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Sample records for dyserythropoietic anemia type

  1. Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia Type 1: Report of One Patient and Analysis of Previously Reported Patients Treated with Interferon Alpha.

    PubMed

    Salihoglu, Ayse; Elverdi, Tugrul; Eskazan, Ahmet Emre; Eyice, Deniz; Bavunoglu, Isil; Ar, Muhlis Cem; Ongoren, Seniz; Guzel, Elif; Baslar, Zafer; Tunckale, Aydin; Tuzuner, Nukhet; Soysal, Teoman

    2016-06-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias are a rare group of inherited anemias characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and distinct morphological abnormalities in the erythroblasts. Interferon alpha has been shown to be effective in type 1 congenital dyserythropoietic anemia but the optimal duration of therapy is undefined. We present here a 32-years-old female patient diagnosed with type 1 congenital dyserythropoietic anemia precipitated by pregnancy and treated successfully with a short course of interferon alpha resulting in a durable response. A literature search including PubMed database on previously published articles regarding congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type 1 patients treated with interferon is conducted. PMID:27408411

  2. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions CDA congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  3. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II associated with G6PD Seattle in a Sicilian child.

    PubMed

    Gangarossa, S; Romano, V; Miraglia del Giudice, E; Perrotta, S; Iolascon, A; Schiliro, G

    1995-01-01

    A 2-year-old Sicilian boy was investigated because of chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA) associated with hepatosplenomegaly. Appropriate studies revealed deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase type Seattle (G6PD Seattle). In addition, bone marrow morphology, serological studies and analysis of red cell membrane proteins revealed congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) type II (or HEMPAS). Because G6PD Seattle on its own does not cause CNSHA, we believe that the clinical manifestations in this patient are essentially due to the CDA type II abnormality. However, the coexistence of these two different red cell abnormalities may affect the clinical picture specifically by making CDA type II more hemolytic than it would have been otherwise. PMID:7725848

  4. Acute Liver Failure in a Pediatric Patient with Congenital Dysery-Thropoietic Anemia Type I Treated with Deferasirox.

    PubMed

    Ling, Galina; Pinsk, Vered; Golan-Tripto, Inbal; Ling, Eduard

    2015-09-23

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDA) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by morphological abnormalities of erythroid precursor cells and various degrees of hemolysis. Iron overload is a result of continuous hemolysis and recurrent transfusions. It is treated with iron chelators, including deferasirox. We present here a case of acute liver failure in a 12 years old girl with CDA type I treated with deferasirox and discuss the approach to treatment. PMID:26487935

  5. New Codanin-1 Gene Mutations in a Italian Patient with Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia Type I and Heterozygous Beta-Thalassemia.

    PubMed

    D'Alcamo, Elena; Agrigento, V; Pitrolo, L; Sclafani, S; Barone, R; Calvaruso, G; Buffa, V; Maggio, A

    2016-06-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with macrocytic anemia, ineffective erythropoiesis, iron overloading and characterized by abnormal chromatin ultrastructure in erythroblasts such as internuclear chromatin bridges, spongy heterochromatin and invagination of the nuclear membrane. A 58-year-old Causasian man with chronic hemolytic anemia, heterozygous for β (+) -globin IVS1, nt110 G>A mutation (causing abnormal alpha:beta globin chain ratio) showed clinical, laboratory and hematological features suggesting diagnosis of CDA1. Sequence analysis of CDA-related genes revealed compound heterozygosity for two novel mutations in the CDAN1 gene: a frameshift mutation 3367 del 4 (TTAG) in exon 25 and a missense mutation c.1811 G>T in exon 11 causing an aminoacid change from glycine to valine at codon 565 (G565V). One of the propositus' brothers showed the same gene mutations. As the CDA1 can mimic thalassemia, a frequent misdiagnosis is possible especially in countries where the prevalence of thalassemia is high. A strong clinical suspicion in patients who do not reveal a clear genetic basis for presumed thalassemia may help clinch the correct diagnosis. PMID:27408412

  6. Successful Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation of a Patient Suffering from Type II Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia A Rare Case Report from Western India

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Gaurang; Shah, Sandip; Panchal, Harsha; Patel, Apurva; Uparkar, Urmila; Anand, Asha; Parikh, Sonia; Patel, Kinnari; Shah, Kamlesh; Revannasiddaiah, Swaroop

    2015-01-01

    The most frequent form of congenital dyserythropoiesis (CDA) is congenital dyserythropoietic anemia II (CDA II). CDA II is a rare genetic anemia in humans, inherited in an autosomally recessive mode, characterized by hepatosplenomegaly normocytic anemia and hemolytic jaundice. Patients are usually transfusion-independent except in severe type. We are here reporting a case of severe transfusion-dependent type II congenital dyserythropoietic anemia in a 5-year-old patient who has undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) at our bone marrow transplantation centre. Patient has had up until now more than 14 mL/kg/month of packed cell volume (PCV), which he required every 15 to 20 days to maintain his hemoglobin of 10 gm/dL and hematocrit of 30%. His pre-HSCT serum ferritin was 1500 ng/mL and he was on iron chelating therapy. Donor was HLA identical sibling (younger brother). The preparative regimen used was busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and antithymocyte globulin (Thymoglobulin). Cyclosporine and short-term methotrexate were used for graft versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. Engraftment of donor cells was quick and the posttransplant course was uneventful. The patient is presently alive and doing well and he has been transfusion-independent for the past 33 months after HSCT. PMID:25692053

  7. Incomplete synthesis of N-glycans in congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II caused by a defect in the gene encoding. alpha. -mannosidase II

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, M.N.; Masri, K.A. ); Dell, A. ); Luzzatto, L. ); Moremen, K.W. )

    1990-10-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II, or hereditary erythroblastic multinuclearity with a positive acidified-serum-lysis test (HEMPAS), is a genetic anemia in humans inherited by an autosomally recessive mode. The enzyme defect in most HEMPAS patients has previously been proposed as a lowered activity of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II, resulting in a lack of polylactosamine on proteins and leading to the accumulation of polylactosaminyl lipids. A recent HEMPAS case, G.C., has now been analyzed by cell-surface labeling, fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry of glycopeptides, and activity assay of glycosylation enzymes. Significantly decreased glycosylation of polylactosaminoglycan proteins and incompletely processed asparagine-linked oligosaccharides were detected in the erythrocyte membranes of G.C. These results suggest that G.C. cells contain a mutation in {alpha}-ManII-encoding gene that results in inefficient expression of {alpha}-ManII mRNA, either through reduced transcription or message instability. This report demonstrates that HEMPAS is caused by a defective gene encoding an enzyme necessary for the synthesis of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides.

  8. Primary defect of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II. Failure in glycosylation of erythrocyte lactosaminoglycan proteins caused by lowered N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, M N; Dell, A; Scartezzini, P

    1987-05-25

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II or hereditary erythroblastic multinuclearity with positive acidified serum test (HEMPAS) is a genetic disease caused by membrane abnormality. Previously we have found that Band 3 and Band 4.5 are not glycosylated by lactosaminoglycans in HEMPAS erythrocytes, whereas normally these proteins have lactosaminoglycans (Fukuda, M. N., Papayannopoulou, T., Gordon-Smith, E. C., Rochant, H., and Testa, U. (1984) Br. J. Haematol. 56, 55-68). In order to find out where glycosylation of lactosaminoglycans stops, we have analyzed the carbohydrate structures of HEMPAS Band 3. By fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry, methylation analysis, and hydrazinolysis followed by exoglycosidase treatments, the following structure was elucidated: (formula; see text) N-Linked glycopeptides synthesized in vitro by reticulocyte microsomes from HEMPAS were shown to be predominantly the above short oligosaccharide, whereas those from normal reticulocytes contain large molecular weight carbohydrates. The N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II, which transfers N-acetylglucosamine to the C-2 position of the Man alpha 1----6Man beta 1----arm of the biantennary core structure, was therefore examined by using Man alpha 1----6(GlcNAc beta 1----2Man alpha 1----3)Man beta 1----4GlcNAc beta 1----4GlcNAcol as an acceptor. N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase II activity was demonstrated in the lymphocyte microsome fraction from normal individuals. However, this enzyme activity was found to be decreased in those from HEMPAS patients. These results suggest that the primary defect of HEMPAS lies in the lowered activity of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II. PMID:2953718

  9. X-linked macrocytic dyserythropoietic anemia in females with an ALAS2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Ulirsch, Jacob C.; Tchaikovskii, Vassili; Ludwig, Leif S.; Wakabayashi, Aoi; Kadirvel, Senkottuvelan; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Bejar, Rafael; Shi, Jiahai; Lovitch, Scott B.; Bishop, David F.; Steensma, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Macrocytic anemia with abnormal erythropoiesis is a common feature of megaloblastic anemias, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, and myelodysplastic syndromes. Here, we characterized a family with multiple female individuals who have macrocytic anemia. The proband was noted to have dyserythropoiesis and iron overload. After an extensive diagnostic evaluation that did not provide insight into the cause of the disease, whole-exome sequencing of multiple family members revealed the presence of a mutation in the X chromosomal gene ALAS2, which encodes 5′-aminolevulinate synthase 2, in the affected females. We determined that this mutation (Y365C) impairs binding of the essential cofactor pyridoxal 5′-phosphate to ALAS2, resulting in destabilization of the enzyme and consequent loss of function. X inactivation was not highly skewed in wbc from the affected individuals. In contrast, and consistent with the severity of the ALAS2 mutation, there was a complete skewing toward expression of the WT allele in mRNA from reticulocytes that could be recapitulated in primary erythroid cultures. Together, the results of the X inactivation and mRNA studies illustrate how this X-linked dominant mutation in ALAS2 can perturb normal erythropoiesis through cell-nonautonomous effects. Moreover, our findings highlight the value of whole-exome sequencing in diagnostically challenging cases for the identification of disease etiology and extension of the known phenotypic spectrum of disease. PMID:25705881

  10. A Child With Dyserythropoietic Anemia and Megakaryocyte Dysplasia Due to a Novel 5'UTR GATA1s Splice Mutation.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Jacob; Temm, Constance; Czader, Magdalena; Nalepa, Grzegorz

    2016-05-01

    We describe a child with dyserythropoietic anemia, thrombocytosis, functional platelet defect, and megakaryocyte dysplasia. We show that (i) this constellation of hematopoietic abnormalities was due to a germline mutation within the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of globin transcription factor 1 (GATA1); (ii) the mutation impaired a 5'UTR GATA1 splicing site, with promoted production of the shortened GATA1 isoform lacking the N-terminus; and (iii) expression of the GATA1 N-terminus is restricted to erythroblasts and megakaryocytes in normal marrow, consistent with the patient's abnormal erythropoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. Our findings provide insights into the clinically relevant in vivo function of the N-terminal domain of GATA1 in human hematopoiesis. PMID:26713410

  11. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Hemolytic Anemia There are many types of hemolytic anemia. The ... the condition, but you develop it. Inherited Hemolytic Anemias With inherited hemolytic anemias, one or more of ...

  12. [Dyserythropoietic syndromes: incidence, diagnosis, therapy].

    PubMed

    Cacciola, E

    1990-10-01

    The nosography of the dyserythropoietic syndromes remains poorly defined in the field of clinical hematology. The prominent pathophysiologic feature lies in the "ineffective erythropoiesis" as expressed by bone marrow erythroid hyperplasia with dysplasia accompanied by a normal or only slightly increased reticulocyte count. Both erythrokinetics and ferrokinetics are impaired, as shown by either slight reduction of the red cell survival or marked increased rate of serum iron transport together with reduced cellular iron utilization. The dyserythropoietic syndromes can be classified as acquired, secondary or congenital. The acquired ones, especially the sideroblastic forms, belonging to the myelodysplastic syndromes, are typical of the elderly whereas the congenital are of childhood. Their treatment is still a matter of controversy. However, the employment of folic acid, Vit. B12, pyridoxine and androgens can be useful in selected cases. In case of severe anemia, blood transfusion are required in association with iron chelating agents. However, some biological molecules, such as erythropoietin, interleukins 3 and 4, hemopoietic growth factors (especially GM-CSF), could represent future prospects of treatment. PMID:2291009

  13. Angioid Streaks in Types I and II Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anaemia (CDA).

    PubMed

    Frimmel, S; Kniestedt, C

    2016-04-01

    Background. Angioid streaks (AS) are visible irregular breaks in Bruch's membrane, extending radially from the optic nerve head and with overlaying atrophic retinal pigment epithelium. In 50 % of patients, AS are associated with Pseudoxanthoma elasticum, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, sickle cell anaemia or Paget's disease. In 50 % of patients, AS are idiopathic. Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anaemia (CDA) is a rare, inherited disorder of ineffective erythropoiesis with morphologically abnormal erythroblasts. CDA was first recognised as a separate entity in 1968 and classified into three main groups. CDA demographics have identified 614 known families and > 700 cases worldwide. A few case reports of AS in CDA I and III have been published, but there is no report of AS in CDA II, the most frequent of the CDAs, as well no follow-up. History and Signs. 8 eyes of 4 CDA patients were examined. The CDA I patients were a 46 year old man and a 52 year old woman. They were first seen in 2009 and followed up for 9 and 11 months, respectively. The 2 female CDA II patients were seen in 2010 and were aged 35 and 42 years at first presentation. Vision, Amsler grid, optical coherence tomography (OCT), fundus pictures and fluorescent angiography were performed. Blood was drawn for neutrophil elastase determination (ELA2). Therapy and Outcome. All patients showed bilateral AS. Mean best corrected visual acuity was 20/20 without metamorphopsia and with normal OCT. During the follow-up period, no progression occurred. No choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) was detected. ELA2 serum levels were normal. Conclusions. This is the first report of AS in CDA II and the first follow-up in CDA I. No evidence of progression was seen within this period of time. Longer follow-up is needed to detect whether AS progresses. All patients with AS should be seen by an ophthalmologist on a regular basis. The risk of CNV is given. Therapy is possible and the outcome is best if the CNV is recognised and

  14. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... anemia Idiopathic aplastic anemia Megaloblastic anemia Pernicious anemia Sickle cell anemia Thalassemia Causes Although many parts of the body ... Some forms of anemia, such as thalassemia or sickle cell anemia, which can be inherited Pregnancy Problems with bone ...

  15. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... anemia Idiopathic aplastic anemia Megaloblastic anemia Pernicious anemia Sickle cell anemia Thalassemia ... Some forms of anemia, such as thalassemia or sickle cell anemia, which can be inherited Pregnancy Problems with bone ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: dyserythropoietic anemia and thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Crispino JD. GATA1 in normal and malignant hematopoiesis. Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2005 Feb;16(1): ... GATA1 function, a paradigm for transcription factors in hematopoiesis. Mol Cell Biol. 2005 Feb;25(4):1215- ...

  17. Pernicious anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... achylic anemia; Congenital pernicious anemia; Juvenile pernicious anemia; Vitamin B12 deficiency (malabsorption) ... Pernicious anemia is a type of vitamin B12 anemia. The body needs ... cells. You get this vitamin from eating foods such as meat, ...

  18. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough ... rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the ...

  19. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  20. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  1. Hypocholesterolemia in chronic anemias with increased erythropoietic activity.

    PubMed

    Shalev, Hanna; Kapelushnik, Joseph; Moser, Asher; Knobler, Hilla; Tamary, Hannah

    2007-03-01

    Hypocholesterolemia of unknown etiology has been previously described in various chronic anemias. Few small studies also suggested that those patients have a lower incidence of atherosclerotic events. The aim of our study was to determine the extent of hypocholesterolemia in various types of anemias. We studied 59 patients with chronic anemias associated with high-erythropoietic activity (thalassemia intermedia, congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I, congenital spherocytosis), 8 patients with low-erythropoietic activity anemias (acquired aplastic anemia, Fanconi anemia, and Diamond Blackfan anemia), and 20 healthy controls. Mean serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, hemoglobin, serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (STR), and serum erythropoietin levels were determined in each patient. All patients with chronic anemia and increased erythropoietic activity had hypocholesterolemia, whereas none of those with low erythropoietic activity was hypocholesterolemic. Mean serum cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol levels were found to be significantly lower in the high-erythropoietic activity group (80+/-19 mg/dl; 31+/-10 mg/dl; 35+/-14 mg/dl, respectively) compared with the control group (P<0.001; 0.001; 0.001, respectively) and the low-erythropoietic activity group (P<0.001; 0.001; 0.01, respectively). Significant inverse correlation (R2=0.507) was observed between serum cholesterol and STR levels, which in the absence of iron deficiency reflect bone marrow activity. Taken together, our results imply that hypocholesterolemia accompanies anemias with high-erythropoietic activity. We suggest that the high-erythropoitic activity-associated hypocholesterolemia is due to increased cholesterol requirements by the proliferating erythoid cells. Further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism and the possible clinical consequences of this phenomenon. PMID

  2. Iron Deficiency and Other Types of Anemia in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mary

    2016-02-15

    Anemia, defined as a hemoglobin level two standard deviations below the mean for age, is prevalent in infants and children worldwide. The evaluation of a child with anemia should begin with a thorough history and risk assessment. Characterizing the anemia as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic based on the mean corpuscular volume will aid in the workup and management. Microcytic anemia due to iron deficiency is the most common type of anemia in children. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization recommend routine screening for anemia at 12 months of age; the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to assess the benefits vs. harms of screening. Iron deficiency anemia, which can be associated with cognitive issues, is prevented and treated with iron supplements or increased intake of dietary iron. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to recommend screening or treating pregnant women for iron deficiency anemia to improve maternal or neonatal outcomes. Delayed cord clamping can improve iron status in infancy, especially for at-risk populations, such as those who are preterm or small for gestational age. Normocytic anemia may be caused by congenital membranopathies, hemoglobinopathies, enzymopathies, metabolic defects, and immune-mediated destruction. An initial reticulocyte count is needed to determine bone marrow function. Macrocytic anemia, which is uncommon in children, warrants subsequent evaluation for vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies, hypothyroidism, hepatic disease, and bone marrow disorders. PMID:26926814

  3. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... blood cells. There are different types, including Fanconi anemia. Causes include Toxic substances, such as pesticides, arsenic, ...

  4. Congenital anemia, dyskeratosis, and progressive alopecia in Polled Hereford calves.

    PubMed

    Steffen, D J; Leipold, H W; Gibb, J; Smith, J E

    1991-05-01

    A new syndrome of anemia, alopecia, and dyskeratosis was identified in Polled Hereford calves in this study. Cutaneous changes included hyperkeratosis and hair loss around the muzzle and ear margins, which progressed to a generalized alopecia and hyperkeratotic dermatitis. Histologically, orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis with dyskeratosis of epidermal and follicular keratinocytes was present. Alopecia was correlated with dyskeratosis of Huxley's layer and an increasing proportion of follicles in the telogen phase of the hair cycle. Dermatitis was characterized by a mild dermal mononuclear cell infiltrate and mild lymphocytic perivascular dermatitis. The anemia present at birth was nonprogressive and was classified as normochromic and normocytic to macrocytic. Reticulocytosis was absent, but bone marrow was markedly hyperplastic. Nuclear cytoplasmic asynchrony of the rubricyte and metarubricyte stages occurred in the bone marrow. Abnormal rubricyte nuclei and maturation arrest at the late rubricyte stage were common. Cytologic features of the erythroid series are similar to those of type I congenital dyserythropoietic anemia of human beings. Genealogic features suggest that this is a primary hereditary defect. The mode of inheritance, however, remains to be determined. PMID:1858254

  5. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) due to a lack of folate. Folate is a type ... B vitamin. It is also called folic acid. Anemia is a condition in which the body does ...

  6. Congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia and dyskeratosis in Australian Poll Hereford calves.

    PubMed

    Kessell, A E; Hanshaw, D M; Finnie, J W; Nosworthy, P

    2012-12-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia (CDA) is a heterogeneous group of rare genetic disorders that in humans is characterised by ineffective haematopoiesis with morphological abnormalities in erythroid precursor cells and secondary iron overload. In the 1990s, a syndrome of CDA with dyskeratosis and progressive alopecia was reported in Poll Hereford calves in Canada and the USA. We report the clinical and pathological findings in two Poll Hereford calves with this syndrome from separate properties in South Australia. The animals had a variably severe anaemia, associated with abnormal nucleated red blood cells in peripheral blood, and large numbers of rubricytes and metarubricytes with a characteristic nuclear ultrastructure in the bone marrow. Both calves were born with a wiry hair coat and a progressively 'dirty-faced' appearance associated with hyperkeratosis and dyskeratosis (apoptosis). PMID:23186092

  7. Hematologically and genetically distinct forms of sickle cell anemia in Africa. The Senegal type and the Benin type.

    PubMed

    Nagel, R L; Fabry, M E; Pagnier, J; Zohoun, I; Wajcman, H; Baudin, V; Labie, D

    1985-04-01

    Patients with sickle cell anemia vary in the hematologic and clinical features of their disease, in part because of variability in the presence of linked and unlinked genes that modify the expression of the disease. The hemoglobin S gene is strongly linked to three different haplotypes of polymorphic endonuclease-restriction sites of the beta-like gene cluster (genes in the vicinity of the beta-globin gene)--one prevalent in Atlantic West Africa, another in central West Africa, and yet another in Bantu-speaking Africa (equatorial, East, and southern Africa). We have studied the differences in the hematologic characteristics of patients with sickle cell anemia from the first two geographical areas. We find that the Senegalese (Atlantic West Africa) patients have higher levels of hemoglobin F, a preponderance of G gamma chains in hemoglobin F, a lower proportion of very dense red cells, and a lower percentage of irreversibly sickled cells than those from Benin (central West Africa). We interpret these data to mean that the gamma-chain composition and the hemoglobin F level are haplotype linked and that the decrease in the percentage of dense cells and irreversibly sickled cells is secondary to the elevation in the hemoglobin F level. Patients with sickle cell anemia in the New World probably correspond to various combinations of these types, in addition to the still hematologically undefined haplotype associated with sickle cell anemia in the Bantu-speaking areas of Africa. PMID:2579336

  8. Sickle cell anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  9. T cell deficiency in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia ('warm type').

    PubMed

    Krüger, J; Rahman, A; Mogk, K U; Mueller-Eckhardt, C

    1976-01-01

    19 patients with chronic 'warm type' autoimmune hemolytic anemia were studied for abnormalities of cellular immune reactions. Evidence was obtained for a reduction of rosette-forming cells (RFC). Lymphocytotoxic antibodies were present in only 8 patients and correlated, with only one exception, with a reduced number of RFC. No significant deviation from normal ranges of the three major immunoglobulin classes in the patients' sera were found. C3 and C4 complement components were also, with one exception, within normal limits. In 18 of 19 patients no apparent association existed between the type or the amount of autoantibodies and/or complement components fixed on red cells and the levels of the respective immunoglobulins or complement in the sera. PMID:1084624

  10. Fanconi anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... People with Fanconi anemia should avoid cancer-causing substances (carcinogens) and have regular check-ups to screen for cancer. Alternative Names Fanconi's anemia; Anemia - Fanconi's Images Formed elements of blood References Bagby GC. Aplastic anemia ...

  11. Postoperative early hemolytic anemia due to inverted teflon felt strip after emergency repair for type A dissection.

    PubMed

    Hata, M; Yoshitake, I; Wakui, S; Unosawa, S; Hata, H; Shiono, M

    2012-10-01

    A 39-year-old man underwent emergency surgery for type A acute aortic dissection complicated by paraplegia. However, hemolytic anemia increased significantly due to severe stenosis of the proximal anastomosis one month after surgery. He finally underwent a redo procedure 4 months after the initial operation whereupon it was verified that half of the inner felt strip used for proximal stump fixation had turned up and was protruding into the inner lumen. We report here on a rare case of survival of postoperative early hemolytic anemia due to severe graft stenosis caused by an inverted inner Teflon felt strip without any extra vascular compression. PMID:21766281

  12. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Pernicious Anemia in an Elderly Japanese Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Kaneko, Masanori; Yano, Toshio; Sato, Naoko; Usuda, Hiroyuki; Miyakoshi, Masashi; Furukawa, Tatsuo; Koike, Tadashi; Kaneko, Kenzo; Kamoi, Kyuzi

    2015-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 66-year-old Japanese man with acute-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) accompanied by pernicious anemia. After 2 weeks of polyuria, the patient developed insulin-deficient hyperglycemia with diabetic ketoacidosis in the absence of verifiable islet-related autoantibodies and began insulin therapy in 2001. Eight years later, he developed gastric autoantibody-positive pernicious anemia and began methylcobalamin treatment. Previous studies have reported cases of slowly progressive autoimmune T1D concomitant with pernicious anemia. The present case suggests that potential associations with organ-specific autoimmune disorders should be considered during the long-term follow-up of T1D patients, even though verifiable islet-related autoantibodies are undetectable. PMID:26370862

  13. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  14. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... Drugs that can cause this type of hemolytic anemia include: Cephalosporins (a class of antibiotics), most common ...

  15. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  16. Pernicious Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Pernicious Anemia? Pernicious anemia (per-NISH-us uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... nervous system working properly. People who have pernicious anemia can't absorb enough vitamin B12 from food. ...

  17. Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Hemolytic Anemia? Hemolytic anemia (HEE-moh-lit-ick uh-NEE-me-uh) ... blood cells to replace them. However, in hemolytic anemia, the bone marrow can't make red blood ...

  18. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic ... Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow is unable to replace the red blood cells that are being destroyed. Immune hemolytic anemia occurs when the immune system mistakenly sees your ...

  19. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... infections and bleeding. Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ...

  20. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn associated with severe congenital anemia of various etiologies.

    PubMed

    Landau, Danielle; Kapelushnik, Josef; Harush, Miri B; Marks, Kyla; Shalev, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Among the many associated features of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate (PPHN), severe congenital anemia has been described only occasionally and is not included in the list of conditions that may cause PPHN in the neonate. We describe the clinical course of a group of 12 full-term neonates with PPHN and congenital anemia due to congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (7/12), α thalasemia (1/12), Diamond-Blackfan (1/12), and epsilon gamma delta beta thalassemia (3/12). The association of congenital anemia and PPHN is more common than previously thought; it can exist with various etiologies and severity of anemia. Congenital anemia has not been described until now as a cause or risk factor for PPHN; it should be considered as such alone or in combination with other known causes to be recognized early and treated appropriately to improve outcome. In families with known cases of congenital anemia due to the above-mentioned diagnosis, closer prenatal follow-up should be offered to anticipate possible fetal distress and/or fetal anemia and PPHN after birth. PMID:24309603

  1. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  2. Fanconi anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cells may result in fatigue ( anemia ). A lower-than-normal amount of platelets may lead to excess bleeding. Most people with Fanconi's anemia have some of these symptoms: Abnormal heart, lungs, and digestive tract Bone problems (especially the hips, spine or ...

  3. Aplastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells. But the disease may return (relapse). A bone marrow transplant with an unrelated donor may be tried if ... Untreated, severe aplastic anemia leads to rapid death. Bone marrow transplant can be very successful in young people. Transplant ...

  4. Aplastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... over time as the disease progresses. Low red cell count (anemia) can cause: Fatigue Pallor (paleness) Rapid heart ... with exercise Weakness Lightheadedness upon standing Low white cell count (leukopenia) causes an increased risk for infection. Low ...

  5. What Causes Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Anemia? The three main causes of anemia are: Blood ... the blood and can lead to anemia. Aplastic Anemia Some infants are born without the ability to ...

  6. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Aplastic Anemia? Aplastic anemia (a-PLAS-tik uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... heart, heart failure , infections, and bleeding. Severe aplastic anemia can even cause death. Overview Aplastic anemia is ...

  7. About Anemia (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes About Anemia KidsHealth > For Kids > About Anemia Print A A ... to every cell in your body. What Is Anemia? Anemia occurs when a person doesn't have ...

  8. Distinct Roles of Urinary Liver-Type Fatty Acid-Binding Protein in Non-Diabetic Patients with Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Naohiko; Yasuda, Takashi; Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Shibagaki, Yugo; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Various stresses including ischemia are known to up-regulate renal L-FABP gene expression and increase the urinary excretion of L-FABP. In diabetic patients with anemia, the urinary excretion of L-FABP is significantly increased. We studied the clinical significance of urinary L-FABP and its relationship with anemia in non-diabetic patients. Subjects and Methods A total of 156 patients were studied in this retrospective cross-sectional analysis. The associations between anemia and urinary L-FABP levels, and the predictors of urinary L-FABP levels in non-diabetic patients were evaluated. Results Urinary L-FABP levels were significantly higher in patients with anemia compared to those in patients without anemia. Similarly, the urinary L-FABP levels were significantly higher in patients with albuminuria compared to those in patients without albuminuria. Urinary L-FABP levels correlated with urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratios, estimated glomerular filtration rates, body mass index, and hemoglobin levels. Multivariate linear regression analysis determined that hemoglobin levels (β = -0.249, P = 0.001) and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratios (β = 0.349, P < 0.001) were significant predictors of urinary L-FABP levels. Conclusions Urinary L-FABP is strongly associated with anemia in non-diabetic patients. PMID:26010898

  9. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Regulation by Type I and II Interferons in the Pathogenesis of Acquired Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Julianne N. P.; Kanwar, Vikramjit S.; MacNamara, Katherine C.

    2016-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) occurs when the bone marrow fails to support production of all three lineages of blood cells, which are necessary for tissue oxygenation, infection control, and hemostasis. The etiology of acquired AA is elusive in the vast majority of cases but involves exhaustion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), which are usually present in the bone marrow in a dormant state, and are responsible for lifelong production of all cells within the hematopoietic system. This destruction is immune mediated and the role of interferons remains incompletely characterized. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) has been associated with AA and type I IFNs (alpha and beta) are well documented to cause bone marrow aplasia during viral infection. In models of infection and inflammation, IFNγ activates HSCs to differentiate and impairs their ability to self-renew, ultimately leading to HSC exhaustion. Recent evidence demonstrating that IFNγ also impacts the HSC microenvironment or niche, raises new questions regarding how IFNγ impairs HSC function in AA. Immune activation can also elicit type I interferons, which may exert effects both distinct from and overlapping with IFNγ on HSCs. IFNα/β increase HSC proliferation in models of sterile inflammation induced by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and lead to BM aplasia during viral infection. Moreover, patients being treated with IFNα exhibit cytopenias, in part due to BM suppression. Herein, we review the current understanding of how interferons contribute to the pathogenesis of acquired AA, and we explore additional potential mechanisms by which interferons directly and indirectly impair HSCs. A comprehensive understanding of how interferons impact hematopoiesis is necessary in order to identify novel therapeutic approaches for treating AA patients. PMID:27621733

  10. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Regulation by Type I and II Interferons in the Pathogenesis of Acquired Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Julianne N P; Kanwar, Vikramjit S; MacNamara, Katherine C

    2016-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) occurs when the bone marrow fails to support production of all three lineages of blood cells, which are necessary for tissue oxygenation, infection control, and hemostasis. The etiology of acquired AA is elusive in the vast majority of cases but involves exhaustion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), which are usually present in the bone marrow in a dormant state, and are responsible for lifelong production of all cells within the hematopoietic system. This destruction is immune mediated and the role of interferons remains incompletely characterized. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) has been associated with AA and type I IFNs (alpha and beta) are well documented to cause bone marrow aplasia during viral infection. In models of infection and inflammation, IFNγ activates HSCs to differentiate and impairs their ability to self-renew, ultimately leading to HSC exhaustion. Recent evidence demonstrating that IFNγ also impacts the HSC microenvironment or niche, raises new questions regarding how IFNγ impairs HSC function in AA. Immune activation can also elicit type I interferons, which may exert effects both distinct from and overlapping with IFNγ on HSCs. IFNα/β increase HSC proliferation in models of sterile inflammation induced by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and lead to BM aplasia during viral infection. Moreover, patients being treated with IFNα exhibit cytopenias, in part due to BM suppression. Herein, we review the current understanding of how interferons contribute to the pathogenesis of acquired AA, and we explore additional potential mechanisms by which interferons directly and indirectly impair HSCs. A comprehensive understanding of how interferons impact hematopoiesis is necessary in order to identify novel therapeutic approaches for treating AA patients. PMID:27621733

  11. Reticulocytopenia in severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) of the warm antibody type.

    PubMed

    Hauke, G; Fauser, A A; Weber, S; Maas, D

    1983-06-01

    A patient with severe AIHA of the warm antibody type, absence of reticulocytes and red cell hyperplasia of the bone marrow is described. In order to maintain a reasonable hemoglobin level 38 units of washed packed red cells were required within 24 days. The treatment with high doses of steroids showed no permanent beneficial effect. After splenectomy the red cell destruction was immediately reduced and the patient went into a remission. Bone marrow culture studies during the acute phase of the disease and at the time of complete hemato- and immunological remission, i.e. 4 months after splenectomy suggested a circulating autoantibody directed to early erythroid progenitors (BFU-E). The inhibitory activity in the patient's plasma did not influence granulocytic or mixed colony formation (CFU-GEMM). In addition to autoantibodies directed to erythroblasts and erythropoietin involved in the pathogenic mechanisms leading to red cell aplasia type I and II the culture studies suggest an unusual autoantibody that might cause the observed reticulocytopenia and erythropoietic hyperplasia of the bone marrow in AIHA. After the splenectomy the patient recovered, he required no further blood transfusions and his disease has not recurred. PMID:6850101

  12. First report of co-morbidity of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and three types of chronic hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Talaat, Iman M.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; El Melegy, Ebtessam H.K.; Alghamdi, Hamed A.; Aljabri, Mohammed F.; Abdallah, Enas A.A.; Sarar, Mohammed; Alshahrani, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), sickle cell anemia, and thalassemia are autosomal recessive disorders that can cause iron deposition in tissues during childhood. PKAN is characterized by accumulation of iron in the basal ganglia causing progressive extrapyramidal manifestations. Thalassemia and sickle cell disease can cause iron overload and deposition in tissues, including central nervous system. Presentation of case we herein report the first report of comorbidity of PKAN, β-thalassemia-major, sickle cell and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) anemias in a 9 years old Saudi female patient who presented with gait disturbance, speech difficulty, and progressive movement disorders of the neck, upper and lower limbs. Conclusion Although extremely rare, β-thalassemia-major, sickle cell and G6PD anemias can be associated with PKAN. It is unknown whether this association is random or due to an unknown factor that may have caused several mutations. PMID:26740874

  13. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1981-1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1982-07-19

    Hereditary anemias of mice are the chief objects of investigation, specificially four macrocytic anemias, 3 types of hemolytic anemia, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB mice, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia and a new hypochromic anemia with hemochromatosis. New types of anemia may be analyzed as new mutations appear. Three new mutations have been identified during the past 18 months. These anemias are studied through characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, study of normal and abnormal erythrocyte membrane proteins, histological and biochemical characterization of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem-cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue and parabiosis between individuals of differently affected genotypes. 31 refs.

  14. [Hemolytic anemias and vitamin B12 deficieny].

    PubMed

    Dietzfelbinger, Hermann; Hubmann, Max

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic anemias consist of corpuscular, immun-hemolytic and toxic hemolytic anemias. Within the group of corpuscular hemolytic anemias, except for the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), all symptoms are caused by underlying heredetiary disorders within the red blood cell membran (hereditary spherocytosis), deficiencies of red cell enzymes (G6PDH- and pyrovatkinase deficiency) or disorders in the hemoglobin molecule (thalassaemia and sickle cell disease). Immune-hemolytic anemias are acquired hemolytic anemias and hemolysis is caused by auto- or allo-antibodies which are directed against red blood cell antigens. They are classified as warm, cold, mixed type or drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Therapy consists of glucocorticoids and other immunsuppressive drugs. Pernicious anemia is the most important vitamin B12 deficiency disorder. Diagnosis relies on cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor. The management should focus on a possibly life-long replacement treatment with cobalamin. PMID:26306021

  15. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to aplastic anemia. Examples include Fanconi anemia , Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, dyskeratosis (DIS-ker-ah-TO-sis) congenita, and Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video ...

  16. Living with Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Anemia Often, you can treat and control anemia. If ... by an inherited or chronic disease or trauma. Anemia and Children/Teens Infants and young children have ...

  17. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  18. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  19. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute -- www. ...

  20. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia of inflammation; AOCD; ACD ... Anemia is a lower-than-normal number of red blood cells in the blood. Some conditions can lead to anemia of chronic disease include: Autoimmune disorders , such as ...

