the functions were specifically designed and fully optimized for applications in radiation therapy. One of the primary issues is the computational efficiency, which is especially critical when patient CT data have to be imported into the simulation model. In this paper we summarize the relevant aspects of the GEANT4 tracking and geometry algorithms and introduce our work on using the code to conduct dose calculations based on CT data. The emphasis is focused on modifications of the GEANT4 source code to meet the requirements for fast dose calculations. The major features include a quick voxel search algorithm, fast volume optimization, and the dynamic assignment of material density. These features are ready to be used for tracking the primary types of particles employed in radiation therapy such as photons, electrons, and heavy charged particles. Recalculation of a proton therapy treatment plan generated by a commercial treatment planning program for a paranasal sinus case is presented as an example. PMID:15543788

  9. UAV-based NDVI calculation over grassland: An alternative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Aguilar, Abraham; Tomelleri, Enrico; Asam, Sarah; Zebisch, Marc

    2016-04-01

    The Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is one of the most widely used indicators for monitoring and assessing vegetation in remote sensing. The index relies on the reflectance difference between the near infrared (NIR) and red light and is thus able to track variations of structural, phenological, and biophysical parameters for seasonal and long-term monitoring. Conventionally, NDVI is inferred from space-borne spectroradiometers, such as MODIS, with moderate resolution up to 250 m ground resolution. In recent years, a new generation of miniaturized radiometers and integrated hyperspectral sensors with high resolution became available. Such small and light instruments are particularly adequate to be mounted on airborne unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) used for monitoring services reaching ground sampling resolution in the order of centimetres. Nevertheless, such miniaturized radiometers and hyperspectral sensors are still very expensive and require high upfront capital costs. Therefore, we propose an alternative, mainly cheaper method to calculate NDVI using a camera constellation consisting of two conventional consumer-grade cameras: (i) a Ricoh GR modified camera that acquires the NIR spectrum by removing the internal infrared filter. A mounted optical filter additionally obstructs all wavelengths below 700 nm. (ii) A Ricoh GR in RGB configuration using two optical filters for blocking wavelengths below 600 nm as well as NIR and ultraviolet (UV) light. To assess the merit of the proposed method, we carry out two comparisons: First, reflectance maps generated by the consumer-grade camera constellation are compared to reflectance maps produced with a hyperspectral camera (Rikola). All imaging data and reflectance maps are processed using the PIX4D software. In the second test, the NDVI at specific points of interest (POI) generated by the consumer-grade camera constellation is compared to NDVI values obtained by ground spectral measurements using a

  10. Calculation of thermomechanical fatigue life based on isothermal behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Saltsman, James F.

    1987-01-01

    The isothermal and thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) crack initiation response of a hypothetical material was analyzed. Expected thermomechanical behavior was evaluated numerically based on simple, isothermal, cyclic stress-strain - time characteristics and on strainrange versus cyclic life relations that have been assigned to the material. The attempt was made to establish basic minimum requirements for the development of a physically accurate TMF life-prediction model. A worthy method must be able to deal with the simplest of conditions: that is, those for which thermal cycling, per se, introduces no damage mechanisms other than those found in isothermal behavior. Under these assumed conditions, the TMF life should be obtained uniquely from known isothermal behavior. The ramifications of making more complex assumptions will be dealt with in future studies. Although analyses are only in their early stages, considerable insight has been gained in understanding the characteristics of several existing high-temperature life-prediction methods. The present work indicates that the most viable damage parameter is based on the inelastic strainrange.

  11. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations and GIPAW NMR Calculations of a Lithium Borate Glass Melt.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Takahiro; Tsuchida, Eiji; Takahashi, Takafumi; Iwadate, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-14

    The atomic structure of a molten 0.3Li2O-0.7B2O3 glass at 1250 K was investigated using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. The gauge including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) method was then employed for computing the chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling constant of (11)B, (17)O, and (7)Li from 764 AIMD derived structures. The chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling constant distributions were directly estimated from the dynamical structure of the molten glass. (11)B NMR parameters of well-known structural units such as the three-coordinated ring, nonring, and four-coordinated tetrahedron were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. In this study, more detailed classification of B units was presented based on the number of O species bonded to the B atoms. This highlights the limitations of (11)B NMR sensitivity for resolving (11)B local environment using the experimentally obtained spectra only. The (17)O NMR parameter distributions can theoretically resolve the bridging and nonbridging O atoms with different structural units such as nonring, single boroxol ring, and double boroxol ring. Slight but clear differences in the number of bridging O atoms surrounding Li that have not been reported experimentally were observed in the theoretically obtained (7)Li NMR parameters. PMID:27010637

  12. Dynamic plasmapause model based on THEMIS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Liu, W.; Cao, J. B.; Fu, H. S.; Yu, J.; Li, X.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a dynamic plasmapause location model established based on 5 years of Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) measurements from 2009 to 2013. In total, 5878 plasmapause crossing events are identified, sufficiently covering all 24 magnetic local time (MLT) sectors. Based on this plasmapause crossing database, we investigate the correlations between plasmapause locations with solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. Input parameters for the best fits are obtained for different MLT sectors, and finally, we choose five input parameters to build a plasmapause location model, including 5 min-averaged SYM-H, AL, and AU indices as well as hourly-averaged AE and Kp indices. two out-of-sample comparisons on the evolution of the plasmapause is shown during two magnetic storms, demonstrating good agreement between model results and observations. Two major advantages are achieved by this model. First, this model provides plasmapause locations at 24 MLT sectors, still providing good consistency with observations. Second, this model is able to reproduce dynamic variations of the plasmapause on timescales as short as 5 min.

  13. Motion detection based on recurrent network dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Joukes, Jeroen; Hartmann, Till S.; Krekelberg, Bart

    2014-01-01

    The detection of visual motion requires temporal delays to compare current with earlier visual input. Models of motion detection assume that these delays reside in separate classes of slow and fast thalamic cells, or slow and fast synaptic transmission. We used a data-driven modeling approach to generate a model that instead uses recurrent network dynamics with a single, fixed temporal integration window to implement the velocity computation. This model successfully reproduced the temporal response dynamics of a population of motion sensitive neurons in macaque middle temporal area (MT) and its constituent parts matched many of the properties found in the motion processing pathway (e.g., Gabor-like receptive fields (RFs), simple and complex cells, spatially asymmetric excitation and inhibition). Reverse correlation analysis revealed that a simplified network based on first and second order space-time correlations of the recurrent model behaved much like a feedforward motion energy (ME) model. The feedforward model, however, failed to capture the full speed tuning and direction selectivity properties based on higher than second order space-time correlations typically found in MT. These findings support the idea that recurrent network connectivity can create temporal delays to compute velocity. Moreover, the model explains why the motion detection system often behaves like a feedforward ME network, even though the anatomical evidence strongly suggests that this network should be dominated by recurrent feedback. PMID:25565992

  14. Validation of KENO based criticality calculations at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Felsher, P.D.; McKamy, J.N.; Monahan, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    In the absence of experimental data it is necessary to rely on computer based computational methods in evaluating the criticality condition of a nuclear system. The validity of the computer codes is established in a two part procedure as outlined in ANSI/ANS 8.1. The first step, usually the responsibility of the code developer, involves verification that the algorithmic structure of the code is performing the intended mathematical operations correctly. The second step involves an assessment of the codes ability to realistically portray the governing physical processes in question. This is accomplished by determining the code's bias, or systematic error, through a comparison of computational results to accepted values obtained experimentally. In this paper we discuss the validation process for KENO and the Hansen-Roach cross sections in use at EG G Rocky Flats.

  15. Glass viscosity calculation based on a global statistical modelling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fluegel, Alex

    2007-02-01

    A global statistical glass viscosity model was developed for predicting the complete viscosity curve, based on more than 2200 composition-property data of silicate glasses from the scientific literature, including soda-lime-silica container and float glasses, TV panel glasses, borosilicate fiber wool and E type glasses, low expansion borosilicate glasses, glasses for nuclear waste vitrification, lead crystal glasses, binary alkali silicates, and various further compositions from over half a century. It is shown that within a measurement series from a specific laboratory the reported viscosity values are often over-estimated at higher temperatures due to alkali and boron oxide evaporation during the measurement and glass preparation, including data by Lakatos et al. (1972) and the recently published High temperature glass melt property database for process modeling by Seward et al. (2005). Similarly, in the glass transition range many experimental data of borosilicate glasses are reported too high due to phase separation effects. The developed global model corrects those errors. The model standard error was 9-17°C, with R^2 = 0.985-0.989. The prediction 95% confidence interval for glass in mass production largely depends on the glass composition of interest, the composition uncertainty, and the viscosity level. New insights in the mixed-alkali effect are provided.

  16. Validation of KENO-based criticality calculations at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Felsher, P.D.; McKamy, J.N.; Monahan, S.P. )

    1992-01-01

    In the absence of experimental data, it is necessary to rely on computer-based computational methods in evaluating the criticality condition of a nuclear system. The validity of the computer codes is established in a two-part procedure as outlined in ANSI/ANS 8.1. The first step, usually the responsibility of the code developer, involves verification that the algorithmic structure of the code is performing the intended mathematical operations correctly. The second step involves an assessment of the code's ability to realistically portray the governing physical processes in question. This is accomplished by determining the code's bias, or systematic error, through a comparison of computational results to accepted values obtained experimentally. In this paper, the authors discuss the validation process for KENO and the Hansen-Roach cross sections in use at EG and G Rocky Flats. The validation process at Rocky Flats consists of both global and local techniques. The global validation resulted in a maximum k{sub eff} limit of 0.95 for the limiting-accident scanarios of a criticality evaluation.

  17. A numerical method for the calculation of dynamic response and acoustic radiation from an underwater structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Q.; Joseph, P. F.

    2005-05-01

    An approach combining finite element with boundary element methods is proposed to calculate the elastic vibration and acoustic field radiated from an underwater structure. The FEM software NASTRAN is employed for computation of the structural vibration. An uncoupled boundary element method, based on the potential decomposition technique, is described to determine the acoustic added mass and damping coefficients that result due to fluid loading effects. The acoustic matrices of added mass and damping coefficients are then added to the structural mass and damping matrices, respectively, by the DMAP modules of NASTRAN. Numerical results are shown to be in good agreement with experimental data. The complex eigenvalue analyses of underwater structure are obtained by NASTRAN solution sequence SOL107. Results obtained from this study suggest that the natural frequencies of underwater structures are only weakly dependent on the acoustic frequency if the acoustic wavelength is roughly twice as large as the maximum structural dimension.

  18. Attosecond-resolution quantum dynamics calculations for atoms and molecules in strong laser fields.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rui-Feng; Zhang, Pei-Yu; Han, Ke-Li

    2008-06-01

    A parallel quantum electron and nuclei wave packet computer code, LZH-DICP, has been developed to study laser-atom-molecule interaction in the nonperturbative regime with attosecond resolution. The nonlinear phenomena occurring in that regime can be studied with the code in a rigorous way by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation of electrons and nuclei. Time propagation of the wave functions is performed using a split-operator approach, and based on a sine discrete variable representation. Photoelectron spectra for hydrogen and kinetic-energy spectra for molecular hydrogen ion in linearly polarized laser fields are calculated using a flux operator scheme, which testifies to the validity and the high efficiency of LZH-DICP. PMID:18643391

  19. GYutsis: heuristic based calculation of general recoupling coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dyck, D.; Fack, V.

    2003-08-01

    General angular momentum recoupling coefficients can be expressed as a summation formula over products of 6- j coefficients. Yutsis, Levinson and Vanagas developed graphical techniques for representing the general recoupling coefficient as a cubic graph and they describe a set of reduction rules allowing a stepwise generation of the corresponding summation formula. This paper is a follow up to [Van Dyck and Fack, Comput. Phys. Comm. 151 (2003) 353-368] where we described a heuristic algorithm based on these techniques. In this article we separate the heuristic from the algorithm and describe some new heuristic approaches which can be plugged into the generic algorithm. We show that these new heuristics lead to good results: in many cases we get a more efficient summation formula than our previous approach, in particular for problems of higher order. In addition the new features and the use of our program GYutsis, which implements these techniques, is described both for end users and application programmers. Program summaryTitle of program: CycleCostAlgorithm, GYutsis Catalogue number: ADSA Program Summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSA Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland. Users may obtain the program also by downloading either the compressed tar file gyutsis.tgz (for Unix and Linux) or the zip file gyutsis.zip (for Windows) from our website ( http://caagt.rug.ac.be/yutsis/). An applet version of the program is also available on our website and can be run in a web browser from the URL http://caagt.rug.ac.be/yutsis/GYutsisApplet.html. Licensing provisions: none Computers for which the program is designed: any computer with Sun's Java Runtime Environment 1.4 or higher installed. Programming language used: Java 1.2 (Compiler: Sun's SDK 1.4.0) No. of lines in program: approximately 9400 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 544 117 Distribution format: tar gzip file Nature of

  20. Reliable Viscosity Calculation from Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulations: A Time Decomposition Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Otani, Akihito; Maginn, Edward J

    2015-08-11

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics is often used in conjunction with a Green-Kubo integral of the pressure tensor autocorrelation function to compute the shear viscosity of fluids. This approach is computationally expensive and is subject to a large amount of variability because the plateau region of the Green-Kubo integral is difficult to identify unambiguously. Here, we propose a time decomposition approach for computing the shear viscosity using the Green-Kubo formalism. Instead of one long trajectory, multiple independent trajectories are run and the Green-Kubo relation is applied to each trajectory. The averaged running integral as a function of time is fit to a double-exponential function with a weighting function derived from the standard deviation of the running integrals. Such a weighting function minimizes the uncertainty of the estimated shear viscosity and provides an objective means of estimating the viscosity. While the formal Green-Kubo integral requires an integration to infinite time, we suggest an integration cutoff time tcut, which can be determined by the relative values of the running integral and the corresponding standard deviation. This approach for computing the shear viscosity can be easily automated and used in computational screening studies where human judgment and intervention in the data analysis are impractical. The method has been applied to the calculation of the shear viscosity of a relatively low-viscosity liquid, ethanol, and relatively high-viscosity ionic liquid, 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane-sulfonyl)imide ([BMIM][Tf2N]), over a range of temperatures. These test cases show that the method is robust and yields reproducible and reliable shear viscosity values. PMID:26574439

  1. Spatiotemporal-atlas-based dynamic speech imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Maojing; Woo, Jonghye; Liang, Zhi-Pei; Sutton, Bradley P.

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (DS-MRI) has been recognized as a promising method for visualizing articulatory motion of speech in scientific research and clinical applications. However, characterization of the gestural and acoustical properties of the vocal tract remains a challenging task for DS-MRI because it requires: 1) reconstructing high-quality spatiotemporal images by incorporating stronger prior knowledge; and 2) quantitatively interpreting the reconstructed images that contain great motion variability. This work presents a novel imaging method that simultaneously meets both requirements by integrating a spatiotemporal atlas into a Partial Separability (PS) model-based imaging framework. Through the use of an atlas-driven sparsity constraint, this method is capable of capturing high-quality articulatory dynamics at an imaging speed of 102 frames per second and a spatial resolution of 2.2 × 2.2 mm2. Moreover, the proposed method enables quantitative characterization of variability of speech motion, compared to the generic motion pattern across all subjects, through the spatial residual components.

  2. A comparison of methods for melting point calculation using molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Maginn, EJ

    2012-04-14

    Accurate and efficient prediction of melting points for complex molecules is still a challenging task for molecular simulation, although many methods have been developed. Four melting point computational methods, including one free energy-based method (the pseudo-supercritical path (PSCP) method) and three direct methods (two interface-based methods and the voids method) were applied to argon and a widely studied ionic liquid 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM][Cl]). The performance of each method was compared systematically. All the methods under study reproduce the argon experimental melting point with reasonable accuracy. For [BMIM][Cl], the melting point was computed to be 320 K using a revised PSCP procedure, which agrees with the experimental value 337-339 K very well. However, large errors were observed in the computed results using the direct methods, suggesting that these methods are inappropriate for large molecules with sluggish dynamics. The strengths and weaknesses of each method are discussed. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3702587

  3. Dynamic visual cryptography based on chaotic oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrauskiene, Vilma; Palivonaite, Rita; Aleksa, Algiment; Ragulskis, Minvydas

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic visual cryptography scheme based on chaotic oscillations is proposed in this paper. Special computational algorithms are required for hiding the secret image in the cover moiré grating, but the decryption of the secret is completely visual. The secret image is leaked in the form of time-averaged geometric moiré fringes when the cover image is oscillated by a chaotic law. The relationship among the standard deviation of the stochastic time variable, the pitch of the moiré grating and the pixel size ensuring visual decryption of the secret is derived. The parameters of these chaotic oscillations must be carefully preselected before the secret image is leaked from the cover image. Several computational experiments are used to illustrate the functionality and the applicability of the proposed image hiding technique.

  4. Calculation of surface diffusivity and residence time by molecular dynamics with application to nanoscale selective-area growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, S.; Ochoa, E.; Chavez, J. J.; Zhou, X. W.; Zubia, D.

    2015-08-01

    The surface diffusivity and residence time were calculated by molecular dynamics simulations in order to solve the surface diffusion equations for selective-area growth. The calculations for CdTe/CdS material system were performed in substrates with Cd termination and S termination. The surface diffusivity and residence time were obtained at different temperatures (600 K, 800 K, 1000 K, 1200 K, and 1400 K). The thermal activation energies were extracted from Arrhenius equation for each substrate termination. Thereafter, values obtained by molecular dynamics were used in a surface diffusion model to calculate the surface concentration profile of adatoms. Alternating the surface termination has the potential to achieve nanoscale selective-area growth without the need of a dielectric film as a mask.

  5. Measurement and calculation of fluid dynamic characteristics of rough-wall turbulent boundary-layer flows

    SciTech Connect

    Hosni, M.H. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Coleman, H.W. . Mechanical Engineering Dept.); Taylor, R.P. . Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    Experimental measurements of profiles of mean velocity and distributions of boundary-layer thickness and skin friction coefficient from aerodynamically smooth, transitionally rough, and fully rough turbulent boundary-layer flows are presented for four surfaces-three rough and one smooth. The rough surfaces are composed of 1.27 mm diameter hemispheres spaced in staggered arrays 2, 4, and 10 base diameters apart, respectively, on otherwise smooth walls. The current incompressible turbulent boundary-layer rough-wall air flow data are compared with previously published results on another, similar rough surface. It is shown that fully rough mean velocity profiles collapse together when scaled as a function of momentum thickness, as was reported previously. However, this similarity cannot be used to distinguish roughness flow regimes, since a similar degree of collapse is observed in the transitionally rough regimes, since a similar degree of collapse is observed in the transitionally rough data. Observation of the new data shows that scaling on the momentum thickness alone is not sufficient to produce similar velocity profiles for flows over surfaces of different roughness character. The skin friction coefficient data versus the ratio of the momentum thickness to roughness height collapse within the data uncertainty, irrespective of roughness flow regime, with the data for each rough surface collapsing to a different curve. Calculations made using the previously published discrete element prediction method are compared with data from the rough surfaces with well-defined roughness elements, and it is shown that the calculations are in good agreement with the data.

  6. In-Stream Sediment Dynamics for predicted environmental concentration calculations of plant protection products in the FOCUSSW Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehmel, Alexander; Erzgräber, Beate; Gottesbüren, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The exposure assessment for the EU registration procedure of plant protection products (PPP), which is based on the 'Forum for the co-ordination of pesticide fate models and their use' (FOCUS), currently considers only periods of 12-16 months for the exposure assessment in surface water bodies. However, in a recent scientific opinion of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) it is argued that in a multi-year exposure assessment, the accumulation of PPP substances in river sediment may be a relevant process. Therefore, the EFSA proposed to introduce a sediment accumulation factor in order to account for enrichment of PPP substances over several years in the sediment. The calculation of this accumulation factor, however, would consider degradation in sediment as the only dissipation path, and does not take into account riverine sediment dynamics. In order to assess the influence of deposition and the possible extent of substance accumulation in the sediment phase, the hydraulic model HEC-RAS was employed for an assessment of in-stream sediment dynamics of the FOCUS stream scenarios. The model was parameterized according to the stream characteristics of the FOCUS scenarios and was run over a period of 20 years. The results show that with the distribution of grain sizes and the ranges of flow velocity in the FOCUS streams the main sediment process in the streams is transport. First modeling results suggest that about 80% of the eroded sediment mass from the adjacent field are transported to the downstream end of the stream and out of the system, while only about 20% are deposited in the river bed. At the same time, only about 30% of in-stream sediment mass stems from the adjacent field and is associated with PPP substance, while the remaining sediment consists of the substance-free base sediment concentration regarded in the scenarios. With this, the hydraulic modelling approach is able to support the development of a meaningful sediment accumulation factor by

  7. Operating distance calculation of ground-based and air-based infrared system based on Lowtran7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Kan; Tian, Jie; Gu, Guohua; Chen, Qian

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the infrared system operating distance model of point target based on the contrast is used, starting from the target radiance and atmospheric transmission parameters in the operating distance formula. The radiance of different point targets detected by ground-based and air-based detector are analyzed, and the spectral division method is used for the integration of target and background radiance, the databases of atmospheric spectral radiance and transmittance are established by calling Lowtran7. A new method for solving the operating distance formula is proposed. And the operating distance calculation system is established, which improves the efficiency and accuracy of calculation. The databases of atmospheric spectral radiance and transmittance of five meteorological conditions are generated, and the variations of them with wavelength and range are given. The atmospheric radiance of infinite transmission range can be considered as the atmospheric radiance of 100 km by calculating the integration of wavelength. The targets and detectors parameters are set to be simulated by using the generated database. The operating distance of each zenith angle is calculated, and spatial distribution of operating distance is given in the meteorological condition of mid latitude summer.

  8. Fast calculation with point-based method to make CGHs of the polygon model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogihara, Yuki; Ichikawa, Tsubasa; Sakamoto, Yuji

    2014-02-01

    Holography is one of the three-dimensional technology. Light waves from an object are recorded and reconstructed by using a hologram. Computer generated holograms (CGHs), which are made by simulating light propagation using a computer, are able to represent virtual object. However, an enormous amount of computation time is required to make CGHs. There are two primary methods of calculating CGHs: the polygon-based method and the point-based method. In the polygon-based method with Fourier transforms, CGHs are calculated using a fast Fourier transform (FFT). The calculation of complex objects composed of multiple polygons requires as many FFTs, so unfortunately the calculation time become enormous. In contrast, in the point-based method, it is easy to express complex objects, an enormous calculation time is still required. Graphics processing units (GPUs) have been used to speed up the calculations of point-based method. Because a GPU is specialized for parallel computation and CGH calculation can be calculated independently for each pixel. However, expressing a planar object by the point-based method requires a signi cant increase in the density of points and consequently in the number of point light sources. In this paper, we propose a fast calculation algorithm to express planar objects by the point-based method with a GPU. The proposed method accelerate calculation by obtaining the distance between a pixel and the point light source from the adjacent point light source by a difference method. Under certain speci ed conditions, the difference between adjacent object points becomes constant, so the distance is obtained by only an additions. Experimental results showed that the proposed method is more effective than the polygon-based method with FFT when the number of polygons composing an objects are high.

  9. Free Energy Perturbation Hamiltonian Replica-Exchange Molecular Dynamics (FEP\\H-REMD) for absolute ligand binding free energy calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, W.; Roux, B.

    2010-09-01

    Free Energy Perturbation with Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics (FEP/REMD) offers a powerful strategy to improve the convergence of free energy computations. In particular, it has been shown previously that a FEP/REMD scheme allowing random moves within an extended replica ensemble of thermodynamic coupling parameters '{lambda}' can improve the statistical convergence in calculations of absolute binding free energy of ligands to proteins [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2009, 5, 2583]. In the present study, FEP/REMD is extended and combined with an accelerated MD simulations method based on Hamiltonian replica-exchange MD (H-REMD) to overcome the additional problems arising from the existence of kinetically trapped conformations within the protein receptor. In the combined strategy, each system with a given thermodynamic coupling factor {lambda} in the extended ensemble is further coupled with a set of replicas evolving on a biased energy surface with boosting potentials used to accelerate the interconversion among different rotameric states of the side chains in the neighborhood of the binding site. Exchanges are allowed to occur alternatively along the axes corresponding to the thermodynamic coupling parameter {lambda} and the boosting potential, in an extended dual array of coupled {lambda}- and H-REMD simulations. The method is implemented on the basis of new extensions to the REPDSTR module of the biomolecular simulation program CHARMM. As an illustrative example, the absolute binding free energy of p-xylene to the nonpolar cavity of the L99A mutant of the T4 lysozyme was calculated. The tests demonstrate that the dual {lambda}-REMD and H-REMD simulation scheme greatly accelerates the configurational sampling of the rotameric states of the side chains around the binding pocket, thereby improving the convergence of the FEP computations.

  10. Calculation and experiment for dynamic response of bridge in deep water under seismic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun-guang; Sun, Guo-shuai

    2014-08-01

    The fluid-structure interaction under seismic excitation is very complicated, and thus the damage identification of the bridge in deep water is the key technique to ensure the safe service. Based on nonlinear Morison equation considering the added mass effect and the fluid-structure interaction effect, the effect of hydrodynamic pressure on the structure is analyzed. A series of underwater shaking table tests are conducted in the air and in water. The dynamic characteristics affected by hydrodynamic pressure are discussed and the distribution of hydrodynamic pressure is also analyzed. In addition, the damage of structure is distinguished through the natural frequency and the difference of modal curvature, and is then compared with the test results. The numerical simulation and test of this study indicate that the effect of hydrodynamic pressure on the structure should not be neglected. It is also found that the presence of the damage, the location of the damage and the degree of the severity can be judged through the variation of structure frequency and the difference of modal curvature.

  11. FRF based joint dynamics modeling and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrpouya, Majid; Graham, Eldon; Park, Simon S.

    2013-08-01

    Complex structures, such as machine tools, are comprised of several substructures connected to each other through joints to form the assembled structures. Joints can have significant contributions on the behavior of the overall assembly and ignoring joint effects in the design stage may result in considerable deviations from the actual dynamic behavior. The identification of joint dynamics enables us to accurately predict overall assembled dynamics by mathematically combining substructure dynamics through the equilibrium and compatibility conditions at the joint. The essence of joint identification is the determination of the difference between the measured overall dynamics and the rigidly coupled substructure dynamics. In this study, we investigate the inverse receptance coupling (IRC) method and the point-mass joint model, which considers the joint as lumped mass, damping and stiffness elements. The dynamic properties of the joint are investigated using both methods through a finite element (FE) simulation and experimental tests. `100

  12. Structure and lattice dynamics of PrFe3(BO3)4: Ab initio calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshev, V. A.; Nikiforov, A. E.; Petrov, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    The crystal structure and phonon spectrum of PrFe3(BO3)4 are ab initio calculated in the context of the density functional theory. The ion coordinates in the unit cell of a crystal and the lattice parameters are evaluated from the calculations. The types and frequencies of the fundamental vibrations, as well as the line intensities of the IR spectrum, are determined. The elastic constants of the crystal are calculated. A "seed" frequency of the vibration strongly interacting with the electron excitation on the praseodymium ion is obtained for low-frequency A 2 mode. The calculated results are in agreement with the known experimental data.

  13. Calculation of broadband time histories of ground motion, Part II: Kinematic and dynamic modeling using theoretical Green's functions and comparison with the 1994 northridge earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartzell, S.; Guatteri, Mariagiovanna; Mai, P.M.; Liu, P.-C.; Fisk, M. R.

    2005-01-01

    In the evolution of methods for calculating synthetic time histories of ground motion for postulated earthquakes, kinematic source models have dominated to date because of their ease of application. Dynamic models, however, which incorporate a physical relationship between important faulting parameters of stress drop, slip, rupture velocity, and rise time, are becoming more accessible. This article compares a class of kinematic models based on the summation of a fractal distribution of subevent sizes with a dynamic model based on the slip-weakening friction law. Kinematic modeling is done for the frequency band 0.2 to 10.0. Hz, dynamic models are calculated from 0.2 to 2.0. Hz. The strong motion data set for the 1994 Northridge earthquake is used to evaluate and compare the synthetic time histories. Source models are propagated to the far field by convolution with 1D and 3D theoretical Green’s functions. In addition, the kinematic model is used to evaluate the importance of propagation path effects: velocity structure, scattering, and nonlinearity. At present, the kinematic model gives a better broadband fit to the Northridge ground motion than the simple slip-weakening dynamic model. In general, the dynamic model overpredicts rise times and produces insufficient shorter-period energy. Within the context of the slip-weakening model, the Northridge ground motion requires a short slip-weakening distance, on the order of 0.15 m or less. A more complex dynamic model including rate weakening or one that allows shorter rise times near the hypocenter may fit the data better.

  14. A model for stationary and dynamic impression of undercooled boiling in coupled thermohydraulic and neutron physics calculations of nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Roland Guenther

    1987-06-01

    In order to account for subcooled boiling in calculations of neutron physics and thermal hydraulics of light water reactors (where vapor bubbles strongly influence the nuclear chain reaction), a dynamic model is derived from the time-dependent conservation equations. It contains methods for the time-dependent determination of evaporation and condensation heat flow and for the heat transfer coefficient in subcooled boiling. It enables the complete two-phase flow region to be treated consistently. The calculation model was verified using measured data of experiments covering a wide range of thermodynamic boundary conditions. In all cases very good agreement is reached. The results from the coupling of the new calculation model with a neutron kinetics program proves its suitability for the steady-state and transient calculation of reactor cores.

  15. Medical applications of model-based dynamic thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Antoni; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Ruminski, Jacek; Hryciuk, Marcin; Renkielska, Alicja; Grudzinski, Jacek; Siebert, Janusz; Jagielak, Dariusz; Rogowski, Jan; Roszak, Krzysztof; Stojek, Wojciech

    2001-03-01

    The proposal to use active thermography in medical diagnostics is promising in some applications concerning investigation of directly accessible parts of the human body. The combination of dynamic thermograms with thermal models of investigated structures gives attractive possibility to make internal structure reconstruction basing on different thermal properties of biological tissues. Measurements of temperature distribution synchronized with external light excitation allow registration of dynamic changes of local temperature dependent on heat exchange conditions. Preliminary results of active thermography applications in medicine are discussed. For skin and under- skin tissues an equivalent thermal model may be determined. For the assumed model its effective parameters may be reconstructed basing on the results of transient thermal processes. For known thermal diffusivity and conductivity of specific tissues the local thickness of a two or three layer structure may be calculated. Results of some medical cases as well as reference data of in vivo study on animals are presented. The method was also applied to evaluate the state of the human heart during the open chest cardio-surgical interventions. Reference studies of evoked heart infarct in pigs are referred, too. We see the proposed new in medical applications technique as a promising diagnostic tool. It is a fully non-invasive, clean, handy, fast and affordable method giving not only qualitative view of investigated surfaces but also an objective quantitative measurement result, accurate enough for many applications including fast screening of affected tissues.

  16. HP-9825A calculator programs for plotting orbiter RCS jet dynamic pressure contours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, S. W.

    1977-01-01

    Computer programs which generate displays of the dynamic pressure fields generated by orbiter RCS thruster firings are described. The programs can be used to generate dynamic contours for an isolated RCS jet and to superimpose the plume contours for specific jets or jet clusters on front and side views of the orbiter profile.

  17. 3-D parallel program for numerical calculation of gas dynamics problems with heat conductivity on distributed memory computational systems (CS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sofronov, I.D.; Voronin, B.L.; Butnev, O.I.

    1997-12-31

    The aim of the work performed is to develop a 3D parallel program for numerical calculation of gas dynamics problem with heat conductivity on distributed memory computational systems (CS), satisfying the condition of numerical result independence from the number of processors involved. Two basically different approaches to the structure of massive parallel computations have been developed. The first approach uses the 3D data matrix decomposition reconstructed at temporal cycle and is a development of parallelization algorithms for multiprocessor CS with shareable memory. The second approach is based on using a 3D data matrix decomposition not reconstructed during a temporal cycle. The program was developed on 8-processor CS MP-3 made in VNIIEF and was adapted to a massive parallel CS Meiko-2 in LLNL by joint efforts of VNIIEF and LLNL staffs. A large number of numerical experiments has been carried out with different number of processors up to 256 and the efficiency of parallelization has been evaluated in dependence on processor number and their parameters.

  18. SU-E-T-465: Dose Calculation Method for Dynamic Tumor Tracking Using a Gimbal-Mounted Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, S; Inoue, T; Kurokawa, C; Usui, K; Sasai, K; Utsunomiya, S; Ebe, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dynamic tumor tracking using the gimbal-mounted linac (Vero4DRT, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Japan) has been available when respiratory motion is significant. The irradiation accuracy of the dynamic tumor tracking has been reported to be excellent. In addition to the irradiation accuracy, a fast and accurate dose calculation algorithm is needed to validate the dose distribution in the presence of respiratory motion because the multiple phases of it have to be considered. A modification of dose calculation algorithm is necessary for the gimbal-mounted linac due to the degrees of freedom of gimbal swing. The dose calculation algorithm for the gimbal motion was implemented using the linear transformation between coordinate systems. Methods: The linear transformation matrices between the coordinate systems with and without gimbal swings were constructed using the combination of translation and rotation matrices. The coordinate system where the radiation source is at the origin and the beam axis along the z axis was adopted. The transformation can be divided into the translation from the radiation source to the gimbal rotation center, the two rotations around the center relating to the gimbal swings, and the translation from the gimbal center to the radiation source. After operating the transformation matrix to the phantom or patient image, the dose calculation can be performed as the no gimbal swing. The algorithm was implemented in the treatment planning system, PlanUNC (University of North Carolina, NC). The convolution/superposition algorithm was used. The dose calculations with and without gimbal swings were performed for the 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} field with the grid size of 5 mm. Results: The calculation time was about 3 minutes per beam. No significant additional time due to the gimbal swing was observed. Conclusions: The dose calculation algorithm for the finite gimbal swing was implemented. The calculation time was moderate.

