Science.gov

Sample records for dynamics reflect influences

  1. Seasonal Dynamics of Hyperspectral Reflectance Patterns Influencing Detection of Imported Fire Ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) Mound Features in Turfgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive mound-building imported fire ants impact soil quality and turfgrass nutrient management affecting an estimated 8.1 million hectares in sod production, recreational, and residential settings in the southeastern U.S. Reflectance characteristics of imported fire ant mound features (i.e., ant m...

  2. Asymptotic dynamics of reflecting spiral waves.

    PubMed

    Langham, Jacob; Biktasheva, Irina; Barkley, Dwight

    2014-12-01

    Resonantly forced spiral waves in excitable media drift in straight-line paths, their rotation centers behaving as pointlike objects moving along trajectories with a constant velocity. Interaction with medium boundaries alters this velocity and may often result in a reflection of the drift trajectory. Such reflections have diverse characteristics and are known to be highly nonspecular in general. In this context we apply the theory of response functions, which via numerically computable integrals, reduces the reaction-diffusion equations governing the whole excitable medium to the dynamics of just the rotation center and rotation phase of a spiral wave. Spiral reflection trajectories are computed by this method for both small- and large-core spiral waves in the Barkley model. Such calculations provide insight into the process of reflection as well as explanations for differences in trajectories across parameters, including the effects of incidence angle and forcing amplitude. Qualitative aspects of these results are preserved far beyond the asymptotic limit of weak boundary effects and slow resonant drift. PMID:25615159

  3. Estimating the noise influence on recovering reflectances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hironaga, Mikiya; Shimano, Noriyuki

    2010-01-01

    The evaluation of the noise present in the image acquisition system and the influence of the noise is essential to image acquisition. However the mean square errors (MSE) is not divided into two terms, i.e., the noise independent MSE (MSEfree) and noise dependent MSE (MSEnoise) were not discussed separately before. The MSEfree depends on the spectral characteristics of a set of sensors, illuminations and reflectances of imaged objects and the MSEfree arises in the noise free case, however MSEnoise originates from the noise present image acquisition system. One of the authors (N.S.) already proposed a model to separate the MSE into the two factors and also proposed a model to estimate noise variance present in image acquisition systems. By the use of this model, we succeeded in the expression of the MSEnoise as a function of the noise variance and showed that the experimental results agreed fairly well with the expression when the Wiener estimation was used for the recovery. The present paper shows the extended expression for the influence of the system noise on the MSEnoise and the experimental results to show the trustworthiness of the expression for the regression model, Imai-Berns model and finite dimensional linear model.

  4. Practitioners Influence Curriculum Theory: Autobiographical Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Examines dimensions of theoretical perspective on curriculum, noting influences of teachers who were the author's graduate students. The article covers curriculum theorizing, synoptic and historical portrayals, comparative orientations, ideological considerations, teacher/student lore, outside curriculum, preservice/inservice teacher education…

  5. Self-Reflections on Group Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torosyan, Roben

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a first-person account of a training program in group dynamics. It is deliberately written in the first-person to capture the highly personal nature of group dynamic analysis. Proceeding through an intensive account of six days of T-groups, module facilitation, and facilitator feedback sessions, the author examines painful…

  6. The Influence of Particle Size on Infrared Reflectance Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Richardson, Robert L.

    2014-06-13

    Reflectance spectra of solids are influenced by the absorption coefficient as well as the particle size and morphology. In the infrared, spectral features may be observed as either maxima or minima: in general, the upward-going peaks in the reflectance spectrum result from surface scattering, which are rays that have reflected from the surface without penetration, whereas downward-going peaks result from either absorption or volume scattering, i.e. rays that have penetrated into the sample or refracted into the sample interior and are not reflected. The light signal reflected from solids usually encompasses all these effects which include dependencies on particle size, morphology and sample density. This paper measures the reflectance spectra in the 1.3 – 16 micron range for various bulk materials that have a combination of strong and weak absorption bands in order to understand the effects on the spectral features as a function of the mean grain size of the sample. The bulk materials were ground with a mortar and pestle and then sieved to separate the samples into various size fractions: 0-45, 45-90, 90-180, 180-250, 250-500, and >500 microns. The directional-hemispherical spectra were recorded using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere to measure the reflectance for all of the particle-size fractions. We have studied both organic and inorganic materials, but this paper focuses on inorganic salts, NaNO3 in particular. Our studies clearly show that particle size has an enormous influence on the measured reflectance spectra for bulk materials and that successful identification requires sufficient representative reflectance data so as to include the particle size(s) of interest. Origins of the effects are discussed.

  7. Postmodern Influence in Family Therapy Research: Reflections of Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertlein, Katherine M.; Lambert-Shute, Jennifer; Benson, Kristen

    2004-01-01

    Postmodernism has influenced family therapy in significant ways, from clinical work to family therapy research. Little has been written, however, on how to conduct postmodern research in a manner reflecting marriage and family therapy inquiries. The present study seeks to investigate doctoral students understanding of postmodern family therapy…

  8. Influencing and Facilitating Conditions for Developing Reflective Assessment Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rønsen, Anne Kristin; Smith, Kari

    2014-01-01

    By following a professional development project focusing on enhancing assessment competence amongst teachers, the current study examines how teachers use reflective writing and systematic discussions as tools for developing competence in assessment. More specifically, the article aims at identifying conditions that influence and facilitate…

  9. Dynamical Symmetries Reflected in Realistic Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sviratcheva, K.D.; Draayer, J.P.; Vary, J.P.; /Iowa State U. /LLNL, Livermore /SLAC

    2007-04-06

    Realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions, derived within the framework of meson theory or more recently in terms of chiral effective field theory, yield new possibilities for achieving a unified microscopic description of atomic nuclei. Based on spectral distribution methods, a comparison of these interactions to a most general Sp(4) dynamically symmetric interaction, which previously we found to reproduce well that part of the interaction that is responsible for shaping pairing-governed isobaric analog 0{sup +} states, can determine the extent to which this significantly simpler model Hamiltonian can be used to obtain an approximate, yet very good description of low-lying nuclear structure. And furthermore, one can apply this model in situations that would otherwise be prohibitive because of the size of the model space. In addition, we introduce a Sp(4) symmetry breaking term by including the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction in the analysis and examining the capacity of this extended model interaction to imitate realistic interactions. This provides a further step towards gaining a better understanding of the underlying foundation of realistic interactions and their ability to reproduce striking features of nuclei such as strong pairing correlations or collective rotational motion.

  10. Concert halls with strong lateral reflections enhance musical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Robinson, Philip W; Lokki, Tapio

    2014-03-25

    One of the most thrilling cultural experiences is to hear live symphony-orchestra music build up from a whispering passage to a monumental fortissimo. The impact of such a crescendo has been thought to depend only on the musicians' skill, but here we show that interactions between the concert-hall acoustics and listeners' hearing also play a major role in musical dynamics. These interactions contribute to the shoebox-type concert hall's established success, but little prior research has been devoted to dynamic expression in this three-part transmission chain as a complete system. More forceful orchestral playing disproportionately excites high frequency harmonics more than those near the note's fundamental. This effect results in not only more sound energy, but also a different tone color. The concert hall transmits this sound, and the room geometry defines from which directions acoustic reflections arrive at the listener. Binaural directional hearing emphasizes high frequencies more when sound arrives from the sides of the head rather than from the median plane. Simultaneously, these same frequencies are emphasized by higher orchestral-playing dynamics. When the room geometry provides reflections from these directions, the perceived dynamic range is enhanced. Current room-acoustic evaluation methods assume linear behavior and thus neglect this effect. The hypothesis presented here is that the auditory excitation by reflections is emphasized with an orchestra forte most in concert halls with strong lateral reflections. The enhanced dynamic range provides an explanation for the success of rectangularly shaped concert-hall geometry. PMID:24591584

  11. Using Dynamic Software in Mathematics: The Case of Reflection Symmetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Enver; Akkaya, Adnan; Kagizmanli, Türkan Berrin

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine the effects of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) using dynamic software on the achievement of students in mathematics in the topic of reflection symmetry. The study also aimed to ascertain the pre-service mathematics teachers' opinions on the use of CAI in mathematics lessons. In the study, a mixed…

  12. Concert halls with strong lateral reflections enhance musical dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Robinson, Philip W.; Lokki, Tapio

    2014-01-01

    One of the most thrilling cultural experiences is to hear live symphony-orchestra music build up from a whispering passage to a monumental fortissimo. The impact of such a crescendo has been thought to depend only on the musicians’ skill, but here we show that interactions between the concert-hall acoustics and listeners’ hearing also play a major role in musical dynamics. These interactions contribute to the shoebox-type concert hall’s established success, but little prior research has been devoted to dynamic expression in this three-part transmission chain as a complete system. More forceful orchestral playing disproportionately excites high frequency harmonics more than those near the note’s fundamental. This effect results in not only more sound energy, but also a different tone color. The concert hall transmits this sound, and the room geometry defines from which directions acoustic reflections arrive at the listener. Binaural directional hearing emphasizes high frequencies more when sound arrives from the sides of the head rather than from the median plane. Simultaneously, these same frequencies are emphasized by higher orchestral-playing dynamics. When the room geometry provides reflections from these directions, the perceived dynamic range is enhanced. Current room-acoustic evaluation methods assume linear behavior and thus neglect this effect. The hypothesis presented here is that the auditory excitation by reflections is emphasized with an orchestra forte most in concert halls with strong lateral reflections. The enhanced dynamic range provides an explanation for the success of rectangularly shaped concert-hall geometry. PMID:24591584

  13. Polarization influence on reflectance measurements in the spatial frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Wiest, J; Bodenschatz, N; Brandes, A; Liemert, A; Kienle, A

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we quantify the influence of crossed polarizers on reflectance measurements in the spatial frequency domain. The use of crossed polarizers is a very common approach for suppression of specular surface reflections. However, measurements are typically evaluated using a non-polarized scalar theory. The consequences of this discrepancy are the focus of our study, and we also quantify the related errors of the derived optical properties. We used polarized Monte Carlo simulations for forward calculation of the reflectance from different samples. The samples' scatterers are assumed to be spherical, allowing for the calculation of the scattering functions by Mie theory. From the forward calculations, the reduced scattering coefficient [Formula: see text] and the absorption coefficient μa were derived by means of a scalar theory, as commonly used. Here, we use the analytical solution of the scalar radiative transfer equation. With this evaluation approach, which does not consider polarization, we found large errors in [Formula: see text] and μa in the range of 25% and above. Furthermore, we investigated the applicability of the use of a reference measurement to reduce these errors as suggested in literature. We found that this method is not able to generally improve the accuracy of measurements in the spatial frequency domain. Our general recommendation is to apply a polarized theory when using crossed polarizers. PMID:26158399

  14. Neutron Reflectivity Measurement for Polymer Dynamics near Graphene Oxide Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Jaseung

    We investigated the diffusion dynamics of polymer chains confined between graphene oxide layers using neutron reflectivity (NR). The bilayers of polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA)/ deuterated PMMA (d-PMMA) films and polystyrene (PS)/d-PS films with various film thickness sandwiched between Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers of graphene oxide (GO) were prepared. From the NR results, we found that PMMA diffusion dynamics was reduced near the GO surface while the PS diffusion was not significantly changed. This is due to the different strength of GO-polymer interaction. In this talk, these diffusion results will be compared with dewetting dynamics of polymer thin films on the GO monolayers. This has given us the basis for development of graphene-based nanoelectronics with high efficiency, such as heterojunction devices for polymer photovoltaic (OPV) applications.

  15. Dynamical Outcomes of Quenching: Reflections on a Conical Intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Julia H.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2014-04-01

    This review focuses on experimental studies of the dynamical outcomes following collisional quenching of electronically excited OH A2Σ+ radicals by molecular partners. The experimental observables include the branching between reactive and nonreactive decay channels, kinetic energy release, and quantum state distributions of the products. Complementary theoretical investigations reveal regions of strong nonadiabatic coupling, known as conical intersections, which facilitate the quenching process. The dynamical outcomes observed experimentally are connected to the local forces and geometric properties of the nuclei in the conical intersection region. Dynamical calculations for the benchmark OH-H2 system are in good accord with experimental observations, demonstrating that the outcomes reflect the strong coupling in the conical intersection region as the system evolves from the excited electronic state to quenched products.

  16. Dynamics of directional reflectance factor distributions for vegetation canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Directional reflectance factors that span the entire exitance hemisphere are collected on the ground for a variety of homogeneous vegetation canopies and bare soils. NOAA 6/7 AVHRR bands 1 (0.58-0.68 micron) and 2 (0.73-1.1 microns) are used. When possible, geometric measurements of leaf orientation distributions are taken simultaneously with each spectral measurement. Other supporting structural and optical measurements are made. These data sets are taken at various times of the day for each cover type. These unique sets, together with pertinent data in the literature, are used to investigate the dynamics of the directional reflectance factor distribution as a function of the geometric structure of the scene, solar zenith angle, and optical properties of the scene components (leaves and soil). For complete homogeneous vegetation canopies, the principal trend observed at all sun angles and spectral bands is a minimum reflectance near nadir and increasing reflectance with increasing off-nadir view angle for all azimuth directions.

  17. Influence of realistic atom wall potentials in quantum reflection traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madroñero, Javier; Friedrich, Harald

    2007-02-01

    We study the influence of atom-surface interactions close to the surface on the confinement properties in a recently proposed model [A. Jurisch and H. Friedrich, Phys. Lett. A 349, 230 (2006)] for quantum reflection traps and test the reliability of the sharp-step approximation used there. Accurate numerical calculations show a dependence of the surviving particle fraction on characteristic potential lengths determined by the behavior of the interaction in the limits r→0 and r→∞ of the atom-surface distance r . For interactions dominated by the retarded potential proportional to 1/r4 we find that the simplified sharp-step potential reproduces the behavior of the trapped atoms well, both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  18. Using dynamic software in mathematics: the case of reflection symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, Enver; Akkaya, Adnan; Berrin Kağizmanli, Türkan

    2014-10-01

    This study was carried out to examine the effects of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) using dynamic software on the achievement of students in mathematics in the topic of reflection symmetry. The study also aimed to ascertain the pre-service mathematics teachers' opinions on the use of CAI in mathematics lessons. In the study, a mixed research method was used. The study group of this research consists of 30 pre-service mathematics teachers. The data collection tools used include a reflection knowledge test, a survey and observations. Based on the analysis of the data obtained from the study, the use of CAI had a positive effect on achievement in the topic of reflection symmetry of the pre-service mathematics teachers. The pre-service mathematics teachers were found to largely consider that a mathematics education which is carried out utilizing CAI will be more beneficial in terms of 'visualization', 'saving of time' and 'increasing interest/attention in the lesson'. In addition, it was found that the vast majority of them considered using computers in their teaching on the condition that the learning environment in which they would be operating has the appropriate technological equipment.

  19. Influence of Interlocutor/Reader on Utterance in Reflective Writing and Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collyer, Vivian M.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of the Other on utterance is foundational to language study. This analysis contrasts this influence within two modes of communication: reflective writing and interview. The data source is derived from the reflective writings and interview transcripts of a twelfth-grade physics student. In this student's case, reflective writing…

  20. Dynamic speckle illumination wide-field reflection phase microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youngwoon; Hosseini, Poorya; Choi, Wonshik; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; So, Peter T. C.; Yaqoob, Zahid

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a quantitative reflection-phase microscope based on time-varying speckle-field illumination. Due to the short spatial coherence length of the speckle field, the proposed imaging system features superior lateral resolution, 520 nm, as well as high-depth selectivity, 1.03 µm. Off-axis interferometric detection enables wide-field and single-shot imaging appropriate for high-speed measurements. In addition, the measured phase sensitivity of this method, which is the smallest measurable axial motion, is more than 40 times higher than that available using a transmission system. We demonstrate the utility of our method by successfully distinguishing the motion of the top surface from that of the bottom in red blood cells. The proposed method will be useful for studying membrane dynamics in complex eukaryotic cells. PMID:25361156

  1. Using Network Dynamical Influence to Drive Consensus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzo, Giuliano; Young, George F.; MacDonald, Malcolm; Leonard, Naomi E.

    2016-05-01

    Consensus and decision-making are often analysed in the context of networks, with many studies focusing attention on ranking the nodes of a network depending on their relative importance to information routing. Dynamical influence ranks the nodes with respect to their ability to influence the evolution of the associated network dynamical system. In this study it is shown that dynamical influence not only ranks the nodes, but also provides a naturally optimised distribution of effort to steer a network from one state to another. An example is provided where the “steering” refers to the physical change in velocity of self-propelled agents interacting through a network. Distinct from other works on this subject, this study looks at directed and hence more general graphs. The findings are presented with a theoretical angle, without targeting particular applications or networked systems; however, the framework and results offer parallels with biological flocks and swarms and opportunities for design of technological networks.

  2. Using Network Dynamical Influence to Drive Consensus.

    PubMed

    Punzo, Giuliano; Young, George F; Macdonald, Malcolm; Leonard, Naomi E

    2016-01-01

    Consensus and decision-making are often analysed in the context of networks, with many studies focusing attention on ranking the nodes of a network depending on their relative importance to information routing. Dynamical influence ranks the nodes with respect to their ability to influence the evolution of the associated network dynamical system. In this study it is shown that dynamical influence not only ranks the nodes, but also provides a naturally optimised distribution of effort to steer a network from one state to another. An example is provided where the "steering" refers to the physical change in velocity of self-propelled agents interacting through a network. Distinct from other works on this subject, this study looks at directed and hence more general graphs. The findings are presented with a theoretical angle, without targeting particular applications or networked systems; however, the framework and results offer parallels with biological flocks and swarms and opportunities for design of technological networks. PMID:27210291

  3. Using Network Dynamical Influence to Drive Consensus

    PubMed Central

    Punzo, Giuliano; Young, George F.; Macdonald, Malcolm; Leonard, Naomi E.

    2016-01-01

    Consensus and decision-making are often analysed in the context of networks, with many studies focusing attention on ranking the nodes of a network depending on their relative importance to information routing. Dynamical influence ranks the nodes with respect to their ability to influence the evolution of the associated network dynamical system. In this study it is shown that dynamical influence not only ranks the nodes, but also provides a naturally optimised distribution of effort to steer a network from one state to another. An example is provided where the “steering” refers to the physical change in velocity of self-propelled agents interacting through a network. Distinct from other works on this subject, this study looks at directed and hence more general graphs. The findings are presented with a theoretical angle, without targeting particular applications or networked systems; however, the framework and results offer parallels with biological flocks and swarms and opportunities for design of technological networks. PMID:27210291

  4. Cenozoic climate change influences mammalian evolutionary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Figueirido, Borja; Janis, Christine M.; Pérez-Claros, Juan A.; De Renzi, Miquel; Palmqvist, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Global climate change is having profound impacts on the natural world. However, climate influence on faunal dynamics at macroevolutionary scales remains poorly understood. In this paper we investigate the influence of climate over deep time on the diversity patterns of Cenozoic North American mammals. We use factor analysis to identify temporally correlated assemblages of taxa, or major evolutionary faunas that we can then study in relation to climatic change over the past 65 million years. These taxa can be grouped into six consecutive faunal associations that show some correspondence with the qualitative mammalian chronofaunas of previous workers. We also show that the diversity pattern of most of these chronofaunas can be correlated with the stacked deep-sea benthic foraminiferal oxygen isotope (δ18O) curve, which strongly suggests climatic forcing of faunal dynamics over a large macroevolutionary timescale. This study demonstrates the profound influence of climate on the diversity patterns of North American terrestrial mammals over the Cenozoic. PMID:22203974

  5. Influence of atmospheric aerosols and desert reflectance properties on satellite radiance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowker, D. E.; Davis, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    The influence of surface bidirectional reflectance factors, including shadowing, and of atmospheric aerosol variability are modeled for their effects on the remote sensing of desert targets from space in the 0.7-micron region at high spatial resolution. The white sand reflectance data of Salomonson (1968) are used as the basis for the simulation. The effects of the surface bi-directional reflectance and atmospheric aerosol on the nadir-normalized reflectance measured at the satellite are discussed individually and jointly. The net influence of these two factors is shown to depend on the magnitude of other parameters, such as the surface reflectance and solar zenith angle.

  6. Total internal reflection and dynamic light scattering microscopy of gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregor, Brian F.

    Two different techniques which apply optical microscopy in novel ways to the study of biological systems and materials were built and applied to several samples. The first is a system for adapting the well-known technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) to an optical microscope. This can detect and scatter light from very small volumes, as compared to standard DLS which studies light scattering from volumes 1000x larger. The small scattering volume also allows for the observation of nonergodic dynamics in appropriate samples. Porcine gastric mucin (PGM) forms a gel at low pH which lines the epithelial cell layer and acts as a protective barrier against the acidic stomach environment. The dynamics and microscopic viscosity of PGM at different pH levels is studied using polystyrene microspheres as tracer particles. The microscopic viscosity and microrheological properties of the commercial basement membrane Matrigel are also studied with this instrument. Matrigel is frequently used to culture cells and its properties remain poorly determined. Well-characterized and purely synthetic Matrigel substitutes will need to have the correct rheological and morphological characteristics. The second instrument designed and built is a microscope which uses an interferometry technique to achieve an improvement in resolution 2.5x better in one dimension than the Abbe diffraction limit. The technique is based upon the interference of the evanescent field generated on the surface of a prism by a laser in a total internal reflection geometry. The enhanced resolution is demonstrated with fluorescent samples. Additionally. Raman imaging microscopy is demonstrated using the evanescent field in resonant and non-resonant samples, although attempts at applying the enhanced resolution technique to the Raman images were ultimately unsuccessful. Applications of this instrument include high resolution imaging of cell membranes and macroscopic structures in gels and proteins. Finally, a third

  7. The Mirror Reflects both Ways: Action Influences Perception of Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaesi, Sabine; Wilson, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Substantial evidence links perception of others' bodies and mental representation of the observer's own body; however, the overwhelming majority of this evidence is unidirectional, showing influence from perception to action. It has been proposed that the influence also runs from action to perception, but to date the evidence is scant. Here we…

  8. Influence of Controlled Reflected Power on Gyrotron Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchev, N.; Cappa, Á.; Malakhov, D.; Martínez, J.; Konchekov, E.; Tolkachev, A.; Borzosekov, V.; Sarksyan, K.; Petelin, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the reaction of a gyrotron oscillator when a very small fraction of its radiation, extracted from the main beam, is phase-modulated in a controlled way and is finally redirected back to the gyrotron. The gyrotron may exhibit a 10 % modulation of its total power even if the reflected power is lower than 1 %. Moreover, radial probing of the beam power distribution shows that the amplitude of the power modulation differs at different radial positions across the beam.

  9. Counterfactual and Factual Reflection: The Influence of Past Misdeeds on Future Immoral Behavior.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Joseph P; Seabright, Mark A; Reynolds, Scott J; Yam, Kai Chi

    2015-01-01

    Though the decision to behave immorally is situated within the context of prior immoral behavior, research has provided contradictory insights into this process. In a series of experiments, we demonstrate that the effects of prior immoral behavior depend on how individuals think about, or reflect on, their immoral behavior. In Experiment 1, participants who reflected counterfactually on their prior moral lapses morally disengaged (i.e., rationalized) less than participants who reflected factually. In Experiment 2, participants who reflected counterfactually on their prior moral lapses experienced more guilt than those who reflected factually. Finally, in Experiments 3 and 4, participants who reflected counterfactually lied less on unrelated tasks with real monetary stakes than those who reflected factually. Our studies provide important insights into moral rationalization and moral compensation processes and demonstrate the profound influence of reflection in everyday moral life. PMID:25668142

  10. Soybean canopy reflectance as influenced by cultural practices. [West Lafayette, Indiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Kollenkark, J. C.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments were conducted at West Lafayette, Indiana in 1978 and 1979 to study the reflectance factor of soybean canopies as affected by differences in row width, population, planting date, cultivar and soil type. Reflectance factor data were acquired throughout the growing season with a LANDSAT-band radiometer. Agronomic data included plant height, leaf area index, development stage, total fresh and dry biomass, percent soil cover, and grain yield. The results indicate that row width, planting date, and cultivar influence the percent soil cover, leaf area index, and biomass present, which are in turn related to the multispectral reflectance. Additionally, the reflectance data were quite sensitive to the onset of senescence. Soil color and moisture were found to be important factors influencing the reflectance in single LANDSAT bands, but the near infrared/red reflectance ratio and the greeness transformation were less sensitive than the single bands to the soil background present.

  11. Canopy reflectance as influenced by solar illumination angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E. (Principal Investigator); Kollenkark, J. C.; Vanderbilt, V. C.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of the solar illumination angle and row azimuth angle of the measured reflectance factor (RF) of soybean canopies was investigated. Diurnal changes of nearly 140% were observed in the red wavelength region when canopies covered 64% of the soil. The amount of shadow observed was a function of the plant geometry and row width. As soil cover approached 100%, the diurnal changes diminished. A function tht describes the solar illumination angle with respect to the row azimuth explained most of the diurnal variation in the measured RF. Variation in near infrared response was much less and did not appear to be as strongly related to Sun-row angle interactions. The near infrared/red ratio was highly sensitive to Sun angle-row direction interactions, whereas the greenness function, utilizing all four spectral bands, was not.

  12. Influence of gas humidity on the reflection coefficient of multilayer dielectric mirrors.

    PubMed

    Serdyukov, V I; Sinitsa, L N; Lugovskoi, A A

    2016-06-10

    The influence of water vapor on the reflection coefficient of multilayer mirrors was studied using a gas cell with multiple reflections from the mirrors. A strong change in the reflection coefficient of the mirrors (up to 0.9%) was found when water vapor under a pressure of 23 mbar was injected into the cell, which was interpreted as a change in the refraction index of the layers of multilayer coatings when water vapor penetrated into the porous coating structure. PMID:27409037

  13. Teacher Reflection in a Hall of Mirrors: Historical Influences and Political Reverberations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendler, Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Traces the history of reflection in teacher education, focusing on its emergence through the influences of Descartes, Dewey, Schon, and feminism. Uses the critical lenses of Foucaultian genealogy and the sociology of scientific knowledge to investigate how the complicated meanings of reflection play out in complex ways through research practice.…

  14. REMOTE ISCHEMIC CONDITIONING INFLUENCES MITOCHONDRIAL DYNAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Cellier, Laura; Tamareille, Sophie; Kalakech, Hussein; Guillou, Sophie; Lenaers, Guy; Prunier, Fabrice; Mirebeau-Prunier, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) has emerged as an attractive strategy to protect the heart against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. The mechanisms by which remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) is protective are to date unknown, yet a well-accepted theory holds that the mitochondria play a central role. Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo fusion and fission. Interventions that decrease mitochondrial fission or increase mitochondrial fusion have been associated with reduced I/R injury. However, whether RIPC influences mitochondrial dynamics or not has yet to be ascertained. We sought to determine the role played by mitochondrial dynamics in RIPC-induced cardioprotection. Male adult rats exposed in vivo to myocardial I/R were assigned to one of two groups, either undergoing 40 min of myocardial ischemia followed by 120 min of reperfusion (MI group) or four 5-min cycles of limb ischemia interspersed by 5 min of limb reperfusion, immediately prior to myocardial ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion (MI+RIPC group). After reperfusion, infarct size was assessed and myocardial tissue was analyzed by Western blot and electron microscopy. RIPC induced smaller infarct size (−28%), increased mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1, and preserved mitochondrial morphology. These findings suggest that mitochondrial dynamics play a role in the mechanisms of RIPC-induced cardioprotection. PMID:26555744

  15. Recognizing dynamic scenes: influence of processing orientation.

    PubMed

    Huff, Markus; Schwan, Stephan; Garsoffky, Bärbel

    2011-04-01

    From face recognition studies, it is known that instructions are able to change processing orientation of stimuli, leading to an impairment of recognition performance. The present study examined instructional influences on the visual recognition of dynamic scenes. A global processing orientation without any instruction was assumed to lead to highest recognition performance, whereas instructions focusing participants' attention on certain characteristics of the event should lead to a local processing orientation with an impairment of visual recognition performance as a direct consequence. Since the pattern of results provided evidence for this hypothesis, theoretical contributions were discussed. PMID:21667754

  16. Node influence identification via resource allocation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shu-Jiao; Ren, Zhuo-Ming; Ye, Chun-Ming; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2014-07-01

    Identifying the node influence in complex networks is an important task to optimally use the network structure and ensure the more efficient spreading in information. In this paper, by taking into account the resource allocation dynamics (RAD) and the k-shell decomposition method, we present an improved method namely RAD to generate the ranking list to evaluate the node influence. First, comparing with the epidemic process results for four real networks, the RAD method could identify the node influence more accurate than the ones generated by the topology-based measures including the degree, k-shell, closeness and the betweenness. Then, a growing scale-free network model with tunable assortative coefficient is introduced to analyze the effect of the assortative coefficient on the accuracy of the RAD method. Finally, the positive correlation is found between the RAD method and the k-shell values which display an exponential form. This work would be helpful for deeply understanding the node influence of a network.

  17. A Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction-Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy Study of Silicon Growth Dynamics During Gas Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy from Silanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, B. A.; Zhang, J.; Taylor, A. G.; Lees, A. K.

    Molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) provides an ideal experimental vehicle for the in situ study of thin film growth dynamics. By using a combination of reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and reflectance anisotropy (difference) spectroscopy [RA(D)S], it is possible to separate morphological (long range order) and local electronic structure effects, which we demonstrate with the growth of silicon films from disilane (Si2H6) on Si(001) (2 × 1)+(1 × 2) reconstructed surfaces. The rate-limiting step in Si growth from both monosilane (SiH4) and disilane is the desorption of molecular hydrogen and we have found using RAS that, over a significant range of temperature and coverage, hydrogen desorption follows zeroth order kinetics as the result of a step-mediated process. Finally, we show how this influences the growth rate on substrates of differing degrees of vicinality.

  18. Influence of interlocutor/reader on utterance in reflective writing and interview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collyer, Vivian M.

    2010-03-01

    The influence of the Other on utterance is foundational to language study. This analysis contrasts this influence within two modes of communication: reflective writing and interview. The data source is derived from the reflective writings and interview transcripts of a twelfth-grade physics student. In this student's case, reflective writing includes extensive utterances, utilizing rhetorical devices to persuade and reconcile with his reader. In the interview, on-going back-and-forth utterances allow the two participants to negotiate a co-constructed meaning for religion. Implications for the classroom are briefly discussed.

  19. Fostering an Action-Reflection Dynamic amongst Student Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Helen; Cowan, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to explore changes taking place in a curriculum design for postgraduate teaching in personnel and development, aimed at enhancing lifelong learning. A scheme is described which aims to improve the alignment for professional development of students, in ways that facilitate critically reflective practice.…

  20. Trophic dynamics influence climate at high latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksanen, L.; Tuomi, M.; Hoset, K.; Oksanen, T.; Olofsson, J.; Dahlgren, J.; Nordic Center of Excellence-Tundra

    2011-12-01

    Abundance relationships between tall woody plants and low herbaceous plants influence ground albedo. Increasing abundance of erect woody plants on the tundra increase the amount of solar energy converted to heat, thus speeding up global warming. By transplanting vegetation blocks from an island with predatory mammals and gray-sided voles (Myodes rufocanus) to similar habitats on islands with gray-sided voles but no resident predators and to islands with neither voles nor predators, we show that changing trophic dynamics radically change the abundance relationships between woody and herbaceous plants. Impacts of food limited gray-sided voles result to devastation of all erect woody plants, regardless of their palatability, thus differing both quantitatively and qualitatively from the selective impacts of the same species in the presence of predators. The shift from vegetation dominated by erect woody plants to vegetation dominated by herbs or trailing dwarf shrubs also increases ground albedo. The relationship between climate and trophic dynamics is thus no one way street. Rather than responding passively to changes in climate, food webs can also influence climate via their impacts on ground albedo.

  1. Dynamically deformable reflective membrane for laser beam shaping and smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, J.; Bitterli, R.; Bich, A.; Noell, W.; Voelkel, R.; Weible, K.; de Rooij, N.

    2012-03-01

    We show a laser beam shaping device made of a deformable continuous reflective membrane fabricated over a scanning stage. The combination of two actuator schemes enables shaping and smoothing of a laser beam with a unique compact device. It is designed to shape an input laser beam into a flat top or Gaussian intensity profile, to support high optical load and to potentially reduce speckle contrast. One single electrode is needed to deform the whole membrane into multiple sub-reflecting concave elements. The scanning stage is used simultaneously to smooth out the remaining interference patterns. The fabrication process is based on SOI wafer and parylene refilling to enable the fabrication of a 100 % fill factor 5 by 5 mm2 deformable membrane. Applications for such device are laser machining and laser display.

  2. Influence of frame inelasticity on poroviscoelastic reflections from a gas-water contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Rui; Chesnokov, Evgeny; Brown, Raymon

    2016-01-01

    As a natural extension of Biot theory, poroviscoelasticity is more comprehensive. The only difference between them is frame inelasticity, which influences wave dispersion, attenuation, reflection, and transmission. Hence we compute the influence, which uses the data of typical sand with gas and water saturation in the Gulf of Mexico with four values of frame inelasticity. The graphically illustrated results show that frame inelasticity has a small influence on the dispersion of P1- and S-waves and almost no influence on the dispersion of P2-wave. The frame inelasticity's influence on the P1- and S-wave attenuation is substantial with only a relatively small impact on the P2-wave attenuation. In some frequency and incident-angle ranges, frame inelasticity's influence on the reflection and transmission coefficients is considerable.

  3. Influence of ionization on reflection of solitary waves in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jyoti,; Malik, Hitendra K.; Kumar, Ravinder; Dahiya, Raj P.

    2013-09-15

    The reflection of nonlinear solitary waves is studied in a nonuniform, magnetized plasma diffusing from an ionization source along the magnetic field lines. Contribution of the ionization term is included in the continuity equation. The behavior of solitary waves is governed by modified form of Korteweg–de Vries equation (called mKdV equation). In order to investigate the reflection of solitary waves, the mKdV equations for the right and left going waves are derived, and solved by finding new transformations coupled at the point of reflection, for obtaining the expression of reflection coefficient. Contrary to the case of usual inhomogeneous plasma, the present analysis shows that a combination of usual sech{sup 2} structure and tanh structure (called the tail of soliton) arises due to the influence of ionization term. Interestingly, this tailing structure disappears after the reflection of the soliton and hence, the soliton is downshifted prominently.

  4. Investigation of acoustic beam reflection influence on the collinear acousto-optic interaction characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mantsevich, S N

    2016-08-01

    Significant part of acousto-optic devices apply the acoustic beam reflection to arouse the desired type of acoustic mode propagating along the required direction in crystal. The influence of acoustic beam reflection process on the ultrasound field structure in the acousto-optic cell and the collinear acousto-optic diffraction characteristics is examined in this paper. The investigation is carried on the example of the collinear acousto-optic filter fabricated on the base of calcium molybdate crystal. It is shown that the reflection process changes the acoustic field structure and affects the acousto-optic filter transmission function shape and diffraction efficiency. PMID:27153373

  5. Influence of contact state on NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenliang; Liu, Rong; Xu, Kexin; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2005-08-01

    In the practice of non-invasive blood glucose measurement by near-infrared (NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, an optical probe usually directly contacts skin in order to eliminate specular reflection. In this paper, the influence of contact state on the diffuse reflectance in vivo and the variation trend of diffuse reflectance with contact time under the same contact pressure, are investigated at wavelengths ranging from 1100 to 1700 nm. The result shows that the diffuse reflectance decreases with increasing contact pressure under the contact state. At a certain applied pressure, the diffuse reflectance fluctuates significantly at the beginning of contact, and the fluctuation becomes stable with elapsing contacting time. It is our aim in this paper to find out the optimal contact state and optimal measuring time, in order to reduce the influence of contact pressure on diffuse reflectance measurements. It is found from our experiments that, for in vivo measurement, the optimal contact state appears when the skin is pressed to about 0.5 mm by the probe, where the probe contacts the palm entirely, and that the optimal measuring time is at the 30th second since the probe contacting with the measuring site. Putting the above conclusions into practice, the repeatability of spectra is improved greatly.

  6. Influence of spatial differential reflection parameters on 2,4,6- trinitrotoluene (TNT) absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubroca, Thierry; Guetard, Ga"l.; Hummel, Rolf E.

    2012-06-01

    Differential reflectometry has been shown to be a sensitive and fast tool to detect explosive substances on surfaces such as luggage and parcel. This paper elucidates the influence of several parameters on the sensitivity of the technique. An expression for the reflected intensity that contains the influence of angle of incidence, wavelength of the incident light, and surface roughness has been established. The feature used to identify and detect TNT stems mainly from the diffuse component of the reflected light. This spectral "finger-print" shape does not change by varying these parameters. The maximum sensitivity is obtained for samples which are strongly diffusive and weakly specular.

  7. Disrupted modular brain dynamics reflect cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    de Haan, W; van der Flier, W M; Koene, T; Smits, L L; Scheltens, P; Stam, C J

    2012-02-15

    The relation between pathology and cognitive dysfunction in dementia is still poorly understood, although disturbed communication between different brain regions is almost certainly involved. In this study we combine magneto-encephalography (MEG) and network analysis to investigate the role of functional sub-networks (modules) in the brain with regard to cognitive failure in Alzheimer's disease. Whole-head resting-state (MEG) was performed in 18 Alzheimer patients (age 67 ± 9, 6 females, MMSE 23 ± 5) and 18 healthy controls (age 66 ± 9, 11 females, MMSE 29 ± 1). We constructed functional brain networks based on interregional synchronization measurements, and performed graph theoretical analysis with a focus on modular organization. The overall modular strength and the number of modules changed significantly in Alzheimer patients. The parietal cortex was the most highly connected network area, but showed the strongest intramodular losses. Nonetheless, weakening of intermodular connectivity was even more outspoken, and more strongly related to cognitive impairment. The results of this study demonstrate that particularly the loss of communication between different functional brain regions reflects cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. These findings imply the relevance of regarding dementia as a functional network disorder. PMID:22154957

  8. Dissolution dynamics of thin films measured by optical reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punckt, Christian; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2009-12-01

    Measuring the dissolution dynamics of thin films in situ both with spatial and temporal resolution can be a challenging task. Available methods such as scanning electrochemical microscopy rely on scanning the specimen and are intrinsically slow. We developed a characterization technique employing only an optical microscope, a digital charge coupled device camera, and a computer for image processing. It is capable of detecting dissolution rates of the order of nm/min and has a spatial and temporal resolution which is limited by the imaging and recording setup. We demonstrate the capabilities of our method by analyzing the electrochemical dissolution of copper thin films on gold substrates in a mild hydrochloric acid solution. Due to its simplicity, our technique can be implemented in any laboratory and can be applied to a variety of systems such as thin film sensors or passive coatings.

  9. INFLUENCES OF CARTILAGINOUS RINGS ON TRACHEOBRONCHIAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fluid dynamics patterns within tracheobronchial airways reflect interactions between cartilaginous rings and inspiratory flow rates. The results of supercomputer simulations performed herein were complex, yet systematic. The effects of cartilaginous rings upon tracheobronchial fl...

  10. The influence of inhomogeneity of the reflectivity distribution on the accuracy of its measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salman, Y. M.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of pulse volume dimensions on the accuracy of reflectivity from various clouds is considered. It is shown that due to the spatial averaging and the inhomogeneities of the clouds, the dependence frequently breaks down, which is a cause of lower values of the spatial distribution estimate. Values of the corrections calculated for various conditions are presented.

  11. Influence of Cultural Norms and Collaborative Discussions on Children's Reflective Essays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Il-Hee; Anderson, Richard C.; Miller, Brian; Jeong, Jongseong; Swim, Terri

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of culture and discussion participation on rhetorical patterns in the reflective essays of 238 Korean and 196 American 4th-graders. Results showed significant differences between Korean children's essays and American children's essays in types of reasons, uses of argument elements, and uses of rhetorical…

  12. Qualitative Career Assessment: Developing the My System of Career Influences Reflection Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Mary; Watson, Mark; Patton, Wendy

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on the development of a qualitative career assessment activity, the My System of Career Influences (MSCI) Reflection Activity. The article describes the process of developing and testing the instrument. The testing was conducted in two stages with adults and adolescents. Findings from Stage 1 indicate that the MSCI (pilot…

  13. An Evaluation of the Influence of Case Method Instruction on the Reflective Thinking of MSW Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milner, Marleen

    2009-01-01

    Social work practice requires that graduates be prepared to deal with complex, multifaceted problems which cannot be defined completely, do not have absolute, correct answers and can be approached from multiple perspectives. This study evaluated the influence of case-based instruction on MSW students' reflective judgment, an aspect of critical…

  14. Learning about University Teaching: Reflections on a Research Study Investigating Influences for Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Angela M.

    2006-01-01

    This article reflects on findings from research involving case studies of four novice lecturers enrolled on a one-year university teaching development programme. The study sought to contribute to an understanding of the "process" of pedagogic change and the influences which affect it. Findings suggest that key aspects of the lecturers' experience…

  15. Influence of measurement geometry on the human skin reflectance spectra detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2007-06-01

    One of the optical techniques applied in skin lesion investigations is reflectance spectroscopy of cutaneous tissues. Diffuse reflectance signals could be applied for absolute determination of absorption and scattering coefficients of biological tissue and give reliable results for wide range of wavelengths. However, light distribution anisotropy leads to significant influence over the reflectance spectra appearance depending on the used geometry. To obtain good reproducibility and repeatability of the results, one needs to fix carefully the geometrical conditions. We present skin reflectance spectra obtained at different angles and distances from tissue surface and discuss possible reasons for differences observed. In the case of small angles of incidence, we have significant losses of the backscattered light related to the anisotropy of the tissue and the intensity observed of the reflected signal is much lower than in the case of diffuse reflectance signal detected at higher angles. In the case of direct contact between skin surface and end tip of the fibers great reduction of the short wavelength component is observed. The appearance of higher intensity blue signal as the distance between end tip of the optical fibers and skin surface is increased could be related to the specular component of the reflectance spectra. An optimum distance exists where the registered signal has the greatest value, which is related to the specific parameters of the optical fibers used, such as diameter and optical aperture.

  16. Influence of target reflection on three-dimensional range gated reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chua, Sing Yee; Wang, Xin; Guo, Ningqun; Tan, Ching Seong

    2016-08-20

    The range gated technique is a promising laser ranging method that is widely used in different fields such as surveillance, industry, and military. In a range gated system, a reflected laser pulse returned from the target scene contains key information for range reconstruction, which directly affects the system performance. Therefore, it is necessary to study the characteristics and effects of the target reflection factor. In this paper, theoretical and experimental analyses are performed to investigate the influence of target reflection on three-dimensional (3D) range gated reconstruction. Based on laser detection and ranging (LADAR) and bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) theory, a 3D range gated reconstruction model is derived and the effect on range accuracy is analyzed from the perspectives of target surface reflectivity and angle of laser incidence. Our theoretical and experimental study shows that the range accuracy is proportional to the target surface reflectivity, but it decreases when the angle of incidence increases to adhere to the BRDF model. The presented findings establish a comprehensive understanding of target reflection in 3D range gated reconstruction, which is of interest to various applications such as target recognition and object modeling. This paper provides a reference for future improvement to perform accurate range compensation or correction. PMID:27556975

  17. Misconceptions about coercion and undue influence: reflections on the views of IRB members.

    PubMed

    Largent, Emily; Grady, Christine; Miller, Franklin G; Wertheimer, Alan

    2013-11-01

    Payment to recruit research subjects is a common practice but raises ethical concerns relating to the potential for coercion or undue influence. We conducted the first national study of IRB members and human subjects protection professionals to explore attitudes as to whether and why payment of research participants constitutes coercion or undue influence. Upon critical evaluation of the cogency of ethical concerns regarding payment, as reflected in our survey results, we found expansive or inconsistent views about coercion and undue influence that may interfere with valuable research. In particular, respondents appear to believe that coercion and undue influence lie on a continuum; by contrast, we argue that they are wholly distinct: whereas undue influence is a cognitive distortion relating to assessment of risks and benefits, coercion is a threat of harm. Because payment is an offer, rather than a threat, payment is never coercive. PMID:22493972

  18. MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT COERCION AND UNDUE INFLUENCE: REFLECTIONS ON THE VIEWS OF IRB MEMBERS

    PubMed Central

    LARGENT, EMILY; GRADY, CHRISTINE; MILLER, FRANKLIN G.; WERTHEIMER, ALAN

    2016-01-01

    Payment to recruit research subjects is a common practice but raises ethical concerns relating to the potential for coercion or undue influence. We conducted the first national study of IRB members and human subjects protection professionals to explore attitudes as to whether and why payment of research participants constitutes coercion or undue influence. Upon critical evaluation of the cogency of ethical concerns regarding payment, as reflected in our survey results, we found expansive or inconsistent views about coercion and undue influence that may interfere with valuable research. In particular, respondents appear to believe that coercion and undue influence lie on a continuum; by contrast, we argue that they are wholly distinct: whereas undue influence is a cognitive distortion relating to assessment of risks and benefits, coercion is a threat of harm. Because payment is an offer, rather than a threat, payment is never coercive. PMID:22493972

  19. Probing carrier dynamics of individual layers in a heterostructure using transient reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Salahuddin; Jayabalan, J. Singh, Asha; Yogi, Rachana; Chari, Rama

    2015-09-21

    We report the wavelength dependent transient reflectivity measurements in AlGaAs-GaAs heterostructures having two-dimensional electron (or hole) gas near the interface. Using a multilayer model for transient reflectivity, we show that the magnitude and sign of contributions from the carriers in two-dimensional electron (or hole) gas and GaAs to the total signal depends on the wavelength. Further, it has been shown that it is possible to study the carrier dynamics in a given layer of a heterostructure by performing transient reflectivity at specific wavelengths.

  20. Fiber Bragg grating dynamic strain sensor using an adaptive reflective semiconductor optical amplifier source.

    PubMed

    Wei, Heming; Tao, Chuanyi; Zhu, Yinian; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) is configured to demodulate dynamic spectral shifts of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) dynamic strain sensor. The FBG sensor and the RSOA source form an adaptive fiber cavity laser. As the reflective spectrum of the FBG sensor changes due to dynamic strains, the wavelength of the laser output shifts accordingly, which is subsequently converted into a corresponding phase shift and demodulated by an unbalanced Michelson interferometer. Due to the short transition time of the RSOA, the RSOA-FBG cavity can respond to dynamic strains at high frequencies extending to megahertz. A demodulator using a PID controller is used to compensate for low-frequency drifts induced by temperature and large quasi-static strains. As the sensitivity of the demodulator is a function of the optical path difference and the FBG spectral width, optimal parameters to obtain high sensitivity are presented. Multiplexing to demodulate multiple FBG sensors is also discussed. PMID:27139682

  1. Directed dynamical influence is more detectable with noise.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-Jie; Huang, Zi-Gang; Huang, Liang; Liu, Huan; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Successful identification of directed dynamical influence in complex systems is relevant to significant problems of current interest. Traditional methods based on Granger causality and transfer entropy have issues such as difficulty with nonlinearity and large data requirement. Recently a framework based on nonlinear dynamical analysis was proposed to overcome these difficulties. We find, surprisingly, that noise can counterintuitively enhance the detectability of directed dynamical influence. In fact, intentionally injecting a proper amount of asymmetric noise into the available time series has the unexpected benefit of dramatically increasing confidence in ascertaining the directed dynamical influence in the underlying system. This result is established based on both real data and model time series from nonlinear ecosystems. We develop a physical understanding of the beneficial role of noise in enhancing detection of directed dynamical influence. PMID:27066763

  2. Directed dynamical influence is more detectable with noise

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jun-Jie; Huang, Zi-Gang; Huang, Liang; Liu, Huan; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Successful identification of directed dynamical influence in complex systems is relevant to significant problems of current interest. Traditional methods based on Granger causality and transfer entropy have issues such as difficulty with nonlinearity and large data requirement. Recently a framework based on nonlinear dynamical analysis was proposed to overcome these difficulties. We find, surprisingly, that noise can counterintuitively enhance the detectability of directed dynamical influence. In fact, intentionally injecting a proper amount of asymmetric noise into the available time series has the unexpected benefit of dramatically increasing confidence in ascertaining the directed dynamical influence in the underlying system. This result is established based on both real data and model time series from nonlinear ecosystems. We develop a physical understanding of the beneficial role of noise in enhancing detection of directed dynamical influence. PMID:27066763

  3. Directed dynamical influence is more detectable with noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun-Jie; Huang, Zi-Gang; Huang, Liang; Liu, Huan; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2016-04-01

    Successful identification of directed dynamical influence in complex systems is relevant to significant problems of current interest. Traditional methods based on Granger causality and transfer entropy have issues such as difficulty with nonlinearity and large data requirement. Recently a framework based on nonlinear dynamical analysis was proposed to overcome these difficulties. We find, surprisingly, that noise can counterintuitively enhance the detectability of directed dynamical influence. In fact, intentionally injecting a proper amount of asymmetric noise into the available time series has the unexpected benefit of dramatically increasing confidence in ascertaining the directed dynamical influence in the underlying system. This result is established based on both real data and model time series from nonlinear ecosystems. We develop a physical understanding of the beneficial role of noise in enhancing detection of directed dynamical influence.

  4. Influence of community experiences on first-year medical students' reflective writing.

    PubMed

    Beylefeld, Adriana A; Nena, Kali D; Prinsloo, Engela A M

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the usefulness of providing students with community-located experiences as a basis for reflection by observing the degree to which community-located experiences influenced the quality of a reflective writing exercise. Students were prepared for reflection by means of a lecture and a handout on the meaning, function and process of reflection. One hundred and twenty-eight students (66 Afrikaans-speaking, and 62 English-speaking) took part in the study. Initially, most students (71%) who revealed affect prior to the visit reported negative emotional states. For 54% of the students who revealed emotions upon arrival, positive emotional states replaced the negative and this increased to 67% as the visit continued. This represented the most important stage of the personal growth continuum, signifying awareness of perspective 'distortions'. The majority (94.3%) regarded the visit as being important prior to immersing themselves in the theory of primary healthcare. In the questionnaire survey, students were asked for their opinions on the value of reflective writing as a tool for promoting deep learning, as students' attitudes were considered an important determinant of increased uptake of this kind of activity. Reflective writing can be promoted through using a real-world experience as stimulus, and a framework for guiding students' thoughts. PMID:16019336

  5. A Universal Dynamic Threshold Cloud Detection Algorithm (UDTCDA) supported by a prior surface reflectance database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lin; Wei, Jing; Wang, Jian; Mi, Xueting; Guo, Yamin; Lv, Yang; Yang, Yikun; Gan, Ping; Zhou, Xueying; Jia, Chen; Tian, Xinpeng

    2016-06-01

    Conventional cloud detection methods are easily affected by mixed pixels, complex surface structures, and atmospheric factors, resulting in poor cloud detection results. To minimize these problems, a new Universal Dynamic Threshold Cloud Detection Algorithm (UDTCDA) supported by a priori surface reflectance database is proposed in this paper. A monthly surface reflectance database is constructed using long-time-sequenced MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer surface reflectance product (MOD09A1) to provide the surface reflectance of the underlying surfaces. The relationships between the apparent reflectance changes and the surface reflectance are simulated under different observation and atmospheric conditions with the 6S (Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum) model, and the dynamic threshold cloud detection models are developed. Two typical remote sensing data with important application significance and different sensor parameters, MODIS and Landsat 8, are selected for cloud detection experiments. The results were validated against the visual interpretation of clouds and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation cloud measurements. The results showed that the UDTCDA can obtain a high precision in cloud detection, correctly identifying cloudy pixels and clear-sky pixels at rates greater than 80% with error rate and missing rate of less than 20%. The UDTCDA cloud product overall shows less estimation uncertainty than the current MODIS cloud mask products. Moreover, the UDTCDA can effectively reduce the effects of atmospheric factors and mixed pixels and can be applied to different satellite sensors to realize long-term, large-scale cloud detection operations.

  6. Dynamics and control of flexible spinning solar sails under reflectivity modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Junshan; Gong, Shengping; Ma, Pengbin; Li, Junfeng

    2015-10-01

    Electrochromic devices have been used for the attitude control of a spinning solar sail in a deep space mission by modulating the reflectivity of the sail membrane. As a flexible spinning solar sail has no rigid structure to support its membrane, the distributed load due to solar radiation will lead to the deformation of the sail membrane, and the control torque generated by reflectivity modulation can introduce oscillatory motion to the membrane. By contrast, the deformation and oscillatory motion of the sail membrane have an impact on the performance of the reflectivity control. This paper investigates the dynamics and control of flexible spinning solar sails under reflectivity modulation. The static deformation of a spinning sail membrane subjected to solar radiation pressure in an equilibrium state is analyzed. The von Karman theory is used to obtain the displacements and the stress distribution in the equilibrium states. A simplified analytical first-order mode is chosen to model the membrane oscillation. The coupled membrane oscillation-attitude-orbit dynamics are considered for a GeoSail formation flying mission. The relative attitude and orbit control of flexible spinning solar sails under reflectivity modulation are numerically tested. The simulations indicate that the membrane deformation and oscillation have a lower impact on the control of the reflectivity modulated sails than the increase of the spinning rate.

  7. Oblique shock reflection from an axis of symmetry: shock dynamics and relation to the Guderley singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornung, H. G.; Schwendeman, D. W.

    2001-07-01

    Oblique shock reflection from an axis of symmetry is studied using Whitham's theory of geometrical shock dynamics, and the results are compared with previous numerical simulations of the phenomenon by Hornung (2000). The shock shapes (for strong and weak shocks), and the location of the shock-shock (for strong shocks), are in good agreement with the numerical results, though the detail of the shock reflection structure is, of course, not resolved by shock dynamics. A guess at a mathematical form of the shock shape based on an analogy with the Guderley singularity in cylindrical shock implosion, in the form of a generalized hyperbola, fits the shock shape very well. The smooth variation of the exponent in this equation with initial shock angle from the Guderley value at zero to 0.5 at 90° supports the analogy. Finally, steady-flow shock reflection from a symmetry axis is related to the self-similar flow.

  8. Opinion dynamics model with weighted influence: Exit probability and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Soham; Sinha, Suman; Sen, Parongama

    2013-08-01

    We introduce a stochastic model of binary opinion dynamics in which the opinions are determined by the size of the neighboring domains. The exit probability here shows a step function behavior, indicating the existence of a separatrix distinguishing two different regions of basin of attraction. This behavior, in one dimension, is in contrast to other well known opinion dynamics models where no such behavior has been observed so far. The coarsening study of the model also yields novel exponent values. A lower value of persistence exponent is obtained in the present model, which involves stochastic dynamics, when compared to that in a similar type of model with deterministic dynamics. This apparently counterintuitive result is justified using further analysis. Based on these results, it is concluded that the proposed model belongs to a unique dynamical class.

  9. Andreev reflection, a tool to investigate vortex dynamics and quantum turbulence in 3He-B.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Shaun Neil; Jackson, Martin James; Sergeev, Yuri A; Tsepelin, Viktor

    2014-03-25

    Andreev reflection of quasiparticle excitations provides a sensitive and passive probe of flow in superfluid (3)He-B. It is particularly useful for studying complex flows generated by vortex rings and vortex tangles (quantum turbulence). We describe the reflection process and discuss the results of numerical simulations of Andreev reflection from vortex rings and from quantum turbulence. We present measurements of vortices generated by a vibrating grid resonator at very low temperatures. The Andreev reflection is measured using an array of vibrating wire sensors. At low grid velocities, ballistic vortex rings are produced. At higher grid velocities, the rings collide and reconnect to produce quantum turbulence. We discuss spatial correlations of the fluctuating vortex signals measured by the different sensor wires. These reveal detailed information about the formation of quantum turbulence and about the underlying vortex dynamics. PMID:24704872

  10. Photonic sensing of organic solvents through geometric study of dynamic reflection spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqi; Fu, Qianqian; Ge, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Traditional photonic sensing based on the change of balanced reflection of photonic structures can hardly distinguish chemical species with similar refractive indices. Here a sensing method based on the dynamic reflection spectra (DRS) of photonic crystal gel has been developed to distinguish even homologues, isomers and solvents with similar structures and physical properties. There are inherent relationships between solvent properties, diffusion behaviour and evolution of reflection signals, so that the geometric characteristics of DRS pattern including ascending/descending, colour changes, splitting/merging and curvature of reflection band can be utilized to recognize different organic solvents. With adequate solvents being tested, a database of DRS patterns can be established, which provide a standard to identify an unknown solvent. PMID:26082186

  11. Andreev reflection, a tool to investigate vortex dynamics and quantum turbulence in 3He-B

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Shaun Neil; Jackson, Martin James; Sergeev, Yuri A.; Tsepelin, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Andreev reflection of quasiparticle excitations provides a sensitive and passive probe of flow in superfluid 3He-B. It is particularly useful for studying complex flows generated by vortex rings and vortex tangles (quantum turbulence). We describe the reflection process and discuss the results of numerical simulations of Andreev reflection from vortex rings and from quantum turbulence. We present measurements of vortices generated by a vibrating grid resonator at very low temperatures. The Andreev reflection is measured using an array of vibrating wire sensors. At low grid velocities, ballistic vortex rings are produced. At higher grid velocities, the rings collide and reconnect to produce quantum turbulence. We discuss spatial correlations of the fluctuating vortex signals measured by the different sensor wires. These reveal detailed information about the formation of quantum turbulence and about the underlying vortex dynamics. PMID:24704872

  12. Dynamical measurement of refractive index distribution using digital holographic interferometry based on total internal reflection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiwei; Di, Jianglei; Li, Ying; Xi, Teli; Zhao, Jianlin

    2015-10-19

    We present a method for dynamically measuring the refractive index distribution in a large range based on the combination of digital holographic interferometry and total internal reflection. A series of holograms, carrying the index information of mixed liquids adhered on a total reflection prism surface, are recorded with CCD during the diffusion process. Phase shift differences of the reflected light are reconstructed exploiting the principle of double-exposure holographic interferometry. According to the relationship between the reflection phase shift difference and the liquid index, two dimensional index distributions can be directly figured out, assuming that the index of air near the prism surface is constant. The proposed method can also be applied to measure the index of solid media and monitor the index variation during some chemical reaction processes. PMID:26480394

  13. Performance limitations of bilateral force reflection imposed by operator dynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapel, Jim D.

    1989-01-01

    A linearized, single-axis model is presented for bilateral force reflection which facilitates investigation into the effects of manipulator, operator, and task dynamics, as well as time delay and gain scaling. Structural similarities are noted between this model and impedance control. Stability results based upon this model impose requirements upon operator dynamic characteristics as functions of system time delay and environmental stiffness. An experimental characterization reveals the limited capabilities of the human operator to meet these requirements. A procedure is presented for determining the force reflection gain scaling required to provide stability and acceptable operator workload. This procedure is applied to a system with dynamics typical of a space manipulator, and the required gain scaling is presented as a function of environmental stiffness.

  14. Influence of Cenozoic Plateau Growth on Precipitation and Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insel, N.; Poulsen, C. J.; Rowley, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    Large mountain ranges exhibit a first-order control on climate, but it is unclear how climate may have changed over time as topography developed. In this work we use global and regional general circulation models (Genesis3.0, RegCM4) to evaluate dynamical and physical atmospheric changes associated with variations in the Andean and Himalayan topography during the Cenozoic. Our model results show that orogenic plateaus play a critical role in the evolution of climate by affecting atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns. The influence of high topography on regional climate is not purely mechanical through orographic lifting, but also due to modifications of dynamical processes. The uplift of the Andes and Himalaya influence atmospheric flow in the following ways: (1) Orogens act as a barrier to atmospheric flow, thereby changing low-level (800 mbar) wind patterns by causing a reversal and/or significant strengthening of the prevailing winds. The establishment and strength of low-level jets is directly related to mountain elevations. (2) In contrast, monsoonal circulations form without the existence of a plateau, but are modified by high topography through thermal and mechanical effects (e.g. sensible or latent heating, orographic blocking). (3) An increase in the surface pressure gradient between high mountain ranges and the foreland enhances convergence of low-level flow and draws in moisture from adjacent regions. The increase in moisture transport provides the latent heat required to drive convective updrafts and enhances convection and precipitation along the windward flanks of high topography. (4) Regional atmospheric circulation similar to modern are established and amplify as the mountains rise to ~50-75% of their modern elevation. Our model results are largely consistent with proxy evidence of regional climate change, and have implications for the timing and rate of surface plateau uplift. Most importantly, simulated changes in paleoclimate alter

  15. Femtosecond laser ablation dynamics of fused silica extracted from oscillation of time-resolved reflectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kumada, Takayuki Akagi, Hiroshi; Itakura, Ryuji; Otobe, Tomohito; Yokoyama, Atsushi

    2014-03-14

    Femtosecond laser ablation dynamics of fused silica is examined via time-resolved reflectivity measurements. After optical breakdown was caused by irradiation of a pump pulse with fluence F{sub pump} = 3.3–14.9 J/cm{sup 2}, the reflectivity oscillated with a period of 63 ± 2 ps for a wavelength λ = 795 nm. The period was reduced by half for λ = 398 nm. We ascribe the oscillation to the interference between the probe pulses reflected from the front and rear surfaces of the photo-excited molten fused silica layer. The time-resolved reflectivity agrees closely with a model comprising a photo-excited layer which expands due to the formation of voids, and then separates into two parts, one of which is left on the sample surface and the other separated as a molten thin layer from the surface by the spallation mechanism. Such oscillations were not observed in the reflectivity of soda-lime glass. Whether the reflectivity oscillates or not probably depends on the layer viscosity while in a molten state. Since viscosity of the molten fused silica is several orders of magnitude higher than that of the soda-lime glass at the same temperature, fused silica forms a molten thin layer that reflects the probe pulse, whereas the soda-lime glass is fragmented into clusters.

  16. Dynamic reflectance of tin shocked from its beta to BCT phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Gerald; La Lone, Brandon; Veeser, Lynn; Turley, Dale

    2015-06-01

    Shock-induced phase transitions have historically been inferred by features in loading/unloading velocity wave profiles, which arise due to volume or sound speed differences between phases. In 2010, we used a flash-lamp illuminated multi-band reflectometer to demonstrate that iron, tin, cerium, and gallium have measureable reflectance changes at phase boundaries. We have improved upon our prior technique, utilizing an integrating sphere with an internal xenon flash lamp to illuminate a shocked metal beneath a LiF window. The new reflectance system is insensitive to motion, tilt, or curvature and measures the absolute (not relative) reflectance within five bands centered at 500, 700, 850, 1300, and 1550 nm. We have made dynamic reflectance measurements of tin samples shocked to pressures above and below the beta-bct phase transition using either high explosives or a gas gun. Below the transition, the visible reflectance decreases with pressure. At and above the transition, the visible reflectance increases to values higher than the ambient values. Reflectance can therefore be used to locate the beta-bct phase transition boundary for tin, independent of the velocity wave profile. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy, and supported by the Site-Directed Research and Development Program.

  17. The Influence of Dynamic Contact Angle on Wetting Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, Enrique; Garoff, Steven

    2005-01-01

    When surface tension forces dominate, and regardless of whether the situation is static or dynamic, the contact angle (the angle the interface between two immiscible fluids makes when it contacts a solid) is the key parameter that determines the shape of a fluid-fluid interface. The static contact angle is easy to measure and implement in models predicting static capillary surface shapes and such associated quantities as pressure drops. By contrast, when the interface moves relative to the solid (as in dynamic wetting processes) the dynamic contact angle is not identified unambiguously because it depends on the geometry of the system Consequently, its determination becomes problematic and measurements in one geometry cannot be applied in another for prediction purposes. However, knowing how to measure and use the dynamic contact angle is crucial to determine such dynamics as a microsystem throughput reliably. In this talk we will present experimental and analytical efforts aimed at resolving modeling issues present in dynamic wetting. We will review experiments that show the inadequacy of the usual hydrodynamic model when a fluid-fluid meniscus moves over a solid surface such as the wall of a small tube or duct. We will then present analytical results that show how to parametrize these problems in a predictive manner. We will illustrate these ideas by showing how to implement the method in numerical fluid mechanical calculations.

  18. A functional-dynamic reflection on participatory processes in modeling projects.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Roman

    2015-12-01

    The participation of nonscientists in modeling projects/studies is increasingly employed to fulfill different functions. However, it is not well investigated if and how explicitly these functions and the dynamics of a participatory process are reflected by modeling projects in particular. In this review study, I explore participatory modeling projects from a functional-dynamic process perspective. The main differences among projects relate to the functions of participation-most often, more than one per project can be identified, along with the degree of explicit reflection (i.e., awareness and anticipation) on the dynamic process perspective. Moreover, two main approaches are revealed: participatory modeling covering diverse approaches and companion modeling. It becomes apparent that the degree of reflection on the participatory process itself is not always explicit and perfectly visible in the descriptions of the modeling projects. Thus, the use of common protocols or templates is discussed to facilitate project planning, as well as the publication of project results. A generic template may help, not in providing details of a project or model development, but in explicitly reflecting on the participatory process. It can serve to systematize the particular project's approach to stakeholder collaboration, and thus quality management. PMID:25999270

  19. Release Path Temperatures of Shock-Compressed Tin from Dynamic Reflectance and Radiance Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    La Lone, B. M.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; Holtkamp, D. B.; Iverson, A. J.; Hixson, R. S.; Veeser, L. R.

    2013-08-01

    Dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements were conducted for tin samples shock compressed to 35 GPa and released to 15 GPa using high explosives. We determined the reflectance of the tin samples glued to lithium fluoride windows using an integrating sphere with an internal xenon flashlamp as an illumination source. The dynamic reflectance (R) was determined at near normal incidence in four spectral bands with coverage in visible and near-infrared spectra. Uncertainties in R/R0 are < 2%, and uncertainties in absolute reflectance are < 5%. In complementary experiments, thermal radiance from the tin/glue/lithium fluoride interface was recorded with similar shock stress and spectral coverage as the reflectance measurements. The two sets of experiments were combined to obtain the temperature history of the tin surface with an uncertainty of < 2%. The stress at the interface was determined from photonic Doppler velocimetry and combined with the temperatures to obtain temperature-stress release paths for tin. We discuss the relationship between the experimental release paths and release isentropes that begin on the principal shock Hugoniot.