  1. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Fanconi Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Fanconi Anemia? Major Signs and Symptoms Your doctor may suspect ... sisters also should be tested for the disorder. Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  2. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial. PMID:26818422

  3. Thymoma with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kensuke; Inomata, Minehiko; Shiraishi, Shiori; Hayashi, Ryuji; Tobe, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old Japanese male was referred to our hospital with abnormal chest X-ray results and severe Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. He was diagnosed with a stage IV, WHO type A thymoma and was treated with oral prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) and subsequent chemotherapy. After chemotherapy, the patient underwent surgical resection of the thymoma. Hemolysis rapidly disappeared and did not return after the discontinuation of oral corticosteroids. Corticosteroid therapy may be preferable to chemotherapy or thymoma surgical resection in the management of autoimmune hemolytic anemia with thymoma. PMID:25722666

  4. How Is Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood cells. Chelation (ke-LAY-shun) therapy for lead poisoning. Chelation therapy is used mainly in children. This ... iron-deficiency anemia are at increased risk of lead poisoning. Procedures If your anemia is severe, your doctor ...

  5. Anemia in the Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video) Meconium Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Anemia in the Newborn By Arthur E. Kopelman, MD ... Prematurity (ROP) Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC) Jaundice in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Polycythemia in the Newborn Thyroid ...

  6. The Anemias of Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  7. Congenital spherocytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... spheres, and premature breakdown of red blood cells ( hemolytic anemia ). ... Schwartz RS. Autoimmune and intravascular hemolytic anemias In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 163.

  8. [Algorithm for treating preoperative anemia].

    PubMed

    Bisbe Vives, E; Basora Macaya, M

    2015-06-01

    Hemoglobin optimization and treatment of preoperative anemia in surgery with a moderate to high risk of surgical bleeding reduces the rate of transfusions and improves hemoglobin levels at discharge and can also improve postoperative outcomes. To this end, we need to schedule preoperative visits sufficiently in advance to treat the anemia. The treatment algorithm we propose comes with a simple checklist to determine whether we should refer the patient to a specialist or if we can treat the patient during the same visit. With the blood count test and additional tests for iron metabolism, inflammation parameter and glomerular filtration rate, we can decide whether to start the treatment with intravenous iron alone or erythropoietin with or without iron. With significant anemia, a visit after 15 days might be necessary to observe the response and supplement the treatment if required. The hemoglobin objective will depend on the type of surgery and the patient's characteristics. PMID:26320341

  9. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  10. Malaria and anemia.

    PubMed

    Ekvall, Håkan

    2003-03-01

    Anemia due to infection is a major health problem in endemic areas for young children and pregnant women. The anemia is caused by excess removal of nonparasitized erythrocytes in addition to immune destruction of parasitized red cells, and impaired compensation for this loss by bone marrow dysfunction. The pathogenesis is complex, and a predominant mechanism has not been identified. Certain parasite and host characteristics may modify the anemia. Concomitant infections and nutritional deficiencies also contribute to anemia and may interact with the malarial infection. Few preventive strategies exist, and the management of severe malarial anemia with blood transfusion carries a risk of HIV transmission. The current increase in malaria-specific childhood mortality in sub-Saharan Africa attributed to drug-resistant infection is likely partly related to an increase in severe anemia. This review summarizes recent findings on the pathogenesis and epidemiology of malarial anemia. PMID:12579035

  11. Laboratory Evaluation of Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Wallerstein, Ralph O.

    1987-01-01

    The laboratory evaluation of anemia begins with a complete blood count and reticulocyte count. The anemia is then categorized as microcytic, macrocytic or normocytic, with or without reticulocytosis. Examination of the peripheral smear and a small number of specific tests confirm the diagnosis. The serum iron level, total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin level and hemoglobin electrophoresis generally separate the microcytic anemias. The erythrocyte size-distribution width may be particularly helpful in distinguishing iron deficiency from thalassemia minor. Significant changes have occurred in the laboratory evaluation of macrocytic anemia, and a new syndrome of nitrous oxide-induced megaloblastosis and neurologic dysfunction has been recognized. A suggested approach to the hemolytic anemias includes using the micro-Coombs' test and ektacytometry. Finally, a number of causes have been identified for normocytic anemia without reticulocytosis, including normocytic megaloblastic anemia and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. PMID:3577135

  12. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dacie, J V

    1975-10-01

    Warm-type autoantibodies of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) are usually IgG but may be IgM or IgA. They are usual Rh specific. Cold-type antibodies are IgM or IgG (Donath-Landsteiner [DL] antibody). IgM antibodies are usually anit-l (occasionally anti-i) and DL antibodies anti-P. The warm IgG antibodies do not fix complement (C); they cause red blood cell (RBC) destruction predominantly in the spleen as the result of interaction between fixing; they cause RBC destruction either by intravascular lysis (complement sequence completed) or by interaction between C3-coated RBCs and phagocytes in liver and spleen. Gentic factors, immunoglobulin deficiency, somatic mutation, viral infections and drugs, and failure of T-lymphocyte function, all probably play a part in breaking immunological tolerance and the development of AIHA. PMID:1164110

  13. Pernicious anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... low B12 level may have a false positive Pap smear. This is because vitamin B12 deficiency affects the way certain cells (epithelial cells) in the cervix look. When to Contact a Medical ... test Pulmonary tuberculosis Secondary amenorrhea Stomach cancer Type ...

  14. Inborn anemias in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  15. Iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of diagnostic testing and therapeutic recommendations for dogs and cats with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:22942439

  16. Evaluation of Anemia.

    PubMed

    Kujovich, Jody L

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common problem in primary care. Classification based on mean cell volume narrows the differential diagnosis and directs testing. A marked macrocytosis is characteristic of vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies, certain medications, and primary bone marrow disorders. The three most common causes of microcytic anemia are iron deficiency, thalassemia trait, and anemia of inflammation. Additional laboratory testing is required for diagnosis. Determination of the rate of development of anemia and examination of a blood smear may provide diagnostic clues to guide more specialized testing. Diagnosis of iron, vitamin B12, or folate deficiency mandates determination of the underlying cause. PMID:27212091

  17. Sickle Cell Anemia (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can You Do to Stay Well? en español Anemia falciforme What Is Sickle Cell Disease? Sickle cell ... about 10 to 20 days. This usually causes anemia . Anemia is what happens when the body's number ...

  18. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated? Doctors treat pernicious anemia by replacing the missing vitamin B12 in the body. People who have pernicious anemia may need lifelong treatment. The goals of treating ...

  19. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  20. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  1. Hematologic Disorders: Anemia.

    PubMed

    Baltierra, David; Harper, Tiffany; Jones, Matthew Page; Nau, Konrad C

    2015-06-01

    Anemia occurs in up to 25% of the US population. Normal hemoglobin levels vary by race, sex, and age. Classification of anemia by mean corpuscular volume guides the differential diagnosis and evaluation. Iron studies, reticulocyte count, the red blood cell distribution width index, and blood test results are used to make the diagnosis. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common microcytic anemia and is managed with iron therapy. Parenteral iron is available when the oral route cannot be used. Patients who do not benefit from therapy should be evaluated for adherence, malabsorption, occult bleeding, systemic disease, or less common inherited disorders. A source of gastrointestinal bleeding is found in 60% to 70% of patients with iron deficiency anemia who are referred for endoscopy. Normocytic anemia has a broad differential, including nutritional deficiencies, blood loss, renal disease, malignancy (solid tumors or hematologic cancer), rheumatologic disorders, endocrine disorders, and other systemic diseases. Macrocytic anemias are seen with vitamin B12 and folate deficiency, alcohol use, thyroid disease, hydroxyurea, antiretroviral drugs, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloma. Oral vitamin B12 is underused, and can be as effective as intramuscular vitamin B12 in managing anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:26080453

  2. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  3. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They don' ... problem causes sickle cell anemia. People with the disease are born with two sickle cell genes, one ...

  4. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They ... last as long as normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also ...

  5. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is anemia? ... should. [ Top ] How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  6. Anemia of Central Origin.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kazusa; Young, Neal S

    2015-10-01

    Hypoproliferative anemia results from the inability of bone marrow to produce adequate numbers of red blood cells. The list of conditions that cause hypoproliferative anemia is long, starting from common etiologies as iron deficiency to rarer diagnoses of constitutional bone marrow failure syndromes. There is no perfect diagnostic algorithm, and clinical data may not always clearly distinguish "normal" from "abnormal", yet it is important for practicing clinicians to recognize each condition so that treatment can be initiated promptly. This review describes diagnostic approaches to hypoproliferative anemia, with particular emphasis on bone marrow failure syndromes. PMID:26404444

  7. Evaluation of Macrocytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph; Dwyre, Denis M

    2015-10-01

    Macrocytic anemia, defined as a mean cell volume (MCV) ≥100 fL in adults, has a narrow differential diagnosis that requires evaluation of the peripheral blood smear as well as additional laboratory testing taken in conjunction with clinical information that includes patient history and physical examination findings. This review is an update on the approach to a patient with macrocytic anemia with attention paid to the differentiation of megaloblastic and non-megaloblastic macrocytic anemias. Critical to the determination of the diagnosis is the judicious use of laboratory testing and the evaluation of those findings in conjunction with the patient medical, surgical, and medication history. PMID:26404440

  8. Your Guide to Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... lymphoma, and multiple myeloma) l Toxins (e.g., pesticides) l Diamond-Blackfan anemia l Amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia l ... are stopped. n Environmental toxins. Substances such as pesticides, arsenic, and benzene can damage your bone marrow, ...

  9. Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body. About 1 out of every 500 African-American children is born with this form of anemia. Thalassemia , which usually affects people of Mediterranean, African, and Southeast Asian descent, is ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... a lower than normal number of red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste ... Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow- ...

  11. A Japanese family with X-linked sideroblastic anemia affecting females and manifesting as macrocytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Katsurada, Tatsuya; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Daiki; Kawahara, Masahiro; Nakabo, Yukiharu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Yoshida, Yataro

    2016-06-01

    X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is a rare hereditary disorder that typically manifests in males as microcytic anemia. Here, we report a family with XLSA that affects females and manifests as macrocytic anemia. The proband was a Japanese woman harboring a heterozygous mutation c.679C>T in the ALAS2 gene. This mutation causes the amino acid substitution R227C, which disrupts the enzymatic activity of erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinic acid synthase. The mutation was not detected in the ALAS2 complementary DNA from peripheral blood red blood cells of the proband, indicating that the cells were mostly derived from erythroblasts expressing wild-type ALAS2. The proband's mother, who had been diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome, also had XLSA with the same mutation. Clinicians should be aware that XLSA can occur not only in males but also in females, in whom it manifests as macrocytic anemia. PMID:26862056

  12. Who Is at Risk for Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send ... develop during pregnancy due to low levels of iron and folic acid (folate) and changes in the ...

  13. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Thayu, Meena; Mamula, Petar

    2005-10-01

    Anemia is a frequent extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that is commonly overlooked, despite its significant impact on quality of life. Characteristic symptoms include chronic fatigue, headache, and subtle impairment of cognitive function, although some less common symptoms include dyspnea, dizziness, pica, angular stomatitis, shortened attention span, and esophageal webs. Several types of anemia are associated with IBD, but iron deficiency anemia (IDA) accounts for the majority of cases and others include anemia of chronic disease, anemia associated with vitamin deficiency (vitamin B12 and folate), autoimmune anemia, and anemia caused by medication used to treat IBD. The diagnosis of IDA relies on laboratory blood tests. Therefore, these tests should be obtained on a regular basis because characteristic symptoms may be absent or not readily recognized by patients and their clinicians. Complete blood count may suffice; however, iron studies and serum vitamin levels may be necessary to differentiate between specific types of anemia. During the diagnostic process, it is important to consider coexistence of different types of anemia, especially if no response to therapy is noted. The therapy for anemia is directed towards treatment of the underlying inflammatory process and supplemental therapy, depending on the type of deficiency. Iron deficiency anemia is treated with iron preparations, first orally, and if unresponsive or if associated with untoward adverse events leading to decrease in adherence with the therapeutic regimen, with intravenous preparations. Intramuscular therapy has been abandoned due to high rate of complications. Intravenous therapy may be administered as a multiple-dose regimen (intravenous iron sucrose and gluconate) or as a single intravenous dose (iron dextran), which is associated with a higher risk of allergic infusion reactions and requires obligatory test dose administration. Treatment with erythropoietin is

  14. Genetic modulation of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.H.

    1995-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia, a common disorder associated with reduced life span of the red blood cell and vasoocclusive events, is caused by a mutation in the {Beta}-hemoglobin gene. Yet, despite this genetic homogeneity, the phenotype of the disease is heterogeneous. This suggests the modulating influence of associated inherited traits. Some of these may influence the accumulation of fetal hemoglobin, a hemoglobin type that interferes with the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin. Another inherited trait determines the accumulation of {alpha}-globin chains. This review focuses on potential genetic regulators of the phenotype of sickle cell anemia. 125 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. How Is Hemolytic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines rituximab and cyclosporine. If you have severe sickle cell anemia , your doctor may recommend a medicine called hydroxyurea. ... hemoglobin that newborns have. In people who have sickle cell anemia, fetal hemoglobin helps prevent red blood cells from ...

  16. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. PMID:26575109

  17. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated? Doctors decide how to treat Fanconi anemia (FA) based on a person's age and how ... Long-term treatments for FA can: Cure the anemia. Damaged bone marrow cells are replaced with healthy ...

  18. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed? People who have Fanconi anemia (FA) are born with the disorder. They may ... questions about: Any personal or family history of anemia Any surgeries you’ve had related to the ...

  19. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in CKD Page Content On this page: What ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ...

  20. Anemia in People with Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... My ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Anemia in People With Cancer What is anemia? When you don’t have enough healthy red ... the symptoms that bother people most. What causes anemia? There are many different reasons a person with ...

  1. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ... your primary care doctor thinks you have aplastic anemia, he or she may refer you to a ...

  2. Anemia and Oxygen Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    Clinical assessment of tissue oxygenation is challenging. Anemia reflects a decreased oxygen carrying capacity of the blood and its significance in the perioperative setting relates largely to the associated risk of insufficient oxygen delivery and cellular hypoxia. Until meaningful clinical measures of tissue oxygenation are available in veterinary practice, clinicians must rely on evaluation of a patient's hemodynamic and ventilatory performance, along with biochemical and hemogasometric measurements. Blood transfusion is used commonly for treatment of perioperative anemia, and may improve tissue oxygenation by normalizing the rheologic properties of blood and enhancing perfusion, independent of increases in oxygen carrying capacity. PMID:26033442

  3. Management of Anemia of Inflammation in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia

    2012-01-01

    Anemia of any degree is recognized as a significant independent contributor to morbidity, mortality, and frailty in elderly patients. Among the broad types of anemia in the elderly a peculiar role seems to be played by the anemia associated with chronic inflammation, which remains the most complex form of anemia to treat. The origin of this nonspecific inflammation in the elderly has not yet been clarified. It seems more plausible that the oxidative stress that accompanies ageing is the real cause of chronic inflammation of the elderly and that the same oxidative stress is actually a major cause of this anemia. The erythropoietic agents have the potential to play a therapeutic role in this patient population. Despite some promising results, rHuEPO does not have a specific indication for the treatment of anemia in the elderly. Moreover, concerns about their side effects have spurred the search for alternatives. Considering the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of anemia of inflammation in the elderly population, an integrated nutritional/dietetic approach with nutraceuticals that can manipulate oxidative stress and related inflammation may prevent the onset of this anemia and its negative impact on patients' performance and quality of life. PMID:23091709

  4. How Is Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... parts of your blood. The test checks your hemoglobin and hematocrit (hee-MAT-oh-crit) levels. Hemoglobin is the iron-rich protein in red blood ... up in your blood. A low level of hemoglobin or hematocrit is a sign of anemia. The ...

  5. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  6. Anemia and School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  7. Hepcidin and sports anemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important mineral element used by the body in a variety of metabolic and physiologic processes. These processes are highly active when the body is undergoing physical exercises. Prevalence of exercise-induced iron deficiency anemia (also known as sports anemia) is notably high in athletic populations, particularly those with heavy training loads. The pathogenesis of sports anemia is closely related to disorders of iron metabolism, and a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of iron metabolism in the course of physical exercises could expand ways of treatment and prevention of sports anemia. In recent years, there have been remarkable research advances regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying changes of iron metabolism in response to physical exercises. This review has covered these advances, including effects of exercise on duodenum iron absorption, serum iron status, iron distribution in organs, erythropoiesis, and hepcidin’s function and its regulation. New methods for the treatment of exercise-induced iron deficiency are also discussed. PMID:24731443

  8. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  9. Anemia associated with feline leukemia virus infection in cats.

    PubMed

    Mackey, L; Jarrett, W; Jarrett, O; Laird, H

    1975-01-01

    The types of anemia associated with natural and experimental feline leukemia virus (FeLV) infection in cats were investigated. In one experiment, 10 kittens were inoculated neonatally with Jarrett FeLV-1, an isolate of subgroup A; 6 developed anemia a few weeks later. This anemia was characterized by macrocytosis, normoblastosis, increased erythropoiesis in the bone marrow, and extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleen. Anemia was transient and nonfatal and occurred before the onset of lympoid malignancy. The same type of anemia was also seen in 9 of 24 kittens inoculated with Jarrett FeLV-9 of subgroups A and B. A different form of anemai occurred in another experiment in which 10 kittens were inoculated with FeLV-C of subgroup C only. All 10 kittens developed a profound aplastic or erythroblastopenic anemia in which the bone marrow became depleted of erythroid tissue; all kittens died within 16 weeks, most as a direct result of anemia. In an experiment in which kittens were inoculated with FeLV-B of subgroup B only, no kitten showed anemia. Cats with naturally acquired, nonleukemic lymphosarcoma were also studied. Of 33 lymphosarcomas in which myelophthisis was excluded as a cause, 54% of the affected cats had anemia, the features of which were consistent with hemolytic origin. When virus could be grown from these lymphosarcomas, it was of subgroup A alone or a combination of A and B. With one exception, anemic cats had low or negative titers to feline oncornavirus-associated cell membrane antigens. Until more isolates have been tested, it is not known if the various hematologic changes reflected differences in the pathogenic effects of the subgroups of the virus or of types of strains within them. PMID:163317

  10. Nutritional anemia and its control.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Deeksha; Agarwal, Kailash Nath; Agarwal, Dev Kumari

    2002-07-01

    Available studies on prevalence of nutritional anemia in India show that 65% infant and toddlers, 60% 1-6 years of age, 88% adolescent girls (3.3% had hemoglobin < 7.0 g/dl; severe anemia) and 85% pregnant women (9.9% having severe anemia) were anemic. The prevalence of anemia was marginally higher in lactating women as compared to pregnancy. The commonest is iron deficiency anemia. National programmes to control and prevent anemia have not been successful. Experiences from other countries in controlling moderately-severe anemia guide to adopt long-term measures i.e. fortification of food items like milk, cereal, sugar, salt with iron. Use of iron utensils in boiling milk, cooking vegetables etc may contribute significant amount of dietary iron. Nutrition education to improve dietary intakes in family for receiving needed macro/micro nutrients as protein, iron and vitamins like folic acid, B12, A and C etc. for hemoglobin synthesis is important. As an immediate measure medicinal iron is necessary to control anemia. Addition of folate with iron controls anemia and is neuroprotective. Evidence in early childhood suggests vitamin B12 deficiency anemia; thus it may also be given along with iron and folate. PMID:12173702

  11. [Treatment and results of therapy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Tasić, J; Macukanović, L; Pavlović, M; Koraćević, S; Govedarević, N; Kitić, Lj; Tijanić, I; Bakić, M

    1994-01-01

    Basic principles in the therapy of idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody were glucocorticoides and splenectomy. Immunosupresive drugs, plasmaferesis and intravenous high doses gamma globulin therapy are also useful. In secundary autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody we treated basic illness. During the period of 1990-1992 we treated 21 patients with primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 6 patients with secondary /4 CLL and 2 Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma/. Complete remission we found as a normalisation of reticulocites and hemoglobin level respectively. Complete remission by corticoides we got in 14/21 patients, partial response in 2/21 respectively. Complete response by splenectomy we got in 2/3 splenoctomized patients (idiopathic type). For successful treatment secondary hemolytic anemias we treated primary diseases (CLL and malignant lymphoma) and we got in 4/6 patients complete remission. Our results were standard in both type of autoimmune hemolytic anaemias induced by warm antibody. PMID:18173205

  12. Anemia in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrakis, Michael G.; Tsirakis, George

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure is a very common disease, with severe morbidity and mortality, and a frequent reason of hospitalization. Anemia and a concurrent renal impairment are two major risk factors contributing to the severity of the outcome and consist of the cardio renal anemia syndrome. Anemia in heart failure is complex and multifactorial. Hemodilution, absolute or functional iron deficiency, activation of the inflammatory cascade, and impaired erythropoietin production and activity are some pathophysiological mechanisms involved in anemia of the heart failure. Furthermore other concomitant causes of anemia, such as myelodysplastic syndrome and chemotherapy, may worsen the outcome. Based on the pathophysiology of cardiac anemia, there are several therapeutic options that may improve hemoglobin levels, tissues' oxygenation, and probably the outcome. These include administration of iron, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and blood transfusions but still the evidence provided for their use remains limited. PMID:22536520

  13. Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Spano, Filippo; Giardina, Irene; Brillo, Eleonora; Clerici, Graziano; Roura, Luis Cabero

    2015-11-01

    Anemia is the most frequent derailment of physiology in the world throughout the life of a woman. It is a serious condition in countries that are industrialized and in countries with poor resources. The main purpose of this manuscript is to give the right concern of anemia in pregnancy. The most common causes of anemia are poor nutrition, iron deficiencies, micronutrients deficiencies including folic acid, vitamin A and vitamin B12, diseases like malaria, hookworm infestation and schistosomiasis, HIV infection and genetically inherited hemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia. Depending on the severity and duration of anemia and the stage of gestation, there could be different adverse effects including low birth weight and preterm delivery. Treatment of mild anemia prevents more severe forms of anemia, strictly associated with increased risk of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity. PMID:26472066

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of the bone marrow . The ...

  16. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 270 KB). Alternate Language URL Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease Page Content On ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which a person ...

  17. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menu Donate Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia Because you have aplastic anemia , everyday events can ... bleeding, such as contact sports. Pregnancy and Aplastic Anemia Pregnancy is possible for women who have been ...

  18. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells If you’re ... and sluggish, you might have a condition called anemia. Anemia is a common blood disorder that many ...

  19. Anemia as the Main Manifestation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Valeria

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a constellation of different diseases sharing anemia in the great majority of cases, and this cytopenia defines these pathologies and their most dramatic clinical manifestations. Anemia in MDS is due to ineffective erythropoiesis, with a high degree of apoptosis of marrow erythroid progenitors. These progenitors show distinctive dysplastic features that consent diagnosis, and are recognizable and differentiated, although not easily, from other morphologic alterations present in other types of anemia. Reaching the diagnosis of MDS in a macrocytic anemia and alleviating the symptoms of anemia are therefore an essential objective of the treating physician. In this work, the signs and symptoms of anemia in MDS, as well as its peculiar pathophysiology, are discussed. Erythopoietic stimulating agents (ESAs) are providing the best treatment for anemic MDS patients, but their use is still not approved by health agencies. While still waiting for this waiver, their clinical use is widespread and their effectivness is well known, as well as the dismal prognosis of patients who do not respond to ESAs and require transfusions. MDS with del5q constitute a unique model of anemia whose complex pathophysiology has been clarified at least partially, defining its link to ribosomal alterations likewise what observed in hereditary anemias like Blackfan Diamond anemia. Lenalidomide is the agent that has shown striking and specific erythropoietic activity in del5q MDS, and the basis of this response is starting to be understood. Several new agents are under evaluation for ESA refractory/relapsed MDS patients, targeting different putative mechanisms of ineffective erythropoiesis, and are here reviewed. PMID:26404446

  20. Dyserythropoiesis in a child with pyruvate kinase deficiency and coexistent unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney.

    PubMed

    Haija, Marwa Abu El; Qian, You-Wen; Muthukumar, Akila

    2014-08-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is the commonest enzyme deficiency in the glycolytic pathway leading to hemolytic anemia secondary to decreased Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) synthesis in the red cells. synthesis. PK deficiency due to mutations in the PKLR (1q21) gene leads to highly variable clinical presentation ranging from severe fetal anemia to well compensated anemia in adults. We describe dyserythropoiesis in the bone marrow of a child with transfusion dependent anemia and unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) mimicking Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia type I (CDA type I). Persistently low erythrocyte PK levels and double heterozygous mutations present in the PKLR gene confirmed the diagnosis of PK deficiency. PMID:24481986

  1. Clinical and cytogenetic analysis of human anemias from Jammu region of Jammu and Kashmir state

    PubMed Central

    Upma; Kumar, Parvinder; Raina, T. R.; Sharma, Kuldeep; Gupta, Subash

    2010-01-01

    Background: Anemias are the blood disorders characterized by reduction in the number of circulating red blood cells, the amount of hemoglobin, or the volume of packed red cells in blood. Chromosomal aberrations have often been reported from the bone marrow as well as cultured lymphocytes of the anemic patients. Aims: The aims of the study were to find out the commonest type of anemia occurring in the population of Jammu, India and to find out the chromosomal changes involved in the disorder. Material and Methods: Present study has been carried out on the bone marrow samples from 53 clinically diagnosed anemic patients. Cytogenetic study was carried out on slides prepared from these samples. Noncytogenetic factors like age, sex, religion, blood groups, family history of anemia, socioeconomic status, etc. have also been included in the study. Results: Megaloblastic anemia was found to be the commonest type of anemia. Centromere stretching, chromatid breaks, gaps, and elongation of chromosomes were recorded in patients with megaloblastic anemia and combined deficiency anemia. However, structural changes and numerical changes were totally absent. Conclusion: The commonest anemia among the people of Jammu region is megaloblastic anemia and its prevalence is increasing every year. Also, megaloblastic anemia is always associated with reversible cytogenetic changes. PMID:20859508

  2. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: classification and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Sève, Pascal; Philippe, Pierre; Dufour, Jean-François; Broussolle, Christiane; Michel, Marc

    2008-12-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon cause of anemia. Classifications of AIHA include warm AIHA, cold AIHA (including mainly chronic cold agglutinin disease and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria), mixed-type AIHA and drug-induced AIHA. AIHA may also be further subdivided on the basis of etiology. Management of AIHA is based mainly on empirical data and on small, retrospective, uncontrolled studies. The therapeutic options for treating AIHA are increasing with monoclonal antibodies and, potentially, complement inhibitory drugs. Based on data available in the literature and our experience, we propose algorithms for the treatment of warm AIHA and cold agglutinin disease in adults. Therapeutic trials are needed in order to better stratify treatment, taking into account the promising efficacy of rituximab. PMID:21082924

  3. Anemia in Intensive Cardiac Care Unit patients - An underestimated problem.

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Idzkowska, Ewelina; Sobkowicz, Bozena; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2015-09-01

    The heterogeneous group of patients admitted to Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU) as well as nonspecific complaints associated with anemia might be the reason for underdiagnosing or minimization of this problem. Because of this heterogeneity, there are no clear guidelines to follow. It is known that anemia is impairing the outcome. Thus, it is crucial to keep alert in the diagnosis and treatment of anemia, especially in critically ill cardiac patients. The greatest groups of patients admitted to ICCU are those with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), severe arrhythmias as well as individuals after cardiac operations. However, patients suffering other critical cardiac illnesses quite often become anemic during hospitalization in ICCU. It is because anemia is typed in the clinical features of heavy diseases or may be the consequence of treatment. The current review focuses on the incidence, complex etiology and predictive role of anemia in a diverse group of ICCU patients. It discusses clinical aspects of anemia treatment in particular groups of critically ill cardiac patients because proper treatment increases chances for recovery and improves the outcome in this severe group of patients. PMID:26149915

  4. Anemia in Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Prevalence, pathogenesis, and potential impact.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Malay; Rajta, Puja Negi; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common preventable and treatable lifestyle-related disease with high global prevalence. COPD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Comorbidities are important events in the natural history of the disease and have a negative effect on the morbidity and mortality of COPD patients. Cardiac diseases, lung cancer, osteoporosis, and depression are common comorbidities reported for COPD. Recently, anemia has been recognized as a frequent comorbidity in COPD patients. The prevalence of anemia in patients with COPD varies from 7.5% to 33%. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is probably the most common type of anemia associated with COPD. ACD is driven by COPD-mediated systemic inflammation. Anemia in COPD is associated with greater healthcare resource utilization, impaired quality of life, decreased survival, and a greater likelihood of hospitalization. We need large prospective studies to discern the association between anemia and COPD. PMID:25814799

  5. Anemia in Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Prevalence, pathogenesis, and potential impact

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Rajta, Puja Negi; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common preventable and treatable lifestyle-related disease with high global prevalence. COPD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Comorbidities are important events in the natural history of the disease and have a negative effect on the morbidity and mortality of COPD patients. Cardiac diseases, lung cancer, osteoporosis, and depression are common comorbidities reported for COPD. Recently, anemia has been recognized as a frequent comorbidity in COPD patients. The prevalence of anemia in patients with COPD varies from 7.5% to 33%. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is probably the most common type of anemia associated with COPD. ACD is driven by COPD-mediated systemic inflammation. Anemia in COPD is associated with greater healthcare resource utilization, impaired quality of life, decreased survival, and a greater likelihood of hospitalization. We need large prospective studies to discern the association between anemia and COPD. PMID:25814799

  6. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-11-26

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD. PMID:26582375

  7. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Masamitsu

    2008-03-01

    Diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) requires both serologic evidence of an autoantibody and hemolysis. Based on the characteristic temperature reactivity of the autoantibody to red cell membranes, AIHA is classified into warm AIHA or cold AIHA (cold agglutinin disease and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria). Sensitized RBCs are destructed by intravascular and/or extravascular hemolysis. On the basis of etiology, AIHA are classified as idiopathic or secondary. The common cause of secondary AIHA is lymphoproliferative disorders, autoimmune diseases, and infections. The first line therapy of patients with warm AIHA is glucocorticoids and primary treatment for cold AIHA is avoiding cold exposure. The other standard treatments include splenectomy and immunosuppressive drugs. Recently, rituximab, a monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, has been used in refractory AIHA with excellent responses. PMID:18326320

  8. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD. PMID:26637747

  9. Therapy for aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    DeZern, Amy E; Guinan, Eva C

    2011-01-01

    A 24-year-old man from Ecuador presents to your clinic with dyspnea on exertion, bruising, and petechiae. He is noted to be pancytopenic with ANC 430, hemoglobin 7.4 g/dL (reticulocyte count 0.9%), and platelets 18 000. His BM biopsy is hypocellular for age. Ultimately, he is diagnosed with severe aplastic anemia. He is the only child of 2 South American parents without any matches in the unrelated donor registry, including cord blood. He is red cell- and platelet transfusion-dependent. He has been recommended therapy with antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine but declined it. He seeks recommendations about new alternatives to this regimen to improve his chance of response. PMID:22160016

  10. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... need for blood transfusions. Medicines To Suppress the Immune System Research suggests that aplastic anemia may sometimes occur because the body's immune system attacks its own cells by mistake. For this ...

  11. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... I told my doctor that I was very tired. My doctor did blood tests to check for ... or faint ● ● Short of breath ● ● Very weak and tired ● ● Your heart beating very fast What is anemia? ...

  12. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  13. Sexuality and sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Côbo, Viviane de Almeida; Chapadeiro, Cibele Alves; Ribeiro, João Batista; Moraes-Souza, Helio; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano

    2013-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease, the most common hereditary blood disease in the world, is the result of an atypical hemoglobin called S (Hb S) which, when homozygous (Hb SS) is the cause of sickle cell anemia. Changes of puberty, correlated with a delayed growth spurt, begin late in both male and female sickle cell anemia individuals with repercussions on sexuality and reproduction. The objectives of this exploratory and descriptive study were to characterize the development of sexuality in adults with sickle cell anemia by investigating the patient's perception of their sex life, as well as the information they had and needed on this subject. Methods Twenty male and female sickle cell anemia patients treated at the Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba (UFTM) with ages between 19 and 47 years old were enrolled. A socioeconomic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview on sexuality, reproduction and genetic counseling were applied. Results This study shows that the sickle cell anemia patients lacked information on sexuality especially about the risks of pregnancy and the possible inheritance of the disease by their children. Moreover, the sexual life of the patients was impaired due to pain as well as discrimination and negative feelings experienced in close relationships. Conclusion The health care of sickle cell anemia patients should take into account not only the clinical aspects of the disease, but also psychosocial aspects by providing counseling on sexuality, reproduction and genetics, in order to give this population the possibility of a better quality of life. PMID:23741184

  14. Erythroferrone contributes to recovery from anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kautz, Léon; Jung, Grace; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-10-16

    Erythroferrone (ERFE) is an erythropoiesis-driven regulator of iron homeostasis. ERFE mediates the suppression of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin to increase iron absorption and mobilization of iron from stores. We examined the role of ERFE in the recovery from anemia of inflammation (AI) induced by injection of heat-killed Brucella abortus. B abortus-treated wild-type mice developed a moderate anemia and reached nadir hemoglobin 14 days after injection and partially recovered by 28 days. We observed that Erfe expression in the bone marrow and the spleen was greatly increased during anemia and peaked at 14 days after injection, a time course similar to serum erythropoietin. To determine whether ERFE facilitates the recovery from anemia, we analyzed Erfe-deficient mice injected with B abortus. Compared with wild-type mice, Erfe-deficient mice exhibited a more severe anemia, had higher hepcidin levels and consequently lower serum iron concentration on days 14 and 21, and manifested impaired mobilization of iron from stores (liver and spleen). Erfe(-/-) mice eventually compensated by further stimulating erythropoiesis and reticulocyte production. Thus, ERFE contributes to the recovery from AI by suppressing hepcidin and increasing iron availability. PMID:25193872

  15. [The importance of genetic counseling at sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Cínthia Tavares Leal; Coelho, Gabriela Ortega

    2010-06-01

    The genetic counseling has the purpose of guiding people through a conscientious and balanced decision making process regarding procreation, helping them to understand how the hereditary succession can contribute for the occurrence or risk of recurrence of genetic illnesses, as it is the case of the sickle cell anemia. This type of anemia is the most prevalence hereditary illness in Brazil and has clinical complications that can harm the development, the quality of life and lead to death. The present article has the objective to clarify the importance of the genetic counseling for the anemia carriers or falciform trace, aiming at to point out the main characteristics of this illness, its complications and how the diagnosis is made. The study was based on the bibliographical method, looking for studies that deal with this type of anemia and genetic counseling, relating them with guidelines and data from the Health Ministry. Based on the found data, we infer the importance of genetic counseling for the individuals who present the heterozygote form of sickle cell anemia - the falcemic trace - and highlight the need to implement precocious diagnostics programs and genetic and social/psychological orientation for those with the disease or falciform trace. PMID:20640335

  16. [Acquired aplastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hirohito

    2016-02-01

    Idiopathic aplastic anemia (AA) is an autoimmune disease caused by T cells. An increase in the percentage of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein-deficient cells and the presence of HLA allele-lacking leukocytes due to 6pUPD provide indirect evidence that T cells contribute to the pathophysiology of AA. Recent studies have revealed the presence of somatic mutations in MDS and/or AML candidate genes in one third of AA patients. Current treatment topics include the efficacy of eltrombopag for AA found to be refractory to immunosuppressive therapy as well as for newly diagnosed AA when administered in combination with ATG and cyclosporine. Furthermore, improved outcomes of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from unrelated donors using reduced-intensity conditioning regimens have been obtained with eltrombopag. Fludarabine-based regimens are now the mainstream approach for preconditioning and have lowered the transplant-related mortality rate. However, new problems such as mixed chimerism and secondary graft failure have arisen. Attempts to prevent GVHD more efficiently by including ATG and alemtuzumab in the preconditioning regimen are being investigated. PMID:26935624

  17. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia? The most common symptom of anemia is fatigue ( ... mild symptoms or none at all. Complications of Anemia Some people who have anemia may have arrhythmias ( ...