  19. Calculation procedures for oil free scroll compressors based on mathematical modelling of working process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranin, Y.; Burmistrov, A.; Salikeev, S.; Fomina, M.

    2015-08-01

    Basic propositions of calculation procedures for oil free scroll compressors characteristics are presented. It is shown that mathematical modelling of working process in a scroll compressor makes it possible to take into account such factors influencing the working process as heat and mass exchange, mechanical interaction in working chambers, leakage through slots, etc. The basic mathematical model may be supplemented by taking into account external heat exchange, elastic deformation of scrolls, inlet and outlet losses, etc. To evaluate the influence of procedure on scroll compressor characteristics calculations accuracy different calculations were carried out. Internal adiabatic efficiency was chosen as a comparative parameter which evaluates the perfection of internal thermodynamic and gas-dynamic compressor processes. Calculated characteristics are compared with experimental values obtained for the compressor pilot sample.

  20. GPAW - massively parallel electronic structure calculations with Python-based software.

    SciTech Connect

    Enkovaara, J.; Romero, N.; Shende, S.; Mortensen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations are a widely used tool in materials science and large consumer of supercomputing resources. Traditionally, the software packages for these kind of simulations have been implemented in compiled languages, where Fortran in its different versions has been the most popular choice. While dynamic, interpreted languages, such as Python, can increase the effciency of programmer, they cannot compete directly with the raw performance of compiled languages. However, by using an interpreted language together with a compiled language, it is possible to have most of the productivity enhancing features together with a good numerical performance. We have used this approach in implementing an electronic structure simulation software GPAW using the combination of Python and C programming languages. While the chosen approach works well in standard workstations and Unix environments, massively parallel supercomputing systems can present some challenges in porting, debugging and profiling the software. In this paper we describe some details of the implementation and discuss the advantages and challenges of the combined Python/C approach. We show that despite the challenges it is possible to obtain good numerical performance and good parallel scalability with Python based software.

  1. 19 CFR 351.405 - Calculation of normal value based on constructed value.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calculation of normal value based on constructed value. 351.405 Section 351.405 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Calculation of Export Price, Constructed Export Price, Fair Value,...

  2. Creative Uses for Calculator-based Laboratory (CBL) Technology in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Cynthia L.; Ragan, Nicole M.; Murphy, Maureen Kendrick

    1999-01-01

    Reviews three projects that use a graphing calculator linked to a calculator-based laboratory device as a portable data-collection system for students in chemistry classes. Projects include Isolation, Purification and Quantification of Buckminsterfullerene from Woodstove Ashes; Determination of the Activation Energy Associated with the…

  3. Beyond Problem-Based Learning: Using Dynamic PBL in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overton, Tina L.; Randles, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of a novel pedagogy, dynamic problem-based learning. The pedagogy utilises real-world problems that evolve throughout the problem-based learning activity and provide students with choice and different data sets. This new dynamic problem-based learning approach was utilised to teach…

  4. Dynamic fe Model of Sitting Man Adjustable to Body Height, Body Mass and Posture Used for Calculating Internal Forces in the Lumbar Vertebral Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankoke, S.; Buck, B.; Woelfel, H. P.

    1998-08-01

    Long-term whole-body vibrations can cause degeneration of the lumbar spine. Therefore existing degeneration has to be assessed as well as industrial working places to prevent further damage. Hence, the mechanical stress in the lumbar spine—especially in the three lower vertebrae—has to be known. This stress can be expressed as internal forces. These internal forces cannot be evaluated experimentally, because force transducers cannot be implementated in the force lines because of ethical reasons. Thus it is necessary to calculate the internal forces with a dynamic mathematical model of sitting man.A two dimensional dynamic Finite Element model of sitting man is presented which allows calculation of these unknown internal forces. The model is based on an anatomic representation of the lower lumbar spine (L3-L5). This lumber spine model is incorporated into a dynamic model of the upper torso with neck, head and arms as well as a model of the body caudal to the lumbar spine with pelvis and legs. Additionally a simple dynamic representation of the viscera is used. All these parts are modelled as rigid bodies connected by linear stiffnesses. Energy dissipation is modelled by assigning modal damping ratio to the calculated undamped eigenvalues. Geometry and inertial properties of the model are determined according to human anatomy. Stiffnesses of the spine model are derived from static in-vitro experiments in references [1] and [2]. Remaining stiffness parameters and parameters for energy dissipation are determined by using parameter identification to fit measurements in reference [3]. The model, which is available in 3 different postures, allows one to adjust its parameters for body height and body mass to the values of the person for which internal forces have to be calculated.

  5. Calculation of electron paramagnetic resonance spectra from Brownian dynamics trajectories: application to nitroxide side chains in proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Steinhoff, H J; Hubbell, W L

    1996-01-01

    We present a method to simulate electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of spin-labeled proteins that explicitly includes the protein structure in the vicinity of the attached spin label. The method is applied to a spin-labeled polyleucine alpha-helix trimer. From short (6 ns) stochastic dynamics simulations of this trimer, an effective potential energy function is calculated. Interaction with secondary and tertiary structures determine the reorientational motion of the spin label side chains. After reduction to a single particle problem, long stochastic dynamic trajectories (700 ns) of the spin label side-chain reorientation are calculated from which the Lamor frequency trajectory and subsequently the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum is determined. The simulated spectra agree well with experimental electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of bacteriorhodopsin mutants with spin labels in similar secondary and tertiary environments as in the polyleucine. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8889196

  6. The effect of statistical uncertainty on inverse treatment planning based on Monte Carlo dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeraj, Robert; Keall, Paul

    2000-12-01

    The effect of the statistical uncertainty, or noise, in inverse treatment planning for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) based on Monte Carlo dose calculation was studied. Sets of Monte Carlo beamlets were calculated to give uncertainties at Dmax ranging from 0.2% to 4% for a lung tumour plan. The weights of these beamlets were optimized using a previously described procedure based on a simulated annealing optimization algorithm. Several different objective functions were used. It was determined that the use of Monte Carlo dose calculation in inverse treatment planning introduces two errors in the calculated plan. In addition to the statistical error due to the statistical uncertainty of the Monte Carlo calculation, a noise convergence error also appears. For the statistical error it was determined that apparently successfully optimized plans with a noisy dose calculation (3% 1σ at Dmax ), which satisfied the required uniformity of the dose within the tumour, showed as much as 7% underdose when recalculated with a noise-free dose calculation. The statistical error is larger towards the tumour and is only weakly dependent on the choice of objective function. The noise convergence error appears because the optimum weights are determined using a noisy calculation, which is different from the optimum weights determined for a noise-free calculation. Unlike the statistical error, the noise convergence error is generally larger outside the tumour, is case dependent and strongly depends on the required objectives.

  7. Ab initio based force field and molecular dynamics simulations of crystalline TATB.

    PubMed

    Gee, Richard H; Roszak, Szczepan; Balasubramanian, Krishnan; Fried, Laurence E

    2004-04-15

    An all-atom force field for 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) is presented. The classical intermolecular interaction potential for TATB is based on single-point energies determined from high-level ab initio calculations of TATB dimers. The newly developed potential function is used to examine bulk crystalline TATB via molecular dynamics simulations. The isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compression under hydrostatic pressures obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations are in good agreement with experiment. The calculated volume-temperature expansion is almost one dimensional along the c crystallographic axis, whereas under compression, all three unit cell axes participate, albeit unequally. PMID:15267608

  8. Implementation of the forward-reverse method for calculating the potential of mean force using a dynamic restraining protocol.

    PubMed

    Nategholeslam, Mostafa; Gray, C G; Tomberli, Bruno

    2014-12-11

    We present a new sampling and analysis scheme for calculating the potential of mean force (PMF) of systems studied by steered molecular dynamics simulations. This scheme, which we call the bin-passing method, is based on the forward-reverse (FR) method (due to I. Kosztin and co-workers, Kosztin et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124(6), 064106) and arguments based on the second law of thermodynamics. Applying the bin-passing method results in enhanced sampling, better separation of the reversible and irreversible work distributions, and faster convergence to the underlying PMF of the system under study. Post-simulation analysis is performed using a purpose-built software that we have made publicly available at https://github.com/1particle/bin-passing_analyzer under the terms of the GNU General Public License (version 3). Three examples are provided, for systems of varying sizes and complexities, to demonstrate the efficiency of this method and the quality of the results: for the dissociation PMF of NaCl in water, the bin-passing method obtains PMFs in excellent agreement with that obtained for the same system and using the same force-field through static (equilibrium) methods. The bin-passing method gives a very symmetric PMF for passage of a single water molecule through a DPPC bilayer, and the resultant PMF leads to permeability values in better agreement with experiments than those obtained through previous simulation studies. Finally, we consider the interaction of the antimicrobial peptide HHC-36 with two model membranes and employ the bin-passing method to obtain the PMFs for peptide adsorption to the membranes. The characteristics of these PMFs are consistent with the qualities established for the HHC-36 peptide through in vivo and in vitro experiments, as a non-toxic strong antimicrobial agent. PMID:25372312

  9. Ontology-Based Exchange and Immediate Application of Business Calculation Definitions for Online Analytical Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehlenbeck, Matthias; Breitner, Michael H.

    Business users define calculated facts based on the dimensions and facts contained in a data warehouse. These business calculation definitions contain necessary knowledge regarding quantitative relations for deep analyses and for the production of meaningful reports. The business calculation definitions are implementation and widely organization independent. But no automated procedures facilitating their exchange across organization and implementation boundaries exist. Separately each organization currently has to map its own business calculations to analysis and reporting tools. This paper presents an innovative approach based on standard Semantic Web technologies. This approach facilitates the exchange of business calculation definitions and allows for their automatic linking to specific data warehouses through semantic reasoning. A novel standard proxy server which enables the immediate application of exchanged definitions is introduced. Benefits of the approach are shown in a comprehensive case study.

  10. Inverse calculation of biochemical oxygen demand models based on time domain for the tidal Foshan River.

    PubMed

    Er, Li; Xiangying, Zeng

    2014-01-01

    To simulate the variation of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in the tidal Foshan River, inverse calculations based on time domain are applied to the longitudinal dispersion coefficient (E(x)) and BOD decay rate (K(x)) in the BOD model for the tidal Foshan River. The derivatives of the inverse calculation have been respectively established on the basis of different flow directions in the tidal river. The results of this paper indicate that the calculated values of BOD based on the inverse calculation developed for the tidal Foshan River match the measured ones well. According to the calibration and verification of the inversely calculated BOD models, K(x) is more sensitive to the models than E(x) and different data sets of E(x) and K(x) hardly affect the precision of the models. PMID:25026574

  11. Dynamic rating curve assessment in hydrometric stations and calculation of the associated uncertainties : Quality and monitoring indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlot, Thomas; Perret, Christian; Favre, Anne-Catherine

    2013-04-01

    Whether we talk about safety reasons, energy production or regulation, water resources management is one of EDF's (French hydropower company) main concerns. To meet these needs, since the fifties EDF-DTG operates a hydrometric network that includes more than 350 hydrometric stations. The data collected allow real time monitoring of rivers (hydro meteorological forecasts at points of interests), as well as hydrological studies and the sizing of structures. Ensuring the quality of stream flow data is a priority. A rating curve is an indirect method of estimating the discharge in rivers based on water level measurements. The value of discharge obtained thanks to the rating curve is not entirely accurate due to the constant changes of the river bed morphology, to the precision of the gaugings (direct and punctual discharge measurements) and to the quality of the tracing. As time goes on, the uncertainty of the estimated discharge from a rating curve « gets older » and increases: therefore the final level of uncertainty remains particularly difficult to assess. Moreover, the current EDF capacity to produce a rating curve is not suited to the frequency of change of the stage-discharge relationship. The actual method does not take into consideration the variation of the flow conditions and the modifications of the river bed which occur due to natural processes such as erosion, sedimentation and seasonal vegetation growth. In order to get the most accurate stream flow data and to improve their reliability, this study undertakes an original « dynamic» method to compute rating curves based on historical gaugings from a hydrometric station. A curve is computed for each new gauging and a model of uncertainty is adjusted for each of them. The model of uncertainty takes into account the inaccuracies in the measurement of the water height, the quality of the tracing, the uncertainty of the gaugings and the aging of the confidence intervals calculated with a variographic

  12. Calculation of shipboard fire conditions for radioactive materials packages with the methods of computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Wix, S.D.; Cole, J.K.

    1997-09-01

    Shipboard fires both in the same ship hold and in an adjacent hold aboard a break-bulk cargo ship are simulated with a commercial finite-volume computational fluid mechanics code. The fire models and modeling techniques are described and discussed. Temperatures and heat fluxes to a simulated materials package are calculated and compared to experimental values. The overall accuracy of the calculations is assessed.

  13. Long dynamics simulations of proteins using atomistic force fields and a continuum representation of solvent effects: calculation of structural and dynamic properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianfeng; Hassan, Sergio A; Mehler, Ernest L

    2005-08-15

    Long dynamics simulations were carried out on the B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of streptococcal protein G (ProtG) and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) using atomistic descriptions of the proteins and a continuum representation of solvent effects. To mimic frictional and random collision effects, Langevin dynamics (LD) were used. The main goal of the calculations was to explore the stability of tens-of-nanosecond trajectories as generated by this molecular mechanics approximation and to analyze in detail structural and dynamical properties. Conformational fluctuations, order parameters, cross correlation matrices, residue solvent accessibilities, pKa values of titratable groups, and hydrogen-bonding (HB) patterns were calculated from all of the trajectories and compared with available experimental data. The simulations comprised over 40 ns per trajectory for ProtG and over 30 ns per trajectory for BPTI. For comparison, explicit water molecular dynamics simulations (EW/MD) of 3 ns and 4 ns, respectively, were also carried out. Two continuum simulations were performed on each protein using the CHARMM program, one with the all-atom PAR22 representation of the protein force field (here referred to as PAR22/LD simulations) and the other with the modifications introduced by the recently developed CMAP potential (CMAP/LD simulations). The explicit solvent simulations were performed with PAR22 only. Solvent effects are described by a continuum model based on screened Coulomb potentials (SCP) reported earlier, i.e., the SCP-based implicit solvent model (SCP-ISM). For ProtG, both the PAR22/LD and the CMAP/LD 40-ns trajectories were stable, yielding C(alpha) root mean square deviations (RMSD) of about 1.0 and 0.8 A respectively along the entire simulation time, compared to 0.8 A for the EW/MD simulation. For BPTI, only the CMAP/LD trajectory was stable for the entire 30-ns simulation, with a C(alpha) RMSD of approximately 1.4 A, while the PAR22/LD trajectory

  14. Unraveling Thermal and Dynamical Properties of the Cubic BaVO_3 Perovskite from First-Principles Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebrouki, M.; Ouahrani, T.; Çiftci, Y. Öztekin

    2016-07-01

    Using a toolkit of theoretical techniques comprising ab initio density functional theory calculations and quasiharmonic approximation, we investigate temperature dependence of dynamical properties of BaVO_3 perovskite. This interest is triggered by the fact that, recently, it was possible to synthesize a BaVO_3 perovskite, in a cubic phase, at high pressure and temperature. First-principle calculations are achieved thanks to recent development in numerical facilities, especially phonon dispersion curves which are then fully obtained. Elastic constants of the compound are dependent on temperature due to the inevitable anharmonic effects in solids. We show that at low temperature, the full account of the thermal effects incorporating the phonon densities and Sommerfeld model is more appropriate to calculate the thermal properties of a metal.

  15. Calculation of the lattice dynamics and Raman spectra of copper zinc tin chalcogenides and comparison to experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Ankur; Himmetoglu, Burak; Johnson, Melissa; Norris, David J.; Cococcioni, Matteo; Aydil, Eray S.

    2012-04-01

    The electronic structure, lattice dynamics, and Raman spectra of the kesterite, stannite, and pre-mixed Cu-Au (PMCA) structures of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) and Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) were calculated using density functional theory (DFT). Differences in longitudinal and transverse optical (LO-TO) splitting in kesterite, stannite, and PMCA structures can be used to differentiate them. The Γ-point phonon frequencies, which give rise to Raman scattering, exhibit small but measurable shifts, for these three structures. Experimentally measured Raman scattering from CZTS and CZTSe thin films were examined in light of DFT calculations and deconvoluted to explain subtle shifts and asymmetric line shapes often observed in CZTS and CZTSe Raman spectra. Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with ab initio calculations can be used to differentiate between kesterite, stannite, and PMCA structures of CZTS and CZTSe.

  16. Lattice calculation of the magnetic moments of {delta} and {omega}{sup -} baryons with dynamical clover fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, C.; Orginos, K.; Pascalutsa, V.; Vanderhaeghen, M.

    2009-03-01

    We calculate the magnetic dipole moment of the {delta}(1232) and {omega}{sup -} baryons with 2+1 flavors of clover fermions on anisotropic lattices using a background magnetic field. This is the first dynamical calculation of these magnetic moments using a background field technique. The calculation for {omega}{sup -} is done at the physical strange quark mass, with the result in units of the physical nuclear magneton {mu}{sub {omega}{sup -}}=-1.93{+-}0.08{+-}0.12 (where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic) compared to the experimental number: -2.02{+-}0.05. The {delta} has been studied at three unphysical quark masses, corresponding to pion mass m{sub {pi}}=366, 438, and 548 MeV. The pion mass dependence is compared with the behavior obtained from chiral effective field theory.

  17. Pressure effects on the elastic and lattice dynamics properties of AlP from first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Lakel, S.; Okbi, F.; Ibrir, M.; Almi, K.

    2015-03-30

    We have performed first-principles calculations to investigate the behavior under hydrostatic pressure of the structural, elastic and lattice dynamics properties of aluminum phosphide crystal (AlP), in both zinc-blende (B3) and nickel arsenide (B8) phases. Our calculated structural and electronic properties are in good agreement with previous theoretical and experimental results. The elastic constants, bulk modulus (B), shear modulus (G), and Young's modulus (E), Born effective charge and static dielectric constant ε{sub 0}, were calculated with the generalized gradient approximations and the density functional perturbation theory (DFPT). Our results in the pressure behavior of the elastic and dielectric properties of both phases are compared and contrasted with the common III–V materials. The Born effective charge ZB decreases linearly with pressure increasing, while the static dielectric constant decreases quadratically with the increase of pressure.

  18. Free energy calculations from adaptive molecular dynamics simulations with adiabatic reweighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lingling; Stoltz, Gabriel; Lelièvre, Tony; Marinica, Mihai-Cosmin; Athènes, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    We propose an adiabatic reweighting algorithm for computing the free energy along an external parameter from adaptive molecular dynamics simulations. The adaptive bias is estimated using Bayes identity and information from all the sampled configurations. We apply the algorithm to a structural transition in a cluster and to the migration of a crystalline defect along a reaction coordinate. Compared to standard adaptive molecular dynamics, we observe an acceleration of convergence. With the aid of the algorithm, it is also possible to iteratively construct the free energy along the reaction coordinate without having to differentiate the gradient of the reaction coordinate or any biasing potential.

  19. Calculation of phase diagrams for the FeCl2, PbCl2, and ZnCl2 binary systems by using molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Won-Gap; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka

    2006-04-01

    Recently, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been widely employed as a very useful method for the calculation of various physicochemical properties in the molten slags and fluxes. In this study, MD simulation has been applied to calculate the structural, transport, and thermodynamic properties for the FeCl2, PbCl2, and ZnCl2 systems using the Born—Mayer—Huggins type pairwise potential with partial ionic charges. The interatomic potential parameters were determined by fitting the physicochemical properties of iron chloride, lead chloride, and zinc chloride systems with experimentally measured results. The calculated structural, transport, and thermodynamic properties of pure FeCl2, PbCl2, and ZnCl2 showed the same tendency with observed results. Especially, the calculated structural properties of molten ZnCl2 and FeCl2 show the possibility of formation of polymeric network structures based on the ionic complexes of ZnCl{4/2-}, ZnCl{3/-}, FeCl{4/2-}, and FeCl{3/-}, and these calculations have successfully reproduced the measured results. The enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy of mixing for the PbCl2-ZnCl2, FeCl2-PbCl2, and FeCl2-ZnCl2 systems were calculated based on the thermodynamic and structural parameters of each binary system obtained from MD simulation. The phase diagrams of the PbCl2-ZnCl2, FeCl2-PbCl2, and FeCl2-ZnCl2 systems estimated by using the calculated Gibbs energy of mixing reproduced the experimentally measured ones reasonably well.

  20. Local control theory in trajectory-based nonadiabatic dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Curchod, Basile F. E.; Penfold, Thomas J.; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2011-10-15

    In this paper, we extend the implementation of nonadiabatic molecular dynamics within the framework of time-dependent density-functional theory in an external field described in Tavernelli et al.[Phys. Rev. A 81, 052508 (2010)] by calculating on-the-fly pulses to control the population transfer between electronic states using local control theory. Using Tully's fewest switches trajectory surface hopping method, we perform MD to control the photoexcitation of LiF and compare the results to quantum dynamics (QD) calculations performed within the Heidelberg multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree package. We show that this approach is able to calculate a field that controls the population transfer between electronic states. The calculated field is in good agreement with that obtained from QD, and the differences that arise are discussed in detail.

  1. Dynamical basis sets for algebraic variational calculations in quantum-mechanical scattering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Yan; Kouri, Donald J.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1990-01-01

    New basis sets are proposed for linear algebraic variational calculations of transition amplitudes in quantum-mechanical scattering problems. These basis sets are hybrids of those that yield the Kohn variational principle (KVP) and those that yield the generalized Newton variational principle (GNVP) when substituted in Schlessinger's stationary expression for the T operator. Trial calculations show that efficiencies almost as great as that of the GNVP and much greater than the KVP can be obtained, even for basis sets with the majority of the members independent of energy.

  2. Comparison of computer codes for calculating dynamic loads in wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Seven computer codes for analyzing performance and loads in large, horizontal-axis wind turbines were used to calculate blade bending moment loads for two operational conditions of the 100 kW Mod-O wind turbine. Results are compared with test data on the basis of cyclic loads, peak loads, and harmonic contents. Four of the seven codes include rotor-tower interaction and three are limited to rotor analysis. With a few exceptions, all calculated loads were within 25% of nominal test data.

  3. Comparison of computer codes for calculating dynamic loads in wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Seven computer codes for analyzing performance and loads in large, horizontal axis wind turbines were used to calculate blade bending moment loads for two operational conditions of the 100 kW Mod-0 wind turbine. Results were compared with test data on the basis of cyclic loads, peak loads, and harmonic contents. Four of the seven codes include rotor-tower interaction and three were limited to rotor analysis. With a few exceptions, all calculated loads were within 25 percent of nominal test data.

  4. Functional asymmetry in the lysyl-tRNA synthetase explored by molecular dynamics, free energy calculations and experiment

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Samantha J; Tanner, Julian A; Hindley, Alison D; Miller, Andrew D; Gould, Ian R

    2003-01-01

    Background Charging of transfer-RNA with cognate amino acid is accomplished by the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and proceeds through an aminoacyl adenylate intermediate. The lysyl-tRNA synthetase has evolved an active site that specifically binds lysine and ATP. Previous molecular dynamics simulations of the heat-inducible Escherichia coli lysyl-tRNA synthetase, LysU, have revealed differences in the binding of ATP and aspects of asymmetry between the nominally equivalent active sites of this dimeric enzyme. The possibility that this asymmetry results in different binding affinities for the ligands is addressed here by a parallel computational and biochemical study. Results Biochemical experiments employing isothermal calorimetry, steady-state fluorescence and circular dichroism are used to determine the order and stoichiometries of the lysine and nucleotide binding events, and the associated thermodynamic parameters. An ordered mechanism of substrate addition is found, with lysine having to bind prior to the nucleotide in a magnesium dependent process. Two lysines are found to bind per dimer, and trigger a large conformational change. Subsequent nucleotide binding causes little structural rearrangement and crucially only occurs at a single catalytic site, in accord with the simulations. Molecular dynamics based free energy calculations of the ATP binding process are used to determine the binding affinities of each site. Significant differences in ATP binding affinities are observed, with only one active site capable of realizing the experimental binding free energy. Half-of-the-sites models in which the nucleotide is only present at one active site achieve their full binding potential irrespective of the subunit choice. This strongly suggests the involvement of an anti-cooperative mechanism. Pathways for relaying information between the two active sites are proposed. Conclusions The asymmetry uncovered here appears to be a common feature of oligomeric aminoacyl

  5. Programmable Calculator Use in Undergraduate Dynamics, Vibrations, and Elementary Structures Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutchins, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents programmable calculator solutions to selected problems, including area moments of inertia and principal values, the 2-D principal stress problem, C.G. and pitch inertia computations, 3-D eigenvalue problems, 3 DOF vibrations, and a complex flutter determinant. (SK)

  6. Implications to Postsecondary Faculty of Alternative Calculation Methods of Gender-Based Wage Differentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra

    1998-01-01

    A study explored two distinct methods of calculating a precise measure of gender-based wage differentials among college faculty. The first estimation considered wage differences using a formula based on human capital; the second included compensation for past discriminatory practices. Both measures were used to predict three specific aspects of…

  7. Transport and optical properties of CH2 plastics: Ab initio calculation and density-of-states-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knyazev, D. V.; Levashov, P. R.

    2015-11-01

    This work covers an ab initio calculation of transport and optical properties of plastics of the effective composition CH2 at density 0.954 g/cm3 in the temperature range from 5 kK up to 100 kK. The calculation is based on the quantum molecular dynamics, density functional theory and the Kubo-Greenwood formula. The temperature dependence of the static electrical conductivity σ1DC (T) has an unusual shape: σ1DC(T) grows rapidly for 5 kK ≤ T ≤ 10 kK and is almost constant for 20 kK ≤ T ≤ 60 kK. The additional analysis based on the investigation of the electron density of states (DOS) was performed. The rapid growth of σ1DC(T) at 5 kK ≤ T ≤ 10 kK is connected with the increase of DOS at the electron energy equal to the chemical potential ɛ = μ. The frequency dependence of the dynamic electrical conductivity σ1(ω) at 5 kK has the distinct non-Drude shape with the peak at ω ≈ 10 eV. This behavior of σ1(ω) was explained by the dip at the electron DOS.

  8. A comparison of Monte Carlo and model-based dose calculations in radiotherapy using MCNPTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Mark S.; Miller, Laurence F.

    2006-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations for megavoltage radiotherapy beams represent the next generation of dose calculation in the clinical environment. In this paper, calculations obtained by the MCNP code based on CT data from a human pelvis are compared against those obtained by a commercial radiotherapy treatment system (CMS XiO). The MCNP calculations are automated by the use of MCNPTV (MCNP Treatment Verification), an integrated application developed in Visual Basic that runs on a Windows-based PC. The linear accelerator beam is modeled as a finite point source, and validated by comparing depth dose curves and lateral profiles in a water phantom to measured data. Calculated water phantom PDDs are within 1% of measured data, but the lateral profiles exhibit differences of 2.4, 5.5, and 5.7 mm at the 60%, 40%, and 20% isodose lines, respectively. A MCNP calculation is performed using the CT data and 15 points are selected for comparison with XiO. Results are generally within the uncertainty of the MCNP calculation, although differences up to 13.2% are seen in the presence of large heterogeneities.

  9. Simple atmospheric transmittance calculation based on a Fourier-transformed Voigt profile.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu

    2002-11-20

    A method of line-by-line transmission calculation for a homogeneous atmospheric layer that uses the Fourier-transformed Voigt profile is presented. The method is based on a pure Voigt function with no approximation and an interference term that takes into account the line-mixing effect. One can use the method to calculate transmittance, considering each line shape as it is affected by temperature and pressure, with a line database with an arbitrary wave-number range and resolution. To show that the method is feasible for practical model development, we compared the calculated transmittance with that obtained with a conventional model, and good consistency was observed. PMID:12463237

  10. A transport based one-dimensional perturbation code for reactivity calculations in metal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wenz, T.R.

    1995-02-01

    A one-dimensional reactivity calculation code is developed using first order perturbation theory. The reactivity equation is based on the multi-group transport equation using the discrete ordinates method for angular dependence. In addition to the first order perturbation approximations, the reactivity code uses only the isotropic scattering data, but cross section libraries with higher order scattering data can still be used with this code. The reactivity code obtains all the flux, cross section, and geometry data from the standard interface files created by ONEDANT, a discrete ordinates transport code. Comparisons between calculated and experimental reactivities were done with the central reactivity worth data for Lady Godiva, a bare uranium metal assembly. Good agreement is found for isotopes that do not violate the assumptions in the first order approximation. In general for cases where there are large discrepancies, the discretized cross section data is not accurately representing certain resonance regions that coincide with dominant flux groups in the Godiva assembly. Comparing reactivities calculated with first order perturbation theory and a straight {Delta}k/k calculation shows agreement within 10% indicating the perturbation of the calculated fluxes is small enough for first order perturbation theory to be applicable in the modeled system. Computation time comparisons between reactivities calculated with first order perturbation theory and straight {Delta}k/k calculations indicate considerable time can be saved performing a calculation with a perturbation code particularly as the complexity of the modeled problems increase.

  11. PIV-based load investigation in dynamic stall for different reduced frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharali, Kobra; Johnson, David A.

    2014-08-01

    Measuring the aerodynamic loads on dynamic objects in small wind tunnels is often challenging. In this regard, fast-response particle image velocimetry (PIV) data are post-processed using advanced tools to calculate aerodynamic loads based on the control-volume approach. For dynamic stall phenomena, due to the existence of dynamic stall vortices and significant load changes over a short time interval, applying the control-volume technique is difficult in particular for drag estimation. In this study, an examination of the dynamic stall phenomena of an oscillating SD7037 airfoil is reported for a reduced frequency range of when . A numerical simulation is utilized as an alternative method for comparison and agrees well with the experimental results. The results suggest that loads can be determined accurately if the spatial resolution satisfies the reduced frequency increment. Minimizing the control-volume works best for lift determination. For the drag calculation, it was found that the location of the downstream boundary should be placed where it was not disturbed with wake vortices. The high-velocity gradients of the wake vortices increase the error level along the downstream boundary for the drag calculation but not for the lift estimation. Beside the load calculation, high-resolution PIV velocity fields also reveal insights into the effects of reduced frequency on dynamic flow behavior including the pitch angle range for vortex growth (between vortex generation and pinch-off), phase delay and number of vortices. These observations agree well with the load curve behavior.

  12. Should thermostatted ring polymer molecular dynamics be used to calculate thermal reaction rates?

    SciTech Connect

    Hele, Timothy J. H.; Suleimanov, Yury V.

    2015-08-21

    We apply Thermostatted Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (TRPMD), a recently proposed approximate quantum dynamics method, to the computation of thermal reaction rates. Its short-time transition-state theory limit is identical to rigorous quantum transition-state theory, and we find that its long-time limit is independent of the location of the dividing surface. TRPMD rate theory is then applied to one-dimensional model systems, the atom-diatom bimolecular reactions H + H{sub 2}, D + MuH, and F + H{sub 2}, and the prototypical polyatomic reaction H + CH{sub 4}. Above the crossover temperature, the TRPMD rate is virtually invariant to the strength of the friction applied to the internal ring-polymer normal modes, and beneath the crossover temperature the TRPMD rate generally decreases with increasing friction, in agreement with the predictions of Kramers theory. We therefore find that TRPMD is approximately equal to, or less accurate than, ring polymer molecular dynamics for symmetric reactions, and for certain asymmetric systems and friction parameters closer to the quantum result, providing a basis for further assessment of the accuracy of this method.

  13. FeynDyn: A MATLAB program for fast numerical Feynman integral calculations for open quantum system dynamics on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattani, Nikesh S.

    2013-12-01

    This MATLAB program calculates the dynamics of the reduced density matrix of an open quantum system modeled either by the Feynman-Vernon model or the Caldeira-Leggett model. The user gives the program a Hamiltonian matrix that describes the open quantum system as if it were in isolation, a matrix of the same size that describes how that system couples to its environment, and a spectral distribution function and temperature describing the environment’s influence on it, in addition to the open quantum system’s initial density matrix and a grid of times. With this, the program returns the reduced density matrix of the open quantum system at all moments specified by that grid of times (or just the last moment specified by the grid of times if the user makes this choice). This overall calculation can be divided into two stages: the setup of the Feynman integral, and the actual calculation of the Feynman integral for time propagation of the density matrix. When this program calculates this propagation on a multi-core CPU, it is this propagation that is usually the rate-limiting step of the calculation, but when it is calculated on a GPU, the propagation is calculated so quickly that the setup of the Feynman integral can actually become the rate-limiting step. The overhead of transferring information from the CPU to the GPU and back seems to have a negligible effect on the overall runtime of the program. When the required information cannot fit on the GPU, the user can choose to run the entire program on a CPU. Catalogue identifier: AEPX_v1_0. Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEPX_v1_0.html. Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland. Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 703. No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11026. Distribution format: tar.gz. Programming

  14. Artificial neural network based torque calculation of switched reluctance motor without locking the rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucuk, Fuat; Goto, Hiroki; Guo, Hai-Jiao; Ichinokura, Osamu

    2009-04-01

    Feedback of motor torque is required in most of switched reluctance (SR) motor applications in order to control torque and its ripple. An SR motor shows highly nonlinear property which does not allow calculating torque analytically. Torque can be directly measured by torque sensor, but it inevitably increases the cost and has to be properly mounted on the motor shaft. Instead of torque sensor, finite element analysis (FEA) may be employed for torque calculation. However, motor modeling and calculation takes relatively long time. The results of FEA may also differ from the actual results. The most convenient way seems to calculate torque from the measured values of rotor position, current, and flux linkage while locking the rotor at definite positions. However, this method needs an extra assembly to lock the rotor. In this study, a novel torque calculation based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) is presented. Magnetizing data are collected while a 6/4 SR motor is running. They need to be interpolated for torque calculation. ANN is very strong tool for data interpolation. ANN based torque estimation is verified on the 6/4 SR motor and is compared by FEA based torque estimation to show its validity.

