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Sample records for dyserythropoietic anemia type

  1. Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia Type 1: Report of One Patient and Analysis of Previously Reported Patients Treated with Interferon Alpha.

    PubMed

    Salihoglu, Ayse; Elverdi, Tugrul; Eskazan, Ahmet Emre; Eyice, Deniz; Bavunoglu, Isil; Ar, Muhlis Cem; Ongoren, Seniz; Guzel, Elif; Baslar, Zafer; Tunckale, Aydin; Tuzuner, Nukhet; Soysal, Teoman

    2016-06-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias are a rare group of inherited anemias characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and distinct morphological abnormalities in the erythroblasts. Interferon alpha has been shown to be effective in type 1 congenital dyserythropoietic anemia but the optimal duration of therapy is undefined. We present here a 32-years-old female patient diagnosed with type 1 congenital dyserythropoietic anemia precipitated by pregnancy and treated successfully with a short course of interferon alpha resulting in a durable response. A literature search including PubMed database on previously published articles regarding congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type 1 patients treated with interferon is conducted. PMID:27408411

  2. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CDA congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  3. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II associated with G6PD Seattle in a Sicilian child.

    PubMed

    Gangarossa, S; Romano, V; Miraglia del Giudice, E; Perrotta, S; Iolascon, A; Schiliro, G

    1995-01-01

    A 2-year-old Sicilian boy was investigated because of chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA) associated with hepatosplenomegaly. Appropriate studies revealed deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase type Seattle (G6PD Seattle). In addition, bone marrow morphology, serological studies and analysis of red cell membrane proteins revealed congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) type II (or HEMPAS). Because G6PD Seattle on its own does not cause CNSHA, we believe that the clinical manifestations in this patient are essentially due to the CDA type II abnormality. However, the coexistence of these two different red cell abnormalities may affect the clinical picture specifically by making CDA type II more hemolytic than it would have been otherwise. PMID:7725848

  4. Acute Liver Failure in a Pediatric Patient with Congenital Dysery-Thropoietic Anemia Type I Treated with Deferasirox.

    PubMed

    Ling, Galina; Pinsk, Vered; Golan-Tripto, Inbal; Ling, Eduard

    2015-09-23

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDA) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by morphological abnormalities of erythroid precursor cells and various degrees of hemolysis. Iron overload is a result of continuous hemolysis and recurrent transfusions. It is treated with iron chelators, including deferasirox. We present here a case of acute liver failure in a 12 years old girl with CDA type I treated with deferasirox and discuss the approach to treatment. PMID:26487935

  5. New Codanin-1 Gene Mutations in a Italian Patient with Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia Type I and Heterozygous Beta-Thalassemia.

    PubMed

    D'Alcamo, Elena; Agrigento, V; Pitrolo, L; Sclafani, S; Barone, R; Calvaruso, G; Buffa, V; Maggio, A

    2016-06-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with macrocytic anemia, ineffective erythropoiesis, iron overloading and characterized by abnormal chromatin ultrastructure in erythroblasts such as internuclear chromatin bridges, spongy heterochromatin and invagination of the nuclear membrane. A 58-year-old Causasian man with chronic hemolytic anemia, heterozygous for β (+) -globin IVS1, nt110 G>A mutation (causing abnormal alpha:beta globin chain ratio) showed clinical, laboratory and hematological features suggesting diagnosis of CDA1. Sequence analysis of CDA-related genes revealed compound heterozygosity for two novel mutations in the CDAN1 gene: a frameshift mutation 3367 del 4 (TTAG) in exon 25 and a missense mutation c.1811 G>T in exon 11 causing an aminoacid change from glycine to valine at codon 565 (G565V). One of the propositus' brothers showed the same gene mutations. As the CDA1 can mimic thalassemia, a frequent misdiagnosis is possible especially in countries where the prevalence of thalassemia is high. A strong clinical suspicion in patients who do not reveal a clear genetic basis for presumed thalassemia may help clinch the correct diagnosis. PMID:27408412

  6. Successful Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation of a Patient Suffering from Type II Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia A Rare Case Report from Western India

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Gaurang; Shah, Sandip; Panchal, Harsha; Patel, Apurva; Uparkar, Urmila; Anand, Asha; Parikh, Sonia; Patel, Kinnari; Shah, Kamlesh; Revannasiddaiah, Swaroop

    2015-01-01

    The most frequent form of congenital dyserythropoiesis (CDA) is congenital dyserythropoietic anemia II (CDA II). CDA II is a rare genetic anemia in humans, inherited in an autosomally recessive mode, characterized by hepatosplenomegaly normocytic anemia and hemolytic jaundice. Patients are usually transfusion-independent except in severe type. We are here reporting a case of severe transfusion-dependent type II congenital dyserythropoietic anemia in a 5-year-old patient who has undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) at our bone marrow transplantation centre. Patient has had up until now more than 14 mL/kg/month of packed cell volume (PCV), which he required every 15 to 20 days to maintain his hemoglobin of 10 gm/dL and hematocrit of 30%. His pre-HSCT serum ferritin was 1500 ng/mL and he was on iron chelating therapy. Donor was HLA identical sibling (younger brother). The preparative regimen used was busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and antithymocyte globulin (Thymoglobulin). Cyclosporine and short-term methotrexate were used for graft versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. Engraftment of donor cells was quick and the posttransplant course was uneventful. The patient is presently alive and doing well and he has been transfusion-independent for the past 33 months after HSCT. PMID:25692053

  7. Incomplete synthesis of N-glycans in congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II caused by a defect in the gene encoding. alpha. -mannosidase II

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, M.N.; Masri, K.A. ); Dell, A. ); Luzzatto, L. ); Moremen, K.W. )

    1990-10-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II, or hereditary erythroblastic multinuclearity with a positive acidified-serum-lysis test (HEMPAS), is a genetic anemia in humans inherited by an autosomally recessive mode. The enzyme defect in most HEMPAS patients has previously been proposed as a lowered activity of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II, resulting in a lack of polylactosamine on proteins and leading to the accumulation of polylactosaminyl lipids. A recent HEMPAS case, G.C., has now been analyzed by cell-surface labeling, fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry of glycopeptides, and activity assay of glycosylation enzymes. Significantly decreased glycosylation of polylactosaminoglycan proteins and incompletely processed asparagine-linked oligosaccharides were detected in the erythrocyte membranes of G.C. These results suggest that G.C. cells contain a mutation in {alpha}-ManII-encoding gene that results in inefficient expression of {alpha}-ManII mRNA, either through reduced transcription or message instability. This report demonstrates that HEMPAS is caused by a defective gene encoding an enzyme necessary for the synthesis of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides.

  8. Primary defect of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II. Failure in glycosylation of erythrocyte lactosaminoglycan proteins caused by lowered N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, M N; Dell, A; Scartezzini, P

    1987-05-25

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II or hereditary erythroblastic multinuclearity with positive acidified serum test (HEMPAS) is a genetic disease caused by membrane abnormality. Previously we have found that Band 3 and Band 4.5 are not glycosylated by lactosaminoglycans in HEMPAS erythrocytes, whereas normally these proteins have lactosaminoglycans (Fukuda, M. N., Papayannopoulou, T., Gordon-Smith, E. C., Rochant, H., and Testa, U. (1984) Br. J. Haematol. 56, 55-68). In order to find out where glycosylation of lactosaminoglycans stops, we have analyzed the carbohydrate structures of HEMPAS Band 3. By fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry, methylation analysis, and hydrazinolysis followed by exoglycosidase treatments, the following structure was elucidated: (formula; see text) N-Linked glycopeptides synthesized in vitro by reticulocyte microsomes from HEMPAS were shown to be predominantly the above short oligosaccharide, whereas those from normal reticulocytes contain large molecular weight carbohydrates. The N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II, which transfers N-acetylglucosamine to the C-2 position of the Man alpha 1----6Man beta 1----arm of the biantennary core structure, was therefore examined by using Man alpha 1----6(GlcNAc beta 1----2Man alpha 1----3)Man beta 1----4GlcNAc beta 1----4GlcNAcol as an acceptor. N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase II activity was demonstrated in the lymphocyte microsome fraction from normal individuals. However, this enzyme activity was found to be decreased in those from HEMPAS patients. These results suggest that the primary defect of HEMPAS lies in the lowered activity of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II. PMID:2953718

  9. X-linked macrocytic dyserythropoietic anemia in females with an ALAS2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Ulirsch, Jacob C.; Tchaikovskii, Vassili; Ludwig, Leif S.; Wakabayashi, Aoi; Kadirvel, Senkottuvelan; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Bejar, Rafael; Shi, Jiahai; Lovitch, Scott B.; Bishop, David F.; Steensma, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Macrocytic anemia with abnormal erythropoiesis is a common feature of megaloblastic anemias, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, and myelodysplastic syndromes. Here, we characterized a family with multiple female individuals who have macrocytic anemia. The proband was noted to have dyserythropoiesis and iron overload. After an extensive diagnostic evaluation that did not provide insight into the cause of the disease, whole-exome sequencing of multiple family members revealed the presence of a mutation in the X chromosomal gene ALAS2, which encodes 5′-aminolevulinate synthase 2, in the affected females. We determined that this mutation (Y365C) impairs binding of the essential cofactor pyridoxal 5′-phosphate to ALAS2, resulting in destabilization of the enzyme and consequent loss of function. X inactivation was not highly skewed in wbc from the affected individuals. In contrast, and consistent with the severity of the ALAS2 mutation, there was a complete skewing toward expression of the WT allele in mRNA from reticulocytes that could be recapitulated in primary erythroid cultures. Together, the results of the X inactivation and mRNA studies illustrate how this X-linked dominant mutation in ALAS2 can perturb normal erythropoiesis through cell-nonautonomous effects. Moreover, our findings highlight the value of whole-exome sequencing in diagnostically challenging cases for the identification of disease etiology and extension of the known phenotypic spectrum of disease. PMID:25705881

  10. A Child With Dyserythropoietic Anemia and Megakaryocyte Dysplasia Due to a Novel 5'UTR GATA1s Splice Mutation.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Jacob; Temm, Constance; Czader, Magdalena; Nalepa, Grzegorz

    2016-05-01

    We describe a child with dyserythropoietic anemia, thrombocytosis, functional platelet defect, and megakaryocyte dysplasia. We show that (i) this constellation of hematopoietic abnormalities was due to a germline mutation within the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of globin transcription factor 1 (GATA1); (ii) the mutation impaired a 5'UTR GATA1 splicing site, with promoted production of the shortened GATA1 isoform lacking the N-terminus; and (iii) expression of the GATA1 N-terminus is restricted to erythroblasts and megakaryocytes in normal marrow, consistent with the patient's abnormal erythropoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. Our findings provide insights into the clinically relevant in vivo function of the N-terminal domain of GATA1 in human hematopoiesis. PMID:26713410

  11. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Hemolytic Anemia There are many types of hemolytic anemia. The ... the condition, but you develop it. Inherited Hemolytic Anemias With inherited hemolytic anemias, one or more of ...

  12. [Dyserythropoietic syndromes: incidence, diagnosis, therapy].

    PubMed

    Cacciola, E

    1990-10-01

    The nosography of the dyserythropoietic syndromes remains poorly defined in the field of clinical hematology. The prominent pathophysiologic feature lies in the "ineffective erythropoiesis" as expressed by bone marrow erythroid hyperplasia with dysplasia accompanied by a normal or only slightly increased reticulocyte count. Both erythrokinetics and ferrokinetics are impaired, as shown by either slight reduction of the red cell survival or marked increased rate of serum iron transport together with reduced cellular iron utilization. The dyserythropoietic syndromes can be classified as acquired, secondary or congenital. The acquired ones, especially the sideroblastic forms, belonging to the myelodysplastic syndromes, are typical of the elderly whereas the congenital are of childhood. Their treatment is still a matter of controversy. However, the employment of folic acid, Vit. B12, pyridoxine and androgens can be useful in selected cases. In case of severe anemia, blood transfusion are required in association with iron chelating agents. However, some biological molecules, such as erythropoietin, interleukins 3 and 4, hemopoietic growth factors (especially GM-CSF), could represent future prospects of treatment. PMID:2291009

  13. Angioid Streaks in Types I and II Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anaemia (CDA).

    PubMed

    Frimmel, S; Kniestedt, C

    2016-04-01

    Background. Angioid streaks (AS) are visible irregular breaks in Bruch's membrane, extending radially from the optic nerve head and with overlaying atrophic retinal pigment epithelium. In 50 % of patients, AS are associated with Pseudoxanthoma elasticum, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, sickle cell anaemia or Paget's disease. In 50 % of patients, AS are idiopathic. Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anaemia (CDA) is a rare, inherited disorder of ineffective erythropoiesis with morphologically abnormal erythroblasts. CDA was first recognised as a separate entity in 1968 and classified into three main groups. CDA demographics have identified 614 known families and > 700 cases worldwide. A few case reports of AS in CDA I and III have been published, but there is no report of AS in CDA II, the most frequent of the CDAs, as well no follow-up. History and Signs. 8 eyes of 4 CDA patients were examined. The CDA I patients were a 46 year old man and a 52 year old woman. They were first seen in 2009 and followed up for 9 and 11 months, respectively. The 2 female CDA II patients were seen in 2010 and were aged 35 and 42 years at first presentation. Vision, Amsler grid, optical coherence tomography (OCT), fundus pictures and fluorescent angiography were performed. Blood was drawn for neutrophil elastase determination (ELA2). Therapy and Outcome. All patients showed bilateral AS. Mean best corrected visual acuity was 20/20 without metamorphopsia and with normal OCT. During the follow-up period, no progression occurred. No choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) was detected. ELA2 serum levels were normal. Conclusions. This is the first report of AS in CDA II and the first follow-up in CDA I. No evidence of progression was seen within this period of time. Longer follow-up is needed to detect whether AS progresses. All patients with AS should be seen by an ophthalmologist on a regular basis. The risk of CNV is given. Therapy is possible and the outcome is best if the CNV is recognised and

  14. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... anemia Idiopathic aplastic anemia Megaloblastic anemia Pernicious anemia Sickle cell anemia Thalassemia Causes Although many parts of the body ... Some forms of anemia, such as thalassemia or sickle cell anemia, which can be inherited Pregnancy Problems with bone ...

  15. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... anemia Idiopathic aplastic anemia Megaloblastic anemia Pernicious anemia Sickle cell anemia Thalassemia ... Some forms of anemia, such as thalassemia or sickle cell anemia, which can be inherited Pregnancy Problems with bone ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: dyserythropoietic anemia and thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Crispino JD. GATA1 in normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2005 Feb;16(1): ... GATA1 function, a paradigm for transcription factors in hematopoiesis. Mol Cell Biol. 2005 Feb;25(4):1215- ...

  17. Pernicious anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... achylic anemia; Congenital pernicious anemia; Juvenile pernicious anemia; Vitamin B12 deficiency (malabsorption) ... Pernicious anemia is a type of vitamin B12 anemia. The body needs ... cells. You get this vitamin from eating foods such as meat, ...

  18. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough ... rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the ...

  19. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  20. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  1. Hypocholesterolemia in chronic anemias with increased erythropoietic activity.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Hanna; Kapelushnik, Joseph; Moser, Asher; Knobler, Hilla; Tamary, Hannah

    2007-03-01

    Hypocholesterolemia of unknown etiology has been previously described in various chronic anemias. Few small studies also suggested that those patients have a lower incidence of atherosclerotic events. The aim of our study was to determine the extent of hypocholesterolemia in various types of anemias. We studied 59 patients with chronic anemias associated with high-erythropoietic activity (thalassemia intermedia, congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I, congenital spherocytosis), 8 patients with low-erythropoietic activity anemias (acquired aplastic anemia, Fanconi anemia, and Diamond Blackfan anemia), and 20 healthy controls. Mean serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, hemoglobin, serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (STR), and serum erythropoietin levels were determined in each patient. All patients with chronic anemia and increased erythropoietic activity had hypocholesterolemia, whereas none of those with low erythropoietic activity was hypocholesterolemic. Mean serum cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol levels were found to be significantly lower in the high-erythropoietic activity group (80+/-19 mg/dl; 31+/-10 mg/dl; 35+/-14 mg/dl, respectively) compared with the control group (P<0.001; 0.001; 0.001, respectively) and the low-erythropoietic activity group (P<0.001; 0.001; 0.01, respectively). Significant inverse correlation (R2=0.507) was observed between serum cholesterol and STR levels, which in the absence of iron deficiency reflect bone marrow activity. Taken together, our results imply that hypocholesterolemia accompanies anemias with high-erythropoietic activity. We suggest that the high-erythropoitic activity-associated hypocholesterolemia is due to increased cholesterol requirements by the proliferating erythoid cells. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism and the possible clinical consequences of this phenomenon. PMID

  2. Iron Deficiency and Other Types of Anemia in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mary

    2016-02-15

    Anemia, defined as a hemoglobin level two standard deviations below the mean for age, is prevalent in infants and children worldwide. The evaluation of a child with anemia should begin with a thorough history and risk assessment. Characterizing the anemia as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic based on the mean corpuscular volume will aid in the workup and management. Microcytic anemia due to iron deficiency is the most common type of anemia in children. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization recommend routine screening for anemia at 12 months of age; the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to assess the benefits vs. harms of screening. Iron deficiency anemia, which can be associated with cognitive issues, is prevented and treated with iron supplements or increased intake of dietary iron. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to recommend screening or treating pregnant women for iron deficiency anemia to improve maternal or neonatal outcomes. Delayed cord clamping can improve iron status in infancy, especially for at-risk populations, such as those who are preterm or small for gestational age. Normocytic anemia may be caused by congenital membranopathies, hemoglobinopathies, enzymopathies, metabolic defects, and immune-mediated destruction. An initial reticulocyte count is needed to determine bone marrow function. Macrocytic anemia, which is uncommon in children, warrants subsequent evaluation for vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies, hypothyroidism, hepatic disease, and bone marrow disorders. PMID:26926814

  3. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... blood cells. There are different types, including Fanconi anemia. Causes include Toxic substances, such as pesticides, arsenic, ...

  4. Congenital anemia, dyskeratosis, and progressive alopecia in Polled Hereford calves.

    PubMed

    Steffen, D J; Leipold, H W; Gibb, J; Smith, J E

    1991-05-01

    A new syndrome of anemia, alopecia, and dyskeratosis was identified in Polled Hereford calves in this study. Cutaneous changes included hyperkeratosis and hair loss around the muzzle and ear margins, which progressed to a generalized alopecia and hyperkeratotic dermatitis. Histologically, orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis with dyskeratosis of epidermal and follicular keratinocytes was present. Alopecia was correlated with dyskeratosis of Huxley's layer and an increasing proportion of follicles in the telogen phase of the hair cycle. Dermatitis was characterized by a mild dermal mononuclear cell infiltrate and mild lymphocytic perivascular dermatitis. The anemia present at birth was nonprogressive and was classified as normochromic and normocytic to macrocytic. Reticulocytosis was absent, but bone marrow was markedly hyperplastic. Nuclear cytoplasmic asynchrony of the rubricyte and metarubricyte stages occurred in the bone marrow. Abnormal rubricyte nuclei and maturation arrest at the late rubricyte stage were common. Cytologic features of the erythroid series are similar to those of type I congenital dyserythropoietic anemia of human beings. Genealogic features suggest that this is a primary hereditary defect. The mode of inheritance, however, remains to be determined. PMID:1858254

  5. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) due to a lack of folate. Folate is a type ... B vitamin. It is also called folic acid. Anemia is a condition in which the body does ...