  18. Impairment of Bone Health in Pediatric Patients with Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Schündeln, Michael M.; Goretzki, Sarah C.; Hauffa, Pia K.; Wieland, Regina; Bauer, Jens; Baeder, Lena; Eggert, Angelika; Hauffa, Berthold P.; Grasemann, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia result in impaired bone health in both adults and youths. Children with other types of chronic hemolytic anemia may also display impaired bone health. Study Design To assess bone health in pediatric patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, a cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 patients with different forms of hemolytic anemia (i.e., 17 homozygous sickle cell disease and 14 hereditary spherocytosis patients). Biochemical, radiographic and anamnestic parameters of bone health were assessed. Results Vitamin D deficiency with 25 OH-vitamin D serum levels below 20 ng/ml was a common finding (80.5%) in this cohort. Bone pain was present in 31% of patients. Analysis of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteocalcin levels indicated an alteration in bone modeling with significantly elevated RANKL/OPG ratios (control: 0.08+0.07; patients: 0.26+0.2, P = 0.0007). Osteocalcin levels were found to be lower in patients compared with healthy controls (68.5+39.0 ng/ml vs. 118.0+36.6 ng/ml, P = 0.0001). Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant (P<0.025) influence of LDH (partial r2 = 0.29), diagnosis of hemolytic anemia (partial r2 = 0.05) and age (partial r2 = 0.03) on osteocalcin levels. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were more frequently and more severely affected by impaired bone health than patients with hereditary spherocytosis. Conclusion Bone health is impaired in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia. In addition to endocrine alterations, an imbalance in the RANKL/OPG system and low levels of osteocalcin may contribute to this impairment. PMID:25299063

  19. Cold agglutinin-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Randen, Ulla; Tjønnfjord, Geir E

    2015-06-01

    Cold antibody types account for about 25% of autoimmune hemolytic anemias. Primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is characterized by a clonal lymphoproliferative disorder. Secondary cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) complicates specific infections and malignancies. Hemolysis in CAD and CAS is mediated by the classical complement pathway and is predominantly extravascular. Not all patients require treatment. Successful CAD therapy targets the pathogenic B-cell clone. Complement modulation seems promising in both CAD and CAS. Further development and documentation are necessary before clinical use. We review options for possible complement-directed therapy. PMID:26043385

  20. Classification of anemia for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Chulilla, Jose Antonio; Romero Colás, Maria Soledad; Gutiérrez Martín, Martín

    2009-01-01

    Most anemia is related to the digestive system by dietary deficiency, malabsorption, or chronic bleeding. We review the World Health Organization definition of anemia, its morphological classification (microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic) and pathogenic classification (regenerative and hypo regenerative), and integration of these classifications. Interpretation of laboratory tests is included, from the simplest (blood count, routine biochemistry) to the more specific (iron metabolism, vitamin B12, folic acid, reticulocytes, erythropoietin, bone marrow examination and Schilling test). In the text and various algorithms, we propose a hierarchical and logical way to reach a diagnosis as quickly as possible, by properly managing the medical interview, physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, bone marrow examination, and other complementary tests. The prevalence is emphasized in all sections so that the gastroenterologist can direct the diagnosis to the most common diseases, although the tables also include rare diseases. Digestive diseases potentially causing anemia have been studied in preference, but other causes of anemia have been included in the text and tables. Primitive hematological diseases that cause anemia are only listed, but are not discussed in depth. The last section is dedicated to simplifying all items discussed above, using practical rules to guide diagnosis and medical care with the greatest economy of resources and time. PMID:19787825

  1. Issues in prevention of iron deficiency anemia in India.

    PubMed

    Anand, Tanu; Rahi, Manju; Sharma, Pragya; Ingle, Gopal K

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be major public health problem in India. It is estimated that about 20% of maternal deaths are directly related to anemia and another 50% of maternal deaths are associated with it. The question, therefore, is why, despite being the first country to launch the National Nutritional Anemia Prophylaxis Programme in 1970, the problem of IDA remains so widespread. As is to be expected, the economic implications of IDA are also massive. The issues of control of IDA in India are multiple. Inadequate dietary intake of iron, defective iron absorption, increased iron requirements due to repeated pregnancies and lactation, poor iron reserves at birth, timing of umbilical cord clamping, timing and type of complementary food introduction, frequency of infections in children, and excessive physiological blood loss during adolescence and pregnancy are some of the causes responsible for the high prevalence of anemia in India. In addition, there are other multiple programmatic and organizational issues. This review, therefore, is an attempt to examine the current burden of anemia in India, its epidemiology, and the various issues regarding its prevention and control, as well as to offer some innovative approaches to deal with this major health problem. PMID:24984990

  2. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1980-1981)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1981-07-02

    The basic purpose of this study is the delineation and exploitation of inborn anemias of the laboratory mouse, carried out by utilization of genetically homogeneous stocks segregating only for anemia-producing genes; by physiological and histological descriptions of each condition at all stages in the life history; by determination of tissue sites of primary gene action through tissue culture studies, tissue transplantation and parabiosis experiments; by analysis of reactions of normal and anemic mice to a variety of stressful stimuli, including x-irradiation, hypoxia, and toxic chemicals, and by biochemical comparisons between tissues, especially erythrocytes and hemopoietic cells of normal vs each type of anemic mouse. At present 16 single-locus anemias are known in the mouse, plus one with multifactorial inheritance (the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB inbred mice). Of these, six are maintained only by the Jackson Laboratory, and two others have but one additional source. Effects of anemia-producing mutant alleles of these loci (an; f; ja; ha; Hba/sup th/; mk; nb; Sl and Sl/sup d/; sla; sph; and W, W/sup v/, W/sup J/ and 10 other putative W-alleles) are currently under investigation at the Jackson Laboratory. 15 refs.

  3. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  4. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning . Symptoms Mild anemia may have no symptoms. As ... Saunders; 2011:chap 449. Read More Anemia Hemoglobin Lead poisoning Update Date 2/25/2014 Updated by: Sameer ...

  5. Anemia Boosts Stroke Death Risk, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160476.html Anemia Boosts Stroke Death Risk, Study Finds Blood condition ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older stroke victims suffering from anemia -- a lack of red blood cells -- may have ...

  6. Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic - caused by chemicals or toxins ... Possible substances that can cause hemolytic anemia include: Anti-malaria drugs (quinine compounds) Arsenic Dapsone Intravenous water infusion (not half-normal saline or normal saline) Metals (chromium/chromates, ...

  7. Anemia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Anemia URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/anemia.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  8. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency. PMID:25636824

  9. (Inborn anemias of mice): Terminal progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations located at 11 different chromosomal locations in the mouse all affecting hemopoiesis have been studied. These include: Hertwig's anemia (an), W-anemias (W, W/sup v/, W/sup 17J/ to W/sup 41J/), Steel anemias (Sl, Sl/sup d/, etc.), Normoblastic anemia (nb), Jaundiced (ja), Spherocytic anemias (sph, sph/sup ha/), sph/sup 2J/, sph/sup 2BC/, Flexed-tail anemia (f), Microcytic anemia (mk), Sex-linked anemia (Sla), Alpha thallasemia (Hba/sup th/), and a hypochromic anemia associated with low transferrin levels (hpx). Our findings indicate that the erythroid defect in W-anemias stem from an intrinsic defect in the erythroid progenitor cells, and that all other erythroid hemostatic mechanisms are fully functional. Hertwig's anemia (an) is affected in a similar fashion. However, in the case of Steel anemias, the erythroid progenitors are repressed, but when transplanted to appropriate recipients were found to be fully functional. 70 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Manchandani, Raj Pal; Oneal, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare. PMID:27559485

  11. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Manchandani, Raj Pal; Oneal, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare. PMID:27559485

  12. [Approach to the diagnosis and treatment of chronic anemia secondary to gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Rodríguez-Alonso, Lorena; Guardiola Capón, Jordi

    2014-12-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia and can cause asthenia, cognitive and functional impairment, and decompensation of underlying diseases. Iron deficiency anemia is not a disease but is the result of a potentially serious medical problem. Consequently, patients should always undergo investigation of the underlying cause. In men and postmenopausal women, the condition is caused by gastrointestinal loss and malabsorption of iron. In this group, recommended procedures are gastroscopy, colonoscopy and serological testing for celiac disease. If the results of these tests are negative, repeat examinations and iron therapy should be considered. In treatment-refractory or recurrent anemia, the small intestine should be investigated. In this case, the procedure of choice is capsule endoscopy. Iron deficiency anemia should always be treated until iron deposits have returned to normal levels. A wide variety of preparations are available, in both oral and parental formulations. PMID:25443541

  13. Anemia in Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulcer: Prevalence, Clinical Characteristics, and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Chuan, Fengning; Zhang, Min; Yao, Yang; Tian, Wenqing; He, Xiaoqun; Zhou, Bo

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients with anemia and assess the relationship between anemia and DFU outcome. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on patients with DFU who attended our hospital from May 2007 to September 2014. All of the variables in the DFU patients with and without anemia were compared. In this study, 353 subjects were included, anemia was present in 236 patients (66.9%). These patients were significantly male, more likely to be a smoker, had a lower level of serum albumin and worse kidney function, more likely to use at least 2 types of antibiotics and had a worse perfusion of the lower limb, a larger and deeper ulcer and a more severe infection. A multivariate analysis showed that male sex, lower serum albumin, and worse kidney function were independent predictors of anemia in DFU patients. Additionally, in multivariate models, anemia was one of the variables that was most significantly associated with adverse outcomes and with similar findings for secondary outcomes. Receiver operating characteristic analysis determined a hemoglobin cutoff of 12.3 g/dL (females) and 12.1 g/dL (males) to identify a high-risk population of DFU patients who would have adverse outcomes. So anemia is common in patients with DFU. Although typically mild or moderate, anemia has been associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in patients with DFU. PMID:27440798

  14. Incidence of anemia in patients diagnosed with solid tumors receiving chemotherapy, 2010–2013

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hairong; Xu, Lanfang; Page, John H; Cannavale, Kim; Sattayapiwat, Olivia; Rodriguez, Roberto; Chao, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate and characterize the risk of anemia during the course of chemotherapy among patients with five common types of solid tumors. Patients and methods Patients diagnosed with incident cancers of breast, lung, colon/rectum, stomach, and ovary who received chemotherapy were identified from Kaiser Permanente Southern California Health Plan (2010–2012). All clinical data were collected from the health plan’s electronic medical records. Incidence proportions of patients developing anemia and 95% confidence intervals were calculated overall and by anemia severity and type, as well as by stage at cancer diagnosis, and by chemotherapy regimen and cycle. Results A total of 4,426 patients who received chemotherapy were included. Across cancers, 3,962 (89.5%) patients developed anemia during the course of chemotherapy (normocytic 85%, macrocytic 10%, microcytic 5%; normochromic 47%, hyperchromic 44%, hypochromic 9%). The anemia grades were distributed as follows: 58% were grade 1, 34% grade 2, 8% grade 3, and <1% grade 4. The incidence of grade 2+ anemia ranged from 26.3% in colorectal cancer patients to 59.2% in ovarian cancer patients. Incidence of grade 2+ anemia increased from 29% in stage I to 49% in stage IV. Incidence of grade 2+ anemia varied from 18.2% in breast cancer patients treated with cyclophosphamide + docetaxel regimen to 59.7% in patients with ovarian cancer receiving carboplatin + paclitaxel regimen. Conclusion The incidence of moderate-to-severe anemia (hemoglobin <10 g/dL) remained considerably high in patients with solid tumors receiving chemotherapy. The risk of anemia was greater in patients with distant metastasis. PMID:27186078

  15. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  16. Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Phone: 202–776–0544 Fax: 202–776–0545 Internet: www.hematology.org Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation ... Fax: 301–279–7205 Email: help@aamds.org Internet: www.aamds.org Iron Disorders Institute P.O. ...

  17. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  18. An anemia of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Faux, N G; Rembach, A; Wiley, J; Ellis, K A; Ames, D; Fowler, C J; Martins, R N; Pertile, K K; Rumble, R L; Trounson, B; Masters, C L; Bush, A I

    2014-11-01

    Lower hemoglobin is associated with cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since brain iron homeostasis is perturbed in AD, we investigated whether this is peripherally reflected in the hematological and related blood chemistry values from the Australian Imaging Biomarker and Lifestyle (AIBL) study (a community-based, cross-sectional cohort comprising 768 healthy controls (HC), 133 participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 211 participants with AD). We found that individuals with AD had significantly lower hemoglobin, mean cell hemoglobin concentrations, packed cell volume and higher erythrocyte sedimentation rates (adjusted for age, gender, APOE-ɛ4 and site). In AD, plasma iron, transferrin, transferrin saturation and red cell folate levels exhibited a significant distortion of their customary relationship to hemoglobin levels. There was a strong association between anemia and AD (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=2.43, confidence interval (CI) (1.31, 4.54)). Moreover, AD emerged as a strong risk factor for anemia on step-down regression, even when controlling for all other available explanations for anemia (adjusted OR=3.41, 95% CI (1.68, 6.92)). These data indicated that AD is complicated by anemia, which may itself contribute to cognitive decline. PMID:24419041

  19. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations ushering pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Mrabet, S; Ellouze, F; Ellini, S; Mrad, M F

    2015-12-01

    Biermer disease or pernicious anemia is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis characterized by the lack of secretion of gastric intrinsic factor. This leads to an insufficient absorption of vitamin B12 in the ileum. Clinical manifestations are mainly hematologic. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are known but are less frequent especially early in the disease. Inaugural neuropsychiatric arrays are rare and various thus making diagnosis difficult. In this article, we report through two clinical cases different neuropsychiatric manifestations revealing pernicious anemia. Mrs. C.O., aged 56, presented after surgery for gallstones, an acute psychiatric array associated with gait disorders. She had no history of neurological or psychiatric problems. The psychiatric interview revealed delirious syndrome, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Neurological examination noted a flaccid paraplegia with peripheral neuropathic syndrome and myoclonus in the upper limbs. At the full blood count, a macrocytosis (VGM: 112.2fl) without anemia was found. The level of vitamin B12 in the blood was low. Cerebro-spinal MRI was suggestive of a neuro-Biermer and showed hyper signal in the cervical cord on T2-weighted sagittal section. In axial section, hyper signal appears at the posterior columns in the form of V. There were no brain abnormalities. A sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy was diagnosed. The patient received vitamin B12 intramuscularly for ten days associated with neuroleptic treatment. Mrs. R.M., aged 40, was brought to the psychiatry consultation for acute behavioral disorders progressively worsening over a month. An anxiety syndrome, depressive syndrome and delirious syndrome were identified. Neurological examination showed a posterior cordonal syndrome with quadripyramidal syndrome. Full blood count showed a macrocytic anemia. Serum B12 level was collapsed. Cerebro-spinal MRI was normal. She received vitamin B12 with clinical and biological improvement. Features of pernicious anemia

  20. [Anemia as a surgical risk factor].

    PubMed

    Moral García, Victoria; Ángeles Gil de Bernabé Sala, M; Nadia Diana, Kinast; Pericas, Bartolomé Cantallops; Nebot, Alexia Galindo

    2013-07-01

    Perioperative anemia is common in patients undergoing surgery and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and a decreased quality of life. The main causes of anemia in the perioperative context are iron deficiency and chronic inflammation. Anemia can be aggravated by blood loss during surgery, and is most commonly treated with allogeneic transfusion. Moreover, blood transfusions are not without risks, once again increasing patient morbidity and mortality. Given these concerns, we propose to review the pathophysiology of anemia in the surgical environment, as well as its treatment through the consumption of iron-rich foods and by oral or intravenous iron therapy (iron sucrose and iron carboxymaltose). In chronic inflammatory anemia, we use erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (erythropoietin alpha) and, in cases of mixed anemia, the combination of both treatments. The objective is always to reduce the need for perioperative transfusions and speed the recovery from postoperative anemia, as well as decrease the patient morbidity and mortality rate. PMID:24314568

  1. Ret-Y a measure of reticulocyte size: a sensitive indicator of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Kickler, T S; Borowitz, M J; Thompson, R E; Charintranont, N; Law, R

    2004-12-01

    In this study the size of reticulocytes was measured, reticulocyte-Y (Ret-Y), to distinguish iron deficiency anemia from the anemia of chronic disease using a Sysmex XE2100 cell counter. We evaluated this parameter prospectively in 100 patients seen for the evaluation of anemia. A clinical diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia or anemia of chronic disease was made on the basis of a complete blood count, examination of the peripheral smear, and serum ferritin along with a history and physical examination. We analyzed the sensitivity and specificity of the Ret-Y in relationship to the clinical diagnosis. We also measured serum transferrin receptor levels to use as the gold standard laboratory test for iron deficiency against which we compared the Ret-Y. In 40 normal individuals with normal serum ferritin and transferrin receptor levels the mean Ret-Y was 1874 +/- 178 (1 SD). The mean Ret-Y in the anemia of chronic disease group (n=62) was 1722 +/- 162, not significantly different from normal. The mean Ret-Y value among iron-deficient patients (n=38), was 1407 +/- 136 (P <0.01 vs. the anemia of chronic disease group's Ret-Y value). Receiver operator curves showed that Ret-Y correlated closely to the serum transferrin receptor and was superior to the mean corpuscular volume, and ferritin level, in differentiating the type of anemia. The Ret-Y parameter has the highest overall sensitivity and specificity of the panel of tests routinely used in differentiating iron deficiency anemia from anemia of chronic disease. PMID:15596002

  2. Prevalence of Iron deficiency anemia in children with liver cirrhosis: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zareifar, Soheila; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Rahanjam, Najmeh; Farahmand Far, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among the many complications reported for cirrhosis, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has attracted much attention. This type of anemia, in contrast to other types of anemia, is easy to treat prophylactically, but if left untreated can lead to a poor quality of life. The aim of this study was to estimate the hemoglobin and serum iron levels among patients with liver cirrhosis for the early diagnosis of IDA and to avoid unnecessary testing and iron supplementation. Subjects and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 88 children diagnosed with cirrhosis were included, and the values of hemoglobin, serum iron levels and relationship between serum iron (SI), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), prothrombine time (PT), international normalization ratio (INR), total and direct bilirubin and hepatic enzymes were estimated using paired t test, Mann-Whitney, Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: Forty-six (52.3%) of 88 children were girls and 42 (47.7%) were boys. Forty-eight (54.5%) patients had anemia and 8 (9%) had iron deficiency anemia (5 boys, 5.6%, and 3 girls, 3.4%). No relationships were observed between iron deficiency anemia and the patient’s age or gender, whereas there was a relationship between iron deficiency and severity and duration of the disease, although the correlation was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The high frequency of iron deficiency anemia in children with cirrhosis (9%) suggests that timely screening should be used for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26261697

  3. Epidemiology of Anemia in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kushang V.

    2008-01-01

    Anemia is a common, multifactorial condition among older adults. The World Health Organization (WHO) definition of anemia (hemoglobin concentration <12 g/dL in women and <13 g/dL in men) is most often used in epidemiologic studies of older adults. More than 10% of community-dwelling adults age 65 years and older has WHO-defined anemia. After age 50 years, prevalence of anemia increases with advancing age and exceeds 20% in those 85 years and older. In nursing homes, anemia is present in 48–63% of residents. Incidence of anemia in older adults is not well characterized. Among older adults with anemia, approximately one-third have evidence of iron, folate, and/or vitamin B12 deficiency, another third have renal insufficiency and/or chronic inflammation, and the remaining third have anemia that is unexplained. Several studies demonstrate that anemia is associated with poorer survival in older adults. This review details the distribution and consequences of anemia in older adults and identifies future epidemiologic research needs. PMID:18809090

  4. Pagophagia in iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tatsumi; Kawati, Yasunori

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between pagophagia (ice pica) and iron deficiency anemia was studied. All 81 patients with iron deficiency anemia defined as hemoglobin <12.0 g/dl and ferritin level <12 ng/ml were interviewed about their habits of eating ice or other non-food substances. Pagophagia was defined as compulsive and repeated ingestion of at least one tray of ice or ice eating which was relieved after iron administration. Pagophagia was present in 13 patients (16.0%). All patients who received oral iron were periodically assessed employing a questionnaire on pagophagia and laboratory data. Iron therapy can cure the pagophagia earlier than hemoglobin recovery and repair of tissue iron deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of pagophagia is unclear, a biochemical approach involving the central nervous system might elucidate the mechanism underlying these abnormal behaviors. PMID:24850454

  5. [Anemia in chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Grau-Amorós, J; Formiga, F; Urrutia, A

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most common comorbidities in patients with decompensated chronic heart failure admitted to the Internal Medicine Ward. However, although there is evidence supporting its treatment to improve the functional capacity of the patients and to reduce the new admissions rate, the clinical practice guidelines do not provide any directives regarding its approach. This is an ideal clinical problem for the internist due to its multifactorial origin and the comprehensive point of view needed to approach the group of syndromes that occur in these patients (anemia, heart failure, geriatric syndromes, diabetes, etc.) The choice of treatment strategy, if such treatment is decided, should always begin after correcting the congestive signs in the outpatient with optimal treatment of heart failure. PMID:21620391

  6. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1982-1983)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1983-09-09

    The nature of the defects that shorten the effective lifespan of red blood cells in the circulation and which gave rise to anemia, jaundice and to spleen, liver and heart enlargement are studied because they so closely parallel inherited hemolytic anemias in man. In mice, ''hemolytic disease'' initiated by the ja, sph, sph/sup ha/, or the nb genes has been traced to abnormalities in the protein components of their red cell membranes. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of detergent solubilized membranes reveal that in the different genetic types one or more of the major high molecular weight proteins called spectrins is decreased or totally missing. It is one thing to observe a correlation between missing or defective components in selected analytical procedures, and another to establish a causal relationship between the two. To investigate the possible interrelationships, we examined the associations between spectrin or ankyrin content, the severity of the resulting anemia, red cell osmotic fragilities, and the capacity of cells from each genotype to be deformed in a continuous osmotic gradient at constant sheer stress. Our findings indicate that sensitivity to osmotic stress, cell rigidity (inadequate deformability), deficiency of spectrin or ankyrin, and the severity of the anemia, are statistically highly correlated. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. Colonic lymphangiomatosis associated with anemia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Woo Chul; Kim, Hye-Kang; Yoo, Jin Young; Lee, Jeong Rok; Lee, Kang-Moon; Paik, Chang Nyol; Jang, U-Im; Yang, Jin Mo

    2008-01-01

    Lymphangioma is an uncommon malformation of lymphatic system. Multiple colonic lymphangioma named as lymphangiomatosis is considered an extremely rare disease. Although lymphangioma is a benign tumor and most colonic lymphangiomas do not cause symptoms and do not require treatment, resection of lymphangioma is necessary in the presence of symptoms such as abdominal pain, bleeding, intussusceptions. We report a case of colonic lymphangiomatosis in a man who presented with abdominal discomfort and anemia, which was diagnosed and treated with endoscopic snare polypectomy. PMID:18837097

  8. George Minot and Pernicious Anemia.

    PubMed

    Dhungat, J V Pai

    2015-08-01

    George Minot (1885-1950) was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He was great grandson of James Jackson, co-founder of Massachusetts General Hospital in 1821. Graduating from Harvard College he enrolled at Harvard Medical School and obtained his MD in 1912. As a house pupil (intern) at the hospital he became interested in diseases of the blood and began taking meticulous histories of dietary habits of patients with anemia. PMID:27604448

  9. Musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic anemias.

    PubMed

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Forni, Gian Luca; Balocco, Manuela; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the current use of diagnostic imaging modalities in the evaluation of a heterogeneous group of disorders causing chronic anemias by impaired blood cell production (inherited bone marrow failure syndromes of childhood, aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, β-thalassemia) or increased blood cell destruction (sickle cell disease). During the course of these disorders, various musculoskeletal abnormalities can be encountered, including marrow hyperplasia, reversion of yellow marrow to red marrow, growth disturbances, and, occasionally, extramedullary hematopoiesis. Diagnostic imaging may help the clinician to identify specific complications related to either the disease (e.g., bone infarction and acute osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease) or transfusion (e.g., iron overload due to increased hemolysis) and iron chelation (e.g., desferrioxamine-related dysplastic bone changes and deferiprone-related degenerative arthritis) treatments. In this field, magnetic resonance imaging plays a pivotal role because of its high tissue contrast that enables early assessment of bone marrow changes before they become apparent on plain films or computed tomography or metabolic changes occur on bone scintigraphy or positron emission tomography scan. Overall, familiarity with the range of radiological appearances in chronic anemias is important to diagnose complications and establish appropriate therapy. PMID:21644200

  10. Pathophysiology of anemia and erythrocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Vivien M; Rainey, Susan; Lappin, Terence R; Maxwell, A Peter

    2007-11-01

    An increasing understanding of the process of erythropoiesis raises some interesting questions about the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of anemia and erythrocytosis. The mechanisms underlying the development of many of the erythrocytoses, previously characterised as idiopathic, have been elucidated leading to an increased understanding of oxygen homeostasis. Characterisation of anemia and erythrocytosis in relation to serum erythropoietin levels can be a useful addition to clinical diagnostic criteria and provide a rationale for treatment with erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs). Recombinant human erythropoietin as well as other ESAs are now widely used to treat anemias associated with a range of conditions, including chronic kidney disease, chronic inflammatory disorders and cancer. There is also heightened awareness of the potential abuse of ESAs to boost athletic performance in competitive sport. The discovery of erythropoietin receptors outside of the erythropoietic compartment may herald future applications for ESAs in the management of neurological and cardiac diseases. The current controversy concerning optimal hemoglobin levels in chronic kidney disease patients treated with ESAs and the potential negative clinical outcomes of ESA treatment in cancer reinforces the need for cautious evaluation of the pleiotropic effects of ESAs in non-erythroid tissues. PMID:17656101

  11. Anemia Among Hospitalized Children at a Multispecialty Hospital, Bangalore (Karnataka), India

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Firdos; Poornima, Siddaraju; Balaji, Pishey Ashwathnarayan Rao; Varne, Smitha Ranoji Rao; Jayashree, Krishnamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to the limited availability of data related to anemia in hospitalized children, this research was conducted to study the occurrence, morphological patterns, distribution in different age groups, sex, and severity of anemia among children aged 6 months-12 years. Setting: Inpatients in department of pediatrics at a multispecialty hospital, Bangalore. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study from Oct, 2011 to Sep, 2012. Materials and Methods: Ethical clearance was obtained from the ethical committee of the hospital as per 1964 Declaration of Helsinki. Unrestricted random sampling method was used to select the study group consisting of 882 children between the age of 6 months and 12 years. After obtaining the consent, data were obtained and statistically analyzed using statistical tools like mean, median, standard deviation, and Chi-square test. Results: Out of 882 children selected, 642 (72.79%) were anemic, out of which a majority of 629 (98%) children suffered from nonhemoglobinopathies and a meagre 13 (2%) suffered from hemoglobinopathies. Children in the age group of 6 months-1 year were most affected with nonhemoglobinopathies (33%). Moderate degree of anemia (hemoglobin = 7-9.9 g/dL) was the commonest grade of anemia (80%), while microcytic hypochromic anemia was commonest morphological type of anemia (48%). Among hemoglobinopathies, thalassemia major was the most common (69%, that is 9 out of 13 patients). Conclusion: The occurrence of anemia among children aged between 6 months and 12 years is high and nonhemoglobinopathies predominate over the hemoglobinopathies. PMID:24791237

  12. Hepcidin-Dependent Regulation of Erythropoiesis during Anemia in a Teleost Fish, Dicentrarchus labrax

    PubMed Central

    Caldas, Carolina; Ramos, Miguel F.; Rodrigues, Pedro N. S.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is a common disorder, characterized by abnormally low levels of red blood cells or hemoglobin. The mechanisms of anemia development and response have been thoroughly studied in mammals, but little is known in other vertebrates, particularly teleost fish. In this study, different degrees of anemia were induced in healthy European sea bass specimens (Dicentrarchus labrax) and at pre-determined time points hematological parameters, liver iron content and the expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis and hematopoiesis, with particular attention on hepcidins, were evaluated. The experimental anemia prompted a decrease in hamp1 expression in all tested organs, in accordance to an increased need for iron absorption and mobilization, with slight increases in hamp2 in the kidney and intestine. The liver was clearly the major organ involved in iron homeostasis, decreasing its iron content and showing a gene expression profile consistent with an increased iron release and mobilization. Although both the spleen and head kidney are involved in erythropoiesis, the spleen was found to assume a more preponderant role in the recovery of erythrocyte levels. The intestine was also involved in the response to anemia, through the increase of iron transporting genes. Administration of Hamp1 or Hamp2 mature peptides showed that only Hamp1 affects hematological parameters and liver iron content. In conclusion, the molecular mechanisms of response to anemia present in sea bass are similar to the ones described for mammals, with these results indicating that the two hepcidin types from teleosts assume different roles during anemia. PMID:27100629

  13. Diamond-Blackfan anemia and nutritional deficiency-induced anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Gelbart, David

    2014-04-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare, inherited disease that characteristically presents as a chronic, normochromic macrocytosis due to red cell lineage bone marrow failure. Although studies are elaborating on the genetic basis for its associated comorbidities, little has been published comparing this anemia to other chronic anemias that have similar laboratory results in children. This article offers a global perspective of the disease and compares it with anemia due to vitamin B12 and folate deficiency in children. PMID:24662257

  14. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gil, Victor M; Ferreira, Jorge S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common problem and a major cause of mortality, morbidity and impaired quality of life. Anemia is a frequent comorbidity in heart failure and further worsens prognosis and disability. Regardless of anemia status, iron deficiency is a common and usually unidentified problem in patients with heart failure. This article reviews the mechanisms, impact on outcomes and treatment of anemia and iron deficiency in patients with heart failure. PMID:24216080

  15. Anemia in the frail, elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Röhrig, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Anemia and frailty are two common findings in geriatric patients and have been shown to be associated with poor outcomes in this patient group. Recent studies have contributed to the growing evidence of a possible association with the age-related chronic inflammatory status known as “inflammaging”. These findings do not only give a better insight into the pathogenesis of anemia in frailty, but also offer new treatment options. The present article focuses on this assumed association between anemia, frailty, and inflammaging and summarizes current management options for anemia in frail patients. PMID:27051279

  16. Severe Aplastic Anemia Associated With Eosinophilic Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    de Masson, Adèle; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Benhamou, Ygal; Moluçon-Chabrot, Cécile; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Laquerrière, Annie; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Michonneau, David; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Rybojad, Michel; Bonnotte, Bernard; Jardin, Fabrice; Lévesque, Hervé; Bagot, Martine; Socié, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Diffuse eosinophilic fasciitis (Shulman disease) is a rare sclerodermiform syndrome that, in most cases, resolves spontaneously or after corticosteroid therapy. It has been associated with hematologic disorders, such as aplastic anemia. The clinical features and long-term outcomes of patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia have been poorly described. We report the cases of 4 patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated severe aplastic anemia. For 3 of these patients, aplastic anemia was refractory to conventional immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine. One of the patients received rituximab as a second-line therapy with significant efficacy for both the skin and hematologic symptoms. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe rituximab used to treat eosinophilic fasciitis with associated aplastic anemia. In a literature review, we identified 19 additional cases of eosinophilic fasciitis and aplastic anemia. Compared to patients with isolated eosinophilic fasciitis, patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia were more likely to be men (70%) and older (mean age, 56 yr; range, 18–71 yr). Corticosteroid-containing regimens improved skin symptoms in 5 (42%) of 12 cases but were ineffective in the treatment of associated aplastic anemia in all but 1 case. Aplastic anemia was profound in 13 cases (57%) and was the cause of death in 8 cases (35%). Only 5 patients (22%) achieved long-term remission (allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: n = 2; cyclosporine-containing regimen: n = 2; high-dose corticosteroid-based regimen: n = 1). PMID:23429351

  17. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by ...

  18. Do You Know about Sickle Cell Anemia? (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lunch Recipes Do You Know About Sickle Cell Anemia? KidsHealth > For Kids > Do You Know About Sickle ... stay in the hospital. What Causes Sickle Cell Anemia? Sickle cell anemia is an inherited (say: in- ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions X-linked sideroblastic anemia X-linked sideroblastic anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia is an inherited disorder that prevents developing red ...

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding.

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eivindson, Martin; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius; Jensen, Nanna Martin; Jørgensen, Søren Peter; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Rasmussen, Morten; Nathan, Torben

    2015-04-01

    A general overview is given of the causes of anemia with iron deficiency as well as the pathogenesis of anemia and the para-clinical diagnosis of anemia. Anemia with iron deficiency but without overt GI bleeding is associated with a risk of malignant disease of the gastrointestinal tract; upper gastrointestinal cancer is 1/7 as common as colon cancer. Benign gastrointestinal causes of anemia are iron malabsorption (atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, chronic inflammation, and bariatric surgery) and chronic blood loss due to gastrointestinal ulcerations. The following diagnostic strategy is recommended for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency: conduct serological celiac disease screening with transglutaminase antibody (IgA type) and IgA testing and perform bidirectional endoscopy (gastroscopy and colonoscopy). Bidirectional endoscopy is not required in premenopausal women < 40 years of age. Small intestine investigation (capsule endoscopy, CT, or MRI enterography) is not recommended routinely after negative bidirectional endoscopy but should be conducted if there are red flags indicating malignant or inflammatory small bowel disease (e.g., involuntary weight loss, abdominal pain or increased CRP). Targeted treatment of any cause of anemia with iron deficiency found on diagnostic assessment should be initiated. In addition, iron supplementation should be administered, with the goal of normalizing hemoglobin levels and replenishing iron stores. Oral treatment with a 100-200 mg daily dose of elemental iron is recommended (lower dose if side effects), but 3-6 months of oral iron therapy is often required to achieve therapeutic goals. Intravenous iron therapy is used if oral treatment lacks efficacy or causes side effects or in the presence of intestinal malabsorption or prolonged inflammation. Three algorithms are given for the following conditions: a) the paraclinical diagnosis of anemia with iron deficiency; b) the diagnostic work-up for unexplained anemia with

  1. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Hodgkin's Disease: An Unusual Pediatric Association

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maria Miguel; Oliva, Tereza; Pinto, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. AIHA associated with Hodgkin's disease (HD) is uncommon especially in the pediatric population. The diagnosis of AIHA is usually associated with HD at the time of initial presentation or during the course of disease, but it could precede it by years to months. In adults the association of AIHA and HD is more frequent in advanced stages and in the nodular sclerosis and mixed cellularity type HD. Warm immune hemolytic anemia is mainly controlled with steroids and chemotherapy. We report a case of a pediatric patient with direct antiglobulin positive test at the diagnosis of a late relapse of stage III B mixed cellularity type HD. PMID:26904342

  2. Aplastica Anemia And Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cudillo, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a severe and rare disease, characterized by hematopoietic bone marrow failure and peripheral cytopenia. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, activated T1 lymphocytes have been identified as effector cells. The disease can be successfully treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAA) is a syndrome of bone marrow failure following the development of acute seronegative hepatitis. HAA syndrome most often affects young males who presented severe pancytopenia two to three months after an episode of acute hepatitis. The clinical course of hepatitis is more frequently benign but a fulminant severe course is also described. The bone marrow failure can be explosive and severe and it is usually fatal if untreated, no correlations have been observed between severity of hepatitis and AA. In none of the studies a specific virus could be identified and most cases are seronegative for known hepatitis viruses. The clinical characteristics and response to immunotherapy indicate a central role for immune-mediated mechanism in the pathogenesis of HAA. The initial target organ of the immune response is the liver as suggested by the time interval between hepatitis and the onset of bone marrow failure. Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic and blood lymphocytes with T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia. PMID:21415960

  3. [Abdominal pain, constipation and anemia].