  20. Geophysical flows as dynamical systems: the influence of Hide's experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghil, Michael; Read, Peter; Smith, Leonard

    2010-08-01

    Michael Ghil, Peter L Read and Leonard A Smith recount the many and various ways that Raymond Hide has influenced their life and work in geophysical fluid dynamics, meteorology, climatology and planetary sciences, as well as in developing the study of dynamical systems in general.

  1. Dynamics of surface thermal expansion and diffusivity using two-color reflection transient gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, D.M.; Harris, C.B.

    1993-02-01

    We report ultrafast measurements of the dynamic thermal expansion of a surface and the temperature dependent surface thermal diffusivity using a two-color reflection transient grating technique. Studies were performed on p-type, n-type, and undoped GaAs(100) samples at several temperatures. Using a 75 fs ultraviolet probe with visible excitation beams, the electronic effects that dominate single color experiments become negligible; thus surface expansion due to heating and the subsequent contraction caused by cooling provide the dominant influence on the diffracted probe. The diffracted signal was composed of two components, thermal expansion of the surface and heat flow away from the surface, allowing the determination of the rate of expansion as well as the surface thermal diffusivity. At room temperature a signal rise due to thermal expansion was observed, corresponding to a maximum average displacement of {approx} 1 {angstrom} at 32 ps. Large fringe spacings were used, thus the dominant contributions to the signal were expansion and diffusion perpendicular to the surface. Values for the surface thermal diffusivity of GaAs were measured and found to be in reasonable agreement with bulk values above 50{degrees}K. Below 50{degrees}K, the diffusivity at the surface was more than an order of magnitude slower than in the bulk due to increased phonon boundary scattering. Comparison of the results with a straightforward thermal model yields good agreement over a range of temperatures (12--300{degrees}K). The applicability and advantages of the transient grating technique for studying photothermal and photoacoustic phenomena are discussed.

  2. Reflective SOA fiber cavity adaptive laser source for measuring dynamic strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Heming; Tao, Chuanyi; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2016-04-01

    Smart sensors based on Optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are suitable for structural health monitoring of dynamic strains in civil, aerospace, and mechanical structures. In these structures, dynamic strains with high frequencies reveal acoustic emissions cracking or impact loading. It is necessary to find a practical tool for monitoring such structural damages. In this work, we explore an intelligent system based on a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA)- FBG composed as a fiber cavity for measuring dynamic strain in intelligent structures. The ASE light emitted from a RSOA laser and reflected by a FBG is amplified in the fiber cavity and coupled out by a 90:10 coupler, which is demodulated by a low frequency compensated Michelson interferometer using a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller and is monitored via a photodetector. As the wavelength of the FBG shifts due to dynamic strain, the wavelength of the optical output from the laser cavity shifts accordingly, which is demodulated by the Michelson Interferometer. Because the RSOA has a quick transition time, the RSOA- FBG fiber cavity shows an ability of high frequency response to the FBG reflective spectrum shift, with frequency response extending to megahertz.

  3. The Influence of Group Dynamics on Collaborative Scientific Argumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryu, Suna; Sandoval, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Research has addressed what instructional conditions may inhibit or promote scientific argumentation. Little research, however, has paid attention to interpersonal factors that influence collaborative argumentation. The present study examines the ways interpersonal factors affected group dynamics, which influence the features of collaborative…

  4. On the influence of reflective boundary conditions on the statistics of Poisson-Kac diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giona, Massimiliano; Brasiello, Antonio; Crescitelli, Silvestro

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the influence of reflective boundary conditions on the statistics of Poisson-Kac diffusion processes, and specifically how they modify the Poissonian switching-time statistics. After addressing simple cases such as diffusion in a channel, and the switching statistics in the presence of a polarization potential, we thoroughly study Poisson-Kac diffusion in fractal domains. Diffusion in fractal spaces highlights neatly how the modification in the switching-time statistics associated with reflections against a complex and fractal boundary induces new emergent features of Poisson-Kac diffusion leading to a transition from a regular behavior at shorter timescales to emerging anomalous diffusion properties controlled by walk dimensionality of the fractal set.

  5. Influence of human behavior on cholera dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueying; Gao, Daozhou; Wang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to studying the impact of human behavior on cholera infection. We start with a cholera ordinary differential equation (ODE) model that incorporates human behavior via modeling disease prevalence dependent contact rates for direct and indirect transmissions and infectious host shedding. Local and global dynamics of the model are analyzed with respect to the basic reproduction number. We then extend the ODE model to a reaction-convection-diffusion partial differential equation (PDE) model that accounts for the movement of both human hosts and bacteria. Particularly, we investigate the cholera spreading speed by analyzing the traveling wave solutions of the PDE model, and disease threshold dynamics by numerically evaluating the basic reproduction number of the PDE model. Our results show that human behavior can reduce (a) the endemic and epidemic levels, (b) cholera spreading speeds and (c) the risk of infection (characterized by the basic reproduction number). PMID:26119824

  6. Flash Lamp Integrating Sphere Technique for Measuring the Dynamic Reflectance of Shocked Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Gerald; La Lone, Brandon; Veeser, Lynn; Hixson, Rob; Holtkamp, David

    2013-07-08

    Accurate reflectance (R) measurements of metals undergoing shock wave compression can benefit high pressure research in several ways. For example, pressure dependent reflectance measurements can be used to deduce electronic band structure, and discrete changes with pressure or temperature may indicate the occurrence of a phase boundary. Additionally, knowledge of the wavelength dependent emissivity (1 -R, for opaque samples) of the metal surface is essential for accurate pyrometric temperature measurement because the radiance is a function of both the temperature and emissivity. We have developed a method for measuring dynamic reflectance in the visible and near IR spectral regions with nanosecond response time and less than 1.5% uncertainty. The method utilizes an integrating sphere fitted with a xenon flash-lamp illumination source. Because of the integrating sphere, the measurements are insensitive to changes in surface curvature or tilt. The in-situ high brightness of the flash-lamp exceeds the sample’s thermal radiance and also enables the use of solid state detectors for recording the reflectance signals with minimal noise. Using the method, we have examined the dynamic reflectance of gallium and tin subjected to shock compression from high explosives. The results suggest significant reflectance changes across phase boundaries for both metals. We have also used the method to determine the spectral emissivity of shock compressed tin at the interface between tin and a LiF window. The results were used to perform emissivity corrections to previous pyrometry data and obtain shock temperatures of the tin/LiF interface with uncertainties of less than 2%.

  7. Influence of tissue parameters on visual reflectance spectra of port wine stains and normal skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norvang Nilsen, Lill T.; Fiskerstrand, Elisanne J.; Bakken, B.; Grini, D.; Standahl, O.; Milner, Thomas E.; Berns, Michael W.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Svaasand, Lars O.

    1996-01-01

    The visual appearance of port-wine stain lesions is often a red to purple color due to an enlarged blood volume in the upper dermis. The purpose of the treatment is to re-establish normal skin coloration. Visual reflectance spectra should therefore, in principle, contain all relevant information about the lesion. The influence on the spectra from the different tissue parameters, such as melanin, blood content and scattering, is rather composite. However, a simple mathematical model can give a good understanding of the relevance of the different components. This knowledge can be used to optimize the laser treatment of port-wine stain. In vivo reflectance spectra were obtained using an integrating sphere spectrophotometer. A simple mathematical model based on the diffusion approximation was used to simulate port- wine stain and normal skin reflectance spectra. The absorption coefficients of epidermis and dermis are mainly due to melanin and blood. These parameters were measured in separate in vivo experiments and obtained from skin biopsies. The scattering coefficients were based on reported values. Simulated reflectance spectra show good agreement with the measured ones. Even though the diffusion model has limited validity for wavelengths shorter than 600 nm, the simulated spectra from 450 to 600 nm give a qualitative understanding of the influence of the tissue parameters. The results show that dark red to almost dark grey port-wine stains contain enlarged blood fraction in the entire upper dermis. The red port-wine stains appear when the abnormal density of blood is confined to a thin layer. High amount of epidermal melanin results in reduced reflectance throughout the visible spectrum. The characteristic spectrum due to the blood is suppressed. The reflectance spectra are strongly dependent on the dermal and epidermal scattering coefficient; even minor changes as naturally occurring with age, might have a significant impact. A permanently reduced scattering

  8. Imogene M. King's scholars reflect on her wisdom and influence on nursing science.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Pamela N; Killeen, Mary B; Messmer, Patricia R; Leibold Sieloff, Christina

    2009-04-01

    Reflections on the impact of the work of great leaders are vital for both scientists and practitioners to gain important perspectives on the progress of the evolution of the discipline. Recognizing the influence of a particular theorist's impact is particularly important at the time of death, which is the time where the development of a particular theory moves from the originator to the followers. This column serves as a tribute to Imogene M. King, and is dedicated to her wisdom in promoting the conceptual system she developed. PMID:19342711

  9. Dynamic influences of changing gear tooth stiffness

    SciTech Connect

    Morguel, O.K.; Esat, I.

    1997-07-01

    One of the principal sources of vibratory excitation of gear a system is due to the angular speed fluctuation of meshing gears due to non-linearities and profile errors and tooth and supporting bearings flexibility. The transmission error is also influenced by the varying force at the contact point of the meshing gear teeth. The varying contact force itself is influenced by the varying tooth stiffness due to change of orientation of teeth relative to each other, during the contact phase of each pair. This paper presents a simplified single degree of freedom gear system. It is assumed that one member of the gear pair is rigid and flexibility of the gear tooth is attributed only to one section of the gear system. This enables the equation to be simplified to a single degree of freedom system. The resulting non-linear equation is solved iteratively by employing a method which combines piecewise linearization for the stiffness and resulting contact orientation shift due to shaft and tooth flexibility. The contact shift will be referred as the phase shift in this report. The early finding indicates that there are significant differences between the response of the system incorporating three different tooth stiffness, namely, constant tooth stiffness, rectangular wave tooth stiffness and sinusoidal tooth stiffness. The results also implies that any design specification associated with gears has to include gear tooth influences, especially if the excitation is of a major concern. The rectangular stiffness variation which most accurately describes the tooth stiffness gives a response fluctuation, studied in the frequency domain shows that the effective natural frequencies fluctuates between certain upper and lower limits. Thus the paper suggest that any design study should consider these limits.

  10. Concentration of Elements in Food: How Can It Reflect Impact of Environmental and Other Influencing Factors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincevica-Gaile, Zane; Klavins, Maris

    2013-12-01

    Element content of food is variable and can be influenced by different factors. The aim of the present study was to discover the linkage between macro- and microelement concentrations in food produced in Latvia, and possible impacts of environmental factors. More than 300 fresh food samples such as eggs, cottage cheese, honey, root vegetables, apple juice, apple wine were collected in the time period from 2009 to 2011. Samples were mineralised or analysed directly by appropriate method of quantitative analysis: atomic absorption spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Statistical analysis of data revealed that food elemental content can be influenced by sitespecific factors such as geographical origin, seasonality, environmental pollution.

  11. Dynamics of influence on hierarchical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotouhi, Babak; Rabbat, Michael G.

    2013-08-01

    Dichotomous spin dynamics on a pyramidal hierarchical structure (the Bethe lattice) are studied. The system embodies a number of classes, where a class comprises nodes that are equidistant from the root (head node). Weighted links exist between nodes from the same and different classes. The spin (hereafter state) of the head node is fixed. We solve for the dynamics of the system for different boundary conditions. We find necessary conditions so that the classes eventually repudiate or acquiesce in the state imposed by the head node. The results indicate that to reach unanimity across the hierarchy, it suffices that the bottommost class adopts the same state as the head node. Then the rest of the hierarchy will inevitably comply. This also sheds light on the importance of mass media as a means of synchronization between the topmost and bottommost classes. Surprisingly, in the case of discord between the head node and the bottommost classes, the average state over all nodes inclines towards that of the bottommost class regardless of the link weights and intraclass configurations. Hence the role of the bottommost class is signified.

  12. Use of a Remote Sensing Method to Estimate the Influence of Anthropogenic Factors on the Spectral Reflectance of Plant Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora D.; Yanev, Tony K.

    2007-04-01

    Results from a remote sensing study of the influence of stress factors on the leaf spectral reflectance of wheat and tomato plants contaminated by viruses and pea plants treated with herbicides are presented and discussed. The changes arising in the spectral reflectance characteristics of control and treated plants are estimated through statistical methods as well as through derivative analysis to determine specific reflectance features in the red edge region.

  13. Influence of Temperature on the Dynamic Tensile Behavior of Zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, Juan P.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Martinez, Daniel T.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Lebensohn, Ricardo A.; Gray, George T.

    2014-12-01

    The influence of temperature on the dynamic tensile behavior of Zr has been investigated. Bullet-shaped Zr samples with two different textures were dynamically extruded at room temperature and 523 K (250 °C). A higher ductility was measured for samples deformed at elevated temperature as compared to those extruded at room temperature. This difference in ductility is discussed in terms of zirconium's ability to accommodate plastic deformation via thermally enhanced slip activity, as evidenced by examination of the deformed microstructures.

  14. Situating social influence processes: dynamic, multidirectional flows of influence within social networks.

    PubMed

    Mason, Winter A; Conrey, Frederica R; Smith, Eliot R

    2007-08-01

    Social psychologists have studied the psychological processes involved in persuasion, conformity, and other forms of social influence, but they have rarely modeled the ways influence processes play out when multiple sources and multiple targets of influence interact over time. However, workers in other fields from sociology and economics to cognitive science and physics have recognized the importance of social influence and have developed models of influence flow in populations and groups-generally without relying on detailed social psychological findings. This article reviews models of social influence from a number of fields, categorizing them using four conceptual dimensions to delineate the universe of possible models. The goal is to encourage interdisciplinary collaborations to build models that incorporate the detailed, microlevel understanding of influence processes derived from focused laboratory studies but contextualized in ways that recognize how multidirectional, dynamic influences are situated in people's social networks and relationships. PMID:18453465

  15. Total-Internal-Reflection-Fluorescence Microscopy for the Study of Nanobubble Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chon U.; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2012-10-01

    Nanobubbles can be observed with optical microscopy using the total-internal-reflection-fluorescence excitation. We report on total-internal-reflection-fluorescence visualization using rhodamine 6G at 5μM concentration which results in strongly contrasting pictures. The preferential absorption and the high spatial resolution allow us to detect nanobubbles with diameters of 230 nm and above. We resolve the nucleation dynamics during the water-ethanol-water exchange: within 4 min after exchange the bubbles nucleate and form a stable population. Additionally, we demonstrate that tracer particles near to the nanobubbles are following Brownian motion: the remaining drift flow is weaker than a few micrometers per second at a distance of 400 nm from the nanobubble’s center.

  16. Popularity and Adolescent Friendship Networks: Selection and Influence Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Borch, Casey

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the dynamics of popularity in adolescent friendship networks across 3 years in middle school. Longitudinal social network modeling was used to identify selection and influence in the similarity of popularity among friends. It was argued that lower status adolescents strive to enhance their status through befriending higher…

  17. External Dynamics Influencing Tattooing among College Students: A Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firmin, Michael; Tse, Luke; Foster, Janna; Angelini, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    The study utilized qualitative research methodology to assess external dynamics and their influences on tattooing practices among college students. Twenty-four undergraduates supplied in-depth interviews regarding the external variables related to college students' decisions to tattoo. The present research follows (Tse, Firmin, Angelini, & Foster,…

  18. Switch programming of reflectivity control devices for the coupled dynamics of a solar sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tianjian; Gong, Shengping; Mu, Junshan; Li, Junfeng; Wang, Tianshu; Qian, Weiping

    2016-03-01

    As demonstrated in the Interplanetary Kite-craft Accelerated by Radiation Of the Sun (IKAROS), reflectivity control devices (RCDs) are switched on or off independently with each other, which has nevertheless been ignored by many previous researches. This paper emphasizes the discrete property of RCDs, and aims to obtain an appropriate switch law of RCDs for a rigid spinning solar sail. First, the coupled attitude-orbit dynamics is derived from the basic solar force and torque model into an underdetermined linear system with a binary set constraint. Subsequently, the coupled dynamics is reformulated into a constrained quadratic programming and a basic gradient projection method is designed to search for the optimal solution. Finally, a circular sail flying in the Venus rendezvous mission demonstrates the model and method numerically, which illustrates approximately 103 km terminal position error and 0.5 m/s terminal velocity error as 80 independent RCDs are switched on or off appropriately.

  19. Popularity and adolescent friendship networks: selection and influence dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Cillessen, Antonius H N; Borch, Casey

    2013-07-01

    This study examined the dynamics of popularity in adolescent friendship networks across 3 years in middle school. Longitudinal social network modeling was used to identify selection and influence in the similarity of popularity among friends. It was argued that lower status adolescents strive to enhance their status through befriending higher status adolescents, whereas higher status adolescents strive to maintain their status by keeping lower status adolescents at a distance. The results largely supported these expectations. Selection partially accounted for similarity in popularity among friends; adolescents preferred to affiliate with similar-status or higher status peers, reinforcing the attractiveness of popular adolescents and explaining stability of popularity at the individual level. Influence processes also accounted for similarity in popularity over time, showing that peers increase in popularity and become more similar to their friends. The results showed how selection and influence processes account for popularity dynamics in adolescent networks over time. PMID:22985296

  20. Autism spectrum disorder severity reflects the average contribution of de novo and familial influences.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Elise B; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Kosmicki, Jack A; McGrath, Lauren; Neale, Benjamin M; Perlis, Roy H; Daly, Mark J

    2014-10-21

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a highly heterogeneous group of conditions--phenotypically and genetically--although the link between phenotypic variation and differences in genetic architecture is unclear. This study aimed to determine whether differences in cognitive impairment and symptom severity reflect variation in the degree to which ASD cases reflect de novo or familial influences. Using data from more than 2,000 simplex cases of ASD, we examined the relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ), behavior and language assessments, and rate of de novo loss of function (LOF) mutations and family history of broadly defined psychiatric disease (depressive disorders, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia; history of psychiatric hospitalization). Proband IQ was negatively associated with de novo LOF rate (P = 0.03) and positively associated with family history of psychiatric disease (P = 0.003). Female cases had a higher frequency of sporadic genetic events across the severity distribution (P = 0.01). High rates of LOF mutation and low frequencies of family history of psychiatric illness were seen in individuals who were unable to complete a traditional IQ test, a group with the greatest degree of language and behavioral impairment. These analyses provide strong evidence that familial risk for neuropsychiatric disease becomes more relevant to ASD etiology as cases become higher functioning. The findings of this study reinforce that there are many routes to the diagnostic category of autism and could lead to genetic studies with more specific insights into individual cases. PMID:25288738

  1. Influence of precipitation pulses on long-term Prosopis ferox dynamics in the Argentinean intermontane subtropics.

    PubMed

    Morales, Mariano S; Villalba, Ricardo

    2012-02-01

    Biological processes in arid communities are associated with episodic precipitation pulses. We postulate that annual to decadal-scale precipitation pulses modulate the dynamics of the intermontane Prepuna woodlands. To study this hypothesis, we have assessed the influence of precipitation pulses on the rates of growth and survival of Prosopis ferox in the Prepuna woodlands during the past century. Tree ages from several P. ferox stands were used to reconstruct the establishment patterns at each sampling site. Ring-width chronologies provided the basis to assess the influence of annual versus multiannual precipitation pulses on radial growth and establishment over time. Both the radial growth and the stand dynamics of P. ferox at the regional scale were found to be largely modulated by climate, with precipitation the dominant factor influencing interannual variations in P. ferox ring-widths. Our analysis of dendrochronological dating data on 885 individuals of P. ferox revealed a period of abundant establishment from the mid-1970s to beginning of 1990 s, which is coincident with an interval of remarkable above-average precipitation. However, tree-growth and establishment patterns at the local scale in the Prepuna also reflected land-use changes, particularly long-term variations in livestock intensity. The P. ferox dynamics documented here substantiates the hierarchical concept of "resource-pulse" in dry ecosystems, with precipitation pulses of different lengths modulating distinct dynamic processes in the P. ferox woodlands. Interannual variations in precipitation influence year-to-year patterns of P. ferox radial growth, whereas multiannual oscillations in rainfall influence episodic events of tree establishment. The long-term interval considered in this study enabled us to disentangle the roles of natural versus human controls on P. ferox dynamics in the region. PMID:21805299

  2. Influence of credit scoring on the dynamics of Markov chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galina, Timofeeva

    2015-11-01

    Markov processes are widely used to model the dynamics of a credit portfolio and forecast the portfolio risk and profitability. In the Markov chain model the loan portfolio is divided into several groups with different quality, which determined by presence of indebtedness and its terms. It is proposed that dynamics of portfolio shares is described by a multistage controlled system. The article outlines mathematical formalization of controls which reflect the actions of the bank's management in order to improve the loan portfolio quality. The most important control is the organization of approval procedure of loan applications. The credit scoring is studied as a control affecting to the dynamic system. Different formalizations of "good" and "bad" consumers are proposed in connection with the Markov chain model.

  3. Simulating food web dynamics along a gradient: quantifying human influence.

    PubMed

    Jordán, Ferenc; Gjata, Nerta; Mei, Shu; Yule, Catherine M

    2012-01-01

    Realistically parameterized and dynamically simulated food-webs are useful tool to explore the importance of the functional diversity of ecosystems, and in particular relations between the dynamics of species and the whole community. We present a stochastic dynamical food web simulation for the Kelian River (Borneo). The food web was constructed for six different locations, arrayed along a gradient of increasing human perturbation (mostly resulting from gold mining activities) along the river. Along the river, the relative importance of grazers, filterers and shredders decreases with increasing disturbance downstream, while predators become more dominant in governing eco-dynamics. Human activity led to increased turbidity and sedimentation which adversely impacts primary productivity. Since the main difference between the study sites was not the composition of the food webs (structure is quite similar) but the strengths of interactions and the abundance of the trophic groups, a dynamical simulation approach seemed to be useful to better explain human influence. In the pristine river (study site 1), when comparing a structural version of our model with the dynamical model we found that structurally central groups such as omnivores and carnivores were not the most important ones dynamically. Instead, primary consumers such as invertebrate grazers and shredders generated a greater dynamical response. Based on the dynamically most important groups, bottom-up control is replaced by the predominant top-down control regime as distance downstream and human disturbance increased. An important finding, potentially explaining the poor structure to dynamics relationship, is that indirect effects are at least as important as direct ones during the simulations. We suggest that our approach and this simulation framework could serve systems-based conservation efforts. Quantitative indicators on the relative importance of trophic groups and the mechanistic modeling of eco-dynamics

  4. Effects of surface reflectance on local second order shape estimation in dynamic scenes.

    PubMed

    Dövencioğlu, Dicle N; Wijntjes, Maarten W A; Ben-Shahar, Ohad; Doerschner, Katja

    2015-10-01

    In dynamic scenes, relative motion between the object, the observer, and/or the environment projects as dynamic visual information onto the retina (optic flow) that facilitates 3D shape perception. When the object is diffusely reflective, e.g. a matte painted surface, this optic flow is directly linked to object shape, a property found at the foundations of most traditional shape-from-motion (SfM) schemes. When the object is specular, the corresponding specular flow is related to shape curvature, a regime change that challenges the visual system to determine concurrently both the shape and the distortions of the (sometimes unknown) environment reflected from its surface. While human observers are able to judge the global 3D shape of most specular objects, shape-from-specular-flow (SFSF) is not veridical. In fact, recent studies have also shown systematic biases in the perceived motion of such objects. Here we focus on the perception of local shape from specular flow and compare it to that of matte-textured rotating objects. Observers judged local surface shape by adjusting a rotation and scale invariant shape index probe. Compared to shape judgments of static objects we find that object motion decreases intra-observer variability in local shape estimation. Moreover, object motion introduces systematic changes in perceived shape between matte-textured and specular conditions. Taken together, this study provides a new insight toward the contribution of motion and surface material to local shape perception. PMID:25645965

  5. Neutron reflectivity as a tool to study the interdigitation of grafted polymer chains and its dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, Liliane; Restagno, Frédéric; Cousin, Fabrice; Boue, François; Chenneviere, Alexis

    Three series of experiments aimed at characterizing the interdigitation between a brush and a melt, and based on neutron reflectivity, are presented and discussed. The density profile of brush chains has been analysed for series of annealing times, on h-PS brushes in contact with d-PS melts, as a function of molecular weights and grafting densities. We show that the relaxation dynamics of the brush chains can be modelled taking into account the long relaxation time of end tethered chains along with the reptation of the melt chains which accelerates the arm retraction process. Using a non-grafted layer with a thickness smaller than the equilibrium size of the brush when immersed into a thick melt allows one to apply chosen degrees of confinement to the brush. We show that the interdigitation dynamics is affected by such confinements, in a way reminiscent of the change of the glass transition temperature in nanometric PS films. Finally, when the upper d-PS layer is sheared above Tg, flow with large slip at the wall has been observed and interpreted in terms of stretching and expulsion of the grafted chains from the melt. We show how neutron reflectivity directly evidence this expulsion.

  6. Correlation between Ultrasound Reflection Intensity and Tumor Ablation Ratio of Late-Stage Pancreatic Carcinoma in HIFU Therapy: Dynamic Observation on Ultrasound Reflection Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Hui-Yu; Miao, Li-Ying; Wang, Jin-Rui; Xiong, Liu-Lin; Yan, Fang; Zheng, Cui-Shan; Jia, Jian-Wen; Cui, Li-Gang; Chen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    The minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is thermal ablation treatment for late-stage pancreatic carcinoma with widely recognized safety and effectiveness, but there are currently no instant assessment methods for its ablation effect. It is vital to find a real-time high-sensitive assessment method. This research aims to dynamically observe the variation rules of ultrasound reflection intensity, analyze the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio, and find out the value of ultrasound reflection intensity in prognosis of HIFU ablation effect. HIFU intermittent therapies were retrospectively analyzed for 31 subjects with late-stage pancreatic carcinoma from March 2007 to December 2009 in the study. The variation rules of the ultrasound reflection intensity during HIFU therapy were summarized and the correlation between ultrasound reflection intensity and tumor ablation ratio was analyzed based on the tumor ablation ratio indicated by CT scanning. The conclusion is that variation of ultrasound reflection intensity can be used for initial assessment of tumor ablation in HIFU therapy and early prognosis of overall HIFU ablation, providing important clinical basis for improving safety and effectiveness of HIFU therapy. Ultrasound can work as a real-time imaging instrument for observation of HIFU ablation effect in treating late-stage pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:24453916

  7. Influence of nozzle random side loads on launch vehicle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Nilabh; Tkacik, Peter T.; Keanini, Russell G.

    2010-08-01

    It is well known that the dynamic performance of a rocket or launch vehicle is enhanced when the length of the divergent section of its nozzle is reduced or the nozzle exit area ratio is increased. However, there exists a significant performance trade-off in such rocket nozzle designs due to the presence of random side loads under overexpanded nozzle operating conditions. Flow separation and the associated side-load phenomena have been extensively investigated over the past five decades; however, not much has been reported on the effect of side loads on the attitude dynamics of rocket or launch vehicle. This paper presents a quantitative investigation on the influence of in-nozzle random side loads on the attitude dynamics of a launch vehicle. The attitude dynamics of launch vehicle motion is captured using variable-mass control-volume formulation on a cylindrical rigid sounding rocket model. A novel physics-based stochastic model of nozzle side-load force is developed and embedded in the rigid-body model of rocket. The mathematical model, computational scheme, and results corresponding to side loading scenario are subsequently discussed. The results highlight the influence of in-nozzle random side loads on the roll, pitch, yaw, and translational dynamics of a rigid-body rocket model.

  8. Influence of process parameter variation on the reflectivity of sputter-deposited W-C multilayer diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, B.; Benson, P.; Jahoda, K.; Jacobs, J. R.; Bloch, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    Multilayer W-C diffraction gratings with nominal d spacings of 35 A have been fabricated by magnetron sputter deposition. The peak and integrated reflectivities of these films have been measured with Al K-alpha X-rays and compared to theoretical values. The rms surface roughness has been evaluated. The influence of several sputtering-system process parameters on the reflectivities has been investigated.

  9. Dynamic behaviour of HPFRCC: The influence of fibres dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caverzan, Alessio; di Prisco, Marco; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    The promise of fibre-reinforced cementitious composites for dynamic loading application stems from their observed good response under static loading mainly due to fibre contribution. An experimental research aimed at contributing to the understanding of the behaviour of advanced fibre-reinforced cementitious composites subjected to low and high strain rates was carried out underlining the influence of fibres. The material behaviour was investigated at three strain rates (0.1, 1, and 150 s-1) and the tests results were compared with their static behaviour. Tests at intermediate strain rates (0.1-1 s-1) were carried out by means of a hydro-pneumatic machine (HPM), while high strain rates (150 s-1) were investigated by exploiting a modified Hopkinson bar (MHB). Particular attention has been placed on the influence of fibre and fibre dispersion on the dynamic behaviour of the materials: matrix, HPFRCC with random fibre distribution and aligned fibres were compared. The comparison between static and dynamic tests highlighted several relevant aspects regarding the influence of fibres on the peak strength and post-peak behaviour at high strain rates.

  10. An accurate dynamical electron diffraction algorithm for reflection high-energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Cai, C. Y.; Lv, C. L.; Zhou, G. W.; Wang, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    The conventional multislice method (CMS) method, one of the most popular dynamical electron diffraction calculation procedures in transmission electron microscopy, was introduced to calculate reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) as it is well adapted to deal with the deviations from the periodicity in the direction parallel to the surface. However, in the present work, we show that the CMS method is no longer sufficiently accurate for simulating RHEED with the accelerating voltage 3-100 kV because of the high-energy approximation. An accurate multislice (AMS) method can be an alternative for more accurate RHEED calculations with reasonable computing time. A detailed comparison of the numerical calculation of the AMS method and the CMS method is carried out with respect to different accelerating voltages, surface structure models, Debye-Waller factors and glancing angles.

  11. Influence of surface clinker on the crustal structures and dynamics of 'a'ā lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegarth, L. J.; James, M. R.; van Wyk de Vries, B.; Pinkerton, H.

    2010-07-01

    Surface structures on 'a'ā and blocky lavas reflect the internal flow dynamics during emplacement and also influence the dynamics of developing flows. To investigate the effects of brittle, clinkery 'a'ā flow crusts on flow dynamics and surface structures, we conducted sand and silicone laboratory experiments that simulated the advance of lava into a preexisting channelized flow with a surface crust. Experiments carried out with relatively thin crusts produced apparently ductile surface deformation structures, while thick crusts behaved dominantly in a brittle manner. Increased crustal thickness led to increased strength under compression but favored more disruption under tension, as the flow core welled up through tensile fractures, entraining crustal material. At lava flow fronts, upwelling and entrainment would increase heat losses by radiation and advection, respectively, resulting in a positive-feedback cooling loop. Fracturing caused heterogeneous crustal distribution near the flow front, which resulted in lobate flow advance, despite the absence of the viscoelastic layer that has previously been inferred as the primary control on flow advance and lobe formation. We therefore conclude that the influence of a purely brittle crust on the dynamics and surface morphologies of lava flows is more significant than often thought. All of the surface structures produced in the experiments have been observed on lavas or glaciers and many also on landslides and debris flows, suggesting the results can assist in the understanding of a range of natural flows.

  12. Mesoscopic dynamics of diffusion-influenced enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang-Xing; Kapral, Raymond

    2011-01-28

    A particle-based mesoscopic model for enzyme kinetics is constructed and used to investigate the influence of diffusion on the reactive dynamics. Enzymes and enzyme-substrate complexes are modeled as finite-size soft spherical particles, while substrate, product, and solvent molecules are point particles. The system is evolved using a hybrid molecular dynamics-multiparticle collision dynamics scheme. Both the nonreactive and reactive dynamics are constructed to satisfy mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws, and reversible reaction steps satisfy detailed balance. Hydrodynamic interactions among the enzymes and complexes are automatically accounted for in the dynamics. Diffusion manifests itself in various ways, notably in power-law behavior in the evolution of the species concentrations. In accord with earlier investigations, regimes where the product production rate exhibits either monotonic or nonmonotonic behavior as a function of time are found. In addition, the species concentrations display both t(-1/2) and t(-3/2) power-law behavior, depending on the dynamical regime under investigation. For high enzyme volume fractions, cooperative effects influence the enzyme kinetics. The time dependent rate coefficient determined from the mass action rate law is computed and shown to depend on the enzyme concentration. Lifetime distributions of substrate molecules newly released in complex dissociation events are determined and shown to have either a power-law form for rebinding to the same enzyme from which they were released or an exponential form for rebinding to different enzymes. The model can be used and extended to explore a variety of issues related concentration effects and diffusion on enzyme kinetics. PMID:21280744

  13. Molecular Dynamics Calculation of Carbon/Hydrocarbon Reflection Coefficients on a Graphite Surface Employing Distributed Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alman, D. A.; Ruzic, D. N.; Brooks, J. N.

    2001-10-01

    Reflection coefficients of carbon and hydrocarbon molecules have been calculated with a molecular dynamics code. The code uses the Brenner hydrocarbon potential, an empirical many-body potential that can model the chemical bonding in small hydrocarbon molecules and graphite surfaces. A variety of incident energies and angles have been studied. Typical results for carbon show reflection coefficients 0.4 at thermal energy, decreasing to a minimum of 0.15 at 10-20 eV, and then increasing again. Distributed computing is used to distribute the work among 10-20 desktop PCs in the laboratory. The system consists of a client application run on all of the PCs and a single server machine that distributes work and compiles the results sent back from the clients. The client-server software is written in Java and requires no commercial software packages. Thus, the MD code benefits from multiprocessor-like speed-up at no additional cost by using the idle CPU cycles that would otherwise be wasted. These calculations represent an important improvement to the WBC code, which has been used to model surface erosion, core plasma contamination, and tritium codeposition in many fusion design studies and experiments.

  14. The National Board Certification Portfolio Process and Its Influence on Teacher Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the types of teacher reflections and the changes in reflective levels as 15 candidates for National Board Certification worked through the portfolio process. This study also examined how the portfolio requirements and mentoring from candidate support providers helped teachers deepen their levels of reflection. Study findings…

  15. Early Childhood Teachers' Views of Nature of Science: The Influence of Intellectual Levels, Cultural Values, and Explicit Reflective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akerson, Valarie L.; Buzzelli, Cary A.; Donnelly, Lisa A.

    2008-01-01

    This study tracked the influence of explicit reflective instructional methods on cultural values, ethical and intellectual development, and the relationship of these with preservice teachers' views of nature of science (NOS). The researchers used the Views of Nature of Science Form B (VNOS B) to describe NOS views, the Learning Context…

  16. In vivo skin absorption dynamics of topically applied pharmaceuticals monitored by fiber-optic diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Hong; Jheon, Sanghoon; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2007-03-01

    A simple non-invasive ultra-violet/visible (UV/vis) diffusive reflectance spectroscopy combined with fiber-optics was investigated to elicit the dynamics of skin penetration in vivo of a pharmaceutical, aminolevulinic acid polyethylene glycol cream (5-ALA-PEG cream). Temporal data of the reflectance, R( λ), were measured from a bare skin region and from a skin region treated with 5-ALA cream. The difference in apparent optical density [(ΔAOD) = Δ log[1/ R( λ)

  17. The high heritability of educational achievement reflects many genetically influenced traits, not just intelligence.

    PubMed

    Krapohl, Eva; Rimfeld, Kaili; Shakeshaft, Nicholas G; Trzaskowski, Maciej; McMillan, Andrew; Pingault, Jean-Baptiste; Asbury, Kathryn; Harlaar, Nicole; Kovas, Yulia; Dale, Philip S; Plomin, Robert

    2014-10-21

    Because educational achievement at the end of compulsory schooling represents a major tipping point in life, understanding its causes and correlates is important for individual children, their families, and society. Here we identify the general ingredients of educational achievement using a multivariate design that goes beyond intelligence to consider a wide range of predictors, such as self-efficacy, personality, and behavior problems, to assess their independent and joint contributions to educational achievement. We use a genetically sensitive design to address the question of why educational achievement is so highly heritable. We focus on the results of a United Kingdom-wide examination, the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE), which is administered at the end of compulsory education at age 16. GCSE scores were obtained for 13,306 twins at age 16, whom we also assessed contemporaneously on 83 scales that were condensed to nine broad psychological domains, including intelligence, self-efficacy, personality, well-being, and behavior problems. The mean of GCSE core subjects (English, mathematics, science) is more heritable (62%) than the nine predictor domains (35-58%). Each of the domains correlates significantly with GCSE results, and these correlations are largely mediated genetically. The main finding is that, although intelligence accounts for more of the heritability of GCSE than any other single domain, the other domains collectively account for about as much GCSE heritability as intelligence. Together with intelligence, these domains account for 75% of the heritability of GCSE. We conclude that the high heritability of educational achievement reflects many genetically influenced traits, not just intelligence. PMID:25288728

  18. The high heritability of educational achievement reflects many genetically influenced traits, not just intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Krapohl, Eva; Rimfeld, Kaili; Shakeshaft, Nicholas G.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; McMillan, Andrew; Pingault, Jean-Baptiste; Asbury, Kathryn; Harlaar, Nicole; Kovas, Yulia; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Because educational achievement at the end of compulsory schooling represents a major tipping point in life, understanding its causes and correlates is important for individual children, their families, and society. Here we identify the general ingredients of educational achievement using a multivariate design that goes beyond intelligence to consider a wide range of predictors, such as self-efficacy, personality, and behavior problems, to assess their independent and joint contributions to educational achievement. We use a genetically sensitive design to address the question of why educational achievement is so highly heritable. We focus on the results of a United Kingdom-wide examination, the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE), which is administered at the end of compulsory education at age 16. GCSE scores were obtained for 13,306 twins at age 16, whom we also assessed contemporaneously on 83 scales that were condensed to nine broad psychological domains, including intelligence, self-efficacy, personality, well-being, and behavior problems. The mean of GCSE core subjects (English, mathematics, science) is more heritable (62%) than the nine predictor domains (35–58%). Each of the domains correlates significantly with GCSE results, and these correlations are largely mediated genetically. The main finding is that, although intelligence accounts for more of the heritability of GCSE than any other single domain, the other domains collectively account for about as much GCSE heritability as intelligence. Together with intelligence, these domains account for 75% of the heritability of GCSE. We conclude that the high heritability of educational achievement reflects many genetically influenced traits, not just intelligence. PMID:25288728

  19. Influence of dissolved organic materials on turbid water optical properties and remote-sensing reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Harriss, R. C.; Usry, J. W.; Poole, L. R.; Houghton, W. M.; Morris, W. D.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of dissolved organic materials on turbid-water optical properties are assessed, by means of field measurements and laboratory simulations in which upwelled reflectance, attenuation, absorption, and backscatter spectral properties at wavelengths from 450 to 800 nm are examined in relation to water chemistry. The data show that dissolved organic materials decrease upwelled reflectance from turbid waters, and that the decrease in reflectance is a nonlinear function of concentration with the largest gradients at low carbon concentrations, depending on wavelength. Upwelled reflectance is found to be highly correlated with two backscatter-absorption parameters used in some optical models, which are nonlinear with dissolved organic material concentration change.

  20. Disturbance frequency influences patch dynamics in stream benthic algal communities.

    PubMed

    Ledger, Mark E; Harris, Rebecca M L; Armitage, Patrick D; Milner, Alexander M

    2008-04-01

    Disturbance is integral to the organisation of riverine ecosystems. Fluctuating low flows caused by supra-seasonal drought and water management periodically dewater habitat patches, potentially creating heterogeneity in the taxonomic composition and successional dynamics of benthic communities. The frequency of disturbance induced by low flows is contingent upon the topography of the river bed and thus varies among patches. We investigated whether the frequency of patch dewatering influenced the structure and temporal dynamics of benthic algal communities attached to the upper surfaces of stones in stream mesocosms (4 m2). In a 693-day disturbance experiment, we applied short dewatering disturbances (6 days) at high (33-day cycles) and low frequencies (99-day cycles) and compared algal assemblages with undisturbed controls at 21 endpoints. In the absence of disturbance, epilithic space was dominated by the green encrusting alga Gongrosira incrustans. However, drying disturbances consistently reduced the dominance of the green alga, and crust abundance decreased with increasing disturbance frequency, thereby opening space for a diversity of mat-forming diatoms. The response of mat diatoms to disturbance varied markedly during the experiment, from strong reductions in the abundance of loosely attached mats in mid-late 2000 to the exploitation of open space by closely adhering mats in 2001. Contrary responses were attributed to changes in the species composition of mat diatoms, which influenced the physiognomy and hence stress-resistance and resilience of the assemblage. Our results indicate that patchy dewatering of habitat patches during periods of low flow influences the successional dynamics of algae, thereby creating distinctive mosaics on the stream bed. PMID:18193289

  1. Influence of snow-cover properties on avalanche dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkogler, W.; Sovilla, B.; Lehning, M.

    2012-04-01

    Snow avalanches with the potential of reaching traffic routes and settlements are a permanent winter threat for many mountain communities. Snow safety officers have to take the decision whether to close a road, a railway line or a ski slope. Those decisions are often very difficult as they demand the ability to interpret weather forecasts, to establish their implication for the stability and the structure of the snow cover and to evaluate the influence of the snow cover on avalanche run-out distances. In the operational programme 'Italy-Switzerland, project STRADA' we focus on the effects of snow cover on avalanche dynamics, and thus run-out distance, with the aim to provide a better understanding of this influence and to ultimately develop tools to support snow safety officers in their decision process. We selected five avalanches, measured at the Vallée de la Sionne field site, with similar initial mass and topography but different flow dynamics and run-out distances. Significant differences amongst the individual avalanches could be observed for front and internal velocities, impact pressures, flow regimes, deposition volumes and run-out distances. For each of these avalanches, the prevailing snow conditions at release were reconstructed using field data from local snowpits or were modeled with SNOWPACK. Combining flow dynamical data with snow cover properties shows that erodible snow depth, snow density and snow temperature in the snow pack along the avalanche track are among the decisive variables that appear to explain the observed differences. It is further discussed, how these influencing factors can be quantified and used for improved predictions of site and time specific avalanche hazard.

  2. Multiparticle collision dynamics for diffusion-influenced signaling pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strehl, R.; Rohlf, K.

    2016-08-01

    An efficient yet accurate simulation method for modeling diffusion-influenced reaction networks is presented. The method extends existing reactive multiparticle collision dynamics by incorporating species-dependent diffusion coefficients, and developing theoretical expressions for the reactant-dependent diffusion control. This off-lattice particle-based mesoscopic simulation tool is particularly suited for problems in which detailed descriptions of particle trajectories and local reactions are required. Numerical simulations of an intracellular signaling pathway for bacterial chemotaxis are carried out to validate our approach, and to demonstrate its efficiency.

  3. Lattice dynamics of neodymium: Influence of 4 f electron correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, O.; Piekarz, P.; Bosak, A.; Jochym, P. T.; Ibrahimkutty, S.; Seiler, A.; Krisch, M.; Baumbach, T.; Parlinski, K.; Stankov, S.

    2016-07-01

    Incorporation of strong electron correlations into the density functional theory (DFT) for the electronic structure calculations of light lanthanides leads to a modification of interatomic forces and consequently the lattice dynamics. Using first-principles theory we demonstrate the substantial influence of the 4 f electron correlations on the phonon dispersion relations of Nd. The calculations are verified by an inelastic x-ray scattering experiment performed on a single-crystalline Nd(0001) film. We show that very good agreement between the calculated and measured data is achieved when electron-electron interactions are treated by the DFT +U approach.

  4. Vestibular ontogeny: Measuring the influence of the dynamic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Timothy A.; Devries, Sherri M.; Dubois, Linda M.; Nelson, Rick C.

    1993-01-01

    In comparison to other special senses, we are only meagerly informed about the development of vestibular function and the mechanisms that may operate to control or influence the course of vestibular ontogeny. Perhaps one contributing factor to this disparity is the difficulty of evaluating vestibular sense organs directly and noninvasively. The present report describes a recently developed direct noninvasive vestibular function test that can be used to address many basic questions about the developing vestibular system. More particularly, the test can be used to examine the effects of the dynamic environment (e.g. gravitational field and vibration) on vestibular ontogeny.

  5. The influence of acoustic reflections from diffusive architectural surfaces on spatial auditory perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Philip W.

    This thesis addresses the effect of reflections from diffusive architectural surfaces on the perception of echoes and on auditory spatial resolution. Diffusive architectural surfaces play an important role in performance venue design for architectural expression and proper sound distribution. Extensive research has been devoted to the prediction and measurement of the spatial dispersion. However, previous psychoacoustic research on perception of reflections and the precedence effect has focused on specular reflections. This study compares the echo threshold of specular reflections, against those for reflections from realistic architectural surfaces, and against synthesized reflections that isolate individual qualities of reflections from diffusive surfaces, namely temporal dispersion and spectral coloration. In particular, the activation of the precedence effect, as indicated by the echo threshold is measured. Perceptual tests are conducted with direct sound, and simulated or measured reflections with varying temporal dispersion. The threshold for reflections from diffusive architectural surfaces is found to be comparable to that of a specular re ection of similar energy rather than similar amplitude. This is surprising because the amplitude of the dispersed re ection is highly attenuated, and onset cues are reduced. This effect indicates that the auditory system is integrating re ection response energy dispersed over many milliseconds into a single stream. Studies on the effect of a single diffuse reflection are then extended to a full architectural enclosure with various surface properties. This research utilizes auralizations from measured and simulated performance venues to investigate spatial discrimination of multiple acoustic sources in rooms. It is found that discriminating the lateral arrangement of two sources is possible at narrower separation angles when reflections come from at rather than diffusive surfaces. Additionally, subjective impressions are

  6. The Influence of Reflective Self-Explanations on Problem-Solving Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Kyungbin; Jonassen, David H.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the effects of reflective self-explanations on conceptual understanding and problem solving are investigated in a domain of computer programming. After completing a multiple-choice test, 33 students were asked to reflect on and explain why their answers were correct or incorrect. Groups were divided for post hoc analysis based on…

  7. Influence of MR damper modeling on vehicle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de-J Lozoya-Santos, Jorge; Morales-Menendez, Ruben; Ramirez-Mendoza, Ricardo A.; Vivas-Lopez, Carlos A.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of magneto-rheological damper modeling in vehicle dynamics analysis is studied. Several tests using CarSim™ compare a four-corner controlled semi-active suspension for two different magneto-rheological damper models. The magneto-rheological damper characteristics were identified from experimental data. A model-free controller discards the influence of control and emphasizes the compliance of the magneto-rheological damper model; the characteristics of the vehicle index performance considered were comfort, road holding, handling, roll and suspension deflection. The comparison for magneto-rheological damper dynamics and semi-active suspension covers the automotive bandwidth. The results show that high precision of a magneto-rheological damper model as an isolated feature is not enough. The magneto-rheological damper model, as a component of a vehicle suspension, needs to simulate with passive precision and variable damping forces. The findings exhibit the requisite of accurate models for evaluation of semi-active control systems in classic tests. The lack of the friction component in a magneto-rheological damper model leads to an overestimation in handling and stability.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations and neutron reflectivity as an effective approach to characterize biological membranes and related macromolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Darré, L; Iglesias-Fernandez, J; Kohlmeyer, A; Wacklin, H; Domene, C

    2015-10-13

    In combination with other spectroscopy, microscopy, and scattering techniques, neutron reflectivity is a powerful tool to characterize biological systems. Specular reflection of neutrons provides structural information at the nanometer and subnanometer length scales, probing the composition and organization of layered materials. Currently, analysis of neutron reflectivity data involves several simplifying assumptions about the structure of the sample under study, affecting the extraction and interpretation of information from the experimental data. Computer simulations can be used as a source of structural and dynamic data with atomic resolution. We present a novel tool to compare the structural properties determined by neutron reflectivity experiments with those obtained from molecular simulations. This tool allows benchmarking the ability of molecular dynamics simulations to reproduce experimental data, but it also promotes unbiased interpretation of experimentally determined quantities. Two application examples are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the new tool. The first example is the generation of reflectivity profiles for a 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipid bilayer from molecular dynamics simulations using data from both atomistic and coarse-grained models, and comparison with experimentally measured data. The second example is the calculation of lipid volume changes with temperature and composition from all atoms simulations of single and mixed 1,2-di-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayers. PMID:26574275

  9. Diurnal and seasonal dynamics of canopy-level solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence and spectral reflectance indices in a cornfield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A collaborative field campaign was undertaken to examine the temporal dynamics of canopy-level solar-induced fluorescence (SIF) and the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) in conjunction with photosynthetic light use efficiency (LUE) obtained from fluxes measured at an instrumented tower. We condu...

  10. Genetic Influences on Dynamic Complexity of Brain Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Anokhin, Andrey P.; Müller, Viktor; Lindenberger, Ulman; Heath, Andrew C.; Myers, Erin

    2007-01-01

    Human electroencephalogram (EEG) consists of complex aperiodic oscillations that are assumed to indicate underlying neural dynamics such as the number and the degree of independence of oscillating neuronal networks. EEG complexity can be estimated using measures derived from non-linear dynamic systems theory. Variations in such measures have been shown to be associated with normal individual differences in cognition and some neuropsychiatric disorders. Despite the increasing use of EEG complexity measures for the study of normal and abnormal brain functioning, little is known about genetic and environmental influences on these measures. Using the pointwise dimension (PD2) algorithm, this study assessed heritability of EEG complexity at rest in a sample of 214 young female twins consisting of 51 monozygotic (MZ) and 56 dizygotic (DZ) pairs. In MZ twins, intrapair correlations were high and statistically significant; in DZ twins, correlations were substantially smaller. Genetic analyses using linear structural equation modeling revealed high and significant heritability of EEG complexity: 62–68 % in the eyes closed condition, and 46–60 % in the eyes open condition. Results suggest that individual differences in the complexity of resting electrocortical dynamics are largely determined by genetic factors. Neurophysiological mechanisms mediating genetic variation in EEG complexity may include the degree of structural connectivity and functional differentiation among cortical neuronal assemblies. PMID:16442730

  11. Racial identity and reflected appraisals as influences on Asian Americans' racial adjustment.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, A N; Helms, J E

    2001-08-01

    J. E. Helms's (1990) racial identity psychodiagnostic model was used to examine the contribution of racial identity schemas and reflected appraisals to the development of healthy racial adjustment of Asian American university students (N = 188). Racial adjustment was operationally defined as collective self-esteem and awareness of anti-Asian racism. Multiple regression analyses suggested that racial identity schemas and reflected appraisals were significantly predictive of Asian Americans' racial adjustment. Implications for counseling and future research are discussed. PMID:11506069

  12. Beryllium deposition on International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor first mirrors: Layer morphology and influence on mirror reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Temmerman, G.; Baldwin, M. J.; Doerner, R. P.; Nishijima, D.; Seraydarian, R.; Schmid, K.; Kost, F.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Marot, L.

    2007-10-01

    Metallic mirrors will be essential components of the optical diagnostic systems in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Reliability of these systems may be affected by mirror reflectivity changes induced by erosion and/or deposition of impurities (carbon, beryllium). The present study aims to assess the effect of beryllium (Be) deposition on the reflectivity of metallic mirrors and to collect data on the optical quality of these layers in terms of morphology, roughness, etc. Mirrors from molybdenum and copper were exposed in the PISCES-B linear plasma device to collect eroded material from graphite and beryllium targets exposed to beryllium-seeded deuterium plasma. After exposure, relative reflectivity of the mirrors was measured and different surface analysis techniques were used to investigate the properties of the deposited layers. Be layers formed in PISCES-B exhibit high levels of porosity which makes the reflectivity of the Be layers much lower than the reflectivity of pure Be. It is found that if Be deposition occurs on ITER first mirrors, the reflectivity of the coated mirrors will strongly depend on the layer morphology, which in turn depends on the deposition conditions.

  13. Radiative Influences On The Dynamical Structure of Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbie, S.; Jonas, P. R.

    The results of a study will be presented which investigates the role of radiative and la- tent heating processes on the dynamical and microphysical evolution of cirrus clouds. The UK Met. Office's LES model run in 2D is used as the cloud resolving model for this work. Results will be shown pertaining to the effects that solar and IR radiation have on cloud stability, morphology, microphysics, time evolution, and cloud lifetime. In an attempt to generalize the results beyond the model calculations, stability num- bers will be presented that help to assess the influence that these diabatic processes have on the cloud stability. Recent work will also be shown pertaining to full 3D model simulations and a study showing a comparison of results from the LES double moment microphysics scheme to observations.

  14. Communication: The influence of vibrational parity in chiral photoionization dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Powis, Ivan

    2014-03-21

    A pronounced vibrational state dependence of photoelectron angular distributions observed in chiral photoionization experiments is explored using a simple, yet realistic, theoretical model based upon the transiently chiral molecule H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The adiabatic approximation is used to separate vibrational and electronic wavefunctions. The full ionization matrix elements are obtained as an average of the electronic dipole matrix elements over the vibrational coordinate, weighted by the product of neutral and ion state vibrational wavefunctions. It is found that the parity of the vibrational Hermite polynomials influences not just the amplitude, but also the phase of the transition matrix elements, and the latter is sufficient, even in the absence of resonant enhancements, to account for enhanced vibrational dependencies in the chiral photoionization dynamics.

  15. Oxidation-resistant reflective surfaces for solar dynamic power generation in near earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, Daniel A.; Egger, Robert A.; Banholzer, William F.

    1987-01-01

    Reflective surfaces for Space Station power generation systems are required to withstand the atomic oxygen-dominated environment of near earth orbit. Thin films of platinum and rhodium, which are corrosion resistant reflective metals, have been deposited by ion beam sputter deposition onto various substrate materials. Solar reflectances were then measured as a function of time of exposure to a RF-generated air plasma.

  16. Transformation of the Strongly Hydrogen Bonded System into van der Waals one Reflected in Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, K.; Kamińska, E.; Grzybowska, K.; Włodarczyk, P.; Pawlus, S.; Paluch, M.; Zioło, J.; Rzoska, S. J.; Pilch, J.; Kasprzycka, A.; Szeja, W.

    Dielectric relaxation studies on disaccharides lactose and octa-O-acetyl-lactose are reported. The latter is a hydrogen bonded system while the former is a van der Waals glass former. The transformation between them was arranged by substituting hydrogen atoms in lactose by acetyl groups. Hereby the influence of differences in bounding on dynamics of both systems is discussed. We showed that the faster secondary relaxation (labeled γ) in octa-O-acetyl-lactose has much lower amplitude than that of lactose. The relaxation time and activation energy remain unchanged in comparison to the γ- relaxation of lactose. We did not observe the slow secondary relaxation (labeled β), clearly visible in lactose, in its acethyl derivative. Detailed analysis of the dielectric spectra measured for octa-O-acetyl-lactose in its glassy state (not standard change in the shape of the γ- peak with lowering temperature) enabled us to provide probable explanation of our finding. No credible comparative analysis of the α- relaxation process of the lactose and octa-O-acetyl-lactose are presented, because loss spectra of the former carbohydrate were affected by the huge contribution of the dc conductivity. Notwithstanding, one can expect that octa-O-acetyl-lactose has lower glass transition temperature and steepness index than lactose.

  17. Mcl-1 dynamics influence mitotic slippage and death in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Sloss, Olivia; Topham, Caroline; Diez, Maria; Taylor, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-binding drugs such as taxol are frontline treatments for a variety of cancers but exactly how they yield patient benefit is unclear. In cell culture, inhibiting microtubule dynamics prevents spindle assembly, leading to mitotic arrest followed by either apoptosis in mitosis or slippage, whereby a cell returns to interphase without dividing. Myeloid cell leukaemia-1 (Mcl-1), a pro-survival member of the Bcl-2 family central to the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, is degraded during a prolonged mitotic arrest and may therefore act as a mitotic death timer. Consistently, we show that blocking proteasome-mediated degradation inhibits taxol-induced mitotic apoptosis in a Mcl-1-dependent manner. However, this degradation does not require the activity of either APC/C-Cdc20, FBW7 or MULE, three separate E3 ubiquitin ligases implicated in targeting Mcl-1 for degradation. This therefore challenges the notion that Mcl-1 undergoes regulated degradation during mitosis. We also show that Mcl-1 is continuously synthesized during mitosis and that blocking protein synthesis accelerates taxol induced death-in-mitosis. Modulating Mcl-1 levels also influences slippage; overexpressing Mcl-1 extends the time from mitotic entry to mitotic exit in the presence of taxol, while inhibiting Mcl-1 accelerates it. We suggest that Mcl-1 competes with Cyclin B1 for binding to components of the proteolysis machinery, thereby slowing down the slow degradation of Cyclin B1 responsible for slippage. Thus, modulating Mcl-1 dynamics influences both death-in-mitosis and slippage. However, because mitotic degradation of Mcl-1 appears not to be under the control of an E3 ligase, we suggest that the notion of network crosstalk is used with caution. PMID:26769847

  18. Influence of unsteady aerodynamics on driving dynamics of passenger cars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huemer, Jakob; Stickel, Thomas; Sagan, Erich; Schwarz, Martin; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2014-11-01

    Recent approaches towards numerical investigations with computational fluid dynamics methods on unsteady aerodynamic loads of passenger cars identified major differences compared with steady-state aerodynamic excitations. Furthermore, innovative vehicle concepts such as electric-vehicles or hybrid drives further challenge the basic layout of passenger cars. Therefore, the relevance of unsteady aerodynamic loads on cross-wind stability of changing basic vehicle architectures should be analysed. In order to assure and improve handling and ride characteristics at high velocity of the actual range of vehicle layouts, the influence of unsteady excitations on the vehicle response was investigated. For this purpose, a simulation of the vehicle dynamics through multi-body simulation was used. The impact of certain unsteady aerodynamic load characteristics on the vehicle response was quantified and key factors were identified. Through a series of driving simulator tests, the identified differences in the vehicle response were evaluated regarding their significance on the subjective driver perception of cross-wind stability. Relevant criteria for the subjective driver assessment of the vehicle response were identified. As a consequence, a design method for the basic layout of passenger cars and chassis towards unsteady aerodynamic excitations was defined.

  19. Microphysical and Dynamical Influences on Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, J.; Baker, M.; Hegg, D.

    2005-03-18

    Cirrus cloud inhomogeneity occurs at scales greater than the cirrus radiative smoothing scale ({approx}100 m), but less than typical global climate model (GCM) resolutions ({approx}300 km). Therefore, calculating cirrus radiative impacts in GCMs requires an optical depth distribution parameterization. Radiative transfer calculations are sensitive to optical depth distribution assumptions (Fu et al. 2000; Carlin et al. 2002). Using raman lidar observations, we quantify cirrus timescales and optical depth distributions at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Lamont, OK (USA). We demonstrate the sensitivity of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) calculations to assumed optical depth distributions and to the temporal resolution of optical depth measurements. Recent work has highlighted the importance of dynamics and nucleation for cirrus evolution (Haag and Karcher 2004; Karcher and Strom 2003). We need to understand the main controls on cirrus optical depth distributions to incorporate cirrus variability into model radiative transfer calculations. With an explicit ice microphysics parcel model, we aim to understand the influence of ice nucleation mechanism and imposed dynamics on cirrus optical depth distributions.

  20. Influence of follicular dendritic cells on HIV dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Hlavacek, W S; Stilianakis, N I; Perelson, A S

    2000-01-01

    In patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), a large amount of virus is associated with follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) in lymphoid tissue. To assess the influence of FDCs on viral dynamics during antiretroviral therapy we have developed a mathematical model for treatment of HIV-1 infection that includes FDCs. Here, we use this model to analyse measurements of HIV-1 dynamics in the blood and lymphoid tissue of a representative patient, who was treated with a combination of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors. We show that loss of virus from FDCs during therapy can make a much larger contribution to plasma virus than production of virus by infected cells. This result challenges the notion that long-lived infected cells are a significant source of HIV-1 during drug therapy. Due to release of FDC-associated virus, we find that it is necessary to revise upward previous estimates of c, the rate at which free virus is cleared, and delta, the rate at which productively infected cells die. Furthermore, we find that potentially infectious virus, present before treatment, is released from FDCs during therapy and that the persistence of this virus can be affected by whether therapy includes reverse transcriptase inhibitors. PMID:11186306

  1. Deriving seasonal dynamics in ecosystem properties of semi-arid savannas using in situ based hyperspectral reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagesson, T.; Fensholt, R.; Huber, S.; Horion, S.; Guiro, I.; Ehammer, A.; Ardö, J.

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates how seasonal hyperspectral reflectance data (between 350 and 1800 nm) can be used to infer ecosystem properties for a semi-arid savanna ecosystem in West Africa using a unique in situ based dataset. Relationships between seasonal dynamics in hyperspectral reflectance, and ecosystem properties (biomass, gross primary productivity (GPP), light use efficiency (LUE), and fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation (FAPAR)) were analysed. Reflectance data (ρ) were used to study the relationship between normalised difference spectral indices (NDSI) and the measured ecosystem properties. Finally, also the effects of variable sun sensor viewing geometry on different NDSI wavelength combinations were analysed. The wavelengths with the strongest correlation to seasonal dynamics in ecosystem properties were shortwave infrared (biomass), the peak absorption band for chlorophyll a and b (at 682 nm) (GPP), the oxygen A-band at 761 nm used for estimating chlorophyll fluorescence (GPP, and LUE), and blue wavelengths (FAPAR). The NDSI with the strongest correlation to: (i) biomass combined red edge reflectance (ρ705) with green reflectance (ρ587), (ii) GPP combined wavelengths at the peak of green reflection (ρ518, ρ556), (iii) the LUE combined red (ρ688) with blue reflectance (ρ436), and (iv) FAPAR combined blue (ρ399) and near infrared (ρ1295) wavelengths. NDSI combining near infrared and shortwave infrared were strongly affected by solar zenith angles and sensor viewing geometry, as were many combinations of visible wavelengths. This study provides analyses based upon novel multi-angular hyperspectral data for validation of Earth Observation based properties of semi-arid ecosystems, as well as insights for designing spectral characteristics of future sensors for ecosystem monitoring.

  2. Monitoring ecosystem dynamics in an Arctic tundra ecosystem using hyperspectral reflectance and a robotic tram system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Santonu

    ) Is NDVI a good predictor for aboveground biomass and leaf area index (LAI) for plant species that are common in an arctic landscape? (4) How can cyberinfrastructure tools be developed to optimize ground-based remote sensing data collection, management and processing associated with a large scale experimental infrastructure? The Biocomplexity project experimentally manipulated the water table (drained, flooded, and control treatments) of a vegetated thaw lake basin to investigate the effects of altered hydrology on land-atmosphere carbon balance. In each experimental treatment, hyperspectral reflectance data were collected in the visible and near IR range of the spectrum using a robotic tram system that operated along a 300m tramline during the snow free growing period between June and August 2005-09. Water table depths (WTD) and soil volumetric water content were also collected along these transects. During 2005-2007, measurements were made without experimental treatments. Experimental treatments were run in 2008 and 2009, which involved water table being raised (+10cm) and lowered (-10cm) in flooding and draining treatments respectively. A new spectral index, the normalized difference surface water index (NDSWI) was developed and tested at multiple spatial and temporal scales. NDSWI uses the 460nm (blue) and 1000nm (IR) bands and was to capture surface hydrological dynamics in the study area using the robotic tram system. When applied to high spatial resolution satellite imagery, NDSWI was also able to capture changes in surface hydrology at the landscape scale. Interannual patterns of land-surface phenology (measured with the normalized difference vegetation index - NDVI) unexpectedly lacked marked differences under experimental conditions. Measurement of NDVI was, however, compromised when WTD was above ground level. NDVI and NDSWI were negatively correlated when WTD was above ground level, which held when scaled to MODIS imagery collected from satellite

  3. INFLUENCE OF INJURY ON DYNAMIC POSTURAL CONTROL IN RUNNERS

    PubMed Central

    Klusendorf, Anna; Kernozek, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Injury has been linked with altered postural control in active populations. The association between running injury and dynamic postural control has not been examined. Hypothesis/Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine dynamic postural control in injured and uninjured runners using the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), Time to Stabilization (TTS) of ground reaction forces following a single-leg landing, and postural stability indices reflecting the fluctuations in GRFs during single-leg landing and stabilization tasks (forward and lateral hop). It was hypothesized that dynamic postural control differences would exist between runners with a history of injury that interrupted training for ≥7 days (INJ) when compared to runners without injury (CON). Design Case-control study Methods Twenty-two INJ (14 F, 8 M; 23.7 ± 2.1 y; 22.3 ± 2.8 kg/m2; 29.5 ± 16.3 mi/wk) currently running > 50% pre-injury mileage without pain were compared with twenty-two matched CON (14F, 8M; 22.7 ± 1.2 y; 22.7 ± 2.7 kg/m2; 31.2 ± 19.6 mi/wk). INJ group was stratified by site of injury into two groups (Hip/Thigh/Knee and Lower Leg/Ankle/Foot) for secondary analysis. Leg length-normalized anterior, posterolateral, and posteromedial reach distances on the SEBT, medial/lateral and anterior/posterior ground reaction force TTS, directional postural stability indices, and a composite dynamic postural stability index (DPSI), were assessed using mixed model ANOVA (α=0.05) and effect sizes (d). Results No group X direction interaction or group differences were observed for the SEBT (p=0.51, 0.71) or TTS (p=0.83, 0.72) measures. A group X direction interaction was found for postural stability indices during the forward landing task (p<0.01). Both Hip/Thigh/Knee and Lower leg/Ankle/Foot INJ groups demonstrated a greater vertical postural stability index (VPSI) (p=0.01 for both, d=0.80, 0.95) and DPSI (p=0.01, 0.02, d=0.75, 0.93) when

  4. Fluoropolymer Microstructure and Dynamics: Influence of Molecular Orientation Induced by Uniaxial Drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Daniel; Yin, Chaoqing; Runt, James

    Fluorinated semi-crystalline polymer films are attractive for dielectric film applications due to their chemical inertness, heat resistance, and high thermal stability. In the present investigation we explore the influence of orientation induced by uniaxial drawing on the crystalline microstructure and relaxation processes of poly(ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene) (ETFE), in order to ascertain how morphological control can benefit polymer dielectric design. When drawn below or near the Tg, the crystallinity of the drawn films is unchanged, and oriented amorphous structures and crystalline microfibrils form at high draw ratios. This orientation slows segmental relaxation, reflected by an increase in the dynamic Tg, and also delays the transition to the high temperature crystalline form of ETFE. When drawing above the Tg, the films undergo strain-induced crystallization at high draw ratios. For these films an increase in the dynamic Tg is also observed, in addition to a second segmental relaxation process, appearing as a shoulder on the primary process. We propose that this represents a contribution from a rigid amorphous fraction, having slowed chain dynamics. Supported by Office of Naval Research.