  6. Congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia and dyskeratosis in Australian Poll Hereford calves.

    PubMed

    Kessell, A E; Hanshaw, D M; Finnie, J W; Nosworthy, P

    2012-12-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia (CDA) is a heterogeneous group of rare genetic disorders that in humans is characterised by ineffective haematopoiesis with morphological abnormalities in erythroid precursor cells and secondary iron overload. In the 1990s, a syndrome of CDA with dyskeratosis and progressive alopecia was reported in Poll Hereford calves in Canada and the USA. We report the clinical and pathological findings in two Poll Hereford calves with this syndrome from separate properties in South Australia. The animals had a variably severe anaemia, associated with abnormal nucleated red blood cells in peripheral blood, and large numbers of rubricytes and metarubricytes with a characteristic nuclear ultrastructure in the bone marrow. Both calves were born with a wiry hair coat and a progressively 'dirty-faced' appearance associated with hyperkeratosis and dyskeratosis (apoptosis). PMID:23186092

  7. Hematologically and genetically distinct forms of sickle cell anemia in Africa. The Senegal type and the Benin type.

    PubMed

    Nagel, R L; Fabry, M E; Pagnier, J; Zohoun, I; Wajcman, H; Baudin, V; Labie, D

    1985-04-01

    Patients with sickle cell anemia vary in the hematologic and clinical features of their disease, in part because of variability in the presence of linked and unlinked genes that modify the expression of the disease. The hemoglobin S gene is strongly linked to three different haplotypes of polymorphic endonuclease-restriction sites of the beta-like gene cluster (genes in the vicinity of the beta-globin gene)--one prevalent in Atlantic West Africa, another in central West Africa, and yet another in Bantu-speaking Africa (equatorial, East, and southern Africa). We have studied the differences in the hematologic characteristics of patients with sickle cell anemia from the first two geographical areas. We find that the Senegalese (Atlantic West Africa) patients have higher levels of hemoglobin F, a preponderance of G gamma chains in hemoglobin F, a lower proportion of very dense red cells, and a lower percentage of irreversibly sickled cells than those from Benin (central West Africa). We interpret these data to mean that the gamma-chain composition and the hemoglobin F level are haplotype linked and that the decrease in the percentage of dense cells and irreversibly sickled cells is secondary to the elevation in the hemoglobin F level. Patients with sickle cell anemia in the New World probably correspond to various combinations of these types, in addition to the still hematologically undefined haplotype associated with sickle cell anemia in the Bantu-speaking areas of Africa. PMID:2579336

  8. Sickle cell anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  9. T cell deficiency in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia ('warm type').

    PubMed

    Krüger, J; Rahman, A; Mogk, K U; Mueller-Eckhardt, C

    1976-01-01

    19 patients with chronic 'warm type' autoimmune hemolytic anemia were studied for abnormalities of cellular immune reactions. Evidence was obtained for a reduction of rosette-forming cells (RFC). Lymphocytotoxic antibodies were present in only 8 patients and correlated, with only one exception, with a reduced number of RFC. No significant deviation from normal ranges of the three major immunoglobulin classes in the patients' sera were found. C3 and C4 complement components were also, with one exception, within normal limits. In 18 of 19 patients no apparent association existed between the type or the amount of autoantibodies and/or complement components fixed on red cells and the levels of the respective immunoglobulins or complement in the sera. PMID:1084624

  10. Fanconi anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... People with Fanconi anemia should avoid cancer-causing substances (carcinogens) and have regular check-ups to screen for cancer. Alternative Names Fanconi's anemia; Anemia - Fanconi's Images Formed elements of blood References Bagby GC. Aplastic anemia ...

  11. Postoperative early hemolytic anemia due to inverted teflon felt strip after emergency repair for type A dissection.

    PubMed

    Hata, M; Yoshitake, I; Wakui, S; Unosawa, S; Hata, H; Shiono, M

    2012-10-01

    A 39-year-old man underwent emergency surgery for type A acute aortic dissection complicated by paraplegia. However, hemolytic anemia increased significantly due to severe stenosis of the proximal anastomosis one month after surgery. He finally underwent a redo procedure 4 months after the initial operation whereupon it was verified that half of the inner felt strip used for proximal stump fixation had turned up and was protruding into the inner lumen. We report here on a rare case of survival of postoperative early hemolytic anemia due to severe graft stenosis caused by an inverted inner Teflon felt strip without any extra vascular compression. PMID:21766281

  12. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Pernicious Anemia in an Elderly Japanese Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Kaneko, Masanori; Yano, Toshio; Sato, Naoko; Usuda, Hiroyuki; Miyakoshi, Masashi; Furukawa, Tatsuo; Koike, Tadashi; Kaneko, Kenzo; Kamoi, Kyuzi

    2015-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 66-year-old Japanese man with acute-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) accompanied by pernicious anemia. After 2 weeks of polyuria, the patient developed insulin-deficient hyperglycemia with diabetic ketoacidosis in the absence of verifiable islet-related autoantibodies and began insulin therapy in 2001. Eight years later, he developed gastric autoantibody-positive pernicious anemia and began methylcobalamin treatment. Previous studies have reported cases of slowly progressive autoimmune T1D concomitant with pernicious anemia. The present case suggests that potential associations with organ-specific autoimmune disorders should be considered during the long-term follow-up of T1D patients, even though verifiable islet-related autoantibodies are undetectable. PMID:26370862

  13. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  14. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... Drugs that can cause this type of hemolytic anemia include: Cephalosporins (a class of antibiotics), most common ...

  15. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  16. Pernicious Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Pernicious Anemia? Pernicious anemia (per-NISH-us uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... nervous system working properly. People who have pernicious anemia can't absorb enough vitamin B12 from food. ...

  17. Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Hemolytic Anemia? Hemolytic anemia (HEE-moh-lit-ick uh-NEE-me-uh) ... blood cells to replace them. However, in hemolytic anemia, the bone marrow can't make red blood ...

  18. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic ... Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow is unable to replace the red blood cells that are being destroyed. Immune hemolytic anemia occurs when the immune system mistakenly sees your ...

  19. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... infections and bleeding. Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ...

  20. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn associated with severe congenital anemia of various etiologies.

    PubMed

    Landau, Danielle; Kapelushnik, Josef; Harush, Miri B; Marks, Kyla; Shalev, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Among the many associated features of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate (PPHN), severe congenital anemia has been described only occasionally and is not included in the list of conditions that may cause PPHN in the neonate. We describe the clinical course of a group of 12 full-term neonates with PPHN and congenital anemia due to congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (7/12), α thalasemia (1/12), Diamond-Blackfan (1/12), and epsilon gamma delta beta thalassemia (3/12). The association of congenital anemia and PPHN is more common than previously thought; it can exist with various etiologies and severity of anemia. Congenital anemia has not been described until now as a cause or risk factor for PPHN; it should be considered as such alone or in combination with other known causes to be recognized early and treated appropriately to improve outcome. In families with known cases of congenital anemia due to the above-mentioned diagnosis, closer prenatal follow-up should be offered to anticipate possible fetal distress and/or fetal anemia and PPHN after birth. PMID:24309603

  1. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  2. Fanconi anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cells may result in fatigue ( anemia ). A lower-than-normal amount of platelets may lead to excess bleeding. Most people with Fanconi's anemia have some of these symptoms: Abnormal heart, lungs, and digestive tract Bone problems (especially the hips, spine or ...

  3. Aplastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells. But the disease may return (relapse). A bone marrow transplant with an unrelated donor may be tried if ... Untreated, severe aplastic anemia leads to rapid death. Bone marrow transplant can be very successful in young people. Transplant ...

  4. Aplastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... over time as the disease progresses. Low red cell count (anemia) can cause: Fatigue Pallor (paleness) Rapid heart ... with exercise Weakness Lightheadedness upon standing Low white cell count (leukopenia) causes an increased risk for infection. Low ...

  5. What Causes Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Anemia? The three main causes of anemia are: Blood ... the blood and can lead to anemia. Aplastic Anemia Some infants are born without the ability to ...

  6. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Aplastic Anemia? Aplastic anemia (a-PLAS-tik uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... heart, heart failure , infections, and bleeding. Severe aplastic anemia can even cause death. Overview Aplastic anemia is ...

  7. About Anemia (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes About Anemia KidsHealth > For Kids > About Anemia Print A A ... to every cell in your body. What Is Anemia? Anemia occurs when a person doesn't have ...

  8. Distinct Roles of Urinary Liver-Type Fatty Acid-Binding Protein in Non-Diabetic Patients with Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Naohiko; Yasuda, Takashi; Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Shibagaki, Yugo; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Various stresses including ischemia are known to up-regulate renal L-FABP gene expression and increase the urinary excretion of L-FABP. In diabetic patients with anemia, the urinary excretion of L-FABP is significantly increased. We studied the clinical significance of urinary L-FABP and its relationship with anemia in non-diabetic patients. Subjects and Methods A total of 156 patients were studied in this retrospective cross-sectional analysis. The associations between anemia and urinary L-FABP levels, and the predictors of urinary L-FABP levels in non-diabetic patients were evaluated. Results Urinary L-FABP levels were significantly higher in patients with anemia compared to those in patients without anemia. Similarly, the urinary L-FABP levels were significantly higher in patients with albuminuria compared to those in patients without albuminuria. Urinary L-FABP levels correlated with urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratios, estimated glomerular filtration rates, body mass index, and hemoglobin levels. Multivariate linear regression analysis determined that hemoglobin levels (β = -0.249, P = 0.001) and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratios (β = 0.349, P < 0.001) were significant predictors of urinary L-FABP levels. Conclusions Urinary L-FABP is strongly associated with anemia in non-diabetic patients. PMID:26010898

  9. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Regulation by Type I and II Interferons in the Pathogenesis of Acquired Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Julianne N. P.; Kanwar, Vikramjit S.; MacNamara, Katherine C.

    2016-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) occurs when the bone marrow fails to support production of all three lineages of blood cells, which are necessary for tissue oxygenation, infection control, and hemostasis. The etiology of acquired AA is elusive in the vast majority of cases but involves exhaustion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), which are usually present in the bone marrow in a dormant state, and are responsible for lifelong production of all cells within the hematopoietic system. This destruction is immune mediated and the role of interferons remains incompletely characterized. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) has been associated with AA and type I IFNs (alpha and beta) are well documented to cause bone marrow aplasia during viral infection. In models of infection and inflammation, IFNγ activates HSCs to differentiate and impairs their ability to self-renew, ultimately leading to HSC exhaustion. Recent evidence demonstrating that IFNγ also impacts the HSC microenvironment or niche, raises new questions regarding how IFNγ impairs HSC function in AA. Immune activation can also elicit type I interferons, which may exert effects both distinct from and overlapping with IFNγ on HSCs. IFNα/β increase HSC proliferation in models of sterile inflammation induced by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and lead to BM aplasia during viral infection. Moreover, patients being treated with IFNα exhibit cytopenias, in part due to BM suppression. Herein, we review the current understanding of how interferons contribute to the pathogenesis of acquired AA, and we explore additional potential mechanisms by which interferons directly and indirectly impair HSCs. A comprehensive understanding of how interferons impact hematopoiesis is necessary in order to identify novel therapeutic approaches for treating AA patients. PMID:27621733

  10. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Regulation by Type I and II Interferons in the Pathogenesis of Acquired Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Julianne N P; Kanwar, Vikramjit S; MacNamara, Katherine C

    2016-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) occurs when the bone marrow fails to support production of all three lineages of blood cells, which are necessary for tissue oxygenation, infection control, and hemostasis. The etiology of acquired AA is elusive in the vast majority of cases but involves exhaustion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), which are usually present in the bone marrow in a dormant state, and are responsible for lifelong production of all cells within the hematopoietic system. This destruction is immune mediated and the role of interferons remains incompletely characterized. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) has been associated with AA and type I IFNs (alpha and beta) are well documented to cause bone marrow aplasia during viral infection. In models of infection and inflammation, IFNγ activates HSCs to differentiate and impairs their ability to self-renew, ultimately leading to HSC exhaustion. Recent evidence demonstrating that IFNγ also impacts the HSC microenvironment or niche, raises new questions regarding how IFNγ impairs HSC function in AA. Immune activation can also elicit type I interferons, which may exert effects both distinct from and overlapping with IFNγ on HSCs. IFNα/β increase HSC proliferation in models of sterile inflammation induced by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and lead to BM aplasia during viral infection. Moreover, patients being treated with IFNα exhibit cytopenias, in part due to BM suppression. Herein, we review the current understanding of how interferons contribute to the pathogenesis of acquired AA, and we explore additional potential mechanisms by which interferons directly and indirectly impair HSCs. A comprehensive understanding of how interferons impact hematopoiesis is necessary in order to identify novel therapeutic approaches for treating AA patients. PMID:27621733

  11. Reticulocytopenia in severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) of the warm antibody type.

    PubMed

    Hauke, G; Fauser, A A; Weber, S; Maas, D

    1983-06-01

    A patient with severe AIHA of the warm antibody type, absence of reticulocytes and red cell hyperplasia of the bone marrow is described. In order to maintain a reasonable hemoglobin level 38 units of washed packed red cells were required within 24 days. The treatment with high doses of steroids showed no permanent beneficial effect. After splenectomy the red cell destruction was immediately reduced and the patient went into a remission. Bone marrow culture studies during the acute phase of the disease and at the time of complete hemato- and immunological remission, i.e. 4 months after splenectomy suggested a circulating autoantibody directed to early erythroid progenitors (BFU-E). The inhibitory activity in the patient's plasma did not influence granulocytic or mixed colony formation (CFU-GEMM). In addition to autoantibodies directed to erythroblasts and erythropoietin involved in the pathogenic mechanisms leading to red cell aplasia type I and II the culture studies suggest an unusual autoantibody that might cause the observed reticulocytopenia and erythropoietic hyperplasia of the bone marrow in AIHA. After the splenectomy the patient recovered, he required no further blood transfusions and his disease has not recurred. PMID:6850101

  12. First report of co-morbidity of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and three types of chronic hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Talaat, Iman M.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; El Melegy, Ebtessam H.K.; Alghamdi, Hamed A.; Aljabri, Mohammed F.; Abdallah, Enas A.A.; Sarar, Mohammed; Alshahrani, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), sickle cell anemia, and thalassemia are autosomal recessive disorders that can cause iron deposition in tissues during childhood. PKAN is characterized by accumulation of iron in the basal ganglia causing progressive extrapyramidal manifestations. Thalassemia and sickle cell disease can cause iron overload and deposition in tissues, including central nervous system. Presentation of case we herein report the first report of comorbidity of PKAN, β-thalassemia-major, sickle cell and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) anemias in a 9 years old Saudi female patient who presented with gait disturbance, speech difficulty, and progressive movement disorders of the neck, upper and lower limbs. Conclusion Although extremely rare, β-thalassemia-major, sickle cell and G6PD anemias can be associated with PKAN. It is unknown whether this association is random or due to an unknown factor that may have caused several mutations. PMID:26740874

  13. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1981-1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1982-07-19

    Hereditary anemias of mice are the chief objects of investigation, specificially four macrocytic anemias, 3 types of hemolytic anemia, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB mice, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia and a new hypochromic anemia with hemochromatosis. New types of anemia may be analyzed as new mutations appear. Three new mutations have been identified during the past 18 months. These anemias are studied through characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, study of normal and abnormal erythrocyte membrane proteins, histological and biochemical characterization of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem-cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue and parabiosis between individuals of differently affected genotypes. 31 refs.

  14. [Hemolytic anemias and vitamin B12 deficieny].

    PubMed

    Dietzfelbinger, Hermann; Hubmann, Max

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic anemias consist of corpuscular, immun-hemolytic and toxic hemolytic anemias. Within the group of corpuscular hemolytic anemias, except for the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), all symptoms are caused by underlying heredetiary disorders within the red blood cell membran (hereditary spherocytosis), deficiencies of red cell enzymes (G6PDH- and pyrovatkinase deficiency) or disorders in the hemoglobin molecule (thalassaemia and sickle cell disease). Immune-hemolytic anemias are acquired hemolytic anemias and hemolysis is caused by auto- or allo-antibodies which are directed against red blood cell antigens. They are classified as warm, cold, mixed type or drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Therapy consists of glucocorticoids and other immunsuppressive drugs. Pernicious anemia is the most important vitamin B12 deficiency disorder. Diagnosis relies on cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor. The management should focus on a possibly life-long replacement treatment with cobalamin. PMID:26306021

  15. Living with Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Anemia Often, you can treat and control anemia. If ... by an inherited or chronic disease or trauma. Anemia and Children/Teens Infants and young children have ...

  16. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  17. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  18. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute -- www. ...

  19. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to aplastic anemia. Examples include Fanconi anemia , Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, dyskeratosis (DIS-ker-ah-TO-sis) congenita, and Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video ...

  20. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia of inflammation; AOCD; ACD ... Anemia is a lower-than-normal number of red blood cells in the blood. Some conditions can lead to anemia of chronic disease include: Autoimmune disorders , such as ...

  1. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Fanconi Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Fanconi Anemia? Major Signs and Symptoms Your doctor may suspect ... sisters also should be tested for the disorder. Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  2. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial. PMID:26818422

  3. Thymoma with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kensuke; Inomata, Minehiko; Shiraishi, Shiori; Hayashi, Ryuji; Tobe, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old Japanese male was referred to our hospital with abnormal chest X-ray results and severe Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. He was diagnosed with a stage IV, WHO type A thymoma and was treated with oral prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) and subsequent chemotherapy. After chemotherapy, the patient underwent surgical resection of the thymoma. Hemolysis rapidly disappeared and did not return after the discontinuation of oral corticosteroids. Corticosteroid therapy may be preferable to chemotherapy or thymoma surgical resection in the management of autoimmune hemolytic anemia with thymoma. PMID:25722666

  4. Anemia in the Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video) Meconium Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Anemia in the Newborn By Arthur E. Kopelman, MD ... Prematurity (ROP) Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC) Jaundice in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Polycythemia in the Newborn Thyroid ...

  5. The Anemias of Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  6. How Is Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cells. Chelation (ke-LAY-shun) therapy for lead poisoning. Chelation therapy is used mainly in children. This ... iron-deficiency anemia are at increased risk of lead poisoning. Procedures If your anemia is severe, your doctor ...

  7. Congenital spherocytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... spheres, and premature breakdown of red blood cells ( hemolytic anemia ). ... Schwartz RS. Autoimmune and intravascular hemolytic anemias In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 163.

  8. [Algorithm for treating preoperative anemia].

    PubMed

    Bisbe Vives, E; Basora Macaya, M

    2015-06-01

    Hemoglobin optimization and treatment of preoperative anemia in surgery with a moderate to high risk of surgical bleeding reduces the rate of transfusions and improves hemoglobin levels at discharge and can also improve postoperative outcomes. To this end, we need to schedule preoperative visits sufficiently in advance to treat the anemia. The treatment algorithm we propose comes with a simple checklist to determine whether we should refer the patient to a specialist or if we can treat the patient during the same visit. With the blood count test and additional tests for iron metabolism, inflammation parameter and glomerular filtration rate, we can decide whether to start the treatment with intravenous iron alone or erythropoietin with or without iron. With significant anemia, a visit after 15 days might be necessary to observe the response and supplement the treatment if required. The hemoglobin objective will depend on the type of surgery and the patient's characteristics. PMID:26320341

  9. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  10. Malaria and anemia.