  15. A correction-based dose calculation algorithm for kilovoltage x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, George X.; Pawlowski, Jason M.; Coffey, Charles W.

    2008-12-15

    Frequent and repeated imaging procedures such as those performed in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) programs may add significant dose to radiosensitive organs of radiotherapy patients. It has been shown that kV-CBCT results in doses to bone that are up to a factor of 3-4 higher than those in surrounding soft tissue. Imaging guidance procedures are necessary due to their potential benefits, but the additional incremental dose per treatment fraction may exceed an individual organ tolerance. Hence it is important to manage and account for this additional dose from imaging for radiotherapy patients. Currently available model-based dose calculation methods in radiation treatment planning (RTP) systems are not suitable for low-energy x rays, and new and fast calculation algorithms are needed for a RTP system for kilovoltage dose computations. This study presents a new dose calculation algorithm, referred to as the medium-dependent-correction (MDC) algorithm, for accurate patient dose calculation resulting from kilovoltage x rays. The accuracy of the new algorithm is validated against Monte Carlo calculations. The new algorithm overcomes the deficiency of existing density correction based algorithms in dose calculations for inhomogeneous media, especially for CT-based human volumetric images used in radiotherapy treatment planning.

  16. Quantum Tunneling in Testosterone 6β-Hydroxylation by Cytochrome P450: Reaction Dynamics Calculations Employing Multiconfiguration Molecular-Mechanical Potential Energy Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Lin, Hai

    2009-05-01

    Testosterone hydroxylation is a prototypical reaction of human cytochrome P450 3A4, which metabolizes about 50% of oral drugs on the market. Reaction dynamics calculations were carried out for the testosterone 6β-hydrogen abstraction and the 6β-d1-testosterone 6β-duterium abstraction employing a model that consists of the substrate and the active oxidant compound I. The calculations were performed at the level of canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling and were based on a semiglobal full-dimensional potential energy surface generated by the multiconfiguration molecular mechanics technique. The tunneling coefficients were found to be around 3, indicating substantial contributions by quantum tunneling. However, the tunneling made only modest contributions to the kinetic isotope effects. The kinetic isotope effects were computed to be about 2 in the doublet spin state and about 5 in the quartet spin state.

  17. Quantum tunneling in testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation by cytochrome P450: reaction dynamics calculations employing multiconfiguration molecular-mechanical potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Lin, Hai

    2009-10-29

    Testosterone hydroxylation is a prototypical reaction of human cytochrome P450 3A4, which metabolizes about 50% of oral drugs on the market. Reaction dynamics calculations were carried out for the testosterone 6beta-hydrogen abstraction and the 6beta-d(1)-testosterone 6beta-duterium abstraction employing a model that consists of the substrate and the active oxidant compound I. The calculations were performed at the level of canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling and were based on a semiglobal full-dimensional potential energy surface generated by the multiconfiguration molecular mechanics technique. The tunneling coefficients were found to be around 3, indicating substantial contributions by quantum tunneling. However, the tunneling made only modest contributions to the kinetic isotope effects. The kinetic isotope effects were computed to be about 2 in the doublet spin state and about 5 in the quartet spin state. PMID:19480428

  18. Study of ore deposits by the dynamic systems investigation methods: 1. Calculation of the correlation dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodkin, M. V.; Shatakhtsyan, A. R.

    2015-05-01

    The method for calculating the fractal correlation dimension is applied for analyzing the data on the locations of large and extralarge ore deposits. The approach implemented in this study differs by a few of important points from that commonly used, e.g., in the calculations of the correlation dimension for a set of the epicenters (hypocenters) of the earthquakes. Firstly, we demonstrate the possibility and advisability of obtaining different dimension estimates for different spatial scales. Such a separation turned out to be useful in distinguishing between the regularities in the location of ore deposits on the scale of an ore cluster, ore province, and entire continent. Secondly, we introduce a new notion, a mixed correlation dimension, and use it for different types of the objects (e.g., Au and Ag). The standard formula for calculating the correlation dimension is trivially generalized on this case. It is shown that the values of the correlation dimension can be lower and higher than the dimension of the hosting medium. The cases when the correlation dimension is higher than that of the hosting medium are interpreted as a "mutual repulsion" of the deposits of the two mentioned types. In contrast, the small correlation dimensions indicate that the deposits of the corresponding types tend to have spatially close locations. The calculations are conducted for the spherical Earth. The method is applied to the data on the large and extralarge world-class ore deposits from the Largest Mineral Deposits of the World (LMDs) geoinformation system (GIS). Different patterns of the studied behavior are illustrated by the model examples.

  19. Maintain rigid structures in Verlet based Cartesian molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Peng; Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2012-10-01

    An algorithm is presented to maintain rigid structures in Verlet based Cartesian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. After each unconstrained MD step, the coordinates of selected particles are corrected to maintain rigid structures through an iterative procedure of rotation matrix computation. This algorithm, named as SHAPE and implemented in CHARMM program suite, avoids the calculations of Lagrange multipliers, so that the complexity of computation does not increase with the number of particles in a rigid structure. The implementation of this algorithm does not require significant modification of propagation integrator, and can be plugged into any Cartesian based MD integration scheme. A unique feature of the SHAPE method is that it is interchangeable with SHAKE for any object that can be constrained as a rigid structure using multiple SHAKE constraints. Unlike SHAKE, the SHAPE method can be applied to large linear (with three or more centers) and planar (with four or more centers) rigid bodies. Numerical tests with four model systems including two proteins demonstrate that the accuracy and reliability of the SHAPE method are comparable to the SHAKE method, but with much more applicability and efficiency.

  20. A dynamic oppositional biogeography-based optimization approach for time-varying electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Rashid, A; Kim, S; Liu, D; Kim, K Y

    2016-06-01

    Dynamic electrical impedance tomography-based image reconstruction using conventional algorithms such as the extended Kalman filter often exhibits inferior performance due to the presence of measurement noise, the inherent ill-posed nature of the problem and its critical dependence on the selection of the initial guess as well as the state evolution model. Moreover, many of these conventional algorithms require the calculation of a Jacobian matrix. This paper proposes a dynamic oppositional biogeography-based optimization (OBBO) technique to estimate the shape, size and location of the non-stationary region boundaries, expressed as coefficients of truncated Fourier series, inside an object domain using electrical impedance tomography. The conductivity of the object domain is assumed to be known a priori. Dynamic OBBO is a novel addition to the family of dynamic evolutionary algorithms. Moreover, it is the first such study on the application of dynamic evolutionary algorithms for dynamic electrical impedance tomography-based image reconstruction. The performance of the algorithm is tested through numerical simulations and experimental study and is compared with state-of-the-art gradient-based extended Kalman filter. The dynamic OBBO is shown to be far superior compared to the extended Kalman filter. It is found to be robust to measurement noise as well as the initial guess, and does not rely on a priori knowledge of the state evolution model. PMID:27203482

  1. Dynamic NMR under nonstationary conditions: Theoretical model, numerical calculation, and potential of application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babailov, S. P.; Purtov, P. A.; Fomin, E. S.

    2016-08-01

    An expression has been derived for the time dependence of the NMR line shape for systems with multi-site chemical exchange in the absence of spin-spin coupling, in a zero saturation limit. The dynamics of variation of the NMR line shape with time is considered in detail for the case of two-site chemical exchange. Mathematical programs have been designed for numerical simulation of the NMR spectra of chemical exchange systems. The analytical expressions obtained are useful for NMR line shape simulations for systems with photoinduced chemical exchange.

  2. Numerical calculations of a high power CW CO2 gas-dynamic laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hawat, Sharif; Al-Mutaib, Kheir

    2008-03-01

    Numerical solution of gas-dynamic laser equations in a gas mixture CO2:N2:H2O was carried out, using five-temperature-model (one translational and four vibrational temperatures) by a computational program written in FORTRAN. The spatial distributions of population inversion, gain and temperatures of the gas flow, in addition to the laser intensity and power extraction were studied inside the cavity, for certain initial conditions like pressure (p0=20 atm), temperature (T0= 1500 K), ratio of gases in the laser mixture (CO2:N2:H2O ≡ 10:85:5).

  3. Nanoscale Bending of Multilayered Boron Nitride and Graphene Ribbons: Experiment and Objective Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, Ilia; Tang, Dai-Ming; Wei, Xianlong; Dumitricǎ, Traian; Golberg, Dmitri

    2012-07-01

    By combining experiments performed on nanoribbons in situ within a high-resolution TEM with objective molecular dynamics simulations, we reveal common mechanisms in the bending response of few-layer-thick hexagonal boron nitride and graphene nanoribbons. Both materials are observed forming localized kinks in the fully reversible bending experiments. Microscopic simulations and theoretical analysis indicate platelike bending behavior prior to kinking, in spite of the possibility of interlayer sliding, and give the critical curvature for the kinking onset. This behavior is distinct from the rippling and kinking of multi- and single-wall nanotubes under bending. Our findings have implications for future study of nanoscale layered materials, including nanomechanical device design.

  4. Dynamic NMR under nonstationary conditions: Theoretical model, numerical calculation, and potential of application.

    PubMed

    Babailov, S P; Purtov, P A; Fomin, E S

    2016-08-01

    An expression has been derived for the time dependence of the NMR line shape for systems with multi-site chemical exchange in the absence of spin-spin coupling, in a zero saturation limit. The dynamics of variation of the NMR line shape with time is considered in detail for the case of two-site chemical exchange. Mathematical programs have been designed for numerical simulation of the NMR spectra of chemical exchange systems. The analytical expressions obtained are useful for NMR line shape simulations for systems with photoinduced chemical exchange. PMID:27497554

  5. Assessing the ligand selectivity of sphingosine kinases using molecular dynamics and MM-PBSA binding free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Fang, Liang; Wang, Xiaojian; Xi, Meiyang; Liu, Tianqi; Yin, Dali

    2016-04-22

    The dynamic balance of sphingolipids plays a crucial role in diverse biological processes such as mitogenesis, cell migration and angiogenesis. Sphingosine kinases (SKs) including SK1 and SK2 phosphorylate sphingosine to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), and control the critical balance. SK1 overexpression was reported to increase cell survival and proliferation. Although several SK1 selective inhibitors have been reported, detailed analysis toward their selectivity to understand the molecular mechanism has not been performed to our knowledge. Herein, the crystal structure of SK1 and a homology model of SK2 were used to dock five inhibitors (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5). Protein-ligand complexes were then subjected to a molecular dynamics study and MM-PBSA binding free energy calculations. By analyzing the binding model of these inhibitors, we found that residues ILE170, PHE188 and THR192 in SK1 significantly contribute a favorable binding energy to the selectivity. PMID:26927311

  6. Dynamic Spring Model of Rubber Bush Based on Linear Viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Masaki; Sato, Masami; Kobayashi, Takaya

    A set of simplified formulae is proposed for estimating the dynamic spring constants of rubber bushes used in suspension systems. These formulae are structured by extending a set of elastic solutions[Editor2] proposed before to calculate the dynamic spring constants according to the associated law (pseudo-elasticity) of the linear viscoelasticity theory. A unique feature of this method is that it helps in the easy and quick evaluation of the dynamic behavior of rubber bushes for all the six degrees of freedom (axial loading, loading normal to an axis in two directions, wrench in two directions, and torsion[Editor3]) with no direct involvement of the FEM. In order to validate this method of calculation, the results obtained for all the degrees of freedom are compared with those obtained using the FEM. It is verified that this approach is capable of qualitatively reproducing the results obtained by using the FEM analysis.

  7. Comparison of the capillary wave method and pressure tensor route for calculation of interfacial tension in molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Stella; Frost, Denzil S; Phelan, Harrison; Dai, Lenore L

    2013-12-01

    We have studied the calculation of surface and interfacial tension for a variety of liquid-vapor and liquid-liquid interfaces using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Because of the inherently small scale of MD systems, large pressure fluctuations can cause imprecise calculations of surface tension using the pressure tensor route. The capillary wave method exhibited improved precision and stability throughout all of the simulated systems in this study. In order to implement this method, the interface was defined by fitting an error function to the density profile. However, full mapping of the interface from coordinate files produced enhanced accuracy. Upon increasing the system size, both methods exhibited higher precision, although the capillary wave method was still more reliable. PMID:24122780

  8. Partition coefficients and phase behavior for non-toxic ice inhibitors from quantum mechanical calculations and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Trohalaki, S.; Pachter, R.

    1996-10-01

    In our continuing efforts to design new anti-icing compounds for jet fuel, aircraft wings, and runways, we report values of the water-hexadecane partition coefficient calculated using AMSOL and COSMO and compare with experimental results whenever possible. In addition, we present phase-behavior results as predicted from the so-called mean-field lattice-gas Flory-Huggins (FH) theory. The FH interaction parameter, related to the cohesive energy density and the Hildebrand solubility parameter, was obtained from equilibrium molecular dynamics (NM) trajectories of mixed and de-mixed systems. Radial distribution functions for intermolecular oxygen-oxygen separations for hydrogen-bond donors and acceptors were also calculated from the MD trajectories. Integration over the peak indicative of hydrogen bonding yields the average number of nearest-neighbor water molecules, which correlates with the anti-icing performance.

  9. Electronic stopping power calculation method for molecular dynamics simulations using local Firsov and free electron-gas models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltola, J.; Nordlund, K.; Keinonen, J.

    2006-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have proven to be accurate in predicting depth distributions of low-energy ions implanted in materials. Free parameters adjusted for every ion-target combination are conventionally used to obtain depth profiles in accordance with the experimental ones. We have previously developed a model for predicting depth profiles in crystalline Si without free parameters. The electronic stopping power was calculated using local total electron density. The model underestimated the stopping in the < 1 1 0 > channeling direction. We have now taken a new approach to calculate the electronic stopping power. We use the local valence (3p(2)) electron density to account for the electronic energy loss between collisions and the Firsov model to account for the electronic energy loss during collision. The lowest electron densities are adjusted with a parametrization that is same for all ions in all implanting directions to correct the problems in the < 1 1 0 > channeling direction.

  10. Using computational fluid dynamics to calculate the stimulus to the lateral line of a fish in still water.

    PubMed

    Rapo, Mark A; Jiang, Houshuo; Grosenbaugh, Mark A; Coombs, Sheryl

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents the first computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of viscous flow due to a small sphere vibrating near a fish, a configuration that is frequently used for experiments on dipole source localization by the lateral line. Both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) meshes were constructed, reproducing a previously published account of a mottled sculpin approaching an artificial prey. Both the fish-body geometry and the sphere vibration were explicitly included in the simulations. For comparison purposes, calculations using potential flow theory (PFT) of a 3-D dipole without a fish body being present were also performed. Comparisons between the 2-D and 3-D CFD simulations showed that the 2-D calculations did not accurately represent the 3-D flow and therefore did not produce realistic results. The 3-D CFD simulations showed that the presence of the fish body perturbed the dipole source pressure field near the fish body, an effect that was obviously absent in the PFT calculations of the dipole alone. In spite of this discrepancy, the pressure-gradient patterns to the lateral line system calculated from 3-D CFD simulations and PFT were similar. Conversely, the velocity field, which acted on the superficial neuromasts (SNs), was altered by the oscillatory boundary layer that formed at the fish's skin due to the flow produced by the vibrating sphere (accounted for in CFD but not PFT). An analytical solution of an oscillatory boundary layer above a flat plate, which was validated with CFD, was used to represent the flow near the fish's skin and to calculate the detection thresholds of the SNs in terms of flow velocity and strain rate. These calculations show that the boundary layer effects can be important, especially when the height of the cupula is less than the oscillatory boundary layer's Stokes viscous length scale. PMID:19411543

  11. Calculation of the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings based on Fresnel-Kirchhoff's diffraction formula.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanshen; Li, Ting; Xu, Banglian; Hong, Ruijin; Tao, Chunxian; Ling, Jinzhong; Li, Baicheng; Zhang, Dawei; Ni, Zhengji; Zhuang, Songlin

    2013-02-10

    Fraunhofer diffraction formula cannot be applied to calculate the diffraction wave energy distribution of concave gratings like plane gratings because their grooves are distributed on a concave spherical surface. In this paper, a method based on the Kirchhoff diffraction theory is proposed to calculate the diffraction efficiency on concave gratings by considering the curvature of the whole concave spherical surface. According to this approach, each groove surface is divided into several limited small planes, on which the Kirchhoff diffraction field distribution is calculated, and then the diffraction field of whole concave grating can be obtained by superimposition. Formulas to calculate the diffraction efficiency of Rowland-type and flat-field concave gratings are deduced from practical applications. Experimental results showed strong agreement with theoretical computations. With the proposed method, light energy can be optimized to the expected diffraction wave range while implementing aberration-corrected design of concave gratings, particularly for the concave blazed gratings. PMID:23400074

  12. Sparse decomposition learning based dynamic MRI reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Peifei; Zhang, Qieshi; Kamata, Sei-ichiro

    2015-02-01

    Dynamic MRI is widely used for many clinical exams but slow data acquisition becomes a serious problem. The application of Compressed Sensing (CS) demonstrated great potential to increase imaging speed. However, the performance of CS is largely depending on the sparsity of image sequence in the transform domain, where there are still a lot to be improved. In this work, the sparsity is exploited by proposed Sparse Decomposition Learning (SDL) algorithm, which is a combination of low-rank plus sparsity and Blind Compressed Sensing (BCS). With this decomposition, only sparsity component is modeled as a sparse linear combination of temporal basis functions. This enables coefficients to be sparser and remain more details of dynamic components comparing learning the whole images. A reconstruction is performed on the undersampled data where joint multicoil data consistency is enforced by combing Parallel Imaging (PI). The experimental results show the proposed methods decrease about 15~20% of Mean Square Error (MSE) compared to other existing methods.

  13. Lattice dynamics and electron-phonon coupling calculations using nondiagonal supercells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd-Williams, Jonathan; Monserrat, Bartomeu

    Quantities derived from electron-phonon coupling matrix elements require a fine sampling of the vibrational Brillouin zone. Converged results are typically not obtainable using the direct method, in which a perturbation is frozen into the system and the total energy derivatives are calculated using a finite difference approach, because the size of simulation cell needed is prohibitively large. We show that it is possible to determine the response of a periodic system to a perturbation characterized by a wave vector with reduced fractional coordinates (m1 /n1 ,m2 /n2 ,m3 /n3) using a supercell containing a number of primitive cells equal to the least common multiple of n1, n2, and n3. This is accomplished by utilizing supercell matrices containing nonzero off-diagonal elements. We present the results of electron-phonon coupling calculations using the direct method to sample the vibrational Brillouin zone with grids of unprecedented size for a range of systems, including the canonical example of diamond. We also demonstrate that the use of nondiagonal supercells reduces by over an order of magnitude the computational cost of obtaining converged vibrational densities of states and phonon dispersion curves. J.L.-W. is supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). B.M. is supported by Robinson College, Cambridge, and the Cambridge Philosophical Society. This work was supported by EPSRC Grants EP/J017639/1 and EP/K013564/1.

  14. The effects of calculator-based laboratories on standardized test scores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Charlotte Bethany Rains

    Nationwide, the goal of providing a productive science and math education to our youth in today's educational institutions is centering itself around the technology being utilized in these classrooms. In this age of digital technology, educational software and calculator-based laboratories (CBL) have become significant devices in the teaching of science and math for many states across the United States. Among the technology, the Texas Instruments graphing calculator and Vernier Labpro interface, are among some of the calculator-based laboratories becoming increasingly popular among middle and high school science and math teachers in many school districts across this country. In Tennessee, however, it is reported that this type of technology is not regularly utilized at the student level in most high school science classrooms, especially in the area of Physical Science (Vernier, 2006). This research explored the effect of calculator based laboratory instruction on standardized test scores. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of traditional teaching methods versus graphing calculator teaching methods on the state mandated End-of-Course (EOC) Physical Science exam based on ability, gender, and ethnicity. The sample included 187 total tenth and eleventh grade physical science students, 101 of which belonged to a control group and 87 of which belonged to the experimental group. Physical Science End-of-Course scores obtained from the Tennessee Department of Education during the spring of 2005 and the spring of 2006 were used to examine the hypotheses. The findings of this research study suggested the type of teaching method, traditional or calculator based, did not have an effect on standardized test scores. However, the students' ability level, as demonstrated on the End-of-Course test, had a significant effect on End-of-Course test scores. This study focused on a limited population of high school physical science students in the middle Tennessee

  15. Calculations of kaonic nuclei based on chiral meson-baryon amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazda, Daniel; Mareš, Jiří

    2013-09-01

    In-medium KbarN scattering amplitudes developed within a chirally motivated coupled-channel model are used to construct K- nuclear potentials for calculations of K- nuclear quasi-bound states. Self-consistent evaluations yield K- potential depths -Re VK(ρ0) of order 100 MeV. Dynamical polarization effects and two-nucleon KbarNN→YN absorption modes are discussed. The widths ΓK of allK- nuclear quasi-bound states are comparable or even larger than the corresponding binding energies BK, exceeding considerably the energy level spacing.

  16. A Blackboard-Based Dynamic Instructional Planner. ONR Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, William R.

    Dynamic instructional planning was explored as a control mechanism for intelligent tutoring systems through the development of the Blackboard Instructional Planner--a blackboard software-based dynamic planner for computerized intelligent tutoring systems. The planner, designed to be generic to tutors teaching troubleshooting for complex physical…

  17. The Effect of Dynamic Assessment Based Instruction on Children's Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baek, Sun-Geun; Kim, Kyoung Jin

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that dynamic assessment based instruction increases children's learning by using a quasi-experimental research design in Korea. In this study, dynamic assessment is defined as a measurement method of the zone of proximal development (ZPD) as well as the qualitative and quantitative diagnostic information…

  18. A Dynamic Usage Based Perspective on L2 Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verspoor, Marjolijn; Schmid, Monika S.; Xu, Xiaoyan

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the contribution that a dynamic usage based (DUB) perspective can bring to the establishment of objective measures to assess L2 learners' written texts and at the same time to gain insight into the dynamic process of language development. Four hundred and thirty seven texts written by Dutch learners of English…

  19. The Role of Molecular Dynamics Potential of Mean Force Calculations in the Investigation of Enzyme Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Pan, L; Lightstone, F C; Merz, K M

    2016-01-01

    The potential of mean force simulations, widely applied in Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics simulations, are useful tools to examine the free energy variation as a function of one or more specific reaction coordinate(s) for a given system. Implementation of the potential of mean force in the simulations of biological processes, such as enzyme catalysis, can help overcome the difficulties of sampling specific regions on the energy landscape and provide useful insights to understand the catalytic mechanism. The potential of mean force simulations usually require many, possibly parallelizable, short simulations instead of a few extremely long simulations and, therefore, are fairly manageable for most research facilities. In this chapter, we provide detailed protocols for applying the potential of mean force simulations to investigate enzymatic mechanisms for several different enzyme systems. PMID:27498632

  20. Investigation of the liquid Pb/Si(001) interface from ab initio molecular-dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, D. J.; Souto, J.; Alemany, M. M. G.; Longo, R. C.; Gallego, L. J.; Gonzalez, L. E.

    2013-03-01

    The structure of liquid Pb on an ideal Si(001) surface was studied experimentally a decade ago by means of x-ray diffraction and the results were interpreted in terms of the presence of fivefold symmetry Pb structures captured transiently by the potential created by the unreconstructed Si(001) surface. We critically analyze this interpretation in the light of the results obtained in an extensive ab initio molecular dynamics study of a system comprising 314 Pb atoms and 175 Si atoms setup in 7 (001) ideal layers (a total number of 1956 valence electrons) in a slab geometry. The structure found for the first Pb layer is very different from that of bulk Pb, mostly consisting in one-dimensional lines. However, we do observe the possibility of forming transient structures, in particular icosahedral caps. Supported by FIS2008-02490/FIS, FIS2008-04894/FIS, GR120, INCITE09E2R206033ES and INCITE08PXIB206107PR.

  1. Hugoniot curve calculation of nitromethane decomposition mixtures: A reactive force field molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Hong; Hu, Hai-Quan; Cheng, Xin-Lu; Zhang, Li-Yan

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the Hugoniot curve, shock-particle velocity relations, and Chapman-Jouguet conditions of the hot dense system through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The detailed pathways from crystal nitromethane to reacted state by shock compression are simulated. The phase transition of N2 and CO mixture is found at about 10 GPa, and the main reason is that the dissociation of the C-O bond and the formation of C-C bond start at 10.0-11.0 GPa. The unreacted state simulations of nitromethane are consistent with shock Hugoniot data. The complete pathway from unreacted to reacted state is discussed. Through chemical species analysis, we find that the C-N bond breaking is the main event of the shock-induced nitromethane decomposition. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374217) and the Shandong Provincial Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. ZR2014BQ008).

  2. Calculating the dynamics of High Explosive Violent Response (HEVR) after ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2008-10-15

    . Such measures include damage to the confinement, the velocity and fragment size distributions from what was the confinement, and air blast. In the first phase (advisory) model described in [1], the surface to volume ratio and the ignition parameter are calibrated by comparison with experiments using the UK explosive. In order to achieve the second phase (interactive) model, and so calculate the pressure developed and the velocity imparted to the confinement, we need to calculate the spread of the ignition front, the subsequent burn behavior behind that front, and the response of unburned and partially burned explosive to pressurization. A preliminary model to do such calculations is described here.

  3. 40 CFR 1066.605 - Mass-based and molar-based exhaust emission calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... media buoyancy as described in 40 CFR 1065.690. (d) Calculate the emission mass of each gaseous... specified in paragraph (c) of this section or in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart G, as applicable. (b) See the... contamination as described in 40 CFR 1065.660(a), including continuous readings, sample bag readings,...

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of polymer electrolytes based on poly(ethylene oxide) and ionic liquids. II. Dynamical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Luciano T.; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C.

    2007-10-01

    Dynamical properties of polymer electrolytes based on poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and ionic liquids of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations were calculated by molecular dynamics simulations with previously proposed models [L. T. Costa and M. C. Ribeiro, J. Chem. Phys. 124, 184902 (2006)]. The effect of changing the ionic liquid concentration, temperature, and the 1-alkyl-chain lengths, [1,3-dimethylimidazolium]PF6 and [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium]PF6 ([dmim]PF6 and [bmim]PF6), was investigated. Cation diffusion coefficient is higher than those of anion and oxygen atoms of PEO chains. Ionic mobility in PEO /[bmim]PF6 is higher than in PEO /[dmim]PF6, so that the ionic conductivity κ of the former is approximately ten times larger than the latter. The ratio between κ and its estimate from the Nernst-Einstein equation κ /κNE, which is inversely proportional to the strength of ion pairs, is higher in ionic liquid polymer electrolytes than in polymer electrolytes based on inorganic salts with Li+ cations. Calculated time correlation functions corroborate previous evidence from the analysis of equilibrium structure that the ion pairs in ionic liquid polymer electrolytes are relatively weak. Structural relaxation at distinct spatial scales is revealed by the calculation of the intermediate scattering function at different wavevectors. These data are reproduced with stretched exponential functions, so that temperature and wavevector dependences of best fit parameters can be compared with corresponding results for polymer electrolytes containing simpler ions.

  5. Monte Carlo-based dose calculation engine for minibeam radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rovira, I; Sempau, J; Prezado, Y

    2014-02-01

    Minibeam radiation therapy (MBRT) is an innovative radiotherapy approach based on the well-established tissue sparing effect of arrays of quasi-parallel micrometre-sized beams. In order to guide the preclinical trials in progress at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), a Monte Carlo-based dose calculation engine has been developed and successfully benchmarked with experimental data in anthropomorphic phantoms. Additionally, a realistic example of treatment plan is presented. Despite the micron scale of the voxels used to tally dose distributions in MBRT, the combination of several efficiency optimisation methods allowed to achieve acceptable computation times for clinical settings (approximately 2 h). The calculation engine can be easily adapted with little or no programming effort to other synchrotron sources or for dose calculations in presence of contrast agents. PMID:23597423

  6. Massively parallel computational fluid dynamics calculations for aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, J.L.; Hassan, B.

    1998-09-01

    Massively parallel computers have enabled the analyst to solve complicated flow fields (turbulent, chemically reacting) that were previously intractable. Calculations are presented using a massively parallel CFD code called SACCARA (Sandia Advanced Code for Compressible Aerothermodynamics Research and Analysis) currently under development at Sandia National Laboratories as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). Computations were made on a generic reentry vehicle in a hypersonic flowfield utilizing three different distributed parallel computers to assess the parallel efficiency of the code with increasing numbers of processors. The parallel efficiencies for the SACCARA code will be presented for cases using 1, 150, 100 and 500 processors. Computations were also made on a subsonic/transonic vehicle using both 236 and 521 processors on a grid containing approximately 14.7 million grid points. Ongoing and future plans to implement a parallel overset grid capability and couple SACCARA with other mechanics codes in a massively parallel environment are discussed.

  7. A Jini-based dynamic service WebGIS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Wenling; Chen, Xiuwan; Huang, Zhaoqiang; Zhao, Gang

    2007-06-01

    The development of current GIS technology has evolved from single platform GIS system into WebGIS. However, The Geographic Information Services (GIServices) provision and application manner cannot meet the requirement of pervasive computing environment. Jini/JAVA technique, a dynamic distributed architecture for providing spontaneous network of services, might be a tool/solution to improve the GIService performance of current WebGIS. This paper studies and analyses Jini infrastructure and its dynamic service mechanism, designs a new WebGIS architecture with Jini-based dynamic service model. The experiment shows that Jini technique can be integrated into WebGIS and to realize the dynamic services organization and management.

  8. Ab initio Calculations of Electronic Fingerprints of DNA bases on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Rehr, John J.; Kilina, Svetlana; Das, Tanmoy; Haraldsen, Jason T.; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2012-02-01

    We have carried out first principles DFT calculations of the electronic local density of states (LDOS) of DNA nucleotide bases (A,C,G,T) adsorbed on graphene using LDA with ultra-soft pseudo-potentials. We have also calculated the longitudinal transmission currents T(E) through graphene nano-pores as an individual DNA base passes through it, using a non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. We observe several dominant base-dependent features in the LDOS and T(E) in an energy range within a few eV of the Fermi level. These features can serve as electronic fingerprints for the identification of individual bases from dI/dV measurements in scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and nano-pore experiments. Thus these electronic signatures can provide an alternative approach to DNA sequencing.

  9. The Effect of Calculator-Based Ranger Activities on Students' Graphing Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Oh Nam

    2002-01-01

    Addresses three issues of Calculator-based Ranger (CBR) activities on graphing abilities: (a) the effect of CBR activities on graphing abilities; (b) the extent to which prior knowledge about graphing skills affects graphing ability; and (c) the influence of instructional styles on students' graphing abilities. Indicates that CBR activities are…

  10. Robust dynamical recurrences based on Floquet spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, M.; Naseer, K.; Saif, F.

    2011-10-01

    Robust recurrence behavior of wave packets in periodically driven systems and coupled higher dimensional systems is analyzed, which takes place in the realm of higher coupling/modulation strength. We analyze the wave packet dynamics close to nonlinear resonances developed in the systems and provide the analytical understanding of recurrence times. We apply these analytical results to investigate the recurrence times of matter waves in optical lattice in the presence of external periodic forcing. The obtained analytical results can experimentally be observed using currently available experimental setups.

  11. Ab initio molecular dynamics with noisy and cheap quantum Monte Carlo forces: accurate calculation of vibrational frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ye; Sorella, Sandro

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a general and efficient method for the calculation of vibrational frequencies of electronic systems, ranging from molecules to solids. By performing damped molecular dynamics with ab initio forces, we show that quantum vibrational frequencies can be evaluated by diagonalizing the time averaged position-position or force-force correlation matrices, although the ionic motion is treated on the classical level within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The novelty of our approach is to evaluate atomic forces with QMC by means of a highly accurate and correlated variational wave function which is optimized simultaneously during the dynamics. QMC is an accurate and promising many-body technique for electronic structure calculation thanks to massively parallel computers. However, since infinite statistics is not feasible, property evaluation may be affected by large noise that is difficult to harness. Our approach controls the QMC stochastic bias systematically and gives very accurate results with moderate computational effort, namely even with noisy forces. We prove the accuracy and efficiency of our method on the water monomer[A. Zen et al., JCTC 9 (2013) 4332] and dimer. We are currently working on the challenging problem of simulating liquid water at ambient conditions.