  5. Aortic Wave Dynamics and Its Influence on Left Ventricular Workload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2010-11-01

    Clinical and epidemiologic studies have shown that hypertension plays a key role in development of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and ultimately heart failure mostly due to increased LV workload. Therefore, it is crucial to diagnose and treat abnormal high LV workload at early stages. The pumping mechanism of the heart is pulsatile, thus it sends pressure and flow wave into the compliant aorta. The wave dynamics in the aorta is dominated by interplay of heart rate (HR), aortic rigidity, and location of reflection sites. We hypothesized that for a fixed cardiac output (CO) and peripheral resistance (PR), interplay of HR and aortic compliance can create conditions that minimize LV power requirement. We used a computational approach to test our hypothesis. Finite element method with direct coupling method of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) was used. Blood was assumed to be incompressible Newtonian fluid and aortic wall was considered elastic isotropic. Simulations were performed for various heart rates and aortic rigidities while inflow wave, CO, and PR were kept constant. For any aortic compliance, LV power requirement becomes minimal at a specific heart rate. The minimum shifts to higher heart rates as aortic rigidity increases.

  6. Determination of the dynamic stress intensity factors for 7075-T6 aluminum alloy using the reflected caustic method

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukagoshi, Seiji; Takahashi, Susumu; Shimamoto, Akira

    1996-12-31

    Dynamic fracture initiation and propagation in Al 7075-T6 was investigated experimentally using the optical method of reflected caustics combined with a simplified high speed photography. A crack propagation testing configuration consisting of a three point bending specimen loaded In a drop weighting was used. It was found that prior to crack initiation the stress intensity factor time record calculated using the dynamic impact load and a static formula disagrees with the actual stress Intensity factor measured by caustics. The impact fracture tests are performed. With use of Al 7075-T6 band plate test specimens with a V-notch on their one side. The dynamic stress intensity factor K{sub id} are given. With this, the authors experimentally calculated the dynamic fracture toughness K{sub ID}.

  7. Study of the reflectivity of neutron supermirrors influenced by surface oil layers.

    PubMed

    Veres, Tamás; Cser, László

    2010-06-01

    Neutron guides made of supermirror-coated glass are important components of most neutron scattering instruments, thus their quality and possible deterioration due to various deleterious effects (e.g., surface contamination or defects) deserve careful examination. The modification of the reflectivity of supermirrors and the transmission of neutron guides due to surface contamination with hydrocarbon oil has been investigated using neutron reflectometry together with model calculations. A significant loss in the neutron reflectivity was observed for supermirrors covered with thin hydrocarbon oil films, which were confirmed in model calculations. Simulations carried out for several typical arrangements show drastic decreases in the transmitted neutron flux of neutron guides. These simulations show that determining the distortion of the beam profile (using a slit or a pin hole) enables the detection of oil contamination even in an operating neutron guide. PMID:20590233

  8. Systematic spectral analysis of GX 339-4: Influence of Galactic background and reflection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavel, M.; Rodriguez, J.; Corbel, S.; Coriat, M.

    2016-05-01

    Black hole X-ray binaries display large outbursts, during which their properties are strongly variable. We develop a systematic spectral analysis of the 3-40 keV {RXTE}/PCA data in order to study the evolution of these systems and apply it to GX 339-4. Using the low count rate observations, we provide a precise model of the Galactic background at GX 339-4's location and discuss its possible impact on the source spectral parameters. At higher fluxes, the use of a Gaussian line to model the reflection component can lead to the detection of a high-temperature disk, in particular in the high-hard state. We demonstrate that this component is an artifact arising from an incomplete modeling of the reflection spectrum.

  9. Influence of Si doping on the infrared reflectance characteristics of GaN grown on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y. T.; Feng, Z. C.; Chua, S. J.; Li, M. F.; Akutsu, N.; Matsumoto, K.

    1999-11-01

    Si-doped GaN films grown on sapphire are investigated by infrared reflectance. A damping behavior of the interference fringes is observed, and interpreted to be due to the presence of an interface layer between the film and the substrate. A theoretical calculation using a two-layer model to take into account the interface layer resulted in this damping in agreement with the experiment. The damping behavior and an improvement of interface properties by Si incorporation are demonstrated.

  10. Dynamic balancing of isoprene carbon sources reflects photosynthetic and photorespiratory responses to temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Jardine, Kolby; Chambers, Jeffrey; Alves, Eliane G; Teixeira, Andrea; Garcia, Sabrina; Holm, Jennifer; Higuchi, Niro; Manzi, Antonio; Abrell, Leif; Fuentes, Jose D; Nielsen, Lars K; Torn, Margaret S; Vickers, Claudia E

    2014-12-01

    The volatile gas isoprene is emitted in teragrams per annum quantities from the terrestrial biosphere and exerts a large effect on atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene is made primarily from recently fixed photosynthate; however, alternate carbon sources play an important role, particularly when photosynthate is limiting. We examined the relative contribution of these alternate carbon sources under changes in light and temperature, the two environmental conditions that have the strongest influence over isoprene emission. Using a novel real-time analytical approach that allowed us to examine dynamic changes in carbon sources, we observed that relative contributions do not change as a function of light intensity. We found that the classical uncoupling of isoprene emission from net photosynthesis at elevated leaf temperatures is associated with an increased contribution of alternate carbon. We also observed a rapid compensatory response where alternate carbon sources compensated for transient decreases in recently fixed carbon during thermal ramping, thereby maintaining overall increases in isoprene production rates at high temperatures. Photorespiration is known to contribute to the decline in net photosynthesis at high leaf temperatures. A reduction in the temperature at which the contribution of alternate carbon sources increased was observed under photorespiratory conditions, while photosynthetic conditions increased this temperature. Feeding [2-(13)C]glycine (a photorespiratory intermediate) stimulated emissions of [(13)C1-5]isoprene and (13)CO2, supporting the possibility that photorespiration can provide an alternate source of carbon for isoprene synthesis. Our observations have important implications for establishing improved mechanistic predictions of isoprene emissions and primary carbon metabolism, particularly under the predicted increases in future global temperatures. PMID:25318937

  11. Reflective and impulsive influences on unhealthy snacking. The moderating effects of food related self-control.

    PubMed

    Honkanen, Pirjo; Olsen, Svein Ottar; Verplanken, Bas; Tuu, Ho Huy

    2012-04-01

    This study proposes that snacking behaviour may be either reflective and deliberate or impulsive, thus following a dual-process account. We hypothesised that chronic individual differences in food related self-control would moderate the relationships between reflective and impulsive processes. The reflective route was represented by an attitude toward unhealthy snacking, while the impulsive route was represented by the tendency to buy snack on impulse. A web survey was conducted with 207 students and employees at a Norwegian university, and a moderated hierarchical regression analysis using structural equation modelling was used to estimate the theoretical model. The findings showed that both attitudes towards unhealthy snacking and impulsive snack buying tendency were positively related to snack consumption. Food related self-control moderated the relation between attitude and behaviour, as well as the relation between impulsive snack buying tendency and behaviour. The effect of attitude on consumption was relatively strong when food related self-control was strong, while the effect of impulsive snack buying on consumption was relatively strong when food related self-control was weak. The results thus suggest that while weak self-control exposes individuals vulnerable to impulsive tendencies, strong self-control does not necessarily lead to less unhealthy snacking, but this depends on the valence of an individual's attitude. PMID:22138115

  12. Influence of Subpixel Scale Cloud Top Structure on Reflectances from Overcast Stratiform Cloud Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Varnai, Tamas; Winker, David M.

    1998-01-01

    Recent observational studies have shown that satellite retrievals of cloud optical depth based on plane-parallel model theory suffer from systematic biases that depend on viewing geometry, even when observations are restricted to overcast marine stratus layers, arguably the closest to plane parallel in nature. At moderate to low sun elevations, the plane-parallel model significantly overestimates the reflectance dependence on view angle in the forward-scattering direction but shows a similar dependence in the backscattering direction. Theoretical simulations are performed that show that the likely cause for this discrepancy is because the plane-parallel model assumption does not account for subpixel, scale variations in cloud-top height (i.e., "cloud bumps"). Monte Carlo simulation, comparing ID model radiances to radiances from overcast cloud field with 1) cloud-top height variation, but constant cloud volume extinction; 2) flat tops but horizontal variations in cloud volume extinction; and 3) variations in both cloud top height and cloud extinction are performed over a approximately equal to 4 km x 4 km domain (roughly the size of an individual GAC AVHRR pixel). The comparisons show that when cloud-top height variations are included, departures from 1D theory are remarkably similar (qualitatively) to those obtained observationally. In contrast, when clouds are assumed flat and only cloud extinction is variable, reflectance differences are much smaller and do not show any view-angle dependence. When both cloud-top height and cloud extinction variations are included, however, large increases in cloud extinction variability can enhance reflectance difference. The reason 3D-1D reflectance differences are more sensitive to cloud-top height variations in the forward-scattering direction (at moderate to low, sun elevations) is because photons leaving the cloud field in that direction experience fewer scattering events (low-order scattering) and are restricted to the

  13. The Influence of Repeated Teaching and Reflection on Preservice Teachers' Views of Inquiry and Nature of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotter, Christine; Singer, Jonathan; Godley, Jenice

    2009-12-01

    This study describes the influence of a secondary science methods program on secondary science preservice teachers’ views and enactment of nature of science and inquiry-based instructional practices. Built into the structure of this program were three cycles of practice teaching and reflection in which the preservice teachers focused on key pedagogical ideas in classroom settings with middle and high school students. The nine secondary preservice teachers improved both their understanding and enactment of inquiry and nature of science throughout the program period. This study provides evidence of the importance of incorporating multiple low-stakes practicum experiences that are closely tied to methods course goals that are highly scaffolded through both methods instructor and cooperating teacher support and tied to analytic self-reflection.

  14. Influence of plasma composition on reflectance anisotropy spectra for in situ III-V semiconductor dry-etch monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzen, Lars; Kleinschmidt, Ann-Kathrin; Strassner, Johannes; Doering, Christoph; Fouckhardt, Henning; Bock, Wolfgang; Wahl, Michael; Kopnarski, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) can be used to monitor (reactive) ion etching (RIE) of semiconductor samples. We present results on the influence of the Cl2 content of the plasma gas on the RAS spectra during reactive ion etching. In a first step GaAs samples have been used and the RAS spectra are compared to results of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) on sample surfaces and depth profiles. In a second step a III-V semiconductor multilayer system has been investigated using the time-evolution of the average reflected intensity as an indication for the etch rate. In both cases usually even a high amount of Cl2 does not disturb the surface-sensitivity of the RAS signal.

  15. Study of the influence of glucose on diffuse reflection of ultrashort laser pulses from a medium simulating a biological tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, A V; Indukaev, A K; Priezzhev, A V; Myllylae, R

    2008-05-31

    The influence of glucose on the diffuse reflection of near-IR femtosecond laser radiation from single- and three-layer media simulating biological tissues is studied experimentally. Based on a 800-nm femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser emitting 40-fs pulses and a VUV Agat streak camera, a setup is built for time and spatially resolved detection of radiation diffusely reflected from the volume of a strongly scattering medium. A multichannel fibreoptic system is developed for detecting pulses simultaneously at several fixed distances between a radiation source and detector. It is shown that the peak intensity and total energy of detected pulses are sensitive to variations in the glucose concentration in the medium under study from 0 to 1000 mg dL{sup -1}. The relative sensitivity in our experiments achieved 0.030% mg dL{sup -1}. (biophotonics)

  16. Oxidation-resistant reflective surfaces for solar dynamic power generation in near Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, D. A.; Mgf2, Sio2, Al2o3, and si3n4, we

    1986-01-01

    Reflective surfaces for space station power generation systems are required to withstand the atomic oxygen-dominated environment of near Earth orbit. Thin films of platinum and rhodium, which are corrosion resistant reflective metals, have been deposited by ion beam sputter deposition onto various substrate materials. Solar reflectances were then measured as a function of time of exposure to a RF-generated air plasma. Similarly, various protective coating materials, including MgF2, SiO2, Al2O3, and Si3N4, were deposited onto silver-coated substrates and then exposed to the plasma. Analysis of the films both before and after exposure by both ESCA and Auger spectroscopy was also performed. The results indicate that Pt and Rh do not suffer any loss in reflectance over the duration of the tests. Also, each of the coating materials survived the plasma environment. The ESCA and Auger analyses are discussed as well.

  17. Social influences in opinion dynamics: The role of conformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javarone, Marco Alberto

    2014-11-01

    We study the effects of social influences in opinion dynamics. In particular, we define a simple model, based on the majority rule voting, in order to consider the role of conformity. Conformity is a central issue in social psychology as it represents one of people’s behaviors that emerges as a result of their interactions. The proposed model represents agents, arranged in a network and provided with an individual behavior, that change opinion in function of those of their neighbors. In particular, agents can behave as conformists or as nonconformists. In the former case, agents change opinion in accordance with the majority of their social circle (i.e., their neighbors); in the latter case, they do the opposite, i.e., they take the minority opinion. Moreover, we investigate the nonconformity both on a global and on a local perspective, i.e., in relation to the whole population and to the social circle of each nonconformist agent, respectively. We perform a computational study of the proposed model, with the aim to observe if and how the conformity affects the related outcomes. Moreover, we want to investigate whether it is possible to achieve some kind of equilibrium, or of order, during the evolution of the system. Results highlight that the amount of nonconformist agents in the population plays a central role in these dynamics. In particular, conformist agents play the role of stabilizers in fully-connected networks, whereas the opposite happens in complex networks. Furthermore, by analyzing complex topologies of the agent network, we found that in the presence of radical nonconformist agents the topology of the system has a prominent role; otherwise it does not matter since we observed that a conformist behavior is almost always more convenient. Finally, we analyze the results of the model by considering that agents can change also their behavior over time, i.e., conformists can become nonconformists and vice versa.

  18. In vitro dynamic solubility test: influence of various parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Thélohan, S; de Meringo, A

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses the dissolution of mineral fibers in simulated physiological fluids (SPF), and the parameters that affect the solubility measurement in a dynamic test where an SPF runs through a cell containing fibers (Scholze and Conradt test). Solutions simulate either the extracellular fluid (pH 7.6) or the intracellular fluid (pH 4.5). The fibers have various chemical compositions and are either continuously drawn or processed as wool. The fiber solubility is determined by the amount of SiO2 (and occasionally other ions) released in the solution. Results are stated as percentage of the initial silica content released or as dissolution rate v in nm/day. The reproducibility of the test is higher with the less soluble fibers (10% solubility), than with highly soluble fibers (20% solubility). The influence of test parameters, including SPF, test duration, and surface area/volume (SA/V), has been studied. The pH and the inorganic buffer salts have a major influence: industrial glasswool composition is soluble at pH 7.6 but not at pH 4.5. The opposite is true for rock- (basalt) wool composition. For slightly soluble fibers, the dissolution rate v remains constant with time, whereas for highly soluble fibers, the dissolution rate decreases rapidly. The dissolution rates believed to occur are v1, initial dissolution rate, and v2, dissolution rate of the residual fibers. The SA of fibers varies with the mass of the fibers tested, or with the fiber diameter at equal mass. Volume, V, is the chosen flow rate. An increase in the SA/V ratio leads to a decrease in the dissolution rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7882964

  19. Reflectance measurements of port-wine stains: influence of selective cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norvang Nilsen, Lill T.; Fiskerstrand, Elisanne J.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    1996-12-01

    Port wine stain birthmark removal is based on selective photothermolysis. The most common technique utilizes 0.45 ms laser pulses at 585 nm wavelength. High incident energy doses are often needed to reach the ectatic blood vessels in dermis. This might induce changes in pigmentation or even epidermal necrosis. However, the epidermis can be protected by selectively cooling it down prior to laser exposure. Short cooling pulses ensure epidermal protection while preserving the temperature in dermis. Visible reflectance spectra of the birthmark are dependent on the melanin content, the blood volume and the scattering properties. these parameters also determine the fluence underneath the skin during laser exposure. Threshold fluence values can therefore be predicted for each specific lesion. Eight Scandinavian patients with red to purple macular port wine stains were treated with a pulsed dye laser at the energy density 6 J/cm2. Seven patients have developed hyperpigmentation in earlier treatments at this energy dose. One site in each lesion was cooled with a 20 ms cryogen spray immediately prior to laser exposure. Visible reflectance spectra were measured before and eight weeks after treatment. A simulation model based on diffusion approximation was used to estimate blood volume, skin pigmentation and scattering properties each time. The measured reflectance spectra, as well as the clinical observations, showed no significant differences between the cooled and uncooled sites. Estimated blood volume fractions and melanin pigmentations were about the same, and the short cooling spurts did not prevent hyperpigmentation. A light brown color was seen in both sites for 7 patients, and could be detected in the spectra for two patients. However, the estimated increases in pigmentation were small also for these patients. Calculated threshold fluence values were almost the same for cooled and uncooled sites after treatment.

  20. Dynamic shear-influenced collagen self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Saeidi, Nima; Sander, Edward A; Ruberti, Jeffrey W

    2009-12-01

    The ability to influence the direction of polymerization of a self-assembling biomolecular system has the potential to generate materials with extremely high anisotropy. In biological systems where highly-oriented cellular populations give rise to aligned and often load-bearing tissue such organized molecular scaffolds could aid in the contact guidance of cells for engineered tissue constructs (e.g. cornea and tendon). In this investigation we examine the detailed dynamics of pepsin-extracted type I bovine collagen assembly on a glass surface under the influence of flow between two plates. Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) imaging (60x-1.4NA) with focal plane stabilization was used to resolve and track the growth of collagen aggregates on borosilicate glass for 4 different shear rates (500, 80, 20, and 9s(-1)). The detailed morphology of the collagen fibrils/aggregates was examined using Quick Freeze Deep Etch (QFDE) electron microscopy. Nucleation of fibrils on the glass was observed to occur rapidly (approximately 2 min) followed by continued growth of the fibrils. The growth rates were dependent on flow in a complex manner with the highest rate of axial growth (0.1 micro/s) occurring at a shear rate of 9s(-1). The lowest growth rate occurred at the highest shear. Fibrils were observed to both branch and join during the experiments. The best alignment of fibrils was observed at intermediate shear rates of 20 and 80s(-1). However, the investigation revealed that fibril directional growth was not stable. At high shear rates, fibrils would often turn downstream forming what we term "hooks" which are likely the combined result of monomer interaction with the initial collagen layer or "mat" and the high shear rate. Further, QFDE examination of fibril morphology demonstrated that the assembled fibrillar structure did not possess native D-periodicity. Instead, fibrils comprised a collection of generally aligned, monomers which were self-assembled to form a fibril

  1. Influence of impeller shroud forces on turbopump rotor dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Jim P.; Childs, Dara W.

    1989-01-01

    The shrouded-impeller leakage path forces calculated by Childs (1987) have been analyzed to answer two questions. First, because of certain characteristics of the results of Childs, the forces could not be modeled with traditional approaches. Therefore, an approach has been devised to include the forces in conventional rotordynamic analyses. The forces were approximated by traditional stiffness, damping and inertia coefficients with the addition of whirl-frequency-dependent direct and cross-coupled stiffness terms. The forces were found to be well-modeled with this approach. Finally, the effect these forces had on a simple rotor-bearing system was analyzed, and, therefore, they, in addition to seal forces, were applied to a Jeffcott rotor. The traditional methods of dynamic system analysis were modified to incorporate the impeller forces and yielded results for the eigenproblem, frequency response, critical speed, transient response and an iterative technique for finding the frequency of free vibration as well as system stability. All results lead to the conclusion that the forces have little influence on natural frequency but can have appreciable effects on system stability. Specifically, at higher values of fluid swirl at the leakage path entrance, relative stability is reduced. The only unexpected response characteristics that occurred are attributed to the nonlinearity of the model.

  2. Influence of impeller shroud forces on turbopump rotor dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. P.; Childs, Dara W.

    1993-01-01

    The shrouded-impeller leakage path forces calculated by Childs have been analyzed to answer two questions. First, because of certain characteristics or the results of Childs, the forces could not be modeled with traditional approaches. Therefore, an approach has been devised to include the forces in conventional rotordynamic analyses. The forces were found to be well-modeled with this approach. Finally, the effect these forces had on a simple rotor-bearing system was analyzed, and, therefore, they, in addition to seal forces, were applied to a Jeffcott rotor. The traditional methods of dynamic system analysis were modified to incorporate the impeller forces and yielded results for the eigenproblem, frequency response, critical speed, transient response, and an iterative technique for finding the frequency of free vibration as well as system stability. All results lead to the conclusion that the forces have little influence on natural frequency but can have appreciable effects on system stability. Specifically, at higher values of fluid swirl at the leakage path entrance, relative stability is reduced. The only unexpected response characteristics that occurred are attributed to the nonlinearity of the model.

  3. Model for Vortex Ring State Influence on Rotorcraft Flight Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    The influence of vortex ring state (VRS) on rotorcraft flight dynamics is investigated, specifically the vertical velocity drop of helicopters and the roll-off of tiltrotors encountering VRS. The available wind tunnel and flight test data for rotors in vortex ring state are reviewed. Test data for axial flow, non-axial flow, two rotors, unsteadiness, and vortex ring state boundaries are described and discussed. Based on the available measured data, a VRS model is developed. The VRS model is a parametric extension of momentum theory for calculation of the mean inflow of a rotor, hence suitable for simple calculations and real-time simulations. This inflow model is primarily defined in terms of the stability boundary of the aircraft motion. Calculations of helicopter response during VRS encounter were performed, and good correlation is shown with the vertical velocity drop measured in flight tests. Calculations of tiltrotor response during VRS encounter were performed, showing the roll-off behavior characteristic of tiltrotors. Hence it is possible, using a model of the mean inflow of an isolated rotor, to explain the basic behavior of both helicopters and tiltrotors in vortex ring state.

  4. Model for Vortex Ring State Influence on Rotorcraft Flight Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    The influence of vortex ring state (VRS) on rotorcraft flight dynamics is investigated, specifically the vertical velocity drop of helicopters and the roll-off of tiltrotors encountering VRS. The available wind tunnel and flight test data for rotors in vortex ring state are reviewed. Test data for axial flow, nonaxial flow, two rotors, unsteadiness, and vortex ring state boundaries are described and discussed. Based on the available measured data, a VRS model is developed. The VRS model is a parametric extension of momentum theory for calculation of the mean inflow of a rotor, hence suitable for simple calculations and real-time simulations. This inflow model is primarily defined in terms of the stability boundary of the aircraft motion. Calculations of helicopter response during VRS encounter were performed, and good correlation is shown with the vertical velocity drop measured in flight tests. Calculations of tiltrotor response during VRS encounter were performed, showing the roll-off behavior characteristic of tiltrotors. Hence it is possible, using a model of the mean inflow of an isolated rotor, to explain the basic behavior of both helicopters and tiltrotors in vortex ring state.

  5. The Influence of AAC Device Type, Dynamic vs. Static Screen, on Peer Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudek, Karen; Beck, Ann R.; Thompson, James R.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined how children's attitudes toward a peer who used augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) were influenced by type of AAC device accessed by the child for communication. Specifically, the influence of dynamic screens vs. static screens was investigated. Two videotapes were created. In one a child used a dynamic screen…

  6. Modification of the surface state of rough substrates by two different varnishes and influence on the reflected light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Mady; René de la Rie, E.; Delaney, John K.; Charron, Eric; Morales, Kathryn M.

    2006-10-01

    Modification of the visual appearance when a rough surface is covered by a varnish is mostly attributed to the levelling of the substrate surface, which depends on the molecular weight of the varnish. The topography of varnished surfaces, however, has never been measured directly. Surfaces of varnishes applied over glass substrates of varying roughness were studied, therefore, using mechanical profilometry. Two different varnishes made with a low and a high molecular weight resin were studied. Both varnishes lower the r.m.s. roughness of the substrates and filter the high spatial frequencies. These results are amplified for the varnish containing the low molecular weight resin. The light reflected by the varnished samples is modelled from these topographical data. Its angular distribution, calculated from the probability density of slopes is presented, taking into account separately the air/varnish and the varnish/substrate interfaces. These analyses are presented in a back-scattering configuration. They show that varnishing significantly reduces the angular width of the reflected light and that this effect is magnified for the low molecular weight resin. Modelling furthermore shows that the influence of the roughness of the varnish/substrate interface is negligible in the total reflected light.

  7. Variation in normal mood state influences sensitivity to dynamic changes in emotional expression.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Margaret C; Arlegui-Prieto, Maritxu

    2016-03-01

    Normal social functioning depends on the ability to efficiently and accurately detect when someone's facial expression changes to convey positive or negative emotion. While observer mood state has been shown to influence emotion recognition, how variations in normal mood might influence sensitivity to the dynamic emergence of expressions has not yet been addressed. To investigate this, we modified an existing face-morphing paradigm in which a central face gradually changes from neutral to expressive (angry, sad, happy, surprised). Our sample comprised healthy young adults, and current mood state was measured using the PANAS-X. Participants pressed a key as soon as they (1) noticed a physical change in expression (perceptual sensitivity-novel task element), and (2) could clearly conceptualize which expression was emerging (conceptual sensitivity). A final unspeeded response required participants to explicitly label the expression as a measure of recognition accuracy. We measured the percentage morph (expression intensity) at which a perceptual and conceptual change was detected, where greater intensity equates to poorer sensitivity. Increased positive mood reduced perceptual and conceptual sensitivity to angry and sad expressions only (a mood incongruency effect). Of particular interest, increased negative mood decreased conceptual sensitivity for all expressions, but had limited impact on perceptual sensitivity. Thus, heightened negative mood is particularly detrimental for effectively decoding someone else's mood change. This may reflect greater introspection and consumption of attentional resources directed toward the negative self, leaving fewer resources to process emotional signals conveyed by others. This could have important consequences for human social interaction. PMID:26479773

  8. Rethinking the Christian Studies Classroom: Reflections on the Dynamics of Teaching Religion in Southern Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravett, Sandie; Hulsether, Mark; Medine, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    An extended set of conversations conducted by three religious studies faculty teaching at large public universities in the Southern United States spurred these reflections on how their institutional locations inflected issues such as the cultural expectations students bring to the classroom, how these expectations interact with the evolving…

  9. Dynamic Tensions: Early Reflections from MDRC's Evaluation of the Innovative Professional Development Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MDRC, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In the Innovative Professional Development (iPD) Challenge, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has invested in helping school districts and networks redesign their instructional support systems to better support educators in increasing student success. This Issue Focus, the second in a series, presents early reflections from MDRC's evaluation…

  10. Analysis of the influence of tool dynamics in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, S.C.; Luttrell, D.E.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the progress in defining the role of machine and interface dynamics on the surface finish in diamond turning. It contains a review of literature from conventional and diamond machining processes relating tool dynamics, material interactions and tool wear to surface finish. Data from experimental measurements of tool/work piece interface dynamics are presented as well as machine dynamics for the DTM at the Center.

  11. The Influence of Information Acquisition on the Complex Dynamics of Market Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhanbing; Ma, Junhai

    In this paper, we build a dynamical game model with three bounded rational players (firms) to study the influence of information on the complex dynamics of market competition, where useful information is about rival’s real decision. In this dynamical game model, one information-sharing team is composed of two firms, they acquire and share the information about their common competitor, however, they make their own decisions separately, where the amount of information acquired by this information-sharing team will determine the estimation accuracy about the rival’s real decision. Based on this dynamical game model and some creative 3D diagrams, the influence of the amount of information on the complex dynamics of market competition such as local dynamics, global dynamics and profits is studied. These results have significant theoretical and practical values to realize the influence of information.

  12. Influences to System and Superiority of Model Parameters in Dynamic Setting AGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, LI; Hao-yu, Zhang; Jin, Zhang; Jian-fei, Guo; Cui-hong, Liu; Ping-wen, Cheng

    Dynamic setting AGC is based on the improvement of the BISRA-AGC model. Based on the control algorithms and control models of dynamic setting AGC, the influences of the model parameters to system performance were analyzed using the GUI in MATLAB. At the same time, the superiority and limitation of the dynamic setting AGC were analyzed.

  13. Daily MODIS 500 m Reflectance Anisotropy Direct Broadcast (DB) Products for Monitoring Vegetation Phenology Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuai, Yanmin; Schaaf, Crystal; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Strahler, Alan; Roy, David; Morisette, Jeffrey; Wang, Zhuosen; Nightingale, Joanne; Nickeson, Jaime; Richardson, Andrew D.; Xie, Donghui; Wang, Jindi; Li, Xiaowen; Strabala, Kathleen; Davies, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Land surface vegetation phenology is an efficient bio-indicator for monitoring ecosystem variation in response to changes in climatic factors. The primary objective of the current article is to examine the utility of the daily MODIS 500 m reflectance anisotropy direct broadcast (DB) product for monitoring the evolution of vegetation phenological trends over selected crop, orchard, and forest regions. Although numerous model-fitted satellite data have been widely used to assess the spatio-temporal distribution of land surface phenological patterns to understand phenological process and phenomena, current efforts to investigate the details of phenological trends, especially for natural phenological variations that occur on short time scales, are less well served by remote sensing challenges and lack of anisotropy correction in satellite data sources. The daily MODIS 500 m reflectance anisotropy product is employed to retrieve daily vegetation indices (VI) of a 1 year period for an almond orchard in California and for a winter wheat field in northeast China, as well as a 2 year period for a deciduous forest region in New Hampshire, USA. Compared with the ground records from these regions, the VI trajectories derived from the cloud-free and atmospherically corrected MODIS Nadir BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) adjusted reflectance (NBAR) capture not only the detailed footprint and principal attributes of the phenological events (such as flowering and blooming) but also the substantial inter-annual variability. This study demonstrates the utility of the daily 500 m MODIS reflectance anisotropy DB product to provide daily VI for monitoring and detecting changes of the natural vegetation phenology as exemplified by study regions comprising winter wheat, almond trees, and deciduous forest.

  14. The influence of micronutrients in cell culture: a reflection on viability and genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Arigony, Ana Lúcia Vargas; de Oliveira, Iuri Marques; Machado, Miriana; Bordin, Diana Lilian; Bergter, Lothar; Prá, Daniel; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas

    2013-01-01

    Micronutrients, including minerals and vitamins, are indispensable to DNA metabolic pathways and thus are as important for life as macronutrients. Without the proper nutrients, genomic instability compromises homeostasis, leading to chronic diseases and certain types of cancer. Cell-culture media try to mimic the in vivo environment, providing in vitro models used to infer cells' responses to different stimuli. This review summarizes and discusses studies of cell-culture supplementation with micronutrients that can increase cell viability and genomic stability, with a particular focus on previous in vitro experiments. In these studies, the cell-culture media include certain vitamins and minerals at concentrations not equal to the physiological levels. In many common culture media, the sole source of micronutrients is fetal bovine serum (FBS), which contributes to only 5-10% of the media composition. Minimal attention has been dedicated to FBS composition, micronutrients in cell cultures as a whole, or the influence of micronutrients on the viability and genetics of cultured cells. Further studies better evaluating micronutrients' roles at a molecular level and influence on the genomic stability of cells are still needed. PMID:23781504

  15. The Influence of Micronutrients in Cell Culture: A Reflection on Viability and Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Arigony, Ana Lúcia Vargas; de Oliveira, Iuri Marques; Bordin, Diana Lilian; Prá, Daniel; Pêgas Henriques, João Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Micronutrients, including minerals and vitamins, are indispensable to DNA metabolic pathways and thus are as important for life as macronutrients. Without the proper nutrients, genomic instability compromises homeostasis, leading to chronic diseases and certain types of cancer. Cell-culture media try to mimic the in vivo environment, providing in vitro models used to infer cells' responses to different stimuli. This review summarizes and discusses studies of cell-culture supplementation with micronutrients that can increase cell viability and genomic stability, with a particular focus on previous in vitro experiments. In these studies, the cell-culture media include certain vitamins and minerals at concentrations not equal to the physiological levels. In many common culture media, the sole source of micronutrients is fetal bovine serum (FBS), which contributes to only 5–10% of the media composition. Minimal attention has been dedicated to FBS composition, micronutrients in cell cultures as a whole, or the influence of micronutrients on the viability and genetics of cultured cells. Further studies better evaluating micronutrients' roles at a molecular level and influence on the genomic stability of cells are still needed. PMID:23781504

  16. Topographic Influence and Atmospheric Dynamics in the Indian Wells Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uher, Erich J.

    Indian Wells Valley (IWV) is home to the China Lake Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) whose operations necessitate regional forecasting and weather analysis relevant to aviation and plume release scenarios. In order to better understand the terrain influenced mesoscale circulations in the varied complex terrain of Indian Wells Valley surrounding Ridgecrest, four seasonal WRF simulations were analyzed using linear shallow water theory and nonlinear theory for flows over two-dimensional mountains. The goal is to better understand the relationships between atmospheric dynamical processes and the wind/thermal structure of the mesoscale at Indian Wells Valley. This will involve exploring relationships linking theoretical meteorology in complex terrain and advanced high resolution atmospheric modeling in this region. The WRF simulation results show several distinct circulations which rely on the interaction between complex terrain and the background weather conditions: 1) In calm synoptic conditions, diurnal processes guide the evolution of boundary layer stability and slope flows. 2) In periods of greatest seasonal surface heating (i.e. summer), the pressure gradient across the Sierra Nevada drives near surface westerlies across IWV. 3) In conditions with strong synoptic scale increase in stability and meridional winds across the Sierra Nevada, a downslope windstorm can develop in IWV. The downslope winds and compensatory gravity wave activity over IWV will conclude once there is a significant change in conditions aloft, or an increase in convective instability at the surface of IWV which prevents air aloft from sinking towards the surface. These results provide a better understanding of the mesoscale meteorology in this region and improve forecast and analysis for plume transport and aviation needs while also laying the groundwork for future projects managing environmental concerns in this region.

  17. Soil porosity correlation and its influence in percolation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Alfredo; Capa-Morocho, Mirian; Ruis-Ramos, Margarita; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2016-04-01

    The prediction of percolation in natural soils is relevant for modeling root growth and optimizing infiltration of water and nutrients. Also, it would improve our understanding on how pollutants as pesticides, and virus and bacteria (Darnault et al., 2003) reach significant depths without being filtered out by the soil matrix (Beven and Germann, 2013). Random walk algorithms have been used successfully to date to characterize the dynamical characteristics of disordered media. This approach has been used here to describe how soil at different bulk densities and with different threshold values applied to the 3D gray images influences the structure of the pore network and their implications on particle flow and distribution (Ruiz-Ramos et al., 2009). In order to do so first we applied several threshold values to each image analyzed and characterized them through Hurst exponents, then we computed random walks algorithms to calculate distances reached by the particles and speed of those particles. At the same time, 3D structures with a Hurst exponent of ca 0.5 and with different porosities were constructed and the same random walks simulations were replicated over these generated structures. We have found a relationship between Hurst exponents and the speed distribution of the particles reaching percolation of the total soil depth. REFERENCES Darnault, C.J. G., P. Garnier, Y.J. Kim, K.L. Oveson, T.S. Steenhuis, J.Y. Parlange, M. Jenkins, W.C. Ghiorse, and P. Baveye (2003), Preferential transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in variably saturated subsurface environments, Water Environ. Res., 75, 113-120. Beven, Keith and Germann, Peter. 2013. Macropores and water flow in soils revisited. Water Resources Research, 49(6), 3071-3092. DOI: 10.1002/wrcr.20156. Ruiz-Ramos, M., D. del Valle, D. Grinev, and A.M. Tarquis. 2009. Soil hydraulic behaviour at different bulk densities. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 11, EGU2009-6234.

  18. Oxidation of basaltic tephras: Influence on reflectance in the 1 micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrand, William H.; Singer, Robert B.

    1991-01-01

    As part of a ongoing study into the products of hydrovolcanism, tuffs were examined from the Cerro Colorado and Pavant Butte tuff cones. The former resides in the northeastern corner of the Pinacate Volcanic Field in Sonara, Mexico and the latter is in the Black Rock Desert of southern Utah. Numerous samples were collected and many of these had their Vis/IR reflectance measured. It seems likely that in the palagonite tuffs there is a combination of nanocrystalline ferric oxide phases contributing to the UV absorption edge, but not to the 1 micron band, plus more crystalline ferric oxides which do contribute to that band as well as ferrous iron within unaltered sideromelane which is skewing the band center to longer wavelengths. This work has implications for the study of Mars. The present work indicates that when ferrous and ferric iron phases are both present, their combined spectral contribution is a single band in the vicinity of 1 micron. The center, depth, and width of that feature has potential to be used to gauge the relative proportions of ferrous and ferric iron phases.

  19. Genetic data from algae sedimentary DNA reflect the influence of environment over geography

    PubMed Central

    Stoof-Leichsenring, Kathleen R.; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Pestryakova, Luidmila A.; Klemm, Juliane; Epp, Laura S.; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Genetic investigations on eukaryotic plankton confirmed the existence of modern biogeographic patterns, but analyses of palaeoecological data exploring the temporal variability of these patterns have rarely been presented. Ancient sedimentary DNA proved suitable for investigations of past assemblage turnover in the course of environmental change, but genetic relatedness of the identified lineages has not yet been undertaken. Here, we investigate the relatedness of diatom lineages in Siberian lakes along environmental gradients (i.e. across treeline transects), over geographic distance and through time (i.e. the last 7000 years) using modern and ancient sedimentary DNA. Our results indicate that closely-related Staurosira lineages occur in similar environments and less-related lineages in dissimilar environments, in our case different vegetation and co-varying climatic and limnic variables across treeline transects. Thus our study reveals that environmental conditions rather than geographic distance is reflected by diatom-relatedness patterns in space and time. We tentatively speculate that the detected relatedness pattern in Staurosira across the treeline could be a result of adaptation to diverse environmental conditions across the arctic boreal treeline, however, a geographically-driven divergence and subsequent repopulation of ecologically different habitats might also be a potential explanation for the observed pattern. PMID:26261899

  20. Genetic data from algae sedimentary DNA reflect the influence of environment over geography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoof-Leichsenring, Kathleen R.; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Pestryakova, Luidmila A.; Klemm, Juliane; Epp, Laura S.; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    Genetic investigations on eukaryotic plankton confirmed the existence of modern biogeographic patterns, but analyses of palaeoecological data exploring the temporal variability of these patterns have rarely been presented. Ancient sedimentary DNA proved suitable for investigations of past assemblage turnover in the course of environmental change, but genetic relatedness of the identified lineages has not yet been undertaken. Here, we investigate the relatedness of diatom lineages in Siberian lakes along environmental gradients (i.e. across treeline transects), over geographic distance and through time (i.e. the last 7000 years) using modern and ancient sedimentary DNA. Our results indicate that closely-related Staurosira lineages occur in similar environments and less-related lineages in dissimilar environments, in our case different vegetation and co-varying climatic and limnic variables across treeline transects. Thus our study reveals that environmental conditions rather than geographic distance is reflected by diatom-relatedness patterns in space and time. We tentatively speculate that the detected relatedness pattern in Staurosira across the treeline could be a result of adaptation to diverse environmental conditions across the arctic boreal treeline, however, a geographically-driven divergence and subsequent repopulation of ecologically different habitats might also be a potential explanation for the observed pattern.

  1. Retrieval of seasonal dynamics of forest understory reflectance from semi-arid to boreal forests using MODIS BRDF data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisek, Jan; Chen, Jing; Kobayashi, Hideki; Rautiainen, Miina; Schaepman, Michael; Karnieli, Arnon; Sprintsin, Michael; Ryu, Youngryel; Nikopensius, Maris; Raabe, Kairi

    2016-04-01

    Ground vegetation (understory) provides an essential contribution to the whole-stand reflectance signal in many boreal, sub-boreal, and temperate forests. Accurate knowledge about forest understory reflectance is urgently needed in various forest reflectance modelling efforts. However, systematic collections of understory reflectance data covering different sites and ecosystems are almost missing. Measurement of understory reflectance is a real challenge because of an extremely high variability of irradiance at the forest floor, weak signal in some parts of the spectrum, spectral separability issues of over- and understory and its variable nature. Understory can consist of several sub-layers (regenerated tree, shrub, grasses or dwarf shrub, mosses, lichens, litter, bare soil), it has spatially-temporally variable species composition and ground coverage. Additional challenges are introduced by patchiness of ground vegetation, ground surface roughness, and understory-overstory relations. Due to this variability, remote sensing might be the only means to provide consistent data at spatially relevant scales. In this presentation, we report on retrieving seasonal courses of understory Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from multi-angular MODIS BRDF/Albedo data. We compared satellite-based seasonal courses of understory NDVI against an extended collection of different types of forest sites with available in-situ understory reflectance measurements. These sites are distributed along a wide latitudinal gradient on the Northern hemisphere: a sparse and dense black spruce forests in Alaska and Canada, a northern European boreal forest in Finland, hemiboreal needleleaf and deciduous stands in Estonia, a mixed temperate forest in Switzerland, a cool temperate deciduous broadleaf forest in Korea, and a semi-arid pine plantation in Israel. Our results indicated the retrieval method performs well particularly over open forests of different types. We also demonstrated

  2. Pervasive influence of large-scale climate in the dynamics of a terrestrial vertebrate community

    PubMed Central

    Post, Eric; Forchhammer, Mads C

    2001-01-01

    Background Large-scale climatic variability has been implicated in the population dynamics of many vertebrates throughout the Northern Hemisphere, but has not been demonstrated to directly influence dynamics at multiple trophic levels of any single system. Using data from Isle Royale, USA, comprising time series on the long-term dynamics at three trophic levels (wolves, moose, and balsam fir), we analyzed the relative contributions of density dependence, inter-specific interactions, and climate to the dynamics of each level of the community. Results Despite differences in dynamic complexity among the predator, herbivore, and vegetation levels, large-scale climatic variability influenced dynamics directly at all three levels. The strength of the climatic influence on dynamics was, however, strongest at the top and bottom trophic levels, where density dependence was weakest. Conclusions Because of the conflicting influences of environmental variability and intrinsic processes on population stability, a direct influence of climate on the dynamics at all three levels suggests that climate change may alter stability of this community. Theoretical considerations suggest that if it does, such alteration is most likely to result from changes in stability at the top or bottom trophic levels, where the influence of climate was strongest. PMID:11782292

  3. Structures, Organization, and Function of Reflectin Proteins in Dynamically Tunable Reflective Cells*

    PubMed Central

    DeMartini, Daniel G.; Izumi, Michi; Weaver, Aaron T.; Pandolfi, Erica; Morse, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    The reversible assembly of reflectin proteins drives dynamic iridescence in cephalopods. Squid dynamically tune the intensity and colors of iridescence generated by constructive interference from intracellular Bragg reflectors in specialized skin cells called iridocytes. Analysis of the tissue specificity of reflectin subtypes reveals that tunability is correlated with the presence of one specific reflectin sequence. Differential phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the reflectins in response to activation by acetylcholine, as well as differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular spatial distributions, further support the suggestion of different roles for the different reflectin subtypes. PMID:25918159

  4. Some reflections on the influence of Chinese thought on Jung and his psychological theory.

    PubMed

    Stein, Murray

    2005-04-01

    Jung claimed that Richard Wilhelm, whose masterful translations of Chinese wisdom literature into a European language (German) and thence into Western consciousness have brought Chinese modes of thinking to so many, was one of the most important influences on his own life and work. The contacts between the two men, which took place from the early 1920's until Wilhelm's death in 1930, were few but intense and for Jung decisive in several ways. Wilhelm's translations of the I Ching and The Secret of the Golden Flower opened new avenues for Jung that had far-reaching consequences on his research and writing after 1930. The latter opened the door to the study of alchemy as a key to the archetypal process of individuation as rooted in the collective unconscious. 'Synchronicity' is a term that grew out of his contact with Chinese thought, in particular with the I Ching. From his contact with Chinese thought, additionally, he received confirmation of the view, independently arrived at, that adult psychological development is not linear but rather circular and spiral-like. The letters between Jung and Wilhelm illuminate the great importance Jung ascribed to Wilhelm's contribution toward bridging East and West and the potential value of Chinese philosophy for psychotherapy. PMID:15817043

  5. Dynamics of continental collision: influence of the plate contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Franco, Roberta; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2008-09-01

    Observations shows that continental collision may evolve in different ways, resulting in a wide range of tectonic responses. In search of the controlling conditions and parameters, we start from the results of our previous work, which demonstrated that the properties of the plate contact are important for the overall dynamics of convergent plate margins. Two fundamental types of subduction plate contact can be distinguished: one based on a fault and the other based on a weak subduction channel. In this study, we investigate how the plate contact affects the initial stage of continental collision. We use a finite element method to solve the heat and the time-dependent momentum equations for elastic, (power-law) viscous and plastic rheologies. For the same rheological properties and driving forces, varying the nature of the plate contact leads to three types of responses. The presence of a subduction channel promotes coherent and, when the boundary conditions allow it, plate-like subduction of the continental margin. In models with a subduction fault, coherent subduction of the incoming continental lithosphere occurs when the colliding passive margin has a gentle slope. The approaching continental sliver starts to subduct and the subduction is characterized by a non-plate like behaviour-slower subduction velocity than in channel models and strong slab deformation. If the continental margin is steep and the strength of the incoming continental crust is high, fault models result in locking of the trench, eventually leading to slab break-off. If the crustal strength is relatively low, shear delamination of part of the crust is expected. In the channel model, this type of delamination never occurs. The tectonic settings used in our experiments (prescribed plate velocity of the subducting plate versus fixed subducting plate corresponding to a landlocked basin setting) do not significantly influence the nature of the model response. We conclude that initial stages of

  6. Reflections on the Development of a Dynamic Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Karen; McLatchie, Joan; Pelik, Rowena

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to demonstrate how an institutional learning, teaching and assessment (LTA) strategy was developed and a "dynamic" strategy created in order to achieve the ongoing enhancement of the quality of the student learning experience. Developing LTA strategies that foster ongoing engagement and provide inspiration to academic…

  7. How Reflected Wave Fronts Dynamically Establish Hooke's Law in a Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahy, Stephen; O'Riordan, John; O'Sullivan, Colm; Twomey, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A simple benchtop experiment in which a moving cart collides with a fixed spring is described. Force-time and force-distance data recorded during the collision display the transit of compression wave fronts through the spring following impact. These data can be used by students to develop a computational model of the dynamics of this simple…

  8. POST ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH BIPOLAR REFLECTION NEBULAE: RESULT OF DYNAMICAL EJECTION OR SELECTIVE ILLUMINATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, N.; Kwok, Sun; Steffen, W. E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2013-03-10

    A model for post asymptotic giant branch bipolar reflection nebulae has been constructed based on a pair of evacuated cavities in a spherical dust envelope. Many of the observed features of bipolar nebulae, including filled bipolar lobes, an equatorial torus, searchlight beams, and a bright central light source, can be reproduced. The effects on orientation and dust densities are studied and comparisons with some observed examples are offered. We suggest that many observed properties of bipolar nebulae are the result of optical effects and any physical modeling of these nebulae has to take these factors into consideration.

  9. Evaluation of self-focusing influence on laser-induced damage threshold of anti-reflective coated windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakickas, T.; Kudriašov, V.; Sirutkaitis, V.; Grigonis, R.; Gaižauskas, E.

    2005-12-01

    For high intensity lasers it is very important to choose appropriate optical elements. Since invention of high power lasers laser-induced damage of optical coatings was subject of extensive investigations. At high laser intensities the self-focusing in optical elements appears and intensity at rear optics surface can be much higher than at the front surface. Due to this damage of rear-surface can be reached much faster than damage of the front surface. We investigated the influence of self-focusing on damage threshold in fused-silica windows with anti-reflective coatings on both sides. In our experiments we used titanium-sapphire chirped pulse amplification system (130 fs, 2 mJ, 1 kHz repetition rate pulses at 800 nm). We have tested 1 mm, 3 mm and 6 mm thickness fused-silica windows with identical anti-reflective coatings. The front surface of the samples was placed in the waist of focused beam. The experiments were performed for effective spot diameters on the front 145 μm, 95 μm and 43 μm respectively. The experiments showed the self-focusing of beam inside the fused silica window and self-focusing dependence on initial beam diameter. The damage behavior was dependent on irradiation history. Also we found quite strong nonlinear absorption in fused silica.

  10. Distribution of chemical elements in attic dust and soil as reflection of lithology and anthropogenic influence in Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajn, R.

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to establish contents and distribution of chemical elements in attic dust in Slovenia, and to define them according to geology and anthiopogenic influence. Attic dust and topsoil (0-5 cm) samples were collected in the rural area in settlements without known industry and in six largest towns in Slovenia. Analysis of 42 chemical elements was performed. For estimation of the association between elements and sampling materials the R mode factor analysis was applied. Al, Ba, Co, Ci, Fe, La, Mn, Na, Nb, Ni, Sc, Th, Ti, Y, V and Zr in attic dust reflect the natural distribution. The highest elemental contents in attic dust occur in the areas of igneous and metmoiphic rocks and of flysch formation. High contents of the elemental association Co, Ci, Fe, Mn, and Ni reflect also centuries of ferrous metallurgy. Distribution of As, Cd, Cu, Hg, Mo, Sb, Sn, Sr, Pb and Zn represents the anthropogenically introduced chemical elements. Their averages in attic dust are higher compared to topsoil. High contents of these elements are a result of historical Pb-Zn mining and smelting.

  11. Community, intervention and provider support influences on implementation: reflections from a South African illustration of safety, peace and health promotion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The development, implementation and evaluation of community interventions are important for reducing child violence and injuries in low- to middle-income contexts, with successful implementation critical to effective intervention outcomes. The assessment of implementation processes is required to identify the factors that influence effective implementation. This article draws on a child safety, peace and health initiative to examine key factors that enabled or hindered its implementation, in a context characterised by limited resources. Methods A case study approach was employed. The research team was made up of six researchers and intervention coordinators, who led the development and implementation of the Ukuphepha Child Study in South Africa, and who are also the authors of this article. The study used author observations, reflections and discussions of the factors perceived to influence the implementation of the intervention. The authors engaged in an in-depth and iterative dialogic process aimed at abstracting the experiences of the intervention, with a recursive cycle of reflection and dialogue. Data were analysed utilising inductive content analysis, and categorised using classification frameworks for understanding implementation. Results The study highlights key factors that enabled or hindered implementation. These included the community context and concomitant community engagement processes; intervention compatibility and adaptability issues; community service provider perceptions of intervention relevance and expectations; and the intervention support system, characterised by training and mentorship support. Conclusions This evaluation illustrated the complexity of intervention implementation. The study approach sought to support intervention fidelity by fostering and maintaining community endorsement and support, a prerequisite for the unfolding implementation of the intervention. PMID:25081088

  12. Influence of dynamic immunization on epidemic spreading in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qingchu; Fu, Xinchu; Jin, Zhen; Small, Michael

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a new dynamic immunization method based on the static immunization algorithm and study the relationship between dynamic and static immunization. By nodes to be immunized according to static immunization strategies, we build a connection between dynamic and static immunization. Using theoretical arguments and computational simulation we show that dynamic immunization (from a finite vaccine reservoir) is not sufficient to prevent epidemic outbreak, nor does it significantly change the asymptotic prevalence. Nonetheless, we do find that less total vaccine is required to implement this strategy. To help understand this better, we examine the extent and distribution of dynamic immunization required to achieve this reduced vaccine demand. Our results suggest that it is not necessary to increase the immunization rate when the infection rate is relatively small.

  13. Aeroelasticity matters: Some reflections on two decades of testing in the NASA Langley transonic dynamics tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. H., III

    1981-01-01

    Testing of wind-tunnel aeroelastic models is a well established, widely used means of studying flutter trends, validating theory and investigating flutter margins of safety of new vehicle designs. The Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel was designed specifically for work on dynamics and aeroelastic problems of aircraft and space vehicles. A cross section of aeroelastic research and testing in the facility since it became operational more than two decades ago is presented. Examples selected from a large store of experience illustrate the nature and purpose of some major areas of work performed in the tunnel. These areas include: specialized experimental techniques; development testing of new aircraft and launch vehicle designs; evaluation of proposed "fixes" to solve aeroelastic problems uncovered during development testing; study of unexpected aeroelastic phenomena (i.e., "surprises"); control of aeroelastic effects by active and passive means; and, finally, fundamental research involving measurement of unsteady pressures on oscillating wings and control surface.

  14. Medial prefrontal cortical activity reflects dynamic re-evaluation during voluntary persistence.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Joseph T; Kable, Joseph W

    2015-05-01

    Deciding how long to keep waiting for future rewards is a nontrivial problem, especially when the timing of rewards is uncertain. We carried out an experiment in which human decision makers waited for rewards in two environments in which reward-timing statistics favored either a greater or lesser degree of behavioral persistence. We found that decision makers adaptively calibrated their level of persistence for each environment. Functional neuroimaging revealed signals that evolved differently during physically identical delays in the two environments, consistent with a dynamic and context-sensitive reappraisal of subjective value. This effect was observed in a region of ventromedial prefrontal cortex that is sensitive to subjective value in other contexts, demonstrating continuity between valuation mechanisms involved in discrete choice and in temporally extended decisions analogous to foraging. Our findings support a model in which voluntary persistence emerges from dynamic cost/benefit evaluation rather than from a control process that overrides valuation mechanisms. PMID:25849988

  15. Medial prefrontal cortical activity reflects dynamic re-evaluation during voluntary persistence

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Joseph T.; Kable, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    Deciding how long to keep waiting for future rewards is a nontrivial problem, especially when the timing of rewards is uncertain. We report an experiment in which human decision makers waited for rewards in two environments, in which reward-timing statistics favored either a greater or lesser degree of behavioral persistence. We found that decision makers adaptively calibrated their level of persistence for each environment. Functional neuroimaging revealed signals that evolved differently during physically identical delays in the two environments, consistent with a dynamic and context-sensitive reappraisal of subjective value. This effect was observed in a region of ventromedial prefrontal cortex that is sensitive to subjective value in other contexts, demonstrating continuity between valuation mechanisms involved in discrete choice and in temporally extended decisions analogous to foraging. Our findings support a model in which voluntary persistence emerges from dynamic cost/benefit evaluation rather than from a control process that overrides valuation mechanisms. PMID:25849988

  16. Synaptic dynamics and neuronal network connectivity are reflected in the distribution of times in Up states.

    PubMed

    Dao Duc, Khanh; Parutto, Pierre; Chen, Xiaowei; Epsztein, Jérôme; Konnerth, Arthur; Holcman, David

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of neuronal networks connected by synaptic dynamics can sustain long periods of depolarization that can last for hundreds of milliseconds such as Up states recorded during sleep or anesthesia. Yet the underlying mechanism driving these periods remain unclear. We show here within a mean-field model that the residence time of the neuronal membrane potential in cortical Up states does not follow a Poissonian law, but presents several peaks. Furthermore, the present modeling approach allows extracting some information about the neuronal network connectivity from the time distribution histogram. Based on a synaptic-depression model, we find that these peaks, that can be observed in histograms of patch-clamp recordings are not artifacts of electrophysiological measurements, but rather are an inherent property of the network dynamics. Analysis of the equations reveals a stable focus located close to the unstable limit cycle, delimiting a region that defines the Up state. The model further shows that the peaks observed in the Up state time distribution are due to winding around the focus before escaping from the basin of attraction. Finally, we use in vivo recordings of intracellular membrane potential and we recover from the peak distribution, some information about the network connectivity. We conclude that it is possible to recover the network connectivity from the distribution of times that the neuronal membrane voltage spends in Up states. PMID:26283956

  17. Decisions in Motion: Decision Dynamics during Intertemporal Choice reflect Subjective Evaluation of Delayed Rewards

    PubMed Central

    O’Hora, Denis; Carey, Rachel; Kervick, Aoife; Crowley, David; Dabrowski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    People tend to discount rewards or losses that occur in the future. Such delay discounting has been linked to many behavioral and health problems, since people choose smaller short-term gains over greater long-term gains. We investigated whether the effect of delays on the subjective value of rewards is expressed in how people move when they make choices. Over 600 patrons of the RISK LAB exhibition hosted by the Science Gallery DublinTM played a short computer game in which they used a computer mouse to choose between amounts of money at various delays. Typical discounting effects were observed and decision dynamics indicated that choosing smaller short-term rewards became easier (i.e., shorter response times, tighter trajectories, less vacillation) as the delays until later rewards increased. Based on a sequence of choices, subjective values of delayed outcomes were estimated and decision dynamics during initial choices predicted these values. Decision dynamics are affected by subjective values of available options and thus provide a means to estimate such values. PMID:26867497

  18. Synaptic dynamics and neuronal network connectivity are reflected in the distribution of times in Up states

    PubMed Central

    Dao Duc, Khanh; Parutto, Pierre; Chen, Xiaowei; Epsztein, Jérôme; Konnerth, Arthur; Holcman, David

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of neuronal networks connected by synaptic dynamics can sustain long periods of depolarization that can last for hundreds of milliseconds such as Up states recorded during sleep or anesthesia. Yet the underlying mechanism driving these periods remain unclear. We show here within a mean-field model that the residence time of the neuronal membrane potential in cortical Up states does not follow a Poissonian law, but presents several peaks. Furthermore, the present modeling approach allows extracting some information about the neuronal network connectivity from the time distribution histogram. Based on a synaptic-depression model, we find that these peaks, that can be observed in histograms of patch-clamp recordings are not artifacts of electrophysiological measurements, but rather are an inherent property of the network dynamics. Analysis of the equations reveals a stable focus located close to the unstable limit cycle, delimiting a region that defines the Up state. The model further shows that the peaks observed in the Up state time distribution are due to winding around the focus before escaping from the basin of attraction. Finally, we use in vivo recordings of intracellular membrane potential and we recover from the peak distribution, some information about the network connectivity. We conclude that it is possible to recover the network connectivity from the distribution of times that the neuronal membrane voltage spends in Up states. PMID:26283956

  19. Shifts of Gamma Phase across Primary Visual Cortical Sites Reflect Dynamic Stimulus-Modulated Information Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Besserve, Michel; Lowe, Scott C.; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Panzeri, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Distributed neural processing likely entails the capability of networks to reconfigure dynamically the directionality and strength of their functional connections. Yet, the neural mechanisms that may allow such dynamic routing of the information flow are not yet fully understood. We investigated the role of gamma band (50–80 Hz) oscillations in transient modulations of communication among neural populations by using measures of direction-specific causal information transfer. We found that the local phase of gamma-band rhythmic activity exerted a stimulus-modulated and spatially-asymmetric directed effect on the firing rate of spatially separated populations within the primary visual cortex. The relationships between gamma phases at different sites (phase shifts) could be described as a stimulus-modulated gamma-band wave propagating along the spatial directions with the largest information transfer. We observed transient stimulus-related changes in the spatial configuration of phases (compatible with changes in direction of gamma wave propagation) accompanied by a relative increase of the amount of information flowing along the instantaneous direction of the gamma wave. These effects were specific to the gamma-band and suggest that the time-varying relationships between gamma phases at different locations mark, and possibly causally mediate, the dynamic reconfiguration of functional connections. PMID:26394205

  20. Eocene prevalence of monsoon-like climate over eastern China reflected by hydrological dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dehai; Lu, Shicong; Han, Shuang; Sun, Xiaoyan; Quan, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Hydrological dynamics of sedimentary basins are essential for understanding regional climatic pattern in the geological past. In previous qualitative studies lithologically depending on the occurrence of featured sedimentary rocks, the Eocene climate of China had been subdivided into three latitudinal zones, with one subtropical high-controlled arid zone throughout middle China, and two humid zones respectively in the north and south. However, recent advances on mammalian fauna distribution, plant fossil-based quantitative paleoclimatic reconstruction, and modeling experiment jointly suggest that the relatively humid monsoonal climate might have prevailed over the territory. Here we examine and compare sedimentary sequences of 10 Eocene sections across eastern China, and hence the lake level fluctuations, to discuss the nature of climate type. Our results show that, instead of the categorically zonal pattern, the hydroclimate dynamics is intensified landward. This is demonstrated by the fact that, in contrast to the wide developed coal layers around the periphery, evaporites are growingly occurred endocentrically to the central part of middle China. However, although we have had assumed that all evaporites are indicator of extreme aridity, the highly oscillated climate in the central part of middle China was humid in the majority of the Eocene, distinct from permanent arid as seen in deserts or steppe along modern horse latitude. From the upcountry distribution pattern of the Eocene hydrological dynamics, it appears that the relatively dry climate in central China was caused by the impact of continentality or rain shadow effect under monsoonal, or monsoon-like climate.

  1. Deriving seasonal dynamics in ecosystem properties of semi-arid savanna grasslands from in situ-based hyperspectral reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagesson, T.; Fensholt, R.; Huber, S.; Horion, S.; Guiro, I.; Ehammer, A.; Ardo, J.

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates how hyperspectral reflectance (between 350 and 1800 nm) can be used to infer ecosystem properties for a semi-arid savanna grassland in West Africa using a unique in situ-based multi-angular data set of hemispherical conical reflectance factor (HCRF) measurements. Relationships between seasonal dynamics in hyperspectral HCRF and ecosystem properties (biomass, gross primary productivity (GPP), light use efficiency (LUE), and fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by vegetation (FAPAR)) were analysed. HCRF data (ρ) were used to study the relationship between normalised difference spectral indices (NDSIs) and the measured ecosystem properties. Finally, the effects of variable sun sensor viewing geometry on different NDSI wavelength combinations were analysed. The wavelengths with the strongest correlation to seasonal dynamics in ecosystem properties were shortwave infrared (biomass), the peak absorption band for chlorophyll a and b (at 682 nm) (GPP), the oxygen A band at 761 nm used for estimating chlorophyll fluorescence (GPP and LUE), and blue wavelengths (ρ412) (FAPAR). The NDSI with the strongest correlation to (i) biomass combined red-edge HCRF (ρ705) with green HCRF (ρ587), (ii) GPP combined wavelengths at the peak of green reflection (ρ518, ρ556), (iii) LUE combined red (ρ688) with blue HCRF (ρ436), and (iv) FAPAR combined blue (ρ399) and near-infrared (ρ1295) wavelengths. NDSIs combining near infrared and shortwave infrared were strongly affected by solar zenith angles and sensor viewing geometry, as were many combinations of visible wavelengths. This study provides analyses based upon novel multi-angular hyperspectral data for validation of Earth-observation-based properties of semi-arid ecosystems, as well as insights for designing spectral characteristics of future sensors for ecosystem monitoring.

  2. The influence of climatic variability on local population dynamics of Cercidium microphyllum (foothill paloverde)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowers, Janice E.; Turner, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated correlations among climatic variability, population age structure, and seedling survival of a dominant Sonoran Desert tree, Cercidium microphyllum (foothill paloverde), at Tucson, Arizona, USA. A major goal was to determine whether wet years promote seedling establishment and thereby determine population structure. Plant age was estimated from basal circumference for a sample of 980 living and dead trees in twelve 0.5-ha plots. Ages ranged from 1 to 181 years. Age frequency distribution showed that the population is in decline. Most (51.2%) of the 814 living trees were 40-80 years old; only 6.5% were younger than 20 years. The average age of the 166 dead trees was 78 years. Fifty-nine percent of dead trees were aged 60-100 years. Survival of newly emerged seedlings was monitored for 7 years in a 557-m2 permanent plot. Mean survival in the 1st year of life was 1.7%. Only 2 of 1,008 seedlings lived longer than 1 year. Length of survival was not correlated with rainfall. Residual regeneration, an index of the difference between predicted and observed cohort size, showed that regeneration was high during the first half of the twentieth century and poor after the mid-1950s. Trends in regeneration did not reflect interannual variation in seasonal temperature or rain before 1950, that is, in the years before urban warming. Taken together, the seedling study and the regeneration analysis suggest that local population dynamics reflect biotic factors to such an extent that population age structure might not always be a reliable clue to past climatic influences.

  3. Influence of rubbing on rotor dynamics, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, Agnes; Bently, Donald E.; Franklin, Wesley D.; Hayashida, Robert D.; Kingsley, Lori M.; Curry, Arthur E.

    1989-01-01

    Rotor dynamic behavior depends considerably on how much the specific physical phenomena accompanying rotor rubbing against the stator is involved. The experimental results of rotor-to-stator rubbing contact are analyzed. The computer code is described for obtaining numerical calculations of rotor-to-stator rubbing system dynamic responses. Computer generated results are provided. The reduced dynamic data from High Pressure Fuel Turbo Pump (HPFTP) hot fire test are given. The results provide some significant conclusions. Information is provided on the electronic instrumentation used in the experimental testing.

  4. Assessing Static and Dynamic Influences on Inmate Violence Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Inmate misconduct creates problems for other inmates as well as correctional staff. Most empirical assessments of the correlates of inmate misconduct have been conducted at the individual level; however, a facility's level of misconduct may be of equal importance to prison management and state officials because these numbers can reflect order, or…

  5. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography for measuring phase and reflectance dynamics of photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Jonnal, Ravi S.; Lee, Sangyeol; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Zhuolin; Miller, Donald T.

    2012-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography with adaptive optics (AO-OCT) is a noninvasive method for imaging the living retina at the microscopic level. We used AO-OCT technology to follow changes in cone photoreceptor outer segment (OS) length and reflectance. To substantially increase sensitivity of the length measurements, a novel phase retrieval technique was demonstrated, capable of detecting changes on a nanometer scale. We acquired volume videos of 0.65°x0.65° retinal patches at 1.5° temporal to the fovea over 75 and 105 minutes in two subjects. Volumes were dewarped and registered, after which the cone intensity, OS length, and referenced phase difference were tracked over time. The reflections from inner segment/OS junction (IS/OS) and posterior tips of OS (PT) showed significant intensity variations over time. In contrast, the OS length as measured from the intensity images did not change, indicative of a highly stable OS length at least down to the level of the system's axial resolution (3μm). Smaller axial changes, however, were detected with our phase retrieval technique. Specifically, the PT-IS/OS phase difference for the same cones showed significant variation, suggesting real sub-wavelength changes in OS length of 125+/-46 nm/hr for the 22 cones followed. We believe these length changes are due to the normal renewal process of the cone OS that elongate the OS at a rate of about 100 nm/hr. The phase difference measurements were strongly correlated among Alines within the same cone (0.65 radians standard deviation) corresponding to a length sensitivity of 31 nm, or ~100 times smaller than the axial resolution of our system.