    PubMed

    Ekvall, Håkan

    2003-03-01

    Anemia due to infection is a major health problem in endemic areas for young children and pregnant women. The anemia is caused by excess removal of nonparasitized erythrocytes in addition to immune destruction of parasitized red cells, and impaired compensation for this loss by bone marrow dysfunction. The pathogenesis is complex, and a predominant mechanism has not been identified. Certain parasite and host characteristics may modify the anemia. Concomitant infections and nutritional deficiencies also contribute to anemia and may interact with the malarial infection. Few preventive strategies exist, and the management of severe malarial anemia with blood transfusion carries a risk of HIV transmission. The current increase in malaria-specific childhood mortality in sub-Saharan Africa attributed to drug-resistant infection is likely partly related to an increase in severe anemia. This review summarizes recent findings on the pathogenesis and epidemiology of malarial anemia. PMID:12579035

  11. Laboratory Evaluation of Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Wallerstein, Ralph O.

    1987-01-01

    The laboratory evaluation of anemia begins with a complete blood count and reticulocyte count. The anemia is then categorized as microcytic, macrocytic or normocytic, with or without reticulocytosis. Examination of the peripheral smear and a small number of specific tests confirm the diagnosis. The serum iron level, total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin level and hemoglobin electrophoresis generally separate the microcytic anemias. The erythrocyte size-distribution width may be particularly helpful in distinguishing iron deficiency from thalassemia minor. Significant changes have occurred in the laboratory evaluation of macrocytic anemia, and a new syndrome of nitrous oxide-induced megaloblastosis and neurologic dysfunction has been recognized. A suggested approach to the hemolytic anemias includes using the micro-Coombs' test and ektacytometry. Finally, a number of causes have been identified for normocytic anemia without reticulocytosis, including normocytic megaloblastic anemia and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:3577135

  12. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dacie, J V

    1975-10-01

    Warm-type autoantibodies of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) are usually IgG but may be IgM or IgA. They are usual Rh specific. Cold-type antibodies are IgM or IgG (Donath-Landsteiner [DL] antibody). IgM antibodies are usually anit-l (occasionally anti-i) and DL antibodies anti-P. The warm IgG antibodies do not fix complement (C); they cause red blood cell (RBC) destruction predominantly in the spleen as the result of interaction between fixing; they cause RBC destruction either by intravascular lysis (complement sequence completed) or by interaction between C3-coated RBCs and phagocytes in liver and spleen. Gentic factors, immunoglobulin deficiency, somatic mutation, viral infections and drugs, and failure of T-lymphocyte function, all probably play a part in breaking immunological tolerance and the development of AIHA. PMID:1164110

  13. Pernicious anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... low B12 level may have a false positive Pap smear. This is because vitamin B12 deficiency affects the way certain cells (epithelial cells) in the cervix look. When to Contact a Medical ... test Pulmonary tuberculosis Secondary amenorrhea Stomach cancer Type ...

  14. Evaluation of Anemia.

    PubMed

    Kujovich, Jody L

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common problem in primary care. Classification based on mean cell volume narrows the differential diagnosis and directs testing. A marked macrocytosis is characteristic of vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies, certain medications, and primary bone marrow disorders. The three most common causes of microcytic anemia are iron deficiency, thalassemia trait, and anemia of inflammation. Additional laboratory testing is required for diagnosis. Determination of the rate of development of anemia and examination of a blood smear may provide diagnostic clues to guide more specialized testing. Diagnosis of iron, vitamin B12, or folate deficiency mandates determination of the underlying cause. PMID:27212091

  15. Inborn anemias in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  16. Iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of diagnostic testing and therapeutic recommendations for dogs and cats with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:22942439

  17. Sickle Cell Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can You Do to Stay Well? en español Anemia falciforme What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell ... about 10 to 20 days. This usually causes anemia . Anemia is what happens when the body's number ...

  18. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated? Doctors treat pernicious anemia by replacing the missing vitamin B12 in the body. People who have pernicious anemia may need lifelong treatment. The goals of treating ...

  19. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  20. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  1. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  2. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They ... last as long as normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also ...

  3. Hematologic Disorders: Anemia.

    PubMed

    Baltierra, David; Harper, Tiffany; Jones, Matthew Page; Nau, Konrad C

    2015-06-01

    Anemia occurs in up to 25% of the US population. Normal hemoglobin levels vary by race, sex, and age. Classification of anemia by mean corpuscular volume guides the differential diagnosis and evaluation. Iron studies, reticulocyte count, the red blood cell distribution width index, and blood test results are used to make the diagnosis. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common microcytic anemia and is managed with iron therapy. Parenteral iron is available when the oral route cannot be used. Patients who do not benefit from therapy should be evaluated for adherence, malabsorption, occult bleeding, systemic disease, or less common inherited disorders. A source of gastrointestinal bleeding is found in 60% to 70% of patients with iron deficiency anemia who are referred for endoscopy. Normocytic anemia has a broad differential, including nutritional deficiencies, blood loss, renal disease, malignancy (solid tumors or hematologic cancer), rheumatologic disorders, endocrine disorders, and other systemic diseases. Macrocytic anemias are seen with vitamin B12 and folate deficiency, alcohol use, thyroid disease, hydroxyurea, antiretroviral drugs, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloma. Oral vitamin B12 is underused, and can be as effective as intramuscular vitamin B12 in managing anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:26080453

  4. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They don' ... problem causes sickle cell anemia. People with the disease are born with two sickle cell genes, one ...

  5. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is anemia? ... should. [ Top ] How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  6. Anemia of Central Origin.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kazusa; Young, Neal S

    2015-10-01

    Hypoproliferative anemia results from the inability of bone marrow to produce adequate numbers of red blood cells. The list of conditions that cause hypoproliferative anemia is long, starting from common etiologies as iron deficiency to rarer diagnoses of constitutional bone marrow failure syndromes. There is no perfect diagnostic algorithm, and clinical data may not always clearly distinguish "normal" from "abnormal", yet it is important for practicing clinicians to recognize each condition so that treatment can be initiated promptly. This review describes diagnostic approaches to hypoproliferative anemia, with particular emphasis on bone marrow failure syndromes. PMID:26404444

  7. Evaluation of Macrocytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph; Dwyre, Denis M

    2015-10-01

    Macrocytic anemia, defined as a mean cell volume (MCV) ≥100 fL in adults, has a narrow differential diagnosis that requires evaluation of the peripheral blood smear as well as additional laboratory testing taken in conjunction with clinical information that includes patient history and physical examination findings. This review is an update on the approach to a patient with macrocytic anemia with attention paid to the differentiation of megaloblastic and non-megaloblastic macrocytic anemias. Critical to the determination of the diagnosis is the judicious use of laboratory testing and the evaluation of those findings in conjunction with the patient medical, surgical, and medication history. PMID:26404440

  8. Your Guide to Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... lymphoma, and multiple myeloma) l Toxins (e.g., pesticides) l Diamond-Blackfan anemia l Amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia l ... are stopped. n Environmental toxins. Substances such as pesticides, arsenic, and benzene can damage your bone marrow, ...

  9. Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body. About 1 out of every 500 African-American children is born with this form of anemia. Thalassemia , which usually affects people of Mediterranean, African, and Southeast Asian descent, is ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... a lower than normal number of red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste ... Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow- ...

  11. A Japanese family with X-linked sideroblastic anemia affecting females and manifesting as macrocytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Katsurada, Tatsuya; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Daiki; Kawahara, Masahiro; Nakabo, Yukiharu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Yoshida, Yataro

    2016-06-01

    X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is a rare hereditary disorder that typically manifests in males as microcytic anemia. Here, we report a family with XLSA that affects females and manifests as macrocytic anemia. The proband was a Japanese woman harboring a heterozygous mutation c.679C>T in the ALAS2 gene. This mutation causes the amino acid substitution R227C, which disrupts the enzymatic activity of erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinic acid synthase. The mutation was not detected in the ALAS2 complementary DNA from peripheral blood red blood cells of the proband, indicating that the cells were mostly derived from erythroblasts expressing wild-type ALAS2. The proband's mother, who had been diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome, also had XLSA with the same mutation. Clinicians should be aware that XLSA can occur not only in males but also in females, in whom it manifests as macrocytic anemia. PMID:26862056

  12. Who Is at Risk for Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send ... develop during pregnancy due to low levels of iron and folic acid (folate) and changes in the ...

  13. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Thayu, Meena; Mamula, Petar

    2005-10-01

    Anemia is a frequent extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that is commonly overlooked, despite its significant impact on quality of life. Characteristic symptoms include chronic fatigue, headache, and subtle impairment of cognitive function, although some less common symptoms include dyspnea, dizziness, pica, angular stomatitis, shortened attention span, and esophageal webs. Several types of anemia are associated with IBD, but iron deficiency anemia (IDA) accounts for the majority of cases and others include anemia of chronic disease, anemia associated with vitamin deficiency (vitamin B12 and folate), autoimmune anemia, and anemia caused by medication used to treat IBD. The diagnosis of IDA relies on laboratory blood tests. Therefore, these tests should be obtained on a regular basis because characteristic symptoms may be absent or not readily recognized by patients and their clinicians. Complete blood count may suffice; however, iron studies and serum vitamin levels may be necessary to differentiate between specific types of anemia. During the diagnostic process, it is important to consider coexistence of different types of anemia, especially if no response to therapy is noted. The therapy for anemia is directed towards treatment of the underlying inflammatory process and supplemental therapy, depending on the type of deficiency. Iron deficiency anemia is treated with iron preparations, first orally, and if unresponsive or if associated with untoward adverse events leading to decrease in adherence with the therapeutic regimen, with intravenous preparations. Intramuscular therapy has been abandoned due to high rate of complications. Intravenous therapy may be administered as a multiple-dose regimen (intravenous iron sucrose and gluconate) or as a single intravenous dose (iron dextran), which is associated with a higher risk of allergic infusion reactions and requires obligatory test dose administration. Treatment with erythropoietin is

  14. Genetic modulation of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.H.

    1995-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia, a common disorder associated with reduced life span of the red blood cell and vasoocclusive events, is caused by a mutation in the {Beta}-hemoglobin gene. Yet, despite this genetic homogeneity, the phenotype of the disease is heterogeneous. This suggests the modulating influence of associated inherited traits. Some of these may influence the accumulation of fetal hemoglobin, a hemoglobin type that interferes with the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin. Another inherited trait determines the accumulation of {alpha}-globin chains. This review focuses on potential genetic regulators of the phenotype of sickle cell anemia. 125 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. How Is Hemolytic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines rituximab and cyclosporine. If you have severe sickle cell anemia , your doctor may recommend a medicine called hydroxyurea. ... hemoglobin that newborns have. In people who have sickle cell anemia, fetal hemoglobin helps prevent red blood cells from ...

  16. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. PMID:26575109

  17. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated? Doctors decide how to treat Fanconi anemia (FA) based on a person's age and how ... Long-term treatments for FA can: Cure the anemia. Damaged bone marrow cells are replaced with healthy ...

  18. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed? People who have Fanconi anemia (FA) are born with the disorder. They may ... questions about: Any personal or family history of anemia Any surgeries you’ve had related to the ...

  19. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in CKD Page Content On this page: What ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ...

  20. Anemia in People with Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... My ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Anemia in People With Cancer What is anemia? When you don’t have enough healthy red ... the symptoms that bother people most. What causes anemia? There are many different reasons a person with ...

  1. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ... your primary care doctor thinks you have aplastic anemia, he or she may refer you to a ...

  2. Anemia and Oxygen Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    Clinical assessment of tissue oxygenation is challenging. Anemia reflects a decreased oxygen carrying capacity of the blood and its significance in the perioperative setting relates largely to the associated risk of insufficient oxygen delivery and cellular hypoxia. Until meaningful clinical measures of tissue oxygenation are available in veterinary practice, clinicians must rely on evaluation of a patient's hemodynamic and ventilatory performance, along with biochemical and hemogasometric measurements. Blood transfusion is used commonly for treatment of perioperative anemia, and may improve tissue oxygenation by normalizing the rheologic properties of blood and enhancing perfusion, independent of increases in oxygen carrying capacity. PMID:26033442

  3. Management of Anemia of Inflammation in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia

    2012-01-01

    Anemia of any degree is recognized as a significant independent contributor to morbidity, mortality, and frailty in elderly patients. Among the broad types of anemia in the elderly a peculiar role seems to be played by the anemia associated with chronic inflammation, which remains the most complex form of anemia to treat. The origin of this nonspecific inflammation in the elderly has not yet been clarified. It seems more plausible that the oxidative stress that accompanies ageing is the real cause of chronic inflammation of the elderly and that the same oxidative stress is actually a major cause of this anemia. The erythropoietic agents have the potential to play a therapeutic role in this patient population. Despite some promising results, rHuEPO does not have a specific indication for the treatment of anemia in the elderly. Moreover, concerns about their side effects have spurred the search for alternatives. Considering the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of anemia of inflammation in the elderly population, an integrated nutritional/dietetic approach with nutraceuticals that can manipulate oxidative stress and related inflammation may prevent the onset of this anemia and its negative impact on patients' performance and quality of life. PMID:23091709

  4. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  5. Anemia and School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  6. Hepcidin and sports anemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important mineral element used by the body in a variety of metabolic and physiologic processes. These processes are highly active when the body is undergoing physical exercises. Prevalence of exercise-induced iron deficiency anemia (also known as sports anemia) is notably high in athletic populations, particularly those with heavy training loads. The pathogenesis of sports anemia is closely related to disorders of iron metabolism, and a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of iron metabolism in the course of physical exercises could expand ways of treatment and prevention of sports anemia. In recent years, there have been remarkable research advances regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying changes of iron metabolism in response to physical exercises. This review has covered these advances, including effects of exercise on duodenum iron absorption, serum iron status, iron distribution in organs, erythropoiesis, and hepcidin’s function and its regulation. New methods for the treatment of exercise-induced iron deficiency are also discussed. PMID:24731443

  7. How Is Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... parts of your blood. The test checks your hemoglobin and hematocrit (hee-MAT-oh-crit) levels. Hemoglobin is the iron-rich protein in red blood ... up in your blood. A low level of hemoglobin or hematocrit is a sign of anemia. The ...

  8. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  9. Anemia associated with feline leukemia virus infection in cats.

    PubMed

    Mackey, L; Jarrett, W; Jarrett, O; Laird, H

    1975-01-01

    The types of anemia associated with natural and experimental feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection in cats were investigated. In one experiment, 10 kittens were inoculated neonatally with Jarrett FeLV-1, an isolate of subgroup A; 6 developed anemia a few weeks later. This anemia was characterized by macrocytosis, normoblastosis, increased erythropoiesis in the bone marrow, and extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen. Anemia was transient and nonfatal and occurred before the onset of lympoid malignancy. The same type of anemia was also seen in 9 of 24 kittens inoculated with Jarrett FeLV-9 of subgroups A and B. A different form of anemai occurred in another experiment in which 10 kittens were inoculated with FeLV-C of subgroup C only. All 10 kittens developed a profound aplastic or erythroblastopenic anemia in which the bone marrow became depleted of erythroid tissue; all kittens died within 16 weeks, most as a direct result of anemia. In an experiment in which kittens were inoculated with FeLV-B of subgroup B only, no kitten showed anemia. Cats with naturally acquired, nonleukemic lymphosarcoma were also studied. Of 33 lymphosarcomas in which myelophthisis was excluded as a cause, 54% of the affected cats had anemia, the features of which were consistent with hemolytic origin. When virus could be grown from these lymphosarcomas, it was of subgroup A alone or a combination of A and B. With one exception, anemic cats had low or negative titers to feline oncornavirus-associated cell membrane antigens. Until more isolates have been tested, it is not known if the various hematologic changes reflected differences in the pathogenic effects of the subgroups of the virus or of types of strains within them. PMID:163317

  10. Nutritional anemia and its control.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Deeksha; Agarwal, Kailash Nath; Agarwal, Dev Kumari

    2002-07-01

    Available studies on prevalence of nutritional anemia in India show that 65% infant and toddlers, 60% 1-6 years of age, 88% adolescent girls (3.3% had hemoglobin < 7.0 g/dl; severe anemia) and 85% pregnant women (9.9% having severe anemia) were anemic. The prevalence of anemia was marginally higher in lactating women as compared to pregnancy. The commonest is iron deficiency anemia. National programmes to control and prevent anemia have not been successful. Experiences from other countries in controlling moderately-severe anemia guide to adopt long-term measures i.e. fortification of food items like milk, cereal, sugar, salt with iron. Use of iron utensils in boiling milk, cooking vegetables etc may contribute significant amount of dietary iron. Nutrition education to improve dietary intakes in family for receiving needed macro/micro nutrients as protein, iron and vitamins like folic acid, B12, A and C etc. for hemoglobin synthesis is important. As an immediate measure medicinal iron is necessary to control anemia. Addition of folate with iron controls anemia and is neuroprotective. Evidence in early childhood suggests vitamin B12 deficiency anemia; thus it may also be given along with iron and folate. PMID:12173702

  11. [Treatment and results of therapy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Tasić, J; Macukanović, L; Pavlović, M; Koraćević, S; Govedarević, N; Kitić, Lj; Tijanić, I; Bakić, M

    1994-01-01

    Basic principles in the therapy of idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody were glucocorticoides and splenectomy. Immunosupresive drugs, plasmaferesis and intravenous high doses gamma globulin therapy are also useful. In secundary autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody we treated basic illness. During the period of 1990-1992 we treated 21 patients with primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 6 patients with secondary /4 CLL and 2 Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma/. Complete remission we found as a normalisation of reticulocites and hemoglobin level respectively. Complete remission by corticoides we got in 14/21 patients, partial response in 2/21 respectively. Complete response by splenectomy we got in 2/3 splenoctomized patients (idiopathic type). For successful treatment secondary hemolytic anemias we treated primary diseases (CLL and malignant lymphoma) and we got in 4/6 patients complete remission. Our results were standard in both type of autoimmune hemolytic anaemias induced by warm antibody. PMID:18173205

  12. Anemia in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrakis, Michael G.; Tsirakis, George

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure is a very common disease, with severe morbidity and mortality, and a frequent reason of hospitalization. Anemia and a concurrent renal impairment are two major risk factors contributing to the severity of the outcome and consist of the cardio renal anemia syndrome. Anemia in heart failure is complex and multifactorial. Hemodilution, absolute or functional iron deficiency, activation of the inflammatory cascade, and impaired erythropoietin production and activity are some pathophysiological mechanisms involved in anemia of the heart failure. Furthermore other concomitant causes of anemia, such as myelodysplastic syndrome and chemotherapy, may worsen the outcome. Based on the pathophysiology of cardiac anemia, there are several therapeutic options that may improve hemoglobin levels, tissues' oxygenation, and probably the outcome. These include administration of iron, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and blood transfusions but still the evidence provided for their use remains limited. PMID:22536520

  13. Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Spano, Filippo; Giardina, Irene; Brillo, Eleonora; Clerici, Graziano; Roura, Luis Cabero

    2015-11-01

    Anemia is the most frequent derailment of physiology in the world throughout the life of a woman. It is a serious condition in countries that are industrialized and in countries with poor resources. The main purpose of this manuscript is to give the right concern of anemia in pregnancy. The most common causes of anemia are poor nutrition, iron deficiencies, micronutrients deficiencies including folic acid, vitamin A and vitamin B12, diseases like malaria, hookworm infestation and schistosomiasis, HIV infection and genetically inherited hemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia. Depending on the severity and duration of anemia and the stage of gestation, there could be different adverse effects including low birth weight and preterm delivery. Treatment of mild anemia prevents more severe forms of anemia, strictly associated with increased risk of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity. PMID:26472066

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of the bone marrow . The ...