  12. Calculation of adsorption free energy for solute-surface interactions using biased replica-exchange molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Stuart, Steven J.; Latour, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of a biomolecule, such as a peptide or protein, to a functionalized surface is of fundamental importance for a broad range of applications in biotechnology. The adsorption free energy for these types of interactions can be determined from a molecular dynamics simulation using the partitioning between adsorbed and nonadsorbed states, provided that sufficient sampling of both states is obtained. However, if interactions between the solute and the surface are strong, the solute will tend to be trapped near the surface during the simulation, thus preventing the adsorption free energy from being calculated by this method. This situation occurs even when using an advanced sampling algorithm such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD). In this paper, the authors demonstrate the fundamental basis of this problem using a model system consisting of one sodium ion (Na+) as the solute positioned over a surface functionalized with one negatively charged group (COO−) in explicit water. With this simple system, the authors show that sufficient sampling in the coordinate normal to the surface cannot be obtained by conventional REMD alone. The authors then present a method to overcome this problem through the use of an adaptive windowed-umbrella sampling technique to develop a biased-energy function that is combined with REMD. This approach provides an effective method for the calculation of adsorption free energy for solute-surface interactions. PMID:19768127

  13. Medication calculation: the potential role of digital game-based learning in nurse education.

    PubMed

    Foss, Brynjar; Mordt Ba, Petter; Oftedal, Bjørg F; Løkken, Atle

    2013-12-01

    Medication dose calculation is one of several medication-related activities that are conducted by nurses daily. However, medication calculation skills appear to be an area of global concern, possibly because of low numeracy skills, test anxiety, low self-confidence, and low self-efficacy among student nurses. Various didactic strategies have been developed for student nurses who still lack basic mathematical competence. However, we suggest that the critical nature of these skills demands the investigation of alternative and/or supplementary didactic approaches to improve medication calculation skills and to reduce failure rates. Digital game-based learning is a possible solution because of the following reasons. First, mathematical drills may improve medication calculation skills. Second, games are known to be useful during nursing education. Finally, mathematical drill games appear to improve the attitudes of students toward mathematics. The aim of this article was to discuss common challenges of medication calculation skills in nurse education, and we highlight the potential role of digital game-based learning in this area. PMID:24107685

  14. CCSD(T)/CBS fragment-based calculations of lattice energy of molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Červinka, Ctirad; Fulem, Michal; Růžička, Květoslav

    2016-02-14

    A comparative study of the lattice energy calculations for a data set of 25 molecular crystals is performed using an additive scheme based on the individual energies of up to four-body interactions calculated using the coupled clusters with iterative treatment of single and double excitations and perturbative triples correction (CCSD(T)) with an estimated complete basis set (CBS) description. The CCSD(T)/CBS values on lattice energies are used to estimate sublimation enthalpies which are compared with critically assessed and thermodynamically consistent experimental values. The average absolute percentage deviation of calculated sublimation enthalpies from experimental values amounts to 13% (corresponding to 4.8 kJ mol(-1) on absolute scale) with unbiased distribution of positive to negative deviations. As pair interaction energies present a dominant contribution to the lattice energy and CCSD(T)/CBS calculations still remain computationally costly, benchmark calculations of pair interaction energies defined by crystal parameters involving 17 levels of theory, including recently developed methods with local and explicit treatment of electronic correlation, such as LCC and LCC-F12, are also presented. Locally and explicitly correlated methods are found to be computationally effective and reliable methods enabling the application of fragment-based methods for larger systems. PMID:26874495

  15. CCSD(T)/CBS fragment-based calculations of lattice energy of molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Červinka, Ctirad; Fulem, Michal; Růžička, Květoslav

    2016-02-01

    A comparative study of the lattice energy calculations for a data set of 25 molecular crystals is performed using an additive scheme based on the individual energies of up to four-body interactions calculated using the coupled clusters with iterative treatment of single and double excitations and perturbative triples correction (CCSD(T)) with an estimated complete basis set (CBS) description. The CCSD(T)/CBS values on lattice energies are used to estimate sublimation enthalpies which are compared with critically assessed and thermodynamically consistent experimental values. The average absolute percentage deviation of calculated sublimation enthalpies from experimental values amounts to 13% (corresponding to 4.8 kJ mol-1 on absolute scale) with unbiased distribution of positive to negative deviations. As pair interaction energies present a dominant contribution to the lattice energy and CCSD(T)/CBS calculations still remain computationally costly, benchmark calculations of pair interaction energies defined by crystal parameters involving 17 levels of theory, including recently developed methods with local and explicit treatment of electronic correlation, such as LCC and LCC-F12, are also presented. Locally and explicitly correlated methods are found to be computationally effective and reliable methods enabling the application of fragment-based methods for larger systems.

  16. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M.

    2015-04-15

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H{sub ∞} control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  17. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H(∞) control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments. PMID:25933864

  18. Simulating the Dynamics of Earth's Core: Using NCCS Supercomputers Speeds Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    If one wanted to study Earth's core directly, one would have to drill through about 1,800 miles of solid rock to reach liquid core-keeping the tunnel from collapsing under pressures that are more than 1 million atmospheres and then sink an instrument package to the bottom that could operate at 8,000 F with 10,000 tons of force crushing every square inch of its surface. Even then, several of these tunnels would probably be needed to obtain enough data. Faced with difficult or impossible tasks such as these, scientists use other available sources of information - such as seismology, mineralogy, geomagnetism, geodesy, and, above all, physical principles - to derive a model of the core and, study it by running computer simulations. One NASA researcher is doing just that on NCCS computers. Physicist and applied mathematician Weijia Kuang, of the Space Geodesy Branch, and his collaborators at Goddard have what he calls the,"second - ever" working, usable, self-consistent, fully dynamic, three-dimensional geodynamic model (see "The Geodynamic Theory"). Kuang runs his model simulations on the supercomputers at the NCCS. He and Jeremy Bloxham, of Harvard University, developed the original version, written in Fortran 77, in 1996.

  19. Ridge-based bias potentials to accelerate molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Penghao; Duncan, Juliana; Zhang, Liang; Henkelman, Graeme

    2015-12-28

    An effective way to accelerate rare events in molecular dynamics simulations is to apply a bias potential which destabilizes minima without biasing the transitions between stable states. This approach, called hyperdynamics, is limited by our ability to construct general bias potentials without having to understand the reaction mechanisms available to the system, a priori. Current bias potentials are typically constructed in terms of a metric which quantifies the distance that a trajectory deviates from the reactant state minimum. Such metrics include detection of negative curvatures of the potential, an energy increase, or deviations in bond lengths from the minimum. When one of these properties exceeds a critical value, the bias potentials are constructed to approach zero. A problem common to each of these schemes is that their effectiveness decreases rapidly with system size. We attribute this problem to a diminishing volume defined by the metrics around a reactant minimum as compared to the total volume of the reactant state basin. In this work, we mitigate the dimensionality scaling problem by constructing bias potentials that are based upon the distance to the boundary of the reactant basin. This distance is quantified in two ways: (i) by following the minimum mode direction to the reactant boundary and (ii) by training a machine learning algorithm to give an analytic expression for the boundary to which the distance can be calculated. Both of these ridge-based bias potentials are demonstrated to scale qualitatively better with dimensionality than the existing methods. We attribute this improvement to a greater filling fraction of the reactant state using the ridge-based bias potentials as compared to the standard potentials. PMID:26723648

  20. Dynamic Inversion based Control of a Docking Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Nilesh V.; Ippolito, Corey; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2006-01-01

    The problem of position and attitude control of the Stewart platform based docking mechanism is considered motivated by its future application in space missions requiring the autonomous docking capability. The control design is initiated based on the framework of the intelligent flight control architecture being developed at NASA Ames Research Center. In this paper, the baseline position and attitude control system is designed using dynamic inversion with proportional-integral augmentation. The inverse dynamics uses a Newton-Euler formulation that includes the platform dynamics, the dynamics of the individual legs along with viscous friction in the joints. Simulation results are presented using forward dynamics simulated by a commercial physics engine that builds the system as individual elements with appropriate joints and uses constrained numerical integration,

  1. Two-dimensional dynamical drainage-flow model with Monte Carlo transport and diffusion calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, A.J.; Smith, F.G. III

    1982-09-01

    A simplified drainage flow model was developed from the equations of motion and the mass continuity equation in a terrain-following coordinate system. The equations were reduced to a two-dimensional system by vertically integrating over the drainage layer. A numerical solution for the drainage layer depth and wind field was obtained using a fourth order finite difference scheme. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to calculate the transport and diffusion of tracer gases. Model simulations of drainage flow have been compared to observations from the 1980 Geysers area experiments. The Geysers area is mountainous, with steep slopes, some of which are steeper than 10/sup 0/. The model predictions of wind direction are good, but with speeds are not predicted as accurately. Simulation of perfluorocarbon tracer concentrations were in good agreement with observed values. Maximum tracer concentration was predicted to within a factor of five. While predicted plume arrival was somewhat early, the model closely predicted the duration of the passage for plume concentrations greater than 0.5 ppt. The two-dimensional model was found to work equally well in simulating drainage flows over the Savannah River Plant (SRP) and surrounding terrain with slopes of around 1/sup 0/. The model correctly predicted that drainage winds at SRP are usually shallower than 60 m, which is the height at which meteorological towers measure the winds in the SRP production areas. The modest computational requirements of the model make it suitable for use in screening potential industrial sites.

  2. Temperature and pressure effects on GFP mutants: explaining spectral changes by molecular dynamics simulations and TD-DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Jacchetti, Emanuela; Gabellieri, Edi; Cioni, Patrizia; Bizzarri, Ranieri; Nifosì, Riccardo

    2016-05-14

    By combining spectroscopic measurements under high pressure with molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics calculations we investigate how sub-angstrom structural perturbations are able to tune protein function. We monitored the variations in fluorescence output of two green fluorescent protein mutants (termed Mut2 and Mut2Y, the latter containing the key T203Y mutation) subjected to pressures up to 600 MPa, at various temperatures in the 280-320 K range. By performing 150 ns molecular dynamics simulations of the protein structures at various pressures, we evidenced subtle changes in conformation and dynamics around the light-absorbing chromophore. Such changes explain the measured spectral tuning in the case of the sizable 120 cm(-1) red-shift observed for pressurized Mut2Y, but absent in Mut2. Previous work [Barstow et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A., 2008, 105, 13362] on pressure effects on GFP also involved a T203Y mutant. On the basis of cryocooling X-ray crystallography, the pressure-induced fluorescence blue shift at low temperature (77 K) was attributed to key changes in relative conformation of the chromophore and Tyr203 phenol ring. At room temperature, however, a red shift was observed at high pressure, analogous to the one we observe in Mut2Y. Our investigation of structural variations in compressed Mut2Y also explains their result, bridging the gap between low-temperature and room-temperature high-pressure effects. PMID:27102429

  3. Dynamical coupling of plasmons and molecular excitations by hybrid quantum/classical calculations: time-domain approach.

    PubMed

    Sakko, Arto; Rossi, Tuomas P; Nieminen, Risto M

    2014-08-01

    The presence of plasmonic material influences the optical properties of nearby molecules in untrivial ways due to the dynamical plasmon-molecule coupling. We combine quantum and classical calculation schemes to study this phenomenon in a hybrid system that consists of a Na(2) molecule located in the gap between two Au/Ag nanoparticles. The molecule is treated quantum-mechanically with time-dependent density-functional theory, and the nanoparticles with quasistatic classical electrodynamics. The nanoparticle dimer has a plasmon resonance in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum, and the Na(2) molecule has an electron-hole excitation in the same energy range. Due to the dynamical interaction of the two subsystems the plasmon and the molecular excitations couple, creating a hybridized molecular-plasmon excited state. This state has unique properties that yield e.g. enhanced photoabsorption compared to the freestanding Na(2) molecule. The computational approach used enables decoupling of the mutual plasmon-molecule interaction, and our analysis verifies that it is not legitimate to neglect the back coupling effect when describing the dynamical interaction between plasmonic material and nearby molecules. Time-resolved analysis shows nearly instantaneous formation of the coupled state, and provides an intuitive picture of the underlying physics. PMID:25028486

  4. Dynamical coupling of plasmons and molecular excitations by hybrid quantum/classical calculations: time-domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakko, Arto; Rossi, Tuomas P.; Nieminen, Risto M.

    2014-08-01

    The presence of plasmonic material influences the optical properties of nearby molecules in untrivial ways due to the dynamical plasmon-molecule coupling. We combine quantum and classical calculation schemes to study this phenomenon in a hybrid system that consists of a Na2 molecule located in the gap between two Au/Ag nanoparticles. The molecule is treated quantum-mechanically with time-dependent density-functional theory, and the nanoparticles with quasistatic classical electrodynamics. The nanoparticle dimer has a plasmon resonance in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum, and the Na2 molecule has an electron-hole excitation in the same energy range. Due to the dynamical interaction of the two subsystems the plasmon and the molecular excitations couple, creating a hybridized molecular-plasmon excited state. This state has unique properties that yield e.g. enhanced photoabsorption compared to the freestanding Na2 molecule. The computational approach used enables decoupling of the mutual plasmon-molecule interaction, and our analysis verifies that it is not legitimate to neglect the backcoupling effect when describing the dynamical interaction between plasmonic material and nearby molecules. Time-resolved analysis shows nearly instantaneous formation of the coupled state, and provides an intuitive picture of the underlying physics.

  5. Theoretical study of dehydration-carbonation reaction on brucite surface based on ab initio quantum mechanic calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churakov, S. V.; Parrinello, M.

    2003-04-01

    The carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH)2) has been considered as a potential technology for cleaning industrial carbon dioxide waste. The kinetics of the reaction Mg(OH)2 + CO2 -> MgCO3 + H2O have been studied experimentally at 573°C by Bearat at al. [1]. Their experiments suggest that the carbonation of magnesium hydroxide proceeds by the reaction Mg(OH)2 -> MgO + H2O followed by the adsorption of CO2 molecules on the dehydrated brucite surface. Due to the large difference in volumes between Mg(OH)2 and MgO, dehydration causes the formation of dislocations and cracks, allowing water molecules to leave the brucite surface and facilitating the advance of the carbonation front in the bulk solid. The detailed mechanism of this process is however unknown. We used the Car-Parrinello ab initio molecular dynamics method to study the structure and dynamics of the (0001), (1-100) and (11-20) surfaces of brucit and calculated the enthalpy and activation barrier of H2O nucleation and dehydration on different surfaces. The results obtained are in agreement with previous studies of brucite dehydration by Masini and Bernasconi [2]. The reactive Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics method [3] has been applied to investigate the detailed mechanism of the dehydration-carbonation reaction at the (1-100) interface of brucite with the gas phase. Based on the results of our MD simulations and the calculated enthalpy of CO2 adsorption on the dehydrated brucite surfaces we propose a mechanism for the dehydration/carbonation reaction. [1] Bearat H, McKelvy MJ, Chizmeshya AVG, Sharma R, Carpenter RW (2002) J. Amer. Ceram. Soc. 85(4):742 [2] Masini P and Bernasconi M (2001) J. Phys. Cond. Mat. 13: 1-12 [3] Iannuzzi M, Laio A and Parrinello M (2003) Phys. Rev. Lett. (submitted)

  6. A NASTRAN DMAP procedure for calculation of base excitation modal participation factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, W. R.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for calculating the modal participation factors for base excitation problems using a DMAP alter to the NASTRAN real eigenvalue analysis Rigid Format. The DMAP program automates the generation of the seismic mass to add to the degrees of freedom representing the shaker input directions and calculates the modal participation factors. These are shown in the paper to be a good measure of the maximum acceleration expected at any point on the structure when the subsequent frequency response analysis is run.

  7. Dynamic projecting IR zoom-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturlesi, Benjamin E.; Mangoubi, Samuel; Ben-David, Emanuel

    1995-09-01

    An IR target simulating projector system may sometimes require zooming lenses to simulate continuously the target's increasing size as a missile closes the range. In addition, special opto-mechanical layouts may sometimes be needed to allow cascaded action of two or more zooms to increase the zooming range, or to present the missile simultaneously two or more spectral regions. The zooms in these systems may differ in some important characteristics from the more conventional types: (1) The maximum speed and acceleration of their moving parts, as required by the dynamics of the missile-target approach scenario, are to be limited by the performance of commercially available stages carrying those parts, and (2) the motion control system must assure strict adherence to the 'zoom function' (relative position of the zoom's moving parts) to avoid defocusing during the zooming phase. In this paper we describe the implications of complying with these requirements on implementations actually designed and executed.

  8. A program for performing exact quantum dynamics calculations using cylindrical polar coordinates: A nanotube application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skouteris, Dimitris; Gervasi, Osvaldo; Laganà, Antonio

    2009-03-01

    A program that uses the time-dependent wavepacket method to study the motion of structureless particles in a force field of quasi-cylindrical symmetry is presented here. The program utilises cylindrical polar coordinates to express the wavepacket, which is subsequently propagated using a Chebyshev expansion of the Schrödinger propagator. Time-dependent exit flux as well as energy-dependent S matrix elements can be obtained for all states of the particle (describing its angular momentum component along the nanotube axis and the excitation of the radial degree of freedom in the cylinder). The program has been used to study the motion of an H atom across a carbon nanotube. Program summaryProgram title: CYLWAVE Catalogue identifier: AECL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3673 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 35 237 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: RISC workstations Operating system: UNIX RAM: 120 MBytes Classification: 16.7, 16.10 External routines: SUNSOFT performance library (not essential) TFFT2D.F (Temperton Fast Fourier Transform), BESSJ.F (from Numerical Recipes, for the calculation of Bessel functions) (included in the distribution file). Nature of problem: Time evolution of the state of a structureless particle in a quasicylindrical potential. Solution method: Time dependent wavepacket propagation. Running time: 50000 secs. The test run supplied with the distribution takes about 10 minutes to complete.

  9. Modeling and Ab initio Calculations of Thermal Transport in Si-Based Clathrates and Solar Perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuping

    2015-03-01

    We present calculations of the thermal transport coefficients of Si-based clathrates and solar perovskites, as obtained from ab initio calculations and models, where all input parameters derived from first principles. We elucidated the physical mechanisms responsible for the measured low thermal conductivity in Si-based clatherates and predicted their electronic properties and mobilities, which were later confirmed experimentally. We also predicted that by appropriately tuning the carrier concentration, the thermoelectric figure of merit of Sn and Pb based perovskites may reach values ranging between 1 and 2, which could possibly be further increased by optimizing the lattice thermal conductivity through engineering perovskite superlattices. Work done in collaboration with Prof. G. Galli, and supported by DOE/BES Grant No. DE-FG0206ER46262.

  10. Methods for Calculating the Absolute Entropy and free energy of biological systems based on ideas from Polymer Physics

    PubMed Central

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    2009-01-01

    The commonly used simulation techniques, Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) are of a dynamical type which enables one to sample system configurations i correctly with the Boltzmann probability, PiB while the value of PiB is not provided directly; therefore, it is difficult to obtain the absolute entropy, S ~ -ln PiB, and the Helmholtz free energy, F. With a different simulation approach developed in polymer physics, a chain is grown step-by-step with transition probabilities (TPs), and thus their product is the value of the construction probability; therefore, the entropy is known. Because all exact simulation methods are equivalent, i.e. they lead to the same averages and fluctuations of physical properties, one can treat an MC or MD sample as if its members have rather been generated step-by-step. Thus, each configuration i of the sample can be reconstructed (from nothing) by calculating the TPs with which it could have been constructed. This idea applies also to bulk systems such as fluids or magnets. This approach has led earlier to the “local states” (LS) and the “hypothetical scanning” (HS) methods, which are approximate in nature. A recent development is the hypothetical scanning Monte Carlo (HSMC) (or molecular dynamics, HSMD) method which is based on stochastic TPs where all interactions are taken into account. In this respect HSMC(D) can be viewed as exact and the only approximation involved is due to insufficient MC(MD) sampling for calculating the TPs. The validity of HSMC has been established by applying it first to liquid argon, TIP3P water, self-avoiding walks, and polyglycine models, where the results for F were found to agree with those obtained by other methods. Subsequently, HSMD was applied to mobile loops of the enzymes porcine pancreatic α-amylase and acetylcholineesterase in explicit water, where the difference of F between the bound and free states of the loop was calculated. Currently HSMD is being extended for

  11. Methods for calculating the absolute entropy and free energy of biological systems based on ideas from polymer physics.

    PubMed

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    2010-01-01

    The commonly used simulation techniques, Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) are of a dynamical type which enables one to sample system configurations i correctly with the Boltzmann probability, P(i)(B), while the value of P(i)(B) is not provided directly; therefore, it is difficult to obtain the absolute entropy, S approximately -ln P(i)(B), and the Helmholtz free energy, F. With a different simulation approach developed in polymer physics, a chain is grown step-by-step with transition probabilities (TPs), and thus their product is the value of the construction probability; therefore, the entropy is known. Because all exact simulation methods are equivalent, i.e. they lead to the same averages and fluctuations of physical properties, one can treat an MC or MD sample as if its members have rather been generated step-by-step. Thus, each configuration i of the sample can be reconstructed (from nothing) by calculating the TPs with which it could have been constructed. This idea applies also to bulk systems such as fluids or magnets. This approach has led earlier to the "local states" (LS) and the "hypothetical scanning" (HS) methods, which are approximate in nature. A recent development is the hypothetical scanning Monte Carlo (HSMC) (or molecular dynamics, HSMD) method which is based on stochastic TPs where all interactions are taken into account. In this respect, HSMC(D) can be viewed as exact and the only approximation involved is due to insufficient MC(MD) sampling for calculating the TPs. The validity of HSMC has been established by applying it first to liquid argon, TIP3P water, self-avoiding walks (SAW), and polyglycine models, where the results for F were found to agree with those obtained by other methods. Subsequently, HSMD was applied to mobile loops of the enzymes porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase and acetylcholinesterase in explicit water, where the difference in F between the bound and free states of the loop was calculated. Currently

  12. An Extension Dynamic Model Based on BDI Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wang; Feng, Zhu; Hua, Geng; WangJing, Zhu

    this paper's researching is based on the model of BDI Agent. Firstly, This paper analyze the deficiencies of the traditional BDI Agent model, Then propose an extension dynamic model of BDI Agent based on the traditional ones. It can quickly achieve the internal interaction of the tradition model of BDI Agent, deal with complex issues under dynamic and open environment and achieve quick reaction of the model. The new model is a natural and reasonable model by verifying the origin of civilization using the model of monkeys to eat sweet potato based on the design of the extension dynamic model. It is verified to be feasible by comparing the extended dynamic BDI Agent model with the traditional BDI Agent Model uses the SWARM, it has important theoretical significance.

  13. Mechanism of Titin Unfolding by Force: Insight from Quasi-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Pabón, Germán; Amzel, L. Mario

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the unfolding by force of one of the immunoglobulin domains of the muscle protein titin using molecular dynamics simulations at 300 K. Previous studies, done at constant pulling rates, showed that under the effect of the force two strands connected to each other by six backbone H-bonds are pulled apart. No details about the mechanism of H-bond breaking were provided. Our simulation protocol “pull and wait” was designed to correspond to very slow pulling, more similar to the rates used in experiments than are the protocols used in previous computational studies. Under these conditions interstrand backbone H-bonds are not “ripped apart” by the application of the force. Instead, small elongations produced by the force weaken specific backbone H-bonds with respect to water-backbone H-bonds. These weakened bonds allow a single water molecule to make H-bonds to the CO and the NH of the same backbone H-bond while they are still bound to each other. The backbone H-bond then breaks (distance >3.6 Å), but its donor and acceptor atoms remain bound to the same water molecule. Further separation of the chains takes place when a second water molecule makes an H-bond with either the protein backbone donor or acceptor atom. Thus, the force does not directly break the main chain H-bonds: it destabilizes them in such a way that they are replaced by H-bonds to water. With this mechanism, the force necessary to break all the H-bonds required to separate the two strands will be strongly dependent on the pulling speed. Further simulations carried out at low forces but long waiting times (≥ 500 ps, ≤ 10 ns) show that, given enough time, even a very small pulling force (<400 pN) is sufficient to destabilize the interstrand H-bonds and allow them to be replaced by H-bonds to two water molecules. As expected, increasing the temperature to 350 K allows the interstrand H-bonds to break at lower forces than those required at 300 K. PMID:16632514

  14. Comparison of lysimeter based and calculated ASCE reference evapotranspiration in a subhumid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolz, Reinhard; Cepuder, Peter; Eitzinger, Josef

    2016-04-01

    The standardized form of the well-known FAO Penman-Monteith equation, published by the Environmental and Water Resources Institute of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE-EWRI), is recommended as a standard procedure for calculating reference evapotranspiration (ET ref) and subsequently plant water requirements. Applied and validated under different climatic conditions it generally achieved good results compared to other methods. However, several studies documented deviations between measured and calculated reference evapotranspiration depending on environmental and weather conditions. Therefore, it seems generally advisable to evaluate the model under local environmental conditions. In this study, reference evapotranspiration was determined at a subhumid site in northeastern Austria from 2005 to 2010 using a large weighing lysimeter (ET lys). The measured data were compared with ET ref calculations. Daily values differed slightly during a year, at which ET ref was generally overestimated at small values, whereas it was rather underestimated when ET was large, which is supported also by other studies. In our case, advection of sensible heat proved to have an impact, but it could not explain the differences exclusively. Obviously, there were also other influences, such as seasonal varying surface resistance or albedo. Generally, the ASCE-EWRI equation for daily time steps performed best at average weather conditions. The outcomes should help to correctly interpret ET ref data in the region and in similar environments and improve knowledge on the dynamics of influencing factors causing deviations.

  15. Straintronics-based magnetic tunneling junction: Dynamic and static behavior analysis and material investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barangi, Mahmood; Mazumder, Pinaki

    2014-04-01

    We theoretically study the dynamic and static effects of mechanical stress on a straintronics device that includes a piezoelectric film combined with a magnetic tunneling junction. The inverse magnetostriction effect is studied in detail by realizing the varying magnetic susceptibility of the nanomagnet under stress. A dynamic model is developed based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, which provides a platform to simulate the magnetization vector's behavior, critical flipping voltage, and delay properties. Furthermore, by converting the LLG equation into a 2nd order damping differential equation, we develop a proximate approach. This approach predicts the dynamic behavior of the magnetization vector and its dependency on material properties and applied voltage across the device without using sophisticated numerical calculations of the LLG model. Different dynamic and static material properties are observed by simulating five common magnetostrictive materials, including a newly discovered alloy, Galfenol.

  16. Optical characterization and crystal field calculations for some erbium based solid state materials for laser refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Z.; Qiu, Z.; Johnson, Jackie; Homerick, Uwe

    2009-02-01

    The potential of three erbium based solids hosts has been investigated for laser cooling. Absorption and emission spectra have been studied for the low lying IR transitions of erbium that are relevant to recent reports of cooling using the 4I15/2-4I9/2 and4I15/2 -4I13/2 transitions. Experimental studies have been performed for erbium in three hosts; ZBLAN glass and KPb2Cl5 and Cs2NaYCl6 crystals. In order to estimate the efficiencies of cooling, theoretical calculations have been performed for the cubic Elpasolite (Cs2NaYCl6 ) crystal. These calculations also provide a first principle insight into the cooling efficiency for non-cubic and glassy hosts where such calculations are not possible.

  17. Structural predictions based on the compositions of cathodic materials by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Lian, Fang; Chen, Ning; Hao, Zhen-jia; Chou, Kuo-chih

    2015-05-01

    A first-principles method is applied to comparatively study the stability of lithium metal oxides with layered or spinel structures to predict the most energetically favorable structure for different compositions. The binding and reaction energies of the real or virtual layered LiMO2 and spinel LiM2O4 (M = Sc-Cu, Y-Ag, Mg-Sr, and Al-In) are calculated. The effect of element M on the structural stability, especially in the case of multiple-cation compounds, is discussed herein. The calculation results indicate that the phase stability depends on both the binding and reaction energies. The oxidation state of element M also plays a role in determining the dominant structure, i.e., layered or spinel phase. Moreover, calculation-based theoretical predictions of the phase stability of the doped materials agree with the previously reported experimental data.

  18. Efficient algorithms for semiclassical instanton calculations based on discretized path integrals

    SciTech Connect

    Kawatsu, Tsutomu E-mail: smiura@mail.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Miura, Shinichi E-mail: smiura@mail.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2014-07-14

    Path integral instanton method is a promising way to calculate the tunneling splitting of energies for degenerated two state systems. In order to calculate the tunneling splitting, we need to take the zero temperature limit, or the limit of infinite imaginary time duration. In the method developed by Richardson and Althorpe [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 054109 (2011)], the limit is simply replaced by the sufficiently long imaginary time. In the present study, we have developed a new formula of the tunneling splitting based on the discretized path integrals to take the limit analytically. We have applied our new formula to model systems, and found that this approach can significantly reduce the computational cost and gain the numerical accuracy. We then developed the method combined with the electronic structure calculations to obtain the accurate interatomic potential on the fly. We present an application of our ab initio instanton method to the ammonia umbrella flip motion.

  19. GPU-based acceleration of free energy calculations in solid state physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszewski, Michał; Ptok, Andrzej; Crivelli, Dawid; Gardas, Bartłomiej

    2015-07-01

    Obtaining a thermodynamically accurate phase diagram through numerical calculations is a computationally expensive problem that is crucially important to understanding the complex phenomena of solid state physics, such as superconductivity. In this work we show how this type of analysis can be significantly accelerated through the use of modern GPUs. We illustrate this with a concrete example of free energy calculation in multi-band iron-based superconductors, known to exhibit a superconducting state with oscillating order parameter (OP). Our approach can also be used for classical BCS-type superconductors. With a customized algorithm and compiler tuning we are able to achieve a 19×speedup compared to the CPU (119×compared to a single CPU core), reducing calculation time from minutes to mere seconds, enabling the analysis of larger systems and the elimination of finite size effects.

  20. Understanding Iron-based catalysts with efficient Oxygen reduction activity from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, Hasnain; Barbiellini, B.; Jia, Q.; Tylus, U.; Strickland, K.; Bansil, A.; Mukerjee, S.

    2015-03-01

    Catalysts based on Fe/N/C clusters can support the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) without the use of expensive metals such as platinum. These systems can also prevent some poisonous species to block the active sites from the reactant. We have performed spin-polarized calculations on various Fe/N/C fragments using the Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) code. Some results are compared to similar calculations obtained with the Gaussian code. We investigate the partial density of states (PDOS) of the 3d orbitals near the Fermi level and calculate the binding energies of several ligands. Correlations of the binding energies with the 3d electronic PDOS's are used to propose electronic descriptors of the ORR associated with the 3d states of Fe. We also suggest a structural model for the most active site with a ferrous ion (Fe2+) in the high spin state or the so-called Doublet 3 (D3).

  1. Improvements of the Ray-Tracing Based Method Calculating Hypocentral Loci for Earthquake Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Hypocentral loci are very useful to reliable and visual earthquake location. However, they can hardly be analytically expressed when the velocity model is complex. One of methods numerically calculating them is based on a minimum traveltime tree algorithm for tracing rays: a focal locus is represented in terms of ray paths in its residual field from the minimum point (namely initial point) to low residual points (referred as reference points of the focal locus). The method has no restrictions on the complexity of the velocity model but still lacks the ability of correctly dealing with multi-segment loci. Additionally, it is rather laborious to set calculation parameters for obtaining loci with satisfying completeness and fineness. In this study, we improve the ray-tracing based numerical method to overcome its advantages. (1) Reference points of a hypocentral locus are selected from nodes of the model cells that it goes through, by means of a so-called peeling method. (2) The calculation domain of a hypocentral locus is defined as such a low residual area that its connected regions each include one segment of the locus and hence all the focal locus segments are respectively calculated with the minimum traveltime tree algorithm for tracing rays by repeatedly assigning the minimum residual reference point among those that have not been traced as an initial point. (3) Short ray paths without branching are removed to make the calculated locus finer. Numerical tests show that the improved method becomes capable of efficiently calculating complete and fine hypocentral loci of earthquakes in a complex model.

  2. Validation of Force Fields of Rubber through Glass-Transition Temperature Calculation by Microsecond Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pragati; Roy, Sudip; Karimi-Varzaneh, Hossein Ali

    2016-02-25

    Microsecond atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulation has been employed to calculate the glass-transition temperature (Tg) of cis- and trans-1,4-polybutadiene (PB) and 1,4-polyisoprene (PI). Both all-atomistic and united-atom models have been simulated using force fields, already available in literature. The accuracy of these decade old force fields has been tested by comparing calculated glass-transition temperatures to the corresponding experimental values. Tg depicts the phase transition in elastomers and substantially affects various physical properties of polymers, and hence the reproducibility of Tg becomes very crucial from a thermodynamic point of view. Such validation using Tg also evaluates the ability of these force fields to be used for advanced materials like rubber nanocomposites, where Tg is greatly affected by the presence of fillers. We have calculated Tg for a total of eight systems, featuring all-atom and united-atom models of cis- and trans-PI and -PB, which are the major constituents of natural and synthetic rubber. Tuning and refinement of the force fields has also been done using quantum-chemical calculations to obtain desirable density and Tg. Thus, a set of properly validated force fields, capable of reproducing various macroscopic properties of rubber, has been provided. A novel polymer equilibration protocol, involving potential energy convergence as the equilibration criterion, has been proposed. We demonstrate that not only macroscopic polymer properties like density, thermal expansion coefficient, and Tg but also local structural characteristics like end-to-end distance (R) and radius of gyration (Rg) and mechanical properties like bulk modulus have also been equilibrated using our strategy. Complete decay of end-to-end vector autocorrelation function with time also supports proper equilibration using our strategy. PMID:26836395

  3. Photon SAF calculation based on the Chinese mathematical phantom and comparison with the ORNL phantoms.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Rui; Li, Junli; Zhang, Zhan; Wu, Zhen; Zeng, Zhi; Fan, Jiajin

    2008-12-01

    The Chinese mathematical phantom (CMP) is a stylized human body model developed based on the methods of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) mathematical phantom series (OMPS), and data from Reference Asian Man and Chinese Reference Man. It is constructed for radiation dose estimation for Mongolians, whose anatomical parameters are different from those of Caucasians to some extent. Specific absorbed fractions (SAF) are useful quantities for the primary estimation of internal radiation dose. In this paper, a general Monte Carlo code, Monte Carlo N-Particle Code (MCNP) is used to transport particles and calculate SAF. A new variance reduction technique, called the "pointing probability with force collision" method, is implemented into MCNP to reduce the calculation uncertainty, especially for a small-volume target organ. Finally, SAF data for all 31 organs of both sexes of CMP are calculated. A comparison between SAF based on male phantoms of CMP and OMPS demonstrates that the differences apparently exist, and more than 80% of SAF data based on CMP are larger than that of OMPS. However, the differences are acceptable (the differences are above one order of magnitude only in less than 3% of situations) considering the differences in physique. Furthermore, trends in the SAF with increasing photon energy based on the two phantoms agree well. This model complements existing phantoms of different age, sex and ethnicity. PMID:19001898

  4. Dynamic holographic three-dimensional projection based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator and cylindrical fog screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhenxiang; Zheng, Huadong; Lu, Xiaoqian; Gao, Hongyue; Yu, Yingjie

    2015-10-01

    A dynamic holographic three-dimensional (3D) projection based on phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) and cylindrical fog 3D screen is introduced. Sequential kinoforms of a 3D real existing object are calculated from sixty viewing angles using the slice-based fresnel diffraction algorithm. To suppress speckle noise of reconstructed images, sub-kinoforms for each viewing angle are calculated by adding dynamic pseudorandom initial phase factor into each object plane. The sequential kinoforms are reconstructed by a holographic reconstruction system based on phase-only LC-SLM. A specially designed cylindrical fog 3D screen is used as the scattered carrying medium to project the dynamic 3D images. Through our holographic 3D projection system, a vivid dynamic holographic reconstructed projection image can be observed by some observers at the same time.