    PubMed

    Barresi, Fabio; Kunz Caflish, Isabel; Bayly-Schinzel, Leena; Dressel, Holger

    2016-03-30

    We present the case of a 42-year old man who went to the emergency department because of spasmodic abdominal pain. The abdomen was soft. A gastroscopy and a colonoscopy were without pathological findings. The laboratory analyses indicated anemia. The differential blood count showed basophilic granules in the red blood cells. The blood lead level was elevated. A lead poisoning was diagnosed. The cause was the oral intake of an ayurvedic medication which the patient had received in Bangladesh to treat his vitiligo. PMID:27005735

  4. Anemia in children with down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Ariel; Malkiel, Sarah; Wexler, Isaiah D; Levy-Khademi, Floris; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Stepensky, Polina

    2011-01-01

    Background. Iron deficiency anemia impacts on cognitive development. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in children with Down syndrome and identify risk factors for anemia. Methods. We conducted a prolective cross-sectional study of children attending a multidisciplinary Down syndrome medical center. One hundred and forty nine children with Down syndrome aged 0-20 years were enrolled in the study. Information obtained included a medical history, physical and developmental examination, nutritional assessment, and the results of blood tests. Results. Of the patients studied, 8.1% were found to have anemia. Among the 38 children who had iron studies, 50.0% had iron deficiency. In a multivariate analysis, Arab ethnicity and low weight for age were significantly associated with anemia. Gender, height, the presence of an eating disorder, and congenital heart disease were not risk factors for anemia. Conclusions. Children with Down syndrome are at risk for anemia and iron deficiency similar to the general population. Children with Down syndrome should be monitored for anemia and iron deficiency so that prompt intervention can be initiated. PMID:21941570

  5. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  6. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  7. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  8. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  9. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  10. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  11. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  12. Duodenal Amyloidosis Masquerading as Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The present study is a unique illustration of duodenal amyloidosis initially manifesting with iron deficiency anemia. It underscores the importance of clinical suspicion of amyloidosis while performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a biopsy to establish the definite diagnosis in patients with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27625911

  13. Transplant Center Search Form

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congenital dyskeratosis Other: Desmoid small round cell Other: Diamond Blackfan Anemia Other: DiGeorge anomaly Other: Dyserythropoietic anemia ... Retinoblastoma Other: Rhabdomyosarcoma Other: Sanfillipo Syndrome Other: Schwachman-Diamond ... SCIDS Other: Scleroderma Other: Scleromyxedema Other: ...

  14. Homozygosity mapping of Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, M.; Botstein, D.; Kruglyak, L.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare, recessive, genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by progressive insufficiency of the bone marrow and increased cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. Complementation tests among different FA cells have indicated the presence of at least 4 FA-causing genes. One of the genes, FACC, was identified by functional complementation but appears unlikely to account for many phenotypically indistinguishable FA caes. We have begun a linkage study of FA using {open_quotes}homozygosity mapping{close_quotes}, a method that involves genotyping with DNA markers on affected individuals whose parents are related. Because FA is a rare recessive disease, it is most likely that probands are homozygous by descent at the disease locus and, therefore, at nearby DNA markers. Although the probability that any given marker will be homozygous in an inbred individual is high, given markers with moderate heterozygosities, the chance that two unrelated inbred individuals will be homozygous at the same marker is considerably lower. By locating overlapping regions of homozygosity between different families we hope to identify genes that cause FA. Sixteen consanguineous non-FACC FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry at Rockefeller University are under study. An efficient algorithm for data analysis was developed and incorporated into software that can quickly compute exact multipoint lod scores using all markers on an entire chromosome. At the time of this writing, 171 of 229 microsatellite markers spaced at 20 cM intervals across the genome have been analyzed.

  15. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70–85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6–12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80–90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

  16. Effects of ionizing radiation on cells from Fanconi's anemia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth-Rysiecki, G.; Taylor, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The lymphocytes from some Fanconi's anemia patients appeared to be more radiosensitive than normal as measured by the number of X-ray-(or bleomycin-) induced chromosome aberrations seen following G2 treatment. Fibroblasts from the same patients, however, all showed the same degree of colony survival as normals following exposure to gamma-rays (Do, 1.13 +/- 0.072 (S.E.) Gy and 1.14 +/- 0.077 Gy for Fanconi's anemia and normal fibroblasts, respectively). The lack of increased radiosensitivity in Fanconi's fibroblasts was also observed by the same degree of inhibition of DNA synthesis as seen in normals following gamma-irradiation. The results show clearly that there is no increase in radiosensitivity common to all cell types from Fanconi's patients, although an apparent increase in chromosomal radiosensitivity may be seen in the lymphocytes from an occasional patient.

  17. Treating leukemia at the risk of inducing severe anemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendy S; Zhu, Helen He; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Anemia is a frequently observed adverse effect in cancer patients who receive chemotherapy or drugs designed to block specific oncogenic signaling pathways, although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. An article first published online (Zhu HH, Luo X, Zhang K, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2015;112:13342-13347) presented data indicating that cell type-specific pathway cross-talk is likely an important mechanism to consider. Shp2 and Pten, two master regulators of central cytoplasmic signaling pathways, oppose each other in myeloproliferation and leukemogenesis, but cooperate in promoting erythropoiesis. Thus, genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of Shp2 suppresses the leukemogenic effect of Pten loss, yet simultaneously induces severe anemia in mice with Pten deficiency in blood cells. PMID:26826310

  18. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... vitamin C pills or eating foods high in vitamin C, such as citrus fruits or juice, at the same time you eat ... vitamins contain at least this amount.) Foods with vitamin C—such as strawberries and citrus fruits—help your body absorb iron. Eat these foods ...

  19. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... body needs extra folate. Folate is a B vitamin found in foods such as leafy green vegetables, fruits, and dried beans and peas. Folic acid is ... iron, like orange juice, strawberries, broccoli, or other fruits and vegetables with vitamin C. Don't drink coffee or tea with ...

  20. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tips Getting More Help Related Topics Kidney Problems Nutrition ... when you have low numbers of red blood cells. These cells carry oxygen to your body’s organs and tissues. This can happen due to ...

  1. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and webinars ASH Image Bank Educational Web-based library of hematologic imagery In This Section: Resources for Clinicians Resources for Trainees Resources for Educators Resources for Patients Resources for Industry Professionals View all Guidelines & Quality Care Resources to ...

  2. Erythrocyte Catalase Activity in More Frequent Microcytic Hypochromic Anemia: Beta-Thalassemia Trait and Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lazarte, Sandra Stella; Mónaco, María Eugenia; Jimenez, Cecilia Laura; Ledesma Achem, Miryam Emilse; Terán, Magdalena María; Issé, Blanca Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Most common microcytic hypochromic anemias are iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and β-thalassemia trait (BTT), in which oxidative stress (OxS) has an essential role. Catalase causes detoxification of H2O2 in cells, and it is an indispensable antioxidant enzyme. The study was designed to measure erythrocyte catalase activity (ECAT) in patients with IDA (10) or BTT (21), to relate it with thalassemia mutation type (β0 or β+) and to compare it with normal subjects (67). Ninety-eight individuals were analyzed since September 2013 to June 2014 in Tucumán, Argentina. Total blood count, hemoglobin electrophoresis at alkaline pH, HbA2, catalase, and iron status were performed. β-thalassemic mutations were determined by real-time PCR. Normal range for ECAT was 70,0–130,0 MU/L. ECAT was increased in 14% (3/21) of BTT subjects and decreased in 40% (4/10) of those with IDA. No significant difference (p = 0,245) was shown between normal and BTT groups, while between IDA and normal groups the difference was proved to be significant (p = 0,000). In β0 and β+ groups, no significant difference (p = 0,359) was observed. An altered ECAT was detected in IDA and BTT. These results will help to clarify how the catalase activity works in these anemia types. PMID:26527217

  3. Prevalence and associated risk factors of anemia in children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yen, Chia-Feng; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chien, Wu-Chien; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Chia-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is known to be a significant public health problem in many countries. Most of the available information is incomplete or limited to special groups such as people with intellectual disability. The present study aims to provide the information of anemia prevalence and associated risk factors of children and adolescents with intellectual disability in Taiwan. We analyzed physical examination charts of 937 children and adolescents with intellectual disability at the age of 6-18 years from three special schools. We collected information on their demographic characteristics (age and gender), disability condition (type and level), BMI (weight and height) and measured blood hemoglobin concentration (Hb). There were 11.6% of children and adolescents with intellectual disability with anemia (boy <13 g/dl, girl <12 g/dl), and the factors of gender, age, disability level and BMI are significantly correlated to anemia in bivariant analyses in the study. In the logistic regression analysis, the model revealed that the factors of gender (OR=0.63, 95% CI=0.41-0.95), and age (OR=3.21, 95% CI=1.77-5.82) were variables that could significantly predict the anemia occurrence of the participants. The study highlights the anemia prevalence in children and adolescents with ID is a mild public health problem among people with intellectual disabilities, but to prevent the problems become worst; the health authority should include providing children and adolescents with adequate nutrition and appropriate health protections during early childhood. PMID:19717276

  4. Anemia in the Neonate: The Differential Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Nassin, Michele L; Lapping-Carr, Gabrielle; de Jong, Jill L O

    2015-07-01

    Anemia is a common problem in the neonatal period. Presenting symptoms may suggest numerous possible diagnoses ranging from anemia seen as a normal part of development to anemia due to critical pathology. An illustrative case is presented to highlight the appropriate evaluation of the neonate with significant anemia. Several important features of the evaluation of neonatal anemia are highlighted. The constellation of signs and symptoms that occur in conjunction with the anemia are critical for the evaluation. The evaluation should be performed in a step-wise process that starts by eliminating common causes of anemia. Manual review of the peripheral blood smear with a hematologist can be helpful. PMID:26171704

  5. Association between food insecurity and anemia among women of reproductive age

    PubMed Central

    Ghose, Bishwajit; Tang, Shangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Food insecurity and hidden hunger (micronutrient deficiency) affect about two billion people globally. Household food insecurity (HFI) has been shown to be associated with one or multiple micronutrient (MMN) deficiencies among women and children. Chronic food insecurity leads to various deficiency disorders, among which anemia stands out as the most prevalent one. As a high malnutrition prevalent country, Bangladesh has one of the highest rates of anemia among all Asian countries. In this study, we wanted to investigate for any association exists between HFI and anemia among women of reproductive age in Bangladesh. Methodology: Information about demographics, socioeconomic and anemia status on 5,666 married women ageing between 13 and 40 years were collected from a nationally representative cross-sectional survey Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS 2011). Food security was measured by the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS). Capillary hemoglobin concentration (Hb) measured by HemoCue® was used as the biomarker of anemia. Data were analysed using cross-tabulation, chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression methods. Results: Anemia prevalence was 41.7%. Logistic regression showed statistically significant association with anemia and type of residency (p = 0.459; OR = 0.953, 95%CI = 0.840–1.082), wealth status (Poorest: p < 0.001; OR = 1.369, 95%CI = 1.176–1.594; and average: p = 0.030; 95%CI = 1.017–1.398), educational attainment (p < 0.001; OR = 1.276, 95%CI = 1.132–1.439) and household food insecurity (p < 0.001; 95%CI = 1.348–1.830). Women who reported food insecurity were about 1.6 times more likely to suffer from anemia compared to their food secure counterparts. Conclusion: HFI is a significant predictor of anemia among women of reproductive age in Bangladesh. Programs targeting HFI could prove beneficial for anemia reduction strategies. Gender aspects of food and nutrition insecurity should be taken into

  6. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Packman, Charles H

    2015-09-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  7. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  8. Protrusio acetabuli in sickle-cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.; Apple, J.S.; Baber, C.; Putman, C.E.; Rosse, W.F.

    1984-04-01

    Of 155 adults with sickle-cell anemia (SS, SC), radiographs of the pelvis or hip demonstrated protrusio acetabuli on at least one side in 14 (3 men and 11 women), as indicated by projection of the acetabular line medial to the ilio-ischial line. All 14 patients had bone changes attributable to sickle-cell anemia, including marrow hyperplasia and osteonecrosis; however, the severity of femoral or acetabular osteonecrosis did not appear directly related to the protrusion. The authors conclude that sickle-cell anemia can predispose to development of protrusio acetabuli.

  9. Imaging Manifestations of Neurologic Complications in Anemia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ritesh; Sabat, Shyam; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-08-01

    The hallmark signs and symptoms of anemia are directly related to a decrease in oxygen delivery to vital tissues and organs and include pallor, fatigue, lightheadedness, and shortness of breath. Neurologic complications are often nonspecific and can include poor concentration, irritability, faintness, tinnitus, and headache. If undiagnosed or untreated, anemia can progress to cognitive dysfunction, psychosis, encephalopathy, myelopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and more focal syndromes, such as stroke, seizures, chorea, and transverse myelitis. Imaging can play an important role in the early diagnosis and treatment of these neurologic and systemic complications associated with anemia, and hence, better outcome. PMID:27443995

  10. [A simple algorithm for anemia].

    PubMed

    Egyed, Miklós

    2014-03-01

    The author presents a novel algorithm for anaemia based on the erythrocyte haemoglobin content. The scheme is based on the aberrations of erythropoiesis and not on the pathophysiology of anaemia. The hemoglobin content of one erytrocyte is between 28-35 picogram. Any disturbance in hemoglobin synthesis can lead to a lower than 28 picogram hemoglobin content of the erythrocyte which will lead to hypochromic anaemia. In contrary, disturbances of nucleic acid metabolism will result in a hemoglobin content greater than 36 picogram, and this will result in hyperchromic anaemia. Normochromic anemia, characterised by hemoglobin content of erythrocytes between 28 and 35 picogram, is the result of alteration in the proliferation of erythropoeisis. Based on these three categories of anaemia, a unique system can be constructed, which can be used as a model for basic laboratory investigations and work-up of anaemic patients. PMID:24583558

  11. Current concepts in the pathophysiology and treatment of aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Young, Neal S.; Calado, Rodrigo T.; Scheinberg, Phillip

    2006-01-01

    Aplastic anemia, an unusual hematologic disease, is the paradigm of the human bone marrow failure syndromes. Almost universally fatal just a few decades ago, aplastic anemia can now be cured or ameliorated by stem-cell transplantation or immunosuppressive drug therapy. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, with activated type 1 cytotoxic T cells implicated. The molecular basis of the aberrant immune response and deficiencies in hematopoietic cells is now being defined genetically; examples are telomere repair gene mutations in the target cells and dysregulated T-cell activation pathways. Immunosuppression with antithymocyte globulins and cyclosporine is effective at restoring blood-cell production in the majority of patients, but relapse and especially evolution of clonal hematologic diseases remain problematic. Allogeneic stem-cell transplant from histocompatible sibling donors is curative in the great majority of young patients with severe aplastic anemia; the major challenges are extending the benefits of transplantation to patients who are older or who lack family donors. Recent results with alternative sources of stem cells and a variety of conditioning regimens to achieve their engraftment have been promising, with survival in small pediatric case series rivaling conventional transplantation results. PMID:16778145

  12. Anemia among Muslim Bedouin and Jewish women of childbearing age in Southern Israel.

    PubMed

    Treister-Goltzman, Yulia; Peleg, Roni; Biderman, Aya

    2015-11-01

    There are inequalities in health indicators among different ethnic groups living in the same region and receiving the same medical services. Anemia is a global problem. Although the prevalence of anemia is not high in Israel, differences among ethnic groups have not been studied. Our objective was to assess anemia among Bedouin and Jewish women of childbearing age in southern Israel. A retrospective observational study was conducted based on data from computerized medical records. Seven thousand eight hundred seventy-one women in the study clinics underwent complete blood counts and had blood hemoglobin levels of 11 g/dl or below. The Jewish patients were older (31.7 vs. 29.7 years, P < 0.001), practiced birth control more (24.2 vs. 9.9 %, P < 0.001), and adhered to it more (81.1 vs. 61.9 %, P < 0.001). Bedouin women had more children (3.7 vs. 1.9, P < 0.001), and more Bedouin women were pregnant during the study period (49.3 vs. 35.0 %, P < 0.001). The most prevalent types of anemia were iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease. Two types of anemia were proportionally higher among Jewish women, anemia of chronic disease (18.1 vs. 9.7 %, P < 0.001) and folic acid deficiency (3.3 vs. 2.2 %, P > 0.001). The adherence rates for treatment were very low. Three factors associated with severe anemia (hemoglobin below 8 g/dl) were being Bedouin (odds ratio (OR) = 1.295, P < 0.001), use of birth control (OR = 0.419, P < 0.001), and pregnancy (OR = 0.447, P < 0.001). Being a Bedouin woman is a risk factor for severe anemia, and adherence to treatment for anemia is very low in both groups. These findings should be addressed in a national program to reduce health inequalities. PMID:26211919

  13. [Clinical evaluation of anemia in the aged].

    PubMed

    Pentimone, F; Del Corso, L; Frustaci, G; Gnesi, A; Romanelli, A M; Sabbatini, A R

    1992-01-01

    Of 533 patients over 65 years old (153 males and 380 females), admitted to geriatric units for various medical diseases, 111 (20.8%) were anemic. Among males the prevalence of anemia was 30.1%, among females 17.1%. Three principal causes of anemia were revealed. The most frequent (42.3%) was microcytic, hypochromic anemia, with low levels of serum iron concentrations, related to gastrointestinal diseases (with chronic occult blood loss). 38.7% of anemic elderly people was affected by chronic diseases. In 19.0% a folate (16 case) and iron (5 cases) deficiency was revealed. These results suggest that anemia in the elderly is always pathological; hemoglobin values lower than 12 g/dl should be considered abnormal and investigated. PMID:1545920

  14. [Anemia and transfusion therapy: an update].

    PubMed

    Madrazo-González, Z; García-Barrasa, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, L; Rafecas-Renau, A; Alonso-Fernández, G

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most prevalent diseases in the general population and is a very frequently found condition in medical and surgical patients in all medical specialties. A good evaluation of its clinical impact and its therapeutic possibilities is essential. Allogenic blood transfusion is a useful procedure in anemia management, although it has important adverse effects. It is the responsibility of the clinician to know and to take into account all the available alternatives for the treatment of anemia. Blood transfusions, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, iron therapy (oral and endovenous) and other therapeutic alternatives must be rationally used, in accordance with the currently available clinical evidence. This review article summarizes some epidemiological characteristics of anemia, its clinical evaluation and the main therapeutic possibilities based on the present knowledge, placing special emphasis on the critically ill patient. PMID:20483506

  15. Anemia: Progress in molecular mechanisms and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to understanding frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that may stand to benefit from the new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease), rare genetic disorders of red blood cell production, and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new treatment approaches include drugs that target recently defined pathways in red blood cell production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin gene expression, as well as gene therapies using improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies. PMID:25742458

  16. Alleviating anemia and thrombocytopenia in myelofibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Francisco; Correa, Juan-Gonzalo; Hernandez-Boluda, Juan Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Anemia and thrombocytopenia are frequent clinical manifestations of myelofibrosis as well as important prognostic factors of the disease. Concerning the treatment of anemia, the first step should be the correction of reversible contributing factors, such as possible iron, folate and vitamin B12 deficiency. Then, treatment options include erythropoiesis stimulating agents, androgens, immunomodulating drugs, corticosteroids, and splenectomy. Anemia responses may also be observed in some patients treated with JAK inhibitors. However, most patients eventually fail to such therapies and become transfusion dependent. Some of the aforementioned therapies can also improve thrombocytopenia, but the responses are usually observed in patients with moderate platelet count decrease. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the only curative treatment of myelofibrosis, can be an alternative for selected patients with cytopenias who are refractory to conventional therapies. However, for the majority of patients, the management of anemia and severe thrombocytopenia remains an unmet need. PMID:26891375

  17. [Anemias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Zhusina, Yu G

    2016-01-01

    According to different studies, anemia occurs in 8--33% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The paper describes the most important various causes of anemia in COPD, such as systemic inflammation and endocrine disorders, the use of some medications (theophylline, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), frequent COPD exacerbations, and long-term oxygen therapy. Lower hemoglobin levels in COPD patients are accompanied by increased shortness of breath, reduced exercise tolerance, and lower quality of life. Furthermore, some investigations have shown that anemia is an independent predictor of death in patients with COPD. In spite of the fact that anemia may be successfully in these patients, the evidence suggesting the importance of its impact on the prognosis of COPD is limited. PMID:27191018

  18. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency - children ... able to absorb iron well, even though the child is eating enough iron Slow blood loss over ... bleeding in the digestive tract Iron deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning .

  19. Renal cell carcinoma and autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Lands, R; Foust, J

    1996-04-01

    A previously healthy man who became bedridden because of malaise, fatigue, and weakness was found to have an autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). In the course of his evaluation for the AIHA, he was found, coincidentally, to have a renal cell carcinoma. The AIHA was marginally responsive to therapy with corticosteroids, but it resolved promptly after excision of the cancer. This case represents probably a rarely observed association between a nonhematologic malignancy and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. PMID:8614893

  20. Cerebral Microcirculation during Experimental Normovolaemic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bellapart, Judith; Cuthbertson, Kylie; Dunster, Kimble; Diab, Sara; Platts, David G.; Raffel, O. Christopher; Gabrielian, Levon; Barnett, Adrian; Paratz, Jenifer; Boots, Rob; Fraser, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is accepted among critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anemia. Experimental studies suggest that anemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise, when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion among critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure, and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anemia does not result in short-term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain. PMID:26869986

  1. Mouse Models of Anemia of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Airie; Rivera, Seth; Shprung, Dana; Limbrick, Donald; Gabayan, Victoria; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Anemia of cancer (AC) may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and impair quality of life. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of AC could facilitate better treatment, but animal models to study AC are lacking. We characterized four syngeneic C57BL/6 mouse cancers that cause AC. Mice with two different rapidly-growing metastatic lung cancers developed the characteristic findings of anemia of inflammation (AI), with dramatically different degrees of anemia. Mice with rapidly-growing metastatic melanoma also developed a severe anemia by 14 days, with hematologic and inflammatory parameters similar to AI. Mice with a slow-growing peritoneal ovarian cancer developed an iron-deficiency anemia, likely secondary to chronically impaired nutrition and bleeding into the peritoneal cavity. Of the four models, hepcidin mRNA levels were increased only in the milder lung cancer model. Unlike in our model of systemic inflammation induced by heat-killed Brucella abortus, ablation of hepcidin in the ovarian cancer and the milder lung cancer mouse models did not affect the severity of anemia. Hepcidin-independent mechanisms play an important role in these murine models of AC. PMID:24681760

  2. Family structure and child anemia in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Kammi K

    2013-10-01

    Utilizing longitudinal data from the nationally-representative Mexico Family Life Survey, this study assesses the association between family structure and iron-deficient anemia among children ages 3-12 in Mexico. The longitudinal models (n = 4649), which control for baseline anemia status and allow for consideration of family structure transitions, suggest that children living in stable-cohabiting and single-mother families and those who have recently experienced a parental union dissolution have higher odds of anemia than those in stable-married, father-present family structures. Interaction effects indicate that unmarried family contexts have stronger associations with anemia in older children (over age five); and, that the negative effects of parental union dissolution are exacerbated in poorer households. Resident maternal grandparents have a significant beneficial effect on child anemia independent of parental family structure. These results highlight the importance of family structure for child micronutrient deficiencies and suggest that understanding social processes within households may be critical to preventing child anemia in Mexico. PMID:23294876

  3. Renal anemia: from incurable to curable.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuki; Yanagita, Motoko

    2013-11-01

    Renal anemia has been recognized as a characteristic complication of chronic kidney disease. Although many factors are involved in renal anemia, the predominant cause of renal anemia is a relative deficiency in erythropoietin (EPO) production. To date, exogenous recombinant human (rh)EPO has been widely used as a powerful drug for the treatment of patients with renal anemia. Despite its clinical effectiveness, a potential risk for increased mortality has been suggested in patients who receive rhEPO, in addition to the economic burden of rhEPO administration. The induction of endogenous EPO is another therapeutic approach that might have advantages over rhEPO administration. However, the physiological and pathophysiological regulation of EPO are not fully understood, and this lack of understanding has hindered the development of an endogenous EPO inducer. In this review, we will discuss the current treatment for renal anemia and its drawbacks, provide an overview of EPO regulation in healthy and diseased conditions, and propose future directions for therapeutic trials that more directly target the underlying pathophysiology of renal anemia. PMID:23884144

  4. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  5. Mutated Fanconi anemia pathway in non-Fanconi anemia cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yihang; Lee, Yuan-Hao; Panneerselvam, Jayabal; Zhang, Jun; Loo, Lenora W. M.; Fei, Peiwen

    2015-01-01

    An extremely high cancer incidence and the hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents associated with Fanconi Anemia (FA) have marked it to be a unique genetic model system to study human cancer etiology and treatment, which has emerged an intense area of investigation in cancer research. However, there is limited information about the relationship between the mutated FA pathway and the cancer development or/and treatment in patients without FA. Here we analyzed the mutation rates of the seventeen FA genes in 68 DNA sequence datasets. We found that the FA pathway is frequently mutated across a variety of human cancers, with a rate mostly in the range of 15 to 35 % in human lung, brain, bladder, ovarian, breast cancers, or others. Furthermore, we found a statistically significant correlation (p < 0.05) between the mutated FA pathway and the development of human bladder cancer that we only further analyzed. Together, our study demonstrates a previously unknown fact that the mutated FA pathway frequently occurs during the development of non-FA human cancers, holding profound implications directly in advancing our understanding of human tumorigenesis as well as tumor sensitivity/resistance to crosslinking drug-relevant chemotherapy. PMID:26015400

  6. [Prevalence and causal factors of anemia in children in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    El Ati, Jalila; Gaigi, Sadok; Beji, Chiraz; Haddad, Samira; Cherif, Samia; Farhat, Amina; Fattoum, Slaheddine; Ben Abdeladhim, Abdeladhim

    2005-09-01

    Anemia continue to be prevalent among children under five years despite the improvement of socioeconomic and sanitary indicators. The purpose of the present cross-sectorial study is to assess the etiologic factors responsible for anemia. Knowledge of the relative importance of the different causes should form a basis for intervention strategies to prevent and control anemia. The survey covered 955 children under the age of five years, native of two regions with the highest prevalent of anemia, the Southwest and the District of Tunis. The results showed that 29% of children suffered from anemia. About 70% of them were iron deficient. The fractions of the deficiency in vitamin B12 and in folates were insignificant. Only 3% of children had chronic inflammation associated with (and possibly responsible for) their anemia A little fraction of anemia (approximately 5%) was due to thalassemia or drepanocytosis. Picawasan important causal factor of iron deficiency anemia. The parasites identified instool could not cause anemia. PMID:16383194

  7. Erythroblast apoptosis and microenvironmental iron restriction trigger anemia in the VK*MYC model of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bordini, Jessica; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa Sabrina; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Fermo, Isabella; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P Leif; Camaschella, Clara; Campanella, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant disorder characterized by bone marrow proliferation of plasma cells and by overproduction of monoclonal immunoglobulin detectable in the sera (M-spike). Anemia is a common complication of multiple myeloma, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. We aimed to identify the different determinants of anemia using the Vk*MYC mouse, which spontaneously develops an indolent bone marrow localized disease with aging. Affected Vk*MYC mice develop a mild normochromic normocytic anemia. We excluded the possibility that anemia results from defective erythropoietin production, inflammation or increased hepcidin expression. Mature erythroid precursors are reduced in Vk*MYC bone marrow compared with wild-type. Malignant plasma cells express the apoptogenic receptor Fas ligand and, accordingly, active caspase 8 is detected in maturing erythroblasts. Systemic iron homeostasis is not compromised in Vk*MYC animals, but high expression of the iron importer CD71 by bone marrow plasma cells and iron accumulation in bone marrow macrophages suggest that iron competition takes place in the local multiple myeloma microenvironment, which might contribute to anemia. In conclusion, the mild anemia of the Vk*MYC model is mainly related to the local effect of the bone marrow malignant clone in the absence of an overt inflammatory status. We suggest that this reproduces the initial events triggering anemia in patients. PMID:25715406

  8. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Priya M; Perrine, Cria G; Mei, Zuguo; Scanlon, Kelley S

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1-5 years using data from the 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA among children 1-5 years was 7.1% (5.5, 8.7), 3.2% (2.0, 4.3), and 1.1% (0.6, 1.7), respectively. The prevalence of both ID and anemia were higher among children 1-2 years (p < 0.05). In addition, 50% of anemic children 1-2 years were iron deficient. This analysis provides an update on the prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA for a representative sample of US children. Our results suggest little change in these indicators over the past decade. Monitoring of ID and anemia is critical and prevention of ID in early childhood should remain a public health priority. PMID:27249004

  9. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priya M.; Perrine, Cria G.; Mei, Zuguo; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA among children 1–5 years was 7.1% (5.5, 8.7), 3.2% (2.0, 4.3), and 1.1% (0.6, 1.7), respectively. The prevalence of both ID and anemia were higher among children 1–2 years (p < 0.05). In addition, 50% of anemic children 1–2 years were iron deficient. This analysis provides an update on the prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA for a representative sample of US children. Our results suggest little change in these indicators over the past decade. Monitoring of ID and anemia is critical and prevention of ID in early childhood should remain a public health priority. PMID:27249004

  10. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John . E-mail: jvarlott@bidmc.harvard.edu; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell

  11. Frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatry patients

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Sevda; Yıldız, Sevler; Korucu, Tuba; Gundogan, Burcu; Sunbul, Zehra Emine; Korkmaz, Hasan; Atmaca, Murad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anemia could cause psychiatric symptoms such as cognitive function disorders and depression or could deteriorate an existing psychiatric condition when it is untreated. The objective of this study is to scrutinize the frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatric patients and the clinical and sociodemographic factors that could affect this frequency. Methods All inpatients in our clinic who satisfied the study criteria and received treatment between April 2014 and April 2015 were included in this cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic data for 378 patients included in the study and hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit values observed during their admission to the hospital were recorded in the forms. Male patients with an Hb level of <13 g/dL and nonpregnant female patients with an Hb level of <12 g/dL were considered as anemic. Findings Axis 1 diagnoses demonstrated that 172 patients had depressive disorder, 51 patients had bipolar disorder, 54 patients had psychotic disorder, 33 patients had conversion disorder, 19 patients had obsessive-compulsive disorder, 25 patients had generalized anxiety disorder, and 24 patients had other psychiatric conditions. It was also determined that 25.4% of the patients suffered from anemia. Thirty-five percent of females and 10% of males were considered as anemic. The frequency of anemia was the highest among psychotic disorder patients (35%), followed by generalized anxiety disorder patients (32%), and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (26%). Anemia was diagnosed in 22% of depressive disorder patients, 25% of bipolar disorder patients, and 24% of conversion disorder patients. Results The prevalence of anemia among chronic psychiatry patients is more frequent than the general population. Thus, the study concluded that it would be beneficial to consider the physical symptoms and to conduct the required examinations to determine anemia among this patient group. PMID:26543367

  12. Diabetes mellitus increases the prevalence of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: A nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Loutradis, Charalampos; Skodra, Alexandra; Georgianos, Panagiotis; Tolika, Panagiota; Alexandrou, Dimitris; Avdelidou, Afroditi; Sarafidis, Pantelis A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare anemia prevalence between matched chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with and without diabetes mellitus (DM) and to assess factors associated with anemia development. METHODS: This is a nested case-control study of 184 type-2 diabetic and 184 non-diabetic CKD patients from a prospectively assembled database of a Nephrology outpatient clinic, matched for gender, age and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin: Men: < 13 g/dL, women: < 12 g/dL and/or use of recombinant erythropoietin) was examined in comparison, in the total population and by CKD Stage. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with anemia. RESULTS: The total prevalence of anemia was higher in diabetics (47.8% vs 33.2%, P = 0.004). Accordingly, prevalence was higher in diabetics in CKD Stage 3 (53.5% vs 33.1%, P < 0.001) and particularly in Stage 3a (60.4% vs 26.4%, P < 0.001), whereas it was non-significantly higher in Stage 4 (61.3% vs 48.4%; P = 0.307). Serum ferritin was higher in diabetics in total and in CKD stages, while serum iron was similar between groups. In multivariate analyses, DM (OR = 2.206, 95%CI: 1.196-4.069), CKD Stages 3a, 3b, 4 (Stage 4: OR = 12.169, 95%CI: 3.783-39.147) and serum iron (OR = 0.976, 95%CI: 0.968-0.985 per mg/dL increase) were independently associated with anemia. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of anemia progressively increases with advancing stages of CKD and is higher in diabetic than matched non-diabetic CKD patients and diabetes is independently associated with anemia occurrence. Detection and treatment of anemia in diabetic CKD patients should be performed earlier than non-diabetic counterparts. PMID:27458564

  13. BLOOD REGENERATION IN SEVERE ANEMIA : XIV. A LIVER FRACTION POTENT IN PERNICIOUS ANEMIA FED ALONE AND COMBINED WITH WHOLE LIVER, LIVER ASH AND FRESH BILE.

    PubMed

    Robscheit-Robbins, F S; Whipple, G H

    1929-01-31

    A liver extract No. 343, N.N.R. known to be fully potent in pernicious anemia shows but 10 to 20 per cent of the potency of whole liver feeding in severe continuous secondary anemia due to bleeding in dogs. There are wide individual variations which are not noted with whole liver feeding. Supplementing this liver extract with whole bile does not modify the reaction. Supplementing this liver extract with liver ash or apricot ash shows the sum of the two expected feeding reactions. When we supplement this liver extract with small amounts of whole liver (50 to 100 gm.) we may observe hemoglobin and red cell production in excess of the sum of the expected separate reactions. Whether the liver extract increases the potency of the whole liver feeding or vice versa, it suggests similar possibilities in various human secondary anemias. Liver and kidney fractions of varied types deserve much study to ascertain their effect upon widely divergent types of human anemias. PMID:19869543

  14. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  15. Anemia management after acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lelubre, Christophe; Bouzat, Pierre; Crippa, Ilaria Alice; Taccone, Fabio Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is frequent among brain-injured patients, where it has been associated with an increased risk of poor outcome. The pathophysiology of anemia in this patient population remains multifactorial; moreover, whether anemia merely reflects a higher severity of the underlying disease or is a significant determinant of the neurological recovery of such patients remains unclear. Interestingly, the effects of red blood cell transfusions (RBCT) in moderately anemic patients remain controversial; although hemoglobin levels are increased, different studies observed only a modest and inconsistent improvement in cerebral oxygenation after RBCT and raised serious concerns about the risk of increased complications. Thus, considering this "blood transfusion anemia paradox", the optimal hemoglobin level to trigger RBCT in brain-injured patients has not been defined yet; also, there is insufficient evidence to provide strong recommendations regarding which hemoglobin level to target and which associated transfusion strategy (restrictive versus liberal) to select in this patient population. We summarize in this review article the more relevant studies evaluating the effects of anemia and RBCT in patients with an acute neurological condition; also, we propose some potential strategies to optimize transfusion management in such patients. PMID:27311626

  16. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Anemia Among Children Under 5 Years of Age--Uganda, 2009.

    PubMed

    Menon, Manoj P; Yoon, Steven S

    2015-09-01

    Anemia in children under 5 years of age, defined by the World Health Organization as a hemoglobin concentration < 11 g/dL, is a global public health problem. According to the 2006 Demographic Health Survey, the prevalence of anemia among children under five in Uganda was 72% in 2006. The 2009 Uganda Malaria Indicator Survey was conducted in late 2009 and revealed that over 60% of children less than 5 years of age were anemic and that over half of children tested positive for malaria via a rapid diagnostic test. Children with concomitant malaria infection, and in households without any type of mosquito net were more likely to be anemic, confirming that children under 5 years, are vulnerable to both the threat of malaria and anemia and the beneficial effect of malaria prevention tools. However, prevention and treatment of other factors associated with the etiology of anemia (e.g., iron deficiency) are likely necessary to combat the toll of anemia in Uganda. PMID:26055748

  17. Severe anemia due to parvovirus B19 in a silver haired boy.

    PubMed

    Verma, Nishant; Kumar, Archana; Kushwaha, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome (GS) is a rare autosomal recessive immunodeficiency disorder in which the affected children present with characteristic silvery-white hairs. The hair microscopy of these children is characteristic and is helpful in differentiating GS from Chediak-Higashi syndrome which also presents with immunodeficiency and silver hairs. We report a 17-month-old boy with GS type 2 who presented with severe anemia. Bone marrow examination of the child suggested parvovirus B19 as the cause of severe anemia, which was later confirmed by DNA polymerase chain reaction. PMID:26960654

  18. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia? Lower than normal numbers of red blood cells, ... most of the signs and symptoms of aplastic anemia. Signs and Symptoms of Low Blood Cell Counts ...