  6. Ultrafast Carrier Dynamics Measured by the Transient Change in the Reflectance of InP and GaAs Film

    SciTech Connect

    John Klopf

    2005-10-31

    the dynamics of the hot carrier distributions in these materials, but also provide the basis for future development of better diagnostic instruments for the non-destructive evaluation of these important materials. A theoretical model describing the change in reflectance due to the photoexcited hot carrier distribution has also been developed. By applying this model to the experimental results, several important material parameters such as the electron-phonon scattering time and the rates for diffusion and several recombination processes are determined. These values are compared with those reported for similar materials, and the validity of the results is discussed. A complete description of the experimental technique as well as the theoretical reflectance model is presented.

  7. Influence of dynamic conditions on biofilm formation by staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Stepanović, S; Vuković, D; Jezek, P; Pavlović, M; Svabic-Vlahović, M

    2001-07-01

    The modified microtiter plate test was used to investigate biofilm formation by staphylococci under both static and dynamic conditions. The quantity of biofilm produced under static conditions was used as a reference. Dynamic conditions, which were achieved by incubating microtiter plates on a horizontal shaker with and without the presence of glass beads in wells, either reduced biofilm formation or left it unchanged. Dynamic conditions particularly affected the capacity of certain species to produce biofilm: these species included the causative agents of infections associated with a foreign body (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus). On the basis of these results, dynamic conditions should be included as a parameter for evaluating biofilm formation by staphylococci in vitro. PMID:11561809

  8. Analyzing the influence of median cross-section design on highway safety using vehicle dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Stine, Jason S; Hamblin, Bridget C; Brennan, Sean N; Donnell, Eric T

    2010-11-01

    Although vehicle dynamics simulations have long been used in vehicle design and crash reconstruction, their use for highway design is rare. This paper investigates the safety of highway medians through iterative simulations of off-road median encroachments. The commercially available software CarSim was used to simulate over one hundred thousand encroachments, representing the entire passenger vehicle fleet and a wide range of encroachment angles, departure speeds, steering inputs, and braking inputs. Each individual simulation output was then weighted using data from previous studies to reflect the probability of each specific accident scenario occurring in a real-life median encroachment. Results of this analysis illustrate the relative influence of median cross-section geometry on the resulting accident outcomes. The simulations indicate that the overall safety of a highway median depends on the occurrence of both vehicle rollover and median crossover events, and the cross-section shape, slope, and width are all shown to greatly affect each of these incidents. An evaluation of the simulation results was conducted with vehicle trajectories from previous experimental crash tests. Further assessment of the aggregate simulation results to actual crash data was achieved through comparison with several databases of crash statistics. Both efforts showed a strong agreement between the simulations and the real-life crash data. PMID:20728628

  9. Host polymer influence on dilute polystyrene segmental dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, T. R.

    2005-03-01

    We have utilized deuterium NMR to investigate the segmental dynamics of dilute (2%) d3-polystyrene (PS) chains in miscible polymer blends with polybutadiene, poly(vinyl ethylene), polyisoprene, poly(vinyl methylether) and poly(methyl methacrylate). In the dilute limit, we find qualitative differences depending upon whether the host polymer has dynamics that are faster or slower than that of pure PS. In blends where PS is the fast (low Tg) component, segmental dynamics are slowed upon blending and can be fit by the Lodge-McLeish model. When PS is the slow (high Tg) component, PS segmental dynamics speed up upon blending, but cannot be fit by the Lodge-McLeish model unless a temperature dependent self-concentration is employed. These results are qualitatively consistent with a recent suggestion by Kant, Kumar and Colby (Macromolecules, 2003, 10087), based upon data at higher concentrations. Furthermore, as the slow component, we find the segmental dynamics of PS has a temperature dependence similar to that of its host. This suggests viewing the high Tg component dynamics in a miscible blend as similar to a polymer in a low molecular weight solvent.

  10. Dynamics of layer-by-layer growth of a polyelectrolyte multilayer studied in situ using attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Owusu-Nkwantabisah, Silas; Gammana, Madhira; Tripp, Carl P

    2014-10-01

    Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) was used to study the dynamic layer-by-layer (LBL) growth of a sodium polyacrylate (NaPA)/poly(diallydimethylammonium) chloride (PDADMAC) multilayer on TiO2 particles. Molecular weights (Mw) used were 30 and 60 kDa for NaPA and 8.5 and 150 kDa for PDADMAC. IR spectra were recorded in situ as a function of time and were used to obtain the dynamic mass adsorbed and bound fraction of the polymers during each deposition step. For 30 kDa NaPA layers, the dynamics of adsorption show an initial rapid rise in mass followed by a slow increase toward a plateau value upon LBL with 150 kDa PDADMAC. In contrast, the 60 kDa NaPA layers achieve a plateau quickly and do not show a slow increase toward a plateau. In the case of LBL with 150 kDa PDADMAC, the dynamics of the bound fraction of polymer per layer suggest that polymer diffusion and conformational rearrangement occur for the layers of 30 kDa NaPA but not for the 60 kDa NaPA layers. Furthermore, PDADMAC adsorption profiles show that there is no diffusion of the PDADMAC layers and that PDADMAC flattens onto the underlying layer. A linear growth in the mass adsorbed per layer was observed for 150 kDa PDADMAC with both molecular weights of NaPA. In the case of 8.5 kDa PDADMAC, smaller growth increments and the desorption of underlying layers were observed. This work demonstrates the use of ATR-IR in obtaining the dynamics of LBL multilayer formation. Furthermore, it provides an example in which polymer diffusion during LBL film formation does not lead to exponential growth. PMID:25203136

  11. The dynamical influences of cloud shading on simulated supercell thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frame, Jeffrey

    2008-10-01

    supercells with radiation because varying surface characteristics alter the amount of frictional drag experienced by the low-level flow. Additionally, the propagation of the rear-flank gust front is heavily modulated by both the strength and the location of the outflow, which are influenced by the choice of the storm-relative wind profile and the microphysics package. If shortwave radiation is excluded from the model, a shallow stable layer forms over the entire domain and the storm becomes elevated and weakens. The direct absorption and emission of radiation by clouds does not significantly affect the simulated supercells. The base-state environment is changed to see under which conditions cloud shading and friction combine to force the undercutting of the updraft. Neither a morning model initialization nor a cold season model initialization prevent this from occurring in any of the simulations which produce an anvil shadow. The ground-relative wind is also varied because the surface fluxes of both heat and momentum are not Galilean invariant. A storm in which both the rear-flank gust front and updraft slowly move along the major axis of the anvil shadow becomes undercut, much like the stationary storm. A fast moving storm, however, does not become undercut because less time exists to cool the model surface and to decouple the surface layer if the storm moves faster. If the gust front moves into the anvil shadow and the updraft moves normal to the shadow (i.e., the northward movement of the updraft for an eastward-extending anvil), cyclic behavior can result, although this is highly dependent on storm motion. If the gust front propagates into the full sun (i.e., southward movement), the storm is relatively unaffected by the presence of radiation because the dynamics that govern gust front propagation remain relatively unchanged.

  12. Dynamic properties influence the perception of facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Kamachi, Miyuki; Bruce, Vicki; Mukaida, Shigeru; Gyoba, Jiro; Yoshikawa, Sakiko; Akamatsu, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the role played by dynamic information in identifying facial expressions of emotion. Dynamic expression sequences were created by generating and displaying morph sequences which changed the face from neutral to a peak expression in different numbers of intervening intermediate stages, to create fast (6 frames), medium (26 frames), and slow (101 frames) sequences. In experiment 1, participants were asked to describe what the person shown in each sequence was feeling. Sadness was more accurately identified when slow sequences were shown. Happiness, and to some extent surprise, was better from faster sequences, while anger was most accurately detected from the sequences of medium pace. In experiment 2 we used an intensity-rating task and static images as well as dynamic ones to examine whether effects were due to total time of the displays or to the speed of sequence. Accuracies of expression judgments were derived from the rated intensities and the results were similar to those of experiment 1 for angry and sad expressions (surprised and happy were close to ceiling). Moreover, the effect of display time was found only for dynamic expressions and not for static ones, suggesting that it was speed, not time, which was responsible for these effects. These results suggest that representations of basic expressions of emotion encode information about dynamic as well as static properties. PMID:24601038

  13. High temperature far-infrared dynamics of orthorhombic NdMnO3: emissivity and reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Massa, Néstor E; del Campo, Leire; Meneses, Domingos De Sousa; Echegut, Patrick; Martínez-Lope, María Jesús; Alonso, José Antonio

    2013-06-12

    We report on near normal far- and mid-infrared emission and reflectivity of NdMnO3 perovskite from room temperature to sample decomposition above 1800 K. At 300 K the number of infrared active phonons is in close agreement with the 25 calculated for the orthorhombic D(2h)(16)-Pbnm (Z = 4) space group. Their number gradually decreases as we approach the temperature of orbital disorder at ~1023 K where the orthorhombic O' lower temperature cooperative phase coexists with the cubic orthorhombic O. At above ~1200 K, the three infrared active phonons coincide with that expected for cubic Pm-3m (Z = 1) in the high temperature insulating regime. Heating samples in dry air triggers double exchange conductivity by Mn(3+) and Mn(4+) ions and a small polaron mid-infrared band. Fits to the optical conductivity single out the octahedral antisymmetric and symmetric vibrational modes as the main phonons in the electron-phonon interactions at 875 K. For 1745 K, it is enough to consider the symmetric stretching internal mode. An overdamped defect induced Drude component is clearly outlined at the highest temperatures. We conclude that rare earth manganite eg electrons are prone to spin, charge, orbital, and lattice couplings in an intrinsic orbital distorted perovskite lattice, favoring embryonic low energy collective excitations. PMID:23676242

  14. Dynamic blastomere behaviour reflects human embryo ploidy by the four-cell stage

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Shawn L.; Loewke, Kevin E.; Han, Jinnuo; Moussavi, Farshid; Colls, Pere; Munne, Santiago; Behr, Barry; Reijo Pera, Renee A.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that aneuploidy in human embryos is surprisingly frequent with 50–80% of cleavage-stage human embryos carrying an abnormal chromosome number. Here we combine non-invasive time-lapse imaging with karyotypic reconstruction of all blastomeres in four-cell human embryos to address the hypothesis that blastomere behaviour may reflect ploidy during the first two cleavage divisions. We demonstrate that precise cell cycle parameter timing is observed in all euploid embryos to the four-cell stage, whereas only 30% of aneuploid embryos exhibit parameter values within normal timing windows. Further, we observe that the generation of human embryonic aneuploidy is complex with contribution from chromosome-containing fragments/micronuclei that frequently emerge and may persist or become reabsorbed during interphase. These findings suggest that cell cycle and fragmentation parameters of individual blastomeres are diagnostic of ploidy, amenable to automated tracking algorithms, and likely of clinical relevance in reducing transfer of embryos prone to miscarriage. PMID:23212380

  15. Reflections on urban science teacher-student self-efficacy dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Sumi; Maulucci, Maria S. Rivera; Ramos, S. Lizette

    2011-12-01

    This forum article consists of commentaries—authored by Sumi Hagiwara, Maria S. Rivera Maulucci and Lizette Ramos—on the feature article by Virginia Jennings Bolshakova, Carla C. Johnson, and Charlene M. Czerniak. We reflect on a series of questions that take retrospective, introspective, and prospective views of self-efficacy in science education. We review selected studies that explore some of the historical developments and methodological approaches in the literature and examine a teacher-student self-efficacy system model that shows the ways in which teachers' and students' self-efficacy judgments are based upon multiple individual and shared components, such as identity and social interaction within the classroom and school. We close with a call for the design of measures of teacher-student self-efficacy systems, so that we can begin to tailor professional development experiences to the goals and motivations of individual and collective groups of teachers and students in ways that accommodate the unique cultural features of their classrooms and foster student self-efficacy.

  16. Predicting agricultural management influence on long-term soil organic carbon dynamics: implications for biofuel production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term field experiments (LTE) are ideal for predicting the influence of agricultural management on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics and examining biofuel crop residue removal policy questions. Our objectives were (i) to simulate SOC dynamics in LTE soils under various climates, crop rotations,...

  17. Aeroelasticity matters - Some reflections on two decades of testing in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. H., III

    1981-01-01

    In 1955, work was started on the conversion of a subsonic wind tunnel to a 16-foot transonic tunnel with Freon-12 or air as the test medium. The new facility, designated the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT), became fully operational in 1960. A description is presented of aeroelastic testing and research performed in the TDT since 1960. It is pointed out that wind-tunnel tests of aeroelastic models require specialized experimental techniques seldom found in other types of wind-tunnel studies. Attention is given to model mount systems, launch vehicle models, aircraft models, aircraft buffet, gust response, stability derivative measurements, and subcritical testing techniques. Aspects of vehicle development testing are considered along with aeroelastic 'fixes', aeroelastic 'surprises', approaches for controlling aeroelastic effects, and unsteady pressure measurements.

  18. Electronically non-adiabatic influences in surface chemistry and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wodtke, Alec M

    2016-07-01

    Electronically nonadiabatic interactions between molecules and metal surfaces are now well known. Evidence is particularly clear from studies of diatomic molecules that molecular vibration can be strongly coupled to electrons of the metal leading to efficient energy transfer between these two kinds of motion. Since molecular vibration is the same motion needed for bond breaking, it is logical to postulate that electronically nonadiabatic influences on surface chemical reaction probabilities would be strong. Still there are few if any examples where such influences have been clearly investigated. This review recounts the evidence for and against the aforementioned postulate emphasizing reacting systems that have yet to receive full attention and where electronically nonadiabatic influence of reaction probabilities might be clearly demonstrated. PMID:27152489

  19. Spatial asymmetries in connectivity influence colonization-extinction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Miguel A; Fletcher, Robert J; Tremblay, Raymond L; Meléndez-Ackerman, Elvia J

    2015-10-01

    Movement has broad implications for many areas of biology, including evolution, community and population ecology. Movement is crucial in metapopulation ecology because it facilitates colonization and reduces the likelihood of local extinction via rescue effects. Most metapopulation modeling approaches describe connectivity using pair-wise Euclidean distances resulting in the simplifying assumption of a symmetric connectivity pattern. Yet, assuming symmetric connectivity when populations show net asymmetric movement patterns may result in biased estimates of colonization and extinction, and may alter interpretations of the dynamics and conclusions regarding the viability of metapopulations. Here, we use a 10-year time series on a wind-dispersed orchid Lepanthes rupestris that anchors its roots in patches of moss growing on trees or boulders along streams, to test for the role of connectivity asymmetries in explaining the colonization-extinction dynamics of this orchid in a network of 975 patches. We expected that wind direction could highly alter dispersal direction in this orchid. To account for this potential asymmetry, we modified the connectivity measure traditionally used in metapopulation models to allow for asymmetric effective distances between patches and subsequently estimated colonization and extinction probabilities using a dynamic occupancy modeling approach. Asymmetric movement was prevalent in the L. rupestris metapopulation and incorporating potential dispersal asymmetries resulted in higher colonization estimates in larger patches and more accurate models. Accounting for dispersal asymmetries may reveal connectivity effects where they were previously assumed to be negligible and may provide more reliable conclusions regarding the role of connectivity in patch dynamics. PMID:26054613

  20. On the dynamical influence of ocean eddy potential vorticity fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddison, J. R.; Marshall, D. P.; Shipton, J.

    2015-08-01

    The impact of eddy potential vorticity fluxes on the dynamical evolution of the flow is obscured by the presence of large and dynamically-inert rotational fluxes. However, the decomposition of eddy potential vorticity fluxes into rotational and divergent components is non-unique in a bounded domain and requires the imposition of an additional boundary condition. Here it is proposed to invoke a one-to-one correspondence between divergent eddy potential vorticity fluxes and non-divergent eddy momentum tendencies in the quasi-geostrophic residual-mean equations in order to select a unique divergent eddy potential vorticity flux. The divergent eddy potential vorticity flux satisfies a zero tangential component boundary condition. In a simply connected domain, the resulting divergent eddy potential vorticity flux satisfies a powerful optimality condition: it is the horizontally oriented divergent flux with minimum L2 norm. Hence there is a well-defined sense in which this approach removes as much of the dynamically inactive eddy potential vorticity flux as possible, and extracts an underlying dynamically active divergent eddy potential vorticity flux. It is shown that this approach leads to a divergent eddy potential vorticity flux which has an intuitive physical interpretation, via a direct relationship to the resulting forcing of the mean circulation.

  1. About compensation the electronic beam dynamic stratification influence in super-power relativistic Cherenkov oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Kurayev, Alexander A.; Rak, Alexey O.; Sinitsyn, Anatoly K.

    2011-07-01

    On the basis of the exact nonlinear theory relativistic TWT and BWO on irregular hollow waveguides with cathode filters-modulators with the account as propagating, and beyond cut-off waves, with the account of losses in walls of a waveguide and inhomogeneity directing an electronic beam magnetostatic fields finds out influence of dynamic stratification influence on efficiency of the generator. Possibility of almost fill compensation the electronic beam dynamic stratification influence on efficiency by optimization of an electronic beam arrangement in inhomogeneous high frequency and magnetic fields and characteristics of the irregular corrugated waveguide is shown. (author)

  2. Activity of striatal neurons reflects dynamic encoding and recoding of procedural memories.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Terra D; Kubota, Yasuo; Hu, Dan; Jin, Dezhe Z; Graybiel, Ann M

    2005-10-20

    Learning to perform a behavioural procedure as a well-ingrained habit requires extensive repetition of the behavioural sequence, and learning not to perform such behaviours is notoriously difficult. Yet regaining a habit can occur quickly, with even one or a few exposures to cues previously triggering the behaviour. To identify neural mechanisms that might underlie such learning dynamics, we made long-term recordings from multiple neurons in the sensorimotor striatum, a basal ganglia structure implicated in habit formation, in rats successively trained on a reward-based procedural task, given extinction training and then given reacquisition training. The spike activity of striatal output neurons, nodal points in cortico-basal ganglia circuits, changed markedly across multiple dimensions during each of these phases of learning. First, new patterns of task-related ensemble firing successively formed, reversed and then re-emerged. Second, task-irrelevant firing was suppressed, then rebounded, and then was suppressed again. These changing spike activity patterns were highly correlated with changes in behavioural performance. We propose that these changes in task representation in cortico-basal ganglia circuits represent neural equivalents of the explore-exploit behaviour characteristic of habit learning. PMID:16237445

  3. Encoding of Physics Concepts: Concreteness and Presentation Modality Reflected by Human Brain Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Kevin; She, Hsiao-Ching; Chen, Sheng-Chang; Chou, Wen-Chi; Huang, Li-Yu; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Gramann, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Previous research into working memory has focused on activations in different brain areas accompanying either different presentation modalities (verbal vs. non-verbal) or concreteness (abstract vs. concrete) of non-science concepts. Less research has been conducted investigating how scientific concepts are learned and further processed in working memory. To bridge this gap, the present study investigated human brain dynamics associated with encoding of physics concepts, taking both presentation modality and concreteness into account. Results of this study revealed greater theta and low-beta synchronization in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during encoding of concrete pictures as compared to the encoding of both high and low imageable words. In visual brain areas, greater theta activity accompanying stimulus onsets was observed for words as compared to pictures while stronger alpha suppression was observed in responses to pictures as compared to words. In general, the EEG oscillation patterns for encoding words of different levels of abstractness were comparable but differed significantly from encoding of pictures. These results provide insights into the effects of modality of presentation on human encoding of scientific concepts and thus might help in developing new ways to better teach scientific concepts in class. PMID:22848602

  4. Movement dynamics reflect a functional role for weak coupling and role structure in dyadic problem solving.

    PubMed

    Abney, Drew H; Paxton, Alexandra; Dale, Rick; Kello, Christopher T

    2015-11-01

    Successful interaction requires complex coordination of body movements. Previous research has suggested a functional role for coordination and especially synchronization (i.e., time-locked movement across individuals) in different types of human interaction contexts. Although such coordination has been shown to be nearly ubiquitous in human interaction, less is known about its function. One proposal is that synchrony supports and facilitates communication (Topics Cogn Sci 1:305-319, 2009). However, questions still remain about what the properties of coordination for optimizing communication might look like. In the present study, dyads worked together to construct towers from uncooked spaghetti and marshmallows. Using cross-recurrence quantification analysis, we found that dyads with loosely coupled gross body movements performed better, supporting recent work suggesting that simple synchrony may not be the key to effective performance (Riley et al. 2011). We also found evidence that leader-follower dynamics-when sensitive to the specific role structure of the interaction-impact task performance. We discuss our results with respect to the functional role of coordination in human interaction. PMID:25757891

  5. SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY OBSERVATIONS OF A REFLECTING LONGITUDINAL WAVE IN A CORONAL LOOP

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pankaj; Innes, D. E.; Inhester, B.

    2013-12-10

    We report high resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) of intensity oscillations in a hot, T ∼ 8-10 MK, loop. The AIA images show a large coronal loop that was rapidly heated following plasma ejection from one of the loop's footpoints. A wave-like intensity enhancement, seen very clearly in the 131 and 94 Å channel images, propagated ahead of the ejecta along the loop, and was reflected at the opposite footpoint. The wave reflected four times before fading. It was only seen in the hot, 131 and 94 Å channels. The characteristic period and the decay time of the oscillation were ∼630 and ∼440 s, respectively. The phase speed was about 460-510 km s{sup –1} which roughly matches the sound speed of the loop (430-480 km s{sup –1}). The observed properties of the oscillation are consistent with the observations of Dopper-shift oscillations discovered by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation and with their interpretation as slow magnetoacoustic waves. We suggest that the impulsive injection of plasma, following reconnection at one of the loop footpoints, led to rapid heating and the propagation of a longitudinal compressive wave along the loop. The wave bounces back and forth a couple of times before fading.

  6. Influence of subducted components on back-arc melting dynamics in the Manus Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beier, Christoph; Turner, Simon P.; Sinton, John M.; Gill, James B.

    2010-06-01

    Lavas erupted in back-arc basins afford the opportunity to explore the extent to which decompression and subduction-related components influence partial melting in this setting. We present U-Th-Ra disequilibria data from 24 well-characterized lavas from the Manus Basin behind the New Britain volcanic arc, supplemented by some additional trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data. The lavas range in composition from 49.6 to 57.7 wt % SiO2 and can be subdivided into those that are broadly like mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) with Ba/Nb < 16 and back-arc basin basalts (BABB) that are variably influenced by subduction components and have Ba/Nb > 16. Rifts closest to the arc are dominated by BABB, whereas both lavas types erupt further away at the Manus Spreading Center. The MORB have small 230Th excesses (up to 5%) and are displaced below the global correlation of (230Th/238U) with ridge depth. In most respects the BABB closely resemble lavas erupted along the New Britain arc front, including 238U excesses that reach 26%. The Pb isotope data can be explained by mixing of a subduction component into an Indian MORB mantle source. The Pb in the subduction component is derived from both the subducted sediment (5%) and fluids from the subducting altered Solomon Sea oceanic crust (95%), and these were mixed prior to addition to the mantle wedge. U/Th ratios, Fe3+/ΣFe, and H2O contents all increase with increasing 206Pb/204Pb. A model in which addition of the subduction component to the mantle wedge is followed by 230Th in-growth during decompression and dynamic melting all less than 140 kyr prior to eruption can simulate the data. However, our preferred model is one of dynamic decompression melting in which subduction-modified, more oxidized mantle had DU ≪ DTh leading to 238U excesses in contrast to unmodified mantle that yields 230Th excess. Large 226Ra excesses in some southern rift samples require addition of a fluid <8 kyr ago but elsewhere reflect melting under low

  7. Walking in simulated Martian gravity: influence of the portable life support system's design on dynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Scott-Pandorf, Melissa M; O'Connor, Daniel P; Layne, Charles S; Josić, Kresimir; Kurz, Max J

    2009-09-01

    With human exploration of the moon and Mars on the horizon, research considerations for space suit redesign have surfaced. The portable life support system (PLSS) used in conjunction with the space suit during the Apollo missions may have influenced the dynamic balance of the gait pattern. This investigation explored potential issues with the PLSS design that may arise during the Mars exploration. A better understanding of how the location of the PLSS load influences the dynamic stability of the gait pattern may provide insight, such that space missions may have more productive missions with a smaller risk of injury and damaging equipment while falling. We explored the influence the PLSS load position had on the dynamic stability of the walking pattern. While walking, participants wore a device built to simulate possible PLSS load configurations. Floquet and Lyapunov analysis techniques were used to quantify the dynamic stability of the gait pattern. The dynamic stability of the gait pattern was influenced by the position of load. PLSS loads that are placed high and forward on the torso resulted in less dynamically stable walking patterns than loads placed evenly and low on the torso. Furthermore, the kinematic results demonstrated that all joints of the lower extremity may be important for adjusting to different load placements and maintaining dynamic stability. Space scientists and engineers may want to consider PLSS designs that distribute loads evenly and low, and space suit designs that will not limit the sagittal plane range of motion at the lower extremity joints. PMID:19725694

  8. Dynamics of 2013 Sudden Stratospheric Warming event and its impact on cold weather over Eurasia: Role of planetary wave reflection.

    PubMed

    Nath, Debashis; Chen, Wen; Zelin, Cai; Pogoreltsev, Alexander Ivanovich; Wei, Ke

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the impact of stratospheric planetary wave reflection on tropospheric weather over Central Eurasia during the 2013 Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW) event. We analyze EP fluxes and Plumb wave activity fluxes to study the two and three dimensional aspects of wave propagation, respectively. The 2013 SSW event is excited by the combined influence of wavenumber 1 (WN1) and wavenumber 2 (WN2) planetary waves, which makes the event an unusual one and seems to have significant impact on tropospheric weather regime. We observe an extraordinary development of a ridge over the Siberian Tundra and the North Pacific during first development stage (last week of December 2012) and later from the North Atlantic in the second development stage (first week of January 2013), and these waves appear to be responsible for the excitation of the WN2 pattern during the SSW. The wave packets propagated upward and were then reflected back down to central Eurasia due to strong negative wind shear in the upper stratospheric polar jet, caused by the SSW event. Waves that propagated downward led to the formation of a deep trough over Eurasia and brought extreme cold weather over Kazakhstan, the Southern part of Russia and the Northwestern part of China during mid-January 2013. PMID:27051997

  9. Dynamics of 2013 Sudden Stratospheric Warming event and its impact on cold weather over Eurasia: Role of planetary wave reflection

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Debashis; Chen, Wen; Zelin, Cai; Pogoreltsev, Alexander Ivanovich; Wei, Ke

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the impact of stratospheric planetary wave reflection on tropospheric weather over Central Eurasia during the 2013 Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW) event. We analyze EP fluxes and Plumb wave activity fluxes to study the two and three dimensional aspects of wave propagation, respectively. The 2013 SSW event is excited by the combined influence of wavenumber 1 (WN1) and wavenumber 2 (WN2) planetary waves, which makes the event an unusual one and seems to have significant impact on tropospheric weather regime. We observe an extraordinary development of a ridge over the Siberian Tundra and the North Pacific during first development stage (last week of December 2012) and later from the North Atlantic in the second development stage (first week of January 2013), and these waves appear to be responsible for the excitation of the WN2 pattern during the SSW. The wave packets propagated upward and were then reflected back down to central Eurasia due to strong negative wind shear in the upper stratospheric polar jet, caused by the SSW event. Waves that propagated downward led to the formation of a deep trough over Eurasia and brought extreme cold weather over Kazakhstan, the Southern part of Russia and the Northwestern part of China during mid-January 2013. PMID:27051997

  10. Opinion dynamics and influencing on random geometric graphs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weituo; Lim, Chjan C; Korniss, G; Szymanski, Boleslaw K

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the two-word Naming Game on two-dimensional random geometric graphs. Studying this model advances our understanding of the spatial distribution and propagation of opinions in social dynamics. A main feature of this model is the spontaneous emergence of spatial structures called opinion domains which are geographic regions with clear boundaries within which all individuals share the same opinion. We provide the mean-field equation for the underlying dynamics and discuss several properties of the equation such as the stationary solutions and two-time-scale separation. For the evolution of the opinion domains we find that the opinion domain boundary propagates at a speed proportional to its curvature. Finally we investigate the impact of committed agents on opinion domains and find the scaling of consensus time. PMID:24993655

  11. The influence of surface adsorption on microbubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stride, E

    2008-06-28

    In a pure liquid, the behaviour of a gas or vapour microbubble is determined primarily by its size, the ambient pressure and the properties of the surrounding liquid. In practice, however, adsorption of a dissolved substance from the surrounding liquid onto the microbubble surface will often take place, producing a thin coating which can significantly affect both the microbubble's stability and its dynamic response. This can have important implications in a wide range of applications, including underwater acoustics, cavitation detection, medical imaging and drug delivery. The aim of this paper is to review the existing theoretical treatments of coated microbubbles and to present and discuss some recent developments. It will be shown that the presence of the coating can substantially modify the amplitude of microbubble volumetric oscillation, resonance characteristics and relative amplitude in tension and compression. Finally, the need for improved understanding of the dynamic behaviour of surface coatings at high frequencies will be discussed. PMID:18348975

  12. Using directed information for influence discovery in interconnected dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Arvind; Hero, Alfred O.; States, David J.; Engel, James Douglas

    2008-08-01

    Structure discovery in non-linear dynamical systems is an important and challenging problem that arises in various applications such as computational neuroscience, econometrics, and biological network discovery. Each of these systems have multiple interacting variables and the key problem is the inference of the underlying structure of the systems (which variables are connected to which others) based on the output observations (such as multiple time trajectories of the variables). Since such applications demand the inference of directed relationships among variables in these non-linear systems, current methods that have a linear assumption on structure or yield undirected variable dependencies are insufficient. Hence, in this work, we present a methodology for structure discovery using an information-theoretic metric called directed time information (DTI). Using both synthetic dynamical systems as well as true biological datasets (kidney development and T-cell data), we demonstrate the utility of DTI in such problems.

  13. Opinion Dynamics and Influencing on Random Geometric Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weituo; Lim, Chjan C.; Korniss, G.; Szymanski, Boleslaw K.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the two-word Naming Game on two-dimensional random geometric graphs. Studying this model advances our understanding of the spatial distribution and propagation of opinions in social dynamics. A main feature of this model is the spontaneous emergence of spatial structures called opinion domains which are geographic regions with clear boundaries within which all individuals share the same opinion. We provide the mean-field equation for the underlying dynamics and discuss several properties of the equation such as the stationary solutions and two-time-scale separation. For the evolution of the opinion domains we find that the opinion domain boundary propagates at a speed proportional to its curvature. Finally we investigate the impact of committed agents on opinion domains and find the scaling of consensus time. PMID:24993655

  14. Influence of initial conditions on compressible vorticity dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virk, D.; Hussain, F.

    1993-11-01

    Prompted by the lack of a unique choice of pressure ( P) and density (ρ) fields for a compressible free vortex and by the observed dependence of turbulence dynamics on initial P and ρ in compressible simulations, we address the effects of initial conditions on the evolution of a single vortex, on the prototypical phenomenon of vortex reconnection, and on two-dimensional turbulence. Two previous choices of initial conditions used for numerical simulations of compressible turbulence have been: (i) both P and ρ uniform (constant initial conditions, CIC), and (ii) uniform ρ with P determined from the Poisson equation (constant density initial conditions, CDIC). We find these initial conditions to be inappropriate for compressible vorticity dynamics studies. Specifically, in compressible reconnection, the effects of baroclinic vorticity generation and shocklet formation cancel each other during early evolution for CDIC, thus leading to almost incompressible behavior. Although CIC captures compressibility effects, it incorrectly changes the initial vorticity distribution by introducing strong acoustic transients, thereby significantly altering the evolving dynamics. Here, a new initial condition, called polytropic initial condition (PIC), is proposed, for which the Poisson equation is solved for initially polytropically related P and ρ fields. PIC provides P and ρ distributions within vortices which are consistent with those observed in shock-wedge interaction experiment and also leads to compressible solutions with no acoustic transients. At low Mach number ( M), we show that the effects of all these three initial conditions can be predicted by low- M asymptotic theories of the Navier-Stokes equations. At high M, it is shown here that inappropriate initial conditions may alter the evolutionary dynamics and, hence, lead to wrong conclusions regarding compressibility effects. We argue that PIC is a more appropriate choice.

  15. Influence of rubbing on rotor dynamics, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muszynska, Agnes; Bently, Donald E.; Franklin, Wesley D.; Hayashida, Robert D.; Kingsley, Lori M.; Curry, Arthur E.

    1989-01-01

    The results of analytical and experimental research on rotor-to-stationary element rubbing in rotating machines are presented. A characterization of physical phenomena associated with rubbing, as well as a literature survey on the subject of rub is given. The experimental results were obtained from two rubbing rotor rigs: one, which dynamically simulates the space shuttle main engine high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP), and the second one, much simpler, a two-mode rotor rig, designed for more generic studies on rotor-to-stator rubbing. Two areas were studied: generic rotor-to-stator rub-related dynamic phenomena affecting rotating machine behavior and applications to the space shuttle HPFTP. An outline of application of dynamic stiffness methodology for identification of rotor/bearing system modal parameters is given. The mathematical model of rotor/bearing/seal system under rub condition is given. The computer program was developed to calculate rotor responses. Compared with experimental results the computed results prove an adequacy of the model.

  16. Investigation of Influence of Modeling Fidelities on Supply Chain Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kulvatunyou, Boonserm; Son, Young Jun; Venkatestwaran, Jayendran

    2002-12-01

    In this paper, a three-echelon supply chain model is analyzed to determine strategies to reduce the total supply chain system dynamics. Many researchers have attempted to improve the system performance by simulation of an abstract model representing the actual supply chain. Uniqueness of the research in this paper stems from the usage of multiple models with varying degrees of detail representing the same supply chain. The significance of a detailed supply chain model on the quality of experimental result obtained is made clear. Combinations of the factors employed to build an abstract to a detailed supply chain model include: (i) Transportation and production delay, (ii) Demand at the retailer, and (iii) Production and transportation capacity. It is shown that the system dynamics itself varies with increasing detail in the supply chain model. In addition, it is examined to see if a strategy found effective in improving the system dynamics with an abstract supply chain model is also effective with a detailed supply chain model. For this purpose, the following strategies are identified: Inventory level determination, Lead time reduction, Access to Point of Sale (PoS) data I, Access to PoS data II and Vendor Managed Inventory. It is established that the strategy found to be the most effective on an abstract model of the supply chain is not always the best strategy for the real supply chain.

  17. Cluster influences on the internal dynamics of a galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. H.; Smith, B. F.

    1988-01-01

    As part of a study of cluster influences, an attempt is made to map out damage to a galaxy under several different kinds of buffeting a galaxy suffers as it sweeps along its orbit through a cluster. It is shown that a cluster's observational characteristics are determined by the shape of its gravitational potential. It is noted the model galaxy must have full freedom to do whatever the physical galaxy wants to do.

  18. 15N Content Reflects Development of Mycorrhizae and Nitrogen Dynamics During Primary Succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, E. A.; Jumpponen, A.

    2004-05-01

    influence of mycorrhizal fungi on plant N supply, and 3) 15N content of mycorrhizal fungi may be a marker of proteolytic capabilities, and may therefore indicate the importance of organic nitrogen cycling to plant nitrogen supply.

  19. Spectral reflectance patterns and temporal dynamics of common understory types in hemi-boreal forests in Järvselja, Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikopensius, Maris; Raabe, Kairi; Pisek, Jan

    2014-05-01

    The knowledge about spectral properties and seasonal dynamics of understory layers in boreal forests currently holds several gaps. This introduces severe uncertainties while modelling the carbon balance of this ecosystem, which is expected to be prone to major shifts with climate change in the future. In this work the seasonal reflectance dynamics in European hemi-boreal forests are studied. The data for this study was collected at Järvselja Training and Experimental Forestry District (Estonia, 27.26°E 58.30°N). Measurements were taken in three different stands. The silver birch (Betula Pendula Roth) stand grows on typical brown gley-soil and its understory vegetation is dominated by a mixture of several grass species. The Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stand grows on a bog with understory vegetation composed of sparse labrador tea, cotton grass, and a continuous Sphagnum moss layer. The third stand, Norway spruce (Picea abies), grows on a Gleyi Ferric Podzol site with understory vegetation either partially missing or consisting of mosses such as Hylocomium splendens or Pleurozium schreberi [1]. The sampling design was similar to the study by Rautiainen et al. [3] in northern European boreal forests. At each study site, a 100 m long permanent transect was marked with flags. In addition, four intensive study plots (1 m × 1 m) were marked next to the transects at 20 m intervals. The field campaign lasted from May to September 2013. For each site the fractional cover of understory and understory spectra were estimated ten times i.e. every 2 to 3 weeks. Results from Järvselja forest were compared with the seasonal profiles from boreal forests in Hyytiälä, Finland [2]. References [1] A. Kuusk, M. Lang, J. Kuusk, T. Lükk, T. Nilson, M. Mõttus, M. Rautiainen, and A. Eenmäe, "Database of optical and structural data for validation of radiative transfer models", Technical Report, September 2009 [2] M. Rautiainen, M. Mõttus, J. Heiskanen, A. Akujärvi, T. Majasalmi

  20. Autumn leaf subsidies influence spring dynamics of freshwater plankton communities.

    PubMed

    Fey, Samuel B; Mertens, Andrew N; Cottingham, Kathryn L

    2015-07-01

    While ecologists primarily focus on the immediate impact of ecological subsidies, understanding the importance of ecological subsidies requires quantifying the long-term temporal dynamics of subsidies on recipient ecosystems. Deciduous leaf litter transferred from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems exerts both immediate and lasting effects on stream food webs. Recently, deciduous leaf additions have also been shown to be important subsidies for planktonic food webs in ponds during autumn; however, the inter-seasonal effects of autumn leaf subsidies on planktonic food webs have not been studied. We hypothesized that autumn leaf drop will affect the spring dynamics of freshwater pond food webs by altering the availability of resources, water transparency, and the metabolic state of ponds. We created leaf-added and no-leaf-added field mesocosms in autumn 2012, allowed mesocosms to ice-over for the winter, and began sampling the physical, chemical, and biological properties of mesocosms immediately following ice-off in spring 2013. At ice-off, leaf additions reduced dissolved oxygen, elevated total phosphorus concentrations and dissolved materials, and did not alter temperature or total nitrogen. These initial abiotic effects contributed to higher bacterial densities and lower chlorophyll concentrations, but by the end of spring, the abiotic environment, chlorophyll and bacterial densities converged. By contrast, zooplankton densities diverged between treatments during the spring, with leaf additions stimulating copepods but inhibiting cladocerans. We hypothesized that these differences between zooplankton orders resulted from resource shifts following leaf additions. These results suggest that leaf subsidies can alter both the short- and long-term dynamics of planktonic food webs, and highlight the importance of fully understanding how ecological subsidies are integrated into recipient food webs. PMID:25761444

  1. Know yourself and you shall know the other... to a certain extent: multiple paths of influence of self-reflection on mindreading.

    PubMed

    Dimaggio, Giancarlo; Lysaker, Paul H; Carcione, Antonino; Nicolò, Giuseppe; Semerari, Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Social and neurocognitive research suggests that thinking about one's own thinking and thinking about the thinking of others-termed 'mindreading', 'metacognition', 'social cognition' or 'mentalizing' are not identical activities. The ability though to think about thinking in the first person is nevertheless related to the ability to think about other's thoughts in the third person. Unclear is how these phenomena influence one another. In this review, we explore how self-reflection and autobiographical memory influence the capacity to think about the thoughts and emotions of others. We review studies suggesting that the more individuals are able to reflect on and retrieve episodes from their life narratives, the more they are likely to grasp others' thoughts and emotions. We discuss evidence supporting this possibility including studies of the neurocognitive bases of empathy and self-awareness and how different aspects of self-reflection may impact on mindreading. We also draw from clinical reports how improved self-reflection may result in a more nuanced mindreading, namely persons suffering from schizophrenia and narcissistic personality disorder. We finally discuss the implications for research and practice and consider whether there are conditions in which the reverse is true, where self-reflection might impair mindreading or in which mindreading may facilitate self-reflection. PMID:18394921

  2. Influence of the Difficulty of the Matching Familiar Figures Test-20 on the Assessment of Reflection-Impulsivity: An Item Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carretero-Dios, Hugo; Macarena, De los Santos-Roig; Buela-Casal, Gualberto

    2008-01-01

    This study is an item analysis of the Matching Familiar Figures Test-20. We examined error scores in the Matching Familiar Figures Test-20 to determine the influence of the difficulty of the test on the assessment of reflection-impulsivity. The sample included 700 participants aged between 6 and 12 years. The results obtained from the corrected…

  3. The Influence of Reflective Opposite-Sex Norms and Importance of Opposite-Sex Approval on Adjudicated Student Drinking: Theoretical Extensions and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummer, Justin F.; LaBrie, Joseph W.; Lac, Andrew; Louie, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the salience and influence of reflective norms regarding opposite- sex friends, dating, and sexual partners on drinking behaviors of heterosexual college students sanctioned for violating the campus alcohol policy (i.e., adjudicated students). Results revealed that the level of importance placed on approval from the opposite…

  4. What's in Your Box? Promoting Self-Reflection and Analysis of External Influences on Gender Expression and Sexual Orientation Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priest, Hannah M.

    2014-01-01

    This lesson plan is designed to stimulate awareness and reflection on personal attitudes toward gender expression and sexual orientation. Participants are guided to identify and analyze how external influences from various socialization agents shape gender and sexual orientation norms and, consequently, personal attitudes about gender expression…

  5. Modelling of snow avalanche dynamics: influence of model parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhinskiy, A. N.

    The three-parameter hydraulic model of snow avalanche dynamics including the coefficients of dry and turbulent friction and the coefficient of new-snow-mass entrainment was investigated. The 'Domestic' avalanche site in Elbrus region, Caucasus, Russia, was chosen as the model avalanche range. According to the model, the fixed avalanche run-out can be achieved with various combinations of model parameters. At the fixed value of the coefficient of entrainment me, we have a curve on a plane of the coefficients of dry and turbulent friction. It was found that the family of curves (me is a parameter) are crossed at the single point. The value of the coefficient of turbulent friction at the cross-point remained practically constant for the maximum and average avalanche run-outs. The conclusions obtained are confirmed by the results of modelling for six arbitrarily chosen avalanche sites: three in the Khibiny mountains, Kola Peninsula, Russia, two in the Elbrus region and one idealized site with an exponential longitudinal profile. The dependences of run-out on the coefficient of dry friction are constructed for all the investigated avalanche sites. The results are important for the statistical simulation of avalanche dynamics since they suggest the possibility of using only one random model parameter, namely, the coefficient of dry friction, in the model. The histograms and distribution functions of the coefficient of dry friction are constructed and presented for avalanche sites Nos 22 and 43 (Khibiny mountains) and 'Domestic', with the available series of field data.

  6. Opinion dynamics on interacting networks: media competition and social influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    The inner dynamics of the multiple actors of the informations systems - i.e, T.V., newspapers, blogs, social network platforms, - play a fundamental role on the evolution of the public opinion. Coherently with the recent history of the information system (from few main stream media to the massive diffusion of socio-technical system), in this work we investigate how main stream media signed interaction might shape the opinion space. In particular we focus on how different size (in the number of media) and interaction patterns of the information system may affect collective debates and thus the opinions' distribution. We introduce a sophisticated computational model of opinion dynamics which accounts for the coexistence of media and gossip as separated mechanisms and for their feedback loops. The model accounts also for the effect of the media communication patterns by considering both the simple case where each medium mimics the behavior of the most successful one (to maximize the audience) and the case where there is polarization and thus competition among media memes. We show that plurality and competition within information sources lead to stable configurations where several and distant cultures coexist.

  7. Opinion dynamics on interacting networks: media competition and social influence.

    PubMed

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The inner dynamics of the multiple actors of the informations systems - i.e, T.V., newspapers, blogs, social network platforms, - play a fundamental role on the evolution of the public opinion. Coherently with the recent history of the information system (from few main stream media to the massive diffusion of socio-technical system), in this work we investigate how main stream media signed interaction might shape the opinion space. In particular we focus on how different size (in the number of media) and interaction patterns of the information system may affect collective debates and thus the opinions' distribution. We introduce a sophisticated computational model of opinion dynamics which accounts for the coexistence of media and gossip as separated mechanisms and for their feedback loops. The model accounts also for the effect of the media communication patterns by considering both the simple case where each medium mimics the behavior of the most successful one (to maximize the audience) and the case where there is polarization and thus competition among media memes. We show that plurality and competition within information sources lead to stable configurations where several and distant cultures coexist. PMID:24861995

  8. Influence of Opinion Dynamics on the Evolution of Games

    PubMed Central

    Gargiulo, Floriana; Ramasco, José J.

    2012-01-01

    Under certain circumstances such as lack of information or bounded rationality, human players can take decisions on which strategy to choose in a game on the basis of simple opinions. These opinions can be modified after each round by observing own or others payoff results but can be also modified after interchanging impressions with other players. In this way, the update of the strategies can become a question that goes beyond simple evolutionary rules based on fitness and become a social issue. In this work, we explore this scenario by coupling a game with an opinion dynamics model. The opinion is represented by a continuous variable that corresponds to the certainty of the agents respect to which strategy is best. The opinions transform into actions by making the selection of an strategy a stochastic event with a probability regulated by the opinion. A certain regard for the previous round payoff is included but the main update rules of the opinion are given by a model inspired in social interchanges. We find that the fixed points of the dynamics of the coupled model are different from those of the evolutionary game or the opinion models alone. Furthermore, new features emerge such as the independence of the fraction of cooperators with respect to the topology of the social interaction network or the presence of a small fraction of extremist players. PMID:23166600

  9. Dynamics of public opinion under the influence of epidemic spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Junhui; Ni, Shunjiang; Shen, Shifei

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel model with dynamically adjusted confidence level of others to investigate the propagation of public opinion on whether to buy chicken in the case of avian influenza infection in humans. We study how people adjust their confidence level in other people’s opinions according to their perceived infection risk and how the opinion evolution and epidemic spreading affect each other on different complex networks by taking into account the spreading feature of avian influenza, that is, only people who buy chicken are possible to be infected. The simulation results show that in a closed system, people who support buying chicken and people who are infected can achieve a dynamic balance after a few time-steps, and the final stable state is mainly dependent on the level of people’s risk perception, rather than the initial distribution of the different opinions. Our results imply that in the course of the epidemic spread, transparent and timely announcement of the number of infections and the risk of infection can help people take the right self-protection actions, and thus help control the spread of avian influenza.

  10. Opinion dynamics on interacting networks: media competition and social influence

    PubMed Central

    Quattrociocchi, Walter; Caldarelli, Guido; Scala, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The inner dynamics of the multiple actors of the informations systems – i.e, T.V., newspapers, blogs, social network platforms, – play a fundamental role on the evolution of the public opinion. Coherently with the recent history of the information system (from few main stream media to the massive diffusion of socio-technical system), in this work we investigate how main stream media signed interaction might shape the opinion space. In particular we focus on how different size (in the number of media) and interaction patterns of the information system may affect collective debates and thus the opinions' distribution. We introduce a sophisticated computational model of opinion dynamics which accounts for the coexistence of media and gossip as separated mechanisms and for their feedback loops. The model accounts also for the effect of the media communication patterns by considering both the simple case where each medium mimics the behavior of the most successful one (to maximize the audience) and the case where there is polarization and thus competition among media memes. We show that plurality and competition within information sources lead to stable configurations where several and distant cultures coexist. PMID:24861995

  11. Influence of optical polarization on the improvement of light extraction efficiency from reflective scattering structures in AlGaN ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wierer, J. J. Allerman, A. A.; Montaño, I.; Moseley, M. W.

    2014-08-11

    The improvement in light extraction efficiency from reflective scattering structures in AlGaN ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UVLEDs) emitting at ∼270 nm is shown to be influenced by optical polarization. Three UVLEDs with different reflective scattering structures are investigated and compared to standard UVLEDs without scattering structures. The optical polarization and therefore the direction of light propagation within the various UVLEDs are altered by changes in the quantum well (QW) thickness. The improvement in light extraction efficiency of the UVLEDs with reflective scattering structures increases, compared to the UVLEDs without scattering structures, as the fraction of emitted light propagating parallel to the QW plane increases. Additionally, the light extraction efficiency increases as the average distance to the reflective scattering structures decreases.

  12. Influence of the Reynolds number on chaotic mixing in a spatially periodic micromixer and its characterization using dynamical system techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, H. M.; Shu, C.; Wan, S. Y. M.; Chew, Y. T.

    2006-01-01

    A micromixer is a key component of various microfluidic systems, such as microreactors and μ-total analysis systems. One important strategy for passive mixer design is to generate chaotic advection using channel geometry, which usually has spatially periodic structures. In this paper, the influence of the Reynolds number on chaotic mixing in such mixers is studied with three mixer models. Characterization of the mixer with dynamical system techniques is also studied. The influence of fluid inertial effects on the occurrence of chaotic advection is first discussed. It is found that at low Re(Re < 1), the flow could become reversible in the mixer, which raises the difficulty to generate chaotic advection. In this case, specific fluid manipulations, such as stretching and folding processes, are necessary. This study also proposes a characterization method using Lyapunov exponent (λ) and Poincaré mapping information, which allows us to analyze the mixing performance of the mixer with one single mixer unit. Results show that it objectively reflects the dynamical properties of the mixers, such as being globally chaotic, partially chaotic or stable. So it can be used as an analytical tool to differentiate, evaluate and optimize various chaotic micromixers.

  13. The interplay of self-reflection, social interaction and random events in the dynamics of opinion flow in two-party democracies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenegger, Klaus; Hadzibeganovic, Tarik

    2016-01-01

    We propose a continuous process opinion formation model to study the dynamics of a multi-level relationship between voters, political parties, and facts in two-party democratic elections. In our model, opinions can take any real value between two extremes and an unaligned, moderate opinion state without a preference. Starting with a random opinion configuration, individual voter opinions evolve and change over time due to self-reflection, inter-personal communication, external media influence, and noise. Parties are influenced by their own ideologies, facts, and voters’ opinions. Elections are held periodically and the party that is closer in opinion to the majority of voters forms the new government. The government policy is then expected to be in proximity to the voter opinions and the policies of the currently ruling political party. We analyze the tension of opinions as a measure of how dramatically opinions can disagree within a given sample of voters and the success of the government and parties as the degree of coincidence between the policies and facts. Our model generates realistic quasi-periodic alternations between incumbents and challengers that are typical for two-party systems. Moreover, our model shows that relative to other voters’ strategies, conscious voting can lead to more successful governments of not only fact-oriented but also pragmatic and balanced political parties, irrespective of the strategies of the competing opposition parties. In addition, our simulations uncover several interesting features including less victories for strictly ideological or fact-oriented parties unless they include some aspects of populism or pragmatism. In this sense, our model can also describe situations where election outcomes are not necessarily based on votes for the current programs of competing parties and their placement on relevant issues, but instead result from voters’ dissatisfaction with the previous government and the votes against it.

  14. Reflecting Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galea, Simone

    2012-01-01

    This paper demystifies reflective practice on teaching by focusing on the idea of reflection itself and how it has been conceived by two philosophers, Plato and Irigaray. It argues that reflective practice has become a standardized method of defining the teacher in teacher education and teacher accreditation systems. It explores how practices of…

  15. The influence of engine/transmission/governor on tilting proprotor aircraft dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical model is developed for the dynamics of a tilting proprotor aircraft engine and drive train, including a rotor speed governor and interconnect shaft. The dynamic stability of a proprotor and cantilever wing is calculated, including the engine-transmission-governor model. It is concluded that the rotor behaves much as if windmilling as far as its dynamic behavior is concerned, with some influence of the turboshaft engine inertia and damping. The interconnect shaft has a significant influence on the antisymmetric dynamics of proprotor aircraft. The proprotor aerodynamics model is extended to include reverse flow, and a refinement on the method used to calculate the kinematic pitch-bending coupling of the blade is developed.

  16. On the influence of dynamic stress variations on strain accumulation in fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, A. S.; Shilko, E. V.; Astafurov, S. V.; Dimaki, A. V.; Vysotsky, E. M.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a numerical study of the influence of the stress state of interface of the block medium structural elements on the deformation response of interface to the dynamic impacts. It is shown that the basic characteristics of the stress state determining the deformation response of the interface are the values of shear stress and mean stress. It is found that the dependence of the irreversible displacement at the interface zone initiated by dynamic impact on the reduced shear stress is described by the logistic function. Herewith, the influence of the mean stress and dynamic impact energy on the value of displacement initiated by dynamic impact can be taken into account by dependence of the logistic function numerator on these parameters.

  17. Static versus dynamic loads as an influence on bone remodelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyon, L. E.; Rubin, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    Bone remodelling activity in the avian ulna was assessed under conditions of disuse alone, disuse with a superimposed continuous compressive load, and disuse interrupted by a short daily period of intermittent loading. The ulna preparation is made by two submetaphyseal osteotomies, the cut ends of the bone being covered with stainless steel caps which, together with the bone they enclosed, are pierced by pins emerging transcutaneously on the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the wing. The 110 mm long undisturbed section of the bone shaft can be protected from functional loading, loaded continuously in compression by joining the pins with springs, or loaded intermittently in compression by engaging the pins in an Instron machine. Similar loads (525 n) were used in both static and dynamic cases engendering similar peak strains at the bone's midshaft (-2000 x 10-6). The intermitent load was applied at a frequency of 1 Hz during a single 100 second period per day as a ramped square wave, with a rate of change of strain during the ramp of 0.01 per second.

  18. Micelle dynamic simulation and physicochemical characterization of biorelevant media to reflect gastrointestinal environment in fasted and fed states.

    PubMed

    Xie, XiaoYu; Cardot, Jean-Michel; Garrait, Ghislain; Thery, Vincent; El-Hajji, Mohamed; Beyssac, Eric

    2014-10-01

    The characterization of biorelevant media simulating the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract in the fasted and fed states was investigated by classical determination of physicochemical parameters such as pH, osmolality, surface tension and results were compared to in vivo physiological data. Incorporation of fatty material, in order to better simulate the influence of high fat meal was also performed. Stability and characterization of this medium was studied and compared to classical FeSSIF. Micelle characterization and computer dynamic simulation were performed in order to understand the interaction between lecithin and taurocholate and possible interactions between mixed micelle and drugs. The addition of NaTc, lecithin, and/or fatty materials has no influence on pH and osmolality, whereas the presence of fatty material modifies the surface tension. Values of FaSSIF and FeSSIF are in accordance with in vivo parameters and the presence of micelles can simulate the gastrointestinal environment. Modelization of micelles by computer simulation led to a model of mixed micelles in which structures of NaTc interact either by their hydrophilic or hydrophobic phase to give a bilayer stable model in which the lecithin molecule can insert its long carbon chain. The micelle structure is stable and can enhance dissolution of hydrophobic molecules by hydrophobic interaction with the numerous hydrophobic spaces available in the multilayer hydrophilic/hydrophobic layer. PMID:24954150

  19. Technology in postgraduate medical education: a dynamic influence on learning?

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Alison; Webb, Katie

    2015-01-01

    The influence of technology in medical workplace learning is explored by focusing on three uses: m-learning (notably apps), simulation and social media. Smartphones with point-of-care tools (such as textbooks, drug guides and medical calculators) can support workplace learning and doctors’ decision-making. Simulations can help develop technical skills and team interactions, and ‘in situ’ simulations improve the match between the virtual and the real. Social media (wikis, blogs, networking, YouTube) heralds a more participatory and collaborative approach to knowledge development. These uses of technology are related to Kolb's learning cycle and Eraut's intentions of informal learning. Contentions and controversies with these technologies exist. There is a problem with the terminology commonly adopted to describe the use of technology to enhance learning. Using learning technology in the workplace changes the interaction with others and raises issues of professionalism and etiquette. Lack of regulation makes assessment of app quality a challenge. Distraction and dependency are charges levelled at smartphone use in the workplace and these need further research. Unless addressed, these and other challenges will impede the benefits that technology may bring to postgraduate medical education. PMID:26341127

  20. Technology in postgraduate medical education: a dynamic influence on learning?

    PubMed

    Bullock, Alison; Webb, Katie

    2015-11-01

    The influence of technology in medical workplace learning is explored by focusing on three uses: m-learning (notably apps), simulation and social media. Smartphones with point-of-care tools (such as textbooks, drug guides and medical calculators) can support workplace learning and doctors' decision-making. Simulations can help develop technical skills and team interactions, and 'in situ' simulations improve the match between the virtual and the real. Social media (wikis, blogs, networking, YouTube) heralds a more participatory and collaborative approach to knowledge development. These uses of technology are related to Kolb's learning cycle and Eraut's intentions of informal learning. Contentions and controversies with these technologies exist. There is a problem with the terminology commonly adopted to describe the use of technology to enhance learning. Using learning technology in the workplace changes the interaction with others and raises issues of professionalism and etiquette. Lack of regulation makes assessment of app quality a challenge. Distraction and dependency are charges levelled at smartphone use in the workplace and these need further research. Unless addressed, these and other challenges will impede the benefits that technology may bring to postgraduate medical education. PMID:26341127

  1. The Influence of Video Reflection on Preservice Music Teachers' Concerns in Peer- and Field-Teaching Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Sean R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate preservice music teacher concerns as stated in written reflections before and after video feedback. Nineteen preservice music teachers enrolled in instrumental methods courses wrote free-response reflections of peer- and field-teaching episodes. Statements were coded utilizing the Fuller and Bown…

  2. The Influence of Sun Position and Clouds on Reflectance and Vegetation Indices of Greenhouse-Grown Corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The reflectance characteristics of plants and plant canopies far from solar noon or with cloudy skies are not well known. This is an obstacle to making real-time variable-rate N fertilizer applications based on canopy reflectance because such a system must work under cloudy skies and at all times of...

  3. Influence of volume fraction on the dynamics of granular impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbanhowar, Paul; Yang, Ding; Goldman, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    Variation of the volume fraction φ of non-cohesive granular media causes disproportionate changes in the forces exerted on impacting objects and, consequently, the impact kinematics. In our experiments, a computer controlled air fluidized granular bed is used to vary φ from 0.58 (low) to 0.62 (high) for 0.3 mm diameter glass spheres and 1̃ mm poppy seeds. An accelerometer attached to a 4.0 cm diameter steel sphere measures collision forces for initial impact velocities ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 m/s. As an example of the dramatic changes produced by varying φ, time series of the force during impact with poppy seeds at an impact velocity of 1 m/s change from monotonically increasing with slope 100 N/s at φ=0.59 to monotonically decreasing with slope -100 N/s at φ=0.62; glass beads show similar behavior. Increasing φ from low to high at fixed collision velocity causes the penetration depth to decrease monotonically by approximately 50%. However, for the same parameters, the collision duration changes little, decreasing by 10% as φ is increased from 0.58 to 0.6 and then increasing by about 3% as φ is increased to 0.63. Our impact simulations exhibit the same collision dynamics vs. φ and reveal qualitative differences in grain velocity fields and local volume fraction changes between low and high φ states. Support by the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and the Army Research Lab MAST CTA.

  4. Is the Calcite-Water Interface Understood? Direct Comparisons of Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Specular X-ray Reflectivity Data

    SciTech Connect

    Fenter, Paul; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Raiteri, Paolo; Gale, Julian D.

    2013-04-01

    New insights into the structure of the calcite-water interface are obtained through direct model-independent comparison of multiple classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with high-resolution specular X-ray reflectivity (XR) data. This set of comparisons, with four different state-of-the-art force fields (including two non-polarizable, one polarizable, and one reactive force field), reveal new insights into the absolute accuracy of the simulated structures and the uniqueness of the XR-derived structural results. These four simulations, while qualitatively similar, have visibly distinct interfacial structure, and are distinguished through a quantitative comparison of the XR signals calculated from these simulations with experimental XR data. The results demonstrate that the simulated calcite-water interface structures, as a whole, are not consistent with the XR data (i.e., within their precision and accuracy). This disagreement is largely due to the simulation of the calcite lattice. The simulated interfacial water profiles show substantially different levels of agreement with the XR data. Of these, the rigid-ion model (RIM) simulations show the best consistency with the experimental XR data. Further model-dependent comparisons of the structural parameters that describe the interfacial structure (derived from both the MD simulations and the XR data) provide further insight into the sources of differences between these two approaches. Using the new insights from the RIM simulations, new structures of the calcite-water interface consistent with both the experimental data and the simulation are identified and compared to recent results.

  5. Influence of Andean Plateau Rise on South American Climate Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insel, N.; Poulsen, C. J.; Ehlers, T. A.

    2008-12-01

    Large mountain ranges exhibit a first-order control on climate. In South America, the modern Andes act as a barrier to atmospheric flow and control regional wind and precipitation patterns. However, it is unclear how climate may have changed over time as Andean topography developed. We present results from a regional general circulation model (RegCM3) to evaluate dynamical and physical atmospheric changes associated with variations in Andean plateau height during the Cenozoic. A series of five experiments were conducted with plateau topography systematically varying between 0 and 100% of the modern. Experiments were performed over a continental-scale domain with 60km horizontal resolution using the MIT-Emanuel convection scheme. Land surface characteristics, sea-surface temperatures and atmospheric boundary conditions were specified from modern NCEP reanalysis data. Model results show that large-scale upper-level (200 mbar) circulation characteristics are only weakly affected by the removal of the Andes with a slight weakening and eastward shift of the high pressure system over Bolivia. However, low-level (800 mbar) wind patterns change significantly and have a direct effect on precipitation in South America. The following features can be observed as the Andean topography decreases: (1) The dominant wind direction in the central Andes reverses with prevailing winds sourced from the Pacific Ocean. The Westerlies are characterized by low moisture content due to the presence of the cold Humboldt current along the west coast of South America. (2) A reduction in the surface pressure gradient between the Andes and the Amazon Basin reduces convergence over the plateau and suppresses the South American low level jet, reducing the southward moisture flux along the eastern flanks of the Andes that is the primary source for precipitation in the Chaco region. These changes lead to declines in precipitation over the Andes and decreased latent heat release. This results in a

  6. Improved Aerodynamic Influence Coefficients for Dynamic Aeroelastic Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Patrice

    2011-12-01

    Currently at Bombardier Aerospace, aeroelastic analyses are performed using the Doublet Lattice Method (DLM) incorporated in the NASTRAN solver. This method proves to be very reliable and fast in preliminary design stages where wind tunnel experimental results are often not available. Unfortunately, the geometric simplifications and limitations of the DLM, based on the lifting surfaces theory, reduce the ability of this method to give reliable results for all flow conditions, particularly in transonic flow. Therefore, a new method has been developed involving aerodynamic data from high-fidelity CFD codes which solve the Euler or Navier-Stokes equations. These new aerodynamic loads are transmitted to the NASTRAN aeroelastic module through improved aerodynamic influence coefficients (AIC). A cantilevered wing model is created from the Global Express structural model and a set of natural modes is calculated for a baseline configuration of the structure. The baseline mode shapes are then combined with an interpolation scheme to deform the 3-D CFD mesh necessary for Euler and Navier-Stokes analyses. An uncoupled approach is preferred to allow aerodynamic information from different CFD codes. Following the steady state CFD analyses, pressure differences ( DeltaCp), calculated between the deformed models and the original geometry, lead to aerodynamic loads which are transferred to the DLM model. A modal-based AIC method is applied to the aerodynamic matrices of NASTRAN based on a least-square approximation to evaluate aerodynamic loads of a different wing configuration which displays similar types of mode shapes. The methodology developed in this research creates weighting factors based on steady CFD analyses which have an equivalent reduced frequency of zero. These factors are applied to both the real and imaginary part of the aerodynamic matrices as well as all reduced frequencies used in the PK-Method which solves flutter problems. The modal-based AIC method

  7. Influence of saturation on the reflection and refraction at the interface between two semi-infinite poroelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, C.-L.; Lo, W.-C.; Jan, C.-D.; Lee, J.-W.

    2012-04-01

    Based on the theoretical model derived by Yeh et al. (2010), this study simulates and analyzes reflection and refraction of incident elastic waves on a plane interface between two semi-infinite poroelastic half-spaces saturated by two different fluid mixtures. The amplitude and energy ratios of reflected and refracted waves considering the effect of motional modes, inertial and viscous couplings are determined for the first time with respect to water saturation of an incident P1 wave (the first dilatational wave). A plot of amplitude and energy ratios of reflected and refracted waves as a function of water saturation using an illustrative example with Lincoln sand containing an air-water mixture in the lower half-space and Columbia fine sandy loam bearing an oil-water mixture in the upper half-space. Analytical results indicate that the amplitude and energy ratios have the same magnitude order as phase speed, and the ratios of refracted and reflected waves are markedly affected by different physical parameters. This study further elucidates the difference in reflection and refraction between the oblique (30°) and normal (0°) incidences at the interface. The normal incident case have similar trend with the oblique case but no reflected and refracted SV waves exist. The sum of the energy ratio under each degree of water saturation equals unity. Additionally, amplitude and energy ratios of reflected and refracted waves are affected significantly by degree of saturation.

  8. Remote sensing study of the influence of herbicides on the spectral reflectance of pea plant leaves (Pisum sativum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, D.; Alexieva, V.; Yanev, T.; Ivanov, S.

    Results from a remote sensing study of spectral reflectance of leaves of pea plants Pisum sativum L treated by the herbicides atrazine 2 4-D glyphosate fluridone and chlorsulfuron are reported According to the classification of the Herbicide Action Committee reflecting their mode of action they belong to different groups photosystem II bloker - C1 atrazine synthetic auxins - O 2 4-D inhibition of EPSP synthase - G glyphosate photobleaching - F1 fluridone and inhibition of acetoctate synthase - B chlorsulfuron The plants studied were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber in a nutritious medium to which every herbicide was added at three low concentrations 1 mu M 0 1 mu M and 0 01 mu M with respect to the field dose applied in the agricultural practice The spectral measurements of the leaf spectral reflectance were carried out in laboratory using a multichannel spectrometer in the visible and near infrared regions of the spectrum 480 div 810 nm Data was registered in 128 channels at a high spectral resolution of 2 6 nm halfwidth and a spatial resolution of 2 mm 2 The reflectance spectra were obtained from the leaf-reflected radiation referenced against a standard white screen To assess the changes arising in the leaf spectral reflectance under the herbicide action the developed by us approach based on discriminant analysis and other statistical methods was applied The spectral reflectance characteristics SRC were investigated in three spectral intervals 520 div 580 nm region of maximal

  9. Influence of short-circuit duration on dynamic stresses in substations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsanakas, D.K.; Papadias, B.C.