  5. GPU-based ultra-fast dose calculation using a finite size pencil beam model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xuejun; Choi, Dongju; Men, Chunhua; Pan, Hubert; Majumdar, Amitava; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-10-01

    Online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is an attractive concept that promises the ability to deliver an optimal treatment in response to the inter-fraction variability in patient anatomy. However, it has yet to be realized due to technical limitations. Fast dose deposit coefficient calculation is a critical component of the online planning process that is required for plan optimization of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Computer graphics processing units (GPUs) are well suited to provide the requisite fast performance for the data-parallel nature of dose calculation. In this work, we develop a dose calculation engine based on a finite-size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm and a GPU parallel computing framework. The developed framework can accommodate any FSPB model. We test our implementation in the case of a water phantom and the case of a prostate cancer patient with varying beamlet and voxel sizes. All testing scenarios achieved speedup ranging from 200 to 400 times when using a NVIDIA Tesla C1060 card in comparison with a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU. The computational time for calculating dose deposition coefficients for a nine-field prostate IMRT plan with this new framework is less than 1 s. This indicates that the GPU-based FSPB algorithm is well suited for online re-planning for adaptive radiotherapy.

  6. GPU-based ultra-fast dose calculation using a finite size pencil beam model.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xuejun; Choi, Dongju; Men, Chunhua; Pan, Hubert; Majumdar, Amitava; Jiang, Steve B

    2009-10-21

    Online adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is an attractive concept that promises the ability to deliver an optimal treatment in response to the inter-fraction variability in patient anatomy. However, it has yet to be realized due to technical limitations. Fast dose deposit coefficient calculation is a critical component of the online planning process that is required for plan optimization of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Computer graphics processing units (GPUs) are well suited to provide the requisite fast performance for the data-parallel nature of dose calculation. In this work, we develop a dose calculation engine based on a finite-size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm and a GPU parallel computing framework. The developed framework can accommodate any FSPB model. We test our implementation in the case of a water phantom and the case of a prostate cancer patient with varying beamlet and voxel sizes. All testing scenarios achieved speedup ranging from 200 to 400 times when using a NVIDIA Tesla C1060 card in comparison with a 2.27 GHz Intel Xeon CPU. The computational time for calculating dose deposition coefficients for a nine-field prostate IMRT plan with this new framework is less than 1 s. This indicates that the GPU-based FSPB algorithm is well suited for online re-planning for adaptive radiotherapy. PMID:19794244

  7. Parameterizing Coefficients of a POD-Based Dynamical System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalb, Virginia L.

    2010-01-01

    A method of parameterizing the coefficients of a dynamical system based of a proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) representing the flow dynamics of a viscous fluid has been introduced. (A brief description of POD is presented in the immediately preceding article.) The present parameterization method is intended to enable construction of the dynamical system to accurately represent the temporal evolution of the flow dynamics over a range of Reynolds numbers. The need for this or a similar method arises as follows: A procedure that includes direct numerical simulation followed by POD, followed by Galerkin projection to a dynamical system has been proven to enable representation of flow dynamics by a low-dimensional model at the Reynolds number of the simulation. However, a more difficult task is to obtain models that are valid over a range of Reynolds numbers. Extrapolation of low-dimensional models by use of straightforward Reynolds-number-based parameter continuation has proven to be inadequate for successful prediction of flows. A key part of the problem of constructing a dynamical system to accurately represent the temporal evolution of the flow dynamics over a range of Reynolds numbers is the problem of understanding and providing for the variation of the coefficients of the dynamical system with the Reynolds number. Prior methods do not enable capture of temporal dynamics over ranges of Reynolds numbers in low-dimensional models, and are not even satisfactory when large numbers of modes are used. The basic idea of the present method is to solve the problem through a suitable parameterization of the coefficients of the dynamical system. The parameterization computations involve utilization of the transfer of kinetic energy between modes as a function of Reynolds number. The thus-parameterized dynamical system accurately predicts the flow dynamics and is applicable to a range of flow problems in the dynamical regime around the Hopf bifurcation. Parameter

  8. A Blog-Based Dynamic Learning Map

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Kun Te; Huang, Yueh-Min; Jeng, Yu-Lin; Wang, Tzone-I

    2008-01-01

    Problem-based learning is a goal directed and constructive process for learners. When meeting problems, learners usually force themselves to form work groups in order to find a solution. Currently, blogs are becoming more popular and in fact has formed a community wherein people can share their learning experiences with others. Many pedagogical…

  9. Loads and low frequency dynamics - An ENVIRONET data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garba, John A.

    1988-01-01

    The loads and low frequency dynamics data base, part of Environet, is described with particular attention given to its development and contents. The objective of the data base is to provide the payload designer with design approaches and design data to meet STS safety requirements. Currently the data base consists of the following sections: abstract, scope, glossary, requirements, interaction with other environments, summary of the loads analysis process, design considerations, guidelines for payload design loads, information data base, and references.

  10. Dynamic Evolution Model Based on Social Network Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xi; Gou, Zhi-Jian; Zhang, Shi-Bin; Zhao, Wen

    2013-11-01

    Based on the analysis of evolutionary characteristics of public opinion in social networking services (SNS), in the paper we propose a dynamic evolution model, in which opinions are coupled with topology. This model shows the clustering phenomenon of opinions in dynamic network evolution. The simulation results show that the model can fit the data from a social network site. The dynamic evolution of networks accelerates the opinion, separation and aggregation. The scale and the number of clusters are influenced by confidence limit and rewiring probability. Dynamic changes of the topology reduce the number of isolated nodes, while the increased confidence limit allows nodes to communicate more sufficiently. The two effects make the distribution of opinion more neutral. The dynamic evolution of networks generates central clusters with high connectivity and high betweenness, which make it difficult to control public opinions in SNS.

  11. Modelling lateral beam quality variations in pencil kernel based photon dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyholm, T.; Olofsson, J.; Ahnesjö, A.; Karlsson, M.

    2006-08-01

    Standard treatment machines for external radiotherapy are designed to yield flat dose distributions at a representative treatment depth. The common method to reach this goal is to use a flattening filter to decrease the fluence in the centre of the beam. A side effect of this filtering is that the average energy of the beam is generally lower at a distance from the central axis, a phenomenon commonly referred to as off-axis softening. The off-axis softening results in a relative change in beam quality that is almost independent of machine brand and model. Central axis dose calculations using pencil beam kernels show no drastic loss in accuracy when the off-axis beam quality variations are neglected. However, for dose calculated at off-axis positions the effect should be considered, otherwise errors of several per cent can be introduced. This work proposes a method to explicitly include the effect of off-axis softening in pencil kernel based photon dose calculations for arbitrary positions in a radiation field. Variations of pencil kernel values are modelled through a generic relation between half value layer (HVL) thickness and off-axis position for standard treatment machines. The pencil kernel integration for dose calculation is performed through sampling of energy fluence and beam quality in sectors of concentric circles around the calculation point. The method is fully based on generic data and therefore does not require any specific measurements for characterization of the off-axis softening effect, provided that the machine performance is in agreement with the assumed HVL variations. The model is verified versus profile measurements at different depths and through a model self-consistency check, using the dose calculation model to estimate HVL values at off-axis positions. A comparison between calculated and measured profiles at different depths showed a maximum relative error of 4% without explicit modelling of off-axis softening. The maximum relative error

  12. Dose calculation from a D-D-reaction-based BSA for boron neutron capture synovectomy.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Khalid; Naqvi, A A; Maalej, N; Elshahat, B

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to calculate dose in a knee phantom from a D-D-reaction-based Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). The BSA consists of a D(d,n)-reaction-based neutron source enclosed inside a polyethylene moderator and graphite reflector. The polyethylene moderator and graphite reflector sizes were optimized to deliver the highest ratio of thermal to fast neutron yield at the knee phantom. Then neutron dose was calculated at various depths in a knee phantom loaded with boron and therapeutic ratios of synovium dose/skin dose and synovium dose/bone dose were determined. Normalized to same boron loading in synovium, the values of the therapeutic ratios obtained in the present study are 12-30 times higher than the published values. PMID:19828325

  13. Effect of composition on antiphase boundary energy in Ni3Al based alloys: Ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatov, O. I.; Lomaev, I. L.; Gornostyrev, Yu. N.; Ruban, A. V.; Furrer, D.; Venkatesh, V.; Novikov, D. L.; Burlatsky, S. F.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of composition on the antiphase boundary (APB) energy of Ni-based L 12-ordered alloys is investigated by ab initio calculations employing the coherent potential approximation. The calculated APB energies for the {111} and {001} planes reproduce experimental values of the APB energy. The APB energies for the nonstoichiometric γ' phase increase with Al concentration and are in line with the experiment. The magnitude of the alloying effect on the APB energy correlates with the variation of the ordering energy of the alloy according to the alloying element's position in the 3 d row. The elements from the left side of the 3 d row increase the APB energy of the Ni-based L 12-ordered alloys, while the elements from the right side slightly affect it except Ni. The way to predict the effect of an addition on the {111} APB energy in a multicomponent alloy is discussed.

  14. A note on geometric method-based procedures to calculate the Hurst exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinidad Segovia, J. E.; Fernández-Martínez, M.; Sánchez-Granero, M. A.

    2012-03-01

    Geometric method-based procedures, which we will call GM algorithms hereafter, were introduced in M.A. Sánchez-Granero, J.E. Trinidad Segovia, J. García Pérez, Some comments on Hurst exponent and the long memory processes on capital markets, Phys. A 387 (2008) 5543-5551, to calculate the Hurst exponent of a time series. The authors proved that GM algorithms, based on a geometrical approach, are more accurate than classical algorithms, especially with short length time series. The main contribution of this paper is to provide a mathematical background for the validity of these two algorithms to calculate the Hurst exponent H of random processes with stationary and self-affine increments. In particular, we show that these procedures are valid not only for exploring long memory in classical processes such as (fractional) Brownian motions, but also for estimating the Hurst exponent of (fractional) Lévy stable motions.

  15. Prediction of Low-Thermal-Conductivity Compounds with First-Principles Anharmonic Lattice-Dynamics Calculations and Bayesian Optimization.

    PubMed

    Seko, Atsuto; Togo, Atsushi; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Koji; Chaput, Laurent; Tanaka, Isao

    2015-11-13

    Compounds of low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC) are essential for seeking thermoelectric materials with high conversion efficiency. Some strategies have been used to decrease LTC. However, such trials have yielded successes only within a limited exploration space. Here, we report the virtual screening of a library containing 54,779 compounds. Our strategy is to search the library through Bayesian optimization using for the initial data the LTC obtained from first-principles anharmonic lattice-dynamics calculations for a set of 101 compounds. We discovered 221 materials with very low LTC. Two of them even have an electronic band gap <1 eV, which makes them exceptional candidates for thermoelectric applications. In addition to those newly discovered thermoelectric materials, the present strategy is believed to be powerful for many other applications in which the chemistry of materials is required to be optimized. PMID:26613454

  16. Prediction of Low-Thermal-Conductivity Compounds with First-Principles Anharmonic Lattice-Dynamics Calculations and Bayesian Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seko, Atsuto; Togo, Atsushi; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Koji; Chaput, Laurent; Tanaka, Isao

    2015-11-01

    Compounds of low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC) are essential for seeking thermoelectric materials with high conversion efficiency. Some strategies have been used to decrease LTC. However, such trials have yielded successes only within a limited exploration space. Here, we report the virtual screening of a library containing 54 779 compounds. Our strategy is to search the library through Bayesian optimization using for the initial data the LTC obtained from first-principles anharmonic lattice-dynamics calculations for a set of 101 compounds. We discovered 221 materials with very low LTC. Two of them even have an electronic band gap <1 eV , which makes them exceptional candidates for thermoelectric applications. In addition to those newly discovered thermoelectric materials, the present strategy is believed to be powerful for many other applications in which the chemistry of materials is required to be optimized.

  17. Conformational studies of [Nphe5]SFTI-1 by means of 2D NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzozowski, K.; Stawikowski, M.; Ślusarz, R.; Sikorska, E.; Lesner, A.; Łęgowska, A.; Rolka, K.

    2015-11-01

    Trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1 is the smallest and the most potent among BBI inhibitors. It is also an interesting object for SAR studies since it is cyclic 14 amino acid molecule which additionally contains disulfide bridge. We showed that elimination of head-to-tail cycliztion did not influence its activity. Moreover peptoid monomers of Nlys and Nphe introduced in the substrate specificity P1 position of monocyclic SFTI-1 preserved trypsin and chymotripsin inhibitory activity respectively and made P1-P1‧ bond proteolytically stable. These findings motivated us to perform conformational analysis of [Nphe5]SFTI-1 by means of 2D NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics calculations. Obtained structure occurred to be in a good agreement with published structures for wild-type SFTI-1, its monocyclic analog with disulfide bridge only as well as one containing Nlys peptoid monomer in P1 position.

  18. Dynamic hyperfine interactions in 111In(111Cd)-doped ZnO semiconductor: PAC results supported by ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Emiliano L.; Mercurio, Marcio E.; Cordeiro, Moacir R.; Pereira, Luciano F. D.; Carbonari, Artur W.; Rentería, Mario

    2012-08-01

    In this work, we present results of Time-Differential γ-γ Perturbed-Angular-Correlations (PAC) experiments performed in 111Cd-doped ZnO semiconductor. The PAC technique has been applied in order to characterize the electric-field-gradient (EFG) tensor at (111In (EC)→) 111Cd nuclei located, as was later demonstrated, at defect-free cation sites of the ZnO host structure. The PAC experiments were performed in the temperature range of 77-1075 K. At first glance, the unexpected presence of low-intensity dynamic hyperfine interactions was observed, which were analyzed with a perturbation factor based on the Bäverstam and Othaz model. The experimental EFG results were compared with ab initio calculations performed with the Full-Potential Augmented Plane Wave plus local orbital (FP-APW+lo) method, in the framework of the Density Functional Theory (DFT), using the Wien2K code. The presence of the dynamic hyperfine interactions has been analyzed enlightened by the FP-APW+lo calculations of the EFG performed as a function of the charge state of the cell. We could correlate the large strength of the dynamic hyperfine interaction with the strong variation of the EFG due to changes in the electronic charge distribution in the Cd vicinity during the time-window of the PAC measurement. It was also revealed that the Cd impurity decays to a final stable neutral charge state (Cd2+) fast enough (in few ns) to produce the nearly undamped observed PAC spectra.

  19. Stiffness of Diphenylalanine-Based Molecular Solids from First Principles Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuri, Ido; Hod, Oded; Gazit, Ehud; Kronik, Leeor

    2013-03-01

    Diphenylalanine-based peptide nanotubes were found to be unexpectedly stiff, with a Young modulus of 19 GPa. Here, we calculate the Young modulus from first principles, using density functional theory with dispersive corrections. This allows us to show that at least half of the stiffness of the material comes from dispersive interactions and to identify the nature of the interactions that contribute most to the stiffness. This presents a general strategy for the analysis of bioinspired functional materials.

  20. Reactivity of aldehydes at the air-water interface. Insights from molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Martins-Costa, Marilia T C; García-Prieto, Francisco F; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-02-14

    Understanding the influence of solute-solvent interactions on chemical reactivity has been a subject of intense research in the last few decades. Theoretical studies have focused on bulk solvation phenomena and a variety of models and methods have been developed that are now widely used by both theoreticians and experimentalists. Much less attention has been paid, however, to processes that occur at liquid interfaces despite the important role such interfaces play in chemistry and biology. In this study, we have carried out sequential molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanical calculations to analyse the influence of the air-water interface on the reactivity of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde, three simple aldehydes of atmospheric interest. The calculated free-energy profiles exhibit a minimum at the interface, where the average reactivity indices may display large solvation effects. The study emphasizes the role of solvation dynamics, which are responsible for large fluctuations of some molecular properties. We also show that the photolysis rate constant of benzaldehyde in the range 290-308 nm increases by one order of magnitude at the surface of a water droplet, from 2.7 × 10(-5) s(-1) in the gas phase to 2.8 × 10(-4) s(-1) at the air-water interface, and we discuss the potential impact of this result on the chemistry of the troposphere. Experimental data in this domain are still scarce and computer simulations like those presented in this work may provide some insights that can be useful to design new experiments. PMID:25451554

  1. A grid-doubling finite-element technique for calculating dynamic three-dimensional spontaneous rupture on an earthquake fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barall, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new finite-element technique for calculating dynamic 3-D spontaneous rupture on an earthquake fault, which can reduce the required computational resources by a factor of six or more, without loss of accuracy. The grid-doubling technique employs small cells in a thin layer surrounding the fault. The remainder of the modelling volume is filled with larger cells, typically two or four times as large as the small cells. In the resulting non-conforming mesh, an interpolation method is used to join the thin layer of smaller cells to the volume of larger cells. Grid-doubling is effective because spontaneous rupture calculations typically require higher spatial resolution on and near the fault than elsewhere in the model volume. The technique can be applied to non-planar faults by morphing, or smoothly distorting, the entire mesh to produce the desired 3-D fault geometry. Using our FaultMod finite-element software, we have tested grid-doubling with both slip-weakening and rate-and-state friction laws, by running the SCEC/ USGS 3-D dynamic rupture benchmark problems. We have also applied it to a model of the Hayward fault, Northern California, which uses realistic fault geometry and rock properties. FaultMod implements fault slip using common nodes, which represent motion common to both sides of the fault, and differential nodes, which represent motion of one side of the fault relative to the other side. We describe how to modify the traction-at-split-nodes method to work with common and differential nodes, using an implicit time stepping algorithm. ?? Journal compilation ?? 2009 RAS.

  2. Scale-invariant entropy-based theory for dynamic ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Mahulikar, Shripad P. E-mail: spm@aero.iitb.ac.in; Kumari, Priti

    2014-09-01

    Dynamically Ordered self-organized dissipative structure exists in various forms and at different scales. This investigation first introduces the concept of an isolated embedding system, which embeds an open system, e.g., dissipative structure and its mass and/or energy exchange with its surroundings. Thereafter, scale-invariant theoretical analysis is presented using thermodynamic principles for Order creation, existence, and destruction. The sustainability criterion for Order existence based on its structured mass and/or energy interactions with the surroundings is mathematically defined. This criterion forms the basis for the interrelationship of physical parameters during sustained existence of dynamic Order. It is shown that the sufficient condition for dynamic Order existence is approached if its sustainability criterion is met, i.e., its destruction path is blocked. This scale-invariant approach has the potential to unify the physical understanding of universal dynamic ordering based on entropy considerations.

  3. Dynamic Strategic Planning in a Professional Knowledge-Based Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivarius, Niels de Fine; Kousgaard, Marius Brostrom; Reventlow, Susanne; Quelle, Dan Grevelund; Tulinius, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Professional, knowledge-based institutions have a particular form of organization and culture that makes special demands on the strategic planning supervised by research administrators and managers. A model for dynamic strategic planning based on a pragmatic utilization of the multitude of strategy models was used in a small university-affiliated…

  4. Organizational Readiness for Stage-Based Dynamics of Innovation Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, D. Dwayne

    2009-01-01

    Implementing innovations in social and health-related service programs is a dynamic stage-based process. This article discusses training, adoption, implementation, and practice as sequential elements of a conceptual framework for effective preparation and implementation of evidence-based innovations. However, systems need to be prepared for change…

  5. Dynamical friction in head-on galaxy collisions. I. Analytical calculations and restricted three-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, P.; Dupraz, C.

    1994-10-01

    The accretion of a small satellite by a big elliptical galaxy is acknowledged as a key phenomenon in the dynamics of galaxies. It is held responsible for the formation of most fine structures which are observed in ellipticals. Circular orbits for the satellite have been studied in most work so far. However, they may not be representative of the general phenomenon, as their geometry prevents the process from being time-dependent in a genuine way. Here is the first of two articles devoted to the dynamical study of orbital decay during a head-on encounter. Analytical calculations give access to the mechanism of dynamical friction during the event. They consist in the coupled solution of the linearised Poisson and collisionless Boltzmann equations. Our results confirm that time now plays an active role: the drag force undergone by the satellite derives from the transient response of the galaxy and depends on the full past history of the event. As a consequence, dynamical friction is not strictly proportional to the local density as classically expected from Chandrasekhar's formula. Our study is refined by a harmonic analysis of the process. We extend these results by means of restricted three-body simulations. They allow us to deal with a compact satellite and to follow the accretion until merging with the galaxy. We adopt the Multiple Three-Body Algorithm, which naturally accounts for dynamical friction and proves equivalent to the analytical method inasmuch as self-gravity of the galactic wake is unimportant. A satellite along a radial trajectory is braked in a step-like way: its orbital energy is essentially dissipated when it crosses the galactic core. We discuss the dependence of this process on the parameters of the collision: initial energy, mass and radius of the intruder. The size is most important, because it determines both the nature of the galactic response and the ultimate fate of the object. However, we do not properly describe the strong distortion of

  6. An AIS-based approach to calculate atmospheric emissions from the UK fishing fleet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coello, Jonathan; Williams, Ian; Hudson, Dominic A.; Kemp, Simon

    2015-08-01

    The fishing industry is heavily reliant on the use of fossil fuel and emits large quantities of greenhouse gases and other atmospheric pollutants. Methods used to calculate fishing vessel emissions inventories have traditionally utilised estimates of fuel efficiency per unit of catch. These methods have weaknesses because they do not easily allow temporal and geographical allocation of emissions. A large proportion of fishing and other small commercial vessels are also omitted from global shipping emissions inventories such as the International Maritime Organisation's Greenhouse Gas Studies. This paper demonstrates an activity-based methodology for the production of temporally- and spatially-resolved emissions inventories using data produced by Automatic Identification Systems (AIS). The methodology addresses the issue of how to use AIS data for fleets where not all vessels use AIS technology and how to assign engine load when vessels are towing trawling or dredging gear. The results of this are compared to a fuel-based methodology using publicly available European Commission fisheries data on fuel efficiency and annual catch. The results show relatively good agreement between the two methodologies, with an estimate of 295.7 kilotons of fuel used and 914.4 kilotons of carbon dioxide emitted between May 2012 and May 2013 using the activity-based methodology. Different methods of calculating speed using AIS data are also compared. The results indicate that using the speed data contained directly in the AIS data is preferable to calculating speed from the distance and time interval between consecutive AIS data points.

  7. Iterative diagonalization in augmented plane wave based methods in electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha, P.; Laskowski, R.; Schwarz, K.

    2010-01-20

    Due to the increased computer power and advanced algorithms, quantum mechanical calculations based on Density Functional Theory are more and more widely used to solve real materials science problems. In this context large nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problems must be solved repeatedly to calculate the electronic ground state of a solid or molecule. Due to the nonlinear nature of this problem, an iterative solution of the eigenvalue problem can be more efficient provided it does not disturb the convergence of the self-consistent-field problem. The blocked Davidson method is one of the widely used and efficient schemes for that purpose, but its performance depends critically on the preconditioning, i.e. the procedure to improve the search space for an accurate solution. For more diagonally dominated problems, which appear typically for plane wave based pseudopotential calculations, the inverse of the diagonal of (H - ES) is used. However, for the more efficient 'augmented plane wave + local-orbitals' basis set this preconditioning is not sufficient due to large off-diagonal terms caused by the local orbitals. We propose a new preconditioner based on the inverse of (H - {lambda}S) and demonstrate its efficiency for real applications using both, a sequential and a parallel implementation of this algorithm into our WIEN2k code.

  8. A fast dynamic mode in rare earth based glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L. Z.; Xue, R. J.; Zhu, Z. G.; Ngai, K. L.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2016-05-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) usually exhibit only slow β-relaxation peak, and the signature of the fast dynamic is challenging to be observed experimentally in MGs. We report a general and unusual fast dynamic mode in a series of rare earth based MGs manifested as a distinct fast β'-relaxation peak in addition to slow β-relaxation and α-relaxation peaks. We show that the activation energy of the fast β'-relaxation is about 12RTg and is equivalent to the activation of localized flow event. The coupling of these dynamic processes as well as their relationship with glass transition and structural heterogeneity is discussed.

  9. A fast dynamic mode in rare earth based glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, L Z; Xue, R J; Zhu, Z G; Ngai, K L; Wang, W H; Bai, H Y

    2016-05-28

    Metallic glasses (MGs) usually exhibit only slow β-relaxation peak, and the signature of the fast dynamic is challenging to be observed experimentally in MGs. We report a general and unusual fast dynamic mode in a series of rare earth based MGs manifested as a distinct fast β'-relaxation peak in addition to slow β-relaxation and α-relaxation peaks. We show that the activation energy of the fast β'-relaxation is about 12RTg and is equivalent to the activation of localized flow event. The coupling of these dynamic processes as well as their relationship with glass transition and structural heterogeneity is discussed. PMID:27250316

  10. Model of the catalytic mechanism of human aldose reductase based on quantum chemical calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Cachau, R. C.; Howard, E. H.; Barth, P. B.; Mitschler, A. M.; Chevrier, B. C.; Lamour, V.; Joachimiak, A.; Sanishvili, R.; Van Zandt, M.; Sibley, E.; Moras, D.; Podjarny, A.; UPR de Biologie Structurale; National Cancer Inst.; Univ. Louis Pasteur; Inst. for Diabetes Discovery, Inc.

    2000-01-01

    Aldose Reductase is an enzyme involved in diabetic complications, thoroughly studied for the purpose of inhibitor development. The structure of an enzyme-inhibitor complex solved at sub-atomic resolution has been used to develop a model for the catalytic mechanism. This model has been refined using a combination of Molecular Dynamics and Quantum calculations. It shows that the proton donation, the subject of previous controversies, is the combined effect of three residues: Lys 77, Tyr 48 and His 110. Lys 77 polarises the Tyr 48 OH group, which donates the proton to His 110, which becomes doubly protonated. His 110 then moves and donates the proton to the substrate. The key information from the sub-atomic resolution structure is the orientation of the ring and the single protonafion of the His 110 in the enzyme-inhibitor complex. This model is in full agreement with all available experimental data.

  11. An economic prediction of refinement coefficients in wavelet-based adaptive methods for electron structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Pipek, János; Nagy, Szilvia

    2013-03-01

    The wave function of a many electron system contains inhomogeneously distributed spatial details, which allows to reduce the number of fine detail wavelets in multiresolution analysis approximations. Finding a method for decimating the unnecessary basis functions plays an essential role in avoiding an exponential increase of computational demand in wavelet-based calculations. We describe an effective prediction algorithm for the next resolution level wavelet coefficients, based on the approximate wave function expanded up to a given level. The prediction results in a reasonable approximation of the wave function and allows to sort out the unnecessary wavelets with a great reliability. PMID:23115109

  12. A Cumulant-based Analysis of Nonlinear Magnetospheric Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jay R. Johnson; Simon Wing

    2004-01-28

    Understanding magnetospheric dynamics and predicting future behavior of the magnetosphere is of great practical interest because it could potentially help to avert catastrophic loss of power and communications. In order to build good predictive models it is necessary to understand the most critical nonlinear dependencies among observed plasma and electromagnetic field variables in the coupled solar wind/magnetosphere system. In this work, we apply a cumulant-based information dynamical measure to characterize the nonlinear dynamics underlying the time evolution of the Dst and Kp geomagnetic indices, given solar wind magnetic field and plasma input. We examine the underlying dynamics of the system, the temporal statistical dependencies, the degree of nonlinearity, and the rate of information loss. We find a significant solar cycle dependence in the underlying dynamics of the system with greater nonlinearity for solar minimum. The cumulant-based approach also has the advantage that it is reliable even in the case of small data sets and therefore it is possible to avoid the assumption of stationarity, which allows for a measure of predictability even when the underlying system dynamics may change character. Evaluations of several leading Kp prediction models indicate that their performances are sub-optimal during active times. We discuss possible improvements of these models based on this nonparametric approach.

  13. A variational method for the calculation of dynamic polarizabilities and two-photon transition moments - The dressed molecule approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, W. M.

    1984-01-01

    The solution of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation of the molecule + radiation field system is analyzed. A quantized radiation field is used. The relationship between the oscillatory wave function and the dressed state wave function is established, the oscillatory wave function being the solution if the radiation field is turned on at t = 0 and the dressed state being the stationary solution satisfying the boundary condition only if the field is present at t = negative infinity. In general, the oscillatory wave function can be expressed using a complete set of dressed states. However, in the presence of a nonresonant radiation field, the system is well represented by a single dressed state. Molecular properties such as dynamic polarizabilities and two-photon transition moments can be deduced from the dressed state wave function instead of the oscillatory wave function as in previous methods. Because of its stationary character, the dressed state is more amenable to approximate calculations. A CI method is developed for this purpose. The CI matrix is simple in form and can be readily constructed using existing computer codes. The present method can also be adapted to calculate other optical properties.

  14. First-principles calculation and molecular dynamics simulation of fracture behavior of VN layers under uniaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Tao; Peng, Xianghe; Zhao, Yinbo; Feng, Chao; Tang, Shan; Hu, Ning; Wang, Zhongchang

    2015-05-01

    We develop the second nearest-neighbor modified embedded atom method (2NN MEAM) potential for vanadium nitride (VN) in terms of the individual vanadium and nitrogen. The potential parameters are determined by fitting the cohesive energy, lattice parameter, and elastic constants of the VN with the NaCl-type structure, which are obtained by first-principles calculations. We find that the developed potentials can be used to describe the fundamental physical properties of the V-N system with other lattice structures. The calculated tensile stress-strain curves of the VN layers by first principles agree with those obtained by molecular dynamic simulations, validating the use of the developed potential. The bond breaking and its growth and coalescence are found to play an important role in the formation of fracture. We also find that temperature influences markedly the breaking of bonds, which can be attributed to the deviation of atoms from their equilibrium positions due to the thermal activated vibration, or to the superposition of the thermal energy to the deformation energy. Moreover, no dislocations and slips are found throughout the deformation process.

  15. Lattice dynamical calculations of anisotropic temperature factors of atoms in quartz, and the structure of β-quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihara, Kuniaki

    1993-02-01

    Temperature factors for oxygen and silicon atoms in β-quartz were calculated on a Born-von Karman lattice dynamical model of an ordered structure. The calculated thermal ellipsoids were in excellent agreements with those of the previous structure refinements of the order model, for both magnitudes and orientations of the principal axes. The temperature factors are contributed mainly by the soft optic modes in Γ-M and the lowest-lying acoustic modes along Γ-A, which are also strongly temperature-dependent. The cusp-shaped temperature dependence of mean square displacements, , of oxygen atom, observed previously around the α- β transition, are resulted from the softening of these modes. The temperature-dependent modes in Γ-A were also found to cause diffuse scattering extending along ±c* of the fourth hexagon of the hk0 reciprocal lattice plane. The negative expansion known in β-quartz were interpreted in terms of asymmetrical forces exerting on oxygen atoms in Si-O-Si bending modes. In β-quartz, librational motions of oxygen atoms around Si-Si lines with large amplitudes, whose center is just on the β-position of high symmetry, must be possible under the condition that bending tetrahedral O-Si-O angles is energetically more favourable than compressing or stretching Si-O bonds.

  16. NOTE: Monte Carlo dose calculation of segmental IMRT delivery to a moving phantom using dynamic MLC and gating log files

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Mike; Staruch, Robert; Gladwish, Adam; Craig, Jeff; Chen, Jeff; Wong, Eugene

    2008-05-01

    Respiratory gating is emerging as a tool to limit the effect of motion for liver and lung tumors. In order to study the impact of target motion and gated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery, a computer program was developed to simulate segmental IMRT delivery to a moving phantom. Two distinct plans were delivered to a rigid-motion phantom with a film insert in place under four conditions: static, sinusoidal motion, gated sinusoidal motion with a duty cycle of 25% and gated sinusoidal motion with duty cycle of 50% under motion conditions of a typical patient (A = 1 cm, T = 4 s). The MLC controller log files and gating log files were retained to perform a retrospective Monte Carlo dose calculation of the plans. Comparison of the 2D planar dose distributions between simulation and measurement demonstrated that our technique had at least 94% of the points passing gamma criteria of 3% for dose difference and 3 mm as the distance to agreement. This note demonstrates that the use of dynamic multi-leaf collimator and respiratory monitoring system log files together with a fast Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm is an accurate and efficient way to study the dosimetric effect of motion for gated or non-gated IMRT delivery on a rigidly-moving body.

  17. MRI-Based Computed Tomography Metal Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Peter C.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Roper, Justin; Elder, Eric; Crocker, Ian; Fox, Tim; Zhu, X. Ronald; Dong, Lei; Dhabaan, Anees

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) artifacts can severely degrade dose calculation accuracy in proton therapy. Prompted by the recently increased popularity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the radiation therapy clinic, we developed an MRI-based CT artifact correction method for improving the accuracy of proton range calculations. Methods and Materials: The proposed method replaces corrupted CT data by mapping CT Hounsfield units (HU number) from a nearby artifact-free slice, using a coregistered MRI. MRI and CT volumetric images were registered with use of 3-dimensional (3D) deformable image registration (DIR). The registration was fine-tuned on a slice-by-slice basis by using 2D DIR. Based on the intensity of paired MRI pixel values and HU from an artifact-free slice, we performed a comprehensive analysis to predict the correct HU for the corrupted region. For a proof-of-concept validation, metal artifacts were simulated on a reference data set. Proton range was calculated using reference, artifactual, and corrected images to quantify the reduction in proton range error. The correction method was applied to 4 unique clinical cases. Results: The correction method resulted in substantial artifact reduction, both quantitatively and qualitatively. On respective simulated brain and head and neck CT images, the mean error was reduced from 495 and 370 HU to 108 and 92 HU after correction. Correspondingly, the absolute mean proton range errors of 2.4 cm and 1.7 cm were reduced to less than 2 mm in both cases. Conclusions: Our MRI-based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation accuracy for patients with severe CT artifacts.