  19. Aplastic anemia associated with severe hemorrhagic cystitis following radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    NAKANO, TAITO; IZUMI, KOUJI; MAOLAKE, AERKEN; NATSAGDORJI, ARIUNBOLD; IWAMOTO, HIROAKI; KITAGAWA, YASUHIDE; KADONO, YOSHIFUMI; KONAKA, HIROYUKI; MIZOKAMI, ATSUSHI; NAMIKI, MIKIO

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is a rare complication following radiotherapy for intrapelvic cancer types, including cervical cancer, bladder cancer and prostate cancer. The severity of hemorrhagic cystitis is different in each case, although symptoms improve spontaneously in certain cases, and often significant morbidity requiring numerous interventions occurs. Since no treatment strategy exists with high evidences for such severe hemorrhagic cystitis, urologists have difficulty in solving the bleeding and pain, which the patients suffer. Aplastic anemia is a rare blood disorder, with an incidence reported as 2/1 million individuals annually. Patients have a risk of diffuse bleeding for presentation with anemia, thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. The present report presented a case of severe hemorrhagic cystitis remitted successfully by the treatment for underlying aplastic anemia. PMID:27123281

  20. Rituximab for immune hemolytic anemia following T- and B-Cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Corti, P; Bonanomi, S; Vallinoto, C; Balduzzi, A; Uderzo, C; Cazzaniga, G; Gaipa, G; Dassi, M; Perseghin, P; Rovelli, A

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IHA) complicating hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is often unsatisfactory. We report a case of IHA which occurred after T- and B-cell depleted unrelated donor HSCT carried out for mucopolysaccharidosis type I-H (Hurler syndrome) which was successfully treated with anti-CD20+ monoclonal antibody PMID:12486323

  1. Diagnosis of Fanconi Anemia by Diepoxybutane Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Arleen D.

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disorder characterized by congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure, and predisposition to cancer, particularly hematological malignancies and solid tumors of the head and neck. The main role of FA proteins is in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). FA results from pathogenic variants in at least 16 distinct genes, causing genomic instability. Although the highly variable phenotype makes accurate diagnosis on the basis of clinical manifestations difficult in some patients, diagnosis based on a profound sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents can be used to identify the pre-anemia patient as well as patients with aplastic anemia or leukemia who may or may not have the physical stigmata associated with the syndrome. Diepoxybutane (DEB) analysis is the preferred test for FA because other agents have higher rates of false-positive and false-negative results. PMID:25827349

  2. Nucleolar stress in Diamond Blackfan anemia pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R

    2014-06-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia is a red cell hypoplasia that typically presents within the first year of life. Most cases of Diamond Blackfan anemia are caused by ribosome assembly defects linked to haploinsufficiency for structural proteins of either ribosomal subunit. Nucleolar stress associated with abortive ribosome assembly leads to p53 activation via the interaction of free ribosomal proteins with HDM2, a negative regulator of p53. Significant challenges remain in linking this nucleolar stress signaling pathway to the clinical features of Diamond Blackfan anemia. Defining aspects of disease presentation may relate to developmental and physiological triggers that work in conjunction with nucleolar stress signaling to heighten the p53 response in the developing erythron after birth. The growing number of ribosomopathies provides additional challenges for linking molecular mechanisms with clinical phenotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease. PMID:24412987

  3. Very severe aplastic anemia appearing after thymectomy.

    PubMed

    Park, Chi Young; Kim, Hee Je; Kim, Yoo Jin; Park, Yoon Hee; Lee, Jong Wook; Min, Woo Sung; Kim, Chun Choo

    2003-03-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare complication of thymoma and is extremely infrequent after thymectomy. We present a case of a 60-year-old woman with very severe aplastic anemia appearing sixteen months after thymectomy for a thymoma. She underwent thymectomy for a thymoma in April 2000. Preoperative examination revealed no hematologic abnormality. About sixteen months after the operation, she was readmitted because of pancytopenia with cough and fever. Bone marrow aspiration revealed a very severe hypoplasia in all the three cell lines with over 80% fatty tissue, and chest CT revealed no recurrence of thymoma. Her aplastic anemia had responded to cyclosporine A and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). PMID:12760272

  4. Correlates of Anemia in American Blacks and Whites

    PubMed Central

    Zakai, Neil A.; McClure, Leslie A.; Prineas, Ronald; Howard, George; McClellan, William; Holmes, Chris E.; Newsome, Britt B.; Warnock, David G.; Audhya, Paul

    2009-01-01

    For unclear reasons, anemia is more common in American blacks than whites. The authors evaluated anemia prevalence (using World Health Organization criteria) among 19,836 blacks and whites recruited in 2003–2007 for the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke Renal Ancillary study and characterized anemia by 3 anemia-associated conditions (chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and microcytosis). They used multivariable models to assess potential causes of race differences in anemia. Anemia was 3.3-fold more common in blacks than whites, with little attenuation after adjusting for demographic variables, socioeconomic factors, and comorbid conditions. Increasing age, residence in the US southeast, lower income, vascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and never smoking were associated with anemia. Age, diabetes, and vascular disease were stronger correlates of anemia among whites than blacks (P < 0.05). Among those with anemia, chronic kidney disease was less common among blacks than whites (22% vs. 34%), whereas inflammation (18% vs. 14%) and microcytosis (22% vs. 11%) were more common. In this large, geographically diverse cohort, anemia was 3-fold more common in blacks than whites with different characteristics and correlates. Race differences in anemia prevalence were not explained by the factors studied. Future research into the causes and consequences of anemia in different racial groups is needed. PMID:19066309

  5. The Invisible Malady: Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Savitt, Todd L.

    1981-01-01

    Though several articles have appeared on the history of sickle cell anemia in the United States, none has dealt with the dissemination of information from the scientific community to the public. It is an interesting commentary on our society that 60 years have passed before this important but racially oriented disease has reached the public forum. In this article, the author tries to describe the major events in the history of sickle cell anemia and to explain why it has not been publicized. PMID:7021863

  6. Anemia in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kausman, Joshua Yehuda; Powell, Harley Robert; Jones, Colin Lindsay

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of anemia in stable pediatric renal transplant recipients and to examine the association of anemia with renal function, immunosuppressants, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and growth, as well as iron, vitamin B(12), and folate stores. This is a cross-sectional study of the 50 renal transplant recipients currently followed at our center. Patient data were collected regarding hematological parameters, growth, medications, renal function, underlying renal disease, delayed graft function, episodes of rejection, and iron or erythropoietin therapy post transplantation. The mean hemoglobin level (Hb) was 110 g/l and the overall prevalence of anemia was 60%, including 30% who were severely anemic (Hb<100 g/l). There was a high rate of iron deficiency (34%) and serum iron was the parameter of iron metabolism most closely associated with anemia. Hb in patients with low serum iron was 90.7 g/l versus 114.4 g/l in those with normal serum iron ( P<0.01). Both univariate and multiple linear regression determined tacrolimus dose and creatinine clearance to be significant factors associated with anemia. Tacrolimus dose correlated with a 10 g/l reduction in Hb for every increase of tacrolimus dose of 0.054 mg/kg per day ( P=0.001). The dose of mycophenolate was positively correlated with Hb, but this was likely to be confounded by our practice of dose reduction in the setting of anemia. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor use was not associated with anemia. Severely anemic patients tended to be shorter, with a mean Z-score for height of -1.8 compared with -0.9 for those with normal Hb ( P=0.02). Anemia is a significant and common problem in pediatric renal transplant patients. Deteriorating renal function is an important cause, but other factors like iron deficiency and immunosuppression are involved. Definition of iron deficiency is difficult and serum iron may be a valuable indicator. Medication doses

  7. Current approaches for the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Rodríguez-Martínez, Marisol; Gómez-de-León, Andrés; Tarín-Arzaga, Luz; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2013-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an infrequent group of diseases defined by autoantibody mediated red blood cell destruction. Correct diagnosis and classification of this condition are essential to provide appropriate treatment. AIHA is divided into warm and cold types according to the characteristics of the autoantibody involved and by the presence of an underlying or associated disorder into primary and secondary AIHA. Due to its low frequency, treatment for AIHA is largely based on small prospective trials, case series, and empirical observations. This review describes in detail the different treatment approaches for autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Warm antibody type AIHA should be treated with steroids, to which most patients respond, although relapse can occur and maintenance doses are frequently required. Splenectomy is an effective second line treatment and can provide long-term remission without medication. Rituximab is a useful alternative for steroid refractory patients, those requiring high maintenance doses and unfavorable candidates for surgery. Promising therapeutic modifications with this monoclonal antibody are emerging including drug combinations, lower doses, and long-term use. Primary cold agglutinin disease has been recognized as having a lymphoproliferative monoclonal origin. It is unresponsive to both steroids and splenectomy. Rituximab is currently the best therapeutic alternative for this condition, and several treatment regimens are available with variable responses. PMID:23689532

  8. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Children: Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Janani; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Jacob, Eapen K; Kreuter, Justin D; Go, Ronald S

    2016-04-01

    We studied 35 pediatric patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia seen at Mayo Clinic from 1994 to 2014. The median age was 10.0 years and 65.7% were males. Most had warm antibodies (80.0%) and some secondary to viral (14.3%) or autoimmune disorders (31.4%). Seven (20.0%) patients presented with Evans syndrome, 3 of whom also had common variable immunodeficiency. The median hemoglobin at diagnosis was 6.1 g/dL and 62.8% patients required red cell transfusions. The severity of anemia was worse among children below 10 years (median 5.5 vs. 7.0 g/dL, P=0.01). Steroid was the initial treatment for 88.5% patients, with overall response rate of 82.7% (68.5% complete, 14.2% partial) and median response duration of 10.7 months (range, 0.2 to 129.7+ mo). After median follow-up of 26.6 months, 8 (22.8%) patients relapsed. Salvage treatments included splenectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and mycophenolate mofetil. Infectious complications occurred in 9 (25.7%) patients and 1 patient died of cytomegalovirus infection. Four patients had cold agglutinin disease and 3 (75.0%) responded to steroids. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder in pediatric population and most respond well to steroids regardless of the type of antibody. Infectious complications are common and screening for immunodeficiency is recommended among those with Evans syndrome. PMID:26925716

  9. The Evidence-Based Evaluation of Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Eliana V; Bollard, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent disease with multiple possible etiologies and resultant complications. Iron deficiency anemia is a common cause of anemia and is typically due to insufficient intake, poor absorption, or overt or occult blood loss. Distinguishing iron deficiency from other causes of anemia is integral to initiating the appropriate treatment. In addition, identifying the underlying cause of iron deficiency is also necessary to help guide management of these patients. We review the key components to an evidence-based, cost-conscious evaluation of suspected iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27542426

  10. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  11. Aplastic anemia associated with lithium therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Z.; Khan, A. G.; Chaudhry, Z. A.

    1973-01-01

    A case is reported of fatal aplastic anemia developing in a 50-year-old woman who received lithium carbonate in the generally accepted dosage for a manic-depressive disorder. The serum lithium had been determined at regular intervals and never exceeded what is considered a safe level. Patients for whom lithium is prescribed should have periodic hematologic examinations. PMID:4691107

  12. Fanconi Anemia Genes, of Menders and Sweepers.

    PubMed

    Campello, Silvia; Cecconi, Francesco

    2016-05-23

    Reporting recently in Cell, Sumpter et al. (2016) provide evidence that Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway genes, which are mutated in the homonymous disease and are tumor suppressors known as damaged nuclear DNA "menders," also act as intracellular sweepers in selective virophagy and mitophagy. PMID:27219059

  13. Fanconi anemia proteins in telomere maintenance.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Jaya; Liu, Yie

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian chromosome ends are protected by nucleoprotein structures called telomeres. Telomeres ensure genome stability by preventing chromosome termini from being recognized as DNA damage. Telomere length homeostasis is inevitable for telomere maintenance because critical shortening or over-lengthening of telomeres may lead to DNA damage response or delay in DNA replication, and hence genome instability. Due to their repetitive DNA sequence, unique architecture, bound shelterin proteins, and high propensity to form alternate/secondary DNA structures, telomeres are like common fragile sites and pose an inherent challenge to the progression of DNA replication, repair, and recombination apparatus. It is conceivable that longer the telomeres are, greater is the severity of such challenges. Recent studies have linked excessively long telomeres with increased tumorigenesis. Here we discuss telomere abnormalities in a rare recessive chromosomal instability disorder called Fanconi Anemia and the role of the Fanconi Anemia pathway in telomere biology. Reports suggest that Fanconi Anemia proteins play a role in maintaining long telomeres, including processing telomeric joint molecule intermediates. We speculate that ablation of the Fanconi Anemia pathway would lead to inadequate aberrant structural barrier resolution at excessively long telomeres, thereby causing replicative burden on the cell. PMID:27118469

  14. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-08-15

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  15. Cyclical iron supplementation to reduce anemia among Brazilian preschoolers: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common type of nutritional disorder. New strategies for the treatment of anemia are very important for its reduction. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and feasibility of cyclical iron supplementation as a strategy to reduce the prevalence of anemia among preschoolers. Methods A randomized controlled trial was performed in the entire population of under five-year-old children who attended government daycare centers in a small town in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The children were randomly allocated into two intervention groups: the Weekly and Cyclical Groups. During a ten-month period, the Weekly Group (n = 51) received weekly doses of 30 mg elemental iron (40 doses) and the Cyclical Group (n = 48) received two cycles of 20 daily doses of 30 mg elemental iron separated by a four-month period (40 doses). Results Overall, at the end of ten months, the prevalence of anemia of the children on both supplementation regimens showed a significant decrease from 20.20% to 5.05% (p-value < 0.0005). There was no significant difference in the anemia between the two groups (p-value = 0.35). The mean hemoglobin concentration increased by 0.27 g/dL (p-value < 0.016) and 0.47 g/dL (p-value < 0.0005) in the Weekly and Cyclical Groups, respectively; again there was no significant difference between groups (p-value = 0.17). However, the cyclical regimen was easier to manage. Conclusions Both supplementation regimens significantly reduced the prevalence of anemia however administration of the Cyclical Group was easier to carry out and control. Clinical trial registration number NCT00992823 PMID:23305566

  16. Iron deficiency anemia's effect on bone formation in zebrafish mutant.

    PubMed

    Bo, Lin; Liu, Zhichun; Zhong, Yingbin; Huang, Jian; Chen, Bin; Wang, Han; Xu, Youjia

    2016-07-01

    Iron is one of the essential elements of life. Iron metabolism is related to bone metabolism. Previous studies have confirmed that iron overload is a risk factor for osteoporosis. But the correlation between iron deficiency and bone metabolism remains unclear. Ferroportin 1 is identified as a cellular iron exporter and required for normal iron cycling. In zebrafish, the mutant of ferroportin 1 gene (fpn1), weh(tp85c) exhibited the defective iron transport, leading to developing severe hypochromic anemia. We used weh(tp85c) as a model for investigating iron deficiency and bone metabolism. In this study, we examined the morphology of the developing cartilage and vertebrae of the Weh(tp85) compared to the wild type siblings by staining the larvae with alcian blue for cartilage and alizarin red for the bone. In addition, we evaluated the expression patterns of the marker genes of bone development and cell signaling in bone formation. Our results showed that weh(tp85c) mutant larvae exhibited the defects in bone formation, revealing by decreases in the number of calcified vertebrae along with decreased expression of osteoblast novel genes: alpl, runx2a and col1a1a and BMPs signaling genes in osteoblast differentiation: bmp2a and bmp2b. Our data suggest that iron deficiency anemia affects bone formation, potentially through the BMPs signaling pathway in zebrafish. PMID:27184405

  17. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  18. Erythropoietin Levels in Elderly Patients with Anemia of Unknown Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Swetha; Martin, Alison; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Background In many elderly patients with anemia, a specific cause cannot be identified. This study investigates whether erythropoietin levels are inappropriately low in these cases of “anemia of unknown etiology” and whether this trend persists after accounting for confounders. Methods This study includes all anemic patients over 60 years old who had erythropoietin measured between 2005 and 2013 at a single center. Three independent reviewers used defined criteria to assign each patient’s anemia to one of ten etiologies: chronic kidney disease, iron deficiency, chronic disease, confirmed myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), suspected MDS, vitamin B12 deficiency, folate deficiency, anemia of unknown etiology, other etiology, or multifactorial etiology. Iron deficiency anemia served as the comparison group in all analyses. We used linear regression to model the relationship between erythropoietin and the presence of each etiology, sequentially adding terms to the model to account for the hemoglobin concentration, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and Charlson Comorbidity Index. Results A total of 570 patients met the inclusion criteria. Linear regression analysis showed that erythropoietin levels in chronic kidney disease, anemia of chronic disease and anemia of unknown etiology were lower by 48%, 46% and 27%, respectively, compared to iron deficiency anemia even after adjusting for hemoglobin, eGFR and comorbidities. Conclusions We have shown that erythropoietin levels are inappropriately low in anemia of unknown etiology, even after adjusting for confounders. This suggests that decreased erythropoietin production may play a key role in the pathogenesis of anemia of unknown etiology. PMID:27310832

  19. Anemia among Primary School Children in Eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Anemia during childhood impairs physical growth, cognitive development and school performance. Identifying the causes of anemia in specific contexts can help efforts to prevent negative consequences of anemia among children. The objective of this study was to assess prevalence and identify correlates of anemia among school children in Eastern Ethiopia. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted from January 2012 to February 2012 in Kersa, Eastern Ethiopia. The study included randomly selected primary school students. Hemoglobin concentration was measured using a Hemocue haemoglobinometer. A child was identified as anemic if the hemoglobin concentration was <11.5 g/dl for children (5–11 yrs) and < 12 g/dl for child older than 12 years age. Poisson regression model with robust variance was used to calculate prevalence ratios. Result The overall prevalence of anemia was 27.1% (95% CI: 24.98, 29.14): 13.8% had mild, 10.8% moderate, and 2.3% severe anemia. Children with in the age group of 5-9 years (APR, 1.083; 95% CI, 1.044- 1.124) were at higher risk for anemia. Paternal education (Illiterate, 1.109; 1.044 - 1.178) was positively associated with anemia. Children who had irregular legume consumption (APR, 1.069; 95% CI, 1.022 -1.118) were at higher risk for anemia. Conclusion About a quarter of school children suffer from anemia and their educational potential is likely to be affected especially for those with moderate and severe anemia. Child age, irregular legume consumption, and low paternal schooling were associated with anemia. Intervention programmes aimed to reduce anemia among school children are crucial to ensure proper growth and development of children. PMID:25902055

  20. Schilling evaluation of pernicious anemia: current status

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckier, L.S.; Chervu, L.R.

    1984-09-01

    The Schilling examination remains a popular means of evaluating in vivo absorption of vitamin B/sub 12/. When absorption is abnormally low, the test may be repeated with addition to exogenous intrinsic factor (IF) in order to correct the IF deficiency that characterizes pernicious anemia. A dual-isotope variation provides a means of performing both stages of the test simultaneously, thereby speeding up the test and reducing dependence on complete urine collection. In vivo studies indicate that, when administered simultaneously, the absorption of unbound B/sub 12/ is elevated, and IF-bound B/sub 12/ is reduced, in pernicious-anemia patients, relative to the classic two-stage examination. A number of clinical studies indicate significant difficulty in resolving clincial diagnoses with the dual-tracer test. An algorithm is offered for selecting the most suitable variation of the Schilling test to improve the accuracy of test results and the ease of performance.

  1. Exome sequencing reveals a thrombopoietin ligand mutation in a Micronesian family with autosomal recessive aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Syed K.; Olm-Shipman, Adam J.; Wilson, Nathan R.; Abhyankar, Sunil; Ganter, Brigitte; Furness, L. Mike; Fang, Jianwen; Calado, Rodrigo T.

    2013-01-01

    We recently identified 2 siblings afflicted with idiopathic, autosomal recessive aplastic anemia. Whole-exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous missense mutation in thrombopoietin (THPO, c.112C>T) in both affected siblings. This mutation encodes an arginine to cysteine substitution at residue 38 or residue 17 excluding the 21-amino acid signal peptide of THPO receptor binding domain (RBD). THPO has 4 conserved cysteines in its RBD that form 2 disulfide bonds. Our in silico modeling predicts that introduction of a fifth cysteine may disrupt normal disulfide bonding to cause poor receptor binding. In functional assays, the mutant-THPO–containing media shows two- to threefold reduced ability to sustain UT7-TPO cells, which require THPO for proliferation. Both parents and a sibling with heterozygous R17C change have reduced platelet counts, whereas a sibling with wild-type sequence has normal platelet count. Thus, the R17C partial loss-of-function allele results in aplastic anemia in the homozygous state and mild thrombocytopenia in the heterozygous state in our family. Together with the recent identification of THPO receptor (MPL) mutations and the effects of THPO agonists in aplastic anemia, our results have clinical implications in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with aplastic anemia and highlight a role for the THPO-MPL pathway in hematopoiesis in vivo. PMID:24085763

  2. Anemia of renal failure. Use of erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Humphries, J E

    1992-05-01

    Chronic renal failure is almost invariably accompanied by symptomatic anemia. It has been demonstrated that the primary cause of this anemia is inadequate production of erythropoietin by the diseased kidneys. The isolation of erythropoietin, followed by the cloning and expression of the human erythropoietin gene, made possible clinical trials of rHuEPO in uremic patients. rHuEPO produced dramatic increases in the hematocrit in almost all patients treated and also ameliorated many symptoms, such as lethargy, dizziness, and poor appetite, that had long been attributed to the effect of uremic toxins. Adverse effects of treatment with rHuEPO noted in the early clinical trials included hypertension, seizures, arteriovenous fistula or shunt thrombosis, and hyperkalemia. Further study of rHuEPO has shown that many of these side effects may be no more frequent in patients receiving rHuEPO than in other uremic patients not receiving rHuEPO. Reduction of the rHuEPO dosage and subcutaneous administration produce less rapid increases in the hematocrit and may lessen the incidence and severity of these side effects. rHuEPO therapy places great demands on both the body's iron stores and the capacity to rapidly transfer iron from storage sites to the erythroid progenitor cells. Thus, almost all patients treated with rHuEPO become iron deficient and require oral or parenteral iron replacement. Response to rHuEPO in uremic patients is diminished if the anemia is complicated by iron deficiency, inflammatory disorders, aluminum overload, or deficiency of folate or vitamin B12. rHuEPO therapy is safe and effective in the treatment of the anemia of chronic renal failure. The use of rHuEPO leads to enhanced quality of life and eliminates the need for red cell transfusions. In addition to hemodialysis patients, predialysis patients and those on CAPD benefit from and are candidates for rHuEPO therapy. PMID:1578966

  3. Anemia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... 简体中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) ... 貧血症 - 日本語 (Japanese) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Korean (한국어) Anemia 빈혈 - 한국어 (Korean) Bilingual PDF Health ...

  4. [Drug induced hemolytic anemia associated with agranulocytosis].

    PubMed

    Satoh, S; Takahashi, T; Hayashi, T; Okada, Y; Tokunoh, T; Adachi, M; Hinoda, Y; Endoh, T; Imai, K

    1996-10-01

    A 27-year-old female was admitted to a hospital because of severe anemia (hemoglobin 4.9 g/dl) after taking PL (a drug for common cold consisted of Salicylamide, Acetaminophen, Caffeine and Promethazine methylene di-salicylate) and Cefadroxil (an oral antibiotic) for ten days. History and laboratory data leaded to a diagnosis of drug induced hemolytic anemia. 6 units of concentrated red blood cells were transfused and the suspected drugs were discontinued immediately. Though resolution of anemia and no further hemolysis were observed, progressive leukocytopenia developed since four days after the admission. Bone marrow aspiration revealed marked decrease of granulocytic series. The patient was transferred to our hospital and was isolated under laminar air-flow to prevent her from bacterial and fungal infections. She was treated with prednisolone and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. She recovered from leukocytopenia in two weeks without suffering from any life-threatening infection. We extensively analyzed the suspected drugs and mechanism of hemolysis and granulocytopenia. Cefadroxil is turned out to be contributed to hemolysis by an immune complex mechanism. Cefadroxil and Salicylamide were suggested to be involved in granulocytopenia by the induction of antibodies against the leukocytes to which these drugs were bound. Thus Cefadroxil was regarded as a causative drug of both hemolysis and granulocytopenia. This case is of interest for analyzing drug-induced blood abnormality because it is very rare that two lineage of blood were injured by one drug at the same time as far as we know. PMID:8952318

  5. Communicating about chemotherapy-induced anemia.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Brad; Blum, Diane; Cella, David; Hamilton, Heidi; Nail, Lillian; Waltzman, Roger

    2007-01-01

    Many validated instruments exist for determining the impact of chemotherapy-induced anemia and related fatigue on patient quality of life, but few studies analyze how healthcare providers actually discuss these subjects with patients. The authors share their study results on patterns of communication between participating patients and their physicians and allied health professionals. Letters of invitation were mailed to over 1,000 community-based oncologists, 15 of whom met the criteria and agreed to participate in this study on a first-enrolled basis until sufficient participation was ensured. In total, 36 of their patients were audio- and/or video-recorded during their regularly scheduled visits. Post-visit interviews were conducted separately with patients and participating healthcare professionals. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using sociolinguistic techniques. Although 52% of visit time was spent discussing side effects and symptoms, most discussions of anemia and fatigue lacked specificity necessary to determine their true impact on patients' lives. Physician inquiries regarding fatigue also tended to be too brief to elicit patients' chief concerns. Vocabulary used to discuss anemia and related fatigue was variable and imprecise, and no fatigue assessment instrument was used or referenced in any visit. Community-based oncologists are encouraged to modify their vocabulary and consider incorporating a validated fatigue instrument, either within or before the consultation, to improve the quality of such communication. PMID:17265785

  6. Reassessment of the microcytic anemia of lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.R.; Trotzky, M.S.; Pincus, D.

    1981-06-01

    Hematologic abnormalities in childhood lead poisoning may be due, in part, to the presence of other disorders, such as iron deficiency or thalassemia minor. In order to reassess increased lead burden as a cause of microcytic anemia, we studied 58 children with class III or IV lead poisoning, normal iron stores, and no inherited hemoglobinopathy. Anemia occurred in 12% and microcytosis in 21% of these children. The combination of anemia and microcytosis was found in only one of 58 patients (2%). When only children with class IV lead poisoning were studied, the occurrence of microcytosis increased to 46%. However, the combination of microcytosis and anemia was found in only one of these 13 more severely affected patients. Microcytic anemia was similarly uncommon in children with either blood lead concentration greater than or equal to 50 microgram/100 ml. These data indicate that microcytosis and anemia occur much less commonly than previously reported in childhood lead poisoning uncomplicated by other hematologic disorders.

  7. Positive direct antiglobulin tests and heteroimmune hemolysis in patients with severe aplastic anemia and pure red cell anemia treated with antilymphocytic globulin.

    PubMed

    Marmont, A M; Cerri, R; Lercari, G; Van Lint, M T; Bacigalupo, A; Risso, M

    1985-01-01

    Forty-six patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA), 1 with adult pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), 1 with congenital hypoplastic anemia (Diamond-Blackfan) and 1 with severe polymyositis were treated with intravenous antilymphocyte globulins (ALG) of different sources (2 of equine and 1 of rabbit origin). In all patients, direct and indirect antiglobulin tests (DAT and IAT) were performed, and in all patients treated with one type of equine ALG, positive DATs were found in Rh0(D)-positive patients, while the serum of Rh0(D)-negative patients treated with the same ALG reacted in vitro with Rh0(D)-positive erythrocytes. The antibody was eluted and shown to be of equine origin. Two patients suffered from frank heteroimmune hemolytic anemia. Since October 1984, the ALG of this particular source has not displayed any overt anti-erythrocyte activity any more. However, all clinicians treating patients with this type of immune immunosuppression should know that ALG may retain human erythrocyte (presumably anti-LW) activity. PMID:3934901

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of cold agglutinin mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Tjønnfjord, Geir E

    2012-05-01

    Exact diagnosis of the subtype has essential therapeutic consequences in autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Cold-antibody types include primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) and rare cases of cold agglutinin syndrome (CAS) secondary to cancer or acute infection. Primary CAD is a clonal lymphoproliferative disorder. Not all patients require pharmacological therapy, but treatment seems indicated more often than previously thought. Corticosteroids should not be used to treat primary CAD. Half of the patients respond to rituximab monotherapy; median response duration is 11 months. The most efficient treatment to date is fludarabine and rituximab in combination, resulting in responses in 75%, complete responses in 20% and median response duration of more than 66 months. Toxicity may be a concern, and an individualized approach is discussed. Erythrocyte transfusions can be given provided specific precautions are undertaken. No evidence-based therapy exists in secondary CAS, but optimal treatment of the underlying disorder is essential when feasible. PMID:22330255

  9. Structure of equine infectious anemia virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Hideki; Iourin, Oleg; Rao, Zihe; Fry, Elizabeth; Kingsman, Alan; Stuart, David I

    2002-02-01

    The Gag polyprotein is key to the budding of retroviruses from host cells and is cleaved upon virion maturation, the N-terminal membrane-binding domain forming the matrix protein (MA). The 2.8-A resolution crystal structure of MA of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a lentivirus, reveals that, despite showing no sequence similarity, more than half of the molecule can be superimposed on the MAs of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). However, unlike the structures formed by HIV-1 and SIV MAs, the oligomerization state observed is not trimeric. We discuss the potential of this molecule for membrane binding in the light of conformational differences between EIAV MA and HIV or SIV MA. PMID:11799182

  10. Structure of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hatanaka, Hideki; Iourin, Oleg; Rao, Zihe; Fry, Elizabeth; Kingsman, Alan; Stuart, David I.

    2002-01-01

    The Gag polyprotein is key to the budding of retroviruses from host cells and is cleaved upon virion maturation, the N-terminal membrane-binding domain forming the matrix protein (MA). The 2.8-Å resolution crystal structure of MA of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a lentivirus, reveals that, despite showing no sequence similarity, more than half of the molecule can be superimposed on the MAs of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). However, unlike the structures formed by HIV-1 and SIV MAs, the oligomerization state observed is not trimeric. We discuss the potential of this molecule for membrane binding in the light of conformational differences between EIAV MA and HIV or SIV MA. PMID:11799182

  11. Iron deficiency anemia--bridging the knowledge and practice gap.

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh; Goodnough, Lawrence T; Javidroozi, Mazyar; Auerbach, Michael; Carson, Jeffrey; Ershler, William B; Ghiglione, Mary; Glaspy, John; Lew, Indu

    2014-07-01

    Despite its high prevalence, anemia often does not receive proper clinical attention, and detection, evaluation, and management of iron deficiency anemia and iron-restricted erythropoiesis can possibly be an unmet medical need. A multidisciplinary panel of clinicians with expertise in anemia management convened and reviewed recent published data on prevalence, etiology, and health implications of anemia as well as current therapeutic options and available guidelines on management of anemia across various patient populations and made recommendations on the detection, diagnostic approach, and management of anemia. The available evidence confirms that the prevalence of anemia is high across all populations, especially in hospitalized patients. Anemia is associated with worse clinical outcomes including longer length of hospital stay, diminished quality of life, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality, and it is a modifiable risk factor of allogeneic blood transfusion with its own inherent risks. Iron deficiency is usually present in anemic patients. An algorithm for detection and management of anemia was discussed, which incorporated iron study (with primary emphasis on transferrin saturation), serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate, and vitamin B12 and folic acid measurements. Management strategies included iron therapy (oral or intravenous), erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and referral as needed. PMID:24931617

  12. Determinants of Anemia among Preschool Children in Rural, Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Foote, Eric M.; Sullivan, Kevin M.; Ruth, Laird J.; Oremo, Jared; Sadumah, Ibrahim; Williams, Thomas N.; Suchdev, Parminder S.

    2013-01-01

    Although anemia in preschool children is most often attributed to iron deficiency, other nutritional, infectious, and genetic contributors are rarely concurrently measured. In a population-based, cross-sectional survey of 858 children 6–35 months of age in western Kenya, we measured hemoglobin, malaria, inflammation, sickle cell, α-thalassemia, iron deficiency, vitamin A deficiency, anthropometry, and socio-demographic characteristics. Anemia (Hb < 11 g/dL) and severe anemia (Hb < 7 g/dL) prevalence ratios (PRs) for each exposure were determined using multivariable modeling. Anemia (71.8%) and severe anemia (8.4%) were common. Characteristics most strongly associated with anemia were malaria (PR: 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5–1.9), iron deficiency (1.3; 1.2–1.4), and homozygous α-thalassemia (1.3; 1.1–1.4). Characteristics associated with severe anemia were malaria (10.2; 3.5–29.3), inflammation (6.7; 2.3–19.4), and stunting (1.6; 1.0–2.4). Overall 16.8% of anemia cases were associated with malaria, 8.3% with iron deficiency, and 6.1% with inflammation. Interventions should address malaria, iron deficiency, and non-malarial infections to decrease the burden of anemia in this population. PMID:23382166

  13. Anemia Among Children Exposed to Polyparasitism in Coastal Kenya.

    PubMed

    Chang Cojulun, Alicia; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Sutherland, Laura J; Mungai, Peter L; Mutuku, Francis; Muchiri, Eric; Kitron, Uriel; King, Charles H

    2015-11-01

    Anemia represents a substantial problem for children living in areas with limited resources and significant parasite burden. We performed a cross-sectional study of 254 Kenyan preschool- and early school-age children in a setting endemic for multiple chronic parasitic infections to explore mechanisms of their anemia. Complete venous blood cell counts revealed a high prevalence of local childhood anemia (79%). Evaluating the potential links between low hemoglobin and socioeconomic factors, nutritional status, hemoglobinopathy, and/or parasite infection, we identified age < 9 years (odds ratio [OR]: 12.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4, 33) and the presence of asymptomatic malaria infection (OR: 6.8, 95% CI: 2.1, 22) as the strongest independent correlates of having anemia. A total of 130/155 (84%) of anemic children with iron studies had evidence of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), 16% had non-IDA; 50/52 of additionally tested anemic children met soluble transferrin-receptor (sTfR) criteria for combined anemia of inflammation (AI) with IDA. Children in the youngest age group had the greatest odds of iron deficiency (OR: 10.0, 95% CI: 3.9, 26). Although older children aged 9-11 years had less anemia, they had more detectable malaria, Schistosoma infection, hookworm, and proportionately more non-IDA. Anemia in this setting appears multifactorial such that chronic inflammation and iron deficiency need to be addressed together as part of integrated management of childhood anemia. PMID:26324733

  14. Anemia and Mild Cognitive Impairment in the German General Population.

    PubMed

    Dlugaj, Martha; Winkler, Angela; Weimar, Christian; Dürig, Jan; Broecker-Preuss, Martina; Dragano, Nico; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Erbel, Raimund; Eisele, Lewin

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that anemia is associated with cognitive impairment. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the cross-sectional association of anemia as well as the persistence of anemia over the last five years with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and MCI subtypes (amnestic/non-amnestic MCI (aMCI/naMCI)). Out of 4,157 participants (50% men, 50-80 years) of the second examination (t1) of a cohort study (baseline (t0) 2000-2003), we included 4,033 participants with available hemoglobin information and complete cognitive assessment. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin <13 g/dl in men (n = 84) and <12 g/dl in women (n = 79). Group comparisons were used to compare the cognitive subtests. To determine the association of MCI with anemia at t1, with anemia five years prior to the cognitive assessment (t0) and anemia at both time points, we used logistic regression models and included 579 participants with MCI and 1,438 cognitively normal participants out of the total cohort. Anemic participants showed lower performances in verbal memory and executive functions. The fully adjusted odds ratios (OR) for MCI, aMCI, and naMCI in anemic versus non-anemic participants were 1.92 (95% -CI, 1.09-3.39), 1.96 (1.00-3.87), and 1.88 (0.91-3.87). Anemia at both times points showed a non-significant association with naMCI (OR 3.74, 0.94-14.81, fully adjusted). Our results suggest that anemia is associated with an increased risk of MCI independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. The association of anemia and MCI has important clinical relevance, because many causes of anemia can be treated effectively. PMID:26599053

  15. Intestine-specific Disruption of Hypoxia-inducible Factor (HIF)-2α Improves Anemia in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Das, Nupur; Xie, Liwei; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Campbell, Andrew; Rivella, Stefano; Shah, Yatrik M

    2015-09-25

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is caused by genetic defects in the β-globin chain. SCD is a frequently inherited blood disorder, and sickle cell anemia is a common type of hemoglobinopathy. During anemia, the hypoxic response via the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α is highly activated in the intestine and is essential in iron absorption. Intestinal disruption of HIF-2α protects against tissue iron accumulation in iron overload anemias. However, the role of intestinal HIF-2α in regulating anemia in SCD is currently not known. Here we show that in mouse models of SCD, disruption of intestinal HIF-2α significantly decreased tissue iron accumulation. This was attributed to a decrease in intestinal iron absorptive genes, which were highly induced in a mouse model of SCD. Interestingly, disruption of intestinal HIF-2α led to a robust improvement in anemia with an increase in RBC, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. This was attributed to improvement in RBC survival, hemolysis, and insufficient erythropoiesis, which is evident from a significant decrease in serum bilirubin, reticulocyte counts, and serum erythropoietin following intestinal HIF-2α disruption. These data suggest that targeting intestinal HIF-2α has a significant therapeutic potential in SCD pathophysiology. PMID:26296885