    1983-02-01

    The short-circuit peak current and the electromagnetic short-circuit peak force appear at about 10 ms after the short-circuit inception. However, the maximum value of dynamic stress due to the electromagnetic forces may occur much later and depends on the fundamental frequency of the structure. A decrease in dynamic stress can be obtained even if the short-circuit duration is much longer than 10 ms. In the present work, the dynamic stress on stiff conductors and insulators during the short-circuit, as well as, the subsequent free oscillation after fault clearing, are analytically determined and the influence of short-circuit duration on the dynamic stress in certain cases of busbar structures is investigated. Furthermore, the shortest short-circuit duration which results in maximum dynamic stress is given for the entire range of the relevant mechanical fundamental frequencies.

  10. Evolution from surface-influenced to bulk-like dynamics in nanoscopically confined water.

    PubMed

    Romero-Vargas Castrillón, Santiago; Giovambattista, Nicolás; Aksay, Ilhan A; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2009-06-11

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the influence of confinement on the dynamics of a nanoscopic water film at T = 300 K and rho = 1.0 g cm(-3). We consider two infinite hydrophilic (beta-cristobalite) silica surfaces separated by distances between 0.6 and 5.0 nm. The width of the region characterized by surface-dominated slowing down of water rotational dynamics is approximately 0.5 nm, while the corresponding width for translational dynamics is approximately 1.0 nm. The different extent of perturbation undergone by the in-plane dynamic properties is evidence of rotational-translational decoupling. The local in-plane rotational relaxation time and translational diffusion coefficient collapse onto confinement-independent "master" profiles as long as the separation d >or= 1.0 nm. Long-time tails in the perpendicular component of the dipole moment autocorrelation function are indicative of anisotropic behavior in the rotational relaxation. PMID:19449830

  11. Remote sensing of temperate coniferous forest lead area index - The influence of canopy closure, understory vegetation and background reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanner, Michael A.; Pierce, Lars L.; Running, Steven W.; Peterson, David L.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to the effects of canopy closure, understory vegetation, and background reflectance on the relationship between Landsat TM data and the leaf area index (LAI) of temperate coniferous forests in the western U.S. A methodology for correcting TM data for atmospheric conditions and sun-surface-sensor geometry is discussed. Strong inverse curvilinear relationships were found between coniferous forest LAI and TM bands 3 and 5. It is suggested that these inverse relationships are due to increased reflectance of understory vegetation and background in open stands of lower LAI and decreased reflectance of the overstory in closed canopy stands with higher LAI.

  12. Influence of land-use dynamics on natural hazard risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Giacomo; Thaler, Thomas; Fuchs, Sven

    2016-04-01

    In the recent past the magnitude and frequency of natural hazard events has increased notably worldwide, along with global GDP. A higher number of elements are exposed to natural events, therefore the risk is higher. Both estimated losses and understanding about natural hazards have increased during the past decades, which is contradictory as we may logically think. Risk is increasing, due to climate change and societal change: more severe hazards are happening due to changing climatic patterns and conditions, while society is concentrating assets and people in punctual places leading to a higher exposure. Increasing surface of settled area and the concentration of highly valuable assets (e.g. technology) in exposed areas lead to higher probability of losses. Human use of land resources, namely landuse, is the product of human needs and biophysical characteristics of the land. Landuse involves arrangements, activities and inputs people undertake in a certain land cover type to produce, change or maintain it. These changes are due to many reasons, or driving factors: socio-economical, environmental, accessibility to land, land-tenure, etc. The change of those factors may cause many effects and impacts, at various levels and at different time spans. The relation between driving factors and impacts is not straight. It is although a complex interrelation that turns around two central questions: (1) what drives landuse changes and why and (2) what are the impacts on the environment and on the human society of these changes, regarding to natural hazards. The aim of this paper is to analyse the spatio-temporal environmental changes referring to exposure as well as to test the possibilities and limitations of the land use change model Dyna-CLUEs in a mountain region taking parts of the Republic of Austria as an example, and simulating the future landuse dynamics until 2030. We selected an area composed by eighteen municipalities in the Ill-Walgau in the Austrian federal

  13. Reach-Scale Hydraulic Influence on Sediment Dynamics and Morphological Development in a Bedrock Influenced River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entwistle, N. S.; Heritage, G. L.; Milan, D. J.; Tooth, S.

    2014-12-01

    Many large rivers in southern Africa are characterised by a macro-channel cut 10 - 20 m into the ancient planation surface. This has resulted in a variable channel morphology strongly influenced by bedrock outcrops. The influence of bedrock upon flow hydraulics and sediment transport often results in a repeat sequence of alluvial channel types behind bedrock obstructions. This study investigates the hydraulic controls on channel type sequencing on the Sabie River, which drains a 6500 km2 semi-arid catchment of the Lowveld of South Africa and Mozambique. Aerial LIDAR data within the Kruger National Park was interrogated to isolate a bedrock influenced anastomosing reach, together with its associated alluvial sequences up- and downstream. These data were used to create a 2m DEM and a 2D flow model (JFLOW) was used to simulate a sequence of flows from 20 m3s-1 to 5000 m3s-1, with spatial data on water surface, flow depth and channel velocity extracted from the model. Water surface data revealed the strong gradient control exerted by the bedrock influenced anastomosed channel, creating hydraulic conditions suitable for deposition upstream and restricting sedimentation downstream. Steepening of the gradient through the anastomosing reach resulted in altered hydraulics and a changed pattern of sedimentation. At moderate discharges, flow is distributed efficiently across numerous interconnected channels, over low berms and islands, promoting sedimentation. Similarly the backwater effect encourages deposition of fine sediments upstream to create and maintain the alluvial sequence. Under higher flows, water levels rise significantly in the confined upstream reach and shear stress exceeds the threshold necessary to strip stored sediment. In contrast, conditions within the anastomosed reach remain less energetic due to the continued effect of flow distribution. Under extreme flow conditions the bedrock influence is drowned out resulting in dramatically increased energy levels

  14. Understanding the Influence of Organizational Culture and Group Dynamics on Organizational Change and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Colleen; Kline, Theresa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between organizational culture, group dynamics, and organizational learning in the context of organizational change. Design/methodology/approach: A case study was used to examine cultural and group level factors that potentially influence groups' learning in the context of…

  15. Biometrics Technology: Understanding Dynamics Influencing Adoption for Control of Identification Deception within Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwatu, Gideon U.

    2011-01-01

    One of the objectives of any government is the establishment of an effective solution to significantly control crime. Identity fraud in Nigeria has generated global attention and negative publicity toward its citizens. The research problem addressed in this study was the lack of understanding of the dynamics that influenced the adoption and…

  16. Acculturation and Latino Family Processes: How Cultural Involvement, Biculturalism, and Acculturation Gaps Influence Family Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smokowski, Paul R.; Rose, Roderick; Bacallao, Martica L.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated how adolescent and parent acculturation (culture-of-origin and U.S. cultural involvement, biculturalism, acculturation conflicts, and parent-adolescent acculturation gaps) influenced family dynamics (family cohesion, adaptability, familism, and parent-adolescent conflict) in a sample of 402 Latino families from North…

  17. Temporal Dynamics of Hypothesis Generation: The Influences of Data Serial Order, Data Consistency, and Elicitation Timing

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Nicholas D.; Thomas, Rick P.; Davelaar, Eddy J.

    2012-01-01

    The pre-decisional process of hypothesis generation is a ubiquitous cognitive faculty that we continually employ in an effort to understand our environment and thereby support appropriate judgments and decisions. Although we are beginning to understand the fundamental processes underlying hypothesis generation, little is known about how various temporal dynamics, inherent in real world generation tasks, influence the retrieval of hypotheses from long-term memory. This paper presents two experiments investigating three data acquisition dynamics in a simulated medical diagnosis task. The results indicate that the mere serial order of data, data consistency (with previously generated hypotheses), and mode of responding influence the hypothesis generation process. An extension of the HyGene computational model endowed with dynamic data acquisition processes is forwarded and explored to provide an account of the present data. PMID:22754547

  18. Analysis of discontinuities influence on the differences between static and dynamic elastic modulus of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sava, Mihaela; Hadǎr, Anton; Pǎrǎuşanu, Ioan; Petrescu, Horia-Alexandru; Baciu, Florin; Marinel, Stǎnescu Marius

    2016-06-01

    The influence of discontinuities is important for a correct determination of static and dynamic elastic characteristics of the material. In this paper we presented differences arising between the elastic modulus static and dynamic, laminated composite materials reinforced with carbon fiber, aramid and carbon-aramid, depending on the non-uniformity coefficient. For the study were determined static elastic modulus by carrying out traction tests and dynamic elastic modulus by determining the vibration frequency, on specimens of each type of material with and without discontinuities [1]. The elastic properties of composite materials resistance and can be influenced by various defects that arise from technological manufacturing process. This is important for the production of large series of parts of fiber-reinforced composite material, the fibers in the matrix distribution is not uniform. Studies on the mechanical behavior of composites with random distribution of fabrics are made in [2].

  19. Influence of wheel-rail contact modelling on vehicle dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgelman, Nico; Sichani, Matin Sh.; Enblom, Roger; Berg, Mats; Li, Zili; Dollevoet, Rolf

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a comparison of four models of rolling contact used for online contact force evaluation in rail vehicle dynamics. Until now only a few wheel-rail contact models have been used for online simulation in multibody software (MBS). Many more models exist and their behaviour has been studied offline, but a comparative study of the mutual influence between the calculation of the creep forces and the simulated vehicle dynamics seems to be missing. Such a comparison would help researchers with the assessment of accuracy and calculation time. The contact methods investigated in this paper are FASTSIM, Linder, Kik-Piotrowski and Stripes. They are compared through a coupling between an MBS for the vehicle simulation and Matlab for the contact models. This way the influence of the creep force calculation on the vehicle simulation is investigated. More specifically this study focuses on the influence of the contact model on the simulation of the hunting motion and on the curving behaviour.

  20. Influences of Ice Crystal Number Concentrations and Habits on Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komurcu, Muge

    2015-07-01

    Mixed-phase clouds are frequently present in the Arctic atmosphere, and strongly affect the surface energy budget. In this study, the influences of ice crystal number concentrations and crystal growth habits on the Arctic mixed-phase cloud microphysics and dynamics are investigated for internally and externally driven cloud systems using an eddy-resolving model. Separate simulations are performed with increasing ice concentrations and different ice crystal habits. It is found that the habit influence on cloud microphysics and dynamics is as pronounced as increasing the ice crystal concentrations for internally driven clouds and more dominant for externally driven clouds. Habit influence can lead to a 10 % reduction in surface incident longwave radiation flux. Sensitivity tests are performed to identify the interactions between processes affecting cloud dynamics that allow for persistent clouds (i.e., the radiative cooling at cloud top, ice precipitation stabilization at cloud-base). When cloud-base stabilization influences of ice precipitation are weak, cloud dynamics is more sensitive to radiative cooling. Additional sensitivity simulations are done with increasing surface latent and sensible heat fluxes to identify the influences of external forcing on cloud dynamics. It is found that the magnitude of cloud circulations for an externally driven cloud system with strong precipitation and weak surface fluxes is similar to a weakly precipitating, optically thick, internally driven cloud. For cloud systems with intense ice precipitation obtained through either increasing ice crystal concentrations or assuming ice crystal shapes that grow rapidly and fall fast, the cloud layer may collapse despite the moistening effect of surface fluxes.

  1. Influence of non-equilibrium carrier dynamics on pulse amplification in semiconductor gain media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttge, C. N.; Hader, J.; Kilen, I.; Koch, S. W.; Moloney, J. V.

    2015-03-01

    The influence of non-equilibrium carrier dynamics on pulse propagation through inverted semiconductor gain media is investigated. For this purpose, a fully microscopic many-body model is coupled to a Maxwell solver, allowing for a self-consistent investigation of the light-matter-coupling and carrier dynamics, the optical response of the laser and absorber in the multiple-quantum-well medium, and the modification of the light field through the resulting optical polarization. The influence of the intra-pulse dynamics on the magnitude and spectral dependence of pulse amplification for single pulses passing through inverted quantum-well media is identified. In this connection, the pulse-induced non-equilibrium deviations of the carrier distributions, the kinetic-hole filling kinetics in the gain medium, and the saturable-absorber-relaxation dynamics are scrutinized. While pulses shorter than about 100 fs are found to be rather unaffected by the carrier-relaxation dynamics, the pump-related dynamics become prominent for pulses in the multi-picosecond range leading to significant amplification.

  2. Electromagnetic diathermia: a lymphoscintigraphic and light reflection rheographic study of leg lymphatic and venous dynamics in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, P; Kempenaers, F; Vermijlen, S; Van Waeyenberghe, C; Kerckhofs, E; Bossuyt, A; Van den Brande, P; Lievens, P

    2000-03-01

    Because electromagnetic diathermia (ED) has been reported to reduce lymphedema, we opted to examine the effects of ED on leg venous and lymph dynamics in healthy subjects. To examine lymph flow, we performed lymphangioscintigraphy (LAS) in 10 subjects without leg edema and used static images at the injection site and at the inguinal region for "control data." Later, we applied ED (2450 MHz, 200W) and then repeated the LAS using the same dosage and volume. Differences between the first and second sessions were examined using two way ANOVA and the differences between the scores with or without ED were analyzed by a Student's t-test. To examine venous flow, we first tested the left lower leg of 15 healthy subjects on two occasions using light reflection rheography (LRR). Venous refill time was recorded after each individual performed 10 dorsiflexions with the left foot on three occasions with an interval of 3 minutes between each recording. Thereafter, 20 minutes ED (2450 MHz, 200 W) was applied and using the same protocol venous refill time was recorded and repeated after an interval of one week. The 20% level and the declination angle of the refill time was determined and differences between the experimental and control groups analyzed by ANOVA. The results between the first and second sessions were consistent and reproducible with or without the electromagnetic application, with no change of radiotracer transport from the injection site or arrival at the inguinal nodes. There was also a high correlation between the scores for the 50% level and declination angle (r = 0.97) after LRR. Thus, after ED there was an accelerated venous refill time. In conclusion, after ED there was no increase in lymph flow but there was accelerated venous return. PMID:10769811

  3. Culturally Relevant Physical Education in Urban Schools: Reflecting Cultural Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flory, Sara B.; McCaughtry, Nate

    2011-01-01

    Using a three-part theoretical framework, the cultural relevance cycle--which consists of (a) knowing community dynamics, (b) knowing how community dynamics influence educational processes, and (c) implementing strategies that reflect cultural knowledge of the community--we examined teachers' and students' perspectives on culturally relevant…

  4. On the influence of low initial pressure and detonation stochastic nature on Mach reflection of gaseous detonation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. J.; Guo, C. M.

    2014-09-01

    The two-dimensional, time-dependent and reactive Navier-Stokes equations were solved to obtain an insight into Mach reflection of gaseous detonation in a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture diluted by 25 % argon. This mixture generates a mode-7 detonation wave under an initial pressure of 8.00 kPa. Chemical kinetics was simulated by an eight-species, forty-eight-reaction mechanism. It was found that a Mach reflection mode always occurs for a planar detonation wave or planar air shock wave sweeping over wedges with apex angles ranging from to . However, for cellular detonation waves, regular reflection always occurs first, which then transforms into Mach reflection. This phenomenon is more evident for detonations ignited under low initial pressure. Low initial pressure may lead to a curved wave front, that determines the reflection mode. The stochastic nature of boundary shape and transition distance, during deflagration-to-detonation transition, leads to relative disorder of detonation cell location and cell shape. Consequently, when a detonation wave hits the wedge apex, there appears a stochastic variation of triple point origin and variation of the angle between the triple point trajectory and the wedge surface. As the wedge apex angle increases, the distance between the triple point trajectory origin and the wedge apex increases, and the angle between the triple point trajectory and the wedge surface decreases exponentially.

  5. Influence of Subglacial Conditions on Ice Stream Dynamics: Seismic and Potential Field Data from Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M.; Jordan, T. A.; Ferraccioli, F.; Bingham, R. G.

    2012-12-01

    A synthesis of geophysical and glaciological data sets are used to investigate the relationship between ice dynamics and the underlying geology on Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica. We find correlations between subglacial geology and the variability in the flow of the overlying ice. Seismic reflection amplitude analysis shows a layer of soft water-saturated sediment immediately beneath the ice. Beneath this, gravity and magnetic data indicate harder rocks containing a significant geological boundary, aligned in the ice-flow direction. Crossing this boundary, the ice velocity decreases whilst bed roughness and modeled basal drag both increase. The acoustic impedance of the soft sediments at the ice-bed interface shows no significant change across the boundary. The smoother glacier bed, overlying thicker sediments, appears to facilitate the fastest flow. Where the bed is rougher, the soft sediment layer beneath the ice is very thin and overlies basement rocks. We propose that the rough surface of the basement rocks beneath this thin sediment increases the basal drag on the ice, through the intervening soft sediment, without a detectable influence on the sediment's acoustic properties. Changes in the sub-bed (i.e. deeper than the ice-bed interface) lithology appear to account for the contrasting basal drag and ice velocity patterns over the glacier. Subglacial erosion could soon remove the thin sediment layer leading to increased basal drag and reduced ice flow in the future. We conclude that the subglacial geology plays a significant role in controlling the spatial pattern of present-day ice flow and that the consequences of subglacial erosion may be reflected in temporal changes to the ice dynamics in the past and perhaps also in the near future. Schematic of synthesized subglacial interpretation from the area of the seismic surveys. Arrow lengths for ice velocity and basal drag indicate relative magnitudes.

  6. How Different Molecular Architectures Influence the Dynamics of H-Bonded Structures in Glass-Forming Monohydroxy Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Wikarek, M; Pawlus, S; Tripathy, Satya N; Szulc, A; Paluch, M

    2016-06-30

    Primary alcohols have been an active area of research since the beginning of the 20th century. The main problem in studying monohydroxy alcohols is the molecular origin of the slower Debye relaxation, whereas the faster process, recognized as structural relaxation, remains much less investigated. This is because in many primary alcohols the structural process is strongly overlapped by the dominating Debye relaxation. Additionally, there is still no answer for many fundamental questions concerning the origin of the molecular characteristic properties of these materials. One of them is the role of molecular architecture in the formation of hydrogen-bonded structures and its potential connection to the relaxation dynamics of Debye and structural relaxation processes. In this article, we present the results of ambient and high-pressure dielectric studies of monohydroxy alcohols with similar chemical structures but different carbon chain lengths (2-ethyl-1-butanol and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol) and positions of the OH- group (2-methyl-2-hexanol and 2-methyl-3-hexanol). New data are compared with previously collected results for 5-methyl-2-hexanol. We note that differences in molecular architecture have a significant influence on the formation of hydrogen-bonded structures, which is reflected in the behavior of the Debye and structural relaxation processes. Intriguingly, studying the relaxation dynamics in monohydroxy alcohols at high pressures of up to p = 1700 MPa delivers a fundamental bridge to understand the potential connection between molecular conformation and its response to the characteristic properties of these materials. PMID:27254726

  7. Influence of the leaving group on the dynamics of a gas-phase SN2 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stei, Martin; Carrascosa, Eduardo; Kainz, Martin A.; Kelkar, Aditya H.; Meyer, Jennifer; Szabó, István; Czakó, Gábor; Wester, Roland

    2016-02-01

    In addition to the nucleophile and solvent, the leaving group has a significant influence on SN2 nucleophilic substitution reactions. Its role is frequently discussed with respect to reactivity, but its influence on the reaction dynamics remains unclear. Here, we uncover the influence of the leaving group on the gas-phase dynamics of SN2 reactions in a combined approach of crossed-beam imaging and dynamics simulations. We have studied the reaction F- + CH3Cl and compared it to F- + CH3I. For the two leaving groups, Cl and I, we find very similar structures and energetics, but the dynamics show qualitatively different features. Simple scaling of the leaving group mass does not explain these differences. Instead, the relevant impact parameters for the reaction mechanisms are found to be crucial and the differences are attributed to the relative orientation of the approaching reactants. This effect occurs on short timescales and may also prevail in solution-phase conditions.

  8. Reflections in the Mirror of Reggio Emilia's Soul: John Dewey's Foundational Influence on Pedagogy in the Italian Educational Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Gai

    2015-01-01

    This paper articulates John Dewey's socio-political and historical influence upon the foundation and evolution of the world-renowned Reggio Emilia approach to early childhood education. It proposes that the pedagogical depth, influence and endurance of the Italian project are grounded in Dewey's philosophies of education, aesthetics and democracy.…

  9. Remote Sensing Study of the Influence of Different Herbicides on the Leaf Spectral Reflectance and Fluorescence of Pea Plants (Pisum sativum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krezhova, Dora; Yanev, Tony; Iliev, Ilko; Alexieva, Vera; Tsaneva, Mariana

    The effective use of airborne and satellite-based remote sensor systems in resource management, agriculture, mineral exploration and environmental monitoring requires an understanding of the nature and limitations of the high-resolution remote sensing data and of various strategies for processing and interpreting it. In developing the necessary knowledge base, ground-based measurements are the expedient source of information. In this study, remote sensing techniques were applied in laboratory for detection of the influence of herbicides 2.4-D, glyphosate, fluridone and acifluorfen on the leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence of pea plants (Pisum sativum L.). According to the classification of the Herbicide Resistance Action Committee with reference to their mode of action they belong to different groups: synthetic auxins - O (2.4-D), inhibition of EPSP synthase - G (glyphosate), photobleaching - F1 (fluridone), and inhibition of PPO - E (acifluorfen). During the last 40 years, these herbicides are among the ones used most widely in agriculture worldwide. The plants studied were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber in a nutritious medium to which every herbicide was added at two low concentrations (1 µM, 0.1 µM) with respect to the field dose applied in the agricultural practice. High-resolution spectral data for leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence were collected from freshly detached leaves using three multichannel spectrometers. Spectral reflectance characteristics were obtained from the leaf reflectance referenced against a standard (white diffuse screen) in the visible and near infrared ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum (450÷850 nm). Fluorescence spectra were taken in the spectral range 650-850 nm. To assess the changes arising in leaf spectral reflectance under the herbicide action we developed and applied an analytical approach based on discriminant analysis and other statistical methods. The spectral characteristics were analyzed in

  10. Analysis of Relaxation Spectra and Influence of Molecular Weight on the Dynamics of Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethuraman, Vaidyanathan; Ganesan, Venkat

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study both the normal mode dynamics of block copolymers and the influence of MW on the dynamics of the block copolymer. We considered two models to isolate the specific effects arising from the morphological ordering and mobility disparities between the blocks. We effected an explicit normal mode analysis of the chain dynamics in the ordered phases in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the plane of the lamella. For systems with no mobility disparity between the blocks, our analysis demonstrates that the normal modes and their relaxations in the planes parallel and perpendicular to the lamella exhibit significant deviations from the Rouse modes. For systems in which the mobility of one of the blocks was frozen in the lamellar phase, the normal modes closely resembled the Rouse modes for tethered polymers. To understand the spatial inhomogeneities in segmental dynamics of lamellar diblock copolymer systems we probed the local average relaxation times and the dynamical heterogeneities as a function of distance from the interface. Scaling of our results indicate that the interfacial width of the ordered phases serves as the length scale underlying the spatial inhomogeneities in segmental dynamics of the fast monomers. Funded by NSF.

  11. Liberating Moral Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horell, Harold D.

    2013-01-01

    The author argues that if we are to foster life-giving and liberating moral reflection, we must first liberate moral reflection from distortions; specifically, from the distorting effects of moral insensitivity, destructive moral relativism, and confusions resulting from a failure to understand the dynamics of moral reflection. The author proposes…

  12. Kaolin-based foliar reflectant and water deficit influence Malbec leaf and berry temperature, pigments, and photosynthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of a kaolin-based foliar reflectant on traits of commercial interest in the red-skinned wine grape cultivar Malbec (Vitis vinifera L.) were evaluated over three growing seasons by measuring the surface temperatures of leaves and clusters, leaf-level assimilation, leaf and berry pigment c...

  13. The Influence of Cooperative Education and Reflection upon Previous Work Experiences on University Graduates' Vocational Self-Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drewery, David; Nevison, Colleen; Pretti, T. Judene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the relative effects of participation in cooperative education (co-op) and engagement in reflection upon previous work experiences on undergraduate students' vocational self-concept (VSC) at graduation. Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional survey of graduating students (n = 1,483) from a…

  14. Influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1995-01-01

    This semiannual status report lists specific accomplishments made on the research of the influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports. Papers have been presented representing work done on the T-501 engine model; an experimental/simulation study of auxiliary bearing rotordynamics; and a description of a rotordynamical model for a magnetic bearing supported rotor system, including auxiliary bearing effects. A finite element model for a foil bearing has been developed. Additional studies of rotor/bearing/housing dynamics are currently being performed as are studies of the effects of sideloading on auxiliary bearing rotordynamics using the magnetic bearing supported rotor model.

  15. Influence of temperature on spin polarization dynamics in dilute nitride semiconductors—Role of nonparamagnetic centers

    SciTech Connect

    Baranowski, M.; Misiewicz, J.

    2015-10-21

    We report theoretical studies of spin polarization dynamics in dilute nitride semiconductors. We develop a commonly used rate equation model [Lagarde et al., Phys. Status Solidi A 204, 208 (2007) and Kunold et al. Phys. Rev. B 83, 165202 (2011)] to take into account the influence of shallow localizing states on the temperature dependence of spin polarization dynamics and a spin filtering effect. Presented investigations show that the experimentally observed temperature dependence of a spin polarization lifetime in dilute nitrides can be related to the electron capture process by shallow localizing states without paramagnetic properties. This process reduces the efficiency of spin filtering effect by deep paramagnetic centers, especially at low temperatures.

  16. Dynamic Balancing of Isoprene Carbon Sources Reflects Photosynthetic and Photorespiratory Responses to Temperature Stress1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Jeffrey; Alves, Eliane G.; Teixeira, Andrea; Garcia, Sabrina; Holm, Jennifer; Higuchi, Niro; Manzi, Antonio; Abrell, Leif; Fuentes, Jose D.; Nielsen, Lars K.; Torn, Margaret S.; Vickers, Claudia E.

    2014-01-01

    The volatile gas isoprene is emitted in teragrams per annum quantities from the terrestrial biosphere and exerts a large effect on atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene is made primarily from recently fixed photosynthate; however, alternate carbon sources play an important role, particularly when photosynthate is limiting. We examined the relative contribution of these alternate carbon sources under changes in light and temperature, the two environmental conditions that have the strongest influence over isoprene emission. Using a novel real-time analytical approach that allowed us to examine dynamic changes in carbon sources, we observed that relative contributions do not change as a function of light intensity. We found that the classical uncoupling of isoprene emission from net photosynthesis at elevated leaf temperatures is associated with an increased contribution of alternate carbon. We also observed a rapid compensatory response where alternate carbon sources compensated for transient decreases in recently fixed carbon during thermal ramping, thereby maintaining overall increases in isoprene production rates at high temperatures. Photorespiration is known to contribute to the decline in net photosynthesis at high leaf temperatures. A reduction in the temperature at which the contribution of alternate carbon sources increased was observed under photorespiratory conditions, while photosynthetic conditions increased this temperature. Feeding [2-13C]glycine (a photorespiratory intermediate) stimulated emissions of [13C1–5]isoprene and 13CO2, supporting the possibility that photorespiration can provide an alternate source of carbon for isoprene synthesis. Our observations have important implications for establishing improved mechanistic predictions of isoprene emissions and primary carbon metabolism, particularly under the predicted increases in future global temperatures. PMID:25318937

  17. In Search of Multi-Peaked Reflective Spectrum with Optic Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor for Dynamic Strain Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Hsiang

    2006-01-01

    In a typical optic fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain measurement, unless in an ideal static laboratory environment, the presence of vibration or often disturbance always exists, which often creates spurious multiple peaks in the reflected spectrum, resulting in a non-unique determination of strain value. In this report we attempt to investigate the origin of this phenomenon by physical arguments and simple numerical simulation. We postulate that the fiber gratings execute small amplitude transverse vibrations changing the optical path in which the reflected light traverses slightly and non-uniformly. Ultimately, this causes the multi-peak reflected spectrum.

  18. Influence of external magnetic field on dynamics of open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2007-03-15

    The influence of an external magnetic field on the non-Markovian dynamics of an open two-dimensional quantum system is investigated. The fluctuations of collective coordinate and momentum and transport coefficients are studied for a charged harmonic oscillator linearly coupled to a neutral bosonic heat bath. It is shown that the dissipation of collective energy slows down with increasing strength of the external magnetic field. The role of magnetic field in the diffusion processes is illustrated by several examples.

  19. Long-range correlations improve understanding of the influence of network structure on contact dynamics.

    PubMed

    Peyrard, N; Dieckmann, U; Franc, A

    2008-05-01

    Models of infectious diseases are characterized by a phase transition between extinction and persistence. A challenge in contemporary epidemiology is to understand how the geometry of a host's interaction network influences disease dynamics close to the critical point of such a transition. Here we address this challenge with the help of moment closures. Traditional moment closures, however, do not provide satisfactory predictions close to such critical points. We therefore introduce a new method for incorporating longer-range correlations into existing closures. Our method is technically simple, remains computationally tractable and significantly improves the approximation's performance. Our extended closures thus provide an innovative tool for quantifying the influence of interaction networks on spatially or socially structured disease dynamics. In particular, we examine the effects of a network's clustering coefficient, as well as of new geometrical measures, such as a network's square clustering coefficients. We compare the relative performance of different closures from the literature, with or without our long-range extension. In this way, we demonstrate that the normalized version of the Bethe approximation-extended to incorporate long-range correlations according to our method-is an especially good candidate for studying influences of network structure. Our numerical results highlight the importance of the clustering coefficient and the square clustering coefficient for predicting disease dynamics at low and intermediate values of transmission rate, and demonstrate the significance of path redundancy for disease persistence. PMID:18262579

  20. Superfluid {sup 3}He, a two-fluid system, with the normal-fluid dynamics dominated by Andreev reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, G. R.

    2014-12-15

    As a specific offering towards his festschrift, we present a review the various properties of the excitation gas in superfluid {sup 3}He, which depend on Andreev reflection. This phenomenon dominates many of the properties of the normal fluid, especially at the lowest temperatures. We outline the ideas behind this dominance and describe a sample of the many experiments in this system which the operation of Andreev reflection has made possible, from temperature measurement, particle detection, vortex imaging to cosmological analogues.

  1. Influence of surface oxidation on ion dynamics and capacitance in porous and nonporous carbon electrodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dyatkin, Boris; Zhang, Yu; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Cheng, Yongqiang; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Cummings, Peter T.; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2016-04-07

    Here, we investigate the influence of surface chemistry and ion confinement on capacitance and electrosorption dynamics of room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) in supercapacitors. Using air oxidation and vacuum annealing, we produced defunctionalized and oxygen-rich surfaces of carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) and graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs). While oxidized surfaces of porous CDCs improve capacitance and rate handling abilities of ions, defunctionalized nonporous GNPs improve charge storage densities on planar electrodes. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) probed the structure, dynamics, and orientation of RTIL ions confined in divergently functionalized pores. Oxidized, ionophilic surfaces draw ions closer to pore surfaces andmore » enhance potential-driven ion transport during electrosorption. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations corroborated experimental data and demonstrated the significance of surface functional groups on ion orientations, accumulation densities, and capacitance.« less

  2. The new car following model considering vehicle dynamics influence and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dihua; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Geng; Zhao, Min

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the car following model is investigated by considering the vehicle dynamics in a cyber physical view. In fact, that driving is a typical cyber physical process which couples the cyber aspect of the vehicles' information and driving decision tightly with the dynamics and physics of the vehicles and traffic environment. However, the influence from the physical (vehicle) view was been ignored in the previous car following models. In order to describe the car following behavior more reasonably in real traffic, a new car following model by considering vehicle dynamics (for short, D-CFM) is proposed. In this paper, we take the full velocity difference (FVD) car following model as a case. The stability condition is given on the base of the control theory. The analytical method and numerical simulation results show that the new models can describe the evolution of traffic congestion. The simulations also show vehicles with a more actual acceleration of starting process than early models.

  3. Quantification of the influence of the track geometry variability on the train dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, G.; Duhamel, D.; Soize, C.; Funfschilling, C.

    2015-08-01

    In a context of increasing interoperability, several high speed trains are likely to run on the same tracks, whereas they have been originally designed for specific railway networks. Due to different mechanical properties, the dynamic behaviors of the vehicles will be very different from one train to another. The track-vehicle system being strongly non-linear, the dynamic interaction between the vehicle and the railway track has moreover to be analyzed not only on a few track portions but on the whole realm of possibilities of running conditions that the train can be confronted to during its life cycle. The idea of this paper is therefore to show to what extent this influence of the track geometry variability on the train dynamics can be analyzed from the coupling of a deterministic multibody modeling of the train with a track geometry stochastic modeling, which has been identified and validated from experimental data.

  4. The influence of compliant chassis components on motorcycle dynamics: an historical overview and the potential future impact of carbon fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Kelvin; Thomas, Richard; Williams, Owen

    2012-07-01

    This paper details the influence of compliant chassis components on motorcycle dynamics. Initially, research which has previously been carried out in terms of motorcycle dynamics and in particular the impact of compliant chassis components on motorcycle dynamics is discussed. This paper then considers the consequences of these findings with regard to the use of modern materials such as carbon fibre reinforced plastics and the impact they will potentially have on motorcycle dynamics and its simulation.

  5. The influence of atmospheric dynamics and climate modes on mean and extreme values of column ozone over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Johnson, B.; Evans, R. D.; Manney, G. L.; Rieder, H.

    2013-12-01

    Column ozone measurements are available from five US stations since the 1960s. These time series contain valuable information about the inter-annual variability and trends in the atmospheric ozone field related to natural and anthropogenic processes. In addition to total column measurements Umkehr ozone profiles are derived on every clear, sunny day in Boulder, CO, since 1978. These vertical measurements allow for the attributing total column ozone variability to processes of both tropospheric or stratospheric origin. It is well known that ozone in the free troposphere and lower stratosphere is greatly influenced by atmospheric dynamics. Equivalent Latitude and the position of the individual stations with respect to the subtropical and polar jets can be used to relate the variability of total ozone to transport processes. In this study we use data of all five long-term Dobson stations across the US to investigate the influence of atmospheric dynamics and climate modes, i.e., the Northern Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on total ozone variability and trends since the 1960s. In addition to standard evaluation techniques we utilize a so called STL-decomposition method (Seasonal-Trend decomposition procedure based on Loess) and methods of statistical extreme value theory (EVT) to address the temporal variability and trends in the Dobson data, as well as synoptic-scale meteorological (i.e., subtropical jets) and climate variability. While ozone depleting substances dominate the overall negative trend in column ozone over the observational record, our analysis shows that dynamical features such as the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) and climate modes such as ENSO and NAO contribute significantly to ozone variability (and trends) at all 5 US Dobson stations. Some individual stations capture extremes that reflect regional events more strongly than others; the signature of such events becomes clearer when comparing ozone variability

  6. Dynamical parameter analysis of continuous seismic signals of Popocatépetl volcano (Central Mexico): A case of tectonic earthquakes influencing volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárraga, Marta; Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana; Carniel, Roberto; Martínez-Bringas, Alicia; García, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2012-06-01

    The continuous background seismic activity contains information on the internal state of a volcanic system. Here, we report the influence of major regional tectonic earthquakes (M > 5 in most cases) on such state, reflected as changes in the spectral and dynamical parameters of the volcano continuous seismic data. Although changes do not always occur, analysis of five cases of earthquake-induced variations in the signals recorded at Popocatépetl volcano in central México reveal significant fluctuations following the tectonic earthquakes. External visible volcanic activity, such as small to moderate explosions and ash emissions, were related to those fluctuations. We briefly discuss possible causes of the variations. We conclude that recognition of fluctuations in the dynamical parameters in volcano monitoring seismic signals after tectonic earthquakes, even those located in the far field, hundreds of kilometers away, may provide an additional criterion for eruption forecasting, and for decision making in the definition of volcanic alert levels.

  7. Assessing the Extent of Influence Subglacial Hydrology Has on Dynamic Ice Sheet Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babonis, G. S.; Csatho, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    Numerous recent studies have done an excellent job capturing and quantifying the complex pattern of dynamic changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) over the past several decades. The timing of changes in ice velocities and mass balance indicate that the mechanisms controlling these behaviors, both external and internal, act over variable spatial and temporal regimes, can change in rapid and complex fashion, and have significant effect on ice sheet behavior as well as sea level rise. With roughly half of the estimated ice loss from the GrIS attributed to dynamic processes, these changes account for about 250 Gt/yr (2003-2008), equivalence to 0.6 mm/yr sea level rise. One of the primary influences of dynamic ice behavior is ice sheet hydrology, including the storage and transport of water from the supraglacial to subglacial environment, and the subsequent development of water transport pathways, thus demonstrating the need for further characterization of the subglacial environment. Enhanced dynamic flow of ice due to the influence of meltwater distribution on the subglacial environment has been reported, including In-SAR observations of large velocity increases over short periods of time, suggesting regions where dynamic changes are likely being caused by changes in hydrology. Additionally, building upon the 1993-2011 laser altimetry record, analyzed by our Surface Elevation Reconstruction And Change detection (SERAC) procedure, we have detected complex patterns of rapid thickening and thinning patterns over several outlet glaciers. This study presents a comprehensive investigation of hydrologic control on dynamic glacier behavior for several key sites in Greenland. We combine a high resolution surface digital elevation model (DEM) derived by fusing space- and airborne laser altimetry observations and SPIRIT SPOT DEMs, with a high resolution, hydrologically-corrected bedrock DEM derived from a combination of CResIS and Operation Icebridge ice penetrating radar data

  8. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in thin films at reflecting substrates as a means to study nanoscale structure and dynamics at soft-matter interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Täuber, Daniela; Radscheit, Kathrin; von Borczyskowski, Christian; Schulz, Michael; Osipov, Vladimir Al.

    2016-07-01

    Structure and dynamics at soft-matter interfaces play an important role in nature and technical applications. Optical single-molecule investigations are noninvasive and capable to reveal heterogeneities at the nanoscale. In this work we develop an autocorrelation function (ACF) approach to retrieve tracer diffusion parameters obtained from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) experiments in thin liquid films at reflecting substrates. This approach then is used to investigate structure and dynamics in 100-nm-thick 8CB liquid crystal films on silicon wafers with five different oxide thicknesses. We find a different extension of the structural reorientation of 8CB at the solid-liquid interface for thin and for thick oxide. For the thin oxides, the perylenediimide tracer diffusion dynamics in general agrees with the hydrodynamic modeling using no-slip boundary conditions with only a small deviation close to the substrate, while a considerably stronger decrease of the interfacial tracer diffusion is found for the thick oxides.

  9. Reflective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2013-01-01

    Thomas Farrell's "Reflective Teaching" outlines four principles that take teachers from just doing reflection to making it a way of being. Using the four principles, Reflective Practice Is Evidence Based, Reflective Practice Involves Dialogue, Reflective Practice Links Beliefs and Practices, and Reflective Practice Is a Way of Life,…

  10. Inertial stochastic dynamics. II. Influence of inertia on slow kinetic processes of supercoiled DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Daniel A.; Schlick, Tamar

    2000-05-01

    We apply our new algorithms presented in the companion paper (LTID: long-time-step inertial dynamics, IBD: inertial Brownian dynamics) for mass-dependent Langevin dynamics (LD) with hydrodynamics, as well as the standard Brownian dynamical (BD) propagator, to study the thermal fluctuations of supercoiled DNA minicircles. Our DNA model accounts for twisting, bending, and salt-screened electrostatic interactions. Though inertial relaxation times are on the order of picoseconds, much slower kinetic processes are affected by the Brownian (noninertial) approximation typically employed. By comparing results of LTID and IBD to those generated using the standard (BD) algorithm, we find that the equilibrium fluctuations in writhing number, Wr, and radius of gyration, Rg, are influenced by mass-dependent terms. The autocorrelation functions for these quantities differ between the BD simulations and the inertial LD simulations by as much as 10%. In contrast, when the nonequilibrium process of relaxation from a perturbed state is examined, all methods (inertial and diffusive) yield similar results with no detectable statistical differences between the mean folding pathways. Thus, while the evolution of an ensemble toward equilibrium is equally well described by the inertial and the noninertial methods, thermal fluctuations are influenced by inertia. Examination of such equilibrium fluctuations in a biologically relevant macroscopic property—namely the two-site intermolecular distance—reveals mass-dependent behavior: The rate of juxtaposition of linearly distant sites along a 1500-base pair DNA plasmid, occurring over time scales of milliseconds and longer, is increased by about 8% when results from IBD are compared to those from BD. Since inertial modes that decay on the picosecond time scale in the absence of thermal forces exert an influence on slower fluctuations in macroscopic properties, we advocate that IBD be used for generating long-time trajectories of supercoiled

  11. The influence of electrostatic forces on the structure and dynamics of molecular ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, C.; Steinhauser, O.

    2008-06-01

    The vast majority of molecular dynamics simulations are based on nonpolarizable force fields with fixed partial charges for all atoms. The traditional way to obtain these charges are quantum-mechanical calculations performed prior to simulation. Unfortunately, the set of the partial charges heavily relies on the method and the basis set used. Therefore, investigations of the influence of charge variation on simulation data are necessary in order to validate various charge sets. This paper elucidates the consequences of different charge sets on the structure and dynamics of the ionic liquid: 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium dicyanoamide. The structural features seem to be more or less independent of the partial charge set pointing to a dominance of shape force as modeled by Lennard-Jones parameters. This can be seen in the radial distribution and orientational correlation functions. The role of electrostatic forces comes in when studying dynamical properties. Here, significant deviations between different charge sets can be observed. Overall, dynamics seems to be governed by viscosity. In fact, all dynamical parameters presented in this work can be converted from one charge set to another by viscosity scaling.

  12. Active colonization dynamics and diversity patterns are influenced by dendritic network connectivity and species interactions

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Mathew; Altermatt, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Habitat network connectivity influences colonization dynamics, species invasions, and biodiversity patterns. Recent theoretical work suggests dendritic networks, such as those found in rivers, alter expectations regarding colonization and dispersal dynamics compared with other network types. As many native and non-native species are spreading along river networks, this may have important ecological implications. However, experimental studies testing the effects of network structure on colonization and diversity patterns are scarce. Up to now, experimental studies have only considered networks where sites are connected with small corridors, or dispersal was experimentally controlled, which eliminates possible effects of species interactions on colonization dynamics. Here, we tested the effect of network connectivity and species interactions on colonization dynamics using continuous linear and dendritic (i.e., river-like) networks, which allow for active dispersal. We used a set of six protist species and one rotifer species in linear and dendritic microcosm networks. At the start of the experiment, we introduced species, either singularly or as a community within the networks. Species subsequently actively colonized the networks. We periodically measured densities of species throughout the networks over 2 weeks to track community dynamics, colonization, and diversity patterns. We found that colonization of dendritic networks was faster compared with colonization of linear networks, which resulted in higher local mean species richness in dendritic networks. Initially, community similarity was also greater in dendritic networks compared with linear networks, but this effect vanished over time. The presence of species interactions increased community evenness over time, compared with extrapolations from single-species setups. Our experimental findings confirm previous theoretical work and show that network connectivity, species-specific dispersal ability, and species

  13. When meaning matters: The temporal dynamics of semantic influences on visual attention.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Floor; Huettig, Falk; Olivers, Christian N L

    2016-02-01

    An important question is, to what extent is visual attention driven by the semantics of individual objects, rather than by their visual appearance? This study investigates the hypothesis that timing is a crucial factor in the occurrence and strength of semantic influences on visual orienting. To assess the dynamics of such influences, the authors presented the target instruction either before or after visual stimulus onset, while eye movements were continuously recorded throughout the search. The results show a substantial but delayed bias in orienting toward semantically related objects compared with visually related objects when target instruction is presented before visual stimulus onset. However, this delay can be completely undone by presenting the visual information before the target instruction (Experiment 1). Moreover, the absence or presence of visual competition does not change the temporal dynamics of the semantic bias (Experiment 2). Visual orienting is thus driven by priority settings that dynamically shift between visual and semantic representations, with each of these types of bias operating largely independently. The findings bridge the divide between the visual attention and the psycholinguistic literature. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26322686

  14. Influence of DPH on the Structure and Dynamics of a DPPC Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Repáková, Jarmila; Holopainen, Juha M.; Morrow, Michael R.; McDonald, Mark C.; Čapková, Pavla; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2005-01-01

    We have conducted extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations together with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments to quantify the influence of free 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) fluorescent probes on the structure and dynamics of a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer. Atomistic MD simulations show that in the membrane-water interface the influence of DPH is minor, whereas in the acyl-chain region DPH gives rise to major perturbations. In the latter case, DPH is found to influence a wide range of membrane properties, such as the packing and ordering of hydrocarbon tails and the lateral diffusion of lipid molecules. The effects are prominent but of local nature, i.e., the changes observed in the properties of lipid molecules are significant in the vicinity of DPH, but reduce rapidly as the distance from the probe increases. Long-range perturbations due to DPH are hence not expected. Detailed DSC and 2H NMR measurements support this view. DSC shows only subtle perturbation to the cooperative behavior of the membrane system in the presence of DPH, and 2H NMR shows that DPH gives rise to a slight increase in the lipid chain order, in agreement with MD simulations. Potential effects of other probes such as pyrene are briefly discussed. PMID:15722435

  15. Behavioral correlates of the decision process in a dynamic environment: post-choice latencies reflect relative value and choice evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Justine; Westbrook, Fred; Arabzadeh, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    One characteristic of natural environments is that outcomes vary across time. Animals need to adapt to these environmental changes and adjust their choices accordingly. In this experiment, we investigated the sensitivity with which rats could detect, and adapt to, multiple changes in the environment. Rats chose between two spouts which delivered 5% sucrose rewards with distinct probabilities. Across three phases, reward probabilities changed in size (large or small) and direction (increase or decrease). A discrete trial-structure was used, which allowed the choice process to be decomposed into three distinct response latency measures (choice execution latency, spout sampling duration, and trial-initiation latency). We found that a large decrease in reward probabilities rapidly produced the greatest change in choice proportions. The time taken to execute a choice reflected the differences in reward probabilities across the two spouts in some cases, but also reflected training history. By contrast, the amount of time rats spent responding at reward spouts in anticipation of reward consistently reflected the relative likelihood of reward across the two spouts and not the absolute probability of reward. The latency to initiate the subsequent trial reflected choice evaluation. These three response latencies thus indexed key behavioral correlates of the choice process as it unfolds in time. We discuss how this paradigm can be used to assess the corresponding neural correlates of decision-making. PMID:26483649

  16. Reducing the influence of direct reflection on return signal detection in a 3D imaging lidar system by rotating the polarizing beam splitter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhui; Lee, Xiaobao; Cui, Tianxiang; Qu, Yang; Li, Yunxi; Li, Hailong; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    The direction rule of the laser beam traveling through a deflected polarizing beam splitter (PBS) cube is derived. It reveals that, due to the influence of end-face reflection of the PBS at the detector side, the emergent beam coming from the incident beam parallels the direction of the original case without rotation, with only a very small translation interval between them. The formula of the translation interval is also given. Meanwhile, the emergent beam from the return signal at the detector side deflects at an angle twice that of the PBS rotation angle. The correctness has been verified by an experiment. The intensity transmittance of the emergent beam when propagating in the PBS is changes very little if the rotation angle is less than 35 deg. In a 3D imaging lidar system, by rotating the PBS cube by an angle, the direction of the return signal optical axis is separated from that of the origin, which can decrease or eliminate the influence of direct reflection caused by the prism end face on target return signal detection. This has been checked by experiment. PMID:26974613

  17. Influence of the rotor-stator interaction on the dynamic stresses of Francis runners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, R.; Deniau, J. L.; Scolaro, D.; Colombet, C.

    2012-11-01

    Thanks to advances in computing capabilities and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques, it is now possible to calculate realistic unsteady pressure fields in Francis turbines. This paper will explain methods to calculate the structural loads and the dynamic behaviour in order to optimize the turbine design and maximize its reliability and lifetime. Depending on the operating conditions of a Francis turbine, different hydraulic phenomena may impact the mechanical behaviour of the structure. According to their nature, these highly variable phenomena should be treated differently and specifically in order to estimate the potential risks arising on submerged structures, in particular the runner. The operating condition studied thereafter is the point at maximum power with the maximum head. Under this condition, the runner is excited by only one dynamic phenomenon named the Rotor-Stator Interaction (RSI). The origin of the phenomenon is located on the radial gap of the turbine and is the source of pressure fluctuations. A fluid-structure analysis is performed to observe the influence of that dynamic pressure field on the runner behaviour. The first part of the paper deals with the unsteady fluid computation. The RSI phenomenon is totally unsteady so the fluid simulation must take into account the entire machine and its rotation movement, in order to obtain a dynamic pressure field. In the second part of the paper, a method suitable for the RSI study is developed. It is known that the fluctuating pressure in this gap can be described as a sum of spatial components. By evaluating these components in the CFD results and on the scale model, it is possible to assess the relevance of the numerical results on the whole runner. After this step, the numerical pressure field can be used as the dynamic load of the structure. The final part of the paper presentsthe mechanical finite element calculations. A modal analysis of the runner in water and a harmonic analysis of its

  18. Influence of hysteresis on groundwater wave dynamics in an unconfined aquifer with a sloping boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoushtari, Seyed Mohammad Hossein Jazayeri; Cartwright, Nick; Perrochet, Pierre; Nielsen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the influence of hysteresis on water table dynamics in an unconfined aquifer was examined using a numerical model to solve Richards' unsaturated flow equation. The model was subject to simple harmonic forcing across a sloping boundary with a seepage face boundary condition. Time series from both hysteretic and non-hysteretic models were subject to harmonic analysis to extract the amplitude and phase profiles for comparison with existing sand flume data (Cartwright et al., 2004). The results from both model types show good agreement with the data indicating no influence of hysteresis at the oscillation period examined (T = 348 s). The models were then used to perform a parametric study to examine the relationship between oscillation period and hysteresis effects with periods ranging from 3 min to 180 min. At short oscillation periods, (T ≈ 180 s) the effects of hysteresis were negligible with both models providing similar results. As the oscillation period increased, the hysteretic model showed less amplitude damping than the non-hysteretic model. For periods greater than T = 60 min, the phase lag in the non-hysteretic model is greater than for the hysteretic one. For periods less than T = 60 min this trend is reversed and the hysteretic model produced a greater phase lag than the non-hysteretic model. These findings suggest that consideration of hysteresis dynamics in Richards' equation models has no influence on water table wave dispersion for short period forcing such as waves (T ≈ 10 s) whereas for long period forcing such as tides (T ≈ 12.25 h) or storm surges (T ≈ days) hysteresis dynamics should be taken into account.

  19. Dynamic testing of concrete under high confined pressure. Influence of saturation ratio and aggregate size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forquin, P.; Piotrowska, E.; Gary, G.

    2015-09-01

    Concrete structures can be exposed to intense pressure loadings such as projectile-impact or detonation near a concrete structural element. To investigate the mechanical behaviour of concrete under high confining pressure, dynamic quasi-oedometric compression tests have been performed with a large diameter (80 mm) Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus. The concrete sample is placed within a steel confining ring and compressed along its axial direction. Hydrostatic pressures as high as 800 MPa and axial strain of about - 10% are reached during the tests. In the present work, experiments have been conducted on two types of concrete: MB50 microconcrete with a maximum grain size of 2 mm and R30A7 ordinary concrete of maximum grain size about 8 mm. Both concretes are tested in dry or saturated conditions. According to these dynamic experiments it is noted that grain size has a small influence whereas water content has a strong effect on the confined behaviour of concrete.

  20. Influence of visual feedback on dynamic balance control in chronic stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Walker, Eric R; Hyngstrom, Allison S; Schmit, Brian D

    2016-03-21

    Chronic stroke survivors have an increased incidence of falls during walking, suggesting changes in dynamic balance control post-stroke. Despite this increased incidence of falls during walking, balance control is often studied only in standing. The purpose of this study was to quantify deficits in dynamic balance control during walking, and to evaluate the influence of visual feedback on this control in stroke survivors. Ten individuals with chronic stroke, and ten neurologically intact individuals participated in this study. Walking performance was assessed while participants walked on an instrumented split-belt treadmill with different types of visual feedback. Dynamic balance control was quantified using both the extent of center of mass (COM) movement in the frontal plane over a gait cycle (COM sway), and base of support (step width). Stroke survivors walked with larger COM sway and wider step widths compared to controls. Despite these baseline differences, both groups walked with a similar ratio of step width to COM sway (SW/COM). Providing a stationary target with a laser reference of body movement reduced COM sway only in the stroke group, indicating that visual feedback of sway alters dynamic balance control post-stroke. These results demonstrate that stroke survivors attempt to maintain a similar ratio of step width to COM movement, and visual cues can be used to help control COM movement during walking post-stroke. PMID:26916509

  1. Active influence in dynamical models of structural balance in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Tyler H.; Shames, Iman

    2013-07-01

    We consider a nonlinear dynamical system on a signed graph, which can be interpreted as a mathematical model of social networks in which the links can have both positive and negative connotations. In accordance with a concept from social psychology called structural balance, the negative links play a key role in both the structure and dynamics of the network. Recent research has shown that in a nonlinear dynamical system modeling the time evolution of “friendliness levels” in the network, two opposing factions emerge from almost any initial condition. Here we study active external influence in this dynamical model and show that any agent in the network can achieve any desired structurally balanced state from any initial condition by perturbing its own local friendliness levels. Based on this result, we also introduce a new network centrality measure for signed networks. The results are illustrated in an international-relations network using United Nations voting record data from 1946 to 2008 to estimate friendliness levels amongst various countries.

  2. Influence of dynamic factors on nonwetting fluid snap-off in pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wen; Balhoff, Matthew; Cardenas, M. Bayani

    2015-11-01

    Snap-off is an important dynamic multiphase flow phenomenon which occurs in porous media. It plays a dominant role in the residual trapping and mobilization/immobilization of nonwetting fluids such as hydrocarbons or CO2. Current studies, applications, and threshold criteria of snap-off are mostly based on static or equilibrium conditions. Thus, the dynamics of snap-off which is relevant for many real world applications has rarely been systematically studied. While a static criterion indicates the snap-off potential for nonwetting fluids, the competition between the time required for snap-off and the local pore throat capillary number determines whether snap-off actually occurs. Using a theoretical model to couple the wetting film thickness to the local capillary number at the pore throat, we analyzed the dynamics of the wetting/nonwetting interface instability in sinusoidally constricted capillary tubes. The influence of dynamic factors as encapsulated by the effect of local capillary number on nonwetting fluid snap-off time were investigated for varying pore throat to pore body aspect ratio and pore body distances. The analysis showed that snap-off can be inhibited by a sufficiently large local capillary number even in cases where the static snap-off criterion has been met.

  3. Influence of Solute Charge and Pyrrolidinium Ionic Liquid Alkyl Chain Length on Probe Rotational Reorientation Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jianchang; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Baker, Gary A; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Shaw, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the effect of molecular charge on the rotational dynamics of probe solutes in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) has been a subject of growing interest. For the purpose of extending our understanding of charged solute behavior within RTILs, we have studied the rotational dynamics of three illustrative xanthene fluorescent probes within a series of N-alkylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Cnmpyr][Tf2N]) RTILs with different n-alkyl chain lengths (n = 3, 4, 6, 8, or 10) using time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay. The rotational dynamics of the neutral probe rhodamine B dye lies between the stick and slip boundary conditions due to the influence of specific hydrogen bonding interactions. The rotation of the negatively-charged sulforhodamine 640 is slower than that of its positively-charged counterpart rhodamine 6G. An analysis based upon Stokes-Einstein-Debye hydrodynamics indicates that SR640 adheres to stick boundary conditions due to specific interactions, whereas the faster rotation of R6G is attributed to weaker electrostatic interactions. No dependence of the rotational dynamics on the solvent alkyl chain length was observed for any of the three dyes, suggesting that the specific interactions between dyes and RTILs are independent of this solvent parameter.

  4. Influence of the number of topologically interacting neighbors on swarm dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yilun; Bouffanais, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Recent empirical and theoretical works on collective behaviors based on a topological interaction are beginning to offer some explanations as for the physical reasons behind the selection of a particular number of nearest neighbors locally affecting each individual's dynamics. Recently, flocking starlings have been shown to topologically interact with a very specific number of neighbors, between six to eight, while metric-free interactions were found to govern human crowd dynamics. Here, we use network- and graph-theoretic approaches combined with a dynamical model of locally interacting self-propelled particles to study how the consensus reaching process and its dynamics are influenced by the number k of topological neighbors. Specifically, we prove exactly that, in the absence of noise, consensus is always attained with a speed to consensus strictly increasing with k. The analysis of both speed and time to consensus reveals that, irrespective of the swarm size, a value of k ~ 10 speeds up the rate of convergence to consensus to levels close to the one of the optimal all-to-all interaction signaling. Furthermore, this effect is found to be more pronounced in the presence of environmental noise. PMID:24567077

  5. Modeling the influence of polls on elections: a population dynamics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, James M; Restrepo, Juan M; Rael, Rosalyn C

    2009-01-01

    We propose a population dynamics model for quantifying the effects of polling data on the outcome of multi-party elections decided by a majority-rule voting process. We divide the population into two groups: committed voters impervious to polling data, and susceptible voters whose decision to vote is influenced by data, depending on its reliability. This population-based approach to modeling the process sidesteps the problem of upscaling models based upon the choices made by individuals. We find releasing poll data is not advantageous to leading candidates, but it can be exploited by those closely trailing. The analysis identifies the particular type of voting impetus at play in different stages of an election and could help strategists optimize their influence on susceptible voters.

  6. Non-linear controls influence functions in an aircraft dynamics simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Hubbard, James E., Jr.; Motter, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    In the development and testing of novel structural and controls concepts, such as morphing aircraft wings, appropriate models are needed for proper system characterization. In most instances, available system models do not provide the required additional degrees of freedom for morphing structures but may be modified to some extent to achieve a compatible system. The objective of this study is to apply wind tunnel data collected for an Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV), that implements trailing edge morphing, to create a non-linear dynamics simulator, using well defined rigid body equations of motion, where the aircraft stability derivatives change with control deflection. An analysis of this wind tunnel data, using data extraction algorithms, was performed to determine the reference aerodynamic force and moment coefficients for the aircraft. Further, non-linear influence functions were obtained for each of the aircraft s control surfaces, including the sixteen trailing edge flap segments. These non-linear controls influence functions are applied to the aircraft dynamics to produce deflection-dependent aircraft stability derivatives in a non-linear dynamics simulator. Time domain analysis of the aircraft motion, trajectory, and state histories can be performed using these nonlinear dynamics and may be visualized using a 3-dimensional aircraft model. Linear system models can be extracted to facilitate frequency domain analysis of the system and for control law development. The results of this study are useful in similar projects where trailing edge morphing is employed and will be instrumental in the University of Maryland s continuing study of active wing load control.

  7. Influence of canopy biochemical and biophysical variables on reflectance spectra based on canopy radiative transfer model with adding noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pudong; Shi, Runhe; Wang, Hong; Liu, Chaoshun; Sun, Zhibin; Gao, Wei

    2015-09-01

    To provide a reference for canopy parameters inversion, sensitivity analysis of plant canopy parameters based on remote sensing model is a prerequisite for the inversion. Because the local sensitivity analysis do not consider the coupling effect among the parameters, the EFAST (i.e., Extended Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test), a global sensitivity analysis, can be used not only for the analysis of each parameter, but also consider the interacted effect among each parameter. Based on PROSAIL model, the paper focused on the parameters' sensitivity by using simulated data and EFAST method. The results showed that the EFAST considered not only the contribution of single parameter, but also the interactive effects among each parameter, and four parameters, leaf area index (LAI), leaf mesophyll structure (N), the controller factor of the average leaf slope (LIDFa) and soil moisture condition (psoil) had great effect on the canopy reflectance in the whole wavelength from 400 to 2500 nm than other canopy parameters, and the EFAST method enlarged the contribution of some parameters that had little effects.

  8. Retrieval of seasonal dynamics of forest understory reflectance from semiarid to boreal forests using MODIS BRDF data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisek, Jan; Chen, Jing M.; Kobayashi, Hideki; Rautiainen, Miina; Schaepman, Michael E.; Karnieli, Arnon; Sprinstin, Michael; Ryu, Youngryel; Nikopensius, Maris; Raabe, Kairi

    2016-03-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of forest background (understory) reflectance are crucial for retrieving biophysical parameters of forest canopies (overstory) and subsequently for ecosystem modeling. In this communication, we retrieved seasonal courses of understory normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from multiangular Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer bidirectional reflectance distribution function (MODIS BRDF)/albedo data. We compared satellite-based seasonal courses of understory NDVI to understory NDVI values measured in different types of forests distributed along a wide latitudinal gradient (65.12°N-31.35°N). Our results indicated that the retrieval method performs well particularly over open forests of different types. We also demonstrated the limitations of the method for closed canopies, where the understory signal retrieval is much attenuated.

  9. EO-1 Hyperion reflectance time series at calibration and validation sites: stability and sensitivity to seasonal dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, P.K.E.; Middleton, E.M.; Thome, K.J.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Huemmrich, K.F.; Novick, K.A.; Brunsell, N.A.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) Hyperion reflectance time series at established calibration sites to assess the instrument stability and suitability for monitoring vegetation functional parameters. Our analysis using three pseudo-invariant calibration sites in North America indicated that the reflectance time series are devoid of apparent spectral trends and their stability consistently is within 2.5-5 percent throughout most of the spectral range spanning the 12+ year data record. Using three vegetated sites instrumented with eddy covariance towers, the Hyperion reflectance time series were evaluated for their ability to determine important variables of ecosystem function. A number of narrowband and derivative vegetation indices (VI) closely described the seasonal profiles in vegetation function and ecosystem carbon exchange (e.g., net and gross ecosystem productivity) in three very different ecosystems, including a hardwood forest and tallgrass prairie in North America, and a Miombo woodland in Africa. Our results demonstrate the potential for scaling the carbon flux tower measurements to local and regional landscape levels. The VIs with stronger relationships to the CO2 parameters were derived using continuous reflectance spectra and included wavelengths associated with chlorophyll content and/or chlorophyll fluorescence. Since these indices cannot be calculated from broadband multispectral instrument data, the opportunity to exploit these spectrometer-based VIs in the future will depend on the launch of satellites such as EnMAP and HyspIRI. This study highlights the practical utility of space-borne spectrometers for characterization of the spectral stability and uniformity of the calibration sites in support of sensor cross-comparisons, and demonstrates the potential of narrowband VIs to track and spatially extend ecosystem functional status as well as carbon processes measured at flux towers.

  10. EO-1 Hyperion Reflectance Time Series at Calibration and Validation Sites: Stability and Sensitivity to Seasonal Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Petya K. Entcheva; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Thome, Kurt J.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Huemmrich, Karl Fred; Lagomasino, David; Novick, Kimberly A.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) Hyperion reflectance time series at established calibration sites to assess the instrument stability and suitability for monitoring vegetation functional parameters. Our analysis using three pseudo-invariant calibration sites in North America indicated that the reflectance time series are devoid of apparent spectral trends and their stability consistently is within 2.5-5 percent throughout most of the spectral range spanning the 12-plus year data record. Using three vegetated sites instrumented with eddy covariance towers, the Hyperion reflectance time series were evaluated for their ability to determine important variables of ecosystem function. A number of narrowband and derivative vegetation indices (VI) closely described the seasonal profiles in vegetation function and ecosystem carbon exchange (e.g., net and gross ecosystem productivity) in three very different ecosystems, including a hardwood forest and tallgrass prairie in North America, and a Miombo woodland in Africa. Our results demonstrate the potential for scaling the carbon flux tower measurements to local and regional landscape levels. The VIs with stronger relationships to the CO2 parameters were derived using continuous reflectance spectra and included wavelengths associated with chlorophyll content and/or chlorophyll fluorescence. Since these indices cannot be calculated from broadband multispectral instrument data, the opportunity to exploit these spectrometer-based VIs in the future will depend on the launch of satellites such as EnMAP and HyspIRI. This study highlights the practical utility of space-borne spectrometers for characterization of the spectral stability and uniformity of the calibration sites in support of sensor cross-comparisons, and demonstrates the potential of narrowband VIs to track and spatially extend ecosystem functional status as well as carbon processes measured at flux towers.

  11. Spectral reflectance patterns and seasonal dynamics of common understory types in three mature hemi-boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikopensius, Maris; Pisek, Jan; Raabe, Kairi

    2015-12-01

    Due to the growing demand on more accurate prediction of biophysical properties (e.g., leaf area index) or carbon balance models based on remotely sensed data, the understory effect needs to be separated from the overstory. Reflectance models can provide possibility to model and retrieve understory reflectance over large scales, but ground truth data is needed to validate such models and algorithms. In this study, we documented the seasonal variation (April-September) and spectral changes occurring in understory layers of a typical European hemi-boreal forest. The understory composition was recorded and its spectra measured with an ASD FieldSpec Hand-Held UV/VNIR Spectroradiometer eight times at four site types during the growing period (from May to September) in 2013. The collected dataset presented within this study would be of much use to improve and validate algorithms or models for extracting spectral properties of understory from remote sensing data. It can be also further used as a valuable input in radiative transfer simulations that are used to quantify the roles of forest tree layer and understory components in forming a seasonal reflectance course of a hemi-boreal forest, and the upcoming phases of the RAdiation Model Intercomparison (RAMI) experiment.

  12. Influence of an Internally-Generated QBO on Modeled Stratospheric Dynamics and Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Newman, P. A.; Song, I. S.