  18. A design of a DICOM-RT-based tool box for nonrigid 4D dose calculation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Victy Y W; Baker, Colin R; Leung, T W; Tung, Stewart Y

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed to introduce a design of a DICOM-RT-based tool box to facilitate 4D dose calculation based on deformable voxel-dose registration. The computational structure and the calculation algorithm of the tool box were explicitly discussed in the study. The tool box was written in MATLAB in conjunction with CERR. It consists of five main functions which allow a) importation of DICOM-RT-based 3D dose plan, b) deformable image registration, c) tracking voxel doses along breathing cycle, d) presentation of temporal dose distribution at different time phase, and e) derivation of 4D dose. The efficacy of using the tool box for clinical application had been verified with nine clinical cases on retrospective-study basis. The logistic and the robustness of the tool box were tested with 27 applications and the results were shown successful with no computational errors encountered. In the study, the accumulated dose coverage as a function of planning CT taken at end-inhale, end-exhale, and mean tumor position were assessed. The results indicated that the majority of the cases (67%) achieved maximum target coverage, while the planning CT was taken at the temporal mean tumor position and 56% at the end-exhale position. The comparable results to the literature imply that the studied tool box can be reliable for 4D dose calculation. The authors suggest that, with proper application, 4D dose calculation using deformable registration can provide better dose evaluation for treatment with moving target. PMID:27074476

  19. Development of facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers based on equilibrium adsorption cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Masato; Hirose, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Minoru; Thermal management technology Team

    Facile property calculation model for adsorption chillers was developed based on equilibrium adsorption cycles. Adsorption chillers are one of promising systems that can use heat energy efficiently because adsorption chillers can generate cooling energy using relatively low temperature heat energy. Properties of adsorption chillers are determined by heat source temperatures, adsorption/desorption properties of adsorbent, and kinetics such as heat transfer rate and adsorption/desorption rate etc. In our model, dependence of adsorption chiller properties on heat source temperatures was represented using approximated equilibrium adsorption cycles instead of solving conventional time-dependent differential equations for temperature changes. In addition to equilibrium cycle calculations, we calculated time constants for temperature changes as functions of heat source temperatures, which represent differences between equilibrium cycles and real cycles that stemmed from kinetic adsorption processes. We found that the present approximated equilibrium model could calculate properties of adsorption chillers (driving energies, cooling energies, and COP etc.) under various driving conditions quickly and accurately within average errors of 6% compared to experimental data.

  20. Thermal conductivity calculation of bio-aggregates based materials using finite and discrete element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennec, Fabienne; Alzina, Arnaud; Tessier-Doyen, Nicolas; Naitali, Benoit; Smith, David S.

    2012-11-01

    This work is about the calculation of thermal conductivity of insulating building materials made from plant particles. To determine the type of raw materials, the particle sizes or the volume fractions of plant and binder, a tool dedicated to calculate the thermal conductivity of heterogeneous materials has been developped, using the discrete element method to generate the volume element and the finite element method to calculate the homogenized properties. A 3D optical scanner has been used to capture plant particle shapes and convert them into a cluster of discret elements. These aggregates are initially randomly distributed but without any overlap, and then fall down in a container due to the gravity force and collide with neighbour particles according to a velocity Verlet algorithm. Once the RVE is built, the geometry is exported in the open-source Salome-Meca platform to be meshed. The calculation of the effective thermal conductivity of the heterogeneous volume is then performed using a homogenization technique, based on an energy method. To validate the numerical tool, thermal conductivity measurements have been performed on sunflower pith aggregates and on packed beds of the same particles. The experimental values have been compared satisfactorily with a batch of numerical simulations.

  1. Automated Calculation of Water-equivalent Diameter (DW) Based on AAPM Task Group 220.

    PubMed

    Anam, Choirul; Haryanto, Freddy; Widita, Rena; Arif, Idam; Dougherty, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to accurately and effectively automate the calculation of the water-equivalent diameter (DW) from 3D CT images for estimating the size-specific dose. DW is the metric that characterizes the patient size and attenuation. In this study, DW was calculated for standard CTDI phantoms and patient images. Two types of phantom were used, one representing the head with a diameter of 16 cm and the other representing the body with a diameter of 32 cm. Images of 63 patients were also taken, 32 who had undergone a CT head examination and 31 who had undergone a CT thorax examination. There are three main parts to our algorithm for automated DW calculation. The first part is to read 3D images and convert the CT data into Hounsfield units (HU). The second part is to find the contour of the phantoms or patients automatically. And the third part is to automate the calculation of DW based on the automated contouring for every slice (DW,all). The results of this study show that the automated calculation of DW and the manual calculation are in good agreement for phantoms and patients. The differences between the automated calculation of DW and the manual calculation are less than 0.5%. The results of this study also show that the estimating of DW,all using DW,n=1 (central slice along longitudinal axis) produces percentage differences of -0.92% ± 3.37% and 6.75%± 1.92%, and estimating DW,all using DW,n=9 produces percentage differences of 0.23% ± 0.16% and 0.87% ± 0.36%, for thorax and head examinations, respectively. From this study, the percentage differences between normalized size-specific dose estimate for every slice (nSSDEall) and nSSDEn=1 are 0.74% ± 2.82% and -4.35% ± 1.18% for thorax and head examinations, respectively; between nSSDEall and nSSDEn=9 are 0.00% ± 0.46% and -0.60% ± 0.24% for thorax and head examinations, respectively. PMID:27455491

  2. Dynamic molecules: molecular dynamics for everyone. An internet-based access to molecular dynamic simulations: basic concepts.

    PubMed

    Frank, Martin; Gutbrod, Peter; Hassayoun, Chokri; von Der Lieth, Claus-W

    2003-10-01

    Molecular dynamics is a rapidly developing field of science and has become an established tool for studying the dynamic behavior of biomolecules. Although several high quality programs for performing molecular dynamic simulations are freely available, only well-trained scientists are currently able to make use of the broad scientific potential that molecular dynamic simulations offer to gain insight into structural questions at an atomic level. The "Dynamic Molecules" approach is the first internet portal that provides an interactive access to set up, perform and analyze molecular dynamic simulations. It is completely based on standard web technologies and uses only publicly available software. The aim is to open molecular dynamics techniques to a broader range of users including undergraduate students, teachers and scientists outside the bioinformatics field. The time-limiting factors are the availability of free capacity on the computing server to run the simulations and the time required to transport the history file through the internet for the animation mode. The interactive access mode of the portal is acceptable for animations of molecules having up to about 500 atoms. PMID:12908101

  3. Probing Origin of Binding Difference of inhibitors to MDM2 and MDMX by Polarizable Molecular Dynamics Simulation and QM/MM-GBSA Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianzhong; Wang, Jinan; Zhang, Qinggang; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-11-01

    Binding abilities of current inhibitors to MDMX are weaker than to MDM2. Polarizable molecular dynamics simulations (MD) followed by Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (QM//MM-GBSA) calculations were performed to investigate the binding difference of inhibitors to MDM2 and MDMX. The predicted binding free energies not only agree well with the experimental results, but also show that the decrease in van der Walls interactions of inhibitors with MDMX relative to MDM2 is a main factor of weaker bindings of inhibitors to MDMX. The analyses of dihedral angles based on MD trajectories suggest that the closed conformation formed by the residues M53 and Y99 in MDMX leads to a potential steric clash with inhibitors and prevents inhibitors from arriving in the deep of MDMX binding cleft, which reduces the van der Waals contacts of inhibitors with M53, V92, P95 and L98. The calculated results using the residue-based free energy decomposition method further prove that the interaction strength of inhibitors with M53, V92, P95 and L98 from MDMX are obviously reduced compared to MDM2. We expect that this study can provide significant theoretical guidance for designs of potent dual inhibitors to block the p53-MDM2/MDMX interactions.

  4. Probing Origin of Binding Difference of inhibitors to MDM2 and MDMX by Polarizable Molecular Dynamics Simulation and QM/MM-GBSA Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianzhong; Wang, Jinan; Zhang, Qinggang; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-01-01

    Binding abilities of current inhibitors to MDMX are weaker than to MDM2. Polarizable molecular dynamics simulations (MD) followed by Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (QM//MM-GBSA) calculations were performed to investigate the binding difference of inhibitors to MDM2 and MDMX. The predicted binding free energies not only agree well with the experimental results, but also show that the decrease in van der Walls interactions of inhibitors with MDMX relative to MDM2 is a main factor of weaker bindings of inhibitors to MDMX. The analyses of dihedral angles based on MD trajectories suggest that the closed conformation formed by the residues M53 and Y99 in MDMX leads to a potential steric clash with inhibitors and prevents inhibitors from arriving in the deep of MDMX binding cleft, which reduces the van der Waals contacts of inhibitors with M53, V92, P95 and L98. The calculated results using the residue-based free energy decomposition method further prove that the interaction strength of inhibitors with M53, V92, P95 and L98 from MDMX are obviously reduced compared to MDM2. We expect that this study can provide significant theoretical guidance for designs of potent dual inhibitors to block the p53-MDM2/MDMX interactions. PMID:26616018

  5. Credibility theory based dynamic control bound optimization for reservoir flood limited water level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhiqiang; Sun, Ping; Ji, Changming; Zhou, Jianzhong

    2015-10-01

    The dynamic control operation of reservoir flood limited water level (FLWL) can solve the contradictions between reservoir flood control and beneficial operation well, and it is an important measure to make sure the security of flood control and realize the flood utilization. The dynamic control bound of FLWL is a fundamental key element for implementing reservoir dynamic control operation. In order to optimize the dynamic control bound of FLWL by considering flood forecasting error, this paper took the forecasting error as a fuzzy variable, and described it with the emerging credibility theory in recent years. By combining the flood forecasting error quantitative model, a credibility-based fuzzy chance constrained model used to optimize the dynamic control bound was proposed in this paper, and fuzzy simulation technology was used to solve the model. The FENGTAN reservoir in China was selected as a case study, and the results show that, compared with the original operation water level, the initial operation water level (IOWL) of FENGTAN reservoir can be raised 4 m, 2 m and 5.5 m respectively in the three division stages of flood season, and without increasing flood control risk. In addition, the rationality and feasibility of the proposed forecasting error quantitative model and credibility-based dynamic control bound optimization model are verified by the calculation results of extreme risk theory.

  6. Adjoint-based uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis for reactor depletion calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stripling, Hayes Franklin

    Depletion calculations for nuclear reactors model the dynamic coupling between the material composition and neutron flux and help predict reactor performance and safety characteristics. In order to be trusted as reliable predictive tools and inputs to licensing and operational decisions, the simulations must include an accurate and holistic quantification of errors and uncertainties in its outputs. Uncertainty quantification is a formidable challenge in large, realistic reactor models because of the large number of unknowns and myriad sources of uncertainty and error. We present a framework for performing efficient uncertainty quantification in depletion problems using an adjoint approach, with emphasis on high-fidelity calculations using advanced massively parallel computing architectures. This approach calls for a solution to two systems of equations: (a) the forward, engineering system that models the reactor, and (b) the adjoint system, which is mathematically related to but different from the forward system. We use the solutions of these systems to produce sensitivity and error estimates at a cost that does not grow rapidly with the number of uncertain inputs. We present the framework in a general fashion and apply it to both the source-driven and k-eigenvalue forms of the depletion equations. We describe the implementation and verification of solvers for the forward and ad- joint equations in the PDT code, and we test the algorithms on realistic reactor analysis problems. We demonstrate a new approach for reducing the memory and I/O demands on the host machine, which can be overwhelming for typical adjoint algorithms. Our conclusion is that adjoint depletion calculations using full transport solutions are not only computationally tractable, they are the most attractive option for performing uncertainty quantification on high-fidelity reactor analysis problems.

  7. Monte Carlo-based dose calculation for 32P patch source for superficial brachytherapy applications

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Sridhar; Palani, Selvam T.; Saxena, S. K.; Babu, D. A. R.; Dash, A.

    2015-01-01

    Skin cancer treatment involving 32P source is an easy, less expensive method of treatment limited to small and superficial lesions of approximately 1 mm deep. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has indigenously developed 32P nafion-based patch source (1 cm × 1 cm) for treating skin cancer. For this source, the values of dose per unit activity at different depths including dose profiles in water are calculated using the EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code system. For an initial activity of 1 Bq distributed in 1 cm2 surface area of the source, the calculated central axis depth dose values are 3.62 × 10-10 GyBq-1 and 8.41 × 10-11 GyBq-1at 0.0125 and 1 mm depths in water, respectively. Hence, the treatment time calculated for delivering therapeutic dose of 30 Gy at 1 mm depth along the central axis of the source involving 37 MBq activity is about 2.7 hrs. PMID:26150682

  8. Efficient Procedure for the Numerical Calculation of Harmonic Vibrational Frequencies Based on Internal Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2013-08-15

    We propose a general procedure for the numerical calculation of the harmonic vibrational frequencies that is based on internal coordinates and Wilson’s GF methodology via double differentiation of the energy. The internal coordinates are defined as the geometrical parameters of a Z-matrix structure, thus avoiding issues related to their redundancy. Linear arrangements of atoms are described using a dummy atom of infinite mass. The procedure has been automated in FORTRAN90 and its main advantage lies in the nontrivial reduction of the number of single-point energy calculations needed for the construction of the Hessian matrix when compared to the corresponding number using double differentiation in Cartesian coordinates. For molecules of C1 symmetry the computational savings in the energy calculations amount to 36N – 30, where N is the number of atoms, with additional savings when symmetry is present. Typical applications for small and medium size molecules in their minimum and transition state geometries as well as hydrogen bonded clusters (water dimer and trimer) are presented. Finally, in all cases the frequencies based on internal coordinates differ on average by <1 cm–1 from those obtained from Cartesian coordinates.

  9. GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation using phase-space sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townson, Reid W.; Jia, Xun; Tian, Zhen; Jiang Graves, Yan; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Jiang, Steve B.

    2013-06-01

    A novel phase-space source implementation has been designed for graphics processing unit (GPU)-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engines. Short of full simulation of the linac head, using a phase-space source is the most accurate method to model a clinical radiation beam in dose calculations. However, in GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations where the computation efficiency is very high, the time required to read and process a large phase-space file becomes comparable to the particle transport time. Moreover, due to the parallelized nature of GPU hardware, it is essential to simultaneously transport particles of the same type and similar energies but separated spatially to yield a high efficiency. We present three methods for phase-space implementation that have been integrated into the most recent version of the GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation package gDPM v3.0. The first method is to sequentially read particles from a patient-dependent phase-space and sort them on-the-fly based on particle type and energy. The second method supplements this with a simple secondary collimator model and fluence map implementation so that patient-independent phase-space sources can be used. Finally, as the third method (called the phase-space-let, or PSL, method) we introduce a novel source implementation utilizing pre-processed patient-independent phase-spaces that are sorted by particle type, energy and position. Position bins located outside a rectangular region of interest enclosing the treatment field are ignored, substantially decreasing simulation time with little effect on the final dose distribution. The three methods were validated in absolute dose against BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc and compared using gamma-index tests (2%/2 mm above the 10% isodose). It was found that the PSL method has the optimal balance between accuracy and efficiency and thus is used as the default method in gDPM v3.0. Using the PSL method, open fields of 4 × 4, 10 × 10 and 30 × 30 cm

  10. GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation using phase-space sources.

    PubMed

    Townson, Reid W; Jia, Xun; Tian, Zhen; Graves, Yan Jiang; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-06-21

    A novel phase-space source implementation has been designed for graphics processing unit (GPU)-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engines. Short of full simulation of the linac head, using a phase-space source is the most accurate method to model a clinical radiation beam in dose calculations. However, in GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations where the computation efficiency is very high, the time required to read and process a large phase-space file becomes comparable to the particle transport time. Moreover, due to the parallelized nature of GPU hardware, it is essential to simultaneously transport particles of the same type and similar energies but separated spatially to yield a high efficiency. We present three methods for phase-space implementation that have been integrated into the most recent version of the GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation package gDPM v3.0. The first method is to sequentially read particles from a patient-dependent phase-space and sort them on-the-fly based on particle type and energy. The second method supplements this with a simple secondary collimator model and fluence map implementation so that patient-independent phase-space sources can be used. Finally, as the third method (called the phase-space-let, or PSL, method) we introduce a novel source implementation utilizing pre-processed patient-independent phase-spaces that are sorted by particle type, energy and position. Position bins located outside a rectangular region of interest enclosing the treatment field are ignored, substantially decreasing simulation time with little effect on the final dose distribution. The three methods were validated in absolute dose against BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc and compared using gamma-index tests (2%/2 mm above the 10% isodose). It was found that the PSL method has the optimal balance between accuracy and efficiency and thus is used as the default method in gDPM v3.0. Using the PSL method, open fields of 4 × 4, 10 × 10 and 30 × 30 cm

  11. Self-consistent field theory based molecular dynamics with linear system-size scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Richters, Dorothee; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved field-theoretic approach to the grand-canonical potential suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is circumvented by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of the present approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions.

  12. Sassena — X-ray and neutron scattering calculated from molecular dynamics trajectories using massively parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Benjamin; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2012-07-01

    Massively parallel computers now permit the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of multi-million atom systems on time scales up to the microsecond. However, the subsequent analysis of the resulting simulation trajectories has now become a high performance computing problem in itself. Here, we present software for calculating X-ray and neutron scattering intensities from MD simulation data that scales well on massively parallel supercomputers. The calculation and data staging schemes used maximize the degree of parallelism and minimize the IO bandwidth requirements. The strong scaling tested on the Jaguar Petaflop Cray XT5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory exhibits virtually linear scaling up to 7000 cores for most benchmark systems. Since both MPI and thread parallelism is supported, the software is flexible enough to cover scaling demands for different types of scattering calculations. The result is a high performance tool capable of unifying large-scale supercomputing and a wide variety of neutron/synchrotron technology. Catalogue identifier: AELW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 003 742 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 798 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, OpenMPI Computer: Distributed Memory, Cluster of Computers with high performance network, Supercomputer Operating system: UNIX, LINUX, OSX Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, the code has been parallelized using MPI directives. Tested with up to 7000 processors RAM: Up to 1 Gbytes/core Classification: 6.5, 8 External routines: Boost Library, FFTW3, CMAKE, GNU C++ Compiler, OpenMPI, LibXML, LAPACK Nature of problem: Recent developments in supercomputing allow molecular dynamics simulations to

  13. SU-E-T-161: Evaluation of Dose Calculation Based On Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, T; Nakazawa, T; Saitou, Y; Nakata, A; Yano, M; Tateoka, K; Fujimoto, K; Sakata, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to convert pixel values in cone-beam CT (CBCT) using histograms of pixel values in the simulation CT (sim-CT) and the CBCT images and to evaluate the accuracy of dose calculation based on the CBCT. Methods: The sim-CT and CBCT images immediately before the treatment of 10 prostate cancer patients were acquired. Because of insufficient calibration of the pixel values in the CBCT, it is difficult to be directly used for dose calculation. The pixel values in the CBCT images were converted using an in-house program. A 7 fields treatment plans (original plan) created on the sim-CT images were applied to the CBCT images and the dose distributions were re-calculated with same monitor units (MUs). These prescription doses were compared with those of original plans. Results: In the results of the pixel values conversion in the CBCT images,the mean differences of pixel values for the prostate,subcutaneous adipose, muscle and right-femur were −10.78±34.60, 11.78±41.06, 29.49±36.99 and 0.14±31.15 respectively. In the results of the calculated doses, the mean differences of prescription doses for 7 fields were 4.13±0.95%, 0.34±0.86%, −0.05±0.55%, 1.35±0.98%, 1.77±0.56%, 0.89±0.69% and 1.69±0.71% respectively and as a whole, the difference of prescription dose was 1.54±0.4%. Conclusion: The dose calculation on the CBCT images achieve an accuracy of <2% by using this pixel values conversion program. This may enable implementation of efficient adaptive radiotherapy.

  14. A Brief User's Guide to the Excel® -Based DF Calculator

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, Robert T.

    2015-09-30

    To understand the importance of capturing penetrating forms of iodine as well as the other volatile radionuclides, a calculation tool was developed in the form of an Excel® spreadsheet to estimate the overall plant decontamination factor (DF). The tool requires the user to estimate splits of the volatile radionuclides within the major portions of the reprocessing plant, speciation of iodine and individual DFs for each off-gas stream within the Used Nuclear Fuel reprocessing plant. The Impact to the overall plant DF for each volatile radionuclide is then calculated by the tool based on the specific user choices. The Excel® spreadsheet tracks both elemental and penetrating forms of iodine separately and allows changes in the speciation of iodine at each processing step. It also tracks 3H, 14C and 85Kr. This document provides a basic user's guide to the manipulation of this tool.

  15. Ab initio molecular dynamics with noisy forces: Validating the quantum Monte Carlo approach with benchmark calculations of molecular vibrational properties

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Ye Sorella, Sandro; Zen, Andrea

    2014-11-21

    We present a systematic study of a recently developed ab initio simulation scheme based on molecular dynamics and quantum Monte Carlo. In this approach, a damped Langevin molecular dynamics is employed by using a statistical evaluation of the forces acting on each atom by means of quantum Monte Carlo. This allows the use of an highly correlated wave function parametrized by several variational parameters and describing quite accurately the Born-Oppenheimer energy surface, as long as these parameters are determined at the minimum energy condition. However, in a statistical method both the minimization method and the evaluation of the atomic forces are affected by the statistical noise. In this work, we study systematically the accuracy and reliability of this scheme by targeting the vibrational frequencies of simple molecules such as the water monomer, hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, ammonia, and phosphine. We show that all sources of systematic errors can be controlled and reliable frequencies can be obtained with a reasonable computational effort. This work provides convincing evidence that this molecular dynamics scheme can be safely applied also to realistic systems containing several atoms.

  16. Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations on scattering of hyperthermal H atoms from Cu(111) and Au(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Kroes, Geert-Jan Pavanello, Michele; Blanco-Rey, María; Alducin, Maite

    2014-08-07

    Energy loss from the translational motion of an atom or molecule impinging on a metal surface to the surface may determine whether the incident particle can trap on the surface, and whether it has enough energy left to react with another molecule present at the surface. Although this is relevant to heterogeneous catalysis, the relative extent to which energy loss of hot atoms takes place to phonons or electron-hole pair (ehp) excitation, and its dependence on the system's parameters, remain largely unknown. We address these questions for two systems that present an extreme case of the mass ratio of the incident atom to the surface atom, i.e., H + Cu(111) and H + Au(111), by presenting adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) predictions of the energy loss and angular distributions for an incidence energy of 5 eV. The results are compared to the results of AIMDEFp calculations modeling energy loss to ehp excitation using an electronic friction (“EF”) model applied to the AIMD trajectories, so that the energy loss to the electrons is calculated “post” (“p”) the computation of the AIMD trajectory. The AIMD calculations predict average energy losses of 0.38 eV for Cu(111) and 0.13-0.14 eV for Au(111) for H-atoms that scatter from these surfaces without penetrating the surface. These energies closely correspond with energy losses predicted with Baule models, which is suggestive of structure scattering. The predicted adiabatic integral energy loss spectra (integrated over all final scattering angles) all display a lowest energy peak at an energy corresponding to approximately 80% of the average adiabatic energy loss for non-penetrative scattering. In the adiabatic limit, this suggests a way of determining the approximate average energy loss of non-penetratively scattered H-atoms from the integral energy loss spectrum of all scattered H-atoms. The AIMDEFp calculations predict that in each case the lowest energy loss peak should show additional energy loss

  17. Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations on scattering of hyperthermal H atoms from Cu(111) and Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroes, Geert-Jan; Pavanello, Michele; Blanco-Rey, María; Alducin, Maite; Auerbach, Daniel J.

    2014-08-01

    Energy loss from the translational motion of an atom or molecule impinging on a metal surface to the surface may determine whether the incident particle can trap on the surface, and whether it has enough energy left to react with another molecule present at the surface. Although this is relevant to heterogeneous catalysis, the relative extent to which energy loss of hot atoms takes place to phonons or electron-hole pair (ehp) excitation, and its dependence on the system's parameters, remain largely unknown. We address these questions for two systems that present an extreme case of the mass ratio of the incident atom to the surface atom, i.e., H + Cu(111) and H + Au(111), by presenting adiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) predictions of the energy loss and angular distributions for an incidence energy of 5 eV. The results are compared to the results of AIMDEFp calculations modeling energy loss to ehp excitation using an electronic friction ("EF") model applied to the AIMD trajectories, so that the energy loss to the electrons is calculated "post" ("p") the computation of the AIMD trajectory. The AIMD calculations predict average energy losses of 0.38 eV for Cu(111) and 0.13-0.14 eV for Au(111) for H-atoms that scatter from these surfaces without penetrating the surface. These energies closely correspond with energy losses predicted with Baule models, which is suggestive of structure scattering. The predicted adiabatic integral energy loss spectra (integrated over all final scattering angles) all display a lowest energy peak at an energy corresponding to approximately 80% of the average adiabatic energy loss for non-penetrative scattering. In the adiabatic limit, this suggests a way of determining the approximate average energy loss of non-penetratively scattered H-atoms from the integral energy loss spectrum of all scattered H-atoms. The AIMDEFp calculations predict that in each case the lowest energy loss peak should show additional energy loss in the

  18. Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    The response of brittle materials to dynamic loads was studied in this investigation based on a continuum damage model. Damage mechanism was selected to be interaction and growth of subscale cracks. Briefly, the cracks are activated by bulk tension and the density of activated cracks are described by a Weibull statistical distribution. The moduli of a cracked solid derived by Budiansky and O`Connell are then used to represent the global material degradation due to subscale cracking. This continuum damage model was originally developed to study rock fragmentation and was modified in the present study to improve on the post-limit structural response. The model was implemented into a transient dynamic explicit finite element code PRONTO 2D and then used for a numerical study involving the sudden stretching of a plate with a centrally located hole. Numerical results characterizing the dynamic responses of the material were presented. The effect of damage on dynamic material behavior was discussed.

  19. High accuracy modeling for advanced nuclear reactor core designs using Monte Carlo based coupled calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espel, Federico Puente

    The main objective of this PhD research is to develop a high accuracy modeling tool using a Monte Carlo based coupled system. The presented research comprises the development of models to include the thermal-hydraulic feedback to the Monte Carlo method and speed-up mechanisms to accelerate the Monte Carlo criticality calculation. Presently, deterministic codes based on the diffusion approximation of the Boltzmann transport equation, coupled with channel-based (or sub-channel based) thermal-hydraulic codes, carry out the three-dimensional (3-D) reactor core calculations of the Light Water Reactors (LWRs). These deterministic codes utilize nuclear homogenized data (normally over large spatial zones, consisting of fuel assembly or parts of fuel assembly, and in the best case, over small spatial zones, consisting of pin cell), which is functionalized in terms of thermal-hydraulic feedback parameters (in the form of off-line pre-generated cross-section libraries). High accuracy modeling is required for advanced nuclear reactor core designs that present increased geometry complexity and material heterogeneity. Such high-fidelity methods take advantage of the recent progress in computation technology and coupled neutron transport solutions with thermal-hydraulic feedback models on pin or even on sub-pin level (in terms of spatial scale). The continuous energy Monte Carlo method is well suited for solving such core environments with the detailed representation of the complicated 3-D problem. The major advantages of the Monte Carlo method over the deterministic methods are the continuous energy treatment and the exact 3-D geometry modeling. However, the Monte Carlo method involves vast computational time. The interest in Monte Carlo methods has increased thanks to the improvements of the capabilities of high performance computers. Coupled Monte-Carlo calculations can serve as reference solutions for verifying high-fidelity coupled deterministic neutron transport methods

  20. An Individual-Based Model of Zebrafish Population Dynamics Accounting for Energy Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Beaudouin, Rémy; Goussen, Benoit; Piccini, Benjamin; Augustine, Starrlight; Devillers, James; Brion, François; Péry, Alexandre R. R.

    2015-01-01

    Developing population dynamics models for zebrafish is crucial in order to extrapolate from toxicity data measured at the organism level to biological levels relevant to support and enhance ecological risk assessment. To achieve this, a dynamic energy budget for individual zebrafish (DEB model) was coupled to an individual based model of zebrafish population dynamics (IBM model). Next, we fitted the DEB model to new experimental data on zebrafish growth and reproduction thus improving existing models. We further analysed the DEB-model and DEB-IBM using a sensitivity analysis. Finally, the predictions of the DEB-IBM were compared to existing observations on natural zebrafish populations and the predicted population dynamics are realistic. While our zebrafish DEB-IBM model can still be improved by acquiring new experimental data on the most uncertain processes (e.g. survival or feeding), it can already serve to predict the impact of compounds at the population level. PMID:25938409

  1. Perspective: A Dynamics-Based Classification of Ventricular Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, James N.; Garfinkel, Alan; Karagueuzian, Hrayr S.; Nguyen, Thao P.; Olcese, Riccardo; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Qu, Zhilin

    2015-01-01

    Despite key advances in the clinical management of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, culminating with the development of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and catheter ablation techniques, pharmacologic/biologic therapeutics have lagged behind. The fundamental issue is that biological targets are molecular factors. Diseases, however, represent emergent properties at the scale of the organism that result from dynamic interactions between multiple constantly changing molecular factors. For a pharmacologic/biologic therapy to be effective, it must target the dynamic processes that underlie the disease. Here we propose a classification of ventricular arrhythmias that is based on our current understanding of the dynamics occurring at the subcellular, cellular, tissue and organism scales, which cause arrhythmias by simultaneously generating arrhythmia triggers and exacerbating tissue vulnerability. The goal is to create a framework that systematically links these key dynamic factors together with fixed factors (structural and electrophysiological heterogeneity) synergistically promoting electrical dispersion and increased arrhythmia risk to molecular factors that can serve as biological targets. We classify ventricular arrhythmias into three primary dynamic categories related generally to unstable Ca cycling, reduced repolarization, and excess repolarization, respectively. The clinical syndromes, arrhythmia mechanisms, dynamic factors and what is known about their molecular counterparts are discussed. Based on this framework, we propose a computational-experimental strategy for exploring the links between molecular factors, fixed factors and dynamic factors that underlie life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. The ultimate objective is to facilitate drug development by creating an in silico platform to evaluate and predict comprehensively how molecular interventions affect not only a single targeted arrhythmia, but all primary arrhythmia dynamics

  2. Nanothermochromics with VO2-based core-shell structures: Calculated luminous and solar optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.-Y.; Niklasson, G. A.; Granqvist, C. G.

    2011-06-01

    Composites including VO2-based thermochromic nanoparticles are able to combine high luminous transmittance Tlum with a significant modulation of the solar energy transmittance ΔTsol at a "critical" temperature in the vicinity of room temperature. Thus nanothermochromics is of much interest for energy efficient fenestration and offers advantages over thermochromic VO2-based thin films. This paper presents calculations based on effective medium theory applied to dilute suspensions of core-shell nanoparticles and demonstrates that, in particular, moderately thin-walled hollow spherical VO2 nanoshells can give significantly higher values of ΔTsol than solid nanoparticles at the expense of a somewhat lowered Tlum. This paper is a sequel to a recent publication [S.-Y. Li, G. A. Niklasson, and C. G. Granqvist, J. Appl. Phys. 108, 063525 (2010)].

  3. Effects of CT based Voxel Phantoms on Dose Distribution Calculated with Monte Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chaobin; Huang, Qunying; Wu, Yican

    2005-04-01

    A few CT-based voxel phantoms were produced to investigate the sensitivity of Monte Carlo simulations of x-ray beam and electron beam to the proportions of elements and the mass densities of the materials used to express the patient's anatomical structure. The human body can be well outlined by air, lung, adipose, muscle, soft bone and hard bone to calculate the dose distribution with Monte Carlo method. The effects of the calibration curves established by using various CT scanners are not clinically significant based on our investigation. The deviation from the values of cumulative dose volume histogram derived from CT-based voxel phantoms is less than 1% for the given target.

  4. Binding free energies for nicotine analogs inhibiting cytochrome P450 2A6 by a combined use of molecular dynamics simulations and QM/MM-PBSA calculations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haiting; Huang, Xiaoqin; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2014-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations have been performed to explore the dynamic behaviors of cytochrome P450 2A6 (CYP2A6) binding with nicotine analogs (that are typical inhibitors) and to calculate their binding free energies in combination with Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (PBSA) calculations. The combined MD simulations and QM/MM-PBSA calculations reveal that the most important structural parameters affecting the CYP2A6-inhibitor binding affinity are two crucial internuclear distances, that is, the distance between the heme iron atom of CYP2A6 and the coordinating atom of the inhibitor, and the hydrogen-bonding distance between the N297 side chain of CYP2A6 and the pyridine nitrogen of the inhibitor. The combined MD simulations and QM/MM-PBSA calculations have led to dynamic CYP2A6-inhibitor binding structures that are consistent with the observed dynamic behaviors and structural features of CYP2A6-inhibitor binding, and led to the binding free energies that are in good agreement with the experimentally-derived binding free energies. The agreement between the calculated binding free energies and the experimentally-derived binding free energies suggests that the combined MD and QM/MM-PBSA approach may be used as a valuable tool to accurately predict the CYP2A6-inhibitor binding affinities in future computational design of new, potent and selective CYP2A6 inhibitors. PMID:24631364

  5. Fast CPU-based Monte Carlo simulation for radiotherapy dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegenhein, Peter; Pirner, Sven; Kamerling, Cornelis Ph; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations are considered to be the most accurate method for calculating dose distributions in radiotherapy. Its clinical application, however, still is limited by the long runtimes conventional implementations of MC algorithms require to deliver sufficiently accurate results on high resolution imaging data. In order to overcome this obstacle we developed the software-package PhiMC, which is capable of computing precise dose distributions in a sub-minute time-frame by leveraging the potential of modern many- and multi-core CPU-based computers. PhiMC is based on the well verified dose planning method (DPM). We could demonstrate that PhiMC delivers dose distributions which are in excellent agreement to DPM. The multi-core implementation of PhiMC scales well between different computer architectures and achieves a speed-up of up to 37× compared to the original DPM code executed on a modern system. Furthermore, we could show that our CPU-based implementation on a modern workstation is between 1.25× and 1.95× faster than a well-known GPU implementation of the same simulation method on a NVIDIA Tesla C2050. Since CPUs work on several hundreds of GB RAM the typical GPU memory limitation does not apply for our implementation and high resolution clinical plans can be calculated.