  16. Iron, anemia and hepcidin in malaria

    PubMed Central

    Spottiswoode, Natasha; Duffy, Patrick E.; Drakesmith, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Malaria and iron have a complex but important relationship. Plasmodium proliferation requires iron, both during the clinically silent liver stage of growth and in the disease-associated phase of erythrocyte infection. Precisely how the protozoan acquires its iron from its mammalian host remains unclear, but iron chelators can inhibit pathogen growth in vitro and in animal models. In humans, iron deficiency appears to protect against severe malaria, while iron supplementation increases risks of infection and disease. Malaria itself causes profound disturbances in physiological iron distribution and utilization, through mechanisms that include hemolysis, release of heme, dyserythropoiesis, anemia, deposition of iron in macrophages, and inhibition of dietary iron absorption. These effects have significant consequences. Malarial anemia is a major global health problem, especially in children, that remains incompletely understood and is not straightforward to treat. Furthermore, the changes in iron metabolism during a malaria infection may modulate susceptibility to co-infections. The release of heme and accumulation of iron in granulocytes may explain increased vulnerability to non-typhoidal Salmonella during malaria. The redistribution of iron away from hepatocytes and into macrophages may confer host resistance to superinfection, whereby blood-stage parasitemia prevents the development of a second liver-stage Plasmodium infection in the same organism. Key to understanding the pathophysiology of iron metabolism in malaria is the activity of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin is upregulated during blood-stage parasitemia and likely mediates much of the iron redistribution that accompanies disease. Understanding the regulation and role of hepcidin may offer new opportunities to combat malaria and formulate better approaches to treat anemia in the developing world. PMID:24910614

  17. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Martins, Wolney de Andrade; Lopes, Heno Ferreira; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda Marciano; Gualandro, Sandra de Fátima Menosi; Arteaga-Fernández, Edmundo; Mady, Charles

    2012-01-26

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is associated to increased cardiac output, normal heart rate (HR), abnormal QT dispersion and lower diastolic blood pressure (DBP). The mechanisms are still unknown. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there is cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction (CAD) in SCA. The secondary objectives were to distinguish the roles of chronic anemia and hemoglobinopathy and to evaluate the predominance of the sympathetic or parasympathetic systems in the pathogenesis of CAD. Sixteen subjects with SCA, 13 with sickle cell trait (SCT), 13 with iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and 13 healthy volunteers (HV) were evaluated. All subjects were submitted to 24h-electrocardiogram (24h-ECG), plasma norepinephrine (NE) measurement before and after isometric exercise (IE), and also Valsalva maneuver (VM), diving maneuver (DV), and tilt test (TT). Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was also evaluated. The minimum, average and maximum HR as well as the percentage of bradycardia and tachycardia at 24-h ECG were similar in all groups. NE at baseline and after IE did not differ between groups. The SCA group showed less bradycardia at phase IV of VM, less bradycardia during DV, and also less tachycardia and lower DBP during TT. BRS for bradycardia and tachycardia reflex was decreased in the SCA and SCT groups. In conclusion, 1) there is CAD in SCA, and it is characterized by the reduction of BRS and the limitation of HR modulation mediated by the parasympathetic system; 2) cardiovascular sympathetic activity is preserved in SCA; and 3) hemoglobinopathy is the preponderant ethiopathogenic factor. PMID:21868290

  18. [Anemia treatment in peritoneal dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Janković, Nikola; Janković, Mateja

    2009-09-01

    Anemia is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and patients receiving renal replacement therapy. In this paper we will outline the prevention and treatment of anemia in patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD). PD patients are less anemic and more sensitive to erythropoesis-stimulating agent (ESA) than their hemodialysis (HD) counterparts and, in general, dosages required for achieving similar hemoglobin levels to those achieved in HD patients are remarkably less. Before starting with ESA treatment we have to evaluate the degree of anemia and excluded other causes which are not connected with CKD and method of treatment. Patient's compliance is crucial for a successful therapy and it can be improved by decreasing frequency of administration of ESA. Since ESAare expensive, "cost-effectivnes" studies represent an important factor in choosing a distinct drug. Subcutaneous administration provides better long-term utilization of ESA in comparison to intravenous administration and is therefore preferred in PD patients. Intraperitoneal administration is not recommended due to poor bioavailability. In some patients we can observe the reduced response to ESA therapy. The definition of reduced response is generally regarded as a failure to achieve target hemoglobin concentration of >11 g/dL. Identification of underlying cause is not always easy but every attempt should be made to investigate every patient with resistance to therapy because some causes are easily corrected. Since 2005 particular ESA drugs have been approved by Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and registered for use in Croatia. For PD patients the ESAcan be prescribed by general practitioner. The list of available drugs is available in the official government newspaper Nardone novine No.27, March 2nd, 2009. PMID:20232548

  19. Diagnosis and management of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Buchanan, George R

    2014-08-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a common hematologic condition, affecting a substantial proportion of the world's women and young children. Optimal management of IDA requires an accurate diagnosis, identification and correction of the underlying cause, provision of medicinal iron therapy, and confirmation of treatment success. There are limited data to support current treatment approaches regarding oral iron preparation, dosing, monitoring, and duration of therapy. New intravenous iron agents have improved safety profiles, which may foster their increased utilization in the treatment of patients with IDA. Clinical trials focused on improving current treatment standards for IDA are sorely needed. PMID:25064710

  20. Aplastic Anemia in Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    DeZern, Amy E.; Guinan, Eva C.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent and young adult patient presentations of aplastic anemia require a particular perspective on both diagnosis and treatment. This unique age group necessitates a thorough diagnostic evaluation to ensure the etiology, acquired or inherited, is sufficiently determined. The treatment options include human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling hematopoietic cell transplantation or immunosuppressive therapy, and both require attention to the specific medical and social needs of these adolescents and young adults. Longitudinal surveillance throughout life for the development of late complications of the disease and treatment is mandatory. PMID:25228559

  1. Plasma proteome changes associated with refractory anemia and refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Refractory anemia and refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts are two myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) subgroups linked with anemia. MDS is a group of heterogeneous oncohematological bone marrow disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, blood cytopenias, and progression of the disease toward acute myeloid leukemia. The aim of this study was to search for plasma proteome changes in MDS patients with refractory anemia and refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts. Results A total of 26 patient and healthy donor plasma samples were depleted of fourteen high-abundant plasma proteins, separated with 2D electrophoresis, and statistically processed with Progenesis SameSpots software. 55 significantly differing spots were observed and corresponded to 39 different proteins identified by nanoLC-MS/MS. Changes in the fragments of the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 protein were observed. Using mass spectrometry-based relative label-free quantification of tryptic peptides, there were differences in alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein peptides, while no differences were observed between the control and patient sample groups for retinol-binding protein 4 peptides. Conclusions This study describes plasma proteome changes associated with MDS patients with refractory anemia and refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts. Changes observed in the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 fragments were in agreement with our previous studies of other MDS subgroups: refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia and refractory anemia with excess blasts subtype 1. Mass spectrometry-based relative quantification of retinol-binding protein 4 peptides has shown that there are differences in the modification of this protein between refractory anemia with excess blasts subtype 1 patients and MDS patients with refractory anemia and refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts. Alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein seems to be a new potential MDS biomarker candidate. PMID

  2. Hereditary orotic aciduria with epilepsy and without megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Karina; Lauffer, Heinz; Lauenstein, Peter; Hoffmann, Georg F; Seidlitz, Günter

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary orotic aciduria is a rare metabolic disease that results from a defect of uridine-5-monophosphate synthase (UMPS). In affected patients, main clinical symptoms are a markedly increased urinary excretion of orotic acid combined with megaloblastic anemia. This report describes a new case of UMPS deficiency without megaloblastic anemia but with epilepsy. PMID:25757096

  3. Etiology of Strokes in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBaun, Michael R.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; McKinstry, Robert C., III

    2006-01-01

    The most devastating complication of sickle cell anemia is cerebral infarction, affecting [approximately]30% of all individuals with sickle cell anemia. Despite being one of the most common causes of stroke in infants and children, the mechanism of cerebral infarction in this population has not been extensively studied and is poorly understood.…

  4. Factors Associated with Anemia in the Institutionalized Elderly.

    PubMed

    Silva, Emanuelle Cruz da; Roriz, Anna Karla Carneiro; Eickemberg, Michaela; Mello, Adriana Lima; Côrtes, Elvira Barbosa Quadros; Feitosa, Caroline Alves; Medeiros, Jairza Maria Barreto; Ramos, Lílian Barbosa

    2016-01-01

    As a common problem in long-term care facilities (LTCFs), anemia affects 25-63% of the elderly. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of anemia and its associated factors in the institutionalized elderly. The cross-sectional study was carried out with three hundred thirteen individuals aged ≥ 60 years, of both genders, living in long-term care facilities for the elderly in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Poisson regression (PR) with robust variance estimates was used to assess the factors related to anemia. The prevalence of anemia was 38%. Mild anemia was predominant in both genders (male: 26.8%; female: 21.1%), as normocytic and normochromic anemia, with no anisocytosis (69.75%). Anemia was associated with thinness (PR: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.04-2.72) and with moderate (PR: 1.98; 95% CI: 1.07-3.63) and total (PR: 2.61; 95% CI: 1.34-5.07) dependence in the final model. Severe dependence exhibited borderline significance (PR: 1.94; 95% CI: 1.00-3.77). The prevalence of anemia was high in the institutionalized elderly in both genders, with characteristics suggesting chronic diseases as the causal factor, and the frequency of occurrence was higher in thinness elderly with moderate to total dependence. PMID:27607057

  5. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in Hispanic patients with anemia.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Melissa; Rosado-Carrión, Bárbara; Bredy, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Pernicious anemia represents the final phase of a process that begins with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and evolves through progressive levels of atrophy until loss of parietal cell mass. Numerous studies have suggested an association between H. pylori infection, unexplained iron deficiency anemia and cobalamin deficiency. Our research question was to determine whether there is an association between with H. pylori infection and development of anemia in Hispanic patients. This cross sectional pilot study involved data analysis of individual from years 2010-2012 examining the association between H. pylori infection and hemoglobin levels in patients with Hispanic ethnicity. A total of 189 records were evaluated, of which 33 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The study sample was divided in two groups. Group-A: 5 subjects with H. pylori infection and anemia; Group-B: 28 patients with H. pylori without anemia. Fisher exact test applied between categorical variables to determine the statistical significance of symptoms comparing anemic vs. non-anemic H. pylori infected patients yielded a p = 0.0027. In addition, restoration of anemia in two subjects following eradication therapy without previous iron or cobalamin replacement therapy suggested a potential role of this bacterium in the development of anemia in Hispanics. In conclusion, from the results of this study a potential association between Helicobacter pylori infection and anemia in Hispanic patients is suggested. Restoration of hemoglobin after eradication of bacteria further supports this concept. PMID:25065045

  6. Multivariable Discriminant Analysis for the Differential Diagnosis of Microcytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Urrechaga, Eloísa; Aguirre, Urko; Izquierdo, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia are the most common causes of microcytic anemia. Powerful statistical computer programming enables sensitive discriminant analyses to aid in the diagnosis. We aimed at investigating the performance of the multiple discriminant analysis (MDA) to the differential diagnosis of microcytic anemia. Methods. The training group was composed of 200 β-thalassemia carriers, 65 α-thalassemia carriers, 170 iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and 45 mixed cases of thalassemia and acute phase response or iron deficiency. A set of potential predictor parameters that could detect differences among groups were selected: Red Blood Cells (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH), and RBC distribution width (RDW). The functions obtained with MDA analysis were applied to a set of 628 consecutive patients with microcytic anemia. Results. For classifying patients into two groups (genetic anemia and acquired anemia), only one function was needed; 87.9% β-thalassemia carriers, and 83.3% α-thalassemia carriers, and 72.1% in the mixed group were correctly classified. Conclusion. Linear discriminant functions based on hemogram data can aid in differentiating between IDA and thalassemia, so samples can be efficiently selected for further analysis to confirm the presence of genetic anemia. PMID:24093062

  7. Cold Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia due to High-grade non Hodgkin's B cell Lymphoma with Weak Response to Rituximab and Chemotherapy Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Nazel Khosroshahi, Behzad; Jafari, Mohammad; Vazini, Hossein; Ahmadi, Alireza; Shams, Keivan; Kholoujini, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is characterized by shortening of red blood cell (RBC) survival and the presence of autoantibodies directed against autologous RBCs. Approximately 20% of autoimmune hemolytic anemia cases are associated with cold-reactive antibody. About half of patients with AIHA have no underlying associated disease; these cases are termed primary or idiopathic. Secondary cases are associated with underlying diseases or with certain drugs. We report herein a rare case of cold autoimmiune hemolytic anemia due to high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of B-cell type with weak response to rituximab and chemotherapy regimens. For treatment B cell lymphoma, Due to lack of treatment response, we used chemotherapy regimens including R- CHOP for the first time, and then Hyper CVAD, R- ICE and ESHAP were administered, respectively. For treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, we have used the corticosteroid, rituximab, plasmapheresis and blood transfusion and splenectomy. In spite of all attempts, the patient died of anemia and aggressive lymphoma nine months after diagnosis. To our knowledge, this is a rare report from cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia in combination with high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of B-cell type that is refractory to conventional therapies. PMID:26261701

  8. Effect of correction of anemia on echocardiographic and clinical parameters in patients with aortic stenosis involving a three-cuspid aortic valve and normal left ventricular ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Miquel; Ble, Mireia; Cladellas, Mercedes; Molina, Luis; Comín-Colet, Josep; Enjuanes, Cristina; Roqueta, Cristina; Soler, Cristina; Bruguera, Jordi

    2015-07-15

    The objective of the study is to investigate the impact of anemia (defined as hemoglobin concentration of <12 g/dl in women and 13 g/dl in men) on prognosis and to study the effect of recovery from anemia on echocardiographic and clinical parameters in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). This was a prospective study in 315 patients with moderate or severe AS. Patients with anemia received oral iron (ferrous sulfate with mucoproteose, 160 mg iron/day) and erythropoietin, if needed, or intravenous iron, if necessary. The following tests were performed before and after normalization of hemoglobin values: echocardiogram, 6-minute walk test, N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide, and measures of depression, cognitive impairment, and dependence. Patient mean age was 74 years (SD 9). Mean follow-up was 25 months (SD 8). Anemia prevalence in the overall group was 22% (n = 70). Patients who are anemic had a higher rate of complications at follow-up (mortality, hospital admission, or need for valve procedure; 80% vs 62%, p = 0.009). In total, 89% of patients recovered from anemia, with a mean time to recovery of 4.6 weeks (SD 1.4). Improvements were observed on echocardiographic parameters of peak velocity (4.1 to 3.7 m/s, p = 0.02) and mean gradient (44 to 35 mm Hg, p = 0.02). Performance on the 6-minute walk test improved from 235 to 303 m (p <0.001). Median N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide value decreased from 612 to 189 pg/dl (p <0.001). In conclusion, patients with AS and anemia have a worse prognosis than those without anemia. Resolution of anemia is associated with improvements in echocardiographic parameters and functional status, suggesting that treatment of iron deficiency is a relevant option in the management of patients with AS, particularly in nonoperable cases. PMID:25983280

  9. Selection of peptides for serological detection of equine infectious anemia.

    PubMed

    Santos, E M; Cardoso, R; Souza, G R L; Goulart, L R; Heinemann, M B; Leite, R C; Reis, J K P

    2012-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia caused by equine infectious anemia virus is an important disease due to its high severity and incidence in animals. We used a phage display library to isolate peptides that can be considered potential markers for equine infectious anemia diagnosis. We selected peptides using IgG purified from a pool comprised of 20 sera from animals naturally infected with equine infectious anemia virus. The diagnostic potential of these peptides was investigated by ELISA, Western blot and dot blot with purified IgG and serum samples. Based on the results, we chose a peptide mimetic for glycoprotein gp45 epitopes of equine infectious anemia virus, with potential for use as an antigen in indirect diagnostic assays. Synthesis of this peptide has possible applications for the development of new diagnostic tools for this disease. PMID:22653674

  10. Anemia in the Elderly: not Always what it Seems

    PubMed Central

    Cerrano, Marco; Crisà, Elena; Giai, Valentina; Boccadoro, Mario; Ferrero, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Anemia in the elderly is a common but challenging clinical scenario. Here we describe the case of an older woman who presented with anemia and elevated inflammation markers. After a complete diagnostic work-up, a definite etiology of the anemia could not be found so eventually a bone marrow biopsy was performed and she was diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome. She responded well to erythropoietin treatment but her inflammation markers remained elevated thus a positron emission tomography was performed. It turned out that the patient suffered from giant cell artheritis and her anemia completely resolved after steroid treatment. Our case outlines that it is necessary to pay particular attention to anemia of inflammation, which could be due to several and often masked conditions. Myelodysplatic syndromes should be considered when other causes have been ruled out, but their diagnosis can be difficult and requires expertise in the field. PMID:26977276

  11. Pathogenesis of anemia in Trypanosoma brucei-infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Amole, B O; Clarkson, A B; Shear, H L

    1982-01-01

    The pathogenesis of anemia was studied in trypanosome-infected mice. A strain of Trypanosoma brucei, TREU 667, was used which first produces an acute phase marked by waves of parasitemia. Erythrocytes from infected animals were coated with immunoglobulin M during or just before the waves of anemia and parasitological crises. Erythrocytes from normal animals could be sensitized with "precrisis" sera presumably containing antigen and antibody. These data suggest that anemia during the acute phase is due to sensitization of erythrocytes with immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. The anemia is partially compensated by a strong erythropoietic response. The acute phase is followed by a chronic phase marked by a constant high parasitemia and immunosuppression. The less marked anemia occurring during this latter phase is due to hemodilution and perhaps a low but significant immune response to the parasites, which causes continuing erythrocyte sensitization by immunoglobulin M-antigen complexes. PMID:7201455

  12. How I Diagnose Non-thalassemic Microcytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Mariasole; De Falco, Luigia; Iolascon, Achille

    2015-10-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most common form of anemia, characterized by reduced hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis associated with decreased red blood cell volume (MCV). It is a very heterogeneous group of diseases that may be either acquired or inherited. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from defects in globin (hemoglobinopathies or thalassemias) or heme synthesis or in iron availability, or acquisition by the erythroid precursors. Diagnosis of microcytic anaemia appears to be important in children/adolescents, especially to set, where possible, a treatment plan on the basis of the etiology and pathogenesis. After excluding the acquired causes of microcytic anemia that represent the most frequent etiology, according to the differential diagnosis, the analysis of genetic causes, mostly hereditary, must be considered. This review will consider acquired and hereditary microcytic anemias due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects and their diagnosis. PMID:26404439

  13. Anemia in the Elderly: not Always what it Seems.

    PubMed

    Cerrano, Marco; Crisà, Elena; Giai, Valentina; Boccadoro, Mario; Ferrero, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Anemia in the elderly is a common but challenging clinical scenario. Here we describe the case of an older woman who presented with anemia and elevated inflammation markers. After a complete diagnostic work-up, a definite etiology of the anemia could not be found so eventually a bone marrow biopsy was performed and she was diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome. She responded well to erythropoietin treatment but her inflammation markers remained elevated thus a positron emission tomography was performed. It turned out that the patient suffered from giant cell artheritis and her anemia completely resolved after steroid treatment. Our case outlines that it is necessary to pay particular attention to anemia of inflammation, which could be due to several and often masked conditions. Myelodysplatic syndromes should be considered when other causes have been ruled out, but their diagnosis can be difficult and requires expertise in the field. PMID:26977276

  14. Hookworm Anemia in a Peritoneal Dialysis Patient in China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fuquan; Xu, Ying; Xia, Min; Ying, Guanghui; Shou, Zhangfei

    2016-06-01

    Hookworm infections as well as other intestinal nematodiases are endemic in China. In this case, a 70-year-old male showed symptoms of chest tightness, shortness of breath, and both lower extremities edema. The diagnostic result was chronic renal insufficiency, chronic kidney disease (5th stage), and renal anemia at first. Then, he received treatment with traditional drugs. However, this treatment did not help to alleviate the symptoms of the patient significantly. The results of gastroendoscopy showed hookworms in the duodenum, also confirmed by pathology examination. Anemia was markedly ameliorated after eliminating the parasites. The results mentioned above suggested that ancylostomiasis was the leading causes of anemia in this patient, and the etiology of anemia in uremic patients should be systematically considered. Especially when anemia could not be cured by regular treatments, rare diseases should be investigated. PMID:27417086

  15. Hookworm Anemia in a Peritoneal Dialysis Patient in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fuquan; Xu, Ying; Xia, Min; Ying, Guanghui; Shou, Zhangfei

    2016-01-01

    Hookworm infections as well as other intestinal nematodiases are endemic in China. In this case, a 70-year-old male showed symptoms of chest tightness, shortness of breath, and both lower extremities edema. The diagnostic result was chronic renal insufficiency, chronic kidney disease (5th stage), and renal anemia at first. Then, he received treatment with traditional drugs. However, this treatment did not help to alleviate the symptoms of the patient significantly. The results of gastroendoscopy showed hookworms in the duodenum, also confirmed by pathology examination. Anemia was markedly ameliorated after eliminating the parasites. The results mentioned above suggested that ancylostomiasis was the leading causes of anemia in this patient, and the etiology of anemia in uremic patients should be systematically considered. Especially when anemia could not be cured by regular treatments, rare diseases should be investigated. PMID:27417086

  16. Prevalence of anemia among women: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bobdey, Saurabh; Sinha, Shruti

    2012-01-01

    Background The WHO estimates that more than 1/3rd of world population is anemic, of which iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is most common and serious problem of public health significance. Prevalence of anemia in India is among the highest in the world but within the country prevalence rates differ substantially between different regions. Indian Armed Forces personnel and families form a special class as it includes people from all regions. However, reliable data on the prevalence of anemia in families of naval personnel is scanty. The present study highlights the problem of anemia in non-pregnant wives of serving enrolled personnel of the Indian Navy in the reproductive age group. Methods A community based, cross sectional study was carried out at a Naval Base. Physical examination and hemoglobin estimation was done for 257 (100% sample) non-pregnant/non-lactating wives of serving enrolled personnel of the Indian Navy of age between 18 and 45years. Statistical analysis was carried out to estimate the prevalence of anemia. Results & Conclusion The prevalence of anemia was found to be 31.90%. Literacy status and Mean BMI of women with anemia was found to be significantly less than subjects without anemia. In conclusion this was a small study conducted to simply access the prevalence of anemia in wives of naval personnel, which though found much lower than national average is still high at 31.90%. Hence a larger multicentric study is being planned to evaluate the prevalence and factors associated with anemia in families of Armed Forces personnel. PMID:24532919

  17. Microfluidic approach of Sickled Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Loiseau, Etienne; Massiera, Gladys

    2012-11-01

    Sickle Cell Anemia is a disorder of the microcirculation caused by a genetic point mutation that produces an altered hemoglobin protein called HbS. HbS self-assembles reversibly into long rope like fibers inside the red blood cells. The resulting distorded sickled red blood cells are believed to block the smallest capillaries of the tissues producing anemia. Despite the large amount of work that provided a thorough understanding of HbS polymerization in bulk as well as in intact red blood cells at rest, no consequent cellular scale approaches of the study of polymerization and its link to the capillary obstruction have been proposed in microflow, although the problem of obstruction is in essence a circulatory problem. Here, we use microfluidic channels, designed to mimic physiological conditions (flow velocity, oxygen concentration, hematocrit...) of the microcirculation to carry out a biomimetic study at the cellular scale of sickled cell vaso-occlusion. We show that flow geometry, oxygen concentration, white blood cells and free hemoglobin S are essential in the formation of original cell aggregates which could play a role in the vaso-occlusion events.

  18. Maternal anemia associated with walkable distance to healthy food sources in Bronx, New York.

    PubMed

    Bottalico, Danielle M; Johnson, Glen D; Chazotte, Cynthia; Karkowsky, Chavi Eve

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between walkable access to healthy food sources and risk of anemia in pregnancy was evaluated for a cohort of 4678 women who initiated prenatal care in the year 2010 at an academic medical center in Bronx, New York. After geocoding patient residences, street network distances were obtained for the closest healthy food sources, which were identified from multiple databases. For lower-income patients, as indicated by Medicaid or lack of health insurance, those who lived less than 0.25miles from a healthy food source were less likely to be anemic when compared to those who lived farther (adjusted OR=0.65, 95% CI 0.48, 0.88). Patients with commercial insurance showed no effect. These results help to understand how a nutritionally-mediated condition such as anemia during pregnancy can be affected by one's built environment, while also highlighting the importance of conditioning on socioeconomic status for these types of studies. PMID:25779906

  19. Intravenous immunoglobulin-induced hemolytic anemia after thoracoscopic thymectomy for myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Hisashi; Sunkara, Rajitha; Chi, Dorcas Doja; Keogh, Deirdre; Gaissert, Henning

    2014-06-01

    A 24-year-old woman underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic thymectomy for Osserman IIB myasthenia gravis (MG). In preparation for thymectomy, high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) was administered 1 week before the surgical procedure. After uneventful thoracoscopic thymectomy, the postoperative hemoglobin value decreased from 12.1 mg/dL to 8.2 mg/dL. A diagnosis of IVIG-associated hemolytic anemia was made based on a peripheral smear with numerous spherocytes, a positive direct antiglobulin test result, and increased reticulocyte count. Hemoglobin levels after IVIG administration should be monitored closely before and after elective surgical procedures to identify severe anemia. Transfusion of type-matched blood should be avoided and risk factors understood. PMID:24882299

  20. [Treatment of a female patient with sickle-cell anemia during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Díaz-Pache, M V Acedo; Sarrión Bravo, M V; Silva Guisasola, J; Ariño Irujo, J; López Timoneda, F

    2011-01-01

    A 17-year-old girl with drepanocytic (sickle-cell) anemia who was being treated with hydroxyurea and periodic blood transfusions through a Hickman-type catheter was admitted for periodic episodes of fever. Blood cultures were positive for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Massive right atrial thrombosis with pulmonary embolism and bacterial endocarditis were detected by computed tomography. Surgery with a beating heart and cardiopulmonary bypass was undertaken. Drepanocytic anemia in individuals homozygous for hemoglobin S is a rare condition in Spain but we are beginning to see a few cases, in which management during anesthesia will be more complicated. High-risk surgery can be carried out in these patients without adverse events if the anesthesiologist is guided by a complete blood workup and takes precautions during and after surgery to control hydration, oxygenation, temperature, and the acid-base balance. PMID:22046869

  1. Ultrastructural findings in congenital anemia, dyskeratosis, and progressive alopecia in Polled Hereford calves.

    PubMed

    Steffen, D J; Leipold, H W; Elliott, G S; Smith, J E

    1992-05-01

    Ultrastructural evidence of dyserythropoiesis was found in ten calves (ages 1 to 16 months) previously diagnosed as having congenital anemia, dyskeratosis, and progressive alopecia. Morphologic abnormalities found in erythroid precursors of all calves were associated with the nucleus. Rubriblast nuclei were irregular with numerous blebs, indentations, and deep clefts. Elongated blebs appeared as satellite nuclei in some sections. Nuclear membranes had numerous defects or gaps, which were frequently present in, but not limited to, recently divided cells. Cytoplasmic material could be found within these gaps and extending into the nucleus. Rubricytes had chromatin that was abnormally condensed and hyperosmiophilic, with numerous translucent vacuoles present. Binucleate rubricytes occurred frequently in affected calves. These changes resemble those of type I congenital dyserythropoiesis in human beings, and we suggest congenital anemia, dyskeratosis, and progressive alopecia of Polled Hereford calves as the appropriate diagnostic terms to describe this disease. PMID:1621331

  2. COEXISTENCE OF ADDISON'S DISEASE AND PERNICIOUS ANEMIA: IS THE NEW CLASSIFICATION OF AUTOIMMUNE POLYGLANDULAR SYNDROME APPROPRIATE?

    PubMed

    Vrkljan, Ana Marija; Pašalić, Ante; Strinović, Mateja; Perić, Božidar; Kruljac, Ivan; Miroševć, Gorana

    2015-06-01

    A case of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is presented. A 45-year-old man was admitted due to fatigue, malaise and inappetence. He had a history of primary hypothyroidism and was on levothyroxine substitution therapy. One year before, he was diagnosed with normocytic anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency, which was treated with vitamin B12 substitution therapy. Physical examination revealed hypotension and marked hyperpigmentation. Laboratory testing showed hyponatremia, hyperkaliemia and severe normocytic anemia. Endocrinological evaluation disclosed low morning cortisol and increased adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. Hence, the diagnosis of Addison's disease was established. Additional laboratory workup showed positive parietal cell antibodies. However, his vitamin B12 levels were increased due to vitamin B12 supplementation therapy, which was initiated earlier. Gastroscopy and histopathology of gastric mucosa confirmed atrophic gastritis. Based on prior low serum vitamin B12 levels, positive parietal cell antibodies and atrophic gastritis, the patient was diagnosed with pernicious anemia. Hydrocortisone supplementation therapy was administered and titrated according to urinary-free cortisol levels. Electrolyte disbalance and red blood cell count were normalized. This case report demonstrates rather unique features of pernicious anemia in a patient with Addison's disease. It also highlights the link between type II and type III APS. Not only do they share the same etiological factors, but also overlap in pathophysiological and clinical characteristics. This case report favors older classification of APS, which consolidates all endocrine and other organ-specific autoimmune diseases into one category. This is important since it might help avoid pitfalls in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with APS. PMID:26415323

  3. Diagnosis of Pernicious Anemia and the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pari; Rhim, Andrew D.; Haynes, Kevin; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Yang, Yu-Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A number of studies have demonstrated a trophic effect of gastrin on pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Pernicious anemia is a clinical condition characterized by chronic hypergastrinemia. The aim of this study is to determine if pernicious anemia is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Methods This study is a retrospective cohort study using the Health Improvement Network (THIN) database, which contains comprehensive health information on 7.5 million patients in the United Kingdom from 1993–2009. All patients with pernicious anemia in the study cohort were identified and composed the exposed group. Each exposed patient was matched on practice site, sex, and age with up to four unexposed patients without pernicious anemia. The outcome was incident pancreatic cancer. The hazard ratio and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable Cox regression analysis. Results We identified 15,324 patients with pernicious anemia and 55,094 unexposed patients. Mean follow up time was similar between groups (exposed 4.31 [standard deviation (SD) 3.38] years, unexposed 4.63 [SD 3.44] years). The multivariable adjusted hazard ratio for pancreatic cancer associated with pernicious anemia was 1.16 (95% CI 0.77–1.76, p=0.47). Conclusions There is no significant association between pernicious anemia and the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24622073

  4. Prevalence and Determinants of Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Al Zenki, Sameer; Alomirah, Husam; Al Hooti, Suad; Al Hamad, Nawal; Jackson, Robert T.; Rao, Aravinda; Al Jahmah, Nasser; Al Obaid, Ina’am; Al Ghanim, Jameela; Al Somaie, Mona; Zaghloul, Sahar; Al Othman, Amani

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency (ID) of a nationally representative sample of the Kuwait population. We also determined if anemia differed by socioeconomic status or by RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. The subjects who were made up of 1830 males and females between the ages of 2 months to 86 years, were divided into the following age groups (0–5, 5–11, 12–14, 15–19, 20–49, ≥50 years). Results showed that the prevalence of anemia was 3% in adult males and 17% in females. The prevalence of ID varied according to age between 4% (≥50 years) and 21% (5–11 years) and 9% (12–14 years) and 23% (15–19 years), respectively, in males and females. The prevalence of anemia and ID was higher in females compared to males. Adults with normal ferritin level, but with low RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels had higher prevalence of anemia than those with normal RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. This first nationally representative nutrition and health survey in Kuwait indicated that anemia and ID are prevalent and ID contributes significantly to anemia prevalence. PMID:26264015

  5. Anemia management: development of a rapidaccess anemia and intravenous iron service

    PubMed Central

    Radia, Deepti; Momoh, Ibrahim; Dillon, Richard; Francis, Yvonne; Cameron, Laura; Fagg, Toni-Lee; Overland, Hannah; Robinson, Susan; Harrison, Claire N

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the initiation and evolution of the Rapid-Access Anemia Clinic (RAAC) at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospitals, London, UK. This clinic was set up to provide diagnosis and treatment, and to coordinate investigative procedures, where necessary, into the underlying causes of anemia. Initially piloted with anemic preoperative orthopedic patients, the clinic now treats a wide range of conditions, deriving from both internal and external referrals. Treatment includes dietary advice, supplementation with iron, vitamin B12 and folate, and blood transfusion. Most patients at the RAAC need iron replacement, the majority of which require intravenous (IV) iron. Therefore the first-line IV iron-administration protocol is carefully considered to ensure viability of the service and patient satisfaction. Four IV irons available in the UK are discussed, with explanation of the benefits and drawbacks of each product and the reasoning behind the IV iron choice at different stages of the RAAC’s development. Costs to the service, affected by IV iron price and administration regimen, are considered, as well as the product’s contraindications. Finally, the authors reflect on the success of the RAAC and how it has improved patients’ quality-of-treatment experience, in addition to benefiting the hospital and National Health Service in achieving specific health-care mandates and directives. Drawing from the authors’ experiences, recommendations are given to assist others in setting up and providing a successful rapid-access anemia service or similar facility. PMID:23950666

  6. Anemia management: development of a rapidaccess anemia and intravenous iron service.

    PubMed

    Radia, Deepti; Momoh, Ibrahim; Dillon, Richard; Francis, Yvonne; Cameron, Laura; Fagg, Toni-Lee; Overland, Hannah; Robinson, Susan; Harrison, Claire N

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the initiation and evolution of the Rapid-Access Anemia Clinic (RAAC) at Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals, London, UK. This clinic was set up to provide diagnosis and treatment, and to coordinate investigative procedures, where necessary, into the underlying causes of anemia. Initially piloted with anemic preoperative orthopedic patients, the clinic now treats a wide range of conditions, deriving from both internal and external referrals. Treatment includes dietary advice, supplementation with iron, vitamin B12 and folate, and blood transfusion. Most patients at the RAAC need iron replacement, the majority of which require intravenous (IV) iron. Therefore the first-line IV iron-administration protocol is carefully considered to ensure viability of the service and patient satisfaction. Four IV irons available in the UK are discussed, with explanation of the benefits and drawbacks of each product and the reasoning behind the IV iron choice at different stages of the RAAC's development. Costs to the service, affected by IV iron price and administration regimen, are considered, as well as the product's contraindications. Finally, the authors reflect on the success of the RAAC and how it has improved patients' quality-of-treatment experience, in addition to benefiting the hospital and National Health Service in achieving specific health-care mandates and directives. Drawing from the authors' experiences, recommendations are given to assist others in setting up and providing a successful rapid-access anemia service or similar facility. PMID:23950666

  7. Neonatal anemia and hydrops fetalis after maternal mycophenolate mofetil use.

    PubMed

    Tjeertes, I F A; Bastiaans, D E T; van Ganzewinkel, C J L M; Zegers, S H J

    2007-01-01

    After admitting a patient to our Neonatal Intensive Care with a severe anemia and an ear malformation, we ruled out any other cause than maternal medication use. Knowing she used mycophenolate mofetil during pregnancy, we looked for related articles. Two articles were found describing ear malformations, but no article was ever written about anemia caused by this medication. Consulting the international registers of drug effects through the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, we found out that the anemia was never seen or reported before. PMID:17180133

  8. Anemia and pregnancy: a link to maternal chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Raja; Karoshi, Mahantesh; Keith, Louis

    2011-11-01

    Anemia is a global public health problem. It has serious short- and long-term consequences during pregnancy and beyond. The anemic condition is often worsened by the presence of other chronic diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, HIV, and diabetes. Untreated anemia also leads to increased morbidity and mortality from these chronic conditions as well. It is surprising that despite these chronic conditions (such as malaria, tuberculosis, and HIV) often being preventable, they still pose a real threat to public health. This article aims to review the current understanding of the pathophysiology, risks, prevention, and treatment of anemia in the light of these chronic conditions. PMID:22099433

  9. Assessing Chaos in Sickle Cell Anemia Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Wesley; Le Floch, Francois

    2006-11-01

    Recent developments in sickle cell research and blood flow modeling allow for new interpretations of the sickle cell crises. With an appropriate set of theoretical and empirical equations describing the dynamics of the red cells in their environment, and the response of the capillaries to major changes in the rheology, a complete mathematical system has been derived. This system of equations is believed to be of major importance to provide new and significant insight into the causes of the disease and related crises. With simulations, it has been proven that the system transition from a periodic solution to a chaotic one, which illustrates the onset of crises from a regular blood flow synchronized with the heart beat. Moreover, the analysis of the effects of various physiological parameters exposes the potential to control chaotic solutions, which, in turn, could lead to the creation of new and more effective treatments for sickle cell anemia. .