    2011-01-01

    A GEOS V2 CCM simulation with an internally generated quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) signal is compared to an otherwise identical simulation without a QBO. In a present-day climate, inclusion of the modeled QBO makes a significant difference to stratospheric dynamics and ozone throughout the year. The QBO enhances variability in the tropics, as expected, but also in the polar stratosphere in some seasons. The modeled QBO also affects the mean stratospheric climate. Because tropical zonal winds in the baseline simulation are generally easterly, there is a relative increase in zonal wind magnitudes in tropical lower and middle stratosphere in the QBO simulation. Extra-tropical differences between the QBO and 'no QBO' simulations thus reflect a bias toward the westerly phase of the QBO: a relative strengthening and poleward shifting the polar stratospheric jets, and a reduction in Arctic lower stratospheric ozone.

  13. Reflection Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses and provides an example of reflectivity approximation to determine whether reflection will occur. Provides a method to show thin-film interference on a projection screen. Also applies the reflectivity concepts to electromagnetic wave systems. (MVL)

  14. Label-free, real-time detection of the dynamic processes of protein degradation using oblique-incidence reflectivity difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Zhu, J. H.; He, L. P.; Dai, J.; Lu, H. B.; Wu, L.; Jin, K. J.; Yang, G. Z.; Zhu, H.

    2014-04-01

    Based on the requirements for studying the dynamic process of proteinase action substrates in life science, we selected six random proteins including 1L-10, SCGB2A2, CENPQ, GST, HK1, KLHL7, as well as five different concentrations of 1L-10 proteins of 1 mg/ml, 0.5 mg/ml, 0.25 mg/ml, 0.125 mg/ml, and 0.0625 mg/ml, and fabricated two types of substrate protein microarrays, respectively. We detected the dynamic processes of proteins degraded by proteinase K using oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OIRD) method in a label-free and real-time manner. We obtained the relevant degradation velocities and the degradation time. The experimental results demonstrate that OIRD has the ability to study proteinase action substrates which is out of reach of label methods and is expected to offer opportunities to determine protease-substrate relationships on the systems biology level.

  15. Analysis of the dynamic response of pump-turbine impellers. Influence of the rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Presas, Alex; Huang, Xingxing; Guardo, Alfredo; Seidel, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    This paper deals with the dynamic response of pump-turbine impellers. A pump-turbine impeller is a complex structure attached to a rotor and rotating inside a casing full of water with very small clearances between the rotating and the stationary parts. The dynamic response of this type of structures is very complex and it is very much affected by the connection to the rotor as well as by the added mass and boundary conditions. As a consequence its calculation presents several uncertainties. First, the dynamic response of pump-turbine impellers is introduced. Second an experimental investigation in a real impeller attached to the rotor and inside the machine was carried out. For this investigation, the impeller of an existing pump-turbine unit with an installed power of 110 MW and a diameter of 2.87 m was studied. For a better analysis of the experimental results a numerical model using FEM was also built-up. Frequencies and mode-shapes were identified numerically and experimentally and the characteristics of the structural response analyzed. To determine the influence of the rotor and supporting structures on the impeller response the results were compared with the ones obtained with the same impeller but suspended (non-connected to the rotor). Experimental and numerical simulation were also used for this case. The changes in the dynamic response due to the rotor connection were determined. Finally the results obtained are compared with the results from other pump-turbine impellers of different designs and general conclusions about the dynamics of this type of structures are given.

  16. Spectroscopic studies of alpha tocopherol interaction with a model liposome and its influence on oxidation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krilov, Dubravka; Kosović, Marin; Serec, Kristina

    2014-08-01

    The influence of α-tocopherol on the surface conformation of liposome, as a model component of lipoproteins, and its role in oxidation process were studied. FT-IR spectra from suspensions of neat liposome, mixtures of liposome and α-tocopherol and liposome with incorporated α-tocopherol were analyzed. When α-tocopherol was incorporated into liposome, intensities of some bands were decreased or increased in comparison with the spectra of liposome and α-tocopherol mixture. These changes reflect the different localization of α-tocopherol in two types of liposome suspensions. The oxidation of liposome suspensions was initiated by addition of cupric ions. After prolonged oxidation, the differences in FT-IR spectra of oxidized samples were recorded. Differences were observed in comparison with spectra of native and oxidized liposomes were analyzed. The rate of oxidation was measured by EPR oximetry. Oxidation was generally very slow, but faster in liposome without α-tocopherol, indicating the protective role of α-tocopherol against liposome oxidation. On the other hand, liposome suspensions with EDTA in the buffer were not oxidized at all, while those with α-tocopherol and liposome mixture were only slightly oxidized. In this case the consumption of oxygen was the result of liposome oxidation supported by α-tocopherol. These results reflect the ambivalent role of α-tocopherol in liposome oxidation, similarly to findings in studies of lipoprotein oxidation.

  17. Peer Interactions in a Computer Lab: Reflections on Results of a Case Study Involving Web-Based Dynamic Geometry Sketches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Margaret P.

    2005-01-01

    A case study, originally set up to identify and describe some benefits and limitations of using dynamic web-based geometry sketches, provided an opportunity to examine peer interactions in a lab. Since classes were held in a computer lab, teachers and pairs faced the challenges of working and communicating in a lab environment. Research has shown…

  18. Influence of Dynamic Hydraulic Conditions on Nitrogen Cycling in Column Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassen, Niklas; von Netzer, Frederick; Ryabenko, Evgenia; Lüders, Tillmann; Stumpp, Christine

    2015-04-01

    In order to improve management strategies of agricultural nitrogen input, it is of major importance to further understand which factors influence turnover processes within the nitrogen cycle. Many studies have focused on the fate of nitrate in hydrological systems, but up to date only little is known about the influence of dynamic hydraulic conditions on the fate of nitrate at the soil-groundwater interface. We conducted column experiments with natural sediment and compared a system with a fluctuating water table to systems with different water content and static conditions under the constant input of ammonia into the system. We used hydrochemical methods in order to trace nitrogen species, 15N isotope methods to get information about dominating turnover processes and microbial community analysis in order to connect hydrochemical and microbial information. We found that added ammonia was removed more effectively under dynamic hydraulic conditions than under static conditions. Furthermore, denitrification is the dominant process under saturated, static conditions, while nitrification is more important under unsaturated, static conditions. We conclude that a fluctuating water table creates hot spots where both nitrification and denitrification processes can occur spatially close to each other and therefore remove nitrogen more effectively from the system. Furthermore, the fluctuating water table enhances the exchange of solutes and triggers hot moments of solute turnover. Therefore we conclude that a fluctuating water table can amplify hot spots and trigger hot moments of nitrogen cycling.

  19. Diatom community dynamics in a tropical, monsoon-influenced environment: West coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Costa, Priya M.; Anil, Arga Chandrashekar

    2010-07-01

    Diatom communities are influenced by environmental perturbations, such as the monsoon system that impact the niche opportunities of species. To discern the influence of the monsoon system on diatom community structure, we sampled during two consecutive post-monsoons (2001 and 2002) and the intervening pre-monsoon at Mumbai and Jawaharlal Nehru ports along the central west coast of India. Characteristic temporal shifts in diatom community structure were observed across the sampling periods; these were mainly driven by temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen saturation. The nutrient-poor pre-monsoon period supported low abundance yet high species richness and diversity of diatoms. Coscinodiscus, Cyclotella, Thalassiosira, Triceratium, Pleurosigma, Skeletonema and Surirella were the most dominant genera. Both the post-monsoon periods, following dissimilar monsoon events, were dominated by Skeletonema costatum, but differed in some of the residual species . Thalassiosira and Thalassionema spp. dominated mostly during post-monsoon I whereas Triceratium and Pleurosigma spp. dominated during post-monsoon II. To understand the underlying ecological mechanisms involved in such dynamics, we focus on the dominant diatom species in post-monsoon periods, S. costatum, that contributes up to 60% to total diatom cell numbers. This research is relevant in light of the fluctuating monsoon regimes over the Asian continent, the confounding effects of anthropogenic eutrophication and the resulting cascading effects on trophic web dynamics.

  20. A new framework for predicting how roots and microbes influence soil organic matter dynamics in forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, R.; Midgley, M.; Brzostek, E. R.

    2012-12-01

    While it is well-established that tree species modify soil organic matter (SOM) through differences in leaf litter chemistry, far less is known about the role of roots and their microbial associates in influencing SOM dynamics. We investigated the extent to which temperate hardwood trees which associate with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi differ in their effects on SOM turnover from those associating with ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi using 1) root and fungal ingrowth cores, 2) experimental tree girdling and 3) fertilization additions. We conducted our research in the central hardwood forests of southern Indiana where a rich assemblage of AM (e.g. maples, ashes, tulip poplar, black cherry) and EM (e.g. oaks, hickories, beech, pine) tree species co-occur on soils developed from similar parent materials. Our results indicate that EM trees likely play a greater role in contributing to SOM turnover than AM trees as rhizosphere enzyme activities were greater in EM soils than AM soils, and both girdling and fertilization reduced enzyme activities in EM soils but not in AM soils. Although girdling and fertilization had little effect on enzyme activities in AM soils, soil respiration decreased suggesting that much of the carbon (C) allocated belowground was likely derived from roots rather than from mycorrhizal fungi. Collectively our results suggest AM and EM trees influence SOM dynamics in fundamentally unique ways, and that categorizing forests based on the relative abundance of AM and EM trees may provide a useful framework for predicting complex biogeochemical interactions between roots, microbes and SOM.

  1. Influence of Relative Humidity on the Spreading Dynamics of a Drying Drop of Whole Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bou Zeid, Wassim; Brutin, David

    2013-11-01

    Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids start spreading after coming into contact with a solid substrate till the anchoring of the triple line. Our experimental work aims to study the effect of the relative humidity on the spreading dynamics of drops of whole blood. Drops of blood of same volume (+/-4.8%) are injected using a digital micropipette and gently deposited onto microscope ultraclean glass substrates. Experiments are conducted in a glove box at ambient temperature and a range of investigated relative humidities between 13.0% and 80.0%. The recorded images are post-processed using ImageJ in which the position of the contact line is measured every 20 ms. We show that the spreading dynamics is, in a first time, governed by relative humidity and later no more influence by relative humidity. Two spreading regimes are observed and analyzed compared to classical viscous drops. In previous work, we show that relative humidity influences the contact angle and the initial wetting radius. In the first regime, we find a spreading power law exponent that decreases for an increasing relative humidity. In the second regime, all the data collapse on each other and the evolution of the dimensionless radius no more depend on relative humidity.

  2. A theoretical investigation on influences of slab tracks on vertical dynamic responses of railway viaducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Li; Cai, Yuanqiang; Wang, Peng; Sun, Honglei

    2016-07-01

    A railway viaduct model consisting of infinite spans of elastically-supported girders carrying a slab track of infinite length is established to investigate the influence of the slabs on the vertical dynamic response of the viaduct, when a moving harmonic point load or a moving sprung wheel is applied. The infinite rail, the discontinuous slabs and girders of identical span lengths are idealized as Euler-Bernoulli beams. The rail fasteners, the cushion layer beneath the slab and the elastic bearings at the girder supports are represented by discretely distributed springs of hysteretic damping. Due to the repetitive nature of the girders, the model can be divided into periodic three-beam units by the span length of the girder, and then solved analytically in the frequency domain using the property of periodic structure. Besides the first natural frequency of the girder with elastic bearings, it is found that the resonance frequency of the slab on the cushion layer has a significant influence on the dynamic response of the track and the girder. Parametric excitations due to the moving wheel periodically passing the discontinuous slabs contribute significantly to the wheel/rail interactions.

  3. HIV testing among heterosexual young adults: the influence of partners' risk behaviors and relationship dynamics.

    PubMed

    Longmore, Monica A; Johnson, Wendi L; Manning, Wendy D; Giordano, Peggy C

    2013-01-01

    Using relational theory and survey data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (n = 665), this article examined whether individuals were tested for HIV while intimately involved in a current or recent heterosexual relationship. The analyses included the respondent's and partner's sexual risk factors (non-exclusivity and lifetime number of partners), relational variables, prior testing, and demographic characteristics. It was found that 39% of respondents had an HIV test while involved in their current or most recent sexual relationship, and women (47%), compared with men (29%), were significantly more likely to have been tested. Whereas some predictors operated similarly (number of sex partners and pressured to have sex), others displayed significant gender differences (partner's sexual exclusivity, sexual communication difficulties, and pregnancy), particularly related to women's testing behaviors. Excerpts from qualitative interviews with male respondents suggested that some relational dynamics, not well reflected in relational theory, played a role in their testing. Results highlight the need to consider gendered dynamics when targeting young adults for routine HIV testing. PMID:22489753

  4. The influence of redox dynamics on nitrogen cycling and nitrous oxide emissions from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubol, S.; Bellin, A.; Silver, W.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding the role of the nitrogen cycle in soil systems is of importance in many environmental applications (for example, minimizing greenhouse emissions). Soils are a dominant source of nitrous oxide N2O releasing an estimated 9.5 Tg N2O -N year-1 (65% of global emissions according to IPCC, 2001a). Further research is still needed to comprehend key drivers of N2O emissions from soils and its influencing factors. Amongst these factors, water content can be considered a crucial one since it modifies the ratio of N2O - N2 emissions and influences the rate of oxygen supply thus determining whether aerobic processes such as nitrification or anaerobic processes (i.e., denitrification) becomes dominant within the soil. Also, water content is linked to dissolved oxygen and to redox potential, which regulate microbial metabolism and chemical transformations in the environment. Investigating the interplay between these physical and chemical factors is needed to comprehend the nitrogen cycle at the catchment scale. The importance of soil moisture in the nitrogen cycle has already been investigated, however only few works are focusing on water content dynamics. To our knowledge, there are no studies that investigate N-emission under realistic rain conditions as well as linking soil moisture dynamics to nitrate ammonification (also known as DNRA) along the soil profile. The purpose of this study is thus to analyze if there are existing conditions in which an equivalent soil moisture value can be used in predictive models operating at the daily scale. Solving this problem is interesting as a failsafe feature in capabilities of the more complex system, as well as an improvement in understanding better the soil processes themselves. In the current work, we design an experimental soil column which allows one to relate water dynamics to gas emissions in a closed-controlled environment.

  5. Study about the influence of cavitation on the dynamic characteristics for the sliding bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, L. M.; Luo, Y. Y.; Wang, Z. W.

    2015-01-01

    Sliding bearings are employed to support the rotor system and limit the vibration amplitude. In high speed rotor system, cavitation often occurs in the oil film and affects the dynamic characteristics of the sliding bearing greatly. In this paper, numerical method is adopted to simulate the cavitation in the oil film with homogeneous two-phase mixture flow using Singhal-et-al cavitation model in the commercial code FLUENT-solver. Cases without cavitation model were also calculated at the same time. Many computations with different frequency ratios were conducted. Then the rotor dynamic characteristics of the sliding bearing were retrieved. The results show that the cavitation has great influences on the pressure distribution in the oil film. As the rotational speed or whirling speed of the journal increases, the cavitation will become prominent. The dynamic coefficients of the bearing such as stiffness and damping with cavitation model considered are quite different from that without cavitation. So it is worth to pay attention to and do further study about the cavitation in the sliding bearing in the high speed rotor system.

  6. Walking in simulated Martian gravity: Influence of added weight on sagittal dynamic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott-Pandorf, Melissa M.; O'Connor, Daniel P.; Layne, Charles S.; Josić, Krešimir; Kurz, Max J.

    2010-05-01

    With human exploration of the Moon and Mars on the horizon, research considerations for space suit redesign have surfaced. Review of Apollo mission videos revealed repeated instance of falling during extravehicular activities. A better understanding of how suit weight influences the sagittal dynamic stability of the gait pattern may provide insight for new suit design such that space missions may have more productive extravehicular activities and smaller risk of falls that may cause injuries and damage equipment. Participants walked for 4 min in simulated Martian gravity with additional loads of 0%, 15%, 30% and 45% of their body weight. Floquet and Lyapunov analysis techniques were used to quantify the dynamic stability of the sagittal plane gait pattern. Additionally, sagittal plane joint kinematics were evaluated to determine if any modification occurred. Results indicated that weight (i.e., added load) had little effect on the sagittal dynamic stability or joint kinematics while in simulated Martian gravity. Potentially, suit weight may not be a priority for space suit redesign.

  7. Assessing the influence of electrostatic schemes on molecular dynamics simulations of secondary structure forming peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monticelli, Luca; Simões, Carlos; Belvisi, Laura; Colombo, Giorgio

    2006-04-01

    Electrostatic interactions play a fundamental role in determining the structure and dynamics of biomolecules in solution. However the accurate representation of electrostatics in classical mechanics based simulation approaches such as molecular dynamics (MD) is a challenging task. Given the growing importance that MD simulation methods are taking on in the study of protein folding, protein stability and dynamics, and in structure prediction and design projects, it is important to evaluate the influence that different electrostatic schemes have on the results of MD simulations. In this paper we performed long timescale simulations (500 ns) of two peptides, beta3 and RN24 forming different secondary structures, using for each peptide four different electrostatic schemes (namely PME, reaction field correction, and cut-off schemes with and without neutralizing counterions) for a total of eight 500 ns long MD runs. The structural and conformational features of each peptide under the different conditions were evaluated in terms of the time dependence of the flexibility, secondary structure evolution, hydrogen-bonding patterns, and several other structural parameters. The degree of sampling for each simulation as a function of the electrostatic scheme was also critically evaluated. Our results suggest that, while in the case of the short peptide RN24 the performances of the four methods are comparable, PME and RF schemes perform better in maintaining the structure close to the native one for the β-sheet peptide beta3, in which long range contacts are mostly responsible for the definition of the native structure.

  8. The Influence of Hydrogen on the Microstructure and Dynamic Strength of Lean Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstein, Ravit; Glam, Benny; Eliezer, Dan; Moreno, Daniel; Eliezer, Shalom

    2015-06-01

    In this research the dynamic strength of lean duplex stainless steel (LDS) with and without hydrogen was investigated. The LDS was chosen since it has a mixed structure of ferrite (BCC) and austenite (FCC) which allows an attractive combination of high strength and plasticity. Data collection was performed by VISAR and metallurgical analysis by post mortem observation. In addition, a thermal desorption process (TDS) was carried out in order to observe the influence of hydrogen charging on LDS crystal structure and to determine the hydrogen trapping mechanism before and after the plate impact experiments. Several assessments can be made based on the results of this study. TDS analysis revealed that even after hydrogen desorption, some hydrogen remained trapped in the austenitic phase causing a small lattice expansion. After impact, a brittle spall mechanism was seen, which occurred through crack progression along both phases grain boundaries. It was found that even small hydrogen content affects the dynamic strength of LDS. The relation between the microstructure and the dynamic strength of the LDS in the presence of hydrogen will be discussed. This work was supported by the Pazi foundation.

  9. Influence of genioglossus tonic activity on upper airway dynamics assessed by phrenic nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sériès, F; Marc, I

    2002-01-01

    Upper airway (UA) dynamics can be evaluated during wakefulness by using electrical phrenic nerve stimulation (EPNS) applied at end-expiration during exclusive nasal breathing by dissociating twitch flow and phasic activation of UA muscles. This technique can be used to quantify the influence of nonphasic electromyographic (EMG) activity on UA dynamics. UA dynamics was characterized by using EPNS when increasing tonic EMG activity with CO(2) stimulation in six normal awake subjects. Instantaneous flow, esophageal and nasopharyngeal pressures, and genioglossal EMG activity were recorded during EPNS at baseline and during CO(2) ventilatory stimulation. The proportion of twitches presenting an inspiratory-flow limitation pattern decreased from 100% at baseline to 78.7 +/- 21.4% (P = 10(-4)) during CO(2) rebreathing. During CO(2) stimuli, maximal inspiratory twitch flow (VI(max)) of flow-limited twitches significantly rose, with the driving pressure at which flow limitation occurred being more negative. For the group as a whole, the increase in VI(max) and the decrease in pressure were significantly correlated with the rise in end-expiratory EMG activity. UA stability assessed by EPNS is dramatically modified during CO(2) ventilatory stimulation. Changes in tonic genioglossus EMG activity significantly contribute to the improvement in UA stability. PMID:11744686

  10. Influence of climate drivers on colonization and extinction dynamics of wetland-dependent species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ray, Andrew M.; Gould, William R.; Hossack, Blake R.; Sepulveda, Adam; Thoma, David P.; Patla, Debra A.; Daley, Rob; Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater wetlands are particularly vulnerable to climate change. Specifically, changes in temperature, precipitation, and evapotranspiration (i.e., climate drivers) are likely to alter flooding regimes of wetlands and affect the vital rates, abundance, and distributions of wetland-dependent species. Amphibians may be among the most climate-sensitive wetland-dependent groups, as many species rely on shallow or intermittently flooded wetland habitats for breeding. Here, we integrated multiple years of high-resolution gridded climate and amphibian monitoring data from Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks to explicitly model how variations in climate drivers and habitat conditions affect the occurrence and breeding dynamics (i.e., annual extinction and colonization rates) of amphibians. Our results showed that models incorporating climate drivers outperformed models of amphibian breeding dynamics that were exclusively habitat based. Moreover, climate-driven variation in extinction rates, but not colonization rates, disproportionately influenced amphibian occupancy in monitored wetlands. Long-term monitoring from national parks coupled with high-resolution climate data sets will be crucial to describing population dynamics and characterizing the sensitivity of amphibians and other wetland-dependent species to climate change. Further, long-term monitoring of wetlands in national parks will help reduce uncertainty surrounding wetland resources and strengthen opportunities to make informed, science-based decisions that have far-reaching benefits.

  11. Resolving the relative influence of strong field spacetime dynamics and MHD on circumbinary disk physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilhão, Miguel; Noble, Scott C.; Campanelli, Manuela; Zlochower, Yosef

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we evolve magnetized and unmagnetized circumbinary accretion disks around supermassive black hole binaries in the relativistic regime. We use a post-Newtonian expansion to construct an analytical spacetime and determine how the order of the post-Newtonian (PN) expansion affects the dynamics of the gas. We find very small differences in the late-time bulk dynamics of nonmagnetized hydrodynamic evolutions between the two spacetimes down to separations of approximately 40 GM /c2 where M is the total mass of the binary. For smaller separations, the differences due to PN order become comparable to differences caused by using initial data further from equilibrium. For magnetized gas, magnetohydrodynamic stresses, which drives the accretion dynamics, tends to mask all higher order PN effects even at separations of 20 GM /c2 , leading to essentially the same observed electromagnetic luminosity. This implies that our calculations of the electromagnetic signal may be robust down to small binary separations. Our investigation is the first to demonstrate how the level of PN accuracy affects a circumbinary disk's evolution and informs us of the range in separation within which to trust the PN approximation for this kind of study. We also address the influence the initial conditions and binary separation have on simulation predictions.

  12. Evaluation of the coolant reactivity coefficient influence on the dynamic response of a small LFR system

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzi, S.; Bortot, S.; Cammi, A.; Ponciroli, R.

    2012-07-01

    An assessment of the coolant reactivity feedback influence on a small Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) dynamics has been made aimed at providing both qualitative and quantitative insights into the system transient behavior depending on the sign of the above mentioned coefficient. The need of such an investigation has been recognized since fast reactors cooled by heavy liquid metals show to be characterized by a strong coupling between primary and secondary systems. In particular, the coolant density and radial expansion coefficients have been attested to play a major role in determining the core response to any perturbed condition on the Steam Generator (SG) side. The European Lead-cooled System (ELSY)-based demonstrator (DEMO) has been assumed as the reference LFR case study. As a first step, a zero-dimensional dynamics model has been developed and implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK{sup R} environment; then typical transient scenarios have been simulated by incorporating the actual negative lead density reactivity coefficient and its opposite. In all the examined cases results have shown that the reactor behaves in a completely different way when considering a positive coolant feedback instead of the reference one, the system free dynamics resulting moreover considerably slower due to the core and SG mutually conflicting reactions. The outcomes of the present analysis may represent a useful feedback for both the core and the control system designers. (authors)

  13. Exposing the hidden curriculum influencing medical education on the health of Indigenous people in Australia and New Zealand: the role of the Critical Reflection Tool.

    PubMed

    Ewen, Shaun; Mazel, Odette; Knoche, Debra

    2012-02-01

    The disparity in health status between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Australia and New Zealand is widely known, and efforts to address this through medical education are evidenced by initiatives such as the Committee of Deans of Australian Medical Schools' Indigenous Health Curriculum Framework. These efforts have focused primarily on formal curriculum reform. In this article, the authors discuss the role of the hidden curriculum in influencing the teaching and learning of Indigenous health (i.e., the health of Indigenous people) during medical training and suggest that in order to achieve significant changes in learning outcomes, there needs to be better alignment of the formal and hidden curriculum. They describe the Critical Reflection Tool as a potential resource through which educators might begin to identify the dimensions of their institution's hidden curricula. If used effectively, the process may guide institutions to better equip medical school graduates with the training necessary to advance changes in Indigenous health. PMID:22189879

  14. Air cushioning in droplet impact. I. Dynamics of thin films studied by dual wavelength reflection interference microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruiter, Jolet; Mugele, Frieder; van den Ende, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    When a liquid droplet impacts on a solid surface, it not only deforms substantially but also an air film develops between the droplet and the surface. This thin air film—as well as other transparent films—can be characterized by reflection interference microscopy. Even for weakly reflecting interfaces, relative thickness variations of the order of tens of nanometers are easily detected, yet the absolute thickness is generally known only up to an additive constant which is a multiple of half of the wavelength. Here, we present an optical setup for measuring the absolute film thickness and its spatial and temporal behavior using a combination of a standard Hg lamp, an optical microscope, and three synchronized high-speed cameras to detect conventional side-view images as well as interferometric bottom view images at two different wavelengths. The combination of a dual wavelength approach with the finite coherence length set by the broad bandwidth of the optical filters allows for measuring the absolute thickness of transient air films with a spatial resolution better than 30 nm at 50 μs time resolution with a maximum detectable film thickness of approximately 8 μm. This technique will be exploited in Part II to characterize the air film evolution during low velocity droplet impacts.

  15. Influence of frequency detunings and form of the initial field distribution on parametric generation of radiation in a dynamic cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosanov, N. N.; Fedorov, E. G.

    2016-05-01

    Characteristics of parametric generation of an electromagnetic field in a cavity with oscillating mirrors have been calculated as functions of the oscillation frequency detuning from the resonant frequency for different types of frequency dependence of the cavity mirror reflectance. The influence of the initial field distribution in the cavity on the parametric generation efficiency is demonstrated.

  16. Influence of a backward reflection on low-threshold mode instability in Yb3+-doped few-mode fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Antipov, Oleg; Kuznetsov, Maxim; Alekseev, Dmitriy; Tyrtyshnyy, Valentin

    2016-06-27

    An influence of backward reflection on spatio-temporal instability of the fundamental mode in Yb3+-doped few-mode polarization maintaining fiber amplifiers with a core diameter of 10 μm was studied experimentally and theoretically. The mode instability threshold was registered to decrease dramatically in the presence of a backward reflection of the signal from the output fiber end; an increase of the signal bandwidth or input power resulted in the increase of the threshold. Numerical simulation revealed a self-consistent growth of the higher-order mode LP11 and a traveling index grating accompanying the population grating induced by the mode interference field (due to different polarizability of the excited and unexcited Yb3+ ions). The presence of the backward-propagating wave resulted in four-wave mixing on the common index grating induced by the interference field of pairs of the fundamental LP01 and LP11 modes. PMID:27410639

  17. [Dynamics and influence width of dry valley landscape boundary in upper reaches of Minjiang River].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhao-Ping; Chang, Yu; Yang, Meng; Hu, Yuan-Man; Bu, Ren-Cang; He, Xing-Yuan

    2007-09-01

    Based on RS and GIS techniques, the distribution extent of the dry valley in upper reaches of Minjiang River was determined, with the dynamics and influence width of its landscape boundary analyzed. The results indicated that the dry valley had a gradually expanded distribution, and the total length of its boundary was increased. The boundary complexity increased from 1974 to 1995 but decreased from 1995 to 2000, and the upper boundary of the dry valley ascended rapidly along mountain slope. The uppermost elevation of the dry valley boundary was 3128 m in 1974, 3167 m in 1995, and 3181 m in 2000. In the last 26 years, the upper boundary of the dry valley ascended 53 m in total, being about 2 m per year. The influence width of the dry valley boundary was 800 m, which could be regarded as a buffer zone to disturbances. The area between 800-1200 m from the dry valley boundary to exterior was a transition zone intensely influenced by the dry valley and its surrounding landscape, which should be addressed in the restoration of the dry valley. PMID:18062298

  18. The influence of isospin on both statistical and dynamical aspects of HI reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotka, Lee

    2003-04-01

    Several aspects of how isospin can influence reactions will be discussed. From the statistical side, I will review how isospin influences the level density and, for example, residue production in fusion reactions. The most interesting aspect here is how the continuum, many-body effects and isospin conspire to make the general question of nuclear level densities at the limits of stability interesting. What is already known about the isospin dependence of nuclear level densities, what can be experimentally considered with the facilities presently available and those on the drawing board will be discussed. The status of our knowledge of how isospin influences heavy-ion reaction dynamics at intermediate energy will be presented. The theoretical argument for isospin fractionation will be reviewed as well as the some of the pit-falls in searching for this effect experimentally. The present ambiguous status of this search is reviewed. Finally, I will address the largest issue in this subfield, the possibility that flow (and other) measurements might contribute to our knowledge of the isopin dependence of the EoS. Our present uncertainty and significance of this aspect of the EoS as well as what specific measurements can be done to address this issue will be presented.

  19. Paddy rice ecohydrology pattern and influence on nitrogen dynamics in middle-to-high latitude area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Wei; Chen, Siyang; Wang, Xuelei; Shan, Yushu

    2015-10-01

    Paddy rice in middle-to-high latitude areas has a longer growing period with lower temperature. Therefore, it was hypothesized to have a different soil ecohydrology pattern and nitrogen (N) efficiency. Based on daily monitoring of soil moisture and N concentrations in soil water at four depth layers, the characteristics and their ecohydrological interactions, soil environmental indexes and N dynamics were analyzed. The temporal-vertical observations of soil moisture and soil water acquisition rates demonstrated the existence of an impermeable soil layer at 30 cm, which had lower soil organic carbon content. The soil moisture greater in the upper layer had higher soil organic carbon content, which provided the critical conditions for the rice tillage. Lower than the 60 cm depth, the soil moisture increased and had a peak acquisition rate of approximately 0.0075 cm3 s-1. The concentration of NO3--N in the water at the soil subsurface was approximately 2.4 times than that of NH4+-N. The NO3--N had a larger concentration at the deeper layer as a result of downing leaching, but the NH4+-N had a greater concentration in the tops soil layer than the other depths. The soils under the influence of freeze-thawing had the largest TN concentration in surface water at the end of April, which was about three times than that of the peak during the growing period. This study aligned the interactions between the N dynamics with soil microclimatic factors such as temperature, water pH and moisture across the 90 cm profile. The temporal-vertical pattern of soil moisture and the N in soil water provided evidence for the hypothesis that the soil ecohydrology dynamics in this area. These findings were of particular significance to understanding the impacts of paddy rice ecohydrology with N dynamics in middle-to-high latitude areas, which can help to optimize the N availability and water efficiency.

  20. Influence of the implant abutment types and the dynamic loading on initial screw loosening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Sook

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study examined the effects of the abutment types and dynamic loading on the stability of implant prostheses with three types of implant abutments prepared using different fabrication methods by measuring removal torque both before and after dynamic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three groups of abutments were produced using different types of fabrication methods; stock abutment, gold cast abutment, and CAD/CAM custom abutment. A customized jig was fabricated to apply the load at 30° to the long axis. The implant fixtures were fixed to the jig, and connected to the abutments with a 30 Ncm tightening torque. A sine curved dynamic load was applied for 105 cycles between 25 and 250 N at 14 Hz. Removal torque before loading and after loading were evaluated. The SPSS was used for statistical analysis of the results. A Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to compare screw loosening between the abutment systems. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed to compare screw loosening between before and after loading in each group (α=0.05). RESULTS Removal torque value before loading and after loading was the highest in stock abutment, which was then followed by gold cast abutment and CAD/CAM custom abutment, but there were no significant differences. CONCLUSION The abutment types did not have a significant influence on short term screw loosening. On the other hand, after 105 cycles dynamic loading, CAD/CAM custom abutment affected the initial screw loosening, but stock abutment and gold cast abutment did not. PMID:23509006

  1. How saliency, faces, and sound influence gaze in dynamic social scenes.

    PubMed

    Coutrot, Antoine; Guyader, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Conversation scenes are a typical example in which classical models of visual attention dramatically fail to predict eye positions. Indeed, these models rarely consider faces as particular gaze attractors and never take into account the important auditory information that always accompanies dynamic social scenes. We recorded the eye movements of participants viewing dynamic conversations taking place in various contexts. Conversations were seen either with their original soundtracks or with unrelated soundtracks (unrelated speech and abrupt or continuous natural sounds). First, we analyze how auditory conditions influence the eye movement parameters of participants. Then, we model the probability distribution of eye positions across each video frame with a statistical method (Expectation-Maximization), allowing the relative contribution of different visual features such as static low-level visual saliency (based on luminance contrast), dynamic low level visual saliency (based on motion amplitude), faces, and center bias to be quantified. Through experimental and modeling results, we show that regardless of the auditory condition, participants look more at faces, and especially at talking faces. Hearing the original soundtrack makes participants follow the speech turn-taking more closely. However, we do not find any difference between the different types of unrelated soundtracks. These eyetracking results are confirmed by our model that shows that faces, and particularly talking faces, are the features that best explain the gazes recorded, especially in the original soundtrack condition. Low-level saliency is not a relevant feature to explain eye positions made on social scenes, even dynamic ones. Finally, we propose groundwork for an audiovisual saliency model. PMID:24993019

  2. The dynamic role of parental influences in preventing adolescent smoking initiation

    PubMed Central

    Mahabee-Gittens, E. Melinda; Xiao, Yang; Gordon, Judith S.; Khoury, Jane C.

    2013-01-01

    Background As adolescents grow, protective parental influences become less important and peer influences take precedence in adolescent’s initiation of smoking. It is unknown how and when this occurs. We sought to: prospectively estimate incidence rates of smoking initiation from late childhood through mid-adolescence, identify important risk and protective parental influences on smoking initiation, and examine their dynamic nature in order to identify key ages. Methods Longitudinal data from the National Survey of Parents and Youth of 8 nationally representative age cohorts (9–16 years) of never smokers in the U.S. were used (N=5705 dyads at baseline). Analysis involved a series of lagged logistic regression models using a cohort-sequential design. Results The mean sample cumulative incidence rates of tobacco use increased from 1.8% to 22.5% between the 9 and 16 years old age cohorts. Among risk factors, peer smoking was the most important across all ages; 11–15 year-olds who spent time with peers who smoked had 2 to 6.5 times higher odds of initiating smoking. Parent–youth connectedness significantly decreased the odds of smoking initiation by 14–37% in 11–14 year-olds; parental monitoring and punishment for smoking decreased the odds of smoking initiation risk by 36–59% in 10–15 year-olds, and by 15–28% in 12–14 year-olds, respectively. Conclusions Parental influences are important in protecting against smoking initiation across adolescence. At the same time, association with peers who smoke is a very strong risk factor. Our findings provide empirical evidence to suggest that in order to prevent youth from initiating smoking, parents should be actively involved in their adolescents’ lives and guard them against association with peers who smoke. PMID:23380496

  3. The Influence of Surface Plasmons on Excited State Dynamics in PTCDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarova, N. A.

    Organic thin film solar cells can be paired with nanostructured substrates to overcome the issue of narrow spectral absorption in a thin-film configuration. The nanostructured surface acts not only as an effective scattering back reflector to increase the light path within the absorbing thin film but also affords plasmonic activity. The interface between the metal and the absorbing chromophore supports surface plasmon modes. The associated strong electromagnetic field can potentially couple with excitations of the chromophore, altering its exciton dynamics. Such a plasmon-exciton coupling can lead to control over excitation processes, namely singlet fission. Singlet fission is a sharing of excited state energy between chromophores that may regulate instances of multi-exciton generation, allowing the solar cell efficiency to exceed the thermodynamical Shockley-Queisser limit. The current investigation focuses on hybridization of the plasmon and molecular exciton. We coat an organic semiconductor, 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA), on the nanogratings consisting of lines of Ag on a substrate coated with a thick Ag backing. A dielectric spacer layer is included between the organic and the metal in some samples to eliminate any reaction between the two. The SP resonance of the grating is tuned through a PTCDA exciton line by sweeping the incident wave vector. Successful anticrossing between the plasmon and the exciton peaks would be observed in steady-state reflectance data as a function of angle. Though a detailed analysis of reflectance spectra has not been completed, the potential for plasmon-exciton hybdridization is demonstrated.

  4. Dehydration of Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate to Uranyl Nitrate Trihydrate under Ambient Conditions as Observed via Dynamic Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2015-05-22

    the hexahydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] (UNH) and the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3] (UNT) forms. Their stabilities depend on both relative humidity and temperature. Both phases have previously been studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy, but the data were limited by both instrumental resolution and the ability to prepare the samples as pellets without desiccating them. We report time-resolved infrared (IR) measurements using an integrating sphere that allow us to observe the transformation from the hexahydrate to the trihydrate simply by flowing dry nitrogen gas over the sample. Hexahydrate samples were prepared and confirmed via known XRD patterns, then measured in reflectance mode. The hexahydrate has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm-1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample dehydrates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a blue edge shoulder but ultimately resulting in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm-1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT since UNT has two non-equivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a morphological and structural change that has the lustrous lime green crystals changing to the dull greenish yellow of the trihydrate. Crystal structures and phase transformation were confirmed theoretically using DFT calculations and experimentally via microscopy methods. Both methods showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, as opposed to a single crystallographic site in the hexahydrate.

  5. Influence of dislocation and dislocation loop biases on microstructures simulated by rate equation cluster dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, T.

    2015-12-01

    Sensitivity of microstructures under irradiation to absorption biases of dislocations and dislocation loops is investigated by rate equation cluster dynamics (RECD). Contrary to standard rate theory which is often used to estimate sensitivity of cavity growth to biases, it is possible with RECD to quantify the effect of biases on nucleation, growth and coarsening of loops and cavities. For this purpose simple and accurate expressions for dislocation and dislocation loop biases are derived, based on finite element calculations. They are used in a RECD code to quantify the effect of biases on microstructures of austenitic steels irradiated with electrons. It is shown that biases have a strong influence not only on the loop and dislocation network evolutions, but also on cavity nucleation. Sensitivity to some other parameters of the model is also discussed.

  6. Influence of Nanotwin Boundary on the Bauschinger's Effect in Cu: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, D.; Zhang, H.; Li, D. Y.

    2013-09-01

    Plastic pre-strain may decrease the yield strength of metallic materials when stressed in the opposite direction, known as Bauschinger's effect, which could considerably influence the performance of the materials during cyclic loading processes such as fatigue and fretting. In this study, effects of twin boundary (TW) as an ordered obstacle in a nanoscaled Cu crystal on defects' generation and annihilation during cyclic tension-compression loading processes were investigated, in comparison with those occurring in a single crystal (SC), using a molecular dynamics simulation technique. It was observed that the Bauschinger's effect in the nanoscaled TW system was weaker with higher residual strain energy, compared to the SC system; and, the ductility of both the SC and TW systems was increased by the cycling loading, but this increase was smaller for the TW system. Efforts were made to elucidate the mechanisms involved.

  7. Vertical Dynamic Interaction Between Train and Track Influence of Wheel and Track Imperfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, J. C. O.; Igeland, A.

    1995-11-01

    The vertical dynamic behaviour is investigated for a railway bogie moving on a rail which is discretely supported, via railpads, by sleepers resting on an elastic foundation. The transient interaction problem is numerically solved by use of an extended state-spacer vector approach in conjunction with a complex modal superposition for the track. Application examples are given in which the influences of three types of practically important imperfections in the compound vehicle/track system are investigated. The first is a sinusoidal corrugation of the railhead and the second a skid flat on the wheel tread (a wheelflat). The third imperfection is a case where a single sleeper has lost its support due to erosion of the ballast. Physical explanations of the calculated interaction behaviour are given.

  8. Interplay between media and social influence in the collective behavior of opinion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaiori, Francesca; Castellano, Claudio

    2015-10-01

    Messages conveyed by media act as a major drive in shaping attitudes and inducing opinion shift. On the other hand, individuals are strongly affected by peer pressure while forming their own judgment. We solve a general model of opinion dynamics where individuals either hold one of two alternative opinions or are undecided and interact pairwise while exposed to an external influence. As media pressure increases, the system moves from pluralism to global consensus; four distinct classes of collective behavior emerge, crucially depending on the outcome of direct interactions among individuals holding opposite opinions. Observed nontrivial behaviors include hysteretic phenomena and resilience of minority opinions. Notably, consensus could be unachievable even when media and microscopic interactions are biased in favor of the same opinion: The unfavored opinion might even gain the support of the majority.

  9. How motif environment influences transcription factor search dynamics: Finding a needle in a haystack.

    PubMed

    Dror, Iris; Rohs, Remo; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2016-07-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) have to find their binding sites, which are distributed throughout the genome. Facilitated diffusion is currently the most widely accepted model for this search process. Based on this model the TF alternates between one-dimensional sliding along the DNA, and three-dimensional bulk diffusion. In this view, the non-specific associations between the proteins and the DNA play a major role in the search dynamics. However, little is known about how the DNA properties around the motif contribute to the search. Accumulating evidence showing that TF binding sites are embedded within a unique environment, specific to each TF, leads to the hypothesis that the search process is facilitated by favorable DNA features that help to improve the search efficiency. Here, we review the field and present the hypothesis that TF-DNA recognition is dictated not only by the motif, but is also influenced by the environment in which the motif resides. PMID:27192961

  10. Interplay between media and social influence in the collective behavior of opinion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Colaiori, Francesca; Castellano, Claudio

    2015-10-01

    Messages conveyed by media act as a major drive in shaping attitudes and inducing opinion shift. On the other hand, individuals are strongly affected by peer pressure while forming their own judgment. We solve a general model of opinion dynamics where individuals either hold one of two alternative opinions or are undecided and interact pairwise while exposed to an external influence. As media pressure increases, the system moves from pluralism to global consensus; four distinct classes of collective behavior emerge, crucially depending on the outcome of direct interactions among individuals holding opposite opinions. Observed nontrivial behaviors include hysteretic phenomena and resilience of minority opinions. Notably, consensus could be unachievable even when media and microscopic interactions are biased in favor of the same opinion: The unfavored opinion might even gain the support of the majority. PMID:26565297

  11. The Reflective Learning Continuum: Reflecting on Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, James W.; Hay, Amanda; Drago, William

    2005-01-01

    The importance of reflection to marketing educators is increasingly recognized. However, there is a lack of empirical research that considers reflection within the context of both the marketing and general business education literature. This article describes the use of an instrument that can be used to measure four identified levels of a…

  12. Human-caused mortality influences spatial population dynamics: pumas in landscapes with varying mortality risks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newby, Jesse R.; Mills, L. Scott; Ruth, Toni K.; Pletscher, Daniel H.; Mitchell, Michael S.; Quigley, Howard B.; Murphy, Kerry M.; DeSimone, Rich

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of how stressors affect dispersal attributes and the contribution of local populations to multi-population dynamics are of immediate value to basic and applied ecology. Puma (Puma concolor) populations are expected to be influenced by inter-population movements and susceptible to human-induced source–sink dynamics. Using long-term datasets we quantified the contribution of two puma populations to operationally define them as sources or sinks. The puma population in the Northern Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (NGYE) was largely insulated from human-induced mortality by Yellowstone National Park. Pumas in the western Montana Garnet Mountain system were exposed to greater human-induced mortality, which changed over the study due to the closure of a 915 km2 area to hunting. The NGYE’s population growth depended on inter-population movements, as did its ability to act as a source to the larger region. The heavily hunted Garnet area was a sink with a declining population until the hunting closure, after which it became a source with positive intrinsic growth and a 16× increase in emigration. We also examined the spatial and temporal characteristics of individual dispersal attributes (emigration, dispersal distance, establishment success) of subadult pumas (N = 126). Human-caused mortality was found to negatively impact all three dispersal components. Our results demonstrate the influence of human-induced mortality on not only within population vital rates, but also inter-population vital rates, affecting the magnitude and mechanisms of local population’s contribution to the larger metapopulation.

  13. Predicting Agricultural Management Influence on Long-Term Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics: Implications for Biofuel Production

    SciTech Connect

    Gollany, H. T.; Rickman, R. W.; Albrecht, S. L.; Liang, Y.; Kang, Shujiang; Machado, S.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term field experiments (LTE) are ideal for predicting the influence of agricultural management on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics and examining biofuel crop residue removal policy questions. Our objectives were (i) to simulate SOC dynamics in LTE soils under various climates, crop rotations, fertilizer or organic amendments, and crop residue managements using the CQESTR model and (ii) to predict the potential of no-tillage (NT) management to maintain SOC stocks while removing crop residue. Classical LTEs at Champaign, IL (1876), Columbia, MO (1888), Lethbridge, AB (1911), Breton, AB (1930), and Pendleton, OR (1931) were selected for their documented history of management practice and periodic soil organic matter (SOM) measurements. Management practices ranged from monoculture to 2- or 3-yr crop rotations, manure, no fertilizer or fertilizer additions, and crop residue returned, burned, or harvested. Measured and CQESTR predicted SOC stocks under diverse agronomic practices, mean annual temperature (2.1 19 C), precipitation (402 973 mm), and SOC (5.89 33.58 g SOC kg 1) at the LTE sites were significantly related (r 2 = 0.94, n = 186, P < 0.0001) with a slope not significantly different than 1. The simulation results indicated that the quantities of crop residue that can be sustainably harvested without jeopardizing SOC stocks were influenced by initial SOC stocks, crop rotation intensity, tillage practices, crop yield, and climate. Manure or a cover crop/intensified crop rotation under NT are options to mitigate loss of crop residue C, as using fertilizer alone is insufficient to overcome residue removal impact on SOC stocks

  14. Ultrafast charge separation dynamics in opaque, operational dye-sensitized solar cells revealed by femtosecond diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ghadiri, Elham; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M.; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael; Moser, Jacques-E.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient dye-sensitized solar cells are based on highly diffusive mesoscopic layers that render these devices opaque and unsuitable for ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy measurements in transmission mode. We developed a novel sub-200 femtosecond time-resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy scheme combined with potentiostatic control to study various solar cells in fully operational condition. We studied performance optimized devices based on liquid redox electrolytes and opaque TiO2 films, as well as other morphologies, such as TiO2 fibers and nanotubes. Charge injection from the Z907 dye in all TiO2 morphologies was observed to take place in the sub-200 fs time scale. The kinetics of electron-hole back recombination has features in the picosecond to nanosecond time scale. This observation is significantly different from what was reported in the literature where the electron-hole back recombination for transparent films of small particles is generally accepted to occur on a longer time scale of microseconds. The kinetics of the ultrafast electron injection remained unchanged for voltages between +500 mV and –690 mV, where the injection yield eventually drops steeply. The primary charge separation in Y123 organic dye based devices was clearly slower occurring in two picoseconds and no kinetic component on the shorter femtosecond time scale was recorded. PMID:27095505

  15. Ultrafast charge separation dynamics in opaque, operational dye-sensitized solar cells revealed by femtosecond diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiri, Elham; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M.; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael; Moser, Jacques-E.

    2016-04-01

    Efficient dye-sensitized solar cells are based on highly diffusive mesoscopic layers that render these devices opaque and unsuitable for ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy measurements in transmission mode. We developed a novel sub-200 femtosecond time-resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy scheme combined with potentiostatic control to study various solar cells in fully operational condition. We studied performance optimized devices based on liquid redox electrolytes and opaque TiO2 films, as well as other morphologies, such as TiO2 fibers and nanotubes. Charge injection from the Z907 dye in all TiO2 morphologies was observed to take place in the sub-200 fs time scale. The kinetics of electron-hole back recombination has features in the picosecond to nanosecond time scale. This observation is significantly different from what was reported in the literature where the electron-hole back recombination for transparent films of small particles is generally accepted to occur on a longer time scale of microseconds. The kinetics of the ultrafast electron injection remained unchanged for voltages between +500 mV and –690 mV, where the injection yield eventually drops steeply. The primary charge separation in Y123 organic dye based devices was clearly slower occurring in two picoseconds and no kinetic component on the shorter femtosecond time scale was recorded.

  16. Ultrafast charge separation dynamics in opaque, operational dye-sensitized solar cells revealed by femtosecond diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghadiri, Elham; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael; Moser, Jacques-E

    2016-01-01

    Efficient dye-sensitized solar cells are based on highly diffusive mesoscopic layers that render these devices opaque and unsuitable for ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy measurements in transmission mode. We developed a novel sub-200 femtosecond time-resolved diffuse reflectance spectroscopy scheme combined with potentiostatic control to study various solar cells in fully operational condition. We studied performance optimized devices based on liquid redox electrolytes and opaque TiO2 films, as well as other morphologies, such as TiO2 fibers and nanotubes. Charge injection from the Z907 dye in all TiO2 morphologies was observed to take place in the sub-200 fs time scale. The kinetics of electron-hole back recombination has features in the picosecond to nanosecond time scale. This observation is significantly different from what was reported in the literature where the electron-hole back recombination for transparent films of small particles is generally accepted to occur on a longer time scale of microseconds. The kinetics of the ultrafast electron injection remained unchanged for voltages between +500 mV and -690 mV, where the injection yield eventually drops steeply. The primary charge separation in Y123 organic dye based devices was clearly slower occurring in two picoseconds and no kinetic component on the shorter femtosecond time scale was recorded. PMID:27095505

  17. Simulations of a Membrane-Anchored Peptide: Structure, Dynamics, and Influence on Bilayer Properties

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Morten Ø.; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Peters, Günther H.

    2004-01-01

    A three-dimensional structure of a model decapeptide is obtained by performing molecular dynamics simulations of the peptide in explicit water. Interactions between an N-myristoylated form of the folded peptide anchored to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine fluid phase lipid membranes are studied at different applied surface tensions by molecular dynamics simulations. The lipid membrane environment influences the conformational space explored by the peptide. The overall secondary structure of the anchored peptide is found to deviate at times from its structure in aqueous solution through reversible conformational transitions. The peptide is, despite the anchor, highly mobile at the membrane surface with the peptide motion along the bilayer normal being integrated into the collective modes of the membrane. Peptide anchoring moderately alters the lateral compressibility of the bilayer by changing the equilibrium area of the membrane. Although membrane anchoring moderately affects the elastic properties of the bilayer, the model peptide studied here exhibits conformational flexibility and our results therefore suggest that peptide acylation is a feasible way to reinforce peptide-membrane interactions whereby, e.g., the lifetime of receptor-ligand interactions can be prolonged. PMID:15189854

  18. Influence of diphenylsiloxane content on the dynamic creep response of filled, crosslinked polysiloxanes

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, S.A.

    1996-10-01

    Crosslinked polysiloxanes are excellent materials for high temperature applications because of their thermal stability. Addition of inorganic oxide fillers is necessary in order to achieve desired mechanical properties, however. The fillers can contribute mechanical, as well as chemical, degradation sites that influence the thermal stability of the resulting elastomers. Further, application of a dynamically varying mechanical load on the elastomer can accelerate the rate of degradation. In this contribution, the ability of polysiloxanes; elastomers to withstand application of cyclic loads at elevated temperature is examined. The dynamic creep response of poly(diphenylsiloxane-co-dimethylsiloxane)s is characterized as a function of diphenylsiloxane content. Changes in the balance of degradation reactions that give mechanical property changes and the creep response are observed with changing diphenylsiloxane content. Changes in crosslink density with cyclic loading are observed and characterize changes in network structure. Stabilization of the siloxane bonds by the phenyl groups is suggested as an underlying reason for the changes in creep response and network structure of the crosslinked copolymers with varying diphenyisiloxane content.

  19. Traffic dynamics around weaving section influenced by accident: Cellular automata approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lin-Peng; Li, Xin-Gang; Lam, William H. K.

    2015-07-01

    The weaving section, as a typical bottleneck, is one source of vehicle conflicts and an accident-prone area. Traffic accident will block lanes and the road capacity will be reduced. Several models have been established to study the dynamics around traffic bottlenecks. However, little attention has been paid to study the complex traffic dynamics influenced by the combined effects of bottleneck and accident. This paper presents a cellular automaton model to characterize accident-induced traffic behavior around the weaving section. Some effective control measures are proposed and verified for traffic management under accident condition. The total flux as a function of inflow rates, the phase diagrams, the spatial-temporal diagrams, and the density and velocity profiles are presented to analyze the impact of accident. It was shown that the proposed control measures for weaving traffic can improve the capacity of weaving section under both normal and accident conditions; the accidents occurring on median lane in the weaving section are more inclined to cause traffic jam and reduce road capacity; the capacity of weaving section will be greatly reduced when the accident happens downstream the weaving section.

  20. Influence of necking propensity on the dynamic-tensile-extrusion response of fluoropolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Gray Ill, George T; Trujillo, Carl P

    2009-01-01

    The quasi-static and dynamic responses of two fluoropolymers - polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE) - have been extensively characterized. Here we investigate the influence of the propensity to neck or not between PCTFE and PTFE on their responses under Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-TenExt). The Dyn-Ten-Ext technique was originally developed for metals and applied to copper and tantalum spheres by Gray, et al. as a tensile corollary to compressive Taylor Cylinder Impact Testing. Under Taylor Cylinder loading both PTFE and PCTFE exhibit a classic three-diameter ductile deformation pattern. The ductile-to-brittle transition in PTFE occurs at 131 m s{sup -1} with a very tight transition range in impact stress of less than 4 m s{sup -1}. Conversely, the ductile-to-brittle transition in PCTFE occurs between 165 and 200 m s{sup -1} with a gradual transition to stochastic crack formation and ultimately failure. Under Dyn-Ten-Ext loading the onset of extrusion occurs above 164 and 259 m s{sup -1} for PTFE and PCTFE respectively.

  1. Electron-phonon scattering dynamics in ferromagnetic metals and their influence on ultrafast demagnetization processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essert, Sven; Schneider, Hans Christian

    2011-12-01

    We theoretically investigate spin-dependent carrier dynamics due to the electron-phonon interaction after ultrafast optical excitation in ferromagnetic metals. We calculate the electron-phonon matrix elements including the spin-orbit interaction in the electronic wave functions and the interaction potential. Using the matrix elements in Boltzmann scattering integrals, the momentum-resolved carrier distributions are obtained by solving their equation of motion numerically. We find that the optical excitation with realistic laser intensities alone leads to a negligible magnetization change, and that the demagnetization due to electron-phonon interaction is mostly due to hole scattering. Importantly, the calculated demagnetization quenching due to this Elliot-Yafet-type depolarization mechanism is not large enough to explain the experimentally observed result. We argue that the ultrafast demagnetization of ferromagnets does not occur exclusively via an Elliott-Yafet type process, i.e., scattering in the presence of the spin-orbit interaction, but is influenced to a large degree by a dynamical change of the band structure, i.e., the exchange splitting.

  2. Influence of magnetic domain landscape on the flux dynamics in superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamus, Z.; Cieplak, Marta Z.; Kończykowski, M.; Zhu, L. Y.; Chien, C. L.

    2016-02-01

    We use a line of miniature Hall sensors to study the influence of the magnetic domain distribution on the flux dynamics in superconductor/ferromagnet bilayers. Two bilayers are built of a ferromagnetic Co/Pt multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and a superconducting Nb layer, with the insulating layer in-between to avoid proximity effect. The magnetic domain patterns of various geometries are reversibly predefined in the Co/Pt multilayers using the appropriate magnetization procedure. The Pt thickness is different in the two bilayers, resulting in different width and length of the domains, which profoundly affects vortex dynamics. We show that narrow short domains lead to strong confinement of vortices at the sample edge, while narrow elongated domains of uniform width induce smaller confinement and easy vortex entry. Large enhancement of flux pinning and critical current density, by a factor of more than 7, is observed in the last case, while the former results in smaller enhancement. When domains are wide, the disorder in the domain widths becomes beneficial for larger enhancement of pinning, while more uniform distribution of domain widths results in a precipitous drop of the enhancement. The analysis of these results suggests that with increasing domain width, a transition occurs from vortex chains pinned by narrow domains to disordered triangular vortex lattice pinned by a maze of multiply interconnected magnetic domains.

  3. Lagged influence of North Atlantic Oscillation on population dynamics of a Mediterranean terrestrial salamander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvidio, Sebastiano; Oneto, Fabrizio; Ottonello, Dario; Pastorino, Mauro V.

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is a large-scale climatic pattern that strongly influences the atmospheric circulation in the northern Hemisphere and by consequence the long-term variability of marine and terrestrial ecosystem over great part of northern Europe and western Mediterranean. In the Mediterranean, the effects of the NAO on vertebrates has been studied mainly on bird populations but was rarely analysed in ectothermic animals, and in particular in amphibians. In this study, we investigated the relationships between winter, spring and summer NAO indexes and the long-term population dynamics of the plethodontid salamander Speleomantes strinatii. This terrestrial salamander was monitored inside an artificial cave in NW Italy for 24 consecutive years. The relationships between seasonal NAO indexes and the salamander dynamics were assessed by cross-correlation function (CCF) analysis, after prewhitening the time series by autoregressive moving average statistical modelling. Results of CCF analyses indicated that the salamander abundance varied in relation to the one-year ahead winter NAO ( P = 0.018), while no relationships were found with spring and summer indexes. These results strengthen some previous findings that suggested a high sensitivity of temperate terrestrial amphibians to wintertime climatic conditions.

  4. Topographic Influence on Vegetation Distribution: A Distributed Hydrologic Model with Vegetation Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bras, R. L.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Vivoni, E. R.

    2005-12-01

    Vegetation can adaptively evolve and respond following seasonal and inter-annual cycles of climate and water redistribution in the system. As a result, it is commonly observed that in semi-arid regions vegetation follows particular patterns, apparently related to topography. In this paper we discuss how vegetation responds to topographically mediated photosyntetically active radiation and soil moisture in a semi-arid climate characteristic of New Mexico. The analysis is done with a new version of the spatially distributed hydrologic model: tRIBS. The latest evolution of the model couples the physics of the principal water and energy processes over the river basin to the basic plant biochemistry. The end result is a fully dynamic representation of vegetation that responds to and influences the spatially variable hydrology. Using the new modeling framework we construct a set of numerical experiments that examine linkages between the catchment geomorphologic structure and patterns of vegetation productivity. The results stress the importance of proper accounting of dynamic vegetation in understanding the water and energy cycles over the basin.

  5. Lagged influence of North Atlantic Oscillation on population dynamics of a Mediterranean terrestrial salamander.

    PubMed

    Salvidio, Sebastiano; Oneto, Fabrizio; Ottonello, Dario; Pastorino, Mauro V

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is a large-scale climatic pattern that strongly influences the atmospheric circulation in the northern Hemisphere and by consequence the long-term variability of marine and terrestrial ecosystem over great part of northern Europe and western Mediterranean. In the Mediterranean, the effects of the NAO on vertebrates has been studied mainly on bird populations but was rarely analysed in ectothermic animals, and in particular in amphibians. In this study, we investigated the relationships between winter, spring and summer NAO indexes and the long-term population dynamics of the plethodontid salamander Speleomantes strinatii. This terrestrial salamander was monitored inside an artificial cave in NW Italy for 24 consecutive years. The relationships between seasonal NAO indexes and the salamander dynamics were assessed by cross-correlation function (CCF) analysis, after prewhitening the time series by autoregressive moving average statistical modelling. Results of CCF analyses indicated that the salamander abundance varied in relation to the one-year ahead winter NAO (P = 0.018), while no relationships were found with spring and summer indexes. These results strengthen some previous findings that suggested a high sensitivity of temperate terrestrial amphibians to wintertime climatic conditions. PMID:26160231

  6. Talin Influences the Dynamics of the Myosin VII-Membrane Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Galdeen, Shawn A.; Stephens, Stephen; Thomas, David D.

    2007-01-01

    Myosin VII (M7) and talin are ancient and ubiquitous actin-binding proteins with conserved roles in adhesion. Talin serves to link membrane receptors to the underlying actin cytoskeleton and forms a complex with M7 in Dictyostelium. The levels of talinA are tightly linked to M7 levels in Dictyostelium. Cells lacking M7 exhibit an 80% decrease in steady-state levels of talinA, whereas increased levels of M7 result in concomitant increases in total talinA. In contrast, changes in talinA levels do not affect M7 levels. Immunoprecipitation reveals that talinA and M7 are associated with each other in membrane fractions. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments on green fluorescent protein (GFP)-M7 cells expressing different levels of the M7 and talinA show that changes in the overall amounts of these two proteins influences the dynamics of membrane-associated M7. The recovery of GFP-M7 on the membrane is faster in cells lacking talinA and limited in the presence of excess amounts of talinA and M7. These results establish that M7 stabilizes talinA in the cytosol and, in return, talinA regulates the residence time of M7 at the plasma membrane, suggesting that these two proteins are both part of the same dynamic adhesion complex on the plasma membrane. PMID:17671169

  7. Influence of the dynamical image potential on the rainbows in ion channeling through short carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Borka, D.; Petrovic, S.; Neskovic, N.; Mowbray, D. J.; Miskovic, Z. L.

    2006-06-15

    We investigate the influence of the dynamic polarization of the carbon valence electrons on the angular distributions of protons channeled through short (11,9) single-wall carbon nanotubes at speeds of 3 and 5 a.u. (corresponding to the proton energies of 0.223 and 0.621 MeV), with the nanotube length varied from 0.1 to 0.3 {mu}m. The dynamic image force on protons is calculated by means of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the nanotube's dielectric response, whereas the repulsive interaction with the nanotube's cylindrical wall is modeled by a continuum potential based on the Doyle-Turner interatomic potential. The angular distributions of channeled protons are generated by a computer simulation method using the numerical solution of the proton equations of motion in the transverse plane. Our analysis shows that the inclusion of the image interaction causes qualitative changes in the proton deflection function, giving rise to a number of rainbow maxima in the corresponding angular distribution. We propose that observations of those rainbow maxima could be used to deduce detailed information on the relevant interaction potentials, and consequently to probe the electron distribution inside carbon nanotubes.

  8. Upper-Crustal Structures Beneath Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica and their Influence on Ice Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, A.; Peters, L. E.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Christianson, K.; Alley, R. B.; Parizek, B. R.

    2015-12-01

    Ice-mass loss in the Amundsen Sea sector of West Antarctica has nearly doubled in the past four decades and continues to increase at an accelerating pace. Mass loss from Thwaites Glacier (TG) now rivals that from Pine Island Glacier, and modeling and observational studies indicate that TG may have begun an irreversible retreat into a deep marine basin. This retreat may initiate the disintegration of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet sometime in the next several hundred years. However, models cannot yet provide accurate estimates of the rate of ice-mass loss and the resulting sea-level rise. One large unknown in modeling studies is the role of geologic controls on ice dynamics in the TG basin. We use a combination of active-source seismic, ice-penetrating radar and aerogravity data collected on TG to investigate whether upper-crustal structures can exert a fundamental control on TG's ice dynamics. We focus especially on the distribution of sedimentary basins and their association with variability in the ice basal rheology and/or variations in basal-shear stress inferred from modeling. Seismic-reflection/refraction and radar profiling data collected along the main trunk of TG about 250 km inland of the current grounding line indicate the presence of ~10-km wide, >100-m deep sedimentary basin with a relatively smooth ice-bed interface. A co-located Bouguer gravity-anomaly profile, derived from NASA's Operation IceBridge aerogravity data, shows a local gravity-anomaly low that approximately matches the location of this seismically-inferred sedimentary basin. Moreover, this sedimentary basin roughly corresponds to a region of low basal-shear stress inferred from ice-flow modeling. Therefore, we hypothesize that, for at least this location, the sedimentary basin provides a soft, smooth bed for ice flow; hence, upper-crustal structures are closely linked to the basal properties of TG.