  6. Improving iterative surface energy balance convergence for remote sensing based flux calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungel, Ramesh; Allen, Richard G.; Trezza, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    A modification of the iterative procedure of the surface energy balance was purposed to expedite the convergence of Monin-Obukhov stability correction utilized by the remote sensing based flux calculation. This was demonstrated using ground-based weather stations as well as the gridded weather data (North American Regional Reanalysis) and remote sensing based (Landsat 5, 7) images. The study was conducted for different land-use classes in southern Idaho and northern California for multiple satellite overpasses. The convergence behavior of a selected Landsat pixel as well as all of the Landsat pixels within the area of interest was analyzed. Modified version needed multiple times less iteration compared to the current iterative technique. At the time of low wind speed (˜1.3 m/s), the current iterative technique was not able to find a solution of surface energy balance for all of the Landsat pixels, while the modified version was able to achieve it in a few iterations. The study will facilitate many operational evapotranspiration models to avoid the nonconvergence in low wind speeds, which helps to increase the accuracy of flux calculations.

  7. Altazimuth mount based dynamic calibration method for GNSS attitude measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; He, Tao; Sun, Shaohua; Gu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    As the key process to ensure the test accuracy and quality, the dynamic calibration of the GNSS attitude measuring instrument is often embarrassed by the lack of the rigid enough test platform and an accurate enough calibration reference. To solve the problems, a novel dynamic calibration method for GNSS attitude measurement based on altazimuth mount is put forward in this paper. The principle and implementation of this method are presented, and then the feasibility and usability of the method are analyzed in detail involving the applicability of the mount, calibrating precision, calibrating range, base line rigidity and the satellite signal involved factors. Furthermore, to verify and test the method, a confirmatory experiment is carried out with the survey ship GPS attitude measuring instrument, and the experimental results prove that it is a feasible way to the dynamic calibration for GNSS attitude measurement.

  8. A method for calculating strain energy release rate based on beam theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, C. T.; Pandey, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    The Timoshenko beam theory was used to model cracked beams and to calculate the total strain energy release rate. The root rotation of the beam segments at the crack tip were estimated based on an approximate 2D elasticity solution. By including the strain energy released due to the root rotations of the beams during crack extension, the strain energy release rate obtained using beam theory agrees very well with the 2D finite element solution. Numerical examples were given for various beam geometries and loading conditions. Comparisons with existing beam models were also given.

  9. Refinement of overlapping local/global iteration method based on Monte Carlo/p-CMFD calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Y.; Yun, S.; Cho, N. Z.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the overlapping local/global (OLG) iteration method based on Monte Carlo/p-CMFD calculations is refined in two aspects. One is the consistent use of estimators to generate homogenized scattering cross sections. Another is that the incident or exiting angular interval is divided into multi-angular bins to modulate albedo boundary conditions for local problems. Numerical tests show that, compared to the one angle bin case in a previous study, the four angle bin case shows significantly improved results. (authors)

  10. Synthesis, spectral, optical properties and theoretical calculations on schiff bases ligands containing o-tolidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroudj, S.; Bouchouit, M.; Bouchouit, K.; Bouraiou, A.; Messaadia, L.; Kulyk, B.; Figa, V.; Bouacida, S.; Sofiani, Z.; Taboukhat, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper explores the synthesis, structure characterization and optical properties of two new schiff bases. These compounds were obtained by condensation of o-tolidine with salicylaldehyde and cinnamaldehyde. The obtained ligands were characterized by UV, 1H and NMR. Their third-order NLO properties were measured using the third harmonic generation technique on thin films at 1064 nm. The electric dipole moment (μ), the polarizability (α) and the first hyperpolarizability (β) were calculated using the density functional B3LYP method with the lanl2dz basis set. For the results, the title compound shows nonzero β value revealing second order NLO behaviour.

  11. Mapped interpolation scheme for single-point energy corrections in reaction rate calculations and a critical evaluation of dual-level reaction path dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Y.Y.; Truhlar, D.G.; Corchado, J.C.

    1999-02-25

    Three procedures for incorporating higher level electronic structure data into reaction path dynamics calculations are tested. In one procedure, variational transition state theory with interpolated single-point energies, which is denoted VTST-ISPE, a few extra energies calculated with a higher level theory along the lower level reaction path are used to correct the classical energetic profile of the reaction. In the second procedure, denoted variational transition state theory with interpolated optimized corrections (VTST-IOC), which the authors introduced earlier, higher level corrections to energies, frequencies, and moments of inertia are based on stationary-point geometries reoptimized at a higher level than the reaction path was calculated. The third procedure, called interpolated optimized energies (IOE), is like IOC except it omits the frequency correction. Three hydrogen-transfer reactions, CH{sub 3} + H{prime}H {r_arrow} CH{sub 3}H{prime} + H (R1), OH + H{prime}H {r_arrow} HOH{prime} + H (R2), and OH + H{prime}CH{sub 3} {r_arrow} HOH{prime} + CH{sub 3} (R3), are used to test and validate the procedures by comparing their predictions to the reaction rate evaluated with a full variational transition state theory calculation including multidimensional tunneling (VTST/MT) at the higher level. The authors present a very efficient scheme for carrying out VTST-ISPE calculations, which are popular due to their lower computational cost. They also show, on the basis of calculations of the reactions R1--R3 with eight pairs of higher and lower levels, that VTST-IOC with higher level data only at stationary points is a more reliable dual-level procedure than VTST-ISPE with higher level energies all along the reaction path. Although the frequencies along the reaction path are not corrected in the IOE scheme, the results are still better than those from VTST-ISPE; this indicates the importance of optimizing the geometry at the highest possible level.

  12. Graph model for calculating the properties of saturated monoalcohols based on the additivity of energy terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebeshkov, V. V.; Smolyakov, V. M.

    2012-05-01

    A 16-constant additive scheme was derived for calculating the physicochemical properties of saturated monoalcohols CH4O-C9H20O and decomposing the triangular numbers of the Pascal triangle based on the similarity of subgraphs in the molecular graphs (MGs) of the homologous series of these alcohols. It was shown, using this scheme for calculation of properties of saturated monoalcohols as an example, that each coefficient of the scheme (in other words, the number of methods to impose a chain of a definite length i 1, i 2, … on a molecular graph) is the result of the decomposition of the triangular numbers of the Pascal triangle. A linear dependence was found within the adopted classification of structural elements. Sixteen parameters of the schemes were recorded as linear combinations of 17 parameters. The enthalpies of vaporization L {298/K 0} of the saturated monoalcohols CH4O-C9H20O, for which there were no experimental data, were calculated. It was shown that the parameters are not chosen randomly when using the given procedure for constructing an additive scheme by decomposing the triangular numbers of the Pascal triangle.

  13. a Novel Sub-Pixel Matching Algorithm Based on Phase Correlation Using Peak Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Junfeng; Mo, Fan; Yang, Chao; Li, Pin; Tian, Shiqiang

    2016-06-01

    The matching accuracy of homonymy points of stereo images is a key point in the development of photogrammetry, which influences the geometrical accuracy of the image products. This paper presents a novel sub-pixel matching method phase correlation using peak calculation to improve the matching accuracy. The peak theoretic centre that means to sub-pixel deviation can be acquired by Peak Calculation (PC) according to inherent geometrical relationship, which is generated by inverse normalized cross-power spectrum, and the mismatching points are rejected by two strategies: window constraint, which is designed by matching window and geometric constraint, and correlation coefficient, which is effective for satellite images used for mismatching points removing. After above, a lot of high-precise homonymy points can be left. Lastly, three experiments are taken to verify the accuracy and efficiency of the presented method. Excellent results show that the presented method is better than traditional phase correlation matching methods based on surface fitting in these aspects of accuracy and efficiency, and the accuracy of the proposed phase correlation matching algorithm can reach 0.1 pixel with a higher calculation efficiency.

  14. Accelerating Atomic Orbital-based Electronic Structure Calculation via Pole Expansion plus Selected Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lin; Chen, Mohan; Yang, Chao; He, Lixin

    2012-02-10

    We describe how to apply the recently developed pole expansion plus selected inversion (PEpSI) technique to Kohn-Sham density function theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations that are based on atomic orbital discretization. We give analytic expressions for evaluating charge density, total energy, Helmholtz free energy and atomic forces without using the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian. We also show how to update the chemical potential without using Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. The advantage of using PEpSI is that it has a much lower computational complexity than that associated with the matrix diagonalization procedure. We demonstrate the performance gain by comparing the timing of PEpSI with that of diagonalization on insulating and metallic nanotubes. For these quasi-1D systems, the complexity of PEpSI is linear with respect to the number of atoms. This linear scaling can be observed in our computational experiments when the number of atoms in a nanotube is larger than a few hundreds. Both the wall clock time and the memory requirement of PEpSI is modest. This makes it even possible to perform Kohn-Sham DFT calculations for 10,000-atom nanotubes on a single processor. We also show that the use of PEpSI does not lead to loss of accuracy required in a practical DFT calculation.

  15. Excitation migration along oligophenylenevinylene-based chiral stacks: delocalization effects on transport dynamics.

    PubMed

    Beljonne, D; Hennebicq, E; Daniel, C; Herz, L M; Silva, C; Scholes, G D; Hoeben, F J M; Jonkheijm, P; Schenning, A P H J; Meskers, S C J; Phillips, R T; Friend, R H; Meijer, E W

    2005-06-01

    Atomistic models based on quantum-chemical calculations are combined with time-resolved spectroscopic investigations to explore the migration of electronic excitations along oligophenylenevinylene-based chiral stacks. It is found that the usual Pauli master equation (PME) approach relying on uncoherent transport between individual chromophores underestimates the excitation diffusion dynamics, monitored here by the time decay of the transient polarization anisotropy. A better agreement to experiment is achieved when accounting for excitation delocalization among acceptor molecules, as implemented in a modified version of the PME model. The same models are applied to study light harvesting and trapping in guest-host systems built from oligomers of different lengths. PMID:16852286

  16. First-principles calculation of thermodynamic stability of acids and bases under pH environment: A microscopic pH theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Kwiseon; Zhang, S. B.

    2012-04-01

    Despite being one of the most important thermodynamic variables, pH has yet to be incorporated into first-principles thermodynamics to calculate stability of acidic and basic solutes in aqueous solutions. By treating the solutes as defects in homogeneous liquids, we formulate a first-principles approach to calculate their formation energies under proton chemical potential, or pH, based on explicit molecular dynamics. The method draws analogy to first-principle calculations of defect formation energies under electron chemical potential, or Fermi energy, in semiconductors. From this, we propose a simple pictorial representation of the general theory of acid-base chemistry. By performing first-principles molecular dynamics of liquid water models with solutes, we apply the formulation to calculate formation energies of various neutral and charged solutes such as H+, OH-, NH3, NH4+, HCOOH, and HCOO- in water. The deduced auto-dissociation constant of water and the difference in the pKa values of NH3 and HCOOH show good agreement with known experimental values. Our first-principles approach can be further extended and applied to other bio- and electro-chemical molecules such as amino acids and redox reaction couples that could exist in aqueous environments to understand their thermodynamic stability.

  17. First-Principles Calculation of Thermodynamic Stability of Acids and Bases under pH Environment: A Microscopic pH Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. H.; Kim, K.; Zhang, S. B.

    2012-04-07

    Despite being one of the most important thermodynamic variables, pH has yet to be incorporated into first-principles thermodynamics to calculate stability of acidic and basic solutes in aqueous solutions. By treating the solutes as defects in homogeneous liquids, we formulate a first-principles approach to calculate their formation energies under proton chemical potential, or pH, based on explicit molecular dynamics. The method draws analogy to first-principle calculations of defect formation energies under electron chemical potential, or Fermi energy, in semiconductors. From this, we propose a simple pictorial representation of the general theory of acid-base chemistry. By performing first-principles molecular dynamics of liquid water models with solutes, we apply the formulation to calculate formation energies of various neutral and charged solutes such as H{sup +}, OH{sup -}, NH{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, HCOOH, and HCOO{sup -} in water. The deduced auto-dissociation constant of water and the difference in the pKa values of NH{sub 3} and HCOOH show good agreement with known experimental values. Our first-principles approach can be further extended and applied to other bio- and electro-chemical molecules such as amino acids and redox reaction couples that could exist in aqueous environments to understand their thermodynamic stability.

  18. First-principles-based calculation of the electrocaloric effect in BaTiO3: A comparison of direct and indirect methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marathe, Madhura; Grünebohm, Anna; Nishimatsu, Takeshi; Entel, Peter; Ederer, Claude

    2016-02-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations for a first-principles-based effective Hamiltonian to calculate two important quantities characterizing the electrocaloric effect in BaTiO3, the adiabatic temperature change Δ T and the isothermal entropy change Δ S , for different electric field strengths. We compare direct and indirect methods to obtain Δ T and Δ S , and we confirm that both methods indeed lead to an identical result provided that the system does not actually undergo a first order phase transition. We also show that a large electrocaloric response is obtained for electric fields beyond the critical field strength for the first order phase transition. Furthermore, our work fills several gaps regarding the application of the first-principles-based effective Hamiltonian approach, which represents a very attractive and powerful method for the quantitative prediction of electrocaloric properties. In particular, we consider the full temperature and field dependence of the calculated specific heat for the indirect calculation of Δ T , and we discuss the importance of maintaining thermal equilibrium during the field ramping when calculating Δ T using the direct method within a molecular dynamics approach.

  19. Deciphering Jupiter's complex flow dynamics using the upcoming Juno gravity measurements and an adjoint based dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai

    2015-11-01

    The nature of the large scale flow on Jupiter below the cloud level is still unknown. The observed surface wind might be confined to the upper layers, or be a manifestation of deep cylindrical flow. Moreover, it is possible that in the case where the observed wind is superficial, there exists deep flow that is completely separated from the surface. To date, all models linking the wind (via the induced density nomalies) to the gravity field to be measured by Juno, consider only wind flow related to the observed could level wind. Some assume full cylindrical flow while others allow for the wind to decay with depth.Here we explore the possibility of complex wind dynamics that include both the upper-layer wind, and a deep flow that is completely detached from the flow above it. The surface flow is based on the observed cloud level flow and is set to decay with depth. The deep flow is constructed synthetically to produce cylindrical structures with variable width and magnitude, thus allowing for a wide range of possible setups of the unknown deep flow. This flow is also set to decay when approaching the surface flow in coordination with the exponential decay rate. The combined 3D flow is then related to the density anomalies via a dynamical model, taking into account oblateness effects as well, and the resulting density field is then used to calculate the gravitational moments. An adjoint inverse model is constructed for the dynamical model, thus allowing backward integration of the dynamical model, from the expected observations of the gravity moments to the parameters controlling the setup of the deep and surface flows. We show that the model can be used for examination of various scenarios, including cases in which the deep flow is dominating over the surface wind. The novelty of our adjoint based inversion approach is in the ability to identify complex dynamics including deep cylindrical flows that have no manifestation in the observed cloud-level wind. Furthermore

  20. Dual-energy CT-based material extraction for tissue segmentation in Monte Carlo dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Carrier, Jean-François; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2008-05-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations are performed on patient geometries derived from computed tomography (CT) images. For most available MC codes, the Hounsfield units (HU) in each voxel of a CT image have to be converted into mass density (ρ) and material type. This is typically done with a (HU; ρ) calibration curve which may lead to mis-assignment of media. In this work, an improved material segmentation using dual-energy CT-based material extraction is presented. For this purpose, the differences in extracted effective atomic numbers Z and the relative electron densities ρe of each voxel are used. Dual-energy CT material extraction based on parametrization of the linear attenuation coefficient for 17 tissue-equivalent inserts inside a solid water phantom was done. Scans of the phantom were acquired at 100 kVp and 140 kVp from which Z and ρe values of each insert were derived. The mean errors on Z and ρe extraction were 2.8% and 1.8%, respectively. Phantom dose calculations were performed for 250 kVp and 18 MV photon beams and an 18 MeV electron beam in the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc code. Two material assignments were used: the conventional (HU; ρ) and the novel (HU; ρ, Z) dual-energy CT tissue segmentation. The dose calculation errors using the conventional tissue segmentation were as high as 17% in a mis-assigned soft bone tissue-equivalent material for the 250 kVp photon beam. Similarly, the errors for the 18 MeV electron beam and the 18 MV photon beam were up to 6% and 3% in some mis-assigned media. The assignment of all tissue-equivalent inserts was accurate using the novel dual-energy CT material assignment. As a result, the dose calculation errors were below 1% in all beam arrangements. Comparable improvement in dose calculation accuracy is expected for human tissues. The dual-energy tissue segmentation offers a significantly higher accuracy compared to the conventional single-energy segmentation.

  1. Quantum Dynamics with Gaussian Bases Defined by the Quantum Trajectories.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bing; Garashchuk, Sophya

    2016-05-19

    Development of a general approach to construction of efficient high-dimensional bases is an outstanding challenge in quantum dynamics describing large amplitude motion of molecules and fragments. A number of approaches, proposed over the years, utilize Gaussian bases whose parameters are somehow-usually by propagating classical trajectories or by solving coupled variational equations-tailored to the shape of a wave function evolving in time. In this paper we define the time-dependent Gaussian bases through an ensemble of quantum or Bohmian trajectories, known to provide a very compact representation of a wave function due to conservation of the probability density associated with each trajectory. Though the exact numerical implementation of the quantum trajectory dynamics itself is, generally, impractical, the quantum trajectories can be obtained from the wave function expanded in a basis. The resulting trajectories are used to guide compact Gaussian bases, as illustrated on several model problems. PMID:26735750

  2. AN INDIVIDUAL-BASED MODEL OF COTTUS POPULATION DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We explored population dynamics of a southern Appalachian population of Cottus bairdi using a spatially-explicit, individual-based model. The model follows daily growth, mortality, and spawning of individuals as a function of flow and temperature. We modeled movement of juveniles...

  3. Coverage of dynamic correlation effects by density functional theory functionals: density-based analysis for neon.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, K; Nowakowski, K; Grabowski, I; Wasilewski, J

    2009-04-28

    The problem of linking the dynamic electron correlation effects defined in traditional ab initio methods [or wave function theories (WFTs)] with the structure of the individual density functional theory (DFT) exchange and correlation functionals has been analyzed for the Ne atom, for which nondynamic correlation effects play a negligible role. A density-based approach directly hinged on difference radial-density (DRD) distributions defined with respect the Hartree-Fock radial density has been employed for analyzing the impact of dynamic correlation effects on the density. Attention has been paid to the elimination of basis-set incompleteness errors. The DRD distributions calculated by several ab initio methods have been compared to their DFT counterparts generated for representatives of several generations of broadly used exchange-correlation functionals and for the recently developed orbital-dependent OEP2 exchange-correlation functional [Bartlett et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 034104 (2005)]. For the local, generalized-gradient, and hybrid functionals it has been found that the dynamic correlation effects are to a large extend accounted for by densities resulting from exchange-only calculations. Additional calculations with self-interaction corrected exchange potentials indicate that this finding cannot be explained as an artifact caused by the self-interaction error. It has been demonstrated that the VWN5 and LYP correlation functionals do not represent any substantial dynamical correlation effects on the electron density, whereas these effects are well represented by the orbital-dependent OEP2 correlation functional. Critical comparison of the present results with their counterparts reported in literature has been made. Some attention has been paid to demonstrating the differences between the energy- and density-based perspectives. They indicate the usefulness of density-based criteria for developing new exchange-correlation functionals. PMID:19405556

  4. Coverage of dynamic correlation effects by density functional theory functionals: Density-based analysis for neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankowski, K.; Nowakowski, K.; Grabowski, I.; Wasilewski, J.

    2009-04-01

    The problem of linking the dynamic electron correlation effects defined in traditional ab initio methods [or wave function theories (WFTs)] with the structure of the individual density functional theory (DFT) exchange and correlation functionals has been analyzed for the Ne atom, for which nondynamic correlation effects play a negligible role. A density-based approach directly hinged on difference radial-density (DRD) distributions defined with respect the Hartree-Fock radial density has been employed for analyzing the impact of dynamic correlation effects on the density. Attention has been paid to the elimination of basis-set incompleteness errors. The DRD distributions calculated by several ab initio methods have been compared to their DFT counterparts generated for representatives of several generations of broadly used exchange-correlation functionals and for the recently developed orbital-dependent OEP2 exchange-correlation functional [Bartlett et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 034104 (2005)]. For the local, generalized-gradient, and hybrid functionals it has been found that the dynamic correlation effects are to a large extend accounted for by densities resulting from exchange-only calculations. Additional calculations with self-interaction corrected exchange potentials indicate that this finding cannot be explained as an artifact caused by the self-interaction error. It has been demonstrated that the VWN5 and LYP correlation functionals do not represent any substantial dynamical correlation effects on the electron density, whereas these effects are well represented by the orbital-dependent OEP2 correlation functional. Critical comparison of the present results with their counterparts reported in literature has been made. Some attention has been paid to demonstrating the differences between the energy- and density-based perspectives. They indicate the usefulness of density-based criteria for developing new exchange-correlation functionals.

  5. 42 CFR 413.220 - Methodology for calculating the per-treatment base rate under the ESRD prospective payment system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Methodology for calculating the per-treatment base... Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.220 Methodology for calculating the per.... The methodology for determining the per treatment base rate under the ESRD prospective payment...

  6. GPU-based fast Monte Carlo dose calculation for proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xun; Schümann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Jiang, Steve B

    2015-01-01

    Accurate radiation dose calculation is essential for successful proton radiotherapy. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is considered to be the most accurate method. However, the long computation time limits it from routine clinical applications. Recently, graphics processing units (GPUs) have been widely used to accelerate computationally intensive tasks in radiotherapy. We have developed a fast MC dose calculation package, gPMC, for proton dose calculation on a GPU. In gPMC, proton transport is modeled by the class II condensed history simulation scheme with a continuous slowing down approximation. Ionization, elastic and inelastic proton nucleus interactions are considered. Energy straggling and multiple scattering are modeled. Secondary electrons are not transported and their energies are locally deposited. After an inelastic nuclear interaction event, a variety of products are generated using an empirical model. Among them, charged nuclear fragments are terminated with energy locally deposited. Secondary protons are stored in a stack and transported after finishing transport of the primary protons, while secondary neutral particles are neglected. gPMC is implemented on the GPU under the CUDA platform. We have validated gPMC using the TOPAS/Geant4 MC code as the gold standard. For various cases including homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms as well as a patient case, good agreements between gPMC and TOPAS/Geant4 are observed. The gamma passing rate for the 2%/2 mm criterion is over 98.7% in the region with dose greater than 10% maximum dose in all cases, excluding low-density air regions. With gPMC it takes only 6–22 s to simulate 10 million source protons to achieve ~1% relative statistical uncertainty, depending on the phantoms and energy. This is an extremely high efficiency compared to the computational time of tens of CPU hours for TOPAS/Geant4. Our fast GPU-based code can thus facilitate the routine use of MC dose calculation in proton therapy. PMID:23128424

  7. GPU-based fast Monte Carlo dose calculation for proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xun; Schümann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Jiang, Steve B

    2012-12-01

    Accurate radiation dose calculation is essential for successful proton radiotherapy. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is considered to be the most accurate method. However, the long computation time limits it from routine clinical applications. Recently, graphics processing units (GPUs) have been widely used to accelerate computationally intensive tasks in radiotherapy. We have developed a fast MC dose calculation package, gPMC, for proton dose calculation on a GPU. In gPMC, proton transport is modeled by the class II condensed history simulation scheme with a continuous slowing down approximation. Ionization, elastic and inelastic proton nucleus interactions are considered. Energy straggling and multiple scattering are modeled. Secondary electrons are not transported and their energies are locally deposited. After an inelastic nuclear interaction event, a variety of products are generated using an empirical model. Among them, charged nuclear fragments are terminated with energy locally deposited. Secondary protons are stored in a stack and transported after finishing transport of the primary protons, while secondary neutral particles are neglected. gPMC is implemented on the GPU under the CUDA platform. We have validated gPMC using the TOPAS/Geant4 MC code as the gold standard. For various cases including homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms as well as a patient case, good agreements between gPMC and TOPAS/Geant4 are observed. The gamma passing rate for the 2%/2 mm criterion is over 98.7% in the region with dose greater than 10% maximum dose in all cases, excluding low-density air regions. With gPMC it takes only 6-22 s to simulate 10 million source protons to achieve ∼1% relative statistical uncertainty, depending on the phantoms and energy. This is an extremely high efficiency compared to the computational time of tens of CPU hours for TOPAS/Geant4. Our fast GPU-based code can thus facilitate the routine use of MC dose calculation in proton therapy. PMID

  8. A brief comparison between grid based real space algorithms andspectrum algorithms for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang

    2006-12-01

    Quantum mechanical ab initio calculation constitutes the biggest portion of the computer time in material science and chemical science simulations. As a computer center like NERSC, to better serve these communities, it will be very useful to have a prediction for the future trends of ab initio calculations in these areas. Such prediction can help us to decide what future computer architecture can be most useful for these communities, and what should be emphasized on in future supercomputer procurement. As the size of the computer and the size of the simulated physical systems increase, there is a renewed interest in using the real space grid method in electronic structure calculations. This is fueled by two factors. First, it is generally assumed that the real space grid method is more suitable for parallel computation for its limited communication requirement, compared with spectrum method where a global FFT is required. Second, as the size N of the calculated system increases together with the computer power, O(N) scaling approaches become more favorable than the traditional direct O(N{sup 3}) scaling methods. These O(N) methods are usually based on localized orbital in real space, which can be described more naturally by the real space basis. In this report, the author compares the real space methods versus the traditional plane wave (PW) spectrum methods, for their technical pros and cons, and the possible of future trends. For the real space method, the author focuses on the regular grid finite different (FD) method and the finite element (FE) method. These are the methods used mostly in material science simulation. As for chemical science, the predominant methods are still Gaussian basis method, and sometime the atomic orbital basis method. These two basis sets are localized in real space, and there is no indication that their roles in quantum chemical simulation will change anytime soon. The author focuses on the density functional theory (DFT), which is the

  9. GPU-based fast Monte Carlo dose calculation for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xun; Schümann, Jan; Paganetti, Harald; Jiang, Steve B.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate radiation dose calculation is essential for successful proton radiotherapy. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is considered to be the most accurate method. However, the long computation time limits it from routine clinical applications. Recently, graphics processing units (GPUs) have been widely used to accelerate computationally intensive tasks in radiotherapy. We have developed a fast MC dose calculation package, gPMC, for proton dose calculation on a GPU. In gPMC, proton transport is modeled by the class II condensed history simulation scheme with a continuous slowing down approximation. Ionization, elastic and inelastic proton nucleus interactions are considered. Energy straggling and multiple scattering are modeled. Secondary electrons are not transported and their energies are locally deposited. After an inelastic nuclear interaction event, a variety of products are generated using an empirical model. Among them, charged nuclear fragments are terminated with energy locally deposited. Secondary protons are stored in a stack and transported after finishing transport of the primary protons, while secondary neutral particles are neglected. gPMC is implemented on the GPU under the CUDA platform. We have validated gPMC using the TOPAS/Geant4 MC code as the gold standard. For various cases including homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms as well as a patient case, good agreements between gPMC and TOPAS/Geant4 are observed. The gamma passing rate for the 2%/2 mm criterion is over 98.7% in the region with dose greater than 10% maximum dose in all cases, excluding low-density air regions. With gPMC it takes only 6-22 s to simulate 10 million source protons to achieve ˜1% relative statistical uncertainty, depending on the phantoms and energy. This is an extremely high efficiency compared to the computational time of tens of CPU hours for TOPAS/Geant4. Our fast GPU-based code can thus facilitate the routine use of MC dose calculation in proton therapy.

  10. Ab initio calculations on the excited states of Na3 cluster to explore beyond Born-Oppenheimer theories: adiabatic to diabatic potential energy surfaces and nuclear dynamics.

    PubMed

    Paul, Amit Kumar; Ray, Somrita; Mukhopadhyay, Debasis; Adhikari, Satrajit

    2011-07-21

    We perform ab initio calculation using quantum chemistry package (MOLPRO) on the excited states of Na(3) cluster and present the adiabatic PESs for the electronic states 2(2)E' and 1(2)A(1)', and the non-adiabatic coupling (NAC) terms among those states. Since the ab initio calculated NAC elements for the states 2(2)E' and 1(2)A(1)' demonstrate the numerical validity of so called "Curl Condition," such states closely form a sub-Hilbert space. For this subspace, we employ the NAC terms to solve the "adiabatic-diabatic transformation (ADT)" equations to obtain the functional form of the transformation angles and pave the way to construct the continuous and single valued diabatic potential energy surface matrix by exploiting the existing first principle based theoretical means on beyond Born-Oppenheimer treatment. Nuclear dynamics has been carried out on those diabatic surfaces to reproduce the experimental spectrum for system B of Na(3) cluster and thereby, to explore the numerical validity of the theoretical development on beyond Born-Oppenheimer approach for adiabatic to diabatic transformation. PMID:21786987

  11. On the comparisons between dissipative particle dynamics simulations and self-consistent field calculations of diblock copolymer microphase separation.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Paramvir; Zong, Jing; Yang, Delian; Wang, Qiang

    2013-05-21

    To highlight the importance of quantitative and parameter-fitting-free comparisons among different models/methods, we revisited the comparisons made by Groot and Madden [J. Chem. Phys. 108, 8713 (1998)] and Chen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 104907 (2005)] between their dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations of the DPD model and the self-consistent field (SCF) calculations of the "standard" model done by Matsen and Bates [Macromolecules 29, 1091 (1996)] for diblock copolymer (DBC) A-B melts. The small values of the invariant degree of polymerization used in the DPD simulations do not justify the use of the fluctuation theory of Fredrickson and Helfand [J. Chem. Phys. 87, 697 (1987)] by Groot and Madden, and their fitting between the DPD interaction parameters and the Flory-Huggins χ parameter in the "standard" model also has no rigorous basis. Even with their use of the fluctuation theory and the parameter-fitting, we do not find the "quantitative match" for the order-disorder transition of symmetric DBC claimed by Groot and Madden. For lamellar and cylindrical structures, we find that the system fluctuations/correlations decrease the bulk period and greatly suppress the large depletion of the total segmental density at the A-B interfaces as well as its oscillations in A- and B-domains predicted by our SCF calculations of the DPD model. At all values of the A-block volume fractions in the copolymer f (which are integer multiples of 0.1), our SCF calculations give the same sequence of phase transitions with varying χN as the "standard" model, where N denotes the number of segments on each DBC chain. All phase boundaries, however, are shifted to higher χN due to the finite interaction range in the DPD model, except at f = 0.1 (and 0.9), where χN at the transition between the disordered phase and the spheres arranged on a body-centered cubic lattice is lower due to N = 10 in the DPD model. Finally, in 11 of the total 20 cases (f-χN combinations) studied in

  12. On the comparisons between dissipative particle dynamics simulations and self-consistent field calculations of diblock copolymer microphase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Paramvir; Zong, Jing; Yang, Delian; Wang, Qiang

    2013-05-01

    To highlight the importance of quantitative and parameter-fitting-free comparisons among different models/methods, we revisited the comparisons made by Groot and Madden [J. Chem. Phys. 108, 8713 (1998), 10.1063/1.476300] and Chen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 104907 (2005), 10.1063/1.1860351] between their dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations of the DPD model and the self-consistent field (SCF) calculations of the "standard" model done by Matsen and Bates [Macromolecules 29, 1091 (1996), 10.1021/ma951138i] for diblock copolymer (DBC) A-B melts. The small values of the invariant degree of polymerization used in the DPD simulations do not justify the use of the fluctuation theory of Fredrickson and Helfand [J. Chem. Phys. 87, 697 (1987), 10.1063/1.453566] by Groot and Madden, and their fitting between the DPD interaction parameters and the Flory-Huggins χ parameter in the "standard" model also has no rigorous basis. Even with their use of the fluctuation theory and the parameter-fitting, we do not find the "quantitative match" for the order-disorder transition of symmetric DBC claimed by Groot and Madden. For lamellar and cylindrical structures, we find that the system fluctuations/correlations decrease the bulk period and greatly suppress the large depletion of the total segmental density at the A-B interfaces as well as its oscillations in A- and B-domains predicted by our SCF calculations of the DPD model. At all values of the A-block volume fractions in the copolymer f (which are integer multiples of 0.1), our SCF calculations give the same sequence of phase transitions with varying χN as the "standard" model, where N denotes the number of segments on each DBC chain. All phase boundaries, however, are shifted to higher χN due to the finite interaction range in the DPD model, except at f = 0.1 (and 0.9), where χN at the transition between the disordered phase and the spheres arranged on a body-centered cubic lattice is lower due to N = 10 in the DPD

  13. Evaluation of on-board kV cone beam CT (CBCT)-based dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Schreibmann, Eduard; Li, Tianfang; Wang, Chuang; Xing, Lei

    2007-02-01

    On-board CBCT images are used to generate patient geometric models to assist patient setup. The image data can also, potentially, be used for dose reconstruction in combination with the fluence maps from treatment plan. Here we evaluate the achievable accuracy in using a kV CBCT for dose calculation. Relative electron density as a function of HU was obtained for both planning CT (pCT) and CBCT using a Catphan-600 calibration phantom. The CBCT calibration stability was monitored weekly for 8 consecutive weeks. A clinical treatment planning system was employed for pCT- and CBCT-based dose calculations and subsequent comparisons. Phantom and patient studies were carried out. In the former study, both Catphan-600 and pelvic phantoms were employed to evaluate the dosimetric performance of the full-fan and half-fan scanning modes. To evaluate the dosimetric influence of motion artefacts commonly seen in CBCT images, the Catphan-600 phantom was scanned with and without cyclic motion using the pCT and CBCT scanners. The doses computed based on the four sets of CT images (pCT and CBCT with/without motion) were compared quantitatively. The patient studies included a lung case and three prostate cases. The lung case was employed to further assess the adverse effect of intra-scan organ motion. Unlike the phantom study, the pCT of a patient is generally acquired at the time of simulation and the anatomy may be different from that of CBCT acquired at the time of treatment delivery because of organ deformation. To tackle the problem, we introduced a set of modified CBCT images (mCBCT) for each patient, which possesses the geometric information of the CBCT but the electronic density distribution mapped from the pCT with the help of a BSpline deformable image registration software. In the patient study, the dose computed with the mCBCT was used as a surrogate of the 'ground truth'. We found that the CBCT electron density calibration curve differs moderately from that of pCT. No

  14. Modeling of an industrial environment: external dose calculations based on Monte Carlo simulations of photon transport.