  16. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 270 KB). Alternate Language URL Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease Page Content On ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which a person ...

  17. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menu Donate Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia Because you have aplastic anemia , everyday events can ... bleeding, such as contact sports. Pregnancy and Aplastic Anemia Pregnancy is possible for women who have been ...

  18. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells If you’re ... and sluggish, you might have a condition called anemia. Anemia is a common blood disorder that many ...

  19. Anemia as the Main Manifestation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Valeria

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a constellation of different diseases sharing anemia in the great majority of cases, and this cytopenia defines these pathologies and their most dramatic clinical manifestations. Anemia in MDS is due to ineffective erythropoiesis, with a high degree of apoptosis of marrow erythroid progenitors. These progenitors show distinctive dysplastic features that consent diagnosis, and are recognizable and differentiated, although not easily, from other morphologic alterations present in other types of anemia. Reaching the diagnosis of MDS in a macrocytic anemia and alleviating the symptoms of anemia are therefore an essential objective of the treating physician. In this work, the signs and symptoms of anemia in MDS, as well as its peculiar pathophysiology, are discussed. Erythopoietic stimulating agents (ESAs) are providing the best treatment for anemic MDS patients, but their use is still not approved by health agencies. While still waiting for this waiver, their clinical use is widespread and their effectivness is well known, as well as the dismal prognosis of patients who do not respond to ESAs and require transfusions. MDS with del5q constitute a unique model of anemia whose complex pathophysiology has been clarified at least partially, defining its link to ribosomal alterations likewise what observed in hereditary anemias like Blackfan Diamond anemia. Lenalidomide is the agent that has shown striking and specific erythropoietic activity in del5q MDS, and the basis of this response is starting to be understood. Several new agents are under evaluation for ESA refractory/relapsed MDS patients, targeting different putative mechanisms of ineffective erythropoiesis, and are here reviewed. PMID:26404446

  20. Clinical and cytogenetic analysis of human anemias from Jammu region of Jammu and Kashmir state

    PubMed Central

    Upma; Kumar, Parvinder; Raina, T. R.; Sharma, Kuldeep; Gupta, Subash

    2010-01-01

    Background: Anemias are the blood disorders characterized by reduction in the number of circulating red blood cells, the amount of hemoglobin, or the volume of packed red cells in blood. Chromosomal aberrations have often been reported from the bone marrow as well as cultured lymphocytes of the anemic patients. Aims: The aims of the study were to find out the commonest type of anemia occurring in the population of Jammu, India and to find out the chromosomal changes involved in the disorder. Material and Methods: Present study has been carried out on the bone marrow samples from 53 clinically diagnosed anemic patients. Cytogenetic study was carried out on slides prepared from these samples. Noncytogenetic factors like age, sex, religion, blood groups, family history of anemia, socioeconomic status, etc. have also been included in the study. Results: Megaloblastic anemia was found to be the commonest type of anemia. Centromere stretching, chromatid breaks, gaps, and elongation of chromosomes were recorded in patients with megaloblastic anemia and combined deficiency anemia. However, structural changes and numerical changes were totally absent. Conclusion: The commonest anemia among the people of Jammu region is megaloblastic anemia and its prevalence is increasing every year. Also, megaloblastic anemia is always associated with reversible cytogenetic changes. PMID:20859508

  1. Dyserythropoiesis in a child with pyruvate kinase deficiency and coexistent unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney.

    PubMed

    Haija, Marwa Abu El; Qian, You-Wen; Muthukumar, Akila

    2014-08-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is the commonest enzyme deficiency in the glycolytic pathway leading to hemolytic anemia secondary to decreased Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) synthesis in the red cells. synthesis. PK deficiency due to mutations in the PKLR (1q21) gene leads to highly variable clinical presentation ranging from severe fetal anemia to well compensated anemia in adults. We describe dyserythropoiesis in the bone marrow of a child with transfusion dependent anemia and unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) mimicking Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia type I (CDA type I). Persistently low erythrocyte PK levels and double heterozygous mutations present in the PKLR gene confirmed the diagnosis of PK deficiency. PMID:24481986

  2. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: classification and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Sève, Pascal; Philippe, Pierre; Dufour, Jean-François; Broussolle, Christiane; Michel, Marc

    2008-12-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon cause of anemia. Classifications of AIHA include warm AIHA, cold AIHA (including mainly chronic cold agglutinin disease and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria), mixed-type AIHA and drug-induced AIHA. AIHA may also be further subdivided on the basis of etiology. Management of AIHA is based mainly on empirical data and on small, retrospective, uncontrolled studies. The therapeutic options for treating AIHA are increasing with monoclonal antibodies and, potentially, complement inhibitory drugs. Based on data available in the literature and our experience, we propose algorithms for the treatment of warm AIHA and cold agglutinin disease in adults. Therapeutic trials are needed in order to better stratify treatment, taking into account the promising efficacy of rituximab. PMID:21082924

  3. Anemia in Intensive Cardiac Care Unit patients - An underestimated problem.

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Idzkowska, Ewelina; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2015-09-01

    The heterogeneous group of patients admitted to Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU) as well as nonspecific complaints associated with anemia might be the reason for underdiagnosing or minimization of this problem. Because of this heterogeneity, there are no clear guidelines to follow. It is known that anemia is impairing the outcome. Thus, it is crucial to keep alert in the diagnosis and treatment of anemia, especially in critically ill cardiac patients. The greatest groups of patients admitted to ICCU are those with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), severe arrhythmias as well as individuals after cardiac operations. However, patients suffering other critical cardiac illnesses quite often become anemic during hospitalization in ICCU. It is because anemia is typed in the clinical features of heavy diseases or may be the consequence of treatment. The current review focuses on the incidence, complex etiology and predictive role of anemia in a diverse group of ICCU patients. It discusses clinical aspects of anemia treatment in particular groups of critically ill cardiac patients because proper treatment increases chances for recovery and improves the outcome in this severe group of patients. PMID:26149915

  4. Anemia in Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Prevalence, pathogenesis, and potential impact

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Rajta, Puja Negi; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common preventable and treatable lifestyle-related disease with high global prevalence. COPD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Comorbidities are important events in the natural history of the disease and have a negative effect on the morbidity and mortality of COPD patients. Cardiac diseases, lung cancer, osteoporosis, and depression are common comorbidities reported for COPD. Recently, anemia has been recognized as a frequent comorbidity in COPD patients. The prevalence of anemia in patients with COPD varies from 7.5% to 33%. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is probably the most common type of anemia associated with COPD. ACD is driven by COPD-mediated systemic inflammation. Anemia in COPD is associated with greater healthcare resource utilization, impaired quality of life, decreased survival, and a greater likelihood of hospitalization. We need large prospective studies to discern the association between anemia and COPD. PMID:25814799

  5. Anemia in Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Prevalence, pathogenesis, and potential impact.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Malay; Rajta, Puja Negi; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common preventable and treatable lifestyle-related disease with high global prevalence. COPD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Comorbidities are important events in the natural history of the disease and have a negative effect on the morbidity and mortality of COPD patients. Cardiac diseases, lung cancer, osteoporosis, and depression are common comorbidities reported for COPD. Recently, anemia has been recognized as a frequent comorbidity in COPD patients. The prevalence of anemia in patients with COPD varies from 7.5% to 33%. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is probably the most common type of anemia associated with COPD. ACD is driven by COPD-mediated systemic inflammation. Anemia in COPD is associated with greater healthcare resource utilization, impaired quality of life, decreased survival, and a greater likelihood of hospitalization. We need large prospective studies to discern the association between anemia and COPD. PMID:25814799

  6. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-11-26

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD. PMID:26582375

  7. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Masamitsu

    2008-03-01

    Diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) requires both serologic evidence of an autoantibody and hemolysis. Based on the characteristic temperature reactivity of the autoantibody to red cell membranes, AIHA is classified into warm AIHA or cold AIHA (cold agglutinin disease and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria). Sensitized RBCs are destructed by intravascular and/or extravascular hemolysis. On the basis of etiology, AIHA are classified as idiopathic or secondary. The common cause of secondary AIHA is lymphoproliferative disorders, autoimmune diseases, and infections. The first line therapy of patients with warm AIHA is glucocorticoids and primary treatment for cold AIHA is avoiding cold exposure. The other standard treatments include splenectomy and immunosuppressive drugs. Recently, rituximab, a monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, has been used in refractory AIHA with excellent responses. PMID:18326320

  8. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD. PMID:26637747

  9. Therapy for aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    DeZern, Amy E; Guinan, Eva C

    2011-01-01

    A 24-year-old man from Ecuador presents to your clinic with dyspnea on exertion, bruising, and petechiae. He is noted to be pancytopenic with ANC 430, hemoglobin 7.4 g/dL (reticulocyte count 0.9%), and platelets 18 000. His BM biopsy is hypocellular for age. Ultimately, he is diagnosed with severe aplastic anemia. He is the only child of 2 South American parents without any matches in the unrelated donor registry, including cord blood. He is red cell- and platelet transfusion-dependent. He has been recommended therapy with antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine but declined it. He seeks recommendations about new alternatives to this regimen to improve his chance of response. PMID:22160016

  10. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... need for blood transfusions. Medicines To Suppress the Immune System Research suggests that aplastic anemia may sometimes occur because the body's immune system attacks its own cells by mistake. For this ...

  11. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... I told my doctor that I was very tired. My doctor did blood tests to check for ... or faint ● ● Short of breath ● ● Very weak and tired ● ● Your heart beating very fast What is anemia? ...

  12. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  13. Sexuality and sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Côbo, Viviane de Almeida; Chapadeiro, Cibele Alves; Ribeiro, João Batista; Moraes-Souza, Helio; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano

    2013-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease, the most common hereditary blood disease in the world, is the result of an atypical hemoglobin called S (Hb S) which, when homozygous (Hb SS) is the cause of sickle cell anemia. Changes of puberty, correlated with a delayed growth spurt, begin late in both male and female sickle cell anemia individuals with repercussions on sexuality and reproduction. The objectives of this exploratory and descriptive study were to characterize the development of sexuality in adults with sickle cell anemia by investigating the patient's perception of their sex life, as well as the information they had and needed on this subject. Methods Twenty male and female sickle cell anemia patients treated at the Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba (UFTM) with ages between 19 and 47 years old were enrolled. A socioeconomic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview on sexuality, reproduction and genetic counseling were applied. Results This study shows that the sickle cell anemia patients lacked information on sexuality especially about the risks of pregnancy and the possible inheritance of the disease by their children. Moreover, the sexual life of the patients was impaired due to pain as well as discrimination and negative feelings experienced in close relationships. Conclusion The health care of sickle cell anemia patients should take into account not only the clinical aspects of the disease, but also psychosocial aspects by providing counseling on sexuality, reproduction and genetics, in order to give this population the possibility of a better quality of life. PMID:23741184

  14. Erythroferrone contributes to recovery from anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kautz, Léon; Jung, Grace; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-10-16

    Erythroferrone (ERFE) is an erythropoiesis-driven regulator of iron homeostasis. ERFE mediates the suppression of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin to increase iron absorption and mobilization of iron from stores. We examined the role of ERFE in the recovery from anemia of inflammation (AI) induced by injection of heat-killed Brucella abortus. B abortus-treated wild-type mice developed a moderate anemia and reached nadir hemoglobin 14 days after injection and partially recovered by 28 days. We observed that Erfe expression in the bone marrow and the spleen was greatly increased during anemia and peaked at 14 days after injection, a time course similar to serum erythropoietin. To determine whether ERFE facilitates the recovery from anemia, we analyzed Erfe-deficient mice injected with B abortus. Compared with wild-type mice, Erfe-deficient mice exhibited a more severe anemia, had higher hepcidin levels and consequently lower serum iron concentration on days 14 and 21, and manifested impaired mobilization of iron from stores (liver and spleen). Erfe(-/-) mice eventually compensated by further stimulating erythropoiesis and reticulocyte production. Thus, ERFE contributes to the recovery from AI by suppressing hepcidin and increasing iron availability. PMID:25193872

  15. [The importance of genetic counseling at sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Cínthia Tavares Leal; Coelho, Gabriela Ortega

    2010-06-01

    The genetic counseling has the purpose of guiding people through a conscientious and balanced decision making process regarding procreation, helping them to understand how the hereditary succession can contribute for the occurrence or risk of recurrence of genetic illnesses, as it is the case of the sickle cell anemia. This type of anemia is the most prevalence hereditary illness in Brazil and has clinical complications that can harm the development, the quality of life and lead to death. The present article has the objective to clarify the importance of the genetic counseling for the anemia carriers or falciform trace, aiming at to point out the main characteristics of this illness, its complications and how the diagnosis is made. The study was based on the bibliographical method, looking for studies that deal with this type of anemia and genetic counseling, relating them with guidelines and data from the Health Ministry. Based on the found data, we infer the importance of genetic counseling for the individuals who present the heterozygote form of sickle cell anemia - the falcemic trace - and highlight the need to implement precocious diagnostics programs and genetic and social/psychological orientation for those with the disease or falciform trace. PMID:20640335

  16. [Acquired aplastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hirohito

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic aplastic anemia (AA) is an autoimmune disease caused by T cells. An increase in the percentage of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein-deficient cells and the presence of HLA allele-lacking leukocytes due to 6pUPD provide indirect evidence that T cells contribute to the pathophysiology of AA. Recent studies have revealed the presence of somatic mutations in MDS and/or AML candidate genes in one third of AA patients. Current treatment topics include the efficacy of eltrombopag for AA found to be refractory to immunosuppressive therapy as well as for newly diagnosed AA when administered in combination with ATG and cyclosporine. Furthermore, improved outcomes of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from unrelated donors using reduced-intensity conditioning regimens have been obtained with eltrombopag. Fludarabine-based regimens are now the mainstream approach for preconditioning and have lowered the transplant-related mortality rate. However, new problems such as mixed chimerism and secondary graft failure have arisen. Attempts to prevent GVHD more efficiently by including ATG and alemtuzumab in the preconditioning regimen are being investigated. PMID:26935624

  17. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia? The most common symptom of anemia is fatigue ( ... mild symptoms or none at all. Complications of Anemia Some people who have anemia may have arrhythmias ( ...

  18. Impairment of Bone Health in Pediatric Patients with Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Schündeln, Michael M.; Goretzki, Sarah C.; Hauffa, Pia K.; Wieland, Regina; Bauer, Jens; Baeder, Lena; Eggert, Angelika; Hauffa, Berthold P.; Grasemann, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia result in impaired bone health in both adults and youths. Children with other types of chronic hemolytic anemia may also display impaired bone health. Study Design To assess bone health in pediatric patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, a cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 patients with different forms of hemolytic anemia (i.e., 17 homozygous sickle cell disease and 14 hereditary spherocytosis patients). Biochemical, radiographic and anamnestic parameters of bone health were assessed. Results Vitamin D deficiency with 25 OH-vitamin D serum levels below 20 ng/ml was a common finding (80.5%) in this cohort. Bone pain was present in 31% of patients. Analysis of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteocalcin levels indicated an alteration in bone modeling with significantly elevated RANKL/OPG ratios (control: 0.08+0.07; patients: 0.26+0.2, P = 0.0007). Osteocalcin levels were found to be lower in patients compared with healthy controls (68.5+39.0 ng/ml vs. 118.0+36.6 ng/ml, P = 0.0001). Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant (P<0.025) influence of LDH (partial r2 = 0.29), diagnosis of hemolytic anemia (partial r2 = 0.05) and age (partial r2 = 0.03) on osteocalcin levels. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were more frequently and more severely affected by impaired bone health than patients with hereditary spherocytosis. Conclusion Bone health is impaired in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia. In addition to endocrine alterations, an imbalance in the RANKL/OPG system and low levels of osteocalcin may contribute to this impairment. PMID:25299063

  19. Cold agglutinin-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Randen, Ulla; Tjønnfjord, Geir E

    2015-06-01

    Cold antibody types account for about 25% of autoimmune hemolytic anemias. Primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is characterized by a clonal lymphoproliferative disorder. Secondary cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) complicates specific infections and malignancies. Hemolysis in CAD and CAS is mediated by the classical complement pathway and is predominantly extravascular. Not all patients require treatment. Successful CAD therapy targets the pathogenic B-cell clone. Complement modulation seems promising in both CAD and CAS. Further development and documentation are necessary before clinical use. We review options for possible complement-directed therapy. PMID:26043385

  20. Classification of anemia for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Chulilla, Jose Antonio; Romero Colás, Maria Soledad; Gutiérrez Martín, Martín

    2009-01-01

    Most anemia is related to the digestive system by dietary deficiency, malabsorption, or chronic bleeding. We review the World Health Organization definition of anemia, its morphological classification (microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic) and pathogenic classification (regenerative and hypo regenerative), and integration of these classifications. Interpretation of laboratory tests is included, from the simplest (blood count, routine biochemistry) to the more specific (iron metabolism, vitamin B12, folic acid, reticulocytes, erythropoietin, bone marrow examination and Schilling test). In the text and various algorithms, we propose a hierarchical and logical way to reach a diagnosis as quickly as possible, by properly managing the medical interview, physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, bone marrow examination, and other complementary tests. The prevalence is emphasized in all sections so that the gastroenterologist can direct the diagnosis to the most common diseases, although the tables also include rare diseases. Digestive diseases potentially causing anemia have been studied in preference, but other causes of anemia have been included in the text and tables. Primitive hematological diseases that cause anemia are only listed, but are not discussed in depth. The last section is dedicated to simplifying all items discussed above, using practical rules to guide diagnosis and medical care with the greatest economy of resources and time. PMID:19787825

  1. Issues in prevention of iron deficiency anemia in India.

    PubMed

    Anand, Tanu; Rahi, Manju; Sharma, Pragya; Ingle, Gopal K

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be major public health problem in India. It is estimated that about 20% of maternal deaths are directly related to anemia and another 50% of maternal deaths are associated with it. The question, therefore, is why, despite being the first country to launch the National Nutritional Anemia Prophylaxis Programme in 1970, the problem of IDA remains so widespread. As is to be expected, the economic implications of IDA are also massive. The issues of control of IDA in India are multiple. Inadequate dietary intake of iron, defective iron absorption, increased iron requirements due to repeated pregnancies and lactation, poor iron reserves at birth, timing of umbilical cord clamping, timing and type of complementary food introduction, frequency of infections in children, and excessive physiological blood loss during adolescence and pregnancy are some of the causes responsible for the high prevalence of anemia in India. In addition, there are other multiple programmatic and organizational issues. This review, therefore, is an attempt to examine the current burden of anemia in India, its epidemiology, and the various issues regarding its prevention and control, as well as to offer some innovative approaches to deal with this major health problem. PMID:24984990

  2. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1980-1981)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1981-07-02

    The basic purpose of this study is the delineation and exploitation of inborn anemias of the laboratory mouse, carried out by utilization of genetically homogeneous stocks segregating only for anemia-producing genes; by physiological and histological descriptions of each condition at all stages in the life history; by determination of tissue sites of primary gene action through tissue culture studies, tissue transplantation and parabiosis experiments; by analysis of reactions of normal and anemic mice to a variety of stressful stimuli, including x-irradiation, hypoxia, and toxic chemicals, and by biochemical comparisons between tissues, especially erythrocytes and hemopoietic cells of normal vs each type of anemic mouse. At present 16 single-locus anemias are known in the mouse, plus one with multifactorial inheritance (the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB inbred mice). Of these, six are maintained only by the Jackson Laboratory, and two others have but one additional source. Effects of anemia-producing mutant alleles of these loci (an; f; ja; ha; Hba/sup th/; mk; nb; Sl and Sl/sup d/; sla; sph; and W, W/sup v/, W/sup J/ and 10 other putative W-alleles) are currently under investigation at the Jackson Laboratory. 15 refs.