  9. Leaf dynamics in growth and reproduction of Xanthium canadense as influenced by stand density

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Takahiro; Oikawa, Shimpei; Hirose, Tadaki

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf longevity is controlled by the light gradient in the canopy and also by the nitrogen (N) sink strength in the plant. Stand density may influence leaf dynamics through its effects on light gradient and on plant growth and reproduction. This study tests the hypothesis that the control by the light gradient is manifested more in the vegetative period, whereas the opposite is true when the plant becomes reproductive and develops a strong N sink. Methods Stands of Xanthium canadense were established at two densities. Emergence, growth and death of every leaf on the main stem and branches, and plant growth and N uptake were determined from germination to full senescence. Mean residence time and dry mass productivity were calculated per leaf number, leaf area, leaf mass and leaf N (collectively termed ‘leaf variables’) in order to analyse leaf dynamics and its effect on plant growth. Key Results Branching and reproductive activities were higher at low than at high density. Overall there was no significant difference in mean residence time of leaf variables between the two stands. However, early leaf cohorts on the main stem had a longer retention time at low density, whereas later cohorts had a longer retention time at high density. Branch leaves emerged earlier and tended to live longer at low than at high density. Leaf efficiencies, defined as carbon export per unit investment of leaf variables, were higher at low density in all leaf variables except for leaf number. Conclusions In the vegetative phase of plant growth, the light gradient strongly controls leaf longevity, whereas later the effects of branching and reproductive activities become stronger and over-rule the effect of light environment. As leaf N supports photosynthesis and also works as an N source for plant development, N use is pivotal in linking leaf dynamics with plant growth and reproduction. PMID:26248476

  10. Exploring influence of subliminal interoception on whole-brain functional network connectivity dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jarrahi, Behnaz; Mantini, Dante; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kollias, Spyros

    2015-08-01

    Recent fMRI studies have highlighted a dynamic relation across large-scale intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) of human brain. The origin of such temporal variations in functional connectivity especially during the task-free (resting-state) fMRI is still a matter of debate and ongoing investigation. In this exploratory study, we sought to determine whether subliminal differences in interoception (e.g., distention pressure on the viscera) can influence the dynamics of whole-brain functional network connectivity. A group of healthy right-handed female subjects, close in age (n = 15, mean age ± SD = 30.33 ± 8.7 years) underwent a series of eyes-open resting-state fMRI scans under different interoceptive conditions including catheterization and partial bladder filling. Using a high-dimensional independent component analysis, the functional imaging data were parcellated into 75 components, out of which 33 were identified as non-artifactual ICNs. Changes in dynamic functional network connectivity (dFNC) were evaluated using the sliding-time window approach and k-means clustering algorithm. We used subject medians for each cluster state and compared differences in dFNC correlations using a paired t-test. Following a false discovery rate multiple comparison correction threshold of p<;0.05, no significant differences in dFNC were found. However, different dwell times for each (pseudo-)resting-state were observed. More liberal statistical criteria (uncorrected p<;0.005) also indicated differences in dFNC between ICN pairs especially involving the salience, subcortical, sensorimotor, cerebellar and brainstem networks. Further investigations of the effect of internal (bodily) sensations on the time-varying aspects of functional connectivity can improve our understanding of the nature of temporal fluctuations in interrelations between intrinsic brain networks. PMID:26736351

  11. The influence of woody thickening on SOM dynamics along a precipitation gradient in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, Gustavo; Bird, Michael; Wurster, Christopher; Ascough, Philippa; Veenendaal, Elmar; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Schrodt, Franziska; Domingues, Tomas; Feldpausch, Ted; Braojos, Victor; Lloyd, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    We made use of the carbon isotopic composition of soil organic matter (SOM) in bulk and fractionated samples to assess the influence of C3/C4 vegetation on SOM dynamics in semi-natural tropical ecosystems sampled along a precipitation gradient in West Africa. The non-linear nature of the relationship between δ13C and SOC content observed across the latitudinal gradient strongly suggests that in addition to the inherent differences in the input rates and turnover times of tree and grass-derived carbon, the broad range of edaphic characteristics may have a major effect in both the physical protection of particulate organic carbon and the chemical stabilization of 13C enriched microbial metabolites. The stable carbon isotopic composition of SOM with depth indicated that there was a larger proliferation in woody vegetation with increasing precipitation, with such trend being also heavily dependent on the characteristics of the soils. An unbiased assessment of the potential impact of tropical vegetation thickening on SOM dynamics is characteristically difficult given the confounding effects posed by the interaction of varying climatic and edaphic factors. Therefore, in order to minimize the impact of those factors, we selected two neighboring transitional ecosystems (a closed savanna woodland and a semideciduous dry forest) occurring in soils of comparable characteristics. Both sites showed varying degrees of δ13C enrichment with depth in bulk and fractionated SOM. Moreover, radiocarbon analyses of sand-size aggregates (>53 μm HF) yielded relatively short MRT, which shows highly dynamic SOM processes even in fairly deep locations. Interestingly, the most stable SOM fraction associated to silt and clay (

  12. The dynamic influence of emotional words on sentence comprehension: An ERP study.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jinfeng; Wang, Lin; Yang, Yufang

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, we explored the influence of emotional words on the semantic integration of their following neutral nouns during sentence comprehension. We manipulated the emotionality of verbs and the semantic congruity of their following (neutral) object nouns in sentences. Event-related potentials were recorded to the verbs, which were either negative or neutral, and to the object nouns, which were either semantically congruent or incongruent relative to the preceding contexts. We found an N400 and a P600 effect in response to the semantic congruity of the nouns when they followed the neutral verbs. However, the P600 (but not the N400) semantic congruity effect may have been attenuated when the nouns followed the negative verbs. Meanwhile, the negative verbs elicited a larger P2 and N400 than did the neutral verbs. The results indicate that the attention captured by emotional words impaired reanalysis of the following incongruent information, demonstrating a dynamic influence of emotional words on the semantic processing of following information during sentence comprehension. PMID:26833049

  13. Influence of induced axial magnetic field on plasma dynamics and radiative characteristics of Z pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Velikovich, A. L.; Rudakov, L. I.; Osborne, G. C.; Shrestha, I.; Weller, M. E.; Williamson, K. M.; Stafford, A.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.

    2011-10-01

    The influence of an induced axial magnetic field on plasma dynamics and radiative characteristics of Z pinches is investigated. An axial magnetic field was induced in a novel Z-pinch load: a double planar wire array with skewed wires (DPWAsk), which represents a planar wire array in an open magnetic configuration. The induced axial magnetic field suppressed magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities (with m = 0 and m = 1 instability modes) in the Z-pinch plasma. The influence of the initial axial magnetic field on the structure of the plasma column at stagnation was manifested through the formation of a more uniform plasma column compared to a standard double planar wire array (DPWA) load [V. L. Kantsyrev , Phys. PlasmasPHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.2896577 15, 030704 (2008)]. The DPWAsk load is characterized by suppression of MRT instabilities and by the formation of the sub-keV radiation pulse that occurs before the main x-ray peak. Gradients in plasma parameters along the cathode-anode gap were observed and analyzed for DPWAsk loads made from low atomic number Z (Al) and mid-Z (brass) wires.

  14. What’s Coming Near? The Influence of Dynamical Visual Stimuli on Nociceptive Processing

    PubMed Central

    De Paepe, Annick L.; Crombez, Geert; Legrain, Valéry

    2016-01-01

    Objects approaching us may pose a threat, and signal the need to initiate defensive behavior. Detecting these objects early is crucial to either avoid the object or prepare for contact most efficiently. This requires the construction of a coherent representation of our body, and the space closely surrounding our body, i.e. the peripersonal space. This study, with 27 healthy volunteers, investigated how the processing of nociceptive stimuli applied to the hand is influenced by dynamical visual stimuli either approaching or receding from the hand. On each trial a visual stimulus was either approaching or receding the participant’s left or right hand. At different temporal delays from the onset of the visual stimulus, a nociceptive stimulus was applied either at the same or the opposite hand, so that it was presented when the visual stimulus was perceived at varying distances from the hand. Participants were asked to respond as fast as possible at which side they perceived a nociceptive stimulus. We found that reaction times were fastest when the visual stimulus appeared near the stimulated hand. Moreover, investigating the influence of the visual stimuli along the continuous spatial range (from near to far) showed that approaching lights had a stronger spatially dependent effect on nociceptive processing, compared to receding lights. These results suggest that the coding of nociceptive information in a peripersonal frame of reference may constitute a safety margin around the body that is designed to protect it from potential physical threat. PMID:27224421

  15. Influence of Surface Morphology on the Shear-Induced Wear of Alkylsilane Monolayers: Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Summers, Andrew Z; Iacovella, Christopher R; Billingsley, Matthew R; Arnold, Steven T; Cummings, Peter T; McCabe, Clare

    2016-03-15

    Chemisorbed alkylsilane monolayer coatings have been shown to possess favorable lubrication properties; however, film degradation prevents the widespread use of these materials as lubricants in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS). In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to provide insight into the conditions that promote the degradation and wear of these materials. This is achieved through removal of interfacial chain-substrate bonds during shear and the examination of the mobility of the resulting free, unbound chains. Specific focus is given to the effects of surface morphology, which has been shown previously to strongly influence frictional forces in monolayer systems. In-plane order of chain attachments is shown to lead to pressure-induced orientational ordering of monolayers, promoting film stability. This behavior is lost as nonideality is introduced into the substrate and chain patterning on the surface becomes disordered. The presence of surface roughness is found to reduce film stability, with localization of wear observed for chain attachment sites nearest the interface of contact. The influence of substrate nonideality on monolayer degradation is shown to diminish as chain length is increased. PMID:26885941

  16. The influence of substrate and electron acceptor availability on bioactive zone dynamics in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yolcubal, Irfan; Dorn, Jonathan G.; Maier, Raina M.; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2003-11-01

    Two approaches were used to investigate the influence of dissolved oxygen (DO) and substrate availability on the formation and dynamics of "bioactive zones" in a water-saturated porous medium. A bioactive zone is defined as a region where a microbial community is sufficiently active to metabolize bioavailable substrates. In the first approach, microbial activity was characterized by monitoring the spatial and temporal variability of DO and aqueous substrate (salicylate and naphthalene) concentrations during miscible-displacement experiments. In the second approach, microbial activity was monitored using multiple fiber optics emplaced in the porous medium to detect luminescence produced by Pseudomonas putida RB1353, a bioluminescent reporter organism that produces light when salicylate (an intermediate of naphthalene degradation) is present. The results of both approaches show that the location and size of the bioactive zones were influenced by in situ DO and substrate availability. When DO was not a limiting factor (i.e., lower substrate input concentrations), the bioactive zone encompassed the entire column, with the majority of the microbial activity occurring between the inlet and midpoint. However, as the availability of DO became limiting for the higher substrate input experiments, the size of the bioactive zone shrank and was ultimately limited to the proximity of the column inlet.

  17. Urban spring phenology in the middle temperate zone of China: dynamics and influence factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shouzhen; Shi, Ping; Li, Hongzhong

    2016-04-01

    Urbanization and its resultant urban heat island provide a means for evaluating the impact of climate warming on vegetation phenology. To predict the possible response of vegetation phenology to rise of temperature, it is necessary to investigate factors influencing vegetation phenology in different climate zones. The start of growing season (SOS) in seven cities located in the middle temperate humid, semi-humid, semi-arid, and arid climate zones in China was extracted based on satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data. The dynamics of urban SOS from 2000 to 2009 and the correlations between urban SOS and land surface temperatures (LST), precipitation, and sunshine duration, respectively, were analyzed. The results showed that there were no obvious change trends for urban SOS, and the heat island induced by urbanization can make SOS earlier in urban areas than that in adjacent rural areas. And the impact of altitude on SOS was also not negligible in regions with obvious altitude difference between urban and adjacent rural areas. Precipitation and temperature were two main natural factors influencing urban SOS in the middle temperate zone, but their impacts varied with climate zones. Only in Harbin city with lower sunshine duration in spring, sunshine duration had more significant impact than temperature and precipitation. Interference of human activities on urban vegetation was non-negligible, which can lower the dependence of urban SOS on natural climatic factors.

  18. Critical insight into the influence of the potential energy surface on fission dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurek, K.

    2011-07-15

    The present work is dedicated to a careful investigation of the influence of the potential energy surface on the fission process. The time evolution of nuclei at high excitation energy and angular momentum is studied by means of three-dimensional Langevin calculations performed for two different parametrizations of the macroscopic potential: the Finite Range Liquid Drop Model (FRLDM) and the Lublin-Strasbourg Drop (LSD) prescription. Depending on the mass of the system, the topology of the potential throughout the deformation space of interest in fission is observed to noticeably differ within these two approaches, due to the treatment of curvature effects. When utilized in the dynamical calculation as the driving potential, the FRLDM and LSD models yield similar results in the heavy-mass region, whereas the predictions can be strongly dependent on the Potential Energy Surface (PES) for medium-mass nuclei. In particular, the mass, charge, and total kinetic energy distributions of the fission fragments are found to be narrower with the LSD prescription. The influence of critical model parameters on our findings is carefully investigated. The present study sheds light on the experimental conditions and signatures well suited for constraining the parametrization of the macroscopic potential. Its implication regarding the interpretation of available experimental data is briefly discussed.

  19. Influence of induced axial magnetic field on plasma dynamics and radiative characteristics of Z pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Osborne, G. C.; Shrestha, I.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Velikovich, A. L.; Rudakov, L. I.; Williamson, K. M.

    2011-10-15

    The influence of an induced axial magnetic field on plasma dynamics and radiative characteristics of Z pinches is investigated. An axial magnetic field was induced in a novel Z-pinch load: a double planar wire array with skewed wires (DPWAsk), which represents a planar wire array in an open magnetic configuration. The induced axial magnetic field suppressed magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities (with m = 0 and m = 1 instability modes) in the Z-pinch plasma. The influence of the initial axial magnetic field on the structure of the plasma column at stagnation was manifested through the formation of a more uniform plasma column compared to a standard double planar wire array (DPWA) load [V. L. Kantsyrev et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 030704 (2008)]. The DPWAsk load is characterized by suppression of MRT instabilities and by the formation of the sub-keV radiation pulse that occurs before the main x-ray peak. Gradients in plasma parameters along the cathode-anode gap were observed and analyzed for DPWAsk loads made from low atomic number Z (Al) and mid-Z (brass) wires.

  20. What's Coming Near? The Influence of Dynamical Visual Stimuli on Nociceptive Processing.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Annick L; Crombez, Geert; Legrain, Valéry

    2016-01-01

    Objects approaching us may pose a threat, and signal the need to initiate defensive behavior. Detecting these objects early is crucial to either avoid the object or prepare for contact most efficiently. This requires the construction of a coherent representation of our body, and the space closely surrounding our body, i.e. the peripersonal space. This study, with 27 healthy volunteers, investigated how the processing of nociceptive stimuli applied to the hand is influenced by dynamical visual stimuli either approaching or receding from the hand. On each trial a visual stimulus was either approaching or receding the participant's left or right hand. At different temporal delays from the onset of the visual stimulus, a nociceptive stimulus was applied either at the same or the opposite hand, so that it was presented when the visual stimulus was perceived at varying distances from the hand. Participants were asked to respond as fast as possible at which side they perceived a nociceptive stimulus. We found that reaction times were fastest when the visual stimulus appeared near the stimulated hand. Moreover, investigating the influence of the visual stimuli along the continuous spatial range (from near to far) showed that approaching lights had a stronger spatially dependent effect on nociceptive processing, compared to receding lights. These results suggest that the coding of nociceptive information in a peripersonal frame of reference may constitute a safety margin around the body that is designed to protect it from potential physical threat. PMID:27224421

  1. Urban spring phenology in the middle temperate zone of China: dynamics and influence factors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shouzhen; Shi, Ping; Li, Hongzhong

    2016-04-01

    Urbanization and its resultant urban heat island provide a means for evaluating the impact of climate warming on vegetation phenology. To predict the possible response of vegetation phenology to rise of temperature, it is necessary to investigate factors influencing vegetation phenology in different climate zones. The start of growing season (SOS) in seven cities located in the middle temperate humid, semi-humid, semi-arid, and arid climate zones in China was extracted based on satellite-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data. The dynamics of urban SOS from 2000 to 2009 and the correlations between urban SOS and land surface temperatures (LST), precipitation, and sunshine duration, respectively, were analyzed. The results showed that there were no obvious change trends for urban SOS, and the heat island induced by urbanization can make SOS earlier in urban areas than that in adjacent rural areas. And the impact of altitude on SOS was also not negligible in regions with obvious altitude difference between urban and adjacent rural areas. Precipitation and temperature were two main natural factors influencing urban SOS in the middle temperate zone, but their impacts varied with climate zones. Only in Harbin city with lower sunshine duration in spring, sunshine duration had more significant impact than temperature and precipitation. Interference of human activities on urban vegetation was non-negligible, which can lower the dependence of urban SOS on natural climatic factors. PMID:26272052

  2. Dynamic Transcriptomic Profiles between Tomato and a Wild Relative Reflect Distinct Developmental Architectures1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chitwood, Daniel H.; Maloof, Julin N.; Sinha, Neelima R.

    2013-01-01

    Developmental differences between species commonly result from changes in the tissue-specific expression of genes. Clustering algorithms are a powerful means to detect coexpression across tissues in single species but are not often applied to multidimensional data sets, such as gene expression across tissues in multiple species. As next-generation sequencing approaches enable interspecific analyses, methods to visualize and explore such data sets will be required. Here, we analyze a data set comprising gene expression profiles across six different tissue types in domesticated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and a wild relative (Solanum pennellii). We find that self-organizing maps are a useful means to analyze interspecies data, as orthologs can be assigned to independent levels of a “super self-organizing map.” We compare various clustering approaches using a principal component analysis in which the expression of orthologous pairs is indicated by two points. We leverage the expression profile differences between orthologs to look at tissue-specific changes in gene expression between species. Clustering based on expression differences between species (rather than absolute expression profiles) yields groups of genes with large tissue-by-species interactions. The changes in expression profiles of genes we observe reflect differences in developmental architecture, such as changes in meristematic activity between S. lycopersicum and S. pennellii. Together, our results offer a suite of data-exploration methods that will be important to visualize and make biological sense of next-generation sequencing experiments designed explicitly to discover tissue-by-species interactions in gene expression data. PMID:23585653

  3. Contrasting precipitation seasonality influences evapotranspiration dynamics in water-limited shrublands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, Samuel; Vargas, Rodrigo; Yepez, Enrico A.; Acosta, Jose S.; Castro, Angel; Escoto-Rodriguez, Martin; Lopez, Eulogio; Martínez-Osuna, Juan; Rodriguez, Julio C.; Smith, Stephen V.; Vivoni, Enrique R.; Watts, Christopher J.

    2016-02-01

    Water-limited ecosystems occupy nearly 30% of the Earth, but arguably, the controls on their ecosystem processes remain largely uncertain. We analyzed six site years of eddy covariance measurements of evapotranspiration (ET) from 2008 to 2010 at two water-limited shrublands: one dominated by winter precipitation (WP site) and another dominated by summer precipitation (SP site), but with similar solar radiation patterns in the Northern Hemisphere. We determined how physical forcing factors (i.e., net radiation (Rn), soil water content (SWC), air temperature (Ta), and vapor pressure deficit (VPD)) influence annual and seasonal variability of ET. Mean annual ET at SP site was 455 ± 91 mm yr-1, was mainly influenced by SWC during the dry season, by Rn during the wet season, and was highly sensitive to changes in annual precipitation (P). Mean annual ET at WP site was 363 ± 52 mm yr-1, had less interannual variability, but multiple variables (i.e., SWC, Ta, VPD, and Rn) were needed to explain ET among years and seasons. Wavelet coherence analysis showed that ET at SP site has a consistent temporal coherency with Ta and P, but this was not the case for ET at WP site. Our results support the paradigm that SWC is the main control of ET in water-limited ecosystems when radiation and temperature are not the limiting factors. In contrast, when P and SWC are decoupled from available energy (i.e., radiation and temperature), then ET is controlled by an interaction of multiple variables. Our results bring attention to the need for better understanding how climate and soil dynamics influence ET across these globally distributed ecosystems.

  4. Tidal Influences on Belowground Methane Dynamics in a Mesohaline Coastal Marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. C.; Tripathee, R.; Pal, D.; Schafer, K. V.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    The influence of tidal hydrology on belowground distributions and atmospheric fluxes of methane (CH4) remain poorly understood. The greenhouse gas balance of coastal wetland systems is a topic of increasing importance due to mounting proposals for coastal wetland preservation and/or restoration for carbon sequestration purposes, so it is essential that the effects of tides on methane dynamics be more fully understood. Here we describe a set of porewater measurements intended to clarify the influence of tides on belowground CH4 dynamics and their consequent effects on atmospheric emissions. Monthly measurements were conducted for one year in a marsh with mixed Spartina alterniflora and Phragmites australis vegetation and in an adjacent intertidal mud flat. The site is located in the Hackensack Meadowlands in northern New Jersey and is mesohaline, with a range of salinities from 4 - 8 ppt. Measurements indicate major differences in the spatial and temporal dynamics of belowground CH4 between the low marsh and mud flat sediments, though both are characterized by very high dissolved CH4 concentrations of >1,000 μM in summer months. A particularly important distinction is that mud flat porewaters remain saturated with dissolved CH4 into early winter, while low marsh porewarers never reach CH4 saturation and rapidly fall off to negligible concentrations in the autumn months. We attribute this long-term CH4 storage to differences in low-tide water table depths between the mud flat and low marsh, as well as the ventilating effects of macrophytes in the low marsh. We hypothesize that CH4-enriched gas bubbles are produced in mud flat sediments in summer, and then slowly dissolve over the fall and early winter months to maintain near-saturation concentrations in porewater. Static flux chamber measurements conducted at the same site, and discussed in detail in a separate submission, confirm the importance of mud flat CH4 storage in contributing to significant CH4 emissions

  5. Design and demonstration of a system for the deposition of atomic-oxygen durable coatings for reflective solar dynamic power system concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    A system for the vacuum deposition of atomic-oxygen durable coatings for reflective solar dynamic power systems (SDPS) concentrators was designed and demonstrated. The design issues pertinent to SDPS were developed by the Government Aerospace Systems Division of the Harris Corporation and are described in NASA-CR-179489. Both design and demonstration phases have been completed. At the time of this report the deposition system was ready for coating of facets for SDPS concentrators. The materials issue relevant to the coating work were not entirely resolved. These issues can only be resolved when substrates which are comparable to those which will be used in flight hardware are available. The substrates available during the contract period were deficient in the areas of surface roughness and contamination. These issues are discussed more thoroughly in the body of the report.

  6. The influence of strong connections on dynamics of neuron population with long-tailed synaptic weight distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizhkova, E. A.; Chizhov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    This work is devoted to exploring the influence of long-tailed synaptic weights distribution on neural population dynamics. We show numerically that both strong sparse and very weak connections pay crucial role for spontaneous activity whereas they almost do not influence on driven population activity. Moreover, according to obtained results, we suggest that neurons with strong connections form multiple chains, which are the core of spontaneous activity, whereas neurons with weak connections pay little role of partially enhancing of population activity.

  7. Influence of climatic variability on local population dynamics of a Sonoran Desert platyopuntia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowers, Janice E.

    2005-01-01

    Age-based population dynamics of Opuntia engelmannii, a shrubby cactus with flattened cladodes, were investigated at a Sonoran Desert site protected from grazing since 1907. Demographic statistics were determined from births and deaths on six permanent vegetation plots mapped four times between 1968 and 2001. Moderate longevity (13-56 years) and modest per capita annual survival (0.9298) were associated with fairly rapid turnover; cycles of population growth and decline were thus evident over relatively short periods. Age-frequency distribution, determined for subpopulations in two neighboring habitats in 1996 and 2003, was used to calculate residual regeneration, an index of the difference between observed cohort size and idealized survivorship. Establishment peaks occurred in the late 1970s, the mid-1980s, and the early to mid-1990s and coincided with increased winter moisture in the years before germination, ample summer rain in the year of germination, and decreased drought in the years after germination, reflecting favorable conditions for fruit production, seed germination, and seedling survival. Regionally, pulses and gaps in establishment coincide with the frequency and amplitude of large-scale climatic phenomena that affect cycles of moisture and drought on decadal and interdecadal scales. Because of local factors, however, subpopulations within a few km of one another can experience virtually identical climates yet differ strikingly in age structure and density. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dynamic Interplay of Smooth Muscle α-Actin Gene-Regulatory Proteins Reflects the Biological Complexity of Myofibroblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Strauch, Arthur Roger; Hariharan, Seethalakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblasts (MFBs) are smooth muscle-like cells that provide contractile force required for tissue repair during wound healing. The leading agonist for MFB differentiation is transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) that induces transcription of genes encoding smooth muscle α-actin (SMαA) and interstitial collagen that are markers for MFB differentiation. TGFβ1 augments activation of Smad transcription factors, pro-survival Akt kinase, and p38 MAP kinase as well as Wingless/int (Wnt) developmental signaling. These actions conspire to activate β-catenin needed for expression of cyclin D, laminin, fibronectin, and metalloproteinases that aid in repairing epithelial cells and their associated basement membranes. Importantly, β-catenin also provides a feed-forward stimulus that amplifies local TGFβ1 autocrine/paracrine signaling causing transition of mesenchymal stromal cells, pericytes, and epithelial cells into contractile MFBs. Complex, mutually interactive mechanisms have evolved that permit several mammalian cell types to activate the SMαA promoter and undergo MFB differentiation. These molecular controls will be reviewed with an emphasis on the dynamic interplay between serum response factor, TGFβ1-activated Smads, Wnt-activated β-catenin, p38/calcium-activated NFAT protein, and the RNA-binding proteins, Purα, Purβ, and YB-1, in governing transcriptional and translational control of the SMαA gene in injury-activated MFBs. PMID:24832798

  9. Influencing Nanoscale Dynamical and Complex Systems for Advanced Computation and Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Paul Michael

    single-electron-tunneling-junction network and we show how the dynamics simplify for the limiting regime of strong and fast coupling, which are both critical steps towards designing useful computational systems from such oscillators. We use these results to show how this non-autonomous dynamical system can be made into a basis for powerful information processing. For bistable oscillators, we show that each physical gate can act as every possible logic gate through appropriately selected bias voltages. As an example of the flexibility of this computational substrate, we also apply our scheme to demonstrate that, with the necessary external influence, a simple network of oscillators can implement any of the 256 possible elementary cellular automata rules. In the final chapter of this thesis, we describe the first account of using a focused electron beam to directly write nanoscale features into thin films of mesoporous silica. We show that we can both modulate film thickness and induce chemical resistance in patterned regions. We show that this chemical resistance can be achieved with the same conditions and comparable electron dosages as are used in more common applications of electron beam lithography (EBL). We further show that gentle polar solvents, including de-ionized water, are sufficient etchants, readily discriminating between the features and the unexposed film. Taken together, our results suggest a novel yet simple strategy to tailor mesoporous silica with conventional nanoscale lithographic techniques.

  10. Influence of buried interfaces on the charge dynamics in oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Shreedhar Nath

    Influence of buried interfaces was investigated in the ZnO thin films grown on Si at 120°C, 150°C, 170°C, and 200°C. by employing PL and SPV. The PL spectrum of samples grown at higher temperatures showed bandgap emission at ˜3.3 eV, shallow defects emission ˜3.0 eV and visible emission at ˜2.4 eV. On the other hand, the visible emission for the sample grown at 120°C visible emission is red-shifted to ˜2.1eV. SPV spectra of films grown at higher temperatures in nitrogen gas showed bandgap transition whereas 120°C grown sample only showed weak band transition. Instead one can see transition primarily in IR region due to silicon or silicon oxide. Furthermore, analysis of the transient SPV curves in both nitrogen and vacuum revealed two different characteristic time scales (fast and slow) possibly reflecting contributions of both the ZnO surface and the ZnO/Si buried interface.

  11. Influence of system temperature on the micro-structures and dynamics of dust clusters in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Y. L.; Huang, F.; He, Y. F.; Wu, L.; Liu, Y. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Yu, M. Y.

    2015-06-15

    Influence of the system temperature on the micro-structures and dynamics of dust clusters in dusty plasmas is investigated through laboratory experiment and molecular dynamics simulation. The micro-structures, defect numbers, and pair correlation function of the dust clusters are studied for different system temperatures. The dust grains' trajectories, the mean square displacement, and the corresponding self-diffusion coefficient of the clusters are calculated for different temperatures for illustrating the phase properties of the dust clusters. The simulation results confirm that with the increase in system temperature, the micro-structures and dynamics of dust clusters are gradually changed, which qualitatively agree with experimental results.

  12. Ecosystem dynamics of the Pacific-influenced Northern Bering and Chukchi Seas in the Amerasian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.; Cooper, Lee W.; Feder, Howard M.; Sirenko, Boris I.

    2006-10-01

    The shallow continental shelves and slope of the Amerasian Arctic are strongly influenced by nutrient-rich Pacific waters advected over the shelves from the northern Bering Sea into the Arctic Ocean. These high-latitude shelf systems are highly productive both as the ice melts and during the open-water period. The duration and extent of seasonal sea ice, seawater temperature and water mass structure are critical controls on water column production, organic carbon cycling and pelagic-benthic coupling. Short food chains and shallow depths are characteristic of high productivity areas in this region, so changes in lower trophic levels can impact higher trophic organisms rapidly, including pelagic- and benthic-feeding marine mammals and seabirds. Subsistence harvesting of many of these animals is locally important for human consumption. The vulnerability of the ecosystem to environmental change is thought to be high, particularly as sea ice extent declines and seawater warms. In this review, we focus on ecosystem dynamics in the northern Bering and Chukchi Seas, with a more limited discussion of the adjoining Pacific-influenced eastern section of the East Siberian Sea and the western section of the Beaufort Sea. Both primary and secondary production are enhanced in specific regions that we discuss here, with the northern Bering and Chukchi Seas sustaining some of the highest water column production and benthic faunal soft-bottom biomass in the world ocean. In addition, these organic carbon-rich Pacific waters are periodically advected into low productivity regions of the nearshore northern Bering, Chukchi and Beaufort Seas off Alaska and sometimes into the East Siberian Sea, all of which have lower productivity on an annual basis. Thus, these near shore areas are intimately tied to nutrients and advected particulate organic carbon from the Pacific influenced Bering Shelf-Anadyr water. Given the short food chains and dependence of many apex predators on sea ice, recent

  13. Simulations of the quart (101-bar1)/water interface: A comparison of classical force fields, ab initi molecular dynamics, and x-ray reflectivity experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Skelton, Adam; Fenter, Paul; Kubicki, James D.; Wesolowski, David J; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the (1011) surface of quartz interacting with bulk liquid water are performed using three different classical force fields, Lopes et al., ClayFF, and CHARMM water contact angle (CWCA), and compared to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and X-ray reflectivity (XR) results. The axial densities of the water and surface atoms normal to the surface are calculated and compared to previous XR experiments. Favorable agreement is shown for all the force fields with respect to the position of the water atoms. Analyses such as the radial distribution functions between water and hydroxyl atoms and the average cosine of the angle between the water dipole vector and the normal of the surface are also calculated for each force field. Significant differences are found between the different force fields from such analyses, indicating differing descriptions of the structured water in the near vicinity of the surface. AIMD simulations are also performed to obtain the water and hydroxyl structure for comparison among the predictions of the three classical force fields to better understand which force field is most accurate. It is shown that ClayFF exhibits the best agreement with the AIMD simulations for water hydroxyl radial distribution functions, suggesting that ClayFF treats the hydrogen bonding more accurately.

  14. Influence of linear profile modification and loading conditions on the dynamic tooth load and stress of high contact ratio gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chinwai; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1990-01-01

    A computer simulation for the dynamic response of high-contact-ratio spur gear transmissions is presented. High contact ratio gears have the potential to produce lower dynamic tooth loads and minimum root stress but they can be sensitive to tooth profile errors. The analysis presented examines various profile modifications under realistic loading conditions. The effect of these modifications on the dynamic load (force) between mating gear teeth and the dynamic root stress is presented. Since the contact stress is dependent on the dynamic load, minimizing dynamic loads will also minimize contact stresses. It is shown that the combination of profile modification and the applied load (torque) carried by a gear system has a significant influence on gear dynamics. The ideal modification at one value of applied load will not be the best solution for a different load. High-contact-ratio gears were found to require less modification than standard low-contact-ratio gears. High-contact-ratio gears are more adversely affected by excess modification than by under modification. In addition, the optimal profile modification required to minimize the dynamic load (hence the contact stress) on a gear tooth differs from the optimal modification required to minimize the dynamic root (bending) stress. Computer simulation can help find the design tradeoffs to determine the best profile modification to satisfy the conflicting constraints of minimizing both the load and root stress in gears which must operate over a range of applied loads.

  15. A new experimental setup for in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy studies of atmospheric corrosion on metal surfaces considering the influence of ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Wiesinger, R; Kleber, Ch; Frank, J; Schreiner, M

    2009-04-01

    The knowledge available regarding the influence of ultraviolet (UV) light on the atmospheric corrosion of materials is very rudimentary. Therefore, a new experimental setup consisting of a cell for studying in situ reactions occurring at the metal/atmosphere interface by simultaneously applying infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements was designed and built. The cell presented consists of an acrylic glass body with a UV-light-transparent window mounted in such a way that the sample can be irradiated and weathered under controlled atmospheric conditions under a grazing angle of incidence of the IR beam. This new setup was tested by using a specimen of polycrystalline silver, where the growth of Ag(2)CO(3) and AgOH as basic silver carbonate on the surface could be observed. The weathering tests were carried out in synthetic air containing 90% relative humidity (RH) and 250 ppm CO(2), with and without UV light. The results obtained from the IRRAS spectra could be perfectly correlated with the in situ QCM data. PMID:19366514

  16. The influence of microhabitat on the population dynamics of four herbaceous species in a semiarid area of northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, K A; Santos, J M F F; Andrade, J R; Lima, E N; Albuquerque, U P; Ferraz, E M N; Araújo, E L

    2016-02-01

    Variation in annual rainfall is considered the most important factor influencing population dynamics in dry environments. However, different factors may control population dynamics in different microhabitats. This study recognizes that microhabitat variation may attenuate the influence of climatic seasonality on the population dynamics of herbaceous species in dry forest (Caatinga) areas of Brazil. We evaluated the influence of three microhabitats (flat, rocky and riparian) on the population dynamics of four herbaceous species (Delilia biflora, Commelina obliqua, Phaseolus peduncularis and Euphorbia heterophylla) in a Caatinga (dry forest) fragment at the Experimental Station of the Agronomic Research Institute of Pernambuco in Brazil, over a period of three years. D. biflora, C. obliqua and P. peduncularis were found in all microhabitats, but they were present at low densities in the riparian microhabitat. There was no record of E. heterophylla in the riparian microhabitat. Population size, mortality rates and natality rates varied over time in each microhabitat. This study indicates that different establishment conditions influenced the population size and occurrence of the four species, and it confirms that microhabitat can attenuate the effect of drought stress on mortality during the dry season, but the strength of this attenuator role may vary with time and species. PMID:26909622

  17. Influence of the outer scales of temperature and dynamic turbulence on the characteristics of transmitted acoustic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanaeva, L. G.; Belov, V. V.; Burkatovskaya, Yu. B.; Krasnenko, N. P.

    2015-11-01

    In the present work, the problem of propagation of monochromatic acoustic radiation in the lower 500-meter layer of the plain stratified moving turbulent atmosphere is solved by the Monte Carlo method. The influence of the parameters of models of the outer scales of temperature and dynamic turbulence on the intensity of transmitted acoustic radiation intensity is investigated.

  18. Relative influence of plant quality and natural enemies on the seasonal dynamics of bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The abundance and distribution of insect herbivores is determined by, among other things, plant quality and natural enemies. These two factors vary temporally and spatially, subsequently affecting seasonal population dynamics. The relative influence of plant quality and natural enemies on the season...

  19. Influences of Dynamic Level and Pitch Register on the Vibrato Rates and Widths of Violin and Viola Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, Rebecca B.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible influences of pitch register and dynamic level on vibrato rates and widths of university and high school violin and viola players. Analysis showed that pitch register significantly affected the vibrato rates and widths of the performers. Musicians vibrated 0.32 Hz faster and approximately 26…

  20. Neutral hydrogen in high-temperature pinch plasmas and its influence on the ionization dynamics of impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preissing, N.; König, R.; Kolk, K. H.; Kunze, H.-J.

    1992-08-01

    The neutral-hydrogen density in a hot pinch plasma and in the surrounding halo is investigated spectroscopically, and its influence on the ionization dynamics of impurity ions is analyzed. The results are employed in the analysis of effective-ionization-rate coefficients, which are derived for Si viii to Si xii from the time evolution of the respective ions in the plasma.

  1. Influence of food availability on demography and local population dynamics in a long-lived seabird.

    PubMed Central

    Oro, Daniel; Cam, Emmanuelle; Pradel, Roger; Martínez-Abraín, Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    Few studies have addressed the effects of food availability as a proximate factor affecting local adult survival in long-lived organisms and their consequences at local population dynamics. We used capture-recapture analysis of resightings of 10 birth cohorts of ringed Audouin's gulls, Larus audouinii, to estimate adult survival and dispersal (both emigration and immigration). For the first time, permanent emigration (the transient effect in capture-recapture analysis) was modelled for the whole population and not only for the newly marked birds. Gulls exploit to a large extent fishes discarded from trawlers, and a trawling moratorium established since 1991 has decreased food supply for the colony. This was used as a natural experiment of food availability to assess its effects on adult survival and emigration. These and other demographic parameters were used in a projection modelling to assess the probabilities of extinction of the colony under two scenarios of lower and higher food availability. Food availability (together with the age of individuals) influenced emigration probabilities, but not adult survival, which was estimated at 0.91 (s.e. = 0.02). When food was in shorter supply during the chick-rearing period, emigration was very high (ca. 65%) for younger breeders, although this rate decreased sharply with age. Probabilities of extinction were very high when food availability was low, and when environmental stochasticity was introduced, and only stochastic immigration from the outside seemed to prevent extinction. The results highlight the importance of dispersal processes in the population dynamics of long-lived organisms. PMID:15101698

  2. Influence of fluvial environments on sediment archiving processes and temporal pollutant dynamics (Upper Loire River, France).

    PubMed

    Dhivert, E; Grosbois, C; Rodrigues, S; Desmet, M

    2015-02-01

    Floodplains are often cored to build long-term pollutant trends at the basin scale. To highlight the influences of depositional environments on archiving processes, aggradation rates, archived trace element signals and vertical redistribution processes, two floodplain cores were sampled near in two different environments of the Upper Loire River (France): (i) a river bank ridge and (ii) a paleochannel connected by its downstream end. The base of the river bank core is composed of sandy sediments from the end of the Little Ice Age (late 18th century). This composition corresponds to a proximal floodplain aggradation (<50 m from the river channel) and delimits successive depositional steps related to progressive disconnection degree dynamism. This temporal evolution of depositional environments is associated with mineralogical sorting and variable natural trace element signals, even in the <63-μm fraction. The paleochannel core and upper part of the river bank core are composed of fine-grained sediments that settled in the distal floodplain. In this distal floodplain environment, the aggradation rate depends on the topography and connection degree to the river channel. The temporal dynamics of anthropogenic trace element enrichments recorded in the distal floodplain are initially synchronous and present similar levels. Although the river bank core shows general temporal trends, the paleochannel core has a better resolution for short-time variations of trace element signals. After local water depth regulation began in the early 1930s, differences of connection degree were enhanced between the two cores. Therefore, large trace element signal divergences are recorded across the floodplain. The paleochannel core shows important temporal variations of enrichment levels from the 1930s to the coring date. However, the river bank core has no significant temporal variations of trace element enrichments and lower contamination levels because of a lower deposition of

  3. Synergistic influences of phase, density, and climatic variation on the dynamics of fluctuating populations.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Varun R; Getz, Lowell L; Hostetler, Jeffrey A; Ozgul, Arpat; Oli, Madan K

    2011-08-01

    Although ecologists have long recognized that certain mammalian species exhibit high-amplitude, often multiannual, fluctuations in abundance, their causes have remained poorly understood and the subject of intense debate. A key contention has been the relative role of density-dependent and density-independent processes in governing population dynamics. We applied capture-mark-recapture analysis to 25 years of monthly trapping data from a fluctuating prairie vole Microtus ochrogaster population in Illinois, USA, to estimate realized population growth rates and associated vital rates (survival and recruitment) and modeled them as a function of vole density and density-independent climatic variation. We also tested for phase dependence and seasonality in the effects of the above processes. Variation in the realized population growth rate was best explained by phase-specific changes in vole density lagged by one month and mean monthly temperatures with no time lags. The underlying vital rates, survival and recruitment, were influenced by the additive and interactive effects of phase, vole density, and mean monthly temperatures. Our results are consistent with the observation that large-scale population fluctuations are characterized by phase-specific changes in demographic and physiological characteristics. Our findings also support the growing realization that the interaction between climatic variables and density-dependent factors may be a widespread phenomenon, and they suggest that the direction and magnitude of such interactive effects may be phase specific. We conclude that density-dependent and density-independent climatic variables work in tandem during each phase of density fluctuations to drive the dynamics of fluctuating populations. PMID:21905434

  4. Texture-defined objects influence responses of blowfly motion-sensitive neurons under natural dynamical conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Thomas W.; Kern, Roland; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The responses of visual interneurons of flies involved in the processing of motion information do not only depend on the velocity, but also on other stimulus parameters, such as the contrast and the spatial frequency content of the stimulus pattern. These dependencies have been known for long, but it is still an open question how they affect the neurons’ performance in extracting information about the structure of the environment under the specific dynamical conditions of natural flight. Free-flight of blowflies is characterized by sequences of phases of translational movements lasting for just 30–100 ms interspersed with even shorter and extremely rapid saccade-like rotational shifts in flight and gaze direction. Previous studies already analyzed how nearby objects, leading to relative motion on the retina with respect to a more distant background, influenced the response of a class of fly motion sensitive visual interneurons, the horizontal system (HS) cells. In the present study, we focused on objects that differed from their background by discontinuities either in their brightness contrast or in their spatial frequency content. We found strong object-induced effects on the membrane potential even during the short intersaccadic intervals, if the background contrast was small and the object contrast sufficiently high. The object evoked similar response increments provided that it contained higher spatial frequencies than the background, but not under reversed conditions. This asymmetry in the response behavior is partly a consequence of the depolarization level induced by the background. Thus, our results suggest that, under the specific dynamical conditions of natural flight, i.e., on a very short timescale, the responses of HS cells represent object information depending on the polarity of the difference between object and background contrast and spatial frequency content. PMID:24808836

  5. One Versus Two Photon Control of Dynamical Tunneling: Influence of the Irregular Floquet States.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Archana; Keshavamurthy, Srihari

    2015-08-27

    A useful approach to control quantum processes involves driving systems with two colored laser fields and varying the relative phase between the fields to control the quantum interferences. A particularly interesting class of bichromatic control schemes involves the so-called M versus N-photon control that results in laser-induced symmetry breaking and leads to directed transport; however, recent studies have shown that the mechanism of laser-induced symmetry breaking has a common classical and quantum origin. In this context, a relevant question is the extent to which such a detailed classical-quantum correspondence holds if the process to be controlled involves quantum tunneling. In this work, we address this issue in terms of controlling dynamical tunneling between field-induced islands of stability in the classical phase space of a model system, a periodically driven pendulum. This is also a paradigmatic model for Hamiltonian ratchets wherein the islands of stability, that is, nonlinear resonances, play a crucial role in the observed directed transport. We compute an appropriate control landscape for the process and show that despite breaking the relevant symmetries, there exist regions in the control landscape where the control fails. The lack of control can be understood in terms of the phase-space nature of the quantum Floquet states that participate in the dynamics of the initial wavepacket. We argue that robust regions of no control arise due to the phenomenon of chaos-assisted tunneling and comment on the possible influence of such regions on the directed transport in the model system. PMID:26056738

  6. Thermally-induced structural dynamic response of flexural configurations influenced by linear/non-linear thermal effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namburu, Raju R.; Tamma, Kumar K.

    1991-01-01

    The thermally-induced strucural dynamic response of flexural configurations influenced by linear/nonlinear thermal effects is presented in conjunction with 'unified' transient approaches for effectively tackling this class of interdisciplinary problems. For illustrative purposes, the flexural structural models are assumed to be of the Euler-Bernoulli type. The purpose of the present paper is to not only provide an understanding of the influence of general linear/nonlinear thermal effects on flexural configurations, but also to provide to the analyst effective computational tools which help preserve a unified technology for the interdisciplinary areas encompassing structural mechanics/dynamics and thermal sciences. Several numerical test models illustrate the representative thermally-induced structural dynamic response of flexural configurations subjected to general linear/nonlinear temperature effects.

  7. Influence of Shock Prestraining and Grain Size on the Dynamic Tensile Extrusion Response of Copper: Experiments, Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, George, III

    2005-07-01

    The mechanical behavior and damage evolution response of high-purity Cu are influenced by strain rate, temperature, stress state, grain size, and shock prestraining. The effects of grain size on the mechanical response of high-purity Cu have been probed and are correlated with the substructural evolution during deformation. The dynamic extrusion response of shock prestrained Cu demonstrates the significant influence of grain size on the large-strain dynamic tensile ductility of high-purity copper. Eulerian hydrocode simulations utilizing the Mechanical Threshold Stress flow stress model were performed to provide insight into the dynamic extrusion process. Quantitative comparisons between the predicted and measured deformation topologies and extrusion rate will be presented. Predictions of the texture evolution (based upon the deformation rate history and the rigid body rotations experienced by the Cu during the extrusion process) are compared with texture measurements.

  8. Influence of Shock Prestraining and Grain Size on the Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion Response of Copper: Experiments and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G. T. III; Cerreta, E.; Yablinsky, C. A.; Addessio, L. B.; Henrie, B. L.; Sencer, B. H.; Maloy, S. A.; Trujillo, C. P.; Lopez, M. F.; Burkett, M.; Maudlin, P. J.

    2006-07-28

    The mechanical behavior of, and damage evolution in high-purity Cu is influenced by strain rate, temperature, stress state, grain size, and shock prestraining. The effects of grain size on the tensile mechanical response of high-purity Cu have been probed and are correlated with the evolution of the substructure. The dynamic extrusion response of shock prestrained Cu demonstrates the significant influence of grain size on the large-strain dynamic tensile ductility of high-purity copper. Eulerian hydrocode simulations utilizing the Mechanical Threshold Stress constitutive model were performed to provide insight into the dynamic extrusion process. Quantitative comparisons between the predicted and measured deformation topologies and extrusion rates are presented.

  9. Influence of Shock Prestraining and Grain Size on the Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion Response of Copper: Experiments and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, G. T.; Cerreta, E.; Yablinsky, C. A.; Addessio, L. B.; Henrie, B. L.; Sencer, B. H.; Burkett, M.; Maudlin, P. J.; Maloy, S. A.; Trujillo, C. P.; Lopez, M. F.

    2006-07-01

    The mechanical behavior of, and damage evolution in high-purity Cu is influenced by strain rate, temperature, stress state, grain size, and shock prestraining. The effects of grain size on the tensile mechanical response of high-purity Cu have been probed and are correlated with the evolution of the substructure. The dynamic extrusion response of shock prestrained Cu demonstrates the significant influence of grain size on the large-strain dynamic tensile ductility of high-purity copper. Eulerian hydrocode simulations utilizing the Mechanical Threshold Stress constitutive model were performed to provide insight into the dynamic extrusion process. Quantitative comparisons between the predicted and measured deformation topologies and extrusion rates are presented.

  10. Influence of particle and surface quality on the vitrinite reflectance of dispersed organic matter: Comparative exercise using data from the qualifying system for reflectance analysis working group of ICCP

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borrego, A.G.; Araujo, C.V.; Balke, A.; Cardott, B.; Cook, A.C.; David, P.; Flores, D.; Hamor-Vido, M.; Hiltmann, W.; Kalkreuth, W.; Koch, J.; Kommeren, C.J.; Kus, J.; Ligouis, B.; Marques, M.; Mendonca, Filho J.G.; Misz, M.; Oliveira, L.; Pickel, W.; Reimer, K.; Ranasinghe, P.; Suarez-Ruiz, I.; Vieth, A.

    2006-01-01

    The development of a qualifying system for reflectance analysis has been the scope of a working group within the International Committee for Coal and Organic Petrology (ICCP) since 1999, when J. Koch presented a system to qualify vitrinite particles according to their size, proximity to bright components and homogeneity of the surface. After some years of work aimed at improving the classification system using photomicrographs, it was decided to run a round robin exercise on microscopy samples. The classification system tested consists of three qualifiers ranging from excellent to low quality vitrinites with an additional option for unsuitable vitrinites. This paper reports on the results obtained by 22 analysts who were asked to measure random reflectance readings on vitrinite particles assigning to each reading a qualifier. Four samples containing different organic matter types and a variety of vitrinite occurrences have been analysed. Results indicated that the reflectance of particles classified as excellent, good or poor compared to the total average reflectance did not show trends to be systematically lower or higher for the four samples analysed. The differences in reflectance between the qualifiers for any given sample were lower than the scatter of vitrinite reflectance among participants. Overall, satisfactory results were obtained in determining the reflectance of vitrinite in the four samples analysed. This was so for samples having abundant and easy to identify vitrinites (higher plant-derived organic matter) as well as for samples with scarce and difficult to identify particles (samples with dominant marine-derived organic matter). The highest discrepancies were found for the organic-rich oil shales where the selection of the vitrinite population to measure proved to be particularly difficult. Special instructions should be provided for the analysis of this sort of samples. The certainty of identification of the vitrinite associated with the vitrinite

  11. Nitrogen dynamics in a tidal river zone influenced by highly urbanization, western Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, M.; Onodera, S. I.; Shimizu, Y.; Maruyama, Y.; Jin, G.; Aritomi, D.

    2014-12-01

    Tidal river and estuary are the transition zone between freshwater and seawater with high biological production. These areas have characteristics of water level fluctuation which causes surface water-groundwater interaction and the associated change in dynamics of nitrogen. Generally in coastal megacities, severe groundwater depression and high contaminants load influence on the environment of tidal river. However, these effects on the nitrogen dynamics and its load from a river to sea have not been fully evaluated in previous studies. Therefore, we aimed to clarify the characteristics of the nitrogen dynamics with the surface water-groundwater interaction in the tidal river zone of Osaka metropolitan city, western Japan. We conducted the field survey from the river mouth to the 7km upstream area of Yamato River, which has a length of 68km and a watershed area of 1,070 km2. Spatial variations in radon (222Rn) concentrations and the difference of hydraulic potential between river waters and the pore waters suggest that the groundwater discharges to the river channel in the upstream area. In contrast, the river water recharged into the groundwater near the river mouth area. It may be caused by the lowering of groundwater level associated with the excess abstraction in the urban area. The spatial and temporal variations in nutrient concentration indicate that nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentration changed temporally and it was negatively correlated with dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentration. Based on the mass balance estimation in winter and summer periods, nitrogen was removed in tidal river zone in both periods which was estimated to be about 10 % of total nitrogen (TN) load from the upstream. However, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and DON was re-produced in winter and summer periods, respectively. NO3-N concentrations were negatively correlated with velocity of river water, which suggests the progress of denitrification in the tidal river zone under

  12. How Culture Influences Teacher Self-Reflective Problem Solving Behavior and Self-Efficacy: Experiences of White Female Teachers Working through Relationship with Black Students in a Mid-Western American City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolson, Bonnie Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Teachers make a difference. White female middle-class teachers represent 84 percent of Americas' teachers. How does culture influence the self-reflective problem-solving behaviors of urban teachers? Urban schools fail youth by opening the doors for a mass exodus. The problem solving behavior of urban teachers may contribute to the student…

  13. Structure of α-conotoxin BuIA: influences of disulfide connectivity on structural dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ai-Hua; Brandstaetter, Hemma; Nevin, Simon T; Tan, Chia Chia; Clark, Richard J; Adams, David J; Alewood, Paul F; Craik, David J; Daly, Norelle L

    2007-01-01

    Background α-Conotoxins have exciting therapeutic potential based on their high selectivity and affinity for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The spacing between the cysteine residues in α-conotoxins is variable, leading to the classification of sub-families. BuIA is the only α-conotoxin containing a 4/4 cysteine spacing and thus it is of significant interest to examine the structure of this conotoxin. Results In the current study we show the native globular disulfide connectivity of BuIA displays multiple conformations in solution whereas the non-native ribbon isomer has a single well-defined conformation. Despite having multiple conformations in solution the globular form of BuIA displays activity at the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, contrasting with the lack of activity of the structurally well-defined ribbon isomer. Conclusion These findings are opposite to the general trends observed for α-conotoxins where the native isomers have well-defined structures and the ribbon isomers are generally disordered. This study thus highlights the influence of the disulfide connectivity of BuIA on the dynamics of the three-dimensional structure. PMID:17445276

  14. Influence of crystallographic orientation and anisotropy on Kapitza conductance via classical molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duda, J. C.; Kimmer, C. J.; Soffa, W. A.; Zhou, X. W.; Jones, R. E.; Hopkins, P. E.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the influence of crystallographic orientation and anisotropy on local phonon density of states, phonon transmissivity, and Kapitza conductance at interfaces between Lennard-Jones solids via classical molecular dynamics simulations. In agreement with prior works, we find that the Kapitza conductance at an interface between two face-centered cubic materials is independent of crystallographic orientation. On the other hand, at an interface between a face-centered cubic material and a tetragonal material, the Kapitza conductance is strongly dependent on the relative orientation of the tetragonal material, albeit this dependence is subject to the overlap in vibrational spectra of the cubic and tetragonal materials. Furthermore, we show that interactions between acoustic phonons in the cubic material and optical phonons in the tetragonal material can lead to the interface exhibiting greater "thermal anisotropy" as compared to that of the constituent materials. Finally, it is noted that the relative match or mismatch between the Debye temperatures of two materials comprising an interface does not serve an accurate gauge of the efficiency of interfacial thermal transport when those materials have different crystal structures.

  15. Dynamics of phoxim residues in green onion and soil as influenced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fa Yuan; Shi, Zhao Yong; Tong, Rui Jian; Xu, Xiao Feng

    2011-01-15

    Organophosphorus pesticides in crops and soil pose a serious threat to public health and environment. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi may make a contribution to organophosphate degradation in soil and consequently decrease chemical residues in crops. A pot culture experiment was conducted to investigate the influences of Glomus caledonium 90036 and Acaulospora mellea ZZ on the dynamics of phoxim residues in green onion (Allium fistulosum L.) and soil at different harvest dates after phoxim application. Results show that mycorrhizal colonization rates of inoculated plants were higher than 70%. Shoot and root fresh weights did not vary with harvest dates but increased significantly in AM treatments. Phoxim residues in plants and soil decreased gradually with harvest dates, and markedly reduced in AM treatments. Kinetic analysis indicated that phoxim degradation in soil followed a first-order kinetic model. AM inoculation accelerated the degradation process and reduced the half-life. G. caledonium 90036 generally produced more pronounced effects than A. mellea ZZ on both the plant growth and phoxim residues in plants and soil. Our results indicate a promising potential of AM fungi for the control of organophosphate residues in vegetables, as well as for the phytoremediation of organophosphorus pesticide-contaminated soil. PMID:20870354

  16. Structural influences on charge carrier dynamics for small-molecule organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiping Shibata, Yosei; Yamanari, Toshihiro; Matsubara, Koji; Yoshida, Yuji; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Saeki, Akinori; Seki, Shu; Zhou, Ying

    2014-07-07

    We investigated the structural influences on the charge carrier dynamics in zinc phthalocyanine/fullerene (ZnPc/C{sub 60}) photovoltaic cells by introducing poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) and 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl)-bithiophene (BP2T) between indium tin oxide and ZnPc layers. ZnPc films can be tuned to be round, long fiber-like, and short fiber-like structure, respectively. Time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements reveal that charge carrier lifetime in ZnPc/C{sub 60} bilayer films is considerably affected by the intra-grain properties. Transient photocurrent of ZnPc single films indicated that the charge carriers can transport for a longer distance in the long fiber-like grains than that in the round grains, due to the greatly lessened grain boundaries. By carefully controlling the structure of ZnPc films, the short-circuit current and fill factor of a ZnPc/C{sub 60} heterojunction solar cell with BP2T are significantly improved and the power conversion efficiency is increased to 2.6%, which is 120% larger than the conventional cell without BP2T.

  17. Structural influences on charge carrier dynamics for small-molecule organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Saeki, Akinori; Zhou, Ying; Seki, Shu; Shibata, Yosei; Yamanari, Toshihiro; Matsubara, Koji; Yoshida, Yuji

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the structural influences on the charge carrier dynamics in zinc phthalocyanine/fullerene (ZnPc/C60) photovoltaic cells by introducing poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) and 2,5-bis(4-biphenylyl)-bithiophene (BP2T) between indium tin oxide and ZnPc layers. ZnPc films can be tuned to be round, long fiber-like, and short fiber-like structure, respectively. Time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements reveal that charge carrier lifetime in ZnPc/C60 bilayer films is considerably affected by the intra-grain properties. Transient photocurrent of ZnPc single films indicated that the charge carriers can transport for a longer distance in the long fiber-like grains than that in the round grains, due to the greatly lessened grain boundaries. By carefully controlling the structure of ZnPc films, the short-circuit current and fill factor of a ZnPc/C60 heterojunction solar cell with BP2T are significantly improved and the power conversion efficiency is increased to 2.6%, which is 120% larger than the conventional cell without BP2T.

  18. Dissimilar Fitness Associated with Resistance to Fluoroquinolones Influences Clonal Dynamics of Various Multiresistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fuzi, Miklos

    2016-01-01

    Fitness cost associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones was recently shown to vary across clones of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. The resulting dissimilar fitness should have influenced the clonal dynamics and thereby the rates of resistance for these pathogens. Moreover, a similar mechanism was recently proposed for the emergence of the H30 and H30R lineages of ESBL-producing E. coli and the major international clone (ribotype 027) of Clostridium difficile. Furthermore, several additional international clones of various multiresistant bacteria are suspect to have been selected by an analogous process. An ability to develop favorable mutations in the gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes seems to be a prerequisite for pathogens to retain fitness while showing high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones. Since, the consumption of other “non-fluoroquinolone” groups of antibiotics have also contributed to the rise in resistance rates a more judicious use of antibiotics in general and of fluoroquinolones in particular could ameliorate the international resistance situation. PMID:27458434

  19. Influence of the semi-permeable membrane on the performance of dynamic field gradient focusing

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Jeffrey M.; Ivory, Cornelius F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is part of our continued effort to understand the underlying principles of dynamic field gradient focusing. In this investigation, we examined three problems associated with the use of a semi-permeable membrane. First, the influence of steric and ionic exclusion of current carrying ions through the membrane was examined. It was found that resistance to the transport of ions across the membrane resulted in a shallowing of the electric field profile and an increase in the size of the defocusing zone, which is where the slope of the electric field is reversed so that it disperses rather than concentrates solutes. These problems could be reduced by using a membrane with large pores relative to the size of the buffering ions and completely void of fixed charges. Next, a numerical simulation was used to investigate concentration polarization of protein onto the surface of the membrane. Due to the presence of a transverse electric field, species were pulled toward the membrane. If the membrane is restrictive to those species, a concentrated, polarized layer will form on the surface. The simulation showed that by decreasing the channel to a depth of 20 μm, the concentrated region next to the membrane could be reduced. Finally, it was found that changes in column volume due to loss of membrane structural integrity could be mitigated by including a porous ceramic support. The variation in peak elution times was decreased from greater than 20% to less than 3%. PMID:20191552

  20. Understanding the influence of personality on dynamic social gesture processing: An fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Saggar, Manish; Vrticka, Pascal; Reiss, Allan L

    2016-01-01

    This fMRI study aimed at investigating how differences in personality traits affect the processing of dynamic and natural gestures containing social versus nonsocial intent. We predicted that while processing gestures with social intent extraversion would be associated with increased activity within the reticulothalamic-cortical arousal system (RTCS), while neuroticism would be associated with increased activity in emotion processing circuits. The obtained findings partly support our hypotheses. We found a positive correlation between bilateral thalamic activity and extraversion scores while participants viewed social (versus nonsocial) gestures. For neuroticism, the data revealed a more complex activation pattern. Activity in the bilateral frontal operculum and anterior insula, extending into bilateral putamen and right amygdala, was moderated as a function of actor-orientation (i.e., first versus third-person engagement) and face-visibility (actor faces visible versus blurred). Our findings point to the existence of factors other than emotional valence that can influence social gesture processing in particular, and social cognitive affective processing in general, as a function of personality. PMID:26541443

  1. The Influence of Environment on the Reactivity, Dynamics and Spectroscopy of B12 Coenzymes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sension, Roseanne; Ahmasi Harris, D.; Carroll, Elizabeth; Stickrath, Andrew

    2006-03-01

    Adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) dependent enzymes catalyze a variety of chemically difficult reactions that proceed by mechanisms involving organic radicals. In these enzymes radicals are initially generated by homolysis of the cobalt-carbon bond to produce an adenosyl radical and a cob(II)alamin radical. This radical pair may also be generated by optical excitation of the AdoCbl cofactor with visible light. In the work presented here, time-resolved spectroscopic measurements spanning the time range from 10 fs to 10 ns are used to investigate the energetics and dynamics of AdoCbl and other cobalamins as a function of environment. These studies probe the influence of environment on the energy of the low-lying charge transfer states of the cobalamin and on the barriers for dissociation and for recombination of the geminate radical pair. When the AdoCbl coenzyme is bound to the enzyme glutamate mutase, the protein environment is found to stabilize the charge transfer state of AdoCbl relative to observations in water and ethylene glycol. However, the intrinsic rate constant for recombination is only slightly smaller than the rate constant measured in free solution, suggesting the protein does not greatly perturb the ground state stability of the cobalt-carbon bond.

  2. Slippage of Newtonian liquids: influence on the dynamics of dewetting thin films.

    PubMed

    Fetzer, R; Jacobs, K

    2007-11-01

    Slippage of Newtonian liquids in the presence of a solid substrate is a newly found phenomenon, the origin of which is still under debate. In this article, we present a new analysis method to extract the slip length. Enhancing the slip of liquids is an important issue for microfluidic devices that demand for high throughput at low pumping power. We study the velocity of short-chained liquid polystyrene (PS) films dewetting from nonwettable solid substrates. We show how the dynamics of dewetting is influenced by slippage, and we compare the results of two types of substrates that give rise to different slip lengths. As substrates, Si wafers that have been coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) or dodecyltrichlorosilane (DTS) were used. Our results demonstrate that the dewetting velocity for PS films on DTS is significantly larger than on OTS and that this difference originates from the different slip lengths of the liquid on top of the two surfaces. For PS films of thickness between 130 and 230 nm, we find slip lengths between 400 nm and 6 microm, depending on substrate and temperature. PMID:17918979

  3. Carbon dynamics and aggregation in a Vicia faba crop: influence of management practice and cultivar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Navarro, Virginia; Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Fernández, Juan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we assessed the influence of a legume crop (Vicia faba) on the soil properties related to the carbon (C) cycle and soil aggregation, taking into account two cultivars (Muchamiel and Palenca) and two different management practices (conventional and organic). The study was randomly designed in blocks with four replications, in plots of 10 m2. Faba bean crop spanned from 24 November 2014 to 2 March 2015. We took a soil sampling (0-30 cm) from each plot at the end of the cycle to measure soil organic C, recalcitrant C, labile C fractions, microbial biomass C (MBC), aggregate stability and the enzyme activities β-glucosidase, β-glucosaminidase, dehydrogenase, cellulose and arylesterase. Results showed that the cultivar and the management practice had no significant effect on any of the analyzed properties. Significant positive correlations were only observed between soil organic C and arylesterase activity, recalcitrant C and labile C fractions, and recalcitrant C with arylesterase and cellulase activities. So, it seems that the selected cultivars and management practices had similar effects on C dynamics and aggregation. Both management practices maintain the same levels of soil organic C, the different organic C pools, and aggregate stability. In addition, soil microorganisms are responding to the recalcitrant fraction of the organic carbon by release of cellulases and arylesterases. Acknowledgements: This research was financed by the FP7 European Project Eurolegume (FP7-KBBE- 613781).

  4. Influence of Copolyester Composition on Adhesion to Soda-Lime Glass via Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Ben; Hofmann, John; Pasquinelli, Melissa A

    2016-06-01

    Copolyesters are a subset of polymers that have the desirable properties of strength and clarity while retaining chemical resistance, and are thus potential candidates for enhancing the impact resistance of soda-lime glass. Adhesion between the polymer and the glass relates to the impact performance of the system, as well as the longevity of the bond between the polymer and the glass under various conditions. Modifying the types of diols and diacids present in the copolyester provides a method for fine-tuning the physical properties of the polymer. In this study, we used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the influence of the chemical composition of the polymers on adhesion of polymer film laminates to two soda-lime glass surfaces, one tin-rich and one oxygen-rich. By calculating properties such as adhesion energies and contact angles, these results provide insights into how the polymer-glass interaction is impacted by the polymer composition, temperature, and other factors such as the presence of free volume or pi stacking. These results can be used to optimize the adhesion of copolyester films to glass surfaces. PMID:27206103

  5. Influence of Resting Venous Blood Volume Fraction on Dynamic Causal Modeling and System Identifiability.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhenghui; Ni, Pengyu; Wan, Qun; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Pengcheng; Lin, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Changes in BOLD signals are sensitive to the regional blood content associated with the vasculature, which is known as V0 in hemodynamic models. In previous studies involving dynamic causal modeling (DCM) which embodies the hemodynamic model to invert the functional magnetic resonance imaging signals into neuronal activity, V0 was arbitrarily set to a physiolog-ically plausible value to overcome the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. It is interesting to investigate how the V0 value influences DCM. In this study we addressed this issue by using both synthetic and real experiments. The results show that the ability of DCM analysis to reveal information about brain causality depends critically on the assumed V0 value used in the analysis procedure. The choice of V0 value not only directly affects the strength of system connections, but more importantly also affects the inferences about the network architecture. Our analyses speak to a possible refinement of how the hemody-namic process is parameterized (i.e., by making V0 a free parameter); however, the conditional dependencies induced by a more complex model may create more problems than they solve. Obtaining more realistic V0 information in DCM can improve the identifiability of the system and would provide more reliable inferences about the properties of brain connectivity. PMID:27389074

  6. Dissimilar Fitness Associated with Resistance to Fluoroquinolones Influences Clonal Dynamics of Various Multiresistant Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fuzi, Miklos

    2016-01-01

    Fitness cost associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones was recently shown to vary across clones of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. The resulting dissimilar fitness should have influenced the clonal dynamics and thereby the rates of resistance for these pathogens. Moreover, a similar mechanism was recently proposed for the emergence of the H30 and H30R lineages of ESBL-producing E. coli and the major international clone (ribotype 027) of Clostridium difficile. Furthermore, several additional international clones of various multiresistant bacteria are suspect to have been selected by an analogous process. An ability to develop favorable mutations in the gyrase and topoisomerase IV genes seems to be a prerequisite for pathogens to retain fitness while showing high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones. Since, the consumption of other "non-fluoroquinolone" groups of antibiotics have also contributed to the rise in resistance rates a more judicious use of antibiotics in general and of fluoroquinolones in particular could ameliorate the international resistance situation. PMID:27458434

  7. Influence of Resting Venous Blood Volume Fraction on Dynamic Causal Modeling and System Identifiability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenghui; Ni, Pengyu; Wan, Qun; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Pengcheng; Lin, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Changes in BOLD signals are sensitive to the regional blood content associated with the vasculature, which is known as V0 in hemodynamic models. In previous studies involving dynamic causal modeling (DCM) which embodies the hemodynamic model to invert the functional magnetic resonance imaging signals into neuronal activity, V0 was arbitrarily set to a physiolog-ically plausible value to overcome the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. It is interesting to investigate how the V0 value influences DCM. In this study we addressed this issue by using both synthetic and real experiments. The results show that the ability of DCM analysis to reveal information about brain causality depends critically on the assumed V0 value used in the analysis procedure. The choice of V0 value not only directly affects the strength of system connections, but more importantly also affects the inferences about the network architecture. Our analyses speak to a possible refinement of how the hemody-namic process is parameterized (i.e., by making V0 a free parameter); however, the conditional dependencies induced by a more complex model may create more problems than they solve. Obtaining more realistic V0 information in DCM can improve the identifiability of the system and would provide more reliable inferences about the properties of brain connectivity. PMID:27389074

  8. Assessment of the Influence of Fractures on the Dynamics of Coal Seam Fires by Numerical Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuttke, Manfred W.; Zeng, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    Uncontrolled burning coal seam fires still constitute major problems for the coal industry by destroying the resource, a serious hazard for the local people by severe environmental pollution, and a tremendous threat to the global environment by the emission of greenhouse gases and aerosols. In particular when the seams are lying shallow the alteration of the immediate surrounding of the coal seam fire feeds back on the dynamics of the fire. Thermal stress induced fracturing produces direct connections of the fire zone with the atmosphere. This influences the supply with oxygen, the venting of the exhaust gases, and the dissipation of heat. The first two processes are expected to enhance the fire propagation whereas the latter effect should slow it down. With our dedicated coal seam fire code ACME ("Amendable Coal-fire Modeling Exercise") we study these coupled effects of fractures in simulations of typical coal seam fire scenarios based on data from Xinjiang, China. Fractures are predefined as 1D/2D objects in a 2D/3D model geometry and are opened depending on the passage of the heat wave produced by the coal seam fire.