    PubMed

    Kis, Zoltán; Eged, Katalin; Voigt, Gabriele; Meckbach, Reinhard; Müller, Heinz

    2004-02-01

    External gamma exposures from radionuclides deposited on surfaces usually result in the major contribution to the total dose to the public living in urban-industrial environments. The aim of the paper is to give an example for a calculation of the collective and averted collective dose due to the contamination and decontamination of deposition surfaces in a complex environment based on the results of Monte Carlo simulations. The shielding effects of the structures in complex and realistic industrial environments (where productive and/or commercial activity is carried out) were computed by the use of Monte Carlo method. Several types of deposition areas (walls, roofs, windows, streets, lawn) were considered. Moreover, this paper gives a summary about the time dependence of the source strengths relative to a reference surface and a short overview about the mechanical and chemical intervention techniques which can be applied in this area. An exposure scenario was designed based on a survey of average German and Hungarian supermarkets. In the first part of the paper the air kermas per photon per unit area due to each specific deposition area contaminated by 137Cs were determined at several arbitrary locations in the whole environment relative to a reference value of 8.39 x 10(-4) pGy per gamma m(-2). The calculations provide the possibility to assess the whole contribution of a specific deposition area to the collective dose, separately. According to the current results, the roof and the paved area contribute the most part (approximately 92%) to the total dose in the first year taking into account the relative contamination of the deposition areas. When integrating over 10 or 50 y, these two surfaces remain the most important contributors as well but the ratio will increasingly be shifted in favor of the roof. The decontamination of the roof and the paved area results in about 80-90% of the total averted collective dose in each calculated time period (1, 10, 50 y

  15. SDT: A Virus Classification Tool Based on Pairwise Sequence Alignment and Identity Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Muhire, Brejnev Muhizi; Varsani, Arvind; Martin, Darren Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The perpetually increasing rate at which viral full-genome sequences are being determined is creating a pressing demand for computational tools that will aid the objective classification of these genome sequences. Taxonomic classification approaches that are based on pairwise genetic identity measures are potentially highly automatable and are progressively gaining favour with the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). There are, however, various issues with the calculation of such measures that could potentially undermine the accuracy and consistency with which they can be applied to virus classification. Firstly, pairwise sequence identities computed based on multiple sequence alignments rather than on multiple independent pairwise alignments can lead to the deflation of identity scores with increasing dataset sizes. Also, when gap-characters need to be introduced during sequence alignments to account for insertions and deletions, methodological variations in the way that these characters are introduced and handled during pairwise genetic identity calculations can cause high degrees of inconsistency in the way that different methods classify the same sets of sequences. Here we present Sequence Demarcation Tool (SDT), a free user-friendly computer program that aims to provide a robust and highly reproducible means of objectively using pairwise genetic identity calculations to classify any set of nucleotide or amino acid sequences. SDT can produce publication quality pairwise identity plots and colour-coded distance matrices to further aid the classification of sequences according to ICTV approved taxonomic demarcation criteria. Besides a graphical interface version of the program for Windows computers, command-line versions of the program are available for a variety of different operating systems (including a parallel version for cluster computing platforms). PMID:25259891

  16. Novel Anthropometry-Based Calculation of the Body Heat Capacity in the Korean Population.

    PubMed

    Pham, Duong Duc; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Young Boum; Park, Eun Seok; Kim, Ka Yul; Song, Ji Yeon; Kim, Ji Eun; Leem, Chae Hun

    2015-01-01

    Heat capacity (HC) has an important role in the temperature regulation process, particularly in dealing with the heat load. The actual measurement of the body HC is complicated and is generally estimated by body-composition-specific data. This study compared the previously known HC estimating equations and sought how to define HC using simple anthropometric indices such as weight and body surface area (BSA) in the Korean population. Six hundred participants were randomly selected from a pool of 902 healthy volunteers aged 20 to 70 years for the training set. The remaining 302 participants were used for the test set. Body composition analysis using multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to access body components including body fat, water, protein, and mineral mass. Four different HCs were calculated and compared using a weight-based HC (HC_Eq1), two HCs estimated from fat and fat-free mass (HC_Eq2 and HC_Eq3), and an HC calculated from fat, protein, water, and mineral mass (HC_Eq4). HC_Eq1 generally produced a larger HC than the other HC equations and had a poorer correlation with the other HC equations. HC equations using body composition data were well-correlated to each other. If HC estimated with HC_Eq4 was regarded as a standard, interestingly, the BSA and weight independently contributed to the variation of HC. The model composed of weight, BSA, and gender was able to predict more than a 99% variation of HC_Eq4. Validation analysis on the test set showed a very high satisfactory level of the predictive model. In conclusion, our results suggest that gender, BSA, and weight are the independent factors for calculating HC. For the first time, a predictive equation based on anthropometry data was developed and this equation could be useful for estimating HC in the general Korean population without body-composition measurement. PMID:26529594

  17. Novel Anthropometry-Based Calculation of the Body Heat Capacity in the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Duong Duc; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Young Boum; Park, Eun Seok; Kim, Ka Yul; Song, Ji Yeon; Kim, Ji Eun; Leem, Chae Hun

    2015-01-01

    Heat capacity (HC) has an important role in the temperature regulation process, particularly in dealing with the heat load. The actual measurement of the body HC is complicated and is generally estimated by body-composition-specific data. This study compared the previously known HC estimating equations and sought how to define HC using simple anthropometric indices such as weight and body surface area (BSA) in the Korean population. Six hundred participants were randomly selected from a pool of 902 healthy volunteers aged 20 to 70 years for the training set. The remaining 302 participants were used for the test set. Body composition analysis using multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis was used to access body components including body fat, water, protein, and mineral mass. Four different HCs were calculated and compared using a weight-based HC (HC_Eq1), two HCs estimated from fat and fat-free mass (HC_Eq2 and HC_Eq3), and an HC calculated from fat, protein, water, and mineral mass (HC_Eq4). HC_Eq1 generally produced a larger HC than the other HC equations and had a poorer correlation with the other HC equations. HC equations using body composition data were well-correlated to each other. If HC estimated with HC_Eq4 was regarded as a standard, interestingly, the BSA and weight independently contributed to the variation of HC. The model composed of weight, BSA, and gender was able to predict more than a 99% variation of HC_Eq4. Validation analysis on the test set showed a very high satisfactory level of the predictive model. In conclusion, our results suggest that gender, BSA, and weight are the independent factors for calculating HC. For the first time, a predictive equation based on anthropometry data was developed and this equation could be useful for estimating HC in the general Korean population without body-composition measurement. PMID:26529594

  18. Multistate electron transfer dynamics in the condensed phase: Exact calculations from the reduced hierarchy equations of motion approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Midori; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2010-06-07

    Multiple displaced oscillators coupled to an Ohmic heat bath are used to describe electron transfer (ET) in a dissipative environment. By performing a canonical transformation, the model is reduced to a multilevel system coupled to a heat bath with the Brownian spectral distribution. A reduced hierarchy equations of motion approach is introduced for numerically rigorous simulation of the dynamics of the three-level system with various oscillator configurations, for different nonadiabatic coupling strengths and damping rates, and at different temperatures. The time evolution of the reduced density matrix elements illustrates the interplay of coherences between the electronic and vibrational states. The ET reaction rates, defined as a flux-flux correlation function, are calculated using the linear response of the system to an external perturbation as a function of activation energy. The results exhibit an asymmetric inverted parabolic profile in a small activation regime due to the presence of the intermediate state between the reactant and product states and a slowly decaying profile in a large activation energy regime, which arises from the quantum coherent transitions.

  19. Implementation of a Web-Based Spatial Carbon Calculator for Latin America and the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degagne, R. S.; Bachelet, D. M.; Grossman, D.; Lundin, M.; Ward, B. C.

    2013-12-01

    A multi-disciplinary team from the Conservation Biology Institute is creating a web-based tool for the InterAmerican Development Bank (IDB) to assess the impact of potential development projects on carbon stocks in Latin America and the Caribbean. Funded by the German Society for International Cooperation (GIZ), this interactive carbon calculator is an integrated component of the IDB Decision Support toolkit which is currently utilized by the IDB's Environmental Safeguards Group. It is deployed on the Data Basin (www.databasin.org) platform and provides a risk screening function to indicate the potential carbon impact of various types of projects, based on a user-delineated development footprint. The tool framework employs the best available geospatial carbon data to quantify above-ground carbon stocks and highlights potential below-ground and soil carbon hotspots in the proposed project area. Results are displayed in the web mapping interface, as well as summarized in PDF documents generated by the tool.

  20. Electronic structures of halogen-doped Cu2O based on DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zong-Yan; Yi, Juan; Zhou, Da-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    In order to construct p—n homojunction of Cu2O-based thin film solar cells that may increase its conversion efficiency, to synthesize n-type Cu2O with high conductivity is extremely crucial, and considered as a challenge in the near future. The doping effects of halogen on electronic structure of Cu2O have been investigated by density function theory calculations in the present work. Halogen dopants form donor levels below the bottom of conduction band through gaining or losing electrons, suggesting that halogen doping could make Cu2O have n-type conductivity. The lattice distortion, the impurity formation energy, the position, and the band width of donor level of Cu2O1-xHx (H = F, Cl, Br, I) increase with the halogen atomic number. Based on the calculated results, chlorine doping is an effective n-type dopant for Cu2O, owing to the lower impurity formation energy and suitable donor level.

  1. Three dimensional gait analysis using wearable acceleration and gyro sensors based on quaternion calculations.

    PubMed

    Tadano, Shigeru; Takeda, Ryo; Miyagawa, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for three dimensional gait analysis using wearable sensors and quaternion calculations. Seven sensor units consisting of a tri-axial acceleration and gyro sensors, were fixed to the lower limbs. The acceleration and angular velocity data of each sensor unit were measured during level walking. The initial orientations of the sensor units were estimated using acceleration data during upright standing position and the angular displacements were estimated afterwards using angular velocity data during gait. Here, an algorithm based on quaternion calculation was implemented for orientation estimation of the sensor units. The orientations of the sensor units were converted to the orientations of the body segments by a rotation matrix obtained from a calibration trial. Body segment orientations were then used for constructing a three dimensional wire frame animation of the volunteers during the gait. Gait analysis was conducted on five volunteers, and results were compared with those from a camera-based motion analysis system. Comparisons were made for the joint trajectory in the horizontal and sagittal plane. The average RMSE and correlation coefficient (CC) were 10.14 deg and 0.98, 7.88 deg and 0.97, 9.75 deg and 0.78 for the hip, knee and ankle flexion angles, respectively. PMID:23877128

  2. Calculations of helium separation via uniform pores of stanene-based membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guoping; Jiao, Yan; Jiao, Yalong; Ma, Fengxian; Kou, Liangzhi

    2015-01-01

    Summary The development of low energy cost membranes to separate He from noble gas mixtures is highly desired. In this work, we studied He purification using recently experimentally realized, two-dimensional stanene (2D Sn) and decorated 2D Sn (SnH and SnF) honeycomb lattices by density functional theory calculations. To increase the permeability of noble gases through pristine 2D Sn at room temperature (298 K), two practical strategies (i.e., the application of strain and functionalization) are proposed. With their high concentration of large pores, 2D Sn-based membrane materials demonstrate excellent helium purification and can serve as a superior membrane over traditionally used, porous materials. In addition, the separation performance of these 2D Sn-based membrane materials can be significantly tuned by application of strain to optimize the He purification properties by taking both diffusion and selectivity into account. Our results are the first calculations of He separation in a defect-free honeycomb lattice, highlighting new interesting materials for helium separation for future experimental validation. PMID:26885459

  3. Hydration in discrete water. A mean field, cellular automata based approach to calculating hydration free energies.

    PubMed

    Setny, Piotr; Zacharias, Martin

    2010-07-01

    A simple, semiheuristic solvation model based on a discrete, BCC grid of solvent cells has been presented. The model utilizes a mean field approach for the calculation of solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interaction energies and a cellular automata based algorithm for the prediction of solvent distribution in the presence of solute. The construction of the effective Hamiltonian for a solvent cell provides an explicit coupling between orientation-dependent water-solute electrostatic interactions and water-water hydrogen bonding. The water-solute dispersion interaction is also explicitly taken into account. The model does not depend on any arbitrary definition of the solute-solvent interface nor does it use a microscopic surface tension for the calculation of nonpolar contributions to the hydration free energies. It is demonstrated that the model provides satisfactory predictions of hydration free energies for drug-like molecules and is able to reproduce the distribution of buried water molecules within protein structures. The model is computationally efficient and is applicable to arbitrary molecules described by atomistic force field. PMID:20552986

  4. Three Dimensional Gait Analysis Using Wearable Acceleration and Gyro Sensors Based on Quaternion Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Tadano, Shigeru; Takeda, Ryo; Miyagawa, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for three dimensional gait analysis using wearable sensors and quaternion calculations. Seven sensor units consisting of a tri-axial acceleration and gyro sensors, were fixed to the lower limbs. The acceleration and angular velocity data of each sensor unit were measured during level walking. The initial orientations of the sensor units were estimated using acceleration data during upright standing position and the angular displacements were estimated afterwards using angular velocity data during gait. Here, an algorithm based on quaternion calculation was implemented for orientation estimation of the sensor units. The orientations of the sensor units were converted to the orientations of the body segments by a rotation matrix obtained from a calibration trial. Body segment orientations were then used for constructing a three dimensional wire frame animation of the volunteers during the gait. Gait analysis was conducted on five volunteers, and results were compared with those from a camera-based motion analysis system. Comparisons were made for the joint trajectory in the horizontal and sagittal plane. The average RMSE and correlation coefficient (CC) were 10.14 deg and 0.98, 7.88 deg and 0.97, 9.75 deg and 0.78 for the hip, knee and ankle flexion angles, respectively. PMID:23877128

  5. Results of Propellant Mixing Variable Study Using Precise Pressure-Based Burn Rate Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanski, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    A designed experiment was conducted in which three mix processing variables (pre-curative addition mix temperature, pre-curative addition mixing time, and mixer speed) were varied to estimate their effects on within-mix propellant burn rate variability. The chosen discriminator for the experiment was the 2-inch diameter by 4-inch long (2x4) Center-Perforated (CP) ballistic evaluation motor. Motor nozzle throat diameters were sized to produce a common targeted chamber pressure. Initial data analysis did not show a statistically significant effect. Because propellant burn rate must be directly related to chamber pressure, a method was developed that showed statistically significant effects on chamber pressure (either maximum or average) by adjustments to the process settings. Burn rates were calculated from chamber pressures and these were then normalized to a common pressure for comparative purposes. The pressure-based method of burn rate determination showed significant reduction in error when compared to results obtained from the Brooks' modification of the propellant web-bisector burn rate determination method. Analysis of effects using burn rates calculated by the pressure-based method showed a significant correlation of within-mix burn rate dispersion to mixing duration and the quadratic of mixing duration. The findings were confirmed in a series of mixes that examined the effects of mixing time on burn rate variation, which yielded the same results.

  6. GPU Based Fast Free-Wake Calculations For Multiple Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine Rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkal, M.; Novikov, Y.; Üşenmez, S.; Sezer-Uzol, N.; Uzol, O.

    2014-06-01

    Unsteady free-wake solutions of wind turbine flow fields involve computationally intensive interaction calculations, which generally limit the total amount of simulation time or the number of turbines that can be simulated by the method. This problem, however, can be addressed easily using high-level of parallelization. Especially when exploited with a GPU, a Graphics Processing Unit, this property can provide a significant computational speed-up, rendering the most intensive engineering problems realizable in hours of computation time. This paper presents the results of the simulation of the flow field for the NREL Phase VI turbine using a GPU-based in-house free-wake panel method code. Computational parallelism involved in the free-wake methodology is exploited using a GPU, allowing thousands of similar operations to be performed simultaneously. The results are compared to experimental data as well as to those obtained by running a corresponding CPU-based code. Results show that the GPU based code is capable of producing wake and load predictions similar to the CPU- based code and in a substantially reduced amount of time. This capability could allow free- wake based analysis to be used in the possible design and optimization studies of wind farms as well as prediction of multiple turbine flow fields and the investigation of the effects of using different vortex core models, core expansion and stretching models on the turbine rotor interaction problems in multiple turbine wake flow fields.

  7. 129Xe NMR chemical shift in Xe@C60 calculated at experimental conditions: essential role of the relativity, dynamics, and explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Standara, Stanislav; Kulhánek, Petr; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2013-08-15

    The isotropic (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift (CS) in Xe@C60 dissolved in liquid benzene was calculated by piecewise approximation to faithfully simulate the experimental conditions and to evaluate the role of different physical factors influencing the (129)Xe NMR CS. The (129)Xe shielding constant was obtained by averaging the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic shieldings calculated for snapshots obtained from the molecular dynamics trajectory of the Xe@C60 system embedded in a periodic box of benzene molecules. Relativistic corrections were added at the Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) level, included the solvent, and were dynamically averaged. It is demonstrated that the contribution of internal dynamics of the Xe@C60 system represents about 8% of the total nonrelativistic NMR CS, whereas the effects of dynamical solvent add another 8%. The dynamically averaged relativistic effects contribute by 9% to the total calculated (129)Xe NMR CS. The final theoretical value of 172.7 ppm corresponds well to the experimental (129)Xe CS of 179.2 ppm and lies within the estimated errors of the model. The presented computational protocol serves as a prototype for calculations of (129)Xe NMR parameters in different Xe atom guest-host systems. PMID:23703381

  8. Dynamic 3D scanning as a markerless method to calculate multi-segment foot kinematics during stance phase: methodology and first application.

    PubMed

    Van den Herrewegen, Inge; Cuppens, Kris; Broeckx, Mario; Barisch-Fritz, Bettina; Vander Sloten, Jos; Leardini, Alberto; Peeraer, Louis

    2014-08-22

    Multi-segmental foot kinematics have been analyzed by means of optical marker-sets or by means of inertial sensors, but never by markerless dynamic 3D scanning (D3DScanning). The use of D3DScans implies a radically different approach for the construction of the multi-segment foot model: the foot anatomy is identified via the surface shape instead of distinct landmark points. We propose a 4-segment foot model consisting of the shank (Sha), calcaneus (Cal), metatarsus (Met) and hallux (Hal). These segments are manually selected on a static scan. To track the segments in the dynamic scan, the segments of the static scan are matched on each frame of the dynamic scan using the iterative closest point (ICP) fitting algorithm. Joint rotations are calculated between Sha-Cal, Cal-Met, and Met-Hal. Due to the lower quality scans at heel strike and toe off, the first and last 10% of the stance phase is excluded. The application of the method to 5 healthy subjects, 6 trials each, shows a good repeatability (intra-subject standard deviations between 1° and 2.5°) for Sha-Cal and Cal-Met joints, and inferior results for the Met-Hal joint (>3°). The repeatability seems to be subject-dependent. For the validation, a qualitative comparison with joint kinematics from a corresponding established marker-based multi-segment foot model is made. This shows very consistent patterns of rotation. The ease of subject preparation and also the effective and easy to interpret visual output, make the present technique very attractive for functional analysis of the foot, enhancing usability in clinical practice. PMID:24998032

  9. Molecular spectroscopy and dynamics: a polyad-based perspective.

    PubMed

    Herman, Michel; Perry, David S

    2013-07-01

    The efficiency and insight of global, polyad-based modeling in overtone spectroscopy and dynamics is demonstrated. Both vibration and vibration-rotation polyads are considered. The spectroscopic implications of polyad Hamiltonians derive from their ability to account for the detailed line positions and intensities of spectral features and their unique predictive power. The dynamical implications of polyad Hamiltonians include classical bifurcations that lead to the birth of new vibrational modes and intramolecular vibrational-rotational energy redistribution over multiple timescales. The literature is reviewed, with emphasis on acetylene results. PMID:23646355

  10. Panoramic dynamic data acquisition system based on unmanned helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yigang; Zhao, Shuguang; Lin, Zhaorong; Wen, Gaojin; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Weiwei

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, the archaeological tourism has rapidly been developed all over the world, and it has become more and more popular. However, the scope of the human activities has been restricted by complicated geographical terrain, and the popularization of archaeological tourism has been hampered. For the purpose of solving the above problem, the archaeological tourism system of the panoramic dynamic data acquisition system based on unmanned helicopter is designed, and we got the image of the Chinese Ming Dynasty Great Wall realtime 360˚ panoramic dynamic monitor. The applying of this system will increase the scope of the archaeological tourism activities.

  11. Characterizing cerebrovascular dynamics with the wavelet-based multifractal formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. N.; Abdurashitov, A. S.; Sindeeva, O. A.; Sindeev, S. S.; Pavlova, O. N.; Shihalov, G. M.; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    Using the wavelet-transform modulus maxima (WTMM) approach we study the dynamics of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in rats aiming to reveal responses of macro- and microcerebral circulations to changes in the peripheral blood pressure. We show that the wavelet-based multifractal formalism allows quantifying essentially different reactions in the CBF-dynamics at the level of large and small cerebral vessels. We conclude that unlike the macrocirculation that is nearly insensitive to increased peripheral blood pressure, the microcirculation is characterized by essential changes of the CBF-complexity.

  12. Dynamic Co-Operative Scheduling Based on HLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirase, Keiichi; Wakamatsu, Hidefumi; Tsumaya, Akira; Arai, Eiji

    In an advanced factory, higher and higher flexibility is required to meet a great variety of customers' requirements. In this environment, a dynamic management architecture is required for distributed production system. In this paper, a newly distributed simulation architecture called HLA (High Level Architecture) is utilized to achieve a distributed scheduling simulation for dynamic work assignment and flexible working group configuration in a distributed production system. It is verified that the distributed scheduling simulation based on HLA is effective to achieve higher flexibility for a distributed production system, by some case studies.

  13. Structure, thermodynamic and transport properties of imidazolium-based bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquids from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Androulaki, Eleni; Vergadou, Niki; Ramos, Javier; Economou, Ioannis G.

    2012-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed in order to investigate the properties of [C n mim+][Tf2N-] (n = 4, 8, 12) ionic liquids (ILs) in a wide temperature range (298.15-498.15 K) and at atmospheric pressure (1 bar). A previously developed methodology for the calculation of the charge distribution that incorporates ab initio quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) was used to calculate the partial charges for the classical molecular simulations. The wide range of time scales that characterize the segmental dynamics of these ILs, especially at low temperatures, required very long MD simulations, on the order of several tens of nanoseconds, to calculate the thermodynamic (density, thermal expansion, isothermal compressibility), structural (radial distribution functions between the centers of mass of ions and between individual sites, radial-angular distribution functions) and dynamic (relaxation times of the reorientation of the bonds and the torsion angles, self-diffusion coefficients, shear viscosity) properties. The influence of the temperature and the cation's alkyl chain length on the above-mentioned properties was thoroughly investigated. The calculated thermodynamic (primary and derivative) and structural properties are in good agreement with the experimental data, while the extremely sluggish dynamics of the ILs under study renders the calculation of their transport properties a very complicated and challenging task, especially at low temperatures.

  14. An analytic linear accelerator source model for GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhen; Li, Yongbao; Folkerts, Michael; Shi, Feng; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-10-21

    Recently, there has been a lot of research interest in developing fast Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation methods on graphics processing unit (GPU) platforms. A good linear accelerator (linac) source model is critical for both accuracy and efficiency considerations. In principle, an analytical source model should be more preferred for GPU-based MC dose engines than a phase-space file-based model, in that data loading and CPU-GPU data transfer can be avoided. In this paper, we presented an analytical field-independent source model specifically developed for GPU-based MC dose calculations, associated with a GPU-friendly sampling scheme. A key concept called phase-space-ring (PSR) was proposed. Each PSR contained a group of particles that were of the same type, close in energy and reside in a narrow ring on the phase-space plane located just above the upper jaws. The model parameterized the probability densities of particle location, direction and energy for each primary photon PSR, scattered photon PSR and electron PSR. Models of one 2D Gaussian distribution or multiple Gaussian components were employed to represent the particle direction distributions of these PSRs. A method was developed to analyze a reference phase-space file and derive corresponding model parameters. To efficiently use our model in MC dose calculations on GPU, we proposed a GPU-friendly sampling strategy, which ensured that the particles sampled and transported simultaneously are of the same type and close in energy to alleviate GPU thread divergences. To test the accuracy of our model, dose distributions of a set of open fields in a water phantom were calculated using our source model and compared to those calculated using the reference phase-space files. For the high dose gradient regions, the average distance-to-agreement (DTA) was within 1 mm and the maximum DTA within 2 mm. For relatively low dose gradient regions, the root-mean-square (RMS) dose difference was within 1.1% and the maximum

  15. An analytic linear accelerator source model for GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhen; Li, Yongbao; Folkerts, Michael; Shi, Feng; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2015-10-01

    Recently, there has been a lot of research interest in developing fast Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation methods on graphics processing unit (GPU) platforms. A good linear accelerator (linac) source model is critical for both accuracy and efficiency considerations. In principle, an analytical source model should be more preferred for GPU-based MC dose engines than a phase-space file-based model, in that data loading and CPU-GPU data transfer can be avoided. In this paper, we presented an analytical field-independent source model specifically developed for GPU-based MC dose calculations, associated with a GPU-friendly sampling scheme. A key concept called phase-space-ring (PSR) was proposed. Each PSR contained a group of particles that were of the same type, close in energy and reside in a narrow ring on the phase-space plane located just above the upper jaws. The model parameterized the probability densities of particle location, direction and energy for each primary photon PSR, scattered photon PSR and electron PSR. Models of one 2D Gaussian distribution or multiple Gaussian components were employed to represent the particle direction distributions of these PSRs. A method was developed to analyze a reference phase-space file and derive corresponding model parameters. To efficiently use our model in MC dose calculations on GPU, we proposed a GPU-friendly sampling strategy, which ensured that the particles sampled and transported simultaneously are of the same type and close in energy to alleviate GPU thread divergences. To test the accuracy of our model, dose distributions of a set of open fields in a water phantom were calculated using our source model and compared to those calculated using the reference phase-space files. For the high dose gradient regions, the average distance-to-agreement (DTA) was within 1 mm and the maximum DTA within 2 mm. For relatively low dose gradient regions, the root-mean-square (RMS) dose difference was within 1.1% and the maximum

  16. The adaptive dynamic community detection algorithm based on the non-homogeneous random walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Xie, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    With the changing of the habit and custom, people's social activity tends to be changeable. It is required to have a community evolution analyzing method to mine the dynamic information in social network. For that, we design the random walking possibility function and the topology gain function to calculate the global influence matrix of the nodes. By the analysis of the global influence matrix, the clustering directions of the nodes can be obtained, thus the NRW (Non-Homogeneous Random Walk) method for detecting the static overlapping communities can be established. We design the ANRW (Adaptive Non-Homogeneous Random Walk) method via adapting the nodes impacted by the dynamic events based on the NRW. The ANRW combines the local community detection with dynamic adaptive adjustment to decrease the computational cost for ANRW. Furthermore, the ANRW treats the node as the calculating unity, thus the running manner of the ANRW is suitable to the parallel computing, which could meet the requirement of large dataset mining. Finally, by the experiment analysis, the efficiency of ANRW on dynamic community detection is verified.

  17. Model-based dose calculations for {sup 125}I lung brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Furutani, K. M.; Garces, Y. I.; Thomson, R. M.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Model-baseddose calculations (MBDCs) are performed using patient computed tomography (CT) data for patients treated with intraoperative {sup 125}I lung brachytherapy at the Mayo Clinic Rochester. Various metallic artifact correction and tissue assignment schemes are considered and their effects on dose distributions are studied. Dose distributions are compared to those calculated under TG-43 assumptions. Methods: Dose distributions for six patients are calculated using phantoms derived from patient CT data and the EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose. {sup 125}I (GE Healthcare/Oncura model 6711) seeds are fully modeled. Four metallic artifact correction schemes are applied to the CT data phantoms: (1) no correction, (2) a filtered back-projection on a modified virtual sinogram, (3) the reassignment of CT numbers above a threshold in the vicinity of the seeds, and (4) a combination of (2) and (3). Tissue assignment is based on voxel CT number and mass density is assigned using a CT number to mass density calibration. Three tissue assignment schemes with varying levels of detail (20, 11, and 5 tissues) are applied to metallic artifact corrected phantoms. Simulations are also performed under TG-43 assumptions, i.e., seeds in homogeneous water with no interseed attenuation. Results: Significant dose differences (up to 40% for D{sub 90}) are observed between uncorrected and metallic artifact corrected phantoms. For phantoms created with metallic artifact correction schemes (3) and (4), dose volume metrics are generally in good agreement (less than 2% differences for all patients) although there are significant local dose differences. The application of the three tissue assignment schemes results in differences of up to 8% for D{sub 90}; these differences vary between patients. Significant dose differences are seen between fully modeled and TG-43 calculations with TG-43 underestimating the dose (up to 36% in D{sub 90}) for larger volumes containing higher proportions of

  18. Hydroxyl-functionalized 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methyl imidazolium ionic liquids: thermodynamic and structural properties using molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Fakhraee, Mostafa; Zandkarimi, Borna; Salari, Hadi; Gholami, Mohammad Reza

    2014-12-11

    The influences of hydroxyl functional group (-OH) on the thermodynamic and structural properties of ionic liquids (ILs) composed of 1-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-3-methyl imidazolium ([C2OHmim](+)) cation and the six different conventional anions, including [Cl](-), [NO3](-), [BF4](-), [PF6](-), [TfO](-), and [Tf2N](-) have been extensively investigated using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with ab initio calculations over a wide range of temperature (298-550 K). The volumetric thermodynamic properties, enthalpy of vaporization, cohesive energy density, Hildebrand solubility parameter, and heat capacity at constant pressure were estimated at desired temperature. The simulated densities were in good agreement with the experimental data with a slight overestimation. The interionic interaction of selected ILs was also computed using both the MD simulations and ab initio calculations. It was found that the highest association of cation and anion is attributed to [C2OHmim][Cl] followed by [C2OHmim][NO3], and [C2OHmim][Tf2N] with the bulkiest anion has the weakest interionic interaction among chosen ILs. The similar trend of interactions energies was nearly observed from cohesive energy density results. Additional structural details were comprehensively yielded by calculating radial distribution functions (RDFs) and spatial distribution function (SDFs) at 358 K. The most stable configurations of isolated and dimer ion pairs of these ILs were in excellent consistency with RDFs and SDFs results. Significant changes in arrangement of anions around the [C2OHmim](+) cation in comparison with conventional imidazolium-based ILs can be inferred from the MD simulations and ab initio results. Also, microscopic structural properties disclosed that the most strong cation-cation interaction is ascribed to the hydroxyl-functionalized ILs composed of bulkier anions, whereas ILs incorporating [Cl](-) and [NO3](-) anions are mainly involved in cation-anion interactions. The

  19. Mosquito population dynamics from cellular automata-based simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syafarina, Inna; Sadikin, Rifki; Nuraini, Nuning

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present an innovative model for simulating mosquito-vector population dynamics. The simulation consist of two stages: demography and dispersal dynamics. For demography simulation, we follow the existing model for modeling a mosquito life cycles. Moreover, we use cellular automata-based model for simulating dispersal of the vector. In simulation, each individual vector is able to move to other grid based on a random walk. Our model is also capable to represent immunity factor for each grid. We simulate the model to evaluate its correctness. Based on the simulations, we can conclude that our model is correct. However, our model need to be improved to find a realistic parameters to match real data.

  20. Rule-based reasoning for system dynamics in cell systems.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Euna; Nagasaki, Masao; Miyano, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    A system-dynamics-centered ontology, called the Cell System Ontology (CSO), has been developed for representation of diverse biological pathways. Many of the pathway data based on the ontology have been created from databases via data conversion or curated by expert biologists. It is essential to validate the pathway data which may cause unexpected issues such as semantic inconsistency and incompleteness. This paper discusses three criteria for validating the pathway data based on CSO as follows: (1) structurally correct models in terms of Petri nets, (2) biologically correct models to capture biological meaning, and (3) systematically correct models to reflect biological behaviors. Simultaneously, we have investigated how logic-based rules can be used for the ontology to extend its expressiveness and to complement the ontology by reasoning, which aims at qualifying pathway knowledge. Finally, we show how the proposed approach helps exploring dynamic modeling and simulation tasks without prior knowledge. PMID:19425120