  3. Anemia Boosts Stroke Death Risk, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160476.html Anemia Boosts Stroke Death Risk, Study Finds Blood condition ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older stroke victims suffering from anemia -- a lack of red blood cells -- may have ...

  4. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  5. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning . Symptoms Mild anemia may have no symptoms. As ... Saunders; 2011:chap 449. Read More Anemia Hemoglobin Lead poisoning Update Date 2/25/2014 Updated by: Sameer ...

  6. Anemia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Anemia URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/anemia.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  7. Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic - caused by chemicals or toxins ... Possible substances that can cause hemolytic anemia include: Anti-malaria drugs (quinine compounds) Arsenic Dapsone Intravenous water infusion (not half-normal saline or normal saline) Metals (chromium/chromates, ...

  8. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency. PMID:25636824

  9. (Inborn anemias of mice): Terminal progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations located at 11 different chromosomal locations in the mouse all affecting hemopoiesis have been studied. These include: Hertwig's anemia (an), W-anemias (W, W/sup v/, W/sup 17J/ to W/sup 41J/), Steel anemias (Sl, Sl/sup d/, etc.), Normoblastic anemia (nb), Jaundiced (ja), Spherocytic anemias (sph, sph/sup ha/), sph/sup 2J/, sph/sup 2BC/, Flexed-tail anemia (f), Microcytic anemia (mk), Sex-linked anemia (Sla), Alpha thallasemia (Hba/sup th/), and a hypochromic anemia associated with low transferrin levels (hpx). Our findings indicate that the erythroid defect in W-anemias stem from an intrinsic defect in the erythroid progenitor cells, and that all other erythroid hemostatic mechanisms are fully functional. Hertwig's anemia (an) is affected in a similar fashion. However, in the case of Steel anemias, the erythroid progenitors are repressed, but when transplanted to appropriate recipients were found to be fully functional. 70 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Manchandani, Raj Pal; Oneal, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare. PMID:27559485

  11. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Manchandani, Raj Pal; Oneal, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare. PMID:27559485

  12. [Approach to the diagnosis and treatment of chronic anemia secondary to gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Rodríguez-Alonso, Lorena; Guardiola Capón, Jordi

    2014-12-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia and can cause asthenia, cognitive and functional impairment, and decompensation of underlying diseases. Iron deficiency anemia is not a disease but is the result of a potentially serious medical problem. Consequently, patients should always undergo investigation of the underlying cause. In men and postmenopausal women, the condition is caused by gastrointestinal loss and malabsorption of iron. In this group, recommended procedures are gastroscopy, colonoscopy and serological testing for celiac disease. If the results of these tests are negative, repeat examinations and iron therapy should be considered. In treatment-refractory or recurrent anemia, the small intestine should be investigated. In this case, the procedure of choice is capsule endoscopy. Iron deficiency anemia should always be treated until iron deposits have returned to normal levels. A wide variety of preparations are available, in both oral and parental formulations. PMID:25443541

  13. Anemia in Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulcer: Prevalence, Clinical Characteristics, and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Chuan, Fengning; Zhang, Min; Yao, Yang; Tian, Wenqing; He, Xiaoqun; Zhou, Bo

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients with anemia and assess the relationship between anemia and DFU outcome. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients with DFU who attended our hospital from May 2007 to September 2014. All of the variables in the DFU patients with and without anemia were compared. In this study, 353 subjects were included, anemia was present in 236 patients (66.9%). These patients were significantly male, more likely to be a smoker, had a lower level of serum albumin and worse kidney function, more likely to use at least 2 types of antibiotics and had a worse perfusion of the lower limb, a larger and deeper ulcer and a more severe infection. A multivariate analysis showed that male sex, lower serum albumin, and worse kidney function were independent predictors of anemia in DFU patients. Additionally, in multivariate models, anemia was one of the variables that was most significantly associated with adverse outcomes and with similar findings for secondary outcomes. Receiver operating characteristic analysis determined a hemoglobin cutoff of 12.3 g/dL (females) and 12.1 g/dL (males) to identify a high-risk population of DFU patients who would have adverse outcomes. So anemia is common in patients with DFU. Although typically mild or moderate, anemia has been associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in patients with DFU. PMID:27440798

  14. Incidence of anemia in patients diagnosed with solid tumors receiving chemotherapy, 2010–2013

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hairong; Xu, Lanfang; Page, John H; Cannavale, Kim; Sattayapiwat, Olivia; Rodriguez, Roberto; Chao, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate and characterize the risk of anemia during the course of chemotherapy among patients with five common types of solid tumors. Patients and methods Patients diagnosed with incident cancers of breast, lung, colon/rectum, stomach, and ovary who received chemotherapy were identified from Kaiser Permanente Southern California Health Plan (2010–2012). All clinical data were collected from the health plan’s electronic medical records. Incidence proportions of patients developing anemia and 95% confidence intervals were calculated overall and by anemia severity and type, as well as by stage at cancer diagnosis, and by chemotherapy regimen and cycle. Results A total of 4,426 patients who received chemotherapy were included. Across cancers, 3,962 (89.5%) patients developed anemia during the course of chemotherapy (normocytic 85%, macrocytic 10%, microcytic 5%; normochromic 47%, hyperchromic 44%, hypochromic 9%). The anemia grades were distributed as follows: 58% were grade 1, 34% grade 2, 8% grade 3, and <1% grade 4. The incidence of grade 2+ anemia ranged from 26.3% in colorectal cancer patients to 59.2% in ovarian cancer patients. Incidence of grade 2+ anemia increased from 29% in stage I to 49% in stage IV. Incidence of grade 2+ anemia varied from 18.2% in breast cancer patients treated with cyclophosphamide + docetaxel regimen to 59.7% in patients with ovarian cancer receiving carboplatin + paclitaxel regimen. Conclusion The incidence of moderate-to-severe anemia (hemoglobin <10 g/dL) remained considerably high in patients with solid tumors receiving chemotherapy. The risk of anemia was greater in patients with distant metastasis. PMID:27186078

  15. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  16. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  17. Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Phone: 202–776–0544 Fax: 202–776–0545 Internet: www.hematology.org Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation ... Fax: 301–279–7205 Email: help@aamds.org Internet: www.aamds.org Iron Disorders Institute P.O. ...

  18. An anemia of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Faux, N G; Rembach, A; Wiley, J; Ellis, K A; Ames, D; Fowler, C J; Martins, R N; Pertile, K K; Rumble, R L; Trounson, B; Masters, C L; Bush, A I

    2014-11-01

    Lower hemoglobin is associated with cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since brain iron homeostasis is perturbed in AD, we investigated whether this is peripherally reflected in the hematological and related blood chemistry values from the Australian Imaging Biomarker and Lifestyle (AIBL) study (a community-based, cross-sectional cohort comprising 768 healthy controls (HC), 133 participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 211 participants with AD). We found that individuals with AD had significantly lower hemoglobin, mean cell hemoglobin concentrations, packed cell volume and higher erythrocyte sedimentation rates (adjusted for age, gender, APOE-ɛ4 and site). In AD, plasma iron, transferrin, transferrin saturation and red cell folate levels exhibited a significant distortion of their customary relationship to hemoglobin levels. There was a strong association between anemia and AD (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=2.43, confidence interval (CI) (1.31, 4.54)). Moreover, AD emerged as a strong risk factor for anemia on step-down regression, even when controlling for all other available explanations for anemia (adjusted OR=3.41, 95% CI (1.68, 6.92)). These data indicated that AD is complicated by anemia, which may itself contribute to cognitive decline. PMID:24419041

  19. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations ushering pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Mrabet, S; Ellouze, F; Ellini, S; Mrad, M F

    2015-12-01

    Biermer disease or pernicious anemia is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis characterized by the lack of secretion of gastric intrinsic factor. This leads to an insufficient absorption of vitamin B12 in the ileum. Clinical manifestations are mainly hematologic. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are known but are less frequent especially early in the disease. Inaugural neuropsychiatric arrays are rare and various thus making diagnosis difficult. In this article, we report through two clinical cases different neuropsychiatric manifestations revealing pernicious anemia. Mrs. C.O., aged 56, presented after surgery for gallstones, an acute psychiatric array associated with gait disorders. She had no history of neurological or psychiatric problems. The psychiatric interview revealed delirious syndrome, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Neurological examination noted a flaccid paraplegia with peripheral neuropathic syndrome and myoclonus in the upper limbs. At the full blood count, a macrocytosis (VGM: 112.2fl) without anemia was found. The level of vitamin B12 in the blood was low. Cerebro-spinal MRI was suggestive of a neuro-Biermer and showed hyper signal in the cervical cord on T2-weighted sagittal section. In axial section, hyper signal appears at the posterior columns in the form of V. There were no brain abnormalities. A sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy was diagnosed. The patient received vitamin B12 intramuscularly for ten days associated with neuroleptic treatment. Mrs. R.M., aged 40, was brought to the psychiatry consultation for acute behavioral disorders progressively worsening over a month. An anxiety syndrome, depressive syndrome and delirious syndrome were identified. Neurological examination showed a posterior cordonal syndrome with quadripyramidal syndrome. Full blood count showed a macrocytic anemia. Serum B12 level was collapsed. Cerebro-spinal MRI was normal. She received vitamin B12 with clinical and biological improvement. Features of pernicious anemia

  20. [Anemia as a surgical risk factor].

    PubMed

    Moral García, Victoria; Ángeles Gil de Bernabé Sala, M; Nadia Diana, Kinast; Pericas, Bartolomé Cantallops; Nebot, Alexia Galindo

    2013-07-01

    Perioperative anemia is common in patients undergoing surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and a decreased quality of life. The main causes of anemia in the perioperative context are iron deficiency and chronic inflammation. Anemia can be aggravated by blood loss during surgery, and is most commonly treated with allogeneic transfusion. Moreover, blood transfusions are not without risks, once again increasing patient morbidity and mortality. Given these concerns, we propose to review the pathophysiology of anemia in the surgical environment, as well as its treatment through the consumption of iron-rich foods and by oral or intravenous iron therapy (iron sucrose and iron carboxymaltose). In chronic inflammatory anemia, we use erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (erythropoietin alpha) and, in cases of mixed anemia, the combination of both treatments. The objective is always to reduce the need for perioperative transfusions and speed the recovery from postoperative anemia, as well as decrease the patient morbidity and mortality rate. PMID:24314568

  1. Ret-Y a measure of reticulocyte size: a sensitive indicator of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Kickler, T S; Borowitz, M J; Thompson, R E; Charintranont, N; Law, R

    2004-12-01

    In this study the size of reticulocytes was measured, reticulocyte-Y (Ret-Y), to distinguish iron deficiency anemia from the anemia of chronic disease using a Sysmex XE2100 cell counter. We evaluated this parameter prospectively in 100 patients seen for the evaluation of anemia. A clinical diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia or anemia of chronic disease was made on the basis of a complete blood count, examination of the peripheral smear, and serum ferritin along with a history and physical examination. We analyzed the sensitivity and specificity of the Ret-Y in relationship to the clinical diagnosis. We also measured serum transferrin receptor levels to use as the gold standard laboratory test for iron deficiency against which we compared the Ret-Y. In 40 normal individuals with normal serum ferritin and transferrin receptor levels the mean Ret-Y was 1874 +/- 178 (1 SD). The mean Ret-Y in the anemia of chronic disease group (n=62) was 1722 +/- 162, not significantly different from normal. The mean Ret-Y value among iron-deficient patients (n=38), was 1407 +/- 136 (P <0.01 vs. the anemia of chronic disease group's Ret-Y value). Receiver operator curves showed that Ret-Y correlated closely to the serum transferrin receptor and was superior to the mean corpuscular volume, and ferritin level, in differentiating the type of anemia. The Ret-Y parameter has the highest overall sensitivity and specificity of the panel of tests routinely used in differentiating iron deficiency anemia from anemia of chronic disease. PMID:15596002

  2. Prevalence of Iron deficiency anemia in children with liver cirrhosis: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zareifar, Soheila; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Rahanjam, Najmeh; Farahmand Far, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among the many complications reported for cirrhosis, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has attracted much attention. This type of anemia, in contrast to other types of anemia, is easy to treat prophylactically, but if left untreated can lead to a poor quality of life. The aim of this study was to estimate the hemoglobin and serum iron levels among patients with liver cirrhosis for the early diagnosis of IDA and to avoid unnecessary testing and iron supplementation. Subjects and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 88 children diagnosed with cirrhosis were included, and the values of hemoglobin, serum iron levels and relationship between serum iron (SI), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), prothrombine time (PT), international normalization ratio (INR), total and direct bilirubin and hepatic enzymes were estimated using paired t test, Mann-Whitney, Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: Forty-six (52.3%) of 88 children were girls and 42 (47.7%) were boys. Forty-eight (54.5%) patients had anemia and 8 (9%) had iron deficiency anemia (5 boys, 5.6%, and 3 girls, 3.4%). No relationships were observed between iron deficiency anemia and the patient’s age or gender, whereas there was a relationship between iron deficiency and severity and duration of the disease, although the correlation was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The high frequency of iron deficiency anemia in children with cirrhosis (9%) suggests that timely screening should be used for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26261697

  3. Epidemiology of Anemia in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kushang V.

    2008-01-01

    Anemia is a common, multifactorial condition among older adults. The World Health Organization (WHO) definition of anemia (hemoglobin concentration <12 g/dL in women and <13 g/dL in men) is most often used in epidemiologic studies of older adults. More than 10% of community-dwelling adults age 65 years and older has WHO-defined anemia. After age 50 years, prevalence of anemia increases with advancing age and exceeds 20% in those 85 years and older. In nursing homes, anemia is present in 48–63% of residents. Incidence of anemia in older adults is not well characterized. Among older adults with anemia, approximately one-third have evidence of iron, folate, and/or vitamin B12 deficiency, another third have renal insufficiency and/or chronic inflammation, and the remaining third have anemia that is unexplained. Several studies demonstrate that anemia is associated with poorer survival in older adults. This review details the distribution and consequences of anemia in older adults and identifies future epidemiologic research needs. PMID:18809090

  4. [Anemia in chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Grau-Amorós, J; Formiga, F; Urrutia, A

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most common comorbidities in patients with decompensated chronic heart failure admitted to the Internal Medicine Ward. However, although there is evidence supporting its treatment to improve the functional capacity of the patients and to reduce the new admissions rate, the clinical practice guidelines do not provide any directives regarding its approach. This is an ideal clinical problem for the internist due to its multifactorial origin and the comprehensive point of view needed to approach the group of syndromes that occur in these patients (anemia, heart failure, geriatric syndromes, diabetes, etc.) The choice of treatment strategy, if such treatment is decided, should always begin after correcting the congestive signs in the outpatient with optimal treatment of heart failure. PMID:21620391

  5. Pagophagia in iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tatsumi; Kawati, Yasunori

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between pagophagia (ice pica) and iron deficiency anemia was studied. All 81 patients with iron deficiency anemia defined as hemoglobin <12.0 g/dl and ferritin level <12 ng/ml were interviewed about their habits of eating ice or other non-food substances. Pagophagia was defined as compulsive and repeated ingestion of at least one tray of ice or ice eating which was relieved after iron administration. Pagophagia was present in 13 patients (16.0%). All patients who received oral iron were periodically assessed employing a questionnaire on pagophagia and laboratory data. Iron therapy can cure the pagophagia earlier than hemoglobin recovery and repair of tissue iron deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of pagophagia is unclear, a biochemical approach involving the central nervous system might elucidate the mechanism underlying these abnormal behaviors. PMID:24850454

  6. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1982-1983)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1983-09-09

    The nature of the defects that shorten the effective lifespan of red blood cells in the circulation and which gave rise to anemia, jaundice and to spleen, liver and heart enlargement are studied because they so closely parallel inherited hemolytic anemias in man. In mice, ''hemolytic disease'' initiated by the ja, sph, sph/sup ha/, or the nb genes has been traced to abnormalities in the protein components of their red cell membranes. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of detergent solubilized membranes reveal that in the different genetic types one or more of the major high molecular weight proteins called spectrins is decreased or totally missing. It is one thing to observe a correlation between missing or defective components in selected analytical procedures, and another to establish a causal relationship between the two. To investigate the possible interrelationships, we examined the associations between spectrin or ankyrin content, the severity of the resulting anemia, red cell osmotic fragilities, and the capacity of cells from each genotype to be deformed in a continuous osmotic gradient at constant sheer stress. Our findings indicate that sensitivity to osmotic stress, cell rigidity (inadequate deformability), deficiency of spectrin or ankyrin, and the severity of the anemia, are statistically highly correlated. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. George Minot and Pernicious Anemia.