  10. Does iron deficiency anemia affect olfactory function?

    PubMed

    Dinc, Mehmet Emre; Dalgic, Abdullah; Ulusoy, Seckin; Dizdar, Denizhan; Develioglu, Omer; Topak, Murat

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study found a negative effect of IDA on olfactory function. IDA leads to a reduction in olfactory function, and decreases in hemoglobin levels result in further reduction in olfactory function. Objective This study examined the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on olfactory function. Method The study enrolled 50 IDA patients and 50 healthy subjects. Olfactory function was evaluated using the Sniffin' Sticks olfactory test. The diagnosis of IDA was made according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results Patients with IDA had a significantly lower threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) value, and a lower threshold compared with the control group. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of smell selectivity values. PMID:26963317

  11. Antibodies in the treatment of aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Almaguer, David; Jaime-Pérez, Jose Carlos; Ruiz-Arguelles, Guillermo J

    2012-04-01

    Antibodies have been the cornerstone of treatment of acquired aplastic anemia for more than 25 years. Treatment with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is considered pivotal and the addition of cyclosporine improves the overall response rate. This antibody is heterogeneous and horse ATG is apparently more effective than rabbit ATG. Several issues remain unsolved in relation to the combination of ATG and cyclosporine: cost, toxicity and late clonal disorders. In recent years, alternative immunosuppressive therapy has been proposed and new antibodies have emerged: porcine ATG, alemtuzumab, daclizumab, and rituximab. Experience with these antibodies is limited to a few studies with alemtuzumab being the most promising, but the results are interesting and provocative. More studies are needed to find the perfect antibody. PMID:22307362

  12. Pernicious anemia. From past to present.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Santiago, E; Ferre Aracil, C; García García de Paredes, A; Moreira Vicente, V F

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is currently the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in Western countries. The histological lesion upon which this condition is based is autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis. The destruction of parietal cells causes a deficiency in intrinsic factor, an essential protein for vitamin B12 absorption in the terminal ileum. Advances in the last two decades have reopened the debate on a disease that seemed to have been forgotten due to its apparent simplicity. The new role of H. pylori, the value of parietal cell antibodies and intrinsic factor antibodies, the true usefulness of serum vitamin B12 levels, the risk of adenocarcinoma and gastric carcinoids and oral vitamin B12 treatment are just some of the current issues analyzed in depth in this review. PMID:25680481

  13. A microfluidics cytometer for mice anemia detection.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yanrui; Song, Jian; Geng, Zhaoxin; Zhang, Hongze; Wang, Wei; Xie, Lide; Yao, Weijuan; Li, Zhihong

    2012-11-01

    The design and fabrication of a microfluidic cytometer system and its application for reticulocyte detection are described. This chip can count the target cells, which are focused at the detection window without sheath flow. This cytometer system based on optimized epifluoresence has a competitive advantage in the signal-to-noise ratio. Induced fluorescence from the reticulocyte binded with antibody is detected by the optical module and then transformed into the electronic signal by a photo multiplier tube. After signal processing, the results are automatically read out by a digital module and displayed on the system. To evaluate this microfluidic cytometer system, experiments employing polystyrene (PS) micro beads and induced reticulocyte of mice anemia are carried out, respectively, and the results illustrate that the microfluidic cytometer system is effective in detecting the reticulocyte. PMID:22907472

  14. Current management of sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    McGann, Patrick T; Nero, Alecia C; Ware, Russell E

    2013-08-01

    Proper management of sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins with establishing the correct diagnosis early in life, ideally during the newborn period. The identification of affected infants by neonatal screening programs allows early initiation of prophylactic penicillin and pneumococcal immunizations, which help prevent overwhelming sepsis. Ongoing education of families promotes the early recognition of disease-released complications, which allows prompt and appropriate medical evaluation and therapeutic intervention. Periodic evaluation by trained specialists helps provide comprehensive care, including transcranial Doppler examinations to identify children at risk for primary stroke, plus assessments for other parenchymal organ damage as patients become teens and adults. Treatment approaches that previously highlighted acute vaso-occlusive events are now evolving to the concept of preventive therapy. Liberalized use of blood transfusions and early consideration of hydroxyurea treatment represent a new treatment paradigm for SCA management. PMID:23709685

  15. Current Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    McGann, Patrick T.; Nero, Alecia C.; Ware, Russell E.

    2013-01-01

    Proper management of sickle cell anemia (SCA) begins with establishing the correct diagnosis early in life, ideally during the newborn period. The identification of affected infants by neonatal screening programs allows early initiation of prophylactic penicillin and pneumococcal immunizations, which help prevent overwhelming sepsis. Ongoing education of families promotes the early recognition of disease-released complications, which allows prompt and appropriate medical evaluation and therapeutic intervention. Periodic evaluation by trained specialists helps provide comprehensive care, including transcranial Doppler examinations to identify children at risk for primary stroke, plus assessments for other parenchymal organ damage as patients become teens and adults. Treatment approaches that previously highlighted acute vaso-occlusive events are now evolving to the concept of preventive therapy. Liberalized use of blood transfusions and early consideration of hydroxyurea treatment represent a new treatment paradigm for SCA management. PMID:23709685

  16. [Cardiopulmonary complications in sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Rojas-Jiménez, Sara; Lopera-Valle, Johan; Yabur-Espítia, Mirna

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia, considered the most prevalent genetic disease among African Americans, is a disease with autosomal recessive inheritance pattern, characterized by the production of hemoglobin S. This abnormal protein polymerizes and facilitates the formation of fibrillar aggregates that alters the erythrocyte morphology. The stiffness of the red blood cells hinders the adequate transit across microcirculation, leading to hemolysis and increased blood viscosity, which ease thrombogenesis and vascular occlusion, resulting in tissue ischemia and microinfarcts. This disease has a high rate of morbidity and mortality, especially in the first three years of life, when a rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential. Cardiovascular complications such as heart failure and pulmonary hypertension may develop independently, and each one contributes to increased mortality, being the combination of both risk factors, an important aggravating factor for prognosis and a determinant indicator of mortality. PMID:24215682

  17. A case of asymptomatic pancytopenia with clinical features of hemolysis as a presentation of pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Kollipara, Venkateswara K; Brine, Patrick L; Gemmel, David; Ingnam, Sisham

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is an autoimmune disease with a variety of clinical presentations. We describe a case of pernicious anemia presenting with pancytopenia with hemolytic features. Further workup revealed very low vitamin B12 levels and elevated methylmalonic acid. It is important for a general internist to identify pernicious anemia as one of the cause of pancytopenia and hemolytic anemia to avoid extensive workup. Pernicious anemia can present strictly with hematological abnormalities without neurological problems or vice versa as in our case. PMID:27609735

  18. Deletion of a Malaria Invasion Gene Reduces Death and Anemia, in Model Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Noé D.; Safeukui, Innocent; Adelani, Aanuoluwa A.; Tewari, Rita; Reddy, Janardan K.; Rao, Sam; Holder, Anthony; Buffet, Pierre; Mohandas, Narla; Haldar, Kasturi

    2011-01-01

    Malaria parasites induce complex cellular and clinical phenotypes, including anemia, cerebral malaria and death in a wide range of mammalian hosts. Host genes and parasite ‘toxins’ have been implicated in malarial disease, but the contribution of parasite genes remains to be fully defined. Here we assess disease in BALB/c mice and Wistar rats infected by the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei with a gene knock out for merozoite surface protein (MSP) 7. MSP7 is not essential for infection but in P. falciparum, it enhances erythrocyte invasion by 20%. In vivo, as compared to wild type, the P. berghei Δmsp7 mutant is associated with an abrogation of death and a decrease from 3% to 2% in peak, circulating parasitemia. The Δmsp7 mutant is also associated with less anemia and modest increase in the size of follicles in the spleen. Together these data show that deletion of a single parasite invasion ligand modulates blood stage disease, as measured by death and anemia. This work is the first to assess the contribution of a gene present in all plasmodial species in severe disease. PMID:21980474

  19. The effects of progressive anemia on jejunal mucosal and serosal tissue oxygenation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Haisjackl, M; Luz, G; Sparr, H; Germann, R; Salak, N; Friesenecker, B; Deusch, E; Meusburger, S; Hasibeder, W

    1997-03-01

    Anemia may promote intestinal hypoxia. We studied the effects of progressive isovolemic hemodilution on jejunal mucosal (Po2muc), and serosal tissue oxygen tension (Po2ser, Clark-type surface electrodes), mucosal microvascular hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Hbo2muc), and hematocrit (Hctmuc; tissue reflectance spectophotometry) in a jejunal segment. Twelve domestic pigs were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. Laparatomy was performed, arterial supply of a jejunal segment isolated, and constant pressure pump perfused. Seven animals were progressively hemodiluted to systemic hematocrits (Hctsys) of 20%, 15%, 10%, and 6%. Baseline for Po2muc, Po2ser and Hbo2muc was 23.5 +/- 2.1 mm Hg, 57.5 +/- 4 mm Hg, and 47.0% +/- 6.4% which were not different from the five controls. Despite a significant increase in jejunal blood flow, jejunal oxygen delivery decreased and oxygen extraction ratio increased significantly at Hctsys 10% and 6%. Po2ser decreased significantly below or at Hctsys of 15%, whereas Po2muc and Hbo2muc were maintained to Hctsys of 10%, but less than 10% Hbo2muc and mesenteric venous pH decreased significantly, implying that physiological limits of jejunal microvascular adaptation to severe anemia were reached. Decrease of Hctmuc was less pronounced than Hctsys. In conclusion, redistribution of jejunal blood flow and an increase in the ratio of mucosal to systemic hematocrit are the main mechanisms maintaining mucosal oxygen supply during progressive anemia. PMID:9052297

  20. Metformin-Induced Hemolytic Anemia in a Patient With Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Nicole A; Kish, Troy D; Lee, Mikyung L

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, an oral antidiabetic agent, is considered the preferred first-line therapy for patients with type II diabetes. Between 2010 and 2012, it has been estimated that 14 million Americans were administered an oral antidiabetic agent, suggesting the extensive use of metformin among the diabetic population. There have been few case reports implicating metformin in causing hemolytic anemia. We present a case of a 53-year-old white male who developed hemolytic anemia after the initiation of treatment with metformin 500 mg twice daily. The patient experienced a 1.5 g/dL decrease in hemoglobin from baseline and a 2.8 mg/dL increase in total bilirubin within 1 day of treatment. Laboratory results confirmed that the patient was also glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient. The hemolytic anemia resolved on discontinuation of metformin. Although this adverse effect seems to be rare, it is important to consider its seriousness. Clinicians should be advised to closely monitor patients newly started on metformin. PMID:25756470

  1. Long-term reversal of chronic anemia using a hypoxia-regulated erythropoietin gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Binley, Katie; Askham, Zoe; Iqball, Sharifah; Spearman, Hayley; Martin, Leigh; de Alwis, Mahesh; Thrasher, Adrian J; Ali, Robin R; Maxwell, Patrick H; Kingsman, Susan; Naylor, Stuart

    2002-10-01

    Anemia is a common clinical problem, and there is much interest in its role in promoting left ventricular hypertrophy through increasing cardiac workload. Normally, red blood cell production is adjusted through the regulation of erythropoietin (Epo) production by the kidney. One important cause of anemia is relative deficiency of Epo, which occurs in most types of renal disease. Clinically, this can be corrected by supplementation with recombinant Epo. Here we describe an oxygen-regulated gene therapy approach to treating homozygous erythropoietin-SV40 T antigen (Epo-TAg(h)) mice with relative erythropoietin deficiency. We used vectors in which murine Epo expression was directed by an Oxford Biomedica hypoxia response element (OBHRE) or a constitutive cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. Both corrected anemia, but CMV-Epo-treated mice acquired fatal polycythemia. In contrast, OBHRE-Epo corrected the hematocrit level in anemic mice to a normal physiologic level that stabilized without resulting in polycythemia. Importantly, the OBHRE-Epo vector had no significant effect on the hematocrit of control mice. Homozygous Epo-TAg(h) mice display cardiac hypertrophy, a common adaptive response in patients with chronic anemia. In the OBHRE-Epo-treated Epo-TAg(h) mice, we observed a significant reversal of cardiac hypertrophy. We conclude that the OBHRE promoter gives rise to physiologically regulated Epo secretion such that the hematocrit level is corrected to healthy in anemic Epo-TAg(h) mice. This establishes that a hypoxia regulatory mechanism similar to the natural mechanism can be achieved, and it makes EPO gene therapy more attractive and safer in clinical settings. We envisage that this control system will allow regulated delivery of therapeutic gene products in other ischemic settings. PMID:12239150

  2. Association between hypoxemia and anemia following arthroplasty: A pilot clinical study

    PubMed Central

    GAO, FUQIANG; SUN, WEI; GUO, WANSHOU; CHENG, LIMING; LI, ZIRONG; KUSH, NEPALI

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia and anemia are common complications following joint arthroplasty. Whether hypoxia indicates that a patient is anemic and whether anemia causes a decline in arterial oxygen pressure accompanied by hypoxemia are not completely understood. The aim of the present study was to determine the association between hypoxemia and anemia following arthroplasty. A total of 135 patients who underwent arthroplasty at the China-Japan Friendship Hospital between January and May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into five groups depending on the type of arthroplasty they had experienced: Unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA), bilateral TKA, unilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA), bilateral THA or unilateral unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Perioperative peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels were assessed, and the associations between the changes in SpO2 (ΔSpO2) and hemoglobin (ΔHb) levels on the first and third postoperative days (PODs) were analyzed using Pearson's correlation test for each group. The perioperative SpO2 curves for the various groups were typically at their lowest on the day of surgery. Significant hypoxemia was observed on POD 0–2, although a stable recovery curve was observed on POD 3–5. Trends in ΔHb were observed among the 5 groups, with the lowest Hb value observed predominantly on POD 2 and 3. By POD 4 and 5 Hb levels had recovered, with a steadily and consistently increasing curve. There was no statistically significant correlation between ΔSpO2 and decrease in Hb levels (P>0.05). SpO2 levels should not serve as a clinical indicator of the incidence and severity of anemia in patients who have undergone primary arthroplasty. To a point, the degree of postoperative anemic status does not affect SpO2 levels. PMID:27168828

  3. Anemia caused by low iron - infants and toddlers

    MedlinePlus

    ... absorbed better when it is in breast milk. Formula with iron added (iron fortified) also provides enough ... milk rather than breast milk or iron-fortified formula are more likely to have anemia. Cow's milk ...

  4. Biomarkers for the differentiation of anemia and their clinical usefulness

    PubMed Central

    Northrop-Clewes, Christine A; Thurnham, David I

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization defines anemia as the point at which the amount of hemoglobin in the circulation falls below World Health Organization cutoffs for specific age and sex groups. Anemia is a worldwide problem of complex etiology and is associated with many factors. The purpose of this review was to describe the biomarkers used to identify the nature of anemia in patients and in the community. The important biomarkers are the automated red cell counts, tests for nutritional deficiencies, hemoglobinopathies, and inflammation. Diseases are important potential initiators of anemia, but biomarkers of specific diseases are not included in this review, only the underlying feature common to all disease – namely, inflammation. PMID:23687454

  5. Aplastic Anemia in Two Patients with Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Rush, Eric T; Schaefer, G Bradley; Sanger, Warren G; Coccia, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome aneuploidies range in incidence from rather common to exceedingly rare and have a variable phenotype. We report 2 patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies who developed severe aplastic anemia requiring treatment. The first patient had tetrasomy X (48,XXXX) and presented at 9 years of age, and the second patient had trisomy X (47,XXX) and presented at 5 years of age. Although aplastic anemia has been associated with other chromosomal abnormalities, sex chromosome abnormalities have not been traditionally considered a risk factor for this condition. A review of the literature reveals that at least one other patient with a sex chromosome aneuploidy (45,X) has suffered from aplastic anemia and that other autosomal chromosomal anomalies have been described. Despite the uncommon nature of each condition, it is possible that the apparent association is coincidental. A better understanding of the genetic causes of aplastic anemia remains important. PMID:26571231

  6. Characterization of anemia induced by avian osteopetrosis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, R W; Smith, R E

    1978-01-01

    Chickens infected intravenously at 8 days after hatching with an avian osteopetrosis virus developed a severe, progressive anemia in the absence of osteopetrosis. The anemia was characterized as a pancytopenia, in which erythrocytes, granulocytes, and thrombocytes decreased concomitantly. Serum bilirubin levels were normal, whereas erythrocytes from infected chickens demonstrated a slightly elevated osmotic fragility. A negative Coombs test indicated that there was no evidence for erythrocyte-bound antibody. Erythrocytes from infected animals had slightly decreased 51Cr-labeled erythrocyte survival time when compared with normal. Examination of marrow histological preparations, together with ferrokinetic studies with 59Fe, indicated that marrow failure occurred during the acute phase of the anemia. Circulating virus was present during the development and acute phases of the anemia, but disappeared during the recovery phase of the disease. Neutralizing antibody appeared after the disappearance of circulating virus. It is concluded that virus infection induced both marrow failure (aplastic crisis) and decreased erythrocyte survival. Images PMID:215554

  7. Transfusions for anemia in adult and pediatric patients with malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neil; Andrews, Jennifer; Goodnough, Lawrence Tim

    2015-09-01

    Anemia is present in over two-thirds of patients with malignant hematological disorders. The etiology of anemia predominates from ineffective erythropoiesis from marrow infiltration, cytokine related suppression, erythropoietin suppression, and vitamin deficiency; ineffective erythropoiesis is further exacerbated by accelerated clearance due to antibody mediated hemolysis and thrombotic microangiopathy. As the anemia is chronic in nature, symptoms are generally well tolerated and often non-specific. Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is a balance between providing benefit for patients while avoiding risks of transfusion. Conservative/restrictive RBC transfusion practices have shown equivalent patient outcomes compared to liberal transfusion practices, and meta-analysis has shown improved in-hospital mortality, reduced cardiac events, re-bleeding, and bacterial infections. The implications for a lower threshold for transfusion in patients with malignancies are therefore increasingly being scrutinized. Alternative management strategies for anemia with IV iron and erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESAs) should be considered in the appropriate settings. PMID:25796130

  8. Hepatitis associated aplastic anemia: case report and discussion.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Arushi; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2014-09-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is thought to represent an autoimmune disorder leading to generation of activated CD8+ T-cells that target the bone marrow precursors. Hepatitis associated aplastic anemia (HAAA) is a subtype of aplastic anemia that develops within several months ofan episode of acute hepatitis. Etiologic agents include hepatitis viruses (A-E and G), Epstein-Bar virus, cytomegalovirus, HIV, parvovirus B19, and echoviruses amongst others. However, most HAAA cases are labeled "idiopathic" as the inciting agent cannot be identified. Drugs and/or toxins are rarely causal factors. We describe herein a unique case of HAAA linked with the anabolic steroid methasterone that caused a transient cholestatic hepatitis and, subsequently, a severe aplastic anemia in a young man. PMID:25314890

  9. Conjugated Bilirubin Triggers Anemia by Inducing Erythrocyte Death

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Elisabeth; Gatidis, Sergios; Freise, Noemi F; Bock, Hans; Kubitz, Ralf; Lauermann, Christian; Orth, Hans Martin; Klindt, Caroline; Schuier, Maximilian; Keitel, Verena; Reich, Maria; Liu, Guilai; Schmidt, Sebastian; Xu, Haifeng C; Qadri, Syed M; Herebian, Diran; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Mayatepek, Ertan; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Karl S; Föller, Michael; Lang, Philipp A

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic failure is commonly associated with anemia, which may result from gastrointestinal bleeding, vitamin deficiency, or liver-damaging diseases, such as infection and alcohol intoxication. At least in theory, anemia during hepatic failure may result from accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Here we show that bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice leads to severe anemia despite increased reticulocyte numbers. Bilirubin stimulated suicidal death of human erythrocytes. Mechanistically, bilirubin triggered rapid Ca2+ influx, sphingomyelinase activation, formation of ceramide, and subsequent translocation of phosphatidylserine to the erythrocyte surface. Consistent with our in vitro and in vivo findings, incubation of erythrocytes in serum from patients with liver disease induced suicidal death of erythrocytes in relation to their plasma bilirubin concentration. Consistently, patients with hyperbilirubinemia had significantly lower erythrocyte and significantly higher reticulocyte counts compared to patients with low bilirubin levels. Conclusion: Bilirubin triggers suicidal erythrocyte death, thus contributing to anemia during liver disease. (Hepatology 2015;61:275–284) PMID:25065608

  10. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies. PMID:23403618

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia Enhances Red Blood Cell Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Nagababu, Enika; Gulyani, Seema; Earley, Christopher J.; Cutler, Roy G.; Mattson, Mark P.; Rifkind, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress associated with iron deficiency anemia in a murine model was studied feeding an iron deficient diet. Anemia was monitored by a decrease in hematocrit and hemoglobin. For the 9 week study an increase in total iron binding capacity was also demonstrated. Anemia resulted in an increase in red blood cells (RBC) oxidative stress as indicated by increased levels of fluorescent heme degradation products (1.24 fold after 5 weeks; 2.1 fold after 9 weeks). The increase in oxidative stress was further confirmed by elevated levels of methemoglobin for mice fed an iron deficient diet. Increased hemoglobin autoxidation and subsequent generation of ROS can account for the shorter RBC lifespan and other pathological changes associated with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:19051108

  12. Duodenal perforation: an unusual complication of sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Acıpayam, Can; Aldıç, Güliz; Akçora, Bülent; Çelikkaya, Mehmet Emin; Aşkar, Hasan; Dorum, Bayram Ali

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal perforation in childhood is a rare condition with a high mortality rate if not treated surgically. Primary gastroduodenal perforation is frequently associated with peptic ulcer and exhibits a positive family history. Helicobacter pylorus is the most significant agent. Secondary gastroduodenal perforation may be a finding of specific diseases, such as Crohn disease, or more rarely may be associated with diseases such as cystic fibrosis or sickle cell anemia. A 14-year-old boy presented with abdominal and back pain. The patient was operated on for acute abdomen and diagnosed with duodenal perforation. Helicobacter pylorus was negative. There was no risk factor to account for duodenal perforation other than sickle cell anemia. Surgical intervention was successful and without significant sequelae. Duodenal perforation is a rare entity described in patients with sickle cell anemia. To our knowledge, this is the first report of duodenal perforation in a patient sickle cell anemia. PMID:25422692

  13. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron. PMID:26061331

  14. Elevated Serum S-Adenosylhomocysteine in Cobalamin Deficient Megaloblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Shinohara, Elvira M.; Morita, Olga E.; Pagliusi, Regina A.; Blaia-d’Avila, Vera L.; Allen, Robert H.; Stabler, Sally P.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired methylation due to accumulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) may contribute to the pathophysiology of cobalamin deficient anemia. We assayed serum S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), SAH, total homocysteine (tHcy), and methylmalonic acid (MMA) in 15 subjects with cobalamin deficient megaloblastic anemia and compared results to 19 subjects with anemia/pancytopenia due to other causes. Cobalamin deficient subjects had a median hematocrit of 20% and mean cell volume of 111.7 fL. The median serum cobalamin was 37 pg/mL, MMA 3030 nmol/L and tHcy 62.0 umol/L. SAH was elevated in 13 of 15 subjects (median value 42 nmol/L) and the median SAM was normal (103 nmol/L) but SAM/SAH ratio was low, 2.5. The SAH was higher and SAM/SAH ratio lower in cobalamin deficient subjects as compared to those with other anemias after excluding 4 patients with renal insufficiency. SAM concentrations were not low in cobalamin deficiency. Cobalamin injections corrected anemia, MMA, tHcy, SAM/SAH ratio and SAH. Some hematologic variables were inversely correlated with SAH and cobalamin but not tHcy or MMA. In conclusion, serum SAH is elevated in cobalamin deficient subjects with megaloblastic anemia and corrects with parenteral cobalamin therapy. PMID:17292722

  15. HMGB1 Mediates Anemia of Inflammation in Murine Sepsis Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Ferrer, Sergio I; Papoin, Julien; Dancho, Meghan E; Olofsson, Peder S; Li, Jianhua; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Avancena, Patricia; Yang, Huan; Zou, Yong-Rui; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Volpe, Bruce T; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Diamond, Betty; Andersson, Ulf; Steinberg, Bettie M; Blanc, Lionel; Tracey, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Patients surviving sepsis develop anemia, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. Here we observed that mice surviving polymicrobial gram-negative sepsis develop hypochromic, microcytic anemia with reticulocytosis. The bone marrow of sepsis survivors accumulates polychromatophilic and orthochromatic erythroblasts. Compensatory extramedullary erythropoiesis in the spleen is defective during terminal differentiation. Circulating tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-6 are elevated for 5 d after the onset of sepsis, and serum high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) levels are increased from d 7 until at least d 28. Administration of recombinant HMGB1 to healthy mice mediates anemia with extramedullary erythropoiesis and significantly elevated reticulocyte counts. Moreover, administration of anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibodies after sepsis significantly ameliorates the development of anemia (hematocrit 48.5 ± 9.0% versus 37.4 ± 6.1%, p < 0.01; hemoglobin 14.0 ± 1.7 versus 11.7 ± 1.2 g/dL, p < 0.01). Together, these results indicate that HMGB1 mediates anemia by interfering with erythropoiesis, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for anemia in sepsis. PMID:26736178

  16. Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Under-Estimated Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Rogler, Gerhard; Vavricka, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most frequent complications and/or extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Iron deficiency is the most important cause of anemia in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis patients. Iron deficiency even without anemia may impact the quality of life of our IBD patients. In the last 10 years, the understanding of the pathology of iron-deficiency anemia and “anemia of chronic diseases” has increased; new diagnostic tools have been developed and new therapeutic strategies have been discussed. Hepcidin has been identified to be a central regulator of iron absorption from the intestine and of iron plasma levels. Hepcidin is regulated by iron deficiency but also as an acute phase protein by pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-6. Innovative diagnostic tools have not been introduced in clinical routine or are not available for routine diagnostics. As iron substitution therapy is easy these days with a preference for intravenous substitution, the impact of differential diagnosis of anemia in IBD patients is underestimated. PMID:25646159

  17. Association between anemia and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jun; Kong, Xiangyong; Li, Qiuping; Hua, Shaodong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiaoying; Feng, Zhichun

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is commonly seen in preterm infants. It may reduce the capacity of hemoglobin to transport oxygen throughout the body and may result in tissue and organ dysfunction. This study aimed to investigate the effect of anemia on the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants. 243 infants who were admitted to BaYi Children’s Hospital Affiliated to Clinical Medical College in Beijing Military General Hospital with gestational age (GA) less than 32 weeks from February, 2014 to February, 2015 were included in the study. Maternal and infant data were recorded. Multivarariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between anemia and BPD. Of 243 preterm infants, the incidence of anemia was higher in BPD patients than non-BPD patients (p < 0.001). Mean Hct in BPD patients was lower than non-BPD patients at different time points in 1d, 7d, 14d, and 21d. Controlling for other confounding factors, early anemia was associated with an increased risk of BPD. Number of transfusions is also a significant risk factor for BPD (p = 0.001). Therefore, prevention and treatment of early anemia is necessary and reducing number of transfusions may reduce the incidence of BPD in preterm infants. PMID:26936610

  18. Nitrite-induced anemia in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, C.S. ); Francis-Floyd, R.; Beleau, M.H. )

    1989-08-01

    Since 1983 numerous cases of anemia have been reported in populations of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque cultured in the southeastern United States. Environmental nitrite-nitrogen concentrations of 4 mg/L or more occur sporadically in channel catfish culture ponds, and the frequency of occurrence is greatest in the fall and spring. The authors have observed that some cases of anemia in populations of pond-raised channel catfish follow prolonged exposure to high concentrations of environmental nitrite. However, there was no evidence that exposure of channel catfish to environmental nitrite was the cause of the observed anemia. Hemolytic anemia following nitrite exposure has been described for sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri, but not for channel catfish. In the present study the authors show that a variable, but generally mild, anemia develops in channel catfish exposed to nitrite. They also offer a management procedure for preventing the development of anemia during periods of elevated environmental nitrite concentrations.

  19. Concepts of anemia among low income Nicaraguan women.

    PubMed

    Ailinger, Rita L; Moore, Jean B; Pawloski, Lisa; Cortés, Lidya Ruth Zamora

    2009-01-01

    Anemia is a common health problem among women throughout the world, however, there has been minimal research on women's concepts of anemia. The purpose of this study was to examine concepts of anemia in low income Nicaraguan women. A qualitative design was used. Audio-taped open-ended interviews in Spanish with 14 women were used to obtain data. Tapes were transcribed and content analyzed. The findings indicate that few of the women had biomedically accurate concepts of anemia, such as that it was due to lack of iron from poor eating. Others held folk medical beliefs including home remedies, for example drinking the milk of a mare or beet juice and eating certain foods such as bean soup. Most of the women did not know any symptoms of anemia and a few reported that it can develop into leukemia. These concepts of anemia are instructive for nurses working with patients from Nicaragua and will be useful in developing nursing interventions to alleviate this public health problem. PMID:19551265

  20. Anemia in the elderly: a public health crisis in hematology.

    PubMed

    Guralnik, Jack M; Ershler, William B; Schrier, Stanley L; Picozzi, Vincent J

    2005-01-01

    Over 3 million people in the United States aged 65 years and older are anemic. This condition is associated with significant functional impairment and, perhaps, increased mortality. In March 2004, the American Society of Hematology (in conjunction with the National Institute of Aging) convened a "blue ribbon" panel of twenty physicians who are experts on various aspects of this topic. This paper highlights important consensus concepts resulting from that meeting. In particular, four areas of thought are shared. First, the epidemiology of anemia in the elderly is reviewed, including its definition, its expression in different racial groups, and its wide-ranging manifestations. Second, the pathophysiology of anemia in the elderly is reviewed as pertains to three general etiological categories (nutritional, chronic diseases, and so-called "unexplained" anemias). Particular emphasis is given to pathophysiologic mechanisms of anemia that are potentially unique to this age group. Third, a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of anemia for this patient population for the practicing hematologist is provided. Finally, the public health implications of anemia in the elderly for key stakeholder constituencies will be discussed in the oral presentation. PMID:16304431

  1. Protein-energy malnutrition and anemia in Kivu.

    PubMed

    Fondu, P; Hariga-Muller, C; Mozes, N; Neve, J; Van Steirteghem, A; Mandelbaum, I M

    1978-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition in Kivu is associated with a discrete normocytic, normochromic anemia. An attempt to define the physiopathology of this anemia disclosed the following results. As compared with local controls, both iron and total iron binding capacity were low, but with siderophilin saturation and sideroblast counts either normal or elevated; serum and erythrocyte folate was normal, plasma vitamin B12 was normal or elevated, and serum ascorbic acid was normal or elevated. The riboflavin nutritional status was normal. During refeeding, iron and riboflavin deficiencies became apparent. Characteristic findings on admission were the presence of giant erythroblasts and a diminished erythrocyte survival time implicated to an intracorpuscular hemolysis. Two results from the present study could contribute to explanation for the aforementioned abnormalities: low plasma vitamin E levels and, perhaps more importantly, low plasma selenium levels. In conclusion, the anemia of protein-energy malnutrition, as observed in Kivu, is a classifiable nonadaptive anemia that cannot be explained by isolated iron or vitamin deficiencies and whose physiopathology is distinct from that of the anemia of chronic disorders. It is suggested that a selenium deficiency may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this anemia. PMID:413429

  2. Carbaodeim: A natural haematinic blend for treatment of dimorphic anemia of malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Swar, Mohamed Osman; Osman, Atika Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Sudanese nomadic tribes living in the Sahara Region west of Khartoum State depend completely on food made of sour milk and other milk products cooked with onion and dried meat. This is usually added to a porridge made of sorghum flour. Goat and sheep milk is the main component and green vegetables are not commonly taken with this meal. Adults, who move out of their residential areas may have access to other types of food in towns and cities while mothers and children, staying always at home, do not have similar chances. Furthermore, in these dessert areas there is always difficulty in reaching health care facilities and getting medicines. Children from these areas who presented to Ombada Teaching Hospital – west of Omdurman- had very low hemoglobin and their peripheral blood picture showed dimorphic type of anemia. In the search for locally available ingredients that can prevent the occurrence of this type of anemia among the affected population, we studied the constituents of the commonly available fruits and vegetables in the area. We succeeded to formulate a blend (Carbaodeim) made of Carrots (25 gm), Baobab (100 gm) and Godeim (100 gm) which is found to contain iron (34.8 mg), folic acid (2.5 mg), ascorbic acid (372.8 mg), vitamin A (7000 mg), calcium (896.7 mg) and potassium (1910 mg), with many other components that have high nutritional value. This blend is easy to make, safe, nutritious, refreshing and cost effective. Carbaodeim is a naturally available and cost effective haematinic blend that might be added to the food menu of nomadic people as well as patients admitted to hospital with malnutrition or dimorphic type of anemia. PMID:27493404

  3. Classification and therapeutic approaches in autoimmune hemolytic anemia: an update.

    PubMed

    Michel, Marc

    2011-12-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an uncommon autoantibody-mediated immune disorder that affects both children and adults. The diagnosis of AIHA relies mainly on the direct antiglobulin test, which is a highly sensitive and relatively specific test. The classification of AIHA is based on the pattern of the direct antiglobulin test and on the immunochemical properties of the autoantibody (warm or cold type), but also on the presence or absence of an underlying condition or disease (secondary vs primary AIHAs) that may have an impact on treatment and outcome. The distinction between AIHAs due to warm antibody (wAIHA) and AIHAs due to cold antibody is a crucial step of the diagnostic procedure as it influences the therapeutic strategy. Whereas corticosteroids are the cornerstone of treatment in wAIHA, they have no or little efficacy in cold AIHA. In wAIHA that is refractory or dependent to corticosteroids, splenectomy and rituximab are both good alternatives and the benefit?risk ratio of each option must be discussed on an individual basis. In chronic agglutinin disease, the most common variety of cold AIHA in adults, beyond supportive measures, rituximab given either alone or in combination with chemotherapy may be helpful. In this article, the classification of AIHA and the recent progress in therapeutics are discussed. PMID:22077525

  4. Altered translation of GATA1 in Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Leif S; Gazda, Hanna T; Eng, Jennifer C; Eichhorn, Stephen W; Thiru, Prathapan; Ghazvinian, Roxanne; George, Tracy I; Gotlib, Jason R; Beggs, Alan H; Sieff, Colin A; Lodish, Harvey F; Lander, Eric S; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2014-07-01

    Ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency occurs in diverse human diseases including Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), congenital asplenia and T cell leukemia. Yet, how mutations in genes encoding ubiquitously expressed proteins such as these result in cell-type- and tissue-specific defects remains unknown. Here, we identify mutations in GATA1, encoding the critical hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-binding protein-1, that reduce levels of full-length GATA1 protein and cause DBA in rare instances. We show that ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency, the more common cause of DBA, can lead to decreased GATA1 mRNA translation, possibly resulting from a higher threshold for initiation of translation of this mRNA in comparison with other mRNAs. In primary hematopoietic cells from patients with mutations in RPS19, encoding ribosomal protein S19, the amplitude of a transcriptional signature of GATA1 target genes was globally and specifically reduced, indicating that the activity, but not the mRNA level, of GATA1 is decreased in patients with DBA associated with mutations affecting ribosomal proteins. Moreover, the defective hematopoiesis observed in patients with DBA associated with ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency could be partially overcome by increasing GATA1 protein levels. Our results provide a paradigm by which selective defects in translation due to mutations affecting ubiquitous ribosomal proteins can result in human disease. PMID:24952648

  5. Erythropoietin May Improve Anemia in Patients with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Associated with Reticulocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Arbach, Olga; Funck, Robert; Seibt, Frank; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2012-01-01