  9. Influence of ocean tide dynamics on the climate system from the Cretaceous to present day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Tobias; Thomas, Maik

    2016-04-01

    Global numerical ocean models used for paleo-climate reconstructions generally only consider the ocean's general circulation, but neglect tidal dynamics. However, it has been demonstrated that tidally induced friction at the ocean bottom alters the mean ocean circulation and energy fluxes on timescales larger than one tidal period and up to climate timescales. Thereby the mean ocean circulation and temperature advection is altered and can thus affect climate. We simultaneously modeled the ocean's general circulation and tidal dynamics for five time-slices from the Cretaceous to present day: the Albian (ca. 110 million years ago, Ma), the Cenomanian-Turonian Boundary (ca. 93 Ma, CTB), the early Eocene (ca. 55 Ma), the early Pliocene (ca. 3.5 Ma), and a pre-industrial period (ca. 1850 AD). These simulations show that the tectonic evolution of ocean basins changes the resonance conditions in the paleo-oceans over time and thus the position of amphydromic systems and the amplitudes of partial tides. Largest amplitudes of the M2 partial tide are obtained during the early Eocene when they are in the global mean by 150% larger than in the CTB, when amplitudes are smallest. The evolution of the tidal system leads to an individual interaction between tidal dynamics and the ocean general circulation for all time-slices. In the Albian a reduction of horizontal velocities of up to 50% is simulated in the deep Indo-Pacific Throughflow (IPT) below 1000m depth. This reduction is the product of tidal residual mean currents induced by tidal waves propagating from the Pacific Ocean into the Indian Ocean that oppose the prevailing eastward thermohaline currents. In all other time-slices mainly an increase in horizontal transports is simulated. In the CTB both tidal residual mean currents (less than 0.2cm/s in most of the ocean) and the general ocean circulation (less than 0.5cm/s) are small, thus leading to a tidally induced increase by 50% in horizontal velocities in almost half of

  10. Investigating the influence of sea level oscillations in the Danish Straits on the Baltic Sea dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhonova, Natalia; Gusev, Anatoly; Diansky, Nikolay; Zakharchuk, Evgeny

    2016-04-01

    In this research, we study the influence of dynamic processes in the Danish Straits on the sea surface height (SSH) oscillations in the Baltic Sea. For this purpose, we use the model of marine and oceanic circulation INMOM (Institute of Numerical Mathematics Ocean Model). The simulations were carried out for the period 2009-2010, and the coastal station data were used for verification of SSH modelling quality. Comparison of the simulated data with the ones measured in the coastal points showed us that the model does not describe SSH variability in different areas of the Baltic Sea well enough, so in the following simulation series the in situ SSH data of the coastal measurements were assimilated at the open boundary in the Danish Straits. The results of the new simulation showed us that this approach significantly increases the SSH simulation quality in all areas of the sea, where the comparison was made. In particular, the correlation coefficients between the simulated and measured SSH data increased from 0.21-0.73 to 0.81-0.90. On the basis of these results, it has been suggested that the Baltic Sea SSH variability is largely determined by the influence of the dynamic processes in the Danish Straits, which can be represented as a superposition of oscillations of different space-time scales. These oscillations can either be generated in the straits themselves, or propagate from the North Sea. For verification of this hypothesis and assessment of the oscillation propagation distance in the Baltic Sea, the following experiment was performed. At the open boundary in the Danish Straits, the six harmonics were set with the following parameters: the periods are 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, 13.5, 40.5, and 121.5 days, and the amplitude for all the harmonics is 50 cm. The results showed us that the prescribed harmonic oscillations at the open boundary propagate into all areas of the sea without changing the frequency, but with decreasing amplitude. The decrease in amplitude is not

  11. A new methodology for dynamic modelling of health risks arising from wastewater influenced urban flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Claus; Mark, Ole; Djordjevic, Slobodan; Hammond, Michael; Khan, David M.; Erichsen, Anders; Dorrit Enevoldsen, Ann; Heinicke, Gerald; Helwigh, Birgitte

    2015-04-01

    Indroduction Urban flooding due to rainfall exceeding the design capacity of drainage systems is a global problem and it has significant economic and social consequences. While the cost of the direct flood damages of urban flooding is well understood, the indirect damages, like the water borne diseases is in general still poorly understood. Climate changes are expected to increase the frequency of urban flooding in many countries which is likely to increase water borne diseases. Diarrheal diseases are most prevalent in developing countries, where poor sanitation, poor drinking water and poor surface water quality causes a high disease burden and mortality, especially during floods. The level of water borne diarrhea in countries with well-developed water and waste water infrastructure has been reduced to an acceptable level, and the population in general do not consider waste water as being a health risk. Hence, exposure to wastewater influenced urban flood water still has the potential to cause transmission of diarrheal diseases. When managing urban flooding and planning urban climate change adaptations, health risks are rarely taken into consideration. This paper outlines a novel methodology for linking dynamic urban flood modelling with Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA). This provides a unique possibility for understanding the interaction between urban flooding and the health risks caused by direct human contact with flood water and provides an option for reducing the burden of disease in the population through the use of intelligent urban flood risk management. Methodology We have linked hydrodynamic urban flood modelling with quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to determine the risk of infection caused by exposure to wastewater influenced urban flood water. The deterministic model MIKE Flood, which integrates the sewer network model in MIKE Urban and the 2D surface model MIKE21, was used to calculate the concentration of pathogens in the

  12. Effects of H+, He+ ion reflection at the lunar surface and pickup ion dynamics in case of oblique/quasi-parallel magnetic field: 3-D hybrid kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Sarantos, M.

    2013-12-01

    The hybrid kinetic model used here supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the moon-solar wind-magnetosphere of the Earth system. This involves variable upstream magnetic field and solar wind plasma, including energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical to improved interpretation of existing measurements for surface and atmospheric composition from previous missions and planning future missions. Recently, MAP-PAGE-IMA (Plasma energy Angle and Composition Experiment, and Ion Mass Analyzer) onboard Japanese lunar orbiter SELENE (KAGUYA) detected Moon originating ions at 100 km altitude. Ion species of H+, He++, He+, C+, O+, Na+, K+, and Ar+ were definitively identified. The first portion of our modeling devotes to a study of the H+, H2+, He+, Na+ pickup ion dynamics in cases of flow with a oblique and quasi-parallel magnetic field. In the second series of modeling we also take into account collisions between ions and the surface of the moon and further sputtering of fragments from the surface of the moon. The ion reflection at the lunar surface is also responsible for wave activity in the upstream flow. The solar wind parameters are chosen from ARTEMIS observations. The hybrid kinetic model allows us to take into account the finite gyroradius effects of pickup ions and to estimate correctly the ions velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field. Modeling shows the asymmetric Mach cone, pickup and reflected ion tails, and presents another type of lunar-solar wind interaction. Our simulation may be also important for the study of the interaction between the solar wind and very weak comets, Mercury and Pluto.

  13. Reflected Glory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Colin

    2006-01-01

    The scientific model of how people see things is far removed from children's real-world experience. They know that light is needed in order to see an object, but may not know that light is reflected off the object and some of that light enters the eyes. In this article, the author explores children's understanding of reflection and how to develop…

  14. Present Spatial Diversity Patterns of Theobroma cacao L. in the Neotropics Reflect Genetic Differentiation in Pleistocene Refugia Followed by Human-Influenced Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Evert; van Zonneveld, Maarten; Loo, Judy; Hodgkin, Toby; Galluzzi, Gea; van Etten, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) is indigenous to the Amazon basin, but is generally believed to have been domesticated in Mesoamerica for the production of chocolate beverage. However, cacao’s distribution of genetic diversity in South America is also likely to reflect pre-Columbian human influences that were superimposed on natural processes of genetic differentiation. Here we present the results of a spatial analysis of the intra-specific diversity of cacao in Latin America, drawing on a dataset of 939 cacao trees genotypically characterized by means of 96 SSR markers. To assess continental diversity patterns we performed grid-based calculations of allelic richness, Shannon diversity and Nei gene diversity, and distinguished different spatially coherent genetic groups by means of cluster analysis. The highest levels of genetic diversity were observed in the Upper Amazon areas from southern Peru to the Ecuadorian Amazon and the border areas between Colombia, Peru and Brazil. On the assumption that the last glaciation (22,000–13,000 BP) had the greatest pre-human impact on the current distribution and diversity of cacao, we modeled the species’ Pleistocene niche suitability and overlaid this with present-day diversity maps. The results suggest that cacao was already widely distributed in the Western Amazon before the onset of glaciation. During glaciations, cacao populations were likely to have been restricted to several refugia where they probably underwent genetic differentiation, resulting in a number of genetic clusters which are representative for, or closest related to, the original wild cacao populations. The analyses also suggested that genetic differentiation and geographical distribution of a number of other clusters seem to have been significantly affected by processes of human management and accompanying genetic bottlenecks. We discuss the implications of these results for future germplasm collection and in situ, on farm and ex situ conservation of

  15. Influence of the track quality and of the properties of the wheel-rail rolling contact on vehicle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Berta; Felez, Jesus; Lozano, José Antonio; Rodriguez, Pablo

    2013-02-01

    This work describes an analytical approach to determine what degree of accuracy is required in the definition of the rail vehicle models used for dynamic simulations. This way it would be possible to know in advance how the results of simulations may be altered due to the existence of errors in the creation of rolling stock models, whilst also identifying their critical parameters. This would make it possible to maximise the time available to enhance dynamic analysis and focus efforts on factors that are strictly necessary. In particular, the parameters related both to the track quality and to the rolling contact were considered in this study. With this aim, a sensitivity analysis was performed to assess their influence on the vehicle dynamic behaviour. To do this, 72 dynamic simulations were performed modifying, one at a time, the track quality, the wheel-rail friction coefficient and the equivalent conicity of both new and worn wheels. Three values were assigned to each parameter, and two wear states were considered for each type of wheel, one for new wheels and another one for reprofiled wheels. After processing the results of these simulations, it was concluded that all the parameters considered show very high influence, though the friction coefficient shows the highest influence. Therefore, it is recommended to undertake any future simulation job with measured track geometry and track irregularities, measured wheel profiles and normative values of the wheel-rail friction coefficient.

  16. Automated lab-scale visualization of the influence of water table transients on LNAPL source zone dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SUN, S.; Herbert, A. W.; Rivett, M. O.

    2015-12-01

    For buoyant LNAPLs (Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids), fluctuating water table conditions significantly influence capillary-held mass above and below the water table and the quantity of mobile free product floating on the water table. Risks posed by such a dynamic LNAPL source zone vary over time as water tables oscillate from say tidal influences, seasonality or other anthropogenic influences. Whist LNAPL dynamics are evident at field scale, measurements of say LNAPL thickness variation in a well are not very revealing of the actual source zone dynamic nature and point to the importance of lab visualization and modelling studies. We report on the recently completed lab phase of our study in which 2-D sand tanks have been used to visualize hydrocarbon LNAPL redistribution under transient water table conditions, particularly cyclic oscillations. We have developed a fully automated system to: i) Program cyclic water table fluctuations via Raspberry PiTM based electronics; ii) Dynamically monitor the saturation distributions of all fluids (red-dyed-LNAPL, blue-dyed-water and air phase by difference) using high temporal frequency and spatial resolution multi-spectral photography; and iii) Efficiently interpret the imaged data produced via multi-spectral image analysis. Such automated data acquisition and processing has permitted the LNAPL release and its redistribution under oscillating water table conditions to be shown in vivid short video formats of original images and contoured fluid saturations. We present a series of these videos secured under a variety of sand-tank scenarios that aim to understand the controlling influences of fluctuation amplitude and frequency, the influence of lower permeability heterogeneities, and the significance of LNAPL release timing relative to water table position. Our preliminary interpretations of these data will be presented alongside our discussion of the implications for characterization and remediation of LNAPL contaminated sites

  17. Water dynamics in hectorite clays: influence of temperature studied by coupling neutron spin echo and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Marry, Virginie; Dubois, Emmanuelle; Malikova, Natalie; Durand-Vidal, Serge; Longeville, Stéphane; Breu, Josef

    2011-04-01

    Within the wider context of water behavior in soils, and with a particular emphasis on clays surrounding underground radioactive waste packages, we present here the translational dynamics of water in clays in low hydrated states as studied by coupling molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quasielastic neutron scattering experiments by neutron spin echo (NSE). A natural montmorillonite clay of interest is modeled by a synthetic clay which allows us to understand the determining parameters from MD simulations by comparison with the experimental values. We focus on temperatures between 300 and 350 K, i.e., the range relevant to the highlighted application. The activation energy Ea experimentally determined is 6.6 kJ/mol higher than that for bulk water. Simulations are in good agreement with experiments for the relevant set of conditions, and they give more insight into the origin of the observed dynamics. PMID:21381672

  18. The dynamics of small-scale patchiness of plaice and sole as reflected in the catch rates of the Dutch beam trawl fleet and its implications for the fleet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poos, Jan-Jaap; Rijnsdorp, Adriaan D.

    2007-07-01

    Catch rates of sole Solea solea and plaice Pleuronectes platessa in the Dutch beam trawl fleet operating in the North Sea show spatio-temporal variation. The variation in catch rates reflects differences in abundance of the species. Up to 45% of the variation in catch rates can be explained by the time of day of the catch, the engine power of the vessel and the migration cycles of the species. Also, spatial covariance was found in the residual variation for both species using variograms and covariance functions. The ranges of the spatial structure were found to be between approximately 20 to 45 nautical miles, indicating patchy distribution of the species. No differences in the ranges of the spatial structures were found between different seasons. Cross-covariance analysis shows the patches lasted up to two weeks. The implication of the spatial pattern in flatfish for the dynamics of effort allocation is discussed.

  19. Influence of atomic vacancies on the dynamic characteristics of nanoresonators based on double walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ajay M.; Joshi, Anand Y.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic analysis of double walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with different boundary conditions has been performed using atomistic finite element method. The double walled carbon nanotube is modeled considering it as a space frame structure similar to a three dimensional beam. The elastic properties of beam element are calculated by considering mechanical characteristics of covalent bonds between the carbon atoms in the hexagonal lattice. Spring elements are used to describe the interlayer interactions between the inner and outer tubes caused due to the van der Waals forces. The mass of each beam element is assumed as point mass at nodes coinciding with carbon atoms at inner and outer wall of DWCNT. It has been reported that atomic vacancies are formed during the manufacturing process in DWCNT which tend to migrate leading to a change in the mechanical characteristics of the same. Simulations have been carried out to visualize the behavior of such defective DWCNTs subjected to different boundary conditions and when used as mass sensing devices. The variation of such atomic vacancies in outer wall of Zigzag and Armchair DWCNT is performed along the length and the change in response is noted. Moreover, as CNTs have been used as mass sensors extensively, the present approach is focused to explore the use of zigzag and armchair DWCNT as sensing device with a mono-atomic vacancy in it. The results clearly state that the dynamic characteristics are greatly influenced by defects like vacancies in it. A higher frequency shift is observed when the vacancy is located away from the fixed end for both Armchair as well as zigzag type of CNTs. A higher frequency shift is reported for armchair CNT for a mass of 10-22 g which remains constant for 10-21 g and then decreases gradually. Comparison with the other experimental and theoretical studies exhibits good association which suggests that defective DWCNTs can further be explored for mass sensing. This investigation is helpful

  20. Influence of backup bearings and support structure dynamics on the behavior of rotors with active supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, George T.

    1995-01-01

    Progress made in the current year is listed, and the following papers are included in the appendix: Steady-State Dynamic Behavior of an Auxiliary Bearing Supported Rotor System; Dynamic Behavior of a Magnetic Bearing Supported Jet Engine Rotor with Auxiliary Bearings; Dynamic Modelling and Response Characteristics of a Magnetic Bearing Rotor System with Auxiliary Bearings; and Synchronous Dynamics of a Coupled Shaft/Bearing/Housing System with Auxiliary Support from a Clearance Bearing: Analysis and Experiment.

  1. The influence of surface properties on the plasma dynamics in radio-frequency driven oxygen plasmas: Measurements and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Greb, Arthur; Niemi, Kari; O'Connell, Deborah; Gans, Timo

    2013-12-09

    Plasma parameters and dynamics in capacitively coupled oxygen plasmas are investigated for different surface conditions. Metastable species concentration, electronegativity, spatial distribution of particle densities as well as the ionization dynamics are significantly influenced by the surface loss probability of metastable singlet delta oxygen (SDO). Simulated surface conditions are compared to experiments in the plasma-surface interface region using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy. It is demonstrated how in-situ measurements of excitation features can be used to determine SDO surface loss probabilities for different surface materials.

  2. Influence of gas bubbles on nonlinear dynamic characteristics of the oil film of a tilting pad bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlopenko, N. Ya.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of a comparatively low volume concentration of gas microbubbles contained in oil on nonlinear characteristics describing the behavior of an oil film in the guide gap of a hydrodynamic tilting pad bearing under action of a low-frequency harmonic force is analyzed using a numerical dynamic model of a collar-oil film-pad system. It is shown that bubbles in the oil greatly affect the efficiency of the tilting pad bearing. Results of oil-film-dynamics investigations reported previously (including those of the present author) are generalized.

  3. High Dynamics and Precision Optical Measurement Using a Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) in Reflection-Mode: Application to 2D Object Tracking over a Smart Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ivan, Ioan Alexandru; Ardeleanu, Mihai; Laurent, Guillaume J.

    2012-01-01

    When related to a single and good contrast object or a laser spot, position sensing, or sensitive, detectors (PSDs) have a series of advantages over the classical camera sensors, including a good positioning accuracy for a fast response time and very simple signal conditioning circuits. To test the performance of this kind of sensor for microrobotics, we have made a comparative analysis between a precise but slow video camera and a custom-made fast PSD system applied to the tracking of a diffuse-reflectivity object transported by a pneumatic microconveyor called Smart-Surface. Until now, the fast system dynamics prevented the full control of the smart surface by visual servoing, unless using a very expensive high frame rate camera. We have built and tested a custom and low cost PSD-based embedded circuit, optically connected with a camera to a single objective by means of a beam splitter. A stroboscopic light source enhanced the resolution. The obtained results showed a good linearity and a fast (over 500 frames per second) response time which will enable future closed-loop control by using PSD. PMID:23223078

  4. Distributed strain measurement based on long-gauge FBG and delayed transmission/reflection ratiometric reflectometry for dynamic structural deformation monitoring.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Michiko; Igawa, Hirotaka; Kasai, Tokio; Watanabe, Naoyuki

    2015-02-10

    In this paper, we propose a delayed transmission/reflection ratiometric reflectometry (DTR(3)) scheme using a long-gauge fiber Bragg grating (FBG), which can be used for dynamic structural deformation monitoring of structures of between a few to tens of meters in length, such as airplane wings and helicopter blades. FBG sensors used for multipoint sensing generally employ wavelength division multiplexing techniques utilizing several Bragg central wavelengths; by contrast, the DTR(3) interrogator uses a continuous pulse array based on a pseudorandom number code and a long-gauge FBG utilizing a single Bragg wavelength and composed of simple hardware devices. The DTR(3) scheme can detect distributed strain at a 50 cm spatial resolution using a long-gauge FBG with a 100 Hz sampling rate. We evaluated the strain sensing characteristics of the long-gauge FBG when attached to a 2.5 m aluminum bar and a 5.5 m helicopter blade model, determining these structure natural frequencies in free vibration tests and their distributed strain characteristics in static tests. PMID:25968039

  5. Antimicrobial peptide dendrimer interacts with phosphocholine membranes in a fluidity dependent manner: A neutron reflection study combined with molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lind, T K; Darré, L; Domene, C; Urbanczyk-Lipkowska, Z; Cárdenas, M; Wacklin, H P

    2015-10-01

    The interaction mechanism of a novel amphiphilic antimicrobial peptide dendrimer, BALY, with model lipid bilayers was explored through a combination of neutron reflection and molecular dynamics simulations. 1-Palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phos-phocholine (DPPC) lipid bilayers were examined at room temperature to extract information on the interaction of BALY with fluid and gel phases, respectively. Furthermore, a 1:4 mixture of POPC and DPPC was used as a model of a phase-separated membrane. Upon interaction with fluid membranes, BALY inserted in the distal leaflet and caused thinning and disordering of the headgroups. Membrane thinning and expansion of the lipid cross-sectional area were observed for gel phase membranes, also with limited insertion to the distal leaflet. However, dendrimer insertion through the entire lipid tail region was observed upon crossing the lipid phase transition temperature of DPPC and in phase separated membranes. The results show clear differences in the interaction mechanism of the dendrimer depending on the lipid membrane fluidity, and suggest a role for lipid phase separation in promoting its antimicrobial activity. PMID:26025586

  6. The influence of riverine nitrogen on the dynamics of the North Sea oxygen minimum zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Große, Fabian; Kreus, Markus; Lenhart, Hermann; Pätsch, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    The mitigation of eutrophication and its concomitants, like oxygen deficiency in bottom waters, is one of the major aspects of the ecological management of coastal marine ecosystems. In the past, biogeochemical models helped to significantly improve the understanding of the interaction of the physical and biological processes driving eutrophication. Anthropogenic river input of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) is the main driver for eutrophication. Nevertheless, the quantification of their influence in a specific region remains an important issue, since it is as crucial for an efficient management as it is difficult to obtain. During the past decade, a quantitative method applicable to biogeochemical models - often referred to as `trans-boundary nutrient transports' (TBNT) - became more and more popular in the context of marine ecosystem management. This method allows for the tracing of elements from various sources, e.g., nitrogen (N) from different rivers, throughout the whole process chain of the applied model. By this, it provides valuable information about the contributions from different sources to the overall amount and turnover of an element in different areas of the model domain. This information constitutes the basis for the quantification, evaluation and optimisation of river input reduction targets for the tributaries, which are defined in relation to their ecological consequences in the marine environment. In existing studies, the TBNT method has been applied to a variety of biogeochemical models, e.g. to quantify the atmospheric contribution to total N in the North Sea (Troost et al., 2013). This study presents a novel approach to link the TBNT method applied to N to the biological processes driving the oxygen dynamics in the bottom layer of the North Sea. For this purpose, simulations from the biogeochemical model ECOHAM (ECOlogical model HAMburg) are analysed for the years 2002 and 2010, with the focus on the southern central North Sea, the region of

  7. Influence of dynamical equatorial flattening and orientation of a triaxial core on prograde diurnal polar motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Rong; Shen, WenBin

    2016-04-01

    The noise floor of empirical models of diurnal Earth Rotation could reach as low as 1μas as shown by several recent studies. In another aspect, the differences between these empirical models with the theoretical model predictions given by IERS Convention (2010) for certain diurnal frequencies are more than 10 μas (e.g. K1). The traxiality of the core is ignored in the theoretical model given by IERS Convention (2010) because it is highly uncertain. To explain the difference between the empirical model and theoretical model, we consider the possible influence of a triaxial core. We use the difference between empirical models and theoretical model predictions given by IERS Convention (2010) as input to invert the traxiality parameter of the core. In the inversion, we assume the ocean tide response obeys the admittance theory. So extra six admittance parameters are introduced to model the difference between smooth responses inferred from empirical models and that given by theoretical model predictions from IERS Convention (2010). The results show that adding core triaxiality into the theoretical model could narrow the difference between empirical model and theoretical model at diurnal frequencies. The residual of amplitude becomes smaller. For a set of tide components consisting of seven diurnal frequencies (Q1, O1, M1, P1, K1, J1, Oo1), the root mean square of the residual of this set have decreased from more than 10μas to 2˜3μas for most of the empirical models. As for the dynamical equatorial flattening of the core, estimates inverted based on different empirical models are consistent within standard deviation. The results also suggest that the principal axes of the triaxial core does not coincidence with the principal axes of the whole Earth. This study is supported by National 973 Project China (grant No. 2013CB733305), NSFC (grant Nos. 41174011, 41210006, 41504019).

  8. Influence of food type on specific dynamic action of the Chinese skink Eumeces chinensis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhi-Chong; Ji, Xiang; Lu, Hong-Liang; Ma, Xiao-Mei

    2005-01-01

    We used the Chinese skink (Eumeces chinensis) as an experimental model to study influence of food type on specific dynamic action (SDA) of feeding. Thirty-three adult males collected from a natural population were divided equally into three (one control and two experimental) groups. We starved all skinks at 30 degrees C for 3 days and then provided the experimental skinks with a single meal consisting of either mealworms or meat [the flesh of the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana)]. Food ingested by skinks of the two experimental groups differed in lipid content and lean dry mass but not in total dry mass and energy. Defecation following feeding occurred slightly earlier in skinks ingesting mealworms (mean=41.7 h) than in those ingesting meat (mean=47.7 h), but the difference was not significant. Analyses of variance (ANOVAs) with repeated measures showed that temporal variation in oxygen consumption over 72 h after feeding was evident in the experimental skinks but not in the control ones. Oxygen consumption was higher in the experimental skinks than in the control ones during the time interval between 4.5 and 36 h after feeding. The peak metabolic rate was greater but occurred later in skinks ingesting meat than in those ingesting mealworms. The estimated amounts of oxygen consumed by mealworm-fed, meat-fed and unfed skinks at 30 degrees C over 72 h after feeding were 356.5, 393.8 and 295.2 mL, respectively. Our results provide a support for the previous prediction that SDA is affected by types of food ingested by animals as skinks ingesting mealworms and meat differed in the time to reach a peak metabolic rate, the level of the peak metabolic rate and the magnitude of the SDA effect. PMID:15664324

  9. The influence of a model subglacial lake on ice dynamics and internal layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudlaugsson, Eythor; Humbert, Angelika; Kleiner, Thomas; Kohler, Jack; Andreassen, Karin

    2016-04-01

    As ice flows over a subglacial lake, the drop in bed resistance leads to an increase in ice velocities and a draw down of isochrones and cold ice. The ice surface flattens as it adjusts to the lack of resisting forces at the base. The rapid transition in velocity induces changes in ice viscosity and releases deformation energy that can raise the temperature locally. Recent studies of Antarctic subglacial lakes indicate that many lakes experience very fast and possibly episodic drainage, during which the lake size is rapidly reduced as water flows out. Questions that arise are what effect this would have on internal layers within the ice and whether such past drainage events could be inferred from isochrone structures downstream. Here, we study the effect of a subglacial lake on ice dynamics as well as the influence that such short timescale drainage would have on the internal layers of the ice. To this end, we use a full Stokes, polythermal ice flow model. An enthalpy-gradient method is used to account for the evolution of temperature and water content within the ice. We find that a rapid transition between slow-moving ice outside the lake, and full sliding over the lake, can release considerable amounts of deformational energy, with the potential to form a temperate layer at depth in the transition zone. In addition, we provide an explanation for a characteristic surface feature commonly seen at the edges of subglacial lakes, a hummocky surface depression in the transition zone between little to full sliding. We also conclude that rapid changes in the horizontal extent of subglacial lakes and slippery patches, compared to the average ice column velocity, can create a traveling wave at depth within the isochrone structure that transfers downstream with the advection of ice, thus indicating the possibility of detecting past drainage events with ice penetrating radar.

  10. The influence of a model subglacial lake on ice dynamics and internal layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudlaugsson, E.; Humbert, A.; Kleiner, T.; Kohler, J.; Andreassen, K.

    2015-07-01

    As ice flows over a subglacial lake, the drop in bed resistance leads to an increase in ice velocities and a subsequent draw-down of isochrones and cold ice from the surface. The ice surface flattens as it adjusts to the lack of resisting forces at the base. The rapid transition in velocity induces changes in temperature and ice viscosity, releasing deformation energy which raises the temperature locally. Recent studies of Antarctic subglacial lakes indicate that many lakes experience very fast and possibly episodic drainage, during which the lake size is rapidly reduced as water flows out. A question is what effect this would have on internal layers within the ice, and whether such past events could be inferred from isochrone structures downstream. Here, we study the effect of a subglacial lake on the dynamics of a model ice stream as well as the influence that such short timescale drainage would have on the internal layers of the ice. To this end, we use a Full-Stokes, polythermal ice flow model. An enthalpy gradient method is used to account for the evolution of temperature and water content within the ice. We find that the rapid transition between slow-moving ice outside the lake, and full sliding over the lake, releases large amounts of deformational energy, which has the potential to form a temperate layer at depth in the transition zone. In addition, we provide an explanation for a characteristic surface feature, commonly seen at the edges of subglacial lakes, a hummocky surface depression in the transition zone between little to full sliding. We also conclude that rapid changes in lake geometry or basal friction create a travelling wave at depth within the isochrone structure that transfers downstream with the advection of ice, thus indicating the possibility of detecting past events with ice penetrating radar.

  11. Hydrophobicity of biofilm coatings influences the transport dynamics of polystyrene nanoparticles in biofilm-coated sand.

    PubMed

    Mitzel, Michael R; Sand, Stefanie; Whalen, Joann K; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are used in the manufacture of over 2000 industrial and consumer products to enhance their material properties and functions or to enable new nanoparticle-dependent functions. The widespread use of ENPs will result in their release to the subsurface and aquatic environments, where they will interact with indigenous biota. Laboratory column experiments were designed to understand the influence of two different Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms on the mobility of polystyrene latex nanoparticles in granular porous media representative of groundwater aquifers or riverbank filtration settings. The transport behavior of 20 nm carboxylate-modified (CLPs) and sulfate (SLPs) polystyrene latex ENPs suspended in NaCl or CaCl2 (1 and 10 mM ionic strength, pH 7) was studied in columns packed with quartz sand coated with biofilms formed by two P. aeruginosa strains that differed in cell surface hydrophobicity (P. aeruginosa 9027™, relatively hydrophilic and P. aeruginosa PAO1, relatively hydrophobic). Biofilm-coated quartz sand retained more of the electrostatically-stabilized latex ENPs than clean, uncoated sand, regardless of the serotype. As IS increased, clear differences in the shape of the ENP breakthrough curves were observed for each type of biofilm coating. ENP breakthrough in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm-coated sand was generally constant with time whereby breakthrough in the P. aeruginosa 9027 biofilm-coated sand showed dynamic behavior. This indicates a fundamental difference in the mechanisms of ENP deposition onto hydrophilic or hydrophobic biofilm coatings due to the hydration properties of these biofilms. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of considering the surface properties of aquifer grain coatings when evaluating ENP fate in natural subsurface environments. PMID:26845456

  12. The Pitfalls of Collegial Coaching: An Analysis of Collegial Coaching in Medical Education and Its Influence on Stimulating Reflection and Performance of Novice Clinical Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truijen, Karin J. P.; van Woerkom, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Competent clinical teachers are essential for clinical teaching. According to the literature, coaching can contribute to improved levels of reflection and better performance of clinical teachers. By engaging in a dialogue about coachee's teaching behaviour, coaches can stimulate reflection of novice teachers. This study aims to gain…

  13. Influence of magma fragmentation on the plume dynamics of Vulcanian explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheu, B.; Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, M.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last 40 years analytical, numerical and experimental studies have provided insights into many aspects of volcanic eruptions, from the fragmentation behaviour of magma to the development of volcanic plumes, subsequent ash dispersal and pyroclastic density currents. Initially research on volcanic plumes was mainly focussed on Plinian-type eruptions with quasi-steady vent conditions. However, several studies have recently investigated the plume dynamics from short-lived, Vulcanian explosions highlighting the importance of conditions at the vent for the evolution of the plume and its transition from buoyant rise to gravitational collapse (Clarke et al. 2002, Odgen et al. 2008). Previous studies have revealed the complex nature of brittle magma fragmentation in discrete fracturing events, with the time interval between two fracturing events depending on pressure evolution over the fragmentation surface (Fowler et al. 2010, McGuinness et al. 2012). In this study we investigate the influence of magma fragmentation on the dynamics of the evolving plume. We conduct rapid decompression experiments (most closely mimicking Vulcanian-type explosions) using pumice samples from the February 2010 eruption period of Soufriere Hills volcano in Montserrat, West Indies. We compare experiments of solid cylindrical samples undergoing brittle fragmentation to experiments conducted with loose granular particles of the same material (previously fragmented). All experiments are conducted at room temperature and monitored with a series of pressure sensors along the experimental conduit. A transparent setup allows us to capture the entire process from pumice fragmentation, expansion in the conduit to the ejection into the atmosphere (low pressure tank) with a high-speed video camera. In both the fragmentation and granular case, at the initial phase of the experiment the vent pressure exceeds atmospheric pressure resulting in supersonic ejection of the gas phase and the formation of a

  14. Olive Fruit Fly (Bactrocera oleae) Population Dynamics in the Eastern Mediterranean: Influence of Exogenous Uncertainty on a Monophagous Frugivorous Insect

    PubMed Central

    Ordano, Mariano; Engelhard, Izhar; Rempoulakis, Polychronis; Nemny-Lavy, Esther; Blum, Moshe; Yasin, Sami; Lensky, Itamar M.; Papadopoulos, Nikos T.; Nestel, David

    2015-01-01

    Despite of the economic importance of the olive fly (Bactrocera oleae) and the large amount of biological and ecological studies on the insect, the factors driving its population dynamics (i.e., population persistence and regulation) had not been analytically investigated until the present study. Specifically, our study investigated the autoregressive process of the olive fly populations, and the joint role of intrinsic and extrinsic factors molding the population dynamics of the insect. Accounting for endogenous dynamics and the influences of exogenous factors such as olive grove temperature, the North Atlantic Oscillation and the presence of potential host fruit, we modeled olive fly populations in five locations in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Our models indicate that the rate of population change is mainly shaped by first and higher order non-monotonic, endogenous dynamics (i.e., density-dependent population feedback). The olive grove temperature was the main exogenous driver, while the North Atlantic Oscillation and fruit availability acted as significant exogenous factors in one of the five populations. Seasonal influences were also relevant for three of the populations. In spite of exogenous effects, the rate of population change was fairly stable along time. We propose that a special reproductive mechanism, such as reproductive quiescence, allows populations of monophagous fruit flies such as the olive fly to remain stable. Further, we discuss how weather factors could impinge constraints on the population dynamics at the local level. Particularly, local temperature dynamics could provide forecasting cues for management guidelines. Jointly, our results advocate for establishing monitoring programs and for a major focus of research on the relationship between life history traits and populations dynamics. PMID:26010332

  15. The influence of field-free orientation on the predissociation dynamics of the NaI molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ze-Yu; Han, Yong-Chang; Yu, Jie; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2014-01-01

    The orientation and predissociation dynamics of the NaI molecule are studied by using a time-dependent wavepacket method. The NaI molecule is first pre-oriented by a single-cycle pulse (SCP) in terahertz (THz) region and then predissociated by a femtosecond pump pulse. The influence of the molecular field-free orientation on the predissociation dynamics is studied in detail. We calculate the radial and angular distributions, the molecular orientation degrees, and the time-dependent populations for both the ground and excited electronic states. It is found that the pre-orientation affects the angular distributions significantly, and that it has weak influence on the radial distributions. By varying the delay time between the THz SCP and the pump pulse, the angular distribution of the fragments from the predissociation can be manipulated.

  16. The influence of field-free orientation on the predissociation dynamics of the NaI molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Ze-Yu; Han, Yong-Chang Yu, Jie; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2014-01-28

    The orientation and predissociation dynamics of the NaI molecule are studied by using a time-dependent wavepacket method. The NaI molecule is first pre-oriented by a single-cycle pulse (SCP) in terahertz (THz) region and then predissociated by a femtosecond pump pulse. The influence of the molecular field-free orientation on the predissociation dynamics is studied in detail. We calculate the radial and angular distributions, the molecular orientation degrees, and the time-dependent populations for both the ground and excited electronic states. It is found that the pre-orientation affects the angular distributions significantly, and that it has weak influence on the radial distributions. By varying the delay time between the THz SCP and the pump pulse, the angular distribution of the fragments from the predissociation can be manipulated.

  17. Reflections on Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santini, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a teachers reflections on the matter of student expectations. Santini begins with a common understanding of the "Pygmalion effect" from research projects conducted in earlier years that intimated "people's expectations could influence other people in the world around them." In the world of deaf…

  18. Reindeer grazing in subarctic boreal forest - influences on the soil carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koster, Kajar; Berninger, Frank; Köster, Egle; Pumpanen, Jukka

    2015-04-01

    Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus L.) are the most important large mammalian herbivores in the northern ecosystems , which have many effects on plant diversity, soil nutrient cycling and soil organic matter decomposition. Changes caused by reindeer in vegetation have indirect effects on physical features of the soil e.g. soil microclimate, root biomass and also on soil C dynamics. Earlier, the role of reindeer grazing in ground vegetation dynamics and in soil carbon (C) dynamics has been mostly investigated in open tundra heaths. The objectives of this study were to examine if and how the reindeer grazing (and the possible temperature changes in soil caused by heavy grazing) is affecting the soil C dynamics (CO2 efflux from the soil, C storage in soil, microbial biomass in the soil). In a field experiment in Finnish Lapland, in Värriö Strict Nature Reserve (67° 46' N, 29° 35' E) we have assessed the changes occurring in above- and belowground biomasses, and soil C dynamics (CO2 efflux, soil C content, soil microbial biomass C) among areas grazed and ungrazed by reindeer. Our study areas are located in the northern boreal subarctic coniferous forest at the zone of the last intact forest landscapes in Fennoscandia, where large areas of relatively undisturbed subarctic Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests can still be found. The sample plots located in the Värriö Strict Nature Reserve (10 sample plots in total established in year 2013) are situated along the borderline between Finland and Russia, where the ungrazed area was excluded from the reindeer grazing already in 1918, to prevent the Finnish reindeer from going to the Russian side and there are not many reindeer on Russian side of the area. To characterize the stands we have established circular sample plots on areas with a radius of 11.28 m, where different tree characteristics were measured (diameter at 1.3 m, height, height of a tree, crown height, crown diameter, stand age, etc.). On every sample plot

  19. [THE INFLUENCE OF EXTRACT FROM EMBRYONIC CHICKEN TISSUE ON THE DYNAMIC CHANGES OF MICE BLOOD SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AND CYTOKINES AFTER γ-IRRADIATION].

    PubMed

    Pogorelaya, M S

    2015-01-01

    The effect of preparations from embryonic chicken tissue on the dynamic changes in the levels of interleukins: 1β (IL-1 β), 6 (IL-6), 4 (IL-4) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were investigated in vivo, in the blood serum of white female laboratory mice exposed to single total γ-irradiation in a dose of 5 Gy. The experiments found that during the first days after the action of γ-radiation the indices of resistance of the organism undergoe significant destabilizing changes. These changes are manifested by an increase in IL-1β proinflammatory cytokine in response to external influences. However, the rapid decline in its level during the first days after irradiation reflects alterations in its production. The content of the serum IL-4 in all time points was higher than in the intact group. Moreover, the dynamics of its level during the first days after the irradiation was observed. An increased level of CRP was detected 6 hours after the exposure, indicating the dynamic changes of the severity of the inflammatory process. Administration of preparations from embryonic chicken tissue causes a considerable increase in the content of IL-1β and IL-6 in 3 and 6 hours after the r-irradiation, with stabilization after 12 hours. When using the preparations before an irradiation, a significantly lower level of CRP was detected in comparison to animals that did not get the preparations. When using the embryonic preparations, the stimulation of synthesis of IL-4 was observed, whose level increased in every time of taking blood samples. Possibility for induction of row of cytokines, in particular, IL-1β and IL-6, plays an important role in stimulation of hematopoiesis and provides a basis to consider this substance as an immunomodulator in pathologic immunosuppressive states. The decrease of serum CRP level can indicate the ability to reduce the severity of radiation injury. In the experimental conditions, an embryonic preparation exhibits inertness relative to the healthy

  20. Influence of the outer-magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamic waveguide on the reflection of hydromagnetic waves from a shear flow at the magnetopause

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, V. A. Chuiko, D. A.

    2013-12-15

    The coefficient of reflection of a fast magnetosonic wave incident on the magnetosphere from the solar wind is studied analytically in the framework of a plane-stratified model of the medium with allowance for the transverse inhomogeneity of the magnetosphere and a jump of the plasma parameters at the magnetopause. Three factors decisively affecting the properties of reflection are taken into account: the shear flow of the solar wind plasma relative to the magnetosphere; the presence of a magnetospheric magnetohydrodynamic waveguide caused by the transverse plasma inhomogeneity; and the presence of an Alfvén resonance deep in the magnetosphere, where the oscillation energy dissipates. If the solar wind velocity exceeds the wave phase velocity along the magnetopause, then the wave energy in the solar wind is negative and such a wave experiences overreflection. In the opposite case, the wave energy is positive and the wave is reflected only partially. The wave reflection has a pronounced resonant character: the reflection coefficient has deep narrow minima or high narrow maxima at the eigenfrequencies of the magnetospheric waveguide. For other frequencies, the reflection coefficient only slightly differs from unity. The wave energy influx into the magnetosphere is positive for waves with both positive and negative energies. For waves with a negative energy, this is a consequence of their overreflection, because the flux of negative energy carried away by the reflected wave exceeds the incident flux of negative energy.

  1. Disentangling Membrane Dynamics and Cell Migration; Differential Influences of F-actin and Cell-Matrix Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewski, Jacob M.; Shafqat-Abbasi, Hamdah; Jafari-Mamaghani, Mehrdad; Endrias Ganebo, Bereket; Gong, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is heavily interconnected with plasma membrane protrusion and retraction (collectively termed “membrane dynamics”). This makes it difficult to distinguish regulatory mechanisms that differentially influence migration and membrane dynamics. Yet such distinctions may be valuable given evidence that cancer cell invasion in 3D may be better predicted by 2D membrane dynamics than by 2D cell migration, implying a degree of functional independence between these processes. Here, we applied multi-scale single cell imaging and a systematic statistical approach to disentangle regulatory associations underlying either migration or membrane dynamics. This revealed preferential correlations between membrane dynamics and F-actin features, contrasting with an enrichment of links between cell migration and adhesion complex properties. These correlative linkages were often non-linear and therefore context-dependent, strengthening or weakening with spontaneous heterogeneity in cell behavior. More broadly, we observed that slow moving cells tend to increase in area, while fast moving cells tend to shrink, and that the size of dynamic membrane domains is independent of cell area. Overall, we define macromolecular features preferentially associated with either cell migration or membrane dynamics, enabling more specific interrogation and targeting of these processes in future. PMID:26248038

  2. Influence of different sized nanoparticles combined with ultrasound on the optical properties of in vitro normal and cancerous human lung tissue studied with OCT and diffuse reflectance spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L. P.; Wu, G. Y.; Wei, H. J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Yang, H. Q.; He, Y. H.; Xie, S. S.; Liu, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The present study is concerned with the in vitro study of different sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles’ (NPs) penetration and accumulation in human normal lung (NL) tissue and lung adenocarcinoma tumor (LAT) tissue by the methods of continuous optical coherence tomography (OCT) monitoring and diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra measurement, and their evaluating the effects of TiO2 NPs in two sizes (60 nm and 100 nm) and their combination with ultrasound (US) on the optical properties of human NL and LAT tissue. Spectral measurements indicate that TiO2 NPs penetrate and accumulate into the tissues and thus induce enhancement of DR. The averaged and normalized OCT signal intensity suggests that light penetration depth is significantly enlarged by ultrasound. The average attenuation coefficient of NL tissue changes from 5.10  ±  0.26 mm-1 to 3.12  ±  0.43 mm-1 and 2.15  ±  0.54 mm-1 at 120 min for 60 nm TiO2 NPs and 60 nm TiO2NPs/US treatment, respectively, and from 5.54  ±  0.46 mm-1 to 3.24  ±  0.73 mm-1 and 2.69  ±  0.34 mm-1 at 150 min for 100 nm TiO2 NPs and 100 nm TiO2NPs/US, respectively. The average attenuation coefficient of LAT tissue changes from 9.12  ±  0.54 mm-1 to 4.54  ±  0.39 mm-1 and 3.61  ±  0.38 mm-1 at 120 min for 60 nm TiO2 NPs and 60 nm TiO2NPs/US treatment, respectively, and from 9.79  ±  0.32 mm-1 to 5.12  ±  0.47 mm-1 and 4.89  ±  0.59 mm-1 at 150 min for 100 nm TiO2 NPs and 100 nm TiO2NPs/US, respectively. The results suggest that the optical properties of NL and LAT tissues are greatly influenced by TiO2 NPs and their combination with ultrasound.

  3. Influence of Kerr-like medium on the dynamics of a two-mode Raman coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sudha; Gilhare, Karuna

    2016-08-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of an effective two-level atom interacting with two modes via Raman process inside an ideal cavity in the presence of Kerr non-linearity. The cavity modes interact both with the atom as well as the Kerr-like medium. The unitary transformation method presented here, not only solves the time-dependent problem, but also provides the eigensolutions of the interacting Hamiltonian at the same time. We study the atomic-population dynamics and the dynamics of the photon statistics in the two cavity modes. The influence of the Kerr-like medium on the statistics of the field is explored and it is observed that Kerr medium introduces antibunching in mode 1 and this effect is enhanced by a stronger interaction with the non-linear medium. In the high non-linear coupling regime anticorrelated beam become correlated. Kerr medium also introduces non-classical correlation between the two modes.

  4. The Model of Motivational Dynamics in Sport: Resistance to Peer Influence, Behavioral Engagement and Disaffection, Dispositional Coping, and Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Adam R.; Morley, David; Perry, John L.

    2016-01-01

    The Model of Motivational Dynamics (MMD; Skinner and Pitzer, 2012) infers that peers influence behavioral engagement levels, which in turn is linked to coping and resilience. Scholars, however, are yet to test the MMD among an athletic population. The purpose of this paper was to assess an a priori model that included key constructs from the MMD, such as resistance to peer influence, behavioral engagement and disaffection, coping, and resilience among athletes. Three hundred and fifty-one athletes (male n = 173, female n = 178; Mage = 16.15 years) completed a questionnaire that measured each construct. Our results provide support for the model. In particular, there were positive paths between resistance to peer influence and behavioral engagement, behavioral engagement and task-oriented coping, and task-oriented coping with resilience. There was also a positive path between resilience and resistance to peer influence, but a negative path from resistance to peer influence to behavioral disaffection. Due to the reported benefits of enhancing resistance to peer influence and behavioral engagement, researchers could devise sport specific interventions to maximize athletes’ scores in these constructs. PMID:26779107

  5. Influence of biochar and plant growth on organic matter dynamics in a reclaimed mine residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Barriga, Fabián; Díaz, Vicente; Alberto, Jose; Faz, Ángel; Zornoza, Raúl

    2016-04-01

    This study aims at assessing the impact of biochar and marble waste amendment and the development of vegetation in acidic mine wastes on organic matter dynamics. For this purpose, a mine residue was collected in a tailing pond from the Sierra Minera of Cartagena-La Unión (SE Spain), and a greenhouse experiment was established for 120 days. Marble waste (MW) was added in a rate of 200 g kg-1 as a source of calcium carbonate to increase the pH from 3 to 7.5-8 (average pH in the native soils of the area). We added biochar as a source of organic carbon and nutrients, in two different rates, 50 g kg-1 (BC1) and 100 g kg-1 (BC2). To assess the influence of vegetation growth on the creation of a technosoil from mine residues and its impact on organic matter dynamics, the plant species Piptatherum miliaceum (PM) was planted in half the pots with the different amendments. Thus, five treatments were established: unamended and unplanted control (CT), BC1, BC2, BC1+PM and BC2+PM. Results showed that the different treatments had no significant effect on aggregates stability, microbial biomass carbon and the emission of N2O and CH4. So, it seems that longer periods are needed to increase the stability of aggregates and microbial populations, since even the combined use of biochar, marble waste and vegetation was not enough to increase these properties in 120 days. Nonetheless, it was positive that the addition of biochar and the release of root exudates did not trigger the emission of greenhouse gases. Organic carbon significantly increased with the addition of biochar, with values similar to the dose applied, indicating high stability and low mineralization of the amendment. The addition of amendments significantly increased arylesterase activity, while the growth of the plant was needed to significantly increase β-glucosidase activity. The soluble carbon significantly decreased in BC1 and BC2 with regards to CT, while no significant differences were observed among CT and

  6. Black Sea and Mediterranean Sea interaction: influence of the North Aegean dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Androulidakis, Yannis; Krestenitis, Yannis; Kourafalou, Vassiliki

    2013-04-01

    The brackish Black Sea Waters outflow to the Aegean Sea, through the Dardanelles Straits, affects and determines significantly the hydrodynamic and physical characteristics of the Aegean Sea. At the same time, it affects several biological parameters, like chl-a concentrations, and, therefore, the general quality of the marine environment. The investigation and mathematical simulation of the North Aegean's physical oceanography contributes to the knowledge and understanding of the buoyant waters' circulation initial conditions in the wider East Mediterranean region. The implementation and adaptation of the 3-d hydrodynamic mathematical model HYCOM (Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model) in the North Aegean Sea (1/50οx1/50o), significantly contributes to the investigation of the area's hydrodynamic circulation. HYCOM, due to its hybrid coordinate operation, can describe at a satisfactory level, all the different topography and mixing cases of the complicated N. Aegean region. In addition, the high resolution atmospheric forcing and the nesting with a data assimilated broader Mediterranean HYCOM model along the southern open boundary of the North Aegean model, benefit the quality of the results and constitutes an important tool on the description and understanding of the Black Sea influence to the region's dynamics. A fundamental objective is the application and comparison of different Dardanelles outflow parameterizations based a) on the Black Sea water budget, b) on current measurements from a telemetric station in Limnos Island, and c) on historical time series. The Black Sea Waters plume evolution and the circulation patterns are dependant on the outflow rate magnitude, the flow distribution inside the straits and the prevailing winds. The long-term simulation covers the period of the last 20 years (1990-2010), investigating several physical characteristics of the North Aegean Sea, such as the deep water masses evolution, the major Black Sea waters circulation patterns

  7. Dynamics of X-Ray-emitting Ejecta in the Oxygen-rich Supernova Remnant Puppis A Revealed by the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Ohira, Yutaka; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Katsuji; Tamagawa, Toru

    2013-05-01

    Using the unprecedented spectral resolution of the reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) on board XMM-Newton, we reveal dynamics of X-ray-emitting ejecta in the oxygen-rich supernova remnant Puppis A. The RGS spectrum shows prominent K-shell lines, including O VII Heα forbidden and resonance, O VIII Lyα, O VIII Lyβ, and Ne IX Heα resonance, from an ejecta knot positionally coincident with an optical oxygen-rich filament (the so-called Ω filament) in the northeast of the remnant. We find that the line centroids are blueshifted by 1480 ± 140 ± 60 km s-1 (the first and second term errors are measurement and calibration uncertainties, respectively), which is fully consistent with that of the optical Ω filament. Line broadening at 654 eV (corresponding to O VIII Lyα) is obtained to be σ <~ 0.9 eV, indicating an oxygen temperature of <~ 30 keV. Analysis of XMM-Newton MOS spectra shows an electron temperature of ~0.8 keV and an ionization timescale of ~2 × 1010 cm-3 s. We show that the oxygen and electron temperatures as well as the ionization timescale can be reconciled if the ejecta knot was heated by a collisionless shock whose velocity is ~600-1200 km s-1 and was subsequently equilibrated due to Coulomb interactions. The RGS spectrum also shows relatively weak K-shell lines of another ejecta feature located near the northeastern edge of the remnant, from which we measure redward Doppler velocities of 650 ± 70 ± 60 km s-1.

  8. DYNAMICS OF X-RAY-EMITTING EJECTA IN THE OXYGEN-RICH SUPERNOVA REMNANT PUPPIS A REVEALED BY THE XMM-NEWTON REFLECTION GRATING SPECTROMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuda, Satoru; Tamagawa, Toru; Ohira, Yutaka; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Katsuji; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    2013-05-10

    Using the unprecedented spectral resolution of the reflection grating spectrometer (RGS) on board XMM-Newton, we reveal dynamics of X-ray-emitting ejecta in the oxygen-rich supernova remnant Puppis A. The RGS spectrum shows prominent K-shell lines, including O VII He{alpha} forbidden and resonance, O VIII Ly{alpha}, O VIII Ly{beta}, and Ne IX He{alpha} resonance, from an ejecta knot positionally coincident with an optical oxygen-rich filament (the so-called {Omega} filament) in the northeast of the remnant. We find that the line centroids are blueshifted by 1480 {+-} 140 {+-} 60 km s{sup -1} (the first and second term errors are measurement and calibration uncertainties, respectively), which is fully consistent with that of the optical {Omega} filament. Line broadening at 654 eV (corresponding to O VIII Ly{alpha}) is obtained to be {sigma} {approx}< 0.9 eV, indicating an oxygen temperature of {approx}< 30 keV. Analysis of XMM-Newton MOS spectra shows an electron temperature of {approx}0.8 keV and an ionization timescale of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} s. We show that the oxygen and electron temperatures as well as the ionization timescale can be reconciled if the ejecta knot was heated by a collisionless shock whose velocity is {approx}600-1200 km s{sup -1} and was subsequently equilibrated due to Coulomb interactions. The RGS spectrum also shows relatively weak K-shell lines of another ejecta feature located near the northeastern edge of the remnant, from which we measure redward Doppler velocities of 650 {+-} 70 {+-} 60 km s{sup -1}.

  9. Structures and Dynamics of Social Networks: Selection, Influence, and Self-Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Go, Myong-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation studies the social structures and dynamics of human networks: how peers at the micro level and physical environments at the macro level interact with the individual preferences and attributes and shape social dynamics. It is composed of three parts. The first essay, "Friendship Choices and Group Effects in Adolescent Smoking"…

  10. Dissecting the Influences of Climate and Demography on the Dynamics of Leptospirosis in California Sea Lions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic infection of global importance, yet its population dynamics remain poorly understood. We present the first empirically-motivated study of the dynamics of leptospirosis, drawing on a unique 24-year time series of disease in California sea lions (CSLs). Since the early 19...

  11. Transition dynamics of EEG-based network microstates during mental arithmetic and resting wakefulness reflects task-related modulations and developmental changes.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, S I; Laskaris, N A; Micheloyannis, S

    2015-08-01

    We studied how maturation influences the organization of functional brain networks engaged during mental calculations and in resting state. Surface EEG measurements from 20 children (8-12 years) and 25 students (21-26 years) were analyzed. Interregional synchronization of brain activity was quantified by means of Phase Lag Index and for various frequency bands. Based on these pairwise estimates of functional connectivity, we formed graphs which were then characterized in terms of local structure [local efficiency (LE)] and overall integration (global efficiency). The overall data analytic scheme was applied twice, in a static and time-varying mode. Our results showed a characteristic trend: functional segregation dominates the network organization of younger brains. Moreover, in childhood, the overall functional network possesses more prominent small-world network characteristics than in early acorrect in xmldulthood in accordance with the Neural Efficiency Hypothesis. The above trends were intensified by the time-varying approach and identified for the whole set of tested frequency bands (from δ to low γ). By mapping the time-indexed connectivity patterns to multivariate timeseries of nodal LE measurements, we carried out an elaborate study of the functional segregation dynamics and demonstrated that the underlying network undergoes transitions between a restricted number of stable states, that can be thought of as "network-level microstates". The rate of these transitions provided a robust marker of developmental and task-induced alterations, that was found to be insensitive to reference montage and independent component analysis denoising. PMID:26157511

  12. Reflective Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author presents his study of parent participation at an international school in Spain offering the British curriculum. He used quantitative methods and administered questionnaires to gather data that reflected the views of a large proportion of the school's parent community. He administered semi-structured interviews to gain a…

  13. Global dynamic topography observations reveal limited influence of large-scale mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoggard, M. J.; White, N.; Al-Attar, D.

    2016-06-01

    Convective circulation of the Earth's mantle maintains some fraction of surface topography that varies with space and time. Most predictive models show that this dynamic topography has peak amplitudes of about +/-2 km, dominated by wavelengths of 104 km. Here, we test these models against our comprehensive observational database of 2,120 spot measurements of dynamic topography that were determined by analysing oceanic seismic surveys. These accurate measurements have typical peak amplitudes of +/-1 km and wavelengths of approximately 103 km, and are combined with limited continental constraints to generate a global spherical harmonic model, the robustness of which has been carefully tested and benchmarked. Our power spectral analysis reveals significant discrepancies between observed and predicted dynamic topography. At longer wavelengths (such as 104 km), observed dynamic topography has peak amplitudes of about +/-500 m. At shorter wavelengths (such as 103 km), significant dynamic topography is still observed. We show that these discrepancies can be explained if short-wavelength dynamic topography is generated by temperature-driven density anomalies within a sub-plate asthenospheric channel. Stratigraphic observations from adjacent continental margins show that these dynamic topographic signals evolve quickly with time. More rapid temporal and spatial changes in vertical displacement of the Earth's surface have direct consequences for fields as diverse as mantle flow, oceanic circulation and long-term climate change.

  14. Shrub canopies influence soil temperatures but not nutrient dynamics: An experimental test of tundra snow–shrub interactions

    PubMed Central

    Myers-Smith, Isla H; Hik, David S

    2013-01-01

    Shrubs are the largest plant life form in tundra ecosystems; therefore, any changes in the abundance of shrubs will feedback to influence biodiversity, ecosystem function, and climate. The snow–shrub hypothesis asserts that shrub canopies trap snow and insulate soils in winter, increasing the rates of nutrient cycling to create a positive feedback to shrub expansion. However, previous work has not been able to separate the abiotic from the biotic influences of shrub canopies. We conducted a 3-year factorial experiment to determine the influences of canopies on soil temperatures and nutrient cycling parameters by removing ∼0.5 m high willow (Salix spp.) and birch (Betula glandulosa) shrubs, creating artificial shrub canopies and comparing these manipulations to nearby open tundra and shrub patches. Soil temperatures were 4–5°C warmer in January, and 2°C cooler in July under shrub cover. Natural shrub plots had 14–33 cm more snow in January than adjacent open tundra plots. Snow cover and soil temperatures were similar in the manipulated plots when compared with the respective unmanipulated treatments, indicating that shrub canopy cover was a dominant factor influencing the soil thermal regime. Conversely, we found no strong evidence of increased soil decomposition, CO2 fluxes, or nitrate or ammonia adsorbtion under artificial shrub canopy treatments when compared with unmanipulated open tundra. Our results suggest that the abiotic influences of shrub canopy cover alone on nutrient dynamics are weaker than previously asserted. PMID:24198933

  15. Influence of pitch, loudness, and timbre on the perception of instrument dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, Marco; Friberg, Anders

    2011-10-01

    The effect of variations in pitch, loudness, and timbre on the perception of the dynamics of isolated instrumental tones is investigated. A full factorial design was used in a listening experiment. The subjects were asked to indicate the perceived dynamics of each stimulus on a scale from pianissimo to fortissimo. Statistical analysis showed that for the instruments included (i.e., clarinet, flute, piano, trumpet, and violin) timbre and loudness had equally large effects, while pitch was relevant mostly for the first three. The results confirmed our hypothesis that loudness alone is not a reliable estimate of the dynamics of musical tones. PMID:21974491

  16. The fan of influence of streams and channel feedbacks to simulated land surface water and carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chaopeng; Riley, William J.; Smithgall, Kurt R.; Melack, John M.; Fang, Kuai

    2016-02-01

    Large-scale land models assume unidirectional land-to-river hydrological interactions, without considering feedbacks between channels and land. Using a tested, physically based model with explicit multiway interactions between overland, channel, wetland, and groundwater flows, we assessed how the representation and properties of channels influence simulated land surface hydrologic, biogeochemical, and ecosystem dynamics. A zone near the channels where various fluxes and states are significantly influenced by the channels, referred to as the fan of influence (FoI) of channels, has been identified. We elucidated two mechanisms inducing the model-derived FoI: the base flow mechanism, in which incised, gaining streams lower the water table and induce more base flow, and the relatively more efficient conveyance of the channel network compared to overland flow. We systematically varied drainage density and grid resolution to quantify the size of the FoI, which is found to span a large fraction of the watershed (25-50%) for hydrologic variables including depth to water table and recharge, etc. The FoI is more pronounced with low-resolution simulations but remains noticeable in hyperresolution (25 m) subbasin simulations. The FoI and the channel influence on basin-average fluxes are also similar in simulations with alternative parameter sets. We found that high-order, entrenched streams cause larger FoI. In addition, removing the simulated channels has disproportionally large influence on modeled wetland areas and inundation duration, which has implications for coupled biogeochemical or ecological modeling. Our results suggest that explicit channel representation provides important feedbacks to land surface dynamics which should be considered in meso or large-scale simulations. Since grid refinement incurs prohibitive computational cost, subgrid channel parameterization has advantages in efficiency over grid-based representations that do not distinguish between overland

  17. Influence of the added mass effect and boundary conditions on the dynamic response of submerged and confined structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentín, D.; Presas, A.; Egusquiza, E.; Valero, C.

    2014-03-01

    The dynamic response of submerged and confined disk-like structures is of interest in the flied of hydraulic machinery, especially in hydraulic turbine runners. This response is difficult to be estimated with accuracy due to the strong influence of the boundary conditions. Small radial gaps as well as short axial distances to rigid surfaces greatly modify the dynamic response because the fact of the added mass and damping effects. Moreover, the effect of the shaft coupling is also important for certain mode-shapes of the structure. In the present study, the influence of the added mass effect and boundary conditions on the dynamic behavior of a submerged disk attached to a shaft is evaluated through experimental tests and structural- acoustic coupling numerical simulations. For the experimentation, a test rig has been developed. It consists of a confined disk attached to a shaft inside a cylindrical container full of water. The disk can be fixed at different axial positions along the shaft. Piezoelectric patches are used to excite the disk and the response is measured with submersible accelerometers. For each configuration tested, the natural frequencies of the disk and the shaft are studied. Numerical results have been compared with experimental results.

  18. Where Wolves Kill Moose: The Influence of Prey Life History Dynamics on the Landscape Ecology of Predation

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Robert A.; Vucetich, John A.; Roloff, Gary J.; Bump, Joseph K.; Peterson, Rolf O.

    2014-01-01

    The landscape ecology of predation is well studied and known to be influenced by habitat heterogeneity. Little attention has been given to how the influence of habitat heterogeneity on the landscape ecology of predation might be modulated by life history dynamics of prey in mammalian systems. We demonstrate how life history dynamics of moose (Alces alces) contribute to landscape patterns in predation by wolves (Canis lupus) in Isle Royale National Park, Lake Superior, USA. We use pattern analysis and kernel density estimates of moose kill sites to demonstrate that moose in senescent condition and moose in prime condition tend to be wolf-killed in different regions of Isle Royale in winter. Predation on senescent moose was clustered in one kill zone in the northeast portion of the island, whereas predation on prime moose was clustered in 13 separate kill zones distributed throughout the full extent of the island. Moreover, the probability of kill occurrence for senescent moose, in comparison to prime moose, increased in high elevation habitat with patches of dense coniferous trees. These differences can be attributed, at least in part, to senescent moose being more vulnerable to predation and making different risk-sensitive habitat decisions than prime moose. Landscape patterns emerging from prey life history dynamics and habitat heterogeneity have been observed in the predation ecology of fish and insects, but this is the first mammalian system for which such observations have been made. PMID:24622241

  19. Predictability of time averages. I - Dynamical predictability of monthly means. II - The influence of the boundary forcings. [for weather forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukla, J.

    1984-01-01

    The physical basis for the dynamic prediction of monthly means in weather parameters is examined in two papers. In the first paper, an attempt is made to determine the theoretical upper limit of dynamical predictability of monthly means for prescribed nonfluctuating external forcings. In the second paper, the physical mechanisms through which changes in the boundary forcings of SST, soil moisture, albedo, and snow influence atmospheric circulation are discussed. On the basis of both studies, the essential requirements for establishing the physical basis for dynamical prediction of monthly means are to show that: (1) fluctuations of monthly means are larger than can be expected due to sampling of day-to-day weather changes; (2) there are low frequency planetary scale components of circulation which remain predictable beyond the limits of synoptic scale predictability; and (3) the influences of the slowly varying boundary conditions of SST, soil moisture, snow, sea ice are large enough to produce significant and detectable changes in the monthly mean circulations. Observational and numerical evidence which support these requirements are presented.

  20. Where wolves kill moose: the influence of prey life history dynamics on the landscape ecology of predation.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Robert A; Vucetich, John A; Roloff, Gary J; Bump, Joseph K; Peterson, Rolf O

    2014-01-01

    The landscape ecology of predation is well studied and known to be influenced by habitat heterogeneity. Little attention has been given to how the influence of habitat heterogeneity on the landscape ecology of predation might be modulated by life history dynamics of prey in mammalian systems. We demonstrate how life history dynamics of moose (Alces alces) contribute to landscape patterns in predation by wolves (Canis lupus) in Isle Royale National Park, Lake Superior, USA. We use pattern analysis and kernel density estimates of moose kill sites to demonstrate that moose in senescent condition and moose in prime condition tend to be wolf-killed in different regions of Isle Royale in winter. Predation on senescent moose was clustered in one kill zone in the northeast portion of the island, whereas predation on prime moose was clustered in 13 separate kill zones distributed throughout the full extent of the island. Moreover, the probability of kill occurrence for senescent moose, in comparison to prime moose, increased in high elevation habitat with patches of dense coniferous trees. These differences can be attributed, at least in part, to senescent moose being more vulnerable to predation and making different risk-sensitive habitat decisions than prime moose. Landscape patterns emerging from prey life history dynamics and habitat heterogeneity have been observed in the predation ecology of fish and insects, but this is the first mammalian system for which such observations have been made. PMID:24622241