    PubMed

    Dhungat, J V Pai

    2015-08-01

    George Minot (1885-1950) was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He was great grandson of James Jackson, co-founder of Massachusetts General Hospital in 1821. Graduating from Harvard College he enrolled at Harvard Medical School and obtained his MD in 1912. As a house pupil (intern) at the hospital he became interested in diseases of the blood and began taking meticulous histories of dietary habits of patients with anemia. PMID:27604448

  8. Colonic lymphangiomatosis associated with anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Woo Chul; Kim, Hye-Kang; Yoo, Jin Young; Lee, Jeong Rok; Lee, Kang-Moon; Paik, Chang Nyol; Jang, U-Im; Yang, Jin Mo

    2008-01-01

    Lymphangioma is an uncommon malformation of lymphatic system. Multiple colonic lymphangioma named as lymphangiomatosis is considered an extremely rare disease. Although lymphangioma is a benign tumor and most colonic lymphangiomas do not cause symptoms and do not require treatment, resection of lymphangioma is necessary in the presence of symptoms such as abdominal pain, bleeding, intussusceptions. We report a case of colonic lymphangiomatosis in a man who presented with abdominal discomfort and anemia, which was diagnosed and treated with endoscopic snare polypectomy. PMID:18837097

  9. Musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic anemias.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Forni, Gian Luca; Balocco, Manuela; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the current use of diagnostic imaging modalities in the evaluation of a heterogeneous group of disorders causing chronic anemias by impaired blood cell production (inherited bone marrow failure syndromes of childhood, aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, β-thalassemia) or increased blood cell destruction (sickle cell disease). During the course of these disorders, various musculoskeletal abnormalities can be encountered, including marrow hyperplasia, reversion of yellow marrow to red marrow, growth disturbances, and, occasionally, extramedullary hematopoiesis. Diagnostic imaging may help the clinician to identify specific complications related to either the disease (e.g., bone infarction and acute osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease) or transfusion (e.g., iron overload due to increased hemolysis) and iron chelation (e.g., desferrioxamine-related dysplastic bone changes and deferiprone-related degenerative arthritis) treatments. In this field, magnetic resonance imaging plays a pivotal role because of its high tissue contrast that enables early assessment of bone marrow changes before they become apparent on plain films or computed tomography or metabolic changes occur on bone scintigraphy or positron emission tomography scan. Overall, familiarity with the range of radiological appearances in chronic anemias is important to diagnose complications and establish appropriate therapy. PMID:21644200

  10. Pathophysiology of anemia and erythrocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Vivien M; Rainey, Susan; Lappin, Terence R; Maxwell, A Peter

    2007-11-01

    An increasing understanding of the process of erythropoiesis raises some interesting questions about the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of anemia and erythrocytosis. The mechanisms underlying the development of many of the erythrocytoses, previously characterised as idiopathic, have been elucidated leading to an increased understanding of oxygen homeostasis. Characterisation of anemia and erythrocytosis in relation to serum erythropoietin levels can be a useful addition to clinical diagnostic criteria and provide a rationale for treatment with erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs). Recombinant human erythropoietin as well as other ESAs are now widely used to treat anemias associated with a range of conditions, including chronic kidney disease, chronic inflammatory disorders and cancer. There is also heightened awareness of the potential abuse of ESAs to boost athletic performance in competitive sport. The discovery of erythropoietin receptors outside of the erythropoietic compartment may herald future applications for ESAs in the management of neurological and cardiac diseases. The current controversy concerning optimal hemoglobin levels in chronic kidney disease patients treated with ESAs and the potential negative clinical outcomes of ESA treatment in cancer reinforces the need for cautious evaluation of the pleiotropic effects of ESAs in non-erythroid tissues. PMID:17656101

  11. Anemia Among Hospitalized Children at a Multispecialty Hospital, Bangalore (Karnataka), India

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Firdos; Poornima, Siddaraju; Balaji, Pishey Ashwathnarayan Rao; Varne, Smitha Ranoji Rao; Jayashree, Krishnamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to the limited availability of data related to anemia in hospitalized children, this research was conducted to study the occurrence, morphological patterns, distribution in different age groups, sex, and severity of anemia among children aged 6 months-12 years. Setting: Inpatients in department of pediatrics at a multispecialty hospital, Bangalore. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study from Oct, 2011 to Sep, 2012. Materials and Methods: Ethical clearance was obtained from the ethical committee of the hospital as per 1964 Declaration of Helsinki. Unrestricted random sampling method was used to select the study group consisting of 882 children between the age of 6 months and 12 years. After obtaining the consent, data were obtained and statistically analyzed using statistical tools like mean, median, standard deviation, and Chi-square test. Results: Out of 882 children selected, 642 (72.79%) were anemic, out of which a majority of 629 (98%) children suffered from nonhemoglobinopathies and a meagre 13 (2%) suffered from hemoglobinopathies. Children in the age group of 6 months-1 year were most affected with nonhemoglobinopathies (33%). Moderate degree of anemia (hemoglobin = 7-9.9 g/dL) was the commonest grade of anemia (80%), while microcytic hypochromic anemia was commonest morphological type of anemia (48%). Among hemoglobinopathies, thalassemia major was the most common (69%, that is 9 out of 13 patients). Conclusion: The occurrence of anemia among children aged between 6 months and 12 years is high and nonhemoglobinopathies predominate over the hemoglobinopathies. PMID:24791237

  12. Hepcidin-Dependent Regulation of Erythropoiesis during Anemia in a Teleost Fish, Dicentrarchus labrax

    PubMed Central

    Caldas, Carolina; Ramos, Miguel F.; Rodrigues, Pedro N. S.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is a common disorder, characterized by abnormally low levels of red blood cells or hemoglobin. The mechanisms of anemia development and response have been thoroughly studied in mammals, but little is known in other vertebrates, particularly teleost fish. In this study, different degrees of anemia were induced in healthy European sea bass specimens (Dicentrarchus labrax) and at pre-determined time points hematological parameters, liver iron content and the expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis and hematopoiesis, with particular attention on hepcidins, were evaluated. The experimental anemia prompted a decrease in hamp1 expression in all tested organs, in accordance to an increased need for iron absorption and mobilization, with slight increases in hamp2 in the kidney and intestine. The liver was clearly the major organ involved in iron homeostasis, decreasing its iron content and showing a gene expression profile consistent with an increased iron release and mobilization. Although both the spleen and head kidney are involved in erythropoiesis, the spleen was found to assume a more preponderant role in the recovery of erythrocyte levels. The intestine was also involved in the response to anemia, through the increase of iron transporting genes. Administration of Hamp1 or Hamp2 mature peptides showed that only Hamp1 affects hematological parameters and liver iron content. In conclusion, the molecular mechanisms of response to anemia present in sea bass are similar to the ones described for mammals, with these results indicating that the two hepcidin types from teleosts assume different roles during anemia. PMID:27100629

  13. Diamond-Blackfan anemia and nutritional deficiency-induced anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Gelbart, David

    2014-04-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare, inherited disease that characteristically presents as a chronic, normochromic macrocytosis due to red cell lineage bone marrow failure. Although studies are elaborating on the genetic basis for its associated comorbidities, little has been published comparing this anemia to other chronic anemias that have similar laboratory results in children. This article offers a global perspective of the disease and compares it with anemia due to vitamin B12 and folate deficiency in children. PMID:24662257

  14. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gil, Victor M; Ferreira, Jorge S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common problem and a major cause of mortality, morbidity and impaired quality of life. Anemia is a frequent comorbidity in heart failure and further worsens prognosis and disability. Regardless of anemia status, iron deficiency is a common and usually unidentified problem in patients with heart failure. This article reviews the mechanisms, impact on outcomes and treatment of anemia and iron deficiency in patients with heart failure. PMID:24216080

  15. Severe Aplastic Anemia Associated With Eosinophilic Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    de Masson, Adèle; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Benhamou, Ygal; Moluçon-Chabrot, Cécile; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Laquerrière, Annie; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Michonneau, David; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Rybojad, Michel; Bonnotte, Bernard; Jardin, Fabrice; Lévesque, Hervé; Bagot, Martine; Socié, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Diffuse eosinophilic fasciitis (Shulman disease) is a rare sclerodermiform syndrome that, in most cases, resolves spontaneously or after corticosteroid therapy. It has been associated with hematologic disorders, such as aplastic anemia. The clinical features and long-term outcomes of patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia have been poorly described. We report the cases of 4 patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated severe aplastic anemia. For 3 of these patients, aplastic anemia was refractory to conventional immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine. One of the patients received rituximab as a second-line therapy with significant efficacy for both the skin and hematologic symptoms. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe rituximab used to treat eosinophilic fasciitis with associated aplastic anemia. In a literature review, we identified 19 additional cases of eosinophilic fasciitis and aplastic anemia. Compared to patients with isolated eosinophilic fasciitis, patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia were more likely to be men (70%) and older (mean age, 56 yr; range, 18–71 yr). Corticosteroid-containing regimens improved skin symptoms in 5 (42%) of 12 cases but were ineffective in the treatment of associated aplastic anemia in all but 1 case. Aplastic anemia was profound in 13 cases (57%) and was the cause of death in 8 cases (35%). Only 5 patients (22%) achieved long-term remission (allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: n = 2; cyclosporine-containing regimen: n = 2; high-dose corticosteroid-based regimen: n = 1). PMID:23429351

  16. Anemia in the frail, elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Röhrig, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Anemia and frailty are two common findings in geriatric patients and have been shown to be associated with poor outcomes in this patient group. Recent studies have contributed to the growing evidence of a possible association with the age-related chronic inflammatory status known as “inflammaging”. These findings do not only give a better insight into the pathogenesis of anemia in frailty, but also offer new treatment options. The present article focuses on this assumed association between anemia, frailty, and inflammaging and summarizes current management options for anemia in frail patients. PMID:27051279

  17. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by ...

  18. Do You Know about Sickle Cell Anemia? (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lunch Recipes Do You Know About Sickle Cell Anemia? KidsHealth > For Kids > Do You Know About Sickle ... stay in the hospital. What Causes Sickle Cell Anemia? Sickle cell anemia is an inherited (say: in- ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions X-linked sideroblastic anemia X-linked sideroblastic anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia is an inherited disorder that prevents developing red ...

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding.

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eivindson, Martin; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius; Jensen, Nanna Martin; Jørgensen, Søren Peter; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Rasmussen, Morten; Nathan, Torben

    2015-04-01

    A general overview is given of the causes of anemia with iron deficiency as well as the pathogenesis of anemia and the para-clinical diagnosis of anemia. Anemia with iron deficiency but without overt GI bleeding is associated with a risk of malignant disease of the gastrointestinal tract; upper gastrointestinal cancer is 1/7 as common as colon cancer. Benign gastrointestinal causes of anemia are iron malabsorption (atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, chronic inflammation, and bariatric surgery) and chronic blood loss due to gastrointestinal ulcerations. The following diagnostic strategy is recommended for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency: conduct serological celiac disease screening with transglutaminase antibody (IgA type) and IgA testing and perform bidirectional endoscopy (gastroscopy and colonoscopy). Bidirectional endoscopy is not required in premenopausal women < 40 years of age. Small intestine investigation (capsule endoscopy, CT, or MRI enterography) is not recommended routinely after negative bidirectional endoscopy but should be conducted if there are red flags indicating malignant or inflammatory small bowel disease (e.g., involuntary weight loss, abdominal pain or increased CRP). Targeted treatment of any cause of anemia with iron deficiency found on diagnostic assessment should be initiated. In addition, iron supplementation should be administered, with the goal of normalizing hemoglobin levels and replenishing iron stores. Oral treatment with a 100-200 mg daily dose of elemental iron is recommended (lower dose if side effects), but 3-6 months of oral iron therapy is often required to achieve therapeutic goals. Intravenous iron therapy is used if oral treatment lacks efficacy or causes side effects or in the presence of intestinal malabsorption or prolonged inflammation. Three algorithms are given for the following conditions: a) the paraclinical diagnosis of anemia with iron deficiency; b) the diagnostic work-up for unexplained anemia with

  1. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Hodgkin's Disease: An Unusual Pediatric Association

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maria Miguel; Oliva, Tereza; Pinto, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. AIHA associated with Hodgkin's disease (HD) is uncommon especially in the pediatric population. The diagnosis of AIHA is usually associated with HD at the time of initial presentation or during the course of disease, but it could precede it by years to months. In adults the association of AIHA and HD is more frequent in advanced stages and in the nodular sclerosis and mixed cellularity type HD. Warm immune hemolytic anemia is mainly controlled with steroids and chemotherapy. We report a case of a pediatric patient with direct antiglobulin positive test at the diagnosis of a late relapse of stage III B mixed cellularity type HD. PMID:26904342

  2. Aplastica Anemia And Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cudillo, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a severe and rare disease, characterized by hematopoietic bone marrow failure and peripheral cytopenia. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, activated T1 lymphocytes have been identified as effector cells. The disease can be successfully treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAA) is a syndrome of bone marrow failure following the development of acute seronegative hepatitis. HAA syndrome most often affects young males who presented severe pancytopenia two to three months after an episode of acute hepatitis. The clinical course of hepatitis is more frequently benign but a fulminant severe course is also described. The bone marrow failure can be explosive and severe and it is usually fatal if untreated, no correlations have been observed between severity of hepatitis and AA. In none of the studies a specific virus could be identified and most cases are seronegative for known hepatitis viruses. The clinical characteristics and response to immunotherapy indicate a central role for immune-mediated mechanism in the pathogenesis of HAA. The initial target organ of the immune response is the liver as suggested by the time interval between hepatitis and the onset of bone marrow failure. Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic and blood lymphocytes with T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia. PMID:21415960

  3. [Abdominal pain, constipation and anemia].

    PubMed

    Barresi, Fabio; Kunz Caflish, Isabel; Bayly-Schinzel, Leena; Dressel, Holger

    2016-03-30

    We present the case of a 42-year old man who went to the emergency department because of spasmodic abdominal pain. The abdomen was soft. A gastroscopy and a colonoscopy were without pathological findings. The laboratory analyses indicated anemia. The differential blood count showed basophilic granules in the red blood cells. The blood lead level was elevated. A lead poisoning was diagnosed. The cause was the oral intake of an ayurvedic medication which the patient had received in Bangladesh to treat his vitiligo. PMID:27005735

  4. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  5. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  6. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  7. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  8. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  9. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  10. Anemia in children with down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Ariel; Malkiel, Sarah; Wexler, Isaiah D; Levy-Khademi, Floris; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Stepensky, Polina

    2011-01-01

    Background. Iron deficiency anemia impacts on cognitive development. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in children with Down syndrome and identify risk factors for anemia. Methods. We conducted a prolective cross-sectional study of children attending a multidisciplinary Down syndrome medical center. One hundred and forty nine children with Down syndrome aged 0-20 years were enrolled in the study. Information obtained included a medical history, physical and developmental examination, nutritional assessment, and the results of blood tests. Results. Of the patients studied, 8.1% were found to have anemia. Among the 38 children who had iron studies, 50.0% had iron deficiency. In a multivariate analysis, Arab ethnicity and low weight for age were significantly associated with anemia. Gender, height, the presence of an eating disorder, and congenital heart disease were not risk factors for anemia. Conclusions. Children with Down syndrome are at risk for anemia and iron deficiency similar to the general population. Children with Down syndrome should be monitored for anemia and iron deficiency so that prompt intervention can be initiated. PMID:21941570

  11. Duodenal Amyloidosis Masquerading as Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The present study is a unique illustration of duodenal amyloidosis initially manifesting with iron deficiency anemia. It underscores the importance of clinical suspicion of amyloidosis while performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a biopsy to establish the definite diagnosis in patients with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27625911

  12. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  13. Transplant Center Search Form

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congenital dyskeratosis Other: Desmoid small round cell Other: Diamond Blackfan Anemia Other: DiGeorge anomaly Other: Dyserythropoietic anemia ... Retinoblastoma Other: Rhabdomyosarcoma Other: Sanfillipo Syndrome Other: Schwachman-Diamond ... SCIDS Other: Scleroderma Other: Scleromyxedema Other: ...

  14. Homozygosity mapping of Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, M.; Botstein, D.; Kruglyak, L.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare, recessive, genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by progressive insufficiency of the bone marrow and increased cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. Complementation tests among different FA cells have indicated the presence of at least 4 FA-causing genes. One of the genes, FACC, was identified by functional complementation but appears unlikely to account for many phenotypically indistinguishable FA caes. We have begun a linkage study of FA using {open_quotes}homozygosity mapping{close_quotes}, a method that involves genotyping with DNA markers on affected individuals whose parents are related. Because FA is a rare recessive disease, it is most likely that probands are homozygous by descent at the disease locus and, therefore, at nearby DNA markers. Although the probability that any given marker will be homozygous in an inbred individual is high, given markers with moderate heterozygosities, the chance that two unrelated inbred individuals will be homozygous at the same marker is considerably lower. By locating overlapping regions of homozygosity between different families we hope to identify genes that cause FA. Sixteen consanguineous non-FACC FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry at Rockefeller University are under study. An efficient algorithm for data analysis was developed and incorporated into software that can quickly compute exact multipoint lod scores using all markers on an entire chromosome. At the time of this writing, 171 of 229 microsatellite markers spaced at 20 cM intervals across the genome have been analyzed.

  15. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70–85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6–12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80–90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

  16. Effects of ionizing radiation on cells from Fanconi's anemia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth-Rysiecki, G.; Taylor, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The lymphocytes from some Fanconi's anemia patients appeared to be more radiosensitive than normal as measured by the number of X-ray-(or bleomycin-) induced chromosome aberrations seen following G2 treatment. Fibroblasts from the same patients, however, all showed the same degree of colony survival as normals following exposure to gamma-rays (Do, 1.13 +/- 0.072 (S.E.) Gy and 1.14 +/- 0.077 Gy for Fanconi's anemia and normal fibroblasts, respectively). The lack of increased radiosensitivity in Fanconi's fibroblasts was also observed by the same degree of inhibition of DNA synthesis as seen in normals following gamma-irradiation. The results show clearly that there is no increase in radiosensitivity common to all cell types from Fanconi's patients, although an apparent increase in chromosomal radiosensitivity may be seen in the lymphocytes from an occasional patient.

  17. Treating leukemia at the risk of inducing severe anemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendy S; Zhu, Helen He; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Anemia is a frequently observed adverse effect in cancer patients who receive chemotherapy or drugs designed to block specific oncogenic signaling pathways, although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. An article first published online (Zhu HH, Luo X, Zhang K, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2015;112:13342-13347) presented data indicating that cell type-specific pathway cross-talk is likely an important mechanism to consider. Shp2 and Pten, two master regulators of central cytoplasmic signaling pathways, oppose each other in myeloproliferation and leukemogenesis, but cooperate in promoting erythropoiesis. Thus, genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of Shp2 suppresses the leukemogenic effect of Pten loss, yet simultaneously induces severe anemia in mice with Pten deficiency in blood cells. PMID:26826310

  18. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips Getting More Help Related Topics Kidney Problems Nutrition ... when you have low numbers of red blood cells. These cells carry oxygen to your body’s organs and tissues. This can happen due to ...

  19. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... vitamin C pills or eating foods high in vitamin C, such as citrus fruits or juice, at the same time you eat ... vitamins contain at least this amount.) Foods with vitamin C—such as strawberries and citrus fruits—help your body absorb iron. Eat these foods ...

  20. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... body needs extra folate. Folate is a B vitamin found in foods such as leafy green vegetables, fruits, and dried beans and peas. Folic acid is ... iron, like orange juice, strawberries, broccoli, or other fruits and vegetables with vitamin C. Don't drink coffee or tea with ...

  1. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and webinars ASH Image Bank Educational Web-based library of hematologic imagery In This Section: Resources for Clinicians Resources for Trainees Resources for Educators Resources for Patients Resources for Industry Professionals View all Guidelines & Quality Care Resources to ...

  2. Erythrocyte Catalase Activity in More Frequent Microcytic Hypochromic Anemia: Beta-Thalassemia Trait and Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lazarte, Sandra Stella; Mónaco, María Eugenia; Jimenez, Cecilia Laura; Ledesma Achem, Miryam Emilse; Terán, Magdalena María; Issé, Blanca Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Most common microcytic hypochromic anemias are iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and β-thalassemia trait (BTT), in which oxidative stress (OxS) has an essential role. Catalase causes detoxification of H2O2 in cells, and it is an indispensable antioxidant enzyme. The study was designed to measure erythrocyte catalase activity (ECAT) in patients with IDA (10) or BTT (21), to relate it with thalassemia mutation type (β0 or β+) and to compare it with normal subjects (67). Ninety-eight individuals were analyzed since September 2013 to June 2014 in Tucumán, Argentina. Total blood count, hemoglobin electrophoresis at alkaline pH, HbA2, catalase, and iron status were performed. β-thalassemic mutations were determined by real-time PCR. Normal range for ECAT was 70,0–130,0 MU/L. ECAT was increased in 14% (3/21) of BTT subjects and decreased in 40% (4/10) of those with IDA. No significant difference (p = 0,245) was shown between normal and BTT groups, while between IDA and normal groups the difference was proved to be significant (p = 0,000). In β0 and β+ groups, no significant difference (p = 0,359) was observed. An altered ECAT was detected in IDA and BTT. These results will help to clarify how the catalase activity works in these anemia types. PMID:26527217

  3. Prevalence and associated risk factors of anemia in children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yen, Chia-Feng; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chien, Wu-Chien; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Chia-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is known to be a significant public health problem in many countries. Most of the available information is incomplete or limited to special groups such as people with intellectual disability. The present study aims to provide the information of anemia prevalence and associated risk factors of children and adolescents with intellectual disability in Taiwan. We analyzed physical examination charts of 937 children and adolescents with intellectual disability at the age of 6-18 years from three special schools. We collected information on their demographic characteristics (age and gender), disability condition (type and level), BMI (weight and height) and measured blood hemoglobin concentration (Hb). There were 11.6% of children and adolescents with intellectual disability with anemia (boy <13 g/dl, girl <12 g/dl), and the factors of gender, age, disability level and BMI are significantly correlated to anemia in bivariant analyses in the study. In the logistic regression analysis, the model revealed that the factors of gender (OR=0.63, 95% CI=0.41-0.95), and age (OR=3.21, 95% CI=1.77-5.82) were variables that could significantly predict the anemia occurrence of the participants. The study highlights the anemia prevalence in children and adolescents with ID is a mild public health problem among people with intellectual disabilities, but to prevent the problems become worst; the health authority should include providing children and adolescents with adequate nutrition and appropriate health protections during early childhood. PMID:19717276

  4. Anemia in the Neonate: The Differential Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Nassin, Michele L; Lapping-Carr, Gabrielle; de Jong, Jill L O

    2015-07-01

    Anemia is a common problem in the neonatal period. Presenting symptoms may suggest numerous possible diagnoses ranging from anemia seen as a normal part of development to anemia due to critical pathology. An illustrative case is presented to highlight the appropriate evaluation of the neonate with significant anemia. Several important features of the evaluation of neonatal anemia are highlighted. The constellation of signs and symptoms that occur in conjunction with the anemia are critical for the evaluation. The evaluation should be performed in a step-wise process that starts by eliminating common causes of anemia. Manual review of the peripheral blood smear with a hematologist can be helpful. PMID:26171704

  5. Association between food insecurity and anemia among women of reproductive age

    PubMed Central

    Ghose, Bishwajit; Tang, Shangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Food insecurity and hidden hunger (micronutrient deficiency) affect about two billion people globally. Household food insecurity (HFI) has been shown to be associated with one or multiple micronutrient (MMN) deficiencies among women and children. Chronic food insecurity leads to various deficiency disorders, among which anemia stands out as the most prevalent one. As a high malnutrition prevalent country, Bangladesh has one of the highest rates of anemia among all Asian countries. In this study, we wanted to investigate for any association exists between HFI and anemia among women of reproductive age in Bangladesh. Methodology: Information about demographics, socioeconomic and anemia status on 5,666 married women ageing between 13 and 40 years were collected from a nationally representative cross-sectional survey Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS 2011). Food security was measured by the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS). Capillary hemoglobin concentration (Hb) measured by HemoCue® was used as the biomarker of anemia. Data were analysed using cross-tabulation, chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression methods. Results: Anemia prevalence was 41.7%. Logistic regression showed statistically significant association with anemia and type of residency (p = 0.459; OR = 0.953, 95%CI = 0.840–1.082), wealth status (Poorest: p < 0.001; OR = 1.369, 95%CI = 1.176–1.594; and average: p = 0.030; 95%CI = 1.017–1.398), educational attainment (p < 0.001; OR = 1.276, 95%CI = 1.132–1.439) and household food insecurity (p < 0.001; 95%CI = 1.348–1.830). Women who reported food insecurity were about 1.6 times more likely to suffer from anemia compared to their food secure counterparts. Conclusion: HFI is a significant predictor of anemia among women of reproductive age in Bangladesh. Programs targeting HFI could prove beneficial for anemia reduction strategies. Gender aspects of food and nutrition insecurity should be taken into

  6. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Packman, Charles H

    2015-09-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  7. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  8. Protrusio acetabuli in sickle-cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.; Apple, J.S.; Baber, C.; Putman, C.E.; Rosse, W.F.

    1984-04-01

    Of 155 adults with sickle-cell anemia (SS, SC), radiographs of the pelvis or hip demonstrated protrusio acetabuli on at least one side in 14 (3 men and 11 women), as indicated by projection of the acetabular line medial to the ilio-ischial line. All 14 patients had bone changes attributable to sickle-cell anemia, including marrow hyperplasia and osteonecrosis; however, the severity of femoral or acetabular osteonecrosis did not appear directly related to the protrusion. The authors conclude that sickle-cell anemia can predispose to development of protrusio acetabuli.

  9. Imaging Manifestations of Neurologic Complications in Anemia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ritesh; Sabat, Shyam; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-08-01

    The hallmark signs and symptoms of anemia are directly related to a decrease in oxygen delivery to vital tissues and organs and include pallor, fatigue, lightheadedness, and shortness of breath. Neurologic complications are often nonspecific and can include poor concentration, irritability, faintness, tinnitus, and headache. If undiagnosed or untreated, anemia can progress to cognitive dysfunction, psychosis, encephalopathy, myelopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and more focal syndromes, such as stroke, seizures, chorea, and transverse myelitis. Imaging can play an important role in the early diagnosis and treatment of these neurologic and systemic complications associated with anemia, and hence, better outcome. PMID:27443995

  10. [A simple algorithm for anemia].

    PubMed

    Egyed, Miklós

    2014-03-01

    The author presents a novel algorithm for anaemia based on the erythrocyte haemoglobin content. The scheme is based on the aberrations of erythropoiesis and not on the pathophysiology of anaemia. The hemoglobin content of one erytrocyte is between 28-35 picogram. Any disturbance in hemoglobin synthesis can lead to a lower than 28 picogram hemoglobin content of the erythrocyte which will lead to hypochromic anaemia. In contrary, disturbances of nucleic acid metabolism will result in a hemoglobin content greater than 36 picogram, and this will result in hyperchromic anaemia. Normochromic anemia, characterised by hemoglobin content of erythrocytes between 28 and 35 picogram, is the result of alteration in the proliferation of erythropoeisis. Based on these three categories of anaemia, a unique system can be constructed, which can be used as a model for basic laboratory investigations and work-up of anaemic patients. PMID:24583558

  11. Current concepts in the pathophysiology and treatment of aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Young, Neal S.; Calado, Rodrigo T.; Scheinberg, Phillip

    2006-01-01

    Aplastic anemia, an unusual hematologic disease, is the paradigm of the human bone marrow failure syndromes. Almost universally fatal just a few decades ago, aplastic anemia can now be cured or ameliorated by stem-cell transplantation or immunosuppressive drug therapy. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, with activated type 1 cytotoxic T cells implicated. The molecular basis of the aberrant immune response and deficiencies in hematopoietic cells is now being defined genetically; examples are telomere repair gene mutations in the target cells and dysregulated T-cell activation pathways. Immunosuppression with antithymocyte globulins and cyclosporine is effective at restoring blood-cell production in the majority of patients, but relapse and especially evolution of clonal hematologic diseases remain problematic. Allogeneic stem-cell transplant from histocompatible sibling donors is curative in the great majority of young patients with severe aplastic anemia; the major challenges are extending the benefits of transplantation to patients who are older or who lack family donors. Recent results with alternative sources of stem cells and a variety of conditioning regimens to achieve their engraftment have been promising, with survival in small pediatric case series rivaling conventional transplantation results. PMID:16778145

  12. Anemia among Muslim Bedouin and Jewish women of childbearing age in Southern Israel.

    PubMed

    Treister-Goltzman, Yulia; Peleg, Roni; Biderman, Aya

    2015-11-01

    There are inequalities in health indicators among different ethnic groups living in the same region and receiving the same medical services. Anemia is a global problem. Although the prevalence of anemia is not high in Israel, differences among ethnic groups have not been studied. Our objective was to assess anemia among Bedouin and Jewish women of childbearing age in southern Israel. A retrospective observational study was conducted based on data from computerized medical records. Seven thousand eight hundred seventy-one women in the study clinics underwent complete blood counts and had blood hemoglobin levels of 11 g/dl or below. The Jewish patients were older (31.7 vs. 29.7 years, P < 0.001), practiced birth control more (24.2 vs. 9.9 %, P < 0.001), and adhered to it more (81.1 vs. 61.9 %, P < 0.001). Bedouin women had more children (3.7 vs. 1.9, P < 0.001), and more Bedouin women were pregnant during the study period (49.3 vs. 35.0 %, P < 0.001). The most prevalent types of anemia were iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease. Two types of anemia were proportionally higher among Jewish women, anemia of chronic disease (18.1 vs. 9.7 %, P < 0.001) and folic acid deficiency (3.3 vs. 2.2 %, P > 0.001). The adherence rates for treatment were very low. Three factors associated with severe anemia (hemoglobin below 8 g/dl) were being Bedouin (odds ratio (OR) = 1.295, P < 0.001), use of birth control (OR = 0.419, P < 0.001), and pregnancy (OR = 0.447, P < 0.001). Being a Bedouin woman is a risk factor for severe anemia, and adherence to treatment for anemia is very low in both groups. These findings should be addressed in a national program to reduce health inequalities. PMID:26211919

  13. [Anemias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Zhusina, Yu G

    2016-01-01

    According to different studies, anemia occurs in 8--33% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The paper describes the most important various causes of anemia in COPD, such as systemic inflammation and endocrine disorders, the use of some medications (theophylline, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), frequent COPD exacerbations, and long-term oxygen therapy. Lower hemoglobin levels in COPD patients are accompanied by increased shortness of breath, reduced exercise tolerance, and lower quality of life. Furthermore, some investigations have shown that anemia is an independent predictor of death in patients with COPD. In spite of the fact that anemia may be successfully in these patients, the evidence suggesting the importance of its impact on the prognosis of COPD is limited. PMID:27191018

  14. [Clinical evaluation of anemia in the aged].

    PubMed

    Pentimone, F; Del Corso, L; Frustaci, G; Gnesi, A; Romanelli, A M; Sabbatini, A R

    1992-01-01

    Of 533 patients over 65 years old (153 males and 380 females), admitted to geriatric units for various medical diseases, 111 (20.8%) were anemic. Among males the prevalence of anemia was 30.1%, among females 17.1%. Three principal causes of anemia were revealed. The most frequent (42.3%) was microcytic, hypochromic anemia, with low levels of serum iron concentrations, related to gastrointestinal diseases (with chronic occult blood loss). 38.7% of anemic elderly people was affected by chronic diseases. In 19.0% a folate (16 case) and iron (5 cases) deficiency was revealed. These results suggest that anemia in the elderly is always pathological; hemoglobin values lower than 12 g/dl should be considered abnormal and investigated. PMID:1545920

  15. Alleviating anemia and thrombocytopenia in myelofibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Francisco; Correa, Juan-Gonzalo; Hernandez-Boluda, Juan Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Anemia and thrombocytopenia are frequent clinical manifestations of myelofibrosis as well as important prognostic factors of the disease. Concerning the treatment of anemia, the first step should be the correction of reversible contributing factors, such as possible iron, folate and vitamin B12 deficiency. Then, treatment options include erythropoiesis stimulating agents, androgens, immunomodulating drugs, corticosteroids, and splenectomy. Anemia responses may also be observed in some patients treated with JAK inhibitors. However, most patients eventually fail to such therapies and become transfusion dependent. Some of the aforementioned therapies can also improve thrombocytopenia, but the responses are usually observed in patients with moderate platelet count decrease. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the only curative treatment of myelofibrosis, can be an alternative for selected patients with cytopenias who are refractory to conventional therapies. However, for the majority of patients, the management of anemia and severe thrombocytopenia remains an unmet need. PMID:26891375

  16. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency - children ... able to absorb iron well, even though the child is eating enough iron Slow blood loss over ... bleeding in the digestive tract Iron deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning .

  17. [Anemia and transfusion therapy: an update].

    PubMed

    Madrazo-González, Z; García-Barrasa, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, L; Rafecas-Renau, A; Alonso-Fernández, G

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most prevalent diseases in the general population and is a very frequently found condition in medical and surgical patients in all medical specialties. A good evaluation of its clinical impact and its therapeutic possibilities is essential. Allogenic blood transfusion is a useful procedure in anemia management, although it has important adverse effects. It is the responsibility of the clinician to know and to take into account all the available alternatives for the treatment of anemia. Blood transfusions, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, iron therapy (oral and endovenous) and other therapeutic alternatives must be rationally used, in accordance with the currently available clinical evidence. This review article summarizes some epidemiological characteristics of anemia, its clinical evaluation and the main therapeutic possibilities based on the present knowledge, placing special emphasis on the critically ill patient. PMID:20483506

  18. Anemia: Progress in molecular mechanisms and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to understanding frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that may stand to benefit from the new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease), rare genetic disorders of red blood cell production, and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new treatment approaches include drugs that target recently defined pathways in red blood cell production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin gene expression, as well as gene therapies using improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies. PMID:25742458

  19. Cerebral Microcirculation during Experimental Normovolaemic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bellapart, Judith; Cuthbertson, Kylie; Dunster, Kimble; Diab, Sara; Platts, David G.; Raffel, O. Christopher; Gabrielian, Levon; Barnett, Adrian; Paratz, Jenifer; Boots, Rob; Fraser, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is accepted among critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anemia. Experimental studies suggest that anemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise, when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion among critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure, and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anemia does not result in short-term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain. PMID:26869986

  20. Renal cell carcinoma and autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Lands, R; Foust, J

    1996-04-01

    A previously healthy man who became bedridden because of malaise, fatigue, and weakness was found to have an autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). In the course of his evaluation for the AIHA, he was found, coincidentally, to have a renal cell carcinoma. The AIHA was marginally responsive to therapy with corticosteroids, but it resolved promptly after excision of the cancer. This case represents probably a rarely observed association between a nonhematologic malignancy and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. PMID:8614893

  1. Family structure and child anemia in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Kammi K

    2013-10-01

    Utilizing longitudinal data from the nationally-representative Mexico Family Life Survey, this study assesses the association between family structure and iron-deficient anemia among children ages 3-12 in Mexico. The longitudinal models (n = 4649), which control for baseline anemia status and allow for consideration of family structure transitions, suggest that children living in stable-cohabiting and single-mother families and those who have recently experienced a parental union dissolution have higher odds of anemia than those in stable-married, father-present family structures. Interaction effects indicate that unmarried family contexts have stronger associations with anemia in older children (over age five); and, that the negative effects of parental union dissolution are exacerbated in poorer households. Resident maternal grandparents have a significant beneficial effect on child anemia independent of parental family structure. These results highlight the importance of family structure for child micronutrient deficiencies and suggest that understanding social processes within households may be critical to preventing child anemia in Mexico. PMID:23294876

  2. Mouse Models of Anemia of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Airie; Rivera, Seth; Shprung, Dana; Limbrick, Donald; Gabayan, Victoria; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Anemia of cancer (AC) may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and impair quality of life. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of AC could facilitate better treatment, but animal models to study AC are lacking. We characterized four syngeneic C57BL/6 mouse cancers that cause AC. Mice with two different rapidly-growing metastatic lung cancers developed the characteristic findings of anemia of inflammation (AI), with dramatically different degrees of anemia. Mice with rapidly-growing metastatic melanoma also developed a severe anemia by 14 days, with hematologic and inflammatory parameters similar to AI. Mice with a slow-growing peritoneal ovarian cancer developed an iron-deficiency anemia, likely secondary to chronically impaired nutrition and bleeding into the peritoneal cavity. Of the four models, hepcidin mRNA levels were increased only in the milder lung cancer model. Unlike in our model of systemic inflammation induced by heat-killed Brucella abortus, ablation of hepcidin in the ovarian cancer and the milder lung cancer mouse models did not affect the severity of anemia. Hepcidin-independent mechanisms play an important role in these murine models of AC. PMID:24681760

  3. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  4. Renal anemia: from incurable to curable.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuki; Yanagita, Motoko

    2013-11-01

    Renal anemia has been recognized as a characteristic complication of chronic kidney disease. Although many factors are involved in renal anemia, the predominant cause of renal anemia is a relative deficiency in erythropoietin (EPO) production. To date, exogenous recombinant human (rh)EPO has been widely used as a powerful drug for the treatment of patients with renal anemia. Despite its clinical effectiveness, a potential risk for increased mortality has been suggested in patients who receive rhEPO, in addition to the economic burden of rhEPO administration. The induction of endogenous EPO is another therapeutic approach that might have advantages over rhEPO administration. However, the physiological and pathophysiological regulation of EPO are not fully understood, and this lack of understanding has hindered the development of an endogenous EPO inducer. In this review, we will discuss the current treatment for renal anemia and its drawbacks, provide an overview of EPO regulation in healthy and diseased conditions, and propose future directions for therapeutic trials that more directly target the underlying pathophysiology of renal anemia. PMID:23884144

  5. Mutated Fanconi anemia pathway in non-Fanconi anemia cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yihang; Lee, Yuan-Hao; Panneerselvam, Jayabal; Zhang, Jun; Loo, Lenora W. M.; Fei, Peiwen

    2015-01-01

    An extremely high cancer incidence and the hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents associated with Fanconi Anemia (FA) have marked it to be a unique genetic model system to study human cancer etiology and treatment, which has emerged an intense area of investigation in cancer research. However, there is limited information about the relationship between the mutated FA pathway and the cancer development or/and treatment in patients without FA. Here we analyzed the mutation rates of the seventeen FA genes in 68 DNA sequence datasets. We found that the FA pathway is frequently mutated across a variety of human cancers, with a rate mostly in the range of 15 to 35 % in human lung, brain, bladder, ovarian, breast cancers, or others. Furthermore, we found a statistically significant correlation (p < 0.05) between the mutated FA pathway and the development of human bladder cancer that we only further analyzed. Together, our study demonstrates a previously unknown fact that the mutated FA pathway frequently occurs during the development of non-FA human cancers, holding profound implications directly in advancing our understanding of human tumorigenesis as well as tumor sensitivity/resistance to crosslinking drug-relevant chemotherapy. PMID:26015400

  6. [Prevalence and causal factors of anemia in children in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    El Ati, Jalila; Gaigi, Sadok; Beji, Chiraz; Haddad, Samira; Cherif, Samia; Farhat, Amina; Fattoum, Slaheddine; Ben Abdeladhim, Abdeladhim

    2005-09-01

    Anemia continue to be prevalent among children under five years despite the improvement of socioeconomic and sanitary indicators. The purpose of the present cross-sectorial study is to assess the etiologic factors responsible for anemia. Knowledge of the relative importance of the different causes should form a basis for intervention strategies to prevent and control anemia. The survey covered 955 children under the age of five years, native of two regions with the highest prevalent of anemia, the Southwest and the District of Tunis. The results showed that 29% of children suffered from anemia. About 70% of them were iron deficient. The fractions of the deficiency in vitamin B12 and in folates were insignificant. Only 3% of children had chronic inflammation associated with (and possibly responsible for) their anemia A little fraction of anemia (approximately 5%) was due to thalassemia or drepanocytosis. Picawasan important causal factor of iron deficiency anemia. The parasites identified instool could not cause anemia. PMID:16383194

  7. Erythroblast apoptosis and microenvironmental iron restriction trigger anemia in the VK*MYC model of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bordini, Jessica; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa Sabrina; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Fermo, Isabella; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P Leif; Camaschella, Clara; Campanella, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant disorder characterized by bone marrow proliferation of plasma cells and by overproduction of monoclonal immunoglobulin detectable in the sera (M-spike). Anemia is a common complication of multiple myeloma, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. We aimed to identify the different determinants of anemia using the Vk*MYC mouse, which spontaneously develops an indolent bone marrow localized disease with aging. Affected Vk*MYC mice develop a mild normochromic normocytic anemia. We excluded the possibility that anemia results from defective erythropoietin production, inflammation or increased hepcidin expression. Mature erythroid precursors are reduced in Vk*MYC bone marrow compared with wild-type. Malignant plasma cells express the apoptogenic receptor Fas ligand and, accordingly, active caspase 8 is detected in maturing erythroblasts. Systemic iron homeostasis is not compromised in Vk*MYC animals, but high expression of the iron importer CD71 by bone marrow plasma cells and iron accumulation in bone marrow macrophages suggest that iron competition takes place in the local multiple myeloma microenvironment, which might contribute to anemia. In conclusion, the mild anemia of the Vk*MYC model is mainly related to the local effect of the bone marrow malignant clone in the absence of an overt inflammatory status. We suggest that this reproduces the initial events triggering anemia in patients. PMID:25715406

  8. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priya M.; Perrine, Cria G.; Mei, Zuguo; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA among children 1–5 years was 7.1% (5.5, 8.7), 3.2% (2.0, 4.3), and 1.1% (0.6, 1.7), respectively. The prevalence of both ID and anemia were higher among children 1–2 years (p < 0.05). In addition, 50% of anemic children 1–2 years were iron deficient. This analysis provides an update on the prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA for a representative sample of US children. Our results suggest little change in these indicators over the past decade. Monitoring of ID and anemia is critical and prevention of ID in early childhood should remain a public health priority. PMID:27249004

  9. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Priya M; Perrine, Cria G; Mei, Zuguo; Scanlon, Kelley S

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1-5 years using data from the 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA among children 1-5 years was 7.1% (5.5, 8.7), 3.2% (2.0, 4.3), and 1.1% (0.6, 1.7), respectively. The prevalence of both ID and anemia were higher among children 1-2 years (p < 0.05). In addition, 50% of anemic children 1-2 years were iron deficient. This analysis provides an update on the prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA for a representative sample of US children. Our results suggest little change in these indicators over the past decade. Monitoring of ID and anemia is critical and prevention of ID in early childhood should remain a public health priority. PMID:27249004

  10. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John . E-mail: jvarlott@bidmc.harvard.edu; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell

  11. Frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatry patients

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Sevda; Yıldız, Sevler; Korucu, Tuba; Gundogan, Burcu; Sunbul, Zehra Emine; Korkmaz, Hasan; Atmaca, Murad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anemia could cause psychiatric symptoms such as cognitive function disorders and depression or could deteriorate an existing psychiatric condition when it is untreated. The objective of this study is to scrutinize the frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatric patients and the clinical and sociodemographic factors that could affect this frequency. Methods All inpatients in our clinic who satisfied the study criteria and received treatment between April 2014 and April 2015 were included in this cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic data for 378 patients included in the study and hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit values observed during their admission to the hospital were recorded in the forms. Male patients with an Hb level of <13 g/dL and nonpregnant female patients with an Hb level of <12 g/dL were considered as anemic. Findings Axis 1 diagnoses demonstrated that 172 patients had depressive disorder, 51 patients had bipolar disorder, 54 patients had psychotic disorder, 33 patients had conversion disorder, 19 patients had obsessive-compulsive disorder, 25 patients had generalized anxiety disorder, and 24 patients had other psychiatric conditions. It was also determined that 25.4% of the patients suffered from anemia. Thirty-five percent of females and 10% of males were considered as anemic. The frequency of anemia was the highest among psychotic disorder patients (35%), followed by generalized anxiety disorder patients (32%), and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (26%). Anemia was diagnosed in 22% of depressive disorder patients, 25% of bipolar disorder patients, and 24% of conversion disorder patients. Results The prevalence of anemia among chronic psychiatry patients is more frequent than the general population. Thus, the study concluded that it would be beneficial to consider the physical symptoms and to conduct the required examinations to determine anemia among this patient group. PMID:26543367

  12. Diabetes mellitus increases the prevalence of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: A nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Loutradis, Charalampos; Skodra, Alexandra; Georgianos, Panagiotis; Tolika, Panagiota; Alexandrou, Dimitris; Avdelidou, Afroditi; Sarafidis, Pantelis A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare anemia prevalence between matched chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) and to assess factors associated with anemia development. METHODS: This is a nested case-control study of 184 type-2 diabetic and 184 non-diabetic CKD patients from a prospectively assembled database of a Nephrology outpatient clinic, matched for gender, age and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin: Men: < 13 g/dL, women: < 12 g/dL and/or use of recombinant erythropoietin) was examined in comparison, in the total population and by CKD Stage. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with anemia. RESULTS: The total prevalence of anemia was higher in diabetics (47.8% vs 33.2%, P = 0.004). Accordingly, prevalence was higher in diabetics in CKD Stage 3 (53.5% vs 33.1%, P < 0.001) and particularly in Stage 3a (60.4% vs 26.4%, P < 0.001), whereas it was non-significantly higher in Stage 4 (61.3% vs 48.4%; P = 0.307). Serum ferritin was higher in diabetics in total and in CKD stages, while serum iron was similar between groups. In multivariate analyses, DM (OR = 2.206, 95%CI: 1.196-4.069), CKD Stages 3a, 3b, 4 (Stage 4: OR = 12.169, 95%CI: 3.783-39.147) and serum iron (OR = 0.976, 95%CI: 0.968-0.985 per mg/dL increase) were independently associated with anemia. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of anemia progressively increases with advancing stages of CKD and is higher in diabetic than matched non-diabetic CKD patients and diabetes is independently associated with anemia occurrence. Detection and treatment of anemia in diabetic CKD patients should be performed earlier than non-diabetic counterparts. PMID:27458564

  13. BLOOD REGENERATION IN SEVERE ANEMIA : XIV. A LIVER FRACTION POTENT IN PERNICIOUS ANEMIA FED ALONE AND COMBINED WITH WHOLE LIVER, LIVER ASH AND FRESH BILE.

    PubMed

    Robscheit-Robbins, F S; Whipple, G H

    1929-01-31

    A liver extract No. 343, N.N.R. known to be fully potent in pernicious anemia shows but 10 to 20 per cent of the potency of whole liver feeding in severe continuous secondary anemia due to bleeding in dogs. There are wide individual variations which are not noted with whole liver feeding. Supplementing this liver extract with whole bile does not modify the reaction. Supplementing this liver extract with liver ash or apricot ash shows the sum of the two expected feeding reactions. When we supplement this liver extract with small amounts of whole liver (50 to 100 gm.) we may observe hemoglobin and red cell production in excess of the sum of the expected separate reactions. Whether the liver extract increases the potency of the whole liver feeding or vice versa, it suggests similar possibilities in various human secondary anemias. Liver and kidney fractions of varied types deserve much study to ascertain their effect upon widely divergent types of human anemias. PMID:19869543

  14. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  15. Anemia management after acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lelubre, Christophe; Bouzat, Pierre; Crippa, Ilaria Alice; Taccone, Fabio Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is frequent among brain-injured patients, where it has been associated with an increased risk of poor outcome. The pathophysiology of anemia in this patient population remains multifactorial; moreover, whether anemia merely reflects a higher severity of the underlying disease or is a significant determinant of the neurological recovery of such patients remains unclear. Interestingly, the effects of red blood cell transfusions (RBCT) in moderately anemic patients remain controversial; although hemoglobin levels are increased, different studies observed only a modest and inconsistent improvement in cerebral oxygenation after RBCT and raised serious concerns about the risk of increased complications. Thus, considering this "blood transfusion anemia paradox", the optimal hemoglobin level to trigger RBCT in brain-injured patients has not been defined yet; also, there is insufficient evidence to provide strong recommendations regarding which hemoglobin level to target and which associated transfusion strategy (restrictive versus liberal) to select in this patient population. We summarize in this review article the more relevant studies evaluating the effects of anemia and RBCT in patients with an acute neurological condition; also, we propose some potential strategies to optimize transfusion management in such patients. PMID:27311626

  16. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Anemia Among Children Under 5 Years of Age--Uganda, 2009.

    PubMed

    Menon, Manoj P; Yoon, Steven S

    2015-09-01

    Anemia in children under 5 years of age, defined by the World Health Organization as a hemoglobin concentration < 11 g/dL, is a global public health problem. According to the 2006 Demographic Health Survey, the prevalence of anemia among children under five in Uganda was 72% in 2006. The 2009 Uganda Malaria Indicator Survey was conducted in late 2009 and revealed that over 60% of children less than 5 years of age were anemic and that over half of children tested positive for malaria via a rapid diagnostic test. Children with concomitant malaria infection, and in households without any type of mosquito net were more likely to be anemic, confirming that children under 5 years, are vulnerable to both the threat of malaria and anemia and the beneficial effect of malaria prevention tools. However, prevention and treatment of other factors associated with the etiology of anemia (e.g., iron deficiency) are likely necessary to combat the toll of anemia in Uganda. PMID:26055748

  17. Severe anemia due to parvovirus B19 in a silver haired boy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Nishant; Kumar, Archana; Kushwaha, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome (GS) is a rare autosomal recessive immunodeficiency disorder in which the affected children present with characteristic silvery-white hairs. The hair microscopy of these children is characteristic and is helpful in differentiating GS from Chediak-Higashi syndrome which also presents with immunodeficiency and silver hairs. We report a 17-month-old boy with GS type 2 who presented with severe anemia. Bone marrow examination of the child suggested parvovirus B19 as the cause of severe anemia, which was later confirmed by DNA polymerase chain reaction. PMID:26960654

  18. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia? Lower than normal numbers of red blood cells, ... most of the signs and symptoms of aplastic anemia. Signs and Symptoms of Low Blood Cell Counts ...

  19. Aplastic anemia associated with severe hemorrhagic cystitis following radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    NAKANO, TAITO; IZUMI, KOUJI; MAOLAKE, AERKEN; NATSAGDORJI, ARIUNBOLD; IWAMOTO, HIROAKI; KITAGAWA, YASUHIDE; KADONO, YOSHIFUMI; KONAKA, HIROYUKI; MIZOKAMI, ATSUSHI; NAMIKI, MIKIO

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is a rare complication following radiotherapy for intrapelvic cancer types, including cervical cancer, bladder cancer and prostate cancer. The severity of hemorrhagic cystitis is different in each case, although symptoms improve spontaneously in certain cases, and often significant morbidity requiring numerous interventions occurs. Since no treatment strategy exists with high evidences for such severe hemorrhagic cystitis, urologists have difficulty in solving the bleeding and pain, which the patients suffer. Aplastic anemia is a rare blood disorder, with an incidence reported as 2/1 million individuals annually. Patients have a risk of diffuse bleeding for presentation with anemia, thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. The present report presented a case of severe hemorrhagic cystitis remitted successfully by the treatment for underlying aplastic anemia. PMID:27123281

  20. Rituximab for immune hemolytic anemia following T- and B-Cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Corti, P; Bonanomi, S; Vallinoto, C; Balduzzi, A; Uderzo, C; Cazzaniga, G; Gaipa, G; Dassi, M; Perseghin, P; Rovelli, A

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IHA) complicating hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is often unsatisfactory. We report a case of IHA which occurred after T- and B-cell depleted unrelated donor HSCT carried out for mucopolysaccharidosis type I-H (Hurler syndrome) which was successfully treated with anti-CD20+ monoclonal antibody PMID:12486323

  1. Diagnosis of Fanconi Anemia by Diepoxybutane Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Arleen D.

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disorder characterized by congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure, and predisposition to cancer, particularly hematological malignancies and solid tumors of the head and neck. The main role of FA proteins is in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). FA results from pathogenic variants in at least 16 distinct genes, causing genomic instability. Although the highly variable phenotype makes accurate diagnosis on the basis of clinical manifestations difficult in some patients, diagnosis based on a profound sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents can be used to identify the pre-anemia patient as well as patients with aplastic anemia or leukemia who may or may not have the physical stigmata associated with the syndrome. Diepoxybutane (DEB) analysis is the preferred test for FA because other agents have higher rates of false-positive and false-negative results. PMID:25827349

  2. Nucleolar stress in Diamond Blackfan anemia pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R

    2014-06-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia is a red cell hypoplasia that typically presents within the first year of life. Most cases of Diamond Blackfan anemia are caused by ribosome assembly defects linked to haploinsufficiency for structural proteins of either ribosomal subunit. Nucleolar stress associated with abortive ribosome assembly leads to p53 activation via the interaction of free ribosomal proteins with HDM2, a negative regulator of p53. Significant challenges remain in linking this nucleolar stress signaling pathway to the clinical features of Diamond Blackfan anemia. Defining aspects of disease presentation may relate to developmental and physiological triggers that work in conjunction with nucleolar stress signaling to heighten the p53 response in the developing erythron after birth. The growing number of ribosomopathies provides additional challenges for linking molecular mechanisms with clinical phenotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease. PMID:24412987

  3. Very severe aplastic anemia appearing after thymectomy.

    PubMed

    Park, Chi Young; Kim, Hee Je; Kim, Yoo Jin; Park, Yoon Hee; Lee, Jong Wook; Min, Woo Sung; Kim, Chun Choo

    2003-03-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare complication of thymoma and is extremely infrequent after thymectomy. We present a case of a 60-year-old woman with very severe aplastic anemia appearing sixteen months after thymectomy for a thymoma. She underwent thymectomy for a thymoma in April 2000. Preoperative examination revealed no hematologic abnormality. About sixteen months after the operation, she was readmitted because of pancytopenia with cough and fever. Bone marrow aspiration revealed a very severe hypoplasia in all the three cell lines with over 80% fatty tissue, and chest CT revealed no recurrence of thymoma. Her aplastic anemia had responded to cyclosporine A and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). PMID:12760272

  4. Correlates of Anemia in American Blacks and Whites

    PubMed Central

    Zakai, Neil A.; McClure, Leslie A.; Prineas, Ronald; Howard, George; McClellan, William; Holmes, Chris E.; Newsome, Britt B.; Warnock, David G.; Audhya, Paul

    2009-01-01

    For unclear reasons, anemia is more common in American blacks than whites. The authors evaluated anemia prevalence (using World Health Organization criteria) among 19,836 blacks and whites recruited in 2003–2007 for the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke Renal Ancillary study and characterized anemia by 3 anemia-associated conditions (chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and microcytosis). They used multivariable models to assess potential causes of race differences in anemia. Anemia was 3.3-fold more common in blacks than whites, with little attenuation after adjusting for demographic variables, socioeconomic factors, and comorbid conditions. Increasing age, residence in the US southeast, lower income, vascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and never smoking were associated with anemia. Age, diabetes, and vascular disease were stronger correlates of anemia among whites than blacks (P < 0.05). Among those with anemia, chronic kidney disease was less common among blacks than whites (22% vs. 34%), whereas inflammation (18% vs. 14%) and microcytosis (22% vs. 11%) were more common. In this large, geographically diverse cohort, anemia was 3-fold more common in blacks than whites with different characteristics and correlates. Race differences in anemia prevalence were not explained by the factors studied. Future research into the causes and consequences of anemia in different racial groups is needed. PMID:19066309

  5. The Invisible Malady: Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Savitt, Todd L.

    1981-01-01

    Though several articles have appeared on the history of sickle cell anemia in the United States, none has dealt with the dissemination of information from the scientific community to the public. It is an interesting commentary on our society that 60 years have passed before this important but racially oriented disease has reached the public forum. In this article, the author tries to describe the major events in the history of sickle cell anemia and to explain why it has not been publicized. PMID:7021863

  6. Anemia in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kausman, Joshua Yehuda; Powell, Harley Robert; Jones, Colin Lindsay

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of anemia in stable pediatric renal transplant recipients and to examine the association of anemia with renal function, immunosuppressants, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and growth, as well as iron, vitamin B(12), and folate stores. This is a cross-sectional study of the 50 renal transplant recipients currently followed at our center. Patient data were collected regarding hematological parameters, growth, medications, renal function, underlying renal disease, delayed graft function, episodes of rejection, and iron or erythropoietin therapy post transplantation. The mean hemoglobin level (Hb) was 110 g/l and the overall prevalence of anemia was 60%, including 30% who were severely anemic (Hb<100 g/l). There was a high rate of iron deficiency (34%) and serum iron was the parameter of iron metabolism most closely associated with anemia. Hb in patients with low serum iron was 90.7 g/l versus 114.4 g/l in those with normal serum iron ( P<0.01). Both univariate and multiple linear regression determined tacrolimus dose and creatinine clearance to be significant factors associated with anemia. Tacrolimus dose correlated with a 10 g/l reduction in Hb for every increase of tacrolimus dose of 0.054 mg/kg per day ( P=0.001). The dose of mycophenolate was positively correlated with Hb, but this was likely to be confounded by our practice of dose reduction in the setting of anemia. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor use was not associated with anemia. Severely anemic patients tended to be shorter, with a mean Z-score for height of -1.8 compared with -0.9 for those with normal Hb ( P=0.02). Anemia is a significant and common problem in pediatric renal transplant patients. Deteriorating renal function is an important cause, but other factors like iron deficiency and immunosuppression are involved. Definition of iron deficiency is difficult and serum iron may be a valuable indicator. Medication doses

  7. Current approaches for the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Rodríguez-Martínez, Marisol; Gómez-de-León, Andrés; Tarín-Arzaga, Luz; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2013-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an infrequent group of diseases defined by autoantibody mediated red blood cell destruction. Correct diagnosis and classification of this condition are essential to provide appropriate treatment. AIHA is divided into warm and cold types according to the characteristics of the autoantibody involved and by the presence of an underlying or associated disorder into primary and secondary AIHA. Due to its low frequency, treatment for AIHA is largely based on small prospective trials, case series, and empirical observations. This review describes in detail the different treatment approaches for autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Warm antibody type AIHA should be treated with steroids, to which most patients respond, although relapse can occur and maintenance doses are frequently required. Splenectomy is an effective second line treatment and can provide long-term remission without medication. Rituximab is a useful alternative for steroid refractory patients, those requiring high maintenance doses and unfavorable candidates for surgery. Promising therapeutic modifications with this monoclonal antibody are emerging including drug combinations, lower doses, and long-term use. Primary cold agglutinin disease has been recognized as having a lymphoproliferative monoclonal origin. It is unresponsive to both steroids and splenectomy. Rituximab is currently the best therapeutic alternative for this condition, and several treatment regimens are available with variable responses. PMID:23689532

  8. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Children: Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Janani; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Jacob, Eapen K; Kreuter, Justin D; Go, Ronald S

    2016-04-01

    We studied 35 pediatric patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia seen at Mayo Clinic from 1994 to 2014. The median age was 10.0 years and 65.7% were males. Most had warm antibodies (80.0%) and some secondary to viral (14.3%) or autoimmune disorders (31.4%). Seven (20.0%) patients presented with Evans syndrome, 3 of whom also had common variable immunodeficiency. The median hemoglobin at diagnosis was 6.1 g/dL and 62.8% patients required red cell transfusions. The severity of anemia was worse among children below 10 years (median 5.5 vs. 7.0 g/dL, P=0.01). Steroid was the initial treatment for 88.5% patients, with overall response rate of 82.7% (68.5% complete, 14.2% partial) and median response duration of 10.7 months (range, 0.2 to 129.7+ mo). After median follow-up of 26.6 months, 8 (22.8%) patients relapsed. Salvage treatments included splenectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and mycophenolate mofetil. Infectious complications occurred in 9 (25.7%) patients and 1 patient died of cytomegalovirus infection. Four patients had cold agglutinin disease and 3 (75.0%) responded to steroids. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder in pediatric population and most respond well to steroids regardless of the type of antibody. Infectious complications are common and screening for immunodeficiency is recommended among those with Evans syndrome. PMID:26925716

  9. The Evidence-Based Evaluation of Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Eliana V; Bollard, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent disease with multiple possible etiologies and resultant complications. Iron deficiency anemia is a common cause of anemia and is typically due to insufficient intake, poor absorption, or overt or occult blood loss. Distinguishing iron deficiency from other causes of anemia is integral to initiating the appropriate treatment. In addition, identifying the underlying cause of iron deficiency is also necessary to help guide management of these patients. We review the key components to an evidence-based, cost-conscious evaluation of suspected iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27542426

  10. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120