    Background Management of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and reticulocytopenia remains challenging. Case Reports Two patients with decompensated AIHA who were receiving immunosuppressive drugs were treated with erythropoietin (EPO). Administration of EPO increased reticulocyte counts and hemoglobin concentrations in both cases. One patient completely recovered following a short course of treatment. Hemolysis could be compensated in the second patient using only mild doses of immunosuppressive drugs in combination with EPO. Conclusion The administration of EPO should be considered in patients with therapy-refractory AIHA, particularly in the presence of reticulocytopenia. PMID:22851939

  6. Erythropoietin May Improve Anemia in Patients with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Associated with Reticulocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Arbach, Olga; Funck, Robert; Seibt, Frank; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2012-06-01

    BACKGROUND: Management of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and reticulocytopenia remains challenging. CASE REPORTS: Two patients with decompensated AIHA who were receiving immunosuppressive drugs were treated with erythropoietin (EPO). Administration of EPO increased reticulocyte counts and hemoglobin concentrations in both cases. One patient completely recovered following a short course of treatment. Hemolysis could be compensated in the second patient using only mild doses of immunosuppressive drugs in combination with EPO. CONCLUSION: The administration of EPO should be considered in patients with therapy-refractory AIHA, particularly in the presence of reticulocytopenia. PMID:22851939

  7. Iron deficiency anemia. Every case is instructive.

    PubMed

    Brigden, M L

    1993-03-01

    Awareness of subtle symptoms of mild iron deficiency is increasing, but unsuspected iron deficiency is a persistent problem, especially among certain groups, such as menstruating women and milk-fed infants. The diagnosis must be clearly established through appropriate testing, and an underlying cause should always be sought. Useful tests include determination of serum ferritin and iron levels and of iron-binding capacity. A nomogram is available that correlates the serum ferritin value with the degree of inflammation present, but in some patients, bone marrow aspiration and iron staining is still required. When oral iron therapy is undertaken, an appropriate non-enteric-coated, non-sustained-release preparation should be chosen. Gradually increasing the amount of iron supplementation and taking the tablets with meals help limit side effects and ensure patient compliance. Iron therapy should be continued for 6 months after the hemoglobin level returns to normal so that total iron stores are replaced. Follow-up to ensure that iron deficiency anemia has not recurred and that the diagnosis was correct is required. PMID:8446533

  8. Infections in patients with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Jessica M; Scheinberg, Phillip; Young, Neal S; Walsh, Thomas J

    2009-07-01

    Infection is a major cause of death in patients with aplastic anemia (AA). There are differences between the immunocompromised state of a patient with AA and the patient who is neutropenic due to chemotherapy and this leads to a difference in the infections that they incur. Prolonged neutropenia is one of the largest risk factors for the development of infections with the invasive mycoses and bacteria. Recovery from neutropenia is directly related to survival, and supportive care plays a large role in protection while the patient is in a neutropenic state. The most common invasive mycoses include the Aspergillus species, Zygomycetes, Candida spp., and Fusarium spp. Bacterial infections that are seen in patients with AA include gram-positive coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species, Enterococcus, Staphylococus aureus, Clostridium spp., Micrococcus, alpha-hemolytic streptococci, Listeria monocytogenes, and Bacillus cereus. Gram-negative infections including gram-negative bacilli, Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Bacteroides fragilis, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumonia, Aeromonas hydrophilia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Vibrio vulnificus. Viral infections are much less common but include those that belong to the Herpesviridae family, community-acquired respiratory viral infection, and the viral hepatitides A, B, and C. Evidence of the parasite Strongyloides stercoralis has also been documented. This review discusses the major invasive fungal infections, bacterial pathogens, parasites, and viral infections that are found in patients with AA who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy. The specific immune impairment and current treatment parameters for each of these classes of infection will also be discussed. PMID:19549579

  9. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked. PMID:26935626

  10. Infections and inequalities: anemia in AIDS, the disadvantages of poverty

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Lucia; Seley, Celeste; Martorano, Julieta; Garcia-Moreno, Isabella; Troncoso, Alcides

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study anemia in AIDS patients and its relation with socioeconomic, employment status and educational levels. Methods A total number of 442 patients who visited the Infectious Diseases University Hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina were included in the study. Patients were dividied into two groups, i.e. one with anemia and the other without anemia. Anemia epidemiology and its relationship with educational level, housing, job situation, monthly income, total daily caloric intake and weekly intake of meat were evaluated. Results Anemia was found in 228 patients (54%). Comparing patients with or without anemia, a statistically significant difference was found (P<0.000 1) in those whose highest educational level reached was primary school, who lived in a precarious home, who had no stable job or were unable to work, whose income was less than 30 dollars per month, whose meat consumption was less than twice a week or received less than 8 000 calories per day. Conclusions The high prevalence of anemia found in poor patients with AIDS suggests that poverty increases the risk to suffer from this hematological complication. The relationship between economic development policies and AIDS is complex. Our results seem to point to the fact that AIDS epidemic may affect economic development and in turn be affected by it. If we consider that AIDS affects the economically active adult population, despite recent medical progress it usually brings about fatal consequences, especially within the poorest sectors of society where the disease reduces the average life expectancy, increases health care demand and tends to exacerbate poverty and iniquity. PMID:23569955

  11. Erythro-megakaryocytic transcription factors associated with hereditary anemia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2014-01-01

    Most heritable anemias are caused by mutations in genes encoding globins, red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteins, or enzymes in the glycolytic and hexose monophosphate shunt pathways. A less common class of genetic anemia is caused by mutations that alter the functions of erythroid transcription factors (TFs). Many TF mutations associated with heritable anemia cause truncations or amino acid substitutions, resulting in the production of functionally altered proteins. Characterization of these mutant proteins has provided insights into mechanisms of gene expression, hematopoietic development, and human disease. Mutations within promoter or enhancer regions that disrupt TF binding to essential erythroid genes also cause anemia and heritable variations in RBC traits, such as fetal hemoglobin content. Defining the latter may have important clinical implications for de-repressing fetal hemoglobin synthesis to treat sickle cell anemia and β thalassemia. Functionally important alterations in genes encoding TFs or their cognate cis elements are likely to occur more frequently than currently appreciated, a hypothesis that will soon be tested through ongoing genome-wide association studies and the rapidly expanding use of global genome sequencing for human diagnostics. Findings obtained through such studies of RBCs and associated diseases are likely generalizable to many human diseases and quantitative traits. PMID:24652993

  12. Acquired aplastic anemia in children: a review of 100 patients.

    PubMed

    Chuansumrit, A; Hathirat, P; Isarangkura, P

    1990-06-01

    A retrospective study of acquired aplastic anemia in 100 Thai children treated with testosterone and prednisolone during 1969 to 1987 is reported. The age ranged from 3-14.5 years (mean 10.3 years). The male to female ratio was 2.3:1. The duration of follow up ranged from 1-17 year (mean 5 years). Prior exposure to possible etiologic agents was found in 36% : antipyretics, Ya-chood, insecticides, benzene, chloramphenicol and paint. The presenting symptoms were bleeding and anemia 72%, fever with either bleeding or anemia 28%. The common sites of bleeding were purpura, epistaxis, gum and teeth, and the gastrointestinal tract. All patients received appropriate supportive treatment and testosterone combined with prednisolone. The results of treatment were evaluated in 80 cases who were followed up until death or at least one year after the diagnosis. Two-thirds of the patients presented with laboratory findings similar to severe aplastic anemia; the fatality rate was 50% (40/80). Most of them succumbed to infection or bleeding in the first 6 months after diagnosis. The recovery rate was 50% with complete, partial and initial responses in 28%, 17% and 5% respectively. The late malignancy rate was 2%. For severe aplastic anemia or for patients who have poor prognostic factors, early approaches of bone marrow transplantation or antilymphocyte globulin administration should be considered. PMID:2237600

  13. Microcytic anemia in a pregnant woman: beyond iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rollón, Noelia; Fernández-Jiménez, María Cristina; Moreno-Carralero, María Isabel; Murga-Fernández, María José; Morán-Jiménez, María Josefa

    2015-05-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by anemia of varying severity and the presence of ringed sideroblasts in bone marrow. The most common form of inherited sideroblastic anemia is X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA). In many XLSA patients, anemia responds variably to supplementation with pyridoxine (vitamin B6). We describe the case of a pregnant female with XLSA who had a novel mutation on the ALAS2 gene (c.1218G > T, p.Leu406Phe). Oral chelation therapy was contraindicated and high-dose vitamin B6 would have possible side effects in pregnancy. Serum hepcidin level was very low, indicating increased absorption of iron secondary to ineffective erythropoiesis. Therapy was begun with a low dose of pyridoxine that was increased post-partum. The patient's liver showed moderate iron deposits. During a subsequent 3-month period of pyridoxine supplementation, serum ferritin level and transferrin saturation decreased, hemoglobin content and serum hepcidin level normalized, and morphologic red cell abnormalities improved markedly. The patient responded well to treatment, showing the pyridoxine responsiveness of this novel ALAS2 mutation. The baby girl had the same mutation heterozygously, and although she was neither anemic nor showed abnormalities in a peripheral blood smear, she had a mild increment in RDW and her condition is now being followed. PMID:25547425

  14. Sideroblastic anemia in 7 dogs (1996-2002).

    PubMed

    Weiss, Douglas J

    2005-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemia is an anemic condition characterized by chronic hypochromic anemia and the presence of large iron deposits in erythroid cells. Seven dogs with sideroblastic anemia were evaluated retrospectively. Historical, clinical, and clinicopathologic findings were reviewed to determine whether the condition was idiopathic or associated with disease conditions or drug or toxin exposure. Associated diseases were identified in 6 affected dogs and included acute hepatitis, pancreatitis, acute hepatitis and pancreatitis, inflammatory disease, glomerulonephritis, and myelofibrosis. None of the dogs had a history of recent exposure to drugs or toxins. One dog had no evidence of associated disease. Regardless of the associated disease condition, sideroblastic anemia was characterized by moderate to severe nonregenerative and frequently hypochromic anemia with prominent dysplastic features in bone marrow that were most prominent in the erythroid series. Survival varied from days to years. Identification of large numbers of siderocytes or sideroblasts in blood or bone marrow is inconsistent with a diagnosis of iron deficiency and should prompt a search for inflammatory disease conditions, including hepatitis, pancreatitis, and glomerulonephritis. PMID:15954546

  15. 2002 E. Mead Johnson Award for Research in Pediatrics Lecture: the molecular biology of the anemia of chronic disease: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Cindy N; Weinstein, David A; Andrews, Nancy C

    2003-03-01

    The anemia of chronic disease is a common disorder that afflicts patients with a wide variety of inflammatory conditions including arthritis, malignancies, infections, and inflammatory bowel disease. It results in significant morbidity and may be severe enough to require blood transfusions. The pathogenesis of anemia of chronic disease is not fully understood, but poor maintenance of red blood cell mass has been observed at three levels: 1) iron is not efficiently recycled from reticuloendothelial macrophages to erythroid precursors, 2) erythroid precursors respond poorly to erythropoietin, and 3) red blood cell survival is decreased. Whether each of these changes is related to the same effector of the inflammatory process is unknown. We have had the opportunity to investigate severe anemia of chronic disease in an unusual group of patients with glycogen storage disease type 1a. We found that anemia was directly related to the presence of large hepatic adenomas that inappropriately produced a new peptide hormone, hepcidin. Hepcidin has recently been identified as part of the innate immune response and is a key regulator of cellular iron egress. Based on our findings in this patient group, we propose a central role for hepcidin in anemia of chronic disease, linking the inflammatory process with iron recycling and erythropoiesis. We present a hypothesis based on our findings. PMID:12595602

  16. Clonal hematopoiesis in acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Seishi

    2016-07-21

    Clonal hematopoiesis (CH) in aplastic anemia (AA) has been closely linked to the evolution of late clonal disorders, including paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)/acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which are common complications after successful immunosuppressive therapy (IST). With the advent of high-throughput sequencing of recent years, the molecular aspect of CH in AA has been clarified by comprehensive detection of somatic mutations that drive clonal evolution. Genetic abnormalities are found in ∼50% of patients with AA and, except for PIGA mutations and copy-neutral loss-of-heterozygosity, or uniparental disomy (UPD) in 6p (6pUPD), are most frequently represented by mutations involving genes commonly mutated in myeloid malignancies, including DNMT3A, ASXL1, and BCOR/BCORL1 Mutations exhibit distinct chronological profiles and clinical impacts. BCOR/BCORL1 and PIGA mutations tend to disappear or show stable clone size and predict a better response to IST and a significantly better clinical outcome compared with mutations in DNMT3A, ASXL1, and other genes, which are likely to increase their clone size, are associated with a faster progression to MDS/AML, and predict an unfavorable survival. High frequency of 6pUPD and overrepresentation of PIGA and BCOR/BCORL1 mutations are unique to AA, suggesting the role of autoimmunity in clonal selection. By contrast, DNMT3A and ASXL1 mutations, also commonly seen in CH in the general population, indicate a close link to CH in the aged bone marrow, in terms of the mechanism for selection. Detection and close monitoring of somatic mutations/evolution may help with prediction and diagnosis of clonal evolution of MDS/AML and better management of patients with AA. PMID:27121470

  17. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: From lab to bedside.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, R K; Das, Sudipta Sekhar

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is not an uncommon clinical disorder and requires advanced, efficient immunohematological and transfusion support. Many AIHA patients have underlying disorder and therefore, it is incumbent upon the clinician to investigate these patients in detail, as the underlying condition can be of a serious nature such as lymphoproliferative disorder or connective tissue disorder. Despite advances in transfusion medicine, simple immunohematological test such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT) still remains the diagnostic hallmark of AIHA. The sensitive gel technology has enabled the immunohematologist not only to diagnose serologically such patients, but also to characterize red cell bound autoantibodies with regard to their class, subclass and titer in a rapid and simplified way. Detailed characterization of autoantibodies is important, as there is a relationship between in vivo hemolysis and strength of DAT; red cell bound multiple immunoglobulins, immunoglobulin G subclass and titer. Transfusing AIHA patient is a challenge to the immunohematologist as it is encountered with difficulties in ABO grouping and cross matching requiring specialized serological tests such as alloadsorption or autoadsorption. At times, it may be almost impossible to find a fully matched unit to transfuse these patients. However, transfusion should not be withheld in a critically ill patient even in the absence of compatible blood. The "best match" or "least incompatible units" can be transfused to such patients under close supervision without any serious side-effects. All blood banks should have the facilities to perform the necessary investigations required to issue "best match" packed red blood cells in AIHA. Specialized techniques such as elution and adsorption, which at times are helpful in enhancing blood safety in AIHA should be established in all transfusion services. PMID:24678166

  18. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Debaun, Michael R.; Strunk, Robert C.; Redline, Susan; Seicean, Sinziana; Craven, Daniel I.; Gavlak, Johanna C.D.; Wilkey, Olu; Inusa, Baba; Roberts, Irene; Goodpaster, R. Lucas; Malow, Beth; Rodeghier, Mark; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the prevalence of and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). METHODS: Cross-sectional baseline data were analyzed from the Sleep and Asthma Cohort Study, a multicenter prospective study designed to evaluate the contribution of sleep and breathing abnormalities to SCA-related morbidity in children ages 4 to 18 years, unselected for OSAS symptoms or asthma. Multivariable logistic regression assessed the relationships between OSAS status on the basis of overnight in-laboratory polysomnography and putative risk factors obtained from questionnaires and direct measurements. RESULTS: Participants included 243 children with a median age of 10 years; 50% were boys, 99% were of African heritage, and 95% were homozygous for βS hemoglobin. OSAS, defined by obstructive apnea hypopnea indices, was present in 100 (41%) or 25 (10%) children at cutpoints of ≥1 or ≥5, respectively. In univariate analyses, OSAS was associated with higher levels of habitual snoring, lower waking pulse oxygen saturation (Spo2), reduced lung function, less caretaker education, and non–preterm birth. Lower sleep-related Spo2 metrics were also associated with higher obstructive apnea hypopnea indices. In multivariable analyses, habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 remained risk factors for OSAS in children with SCA. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of OSAS in children with SCA is higher than in the general pediatric population. Habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 values, data easily obtained in routine care, were the strongest OSAS risk factors. Because OSAS is a treatable condition with adverse health outcomes, greater efforts are needed to screen, diagnose, and treat OSAS in this high-risk, vulnerable population. PMID:25022740

  19. Inborn anemias in mice. Progress report, 1 August 1979-15 July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1980-08-01

    Four macrocytic anemias, four hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia are under investigation in mice. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus the wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values; (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions; (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis; (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue; (e) functional tests of the stem cell component; (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli; and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  20. Treatment of Anemia in Patients with Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ... Physicians The full report is titled “Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ...

  1. [Floppy baby with macrocytic anemia and vegan mother].

    PubMed

    Schlapbach, L J; Schütz, B; Nuoffer, J M; Brekenfeld, C; Müller, G; Fluri, S

    2007-08-29

    We report the case of a 7 month-old girl that presented with acute anemia, generalized muscular hypotonia and failure to thrive. Laboratory evaluation revealed cobalamin deficiency, due to a vegan diet of the mother. The clinical triad of an acquired floppy baby syndrome with megaloblastic anemia and failure to thrive is pathognomic for infantile cobalamin deficiency. Neurological abnormalities are often irreversible and may be associated with delayed myelinization in the MRI. A normal cobalamin level in maternal serum and absence of anemia do not exclude subclinical deficiency. If cobalamin deficiency is suspected, e.g. in pregnant women on vegan diet, urinary methylmalonic acid excretion and plasma homocysteine levels should be determined and cobalamin substitution should be started at an early stage to avoid potentially irreversible damage of the fetus. PMID:18293883

  2. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disease that primarily affects the black population. This anemia is due to a homozygous state of the abnormal hemoglobin S. An alteration occurs on the DNA molecule involving the substitution of the amino acid valine for glutamic acid at the sixth position on the beta polypeptide chain. This biochemical variation on the DNA molecule creates a physiological change that causes sickle-shaped red blood cells to be produced. The sickle-shaped cells are the result of the hemoglobin S being deoxygenated. This case report presents a case of 16-year-old female with sickle cell disease and its dental management. How to cite this article: Acharya S. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):141-144. PMID:26379384

  3. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disease that primarily affects the black population. This anemia is due to a homozygous state of the abnormal hemoglobin S. An alteration occurs on the DNA molecule involving the substitution of the amino acid valine for glutamic acid at the sixth position on the beta polypeptide chain. This biochemical variation on the DNA molecule creates a physiological change that causes sickle-shaped red blood cells to be produced. The sickle-shaped cells are the result of the hemoglobin S being deoxygenated. This case report presents a case of 16-year-old female with sickle cell disease and its dental management. How to cite this article: Acharya S. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):141-144. PMID:26379384

  4. Prevention of anemia alleviates heart hypertrophy in copper deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lure, M.D.; Fields, M.; Lewis, C.G. Univ. of Maryland, College Park Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC )

    1991-03-11

    The present investigation was designed to examine the role of anemia in the cardiomegaly and myocardial pathology of copper deficiency. Weanling rats were fed a copper deficient diet containing either starch (ST) or fructose (FRU) for five weeks. Six rats consuming the FRU diet were intraperitoneally injected once a week with 1.0 ml/100g bw of packed red blood cells (RBC) obtained from copper deficient rats fed ST. FRU rats injected with RBC did not develop anemia. Additionally, none of the injected rats exhibited heart hypertrophy or gross pathology and all survived. In contrast, non-injected FRU rats were anemic, exhibited severe signs of copper deficiency which include heart hypertrophy with gross pathology, and 44% died. Maintaining the hematocrit with RBC injections resulted in normal heart histology and prevented the mortality associated with the fructose x copper interaction. The finding suggest that the anemia associated with copper deficiency contributes to heart pathology.

  5. [Anemia caused by cancer in the context of palliative care].

    PubMed

    Altinger, Marion; Strasser, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Tumor anemia is very common in patients with cancer. The causes are very diverse and the parameter value depends on several factors. If this however develops to be symptomatic it may adversely impact health related quality of life. Erythropoietin or blood transfusion provides options for treatment. However, these are not always uneventful. There could also be a lack of response to Erythropoietin. This case report describes the complexity of tumor anemia. It also includes a more detailed discussion on the Fatigue Syndrome, which is one of the most common symptoms of patients with cancer. In the context of palliative care there is often the question of alternatives for improving the quality of patients life. Some kinds of treatment may also cause the opposite effect. A multidimensional assessment should help to approach this difficult issue and to find ways for a meaningful treatment of the symptoms of anemia. PMID:22328049

  6. Chronic Anemia and the Role of the Infusion Therapy Nurse.

    PubMed

    Betcher, Jeffrey; Van Ryan, Velvet; Mikhael, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Chronic anemia develops over a course of weeks to months and is usually mild to moderate in nature. It is important to understand the etiology of the reduced number of circulating red blood cells to treat the anemia appropriately. Diagnosis is dependent on patient history and laboratory findings, such as complete blood counts, iron studies, a peripheral smear, and occasionally, a bone marrow biopsy. Treatment modalities frequently administered by infusion therapy nurses include treatment of the underlying chronic disease, replacement of deficiencies (iron, vitamin B12, folate, or erythropoietin), or transfusion of red blood cells. Infusion therapy nurses play a vital role in the assessment and delivery of medication therapy to patients with chronic anemia. PMID:26339940

  7. Pharmacogenetics of ribavirin-induced anemia in hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Ampuero, Javier; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Pharmacogenetics assesses inherited genetic differences in drug metabolic pathways and its role in medicine is growing. Ribavirin (RBV) and peginterferon were the standard of care therapy in hepatitis C virus infection during 15 years, with the addition of first-generation protease inhibitors at the beginning of 2010s. New direct-acting agents are the new standard of care, but RBV remains important in some scenarios. The main adverse effect of RBV is anemia, which requires dose reduction and even stopping treatment in some patients. Pharmacogenetics has identified ITPA and SLC28/29 genes to be closely related to RBV-induced anemia. The routine evaluation of these genes could help to identify those patients at risk of developing anemia during the hepatitis C virus treatment. PMID:27547881

  8. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in neurocritical care

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Andreas H; Zygun, David A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Anemia is one of the most common medical complications to be encountered in critically ill patients. Based on the results of clinical trials, transfusion practices across the world have generally become more restrictive. However, because reduced oxygen delivery contributes to 'secondary' cerebral injury, anemia may not be as well tolerated among neurocritical care patients. Methods The first portion of this paper is a narrative review of the physiologic implications of anemia, hemodilution, and transfusion in the setting of brain-injury and stroke. The second portion is a systematic review to identify studies assessing the association between anemia or the use of red blood cell transfusions and relevant clinical outcomes in various neurocritical care populations. Results There have been no randomized controlled trials that have adequately assessed optimal transfusion thresholds specifically among brain-injured patients. The importance of ischemia and the implications of anemia are not necessarily the same for all neurocritical care conditions. Nevertheless, there exists an extensive body of experimental work, as well as human observational and physiologic studies, which have advanced knowledge in this area and provide some guidance to clinicians. Lower hemoglobin concentrations are consistently associated with worse physiologic parameters and clinical outcomes; however, this relationship may not be altered by more aggressive use of red blood cell transfusions. Conclusions Although hemoglobin concentrations as low as 7 g/dl are well tolerated in most critical care patients, such a severe degree of anemia could be harmful in brain-injured patients. Randomized controlled trials of different transfusion thresholds, specifically in neurocritical care settings, are required. The impact of the duration of blood storage on the neurologic implications of transfusion also requires further investigation. PMID:19519893

  9. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Murray, J Pedro; Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Dufay, J Noelia; Steele, Shelby L; Gaston, Daniel; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Coombs, Andrew J; Liwski, Robert S; Fernandez, Conrad V; Berman, Jason N; McMaster, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala) a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia. PMID:26821380

  10. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Dufay, J. Noelia; Steele, Shelby L.; Gaston, Daniel; Nasrallah, Gheyath K.; Coombs, Andrew J.; Liwski, Robert S.; Fernandez, Conrad V.; Berman, Jason N.; McMaster, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala) a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia. PMID:26821380

  11. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  12. Is there any relation between Duration of breastfeeding and anemia?

    PubMed Central

    Dalili, H; Baghersalimi, A; Dalili, S; Pakdaman, F; Hassanzadeh Rad, A; Abbasi Kakroodi, M; Rezvany, SM; Koohmanaei, Sh

    2015-01-01

    Background In the early months of life, Breastfeeding increases chance of survival, reduces recovery time after disease and mortality due to infections such as diarrhea and acute respiratory infections. However, infants who are exclusively breast-fed for more than 6 months in developing countries may be at increased risk of anemia. Therefore, the aim of study was to assess the relation between duration of breastfeeding and anemia. Materials and Methods In this analytical cross-sectional study, 400 neonates registered in primary health care system since birth time. Complete blood count and serum ferritin were obtained. Data were analyzed by chi- square test and regression analysis. P-value less than 0.05 was considered significant and 95% confidence interval was noted. Results Results of this study showed that 199 infants were anemic (Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration <11 mg/dl). Ten percent of anemic patients reported Ferritin< 12ng/dl and %25 of anemic children had iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In Binominal logistic regression, merely kind of delivery and duration of breastfeeding were effective factors. Binominal logistic regression also showed that natural vaginal delivery and exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 months had a significant influence on anemia. Exclusive breast feeding for 6 months or more increased the likelihood of anemia. In addition, 4 months exclusive breastfeeding decreased 0.686 fold the likelihood of anemia. Conclusion According to the results, it seems that revision of health program recommendations for iron supplementation can be constructive. National planning to promote the level of knowledge regarding natural vaginal delivery and appropriate period for clamping can be recommended. PMID:26985355

  13. Assessment of Anemia Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors among Pregnant Women in Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    M'Cormack, Fredanna A. D.; Drolet, Judy C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Iron deficiency anemia prevalence of pregnant Sierra Leone women currently is reported to be 59.7%. Anemia is considered to be a direct cause of 3-7% of maternal deaths and an indirect cause of 20-40% of maternal deaths. This study explores knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of urban pregnant Sierra Leone women regarding anemia.…

  14. Transfusion-free treatment strategies for acute anemia in critical care.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Caitlin A; Byul Sarah, Sae; Forest, Christopher P

    2016-08-01

    Acute anemia is a frequently encountered diagnosis in critically ill patients, and can be a challenge if blood products are not readily available or if patients refuse these products on the basis of their religious beliefs. This article discusses the goals of anemia management and summarizes several alternatives to blood transfusions that can be used to prevent and treat acute anemia. PMID:27467297

  15. Zinc deficiency anemia and effects of zinc therapy in maintenance hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Tatsuo; Horike, Hideyuki; Fujiki, Shigeatsu; Kitada, Shingo; Sasaki, Tamaki; Kashihara, Naoki

    2009-06-01

    Quantitative adjuvant zinc therapy using polaprezinc was performed to examine the correlation between zinc concentration and anemia in maintenance hemodialysis patients to propose appropriate treatment. Anemia and serum zinc concentration were measured in 117 patients with chronic renal failure receiving outpatient maintenance hemodialysis at Tsuyama Chuo Kinen Hospital. Two bags of polaprezinc (containing zinc 34 mg/day) were administered to 58 patients with lower than normal zinc levels (Zn < 80 mg/dl) as adjuvant zinc therapy to assess anemia improvement. Zinc concentration and all anemia parameters showed significant positive correlation, indicating that anemia improves in patients with high serum zinc levels. Regarding the effects of adjuvant zinc therapy for improving anemia, hemoglobin levels were found to increase significantly to the highest value at 3 weeks. During treatment, the dosage of erythropoietin was reduced significantly from baseline at all assessment points. No zinc poisoning from therapy was seen, but two patients had diarrhea (1.9%). Zinc-treated patients required iron therapy due to the development of iron deficiency. Most maintenance hemodialysis patients suffer from zinc deficiency anemia, and zinc-based polaprezinc has been confirmed to be an effective and safe adjuvant zinc treatment. Most patients diagnosed as refractory anemia with no response to erythropoietin also suffer from zinc deficiency anemia, many of whom are expected to benefit from zinc therapy to improve their anemia. Possible zinc deficiency anemia should be considered in the treatment of refractory anemia with no response to erythropoietin. PMID:19527468

  16. Coomb’s Positive Hemolytic Anemia Due To Insect Bite

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia has occasionally been described in association with insect bites. The venom of certain spiders, bees and wasps, and some snakes can rarely cause intravascular hemolysis. We report here a case of Coombs positive hemolytic anemia due to an insect bite. These bites often pose diagnostic challenges and when associated with systemic manifestations necessitate early intervention. This communication reviews the clinico- hematologic spectrum in these cases and also emphasizes the need to capture the insect as identification would help in early diagnosis and management. PMID:22400097

  17. Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and severe thrombocytopenia in Brucella infection.

    PubMed

    Di Mario, A; Sica, S; Zini, G; Salutari, P; Leone, G

    1995-01-01

    A case of Brucella septicemia presenting at the onset as a severe microangiopathic hemolytic anemia with coexisting dramatic hemorrhagic syndrome (severe epistaxis, gross hematuria, and skin purpura) is reported. A hemogram showed severe thrombocytopenia, anemia, and leukopenia. Bone marrow morphology showed the typical features associated with Brucella infection: numerous histiocytes with signs of activation, multiple granulomata, giant cells, and hemophagocytosis. After appropriate antimicrobial therapy, the clinical and hematological status of the patient improved, and he is alive and well 1 year later with disappearance of all hematological abnormalities. PMID:7827209

  18. [An unusual coincidence of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Zamir, D; Polychuck, I; Reitblat, T; Leibovitz, I; Lugassy, G

    2002-08-01

    A 52 year old man was admitted for hospitalization due to dizziness and weakness that appeared in the previous 2 weeks. Anemia and thrombocytopenia, as well as elevated levels of lactic dehydrogenase, reticulocytosis and schistocytes on blood smear, all suggested thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. However, B12 deficiency was also diagnosed. The diagnosis of pernicious anemia was reassured by both fundic biopsy and the existence of antiparietal cells antibodies and anti-intrinsic cells antibodies. A few courses of plasmapheresis along with parenteral B12 stabilized his physical condition and he was released with no need for further treatment, and only required ambulatory follow-up. PMID:12222131

  19. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Meseeha, Marcelle G.; Attia, Maximos N.; Kolade, Victor O.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  20. Unusual cause of childhood anemia: Imerslund Grasbeck syndrome.

    PubMed

    Laxminarayana, Kishan Prasad Hosapatna; Yeshvanth, Sunil Kumar; Shetty, Jayaprakash K; Permi, Harish S; Rao, Chandrika

    2011-07-01

    Imerslund Grasbeck syndrome (IGS) is a rare autosomal recessive childhood disorder characterized by selective Vitamin (vit) B 12 malabsorption with asymptomatic proteinuria without any structural renal pathology. The patients stay healthy for decades with life-long parenteral vit B12. We report a case of young female who presented with pancytopenia and proteinuria, evaluated in local hospitals as chronic hemolytic anemia (autoimmune cause), finally diagnosed as IGS on complete evaluation. She was treated with injectable vit B12 (1000 μg cyanocobalalmin) and showed drastic recovery. IGS should be considered in patients with megaloblastic anemia not responding to oral vit B12 and associated proteinuria. PMID:22219566

  1. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Meseeha, Marcelle G; Attia, Maximos N; Kolade, Victor O

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  2. Oral human papillomavirus is common in individuals with Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Sharon L.; Wells, Susanne I.; Zhang, Xue; Hoskins, Elizabeth E.; Davies, Stella M.; Myers, Kasiani C.; Mueller, Robin; Panicker, Gitika; Unger, Elizabeth R.; Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Brown, Darron R.; Mehta, Parinda A.; Butsch Kovacic, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Background Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder resulting in a loss of function of the FA-related DNA repair pathway. Individuals with FA are predisposed to some cancers including oropharyngeal and gynecological cancers with known associations with human papillomavirus (HPV) in the general population. Since individuals with FA respond poorly to chemotherapy and radiation, prevention of cancer is critical. Methods To determine if individuals with FA are particularly susceptible to oral HPV infection, we analyzed survey-based risk factor data and tested DNA isolated from oral rinses from 126 individuals with FA and 162 unaffected first-degree family members for 37 HPV types. Results Fourteen individuals (11.1%) with FA tested positive, significantly more (p=0.003) than family members (2.5%). While HPV prevalence was even higher for sexually active individuals with FA (17.7% vs. 2.4% in family; p=0.003), HPV positivity also tended to be higher in the sexually inactive (8.7% in FA vs. 2.9% in siblings). Indeed, having FA increased HPV positivity 4.9 fold (95%CI: 1.6–15.4) considering age and sexual experience, but did not differ by other potential risk factors. Conclusion Our studies suggest that oral HPV is more common in individuals with FA. It will be essential to continue to explore associations between risk factors and immune dysfunction on HPV incidence and persistence over time. Impact HPV vaccination should be emphasized in those with FA as a first step to prevent oropharyngeal cancers, although additional studies are needed to determine if the level of protection it offers in this population is adequate. PMID:25809863

  3. Hepcidin-Induced Iron Deficiency Is Related to Transient Anemia and Hypoferremia in Kawasaki Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Hsien; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Fu-Chen; Yu, Hong-Ren; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Ling; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Li, Sung-Chou; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a type of systemic vasculitis that primarily affects children under the age of five years old. For sufferers of KD, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been found to successfully diminish the occurrence of coronary artery lesions. Anemia is commonly found in KD patients, and we have shown that in appropriately elevated hepcidin levels are related to decreased hemoglobin levels in these patients. In this study, we investigated the time period of anemia and iron metabolism during different stages of KD. A total of 100 patients with KD and 20 control subjects were enrolled in this study for red blood cell and hemoglobin analysis. Furthermore, plasma, urine hepcidin, and plasma IL-6 levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 20 KD patients and controls. Changes in hemoglobin, plasma iron levels, and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) were also measured in patients with KD. Hemoglobin, iron levels, and TIBC were lower (p < 0.001, p = 0.009, and p < 0.001, respectively) while plasma IL-6 and hepcidin levels (both p < 0.001) were higher in patients with KD than in the controls prior to IVIG administration. Moreover, plasma hepcidin levels were positively and significantly correlated with urine hepcidin levels (p < 0.001) prior to IVIG administration. After IVIG treatment, plasma hepcidin and hemoglobin levels significantly decreased (both p < 0.001). Of particular note was a subsequent gradual increase in hemoglobin levels during the three weeks after IVIG treatment; nevertheless, the hemoglobin levels stayed lower in KD patients than in the controls (p = 0.045). These findings provide a longitudinal study of hemoglobin changes and among the first evidence that hepcidin induces transient anemia and hypoferremia during KD's acute inflammatory phase. PMID:27187366

  4. Effects of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents on heart failure patients with anemia: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Yaheng; Yan, Junqiang; Dong, Pingshuan; Wang, Yanyu; Niu, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure (HF) is always complicated with anemia and is associated with bad prognosis in this patient population. Several studies have assessed the potential role of erythropoietin-stimulating agent (ESA) in improving cardiac function and reducing the number of hospitalizations in anemic patients with HF. Aim We performed a meta-analysis to assess the potential role of ESA in the treatment of anemic patients with HF. Material and methods A literature and Medline search was performed to identify studies with control groups that examined the efficacy of ESA therapy in patients with HF and anemia. Results A total of 11 studies were included (n = 3044 subjects) in the final analysis. Compared to placebo, ESA therapy was associated with increased hemoglobin levels (1.89 g/dl; 95% CI: 1.64–2.14, p < 0.00001), increased left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) to 6.88 (95% CI: 0.49–13.28, p = 0.03), decreased B-type natriuretic protein (–272.20; 95% CI: (–444.52)–(–99.89), p = 0.002), improvement in New York Heart Association functional class to –0.33 mean difference (95% CI: (–0.44)–(–0.23), p < 0.00001), and decreased hospitalization (OR = 0.61, 95% CI: 0.39–0.94, p = 0.02). There was no significant between-group difference in all-cause mortality (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.51–1.21, p = 0.27). Conclusions The treatment of anemia with ESA therapy did not reduce the rate of all-cause mortality among patients with heart failure, but ESA therapy made a potential important contribution to patients’ symptomatic improvement. PMID:27625688

  5. Hepcidin-Induced Iron Deficiency Is Related to Transient Anemia and Hypoferremia in Kawasaki Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Hsien; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Fu-Chen; Yu, Hong-Ren; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Ling; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Li, Sung-Chou; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a type of systemic vasculitis that primarily affects children under the age of five years old. For sufferers of KD, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been found to successfully diminish the occurrence of coronary artery lesions. Anemia is commonly found in KD patients, and we have shown that in appropriately elevated hepcidin levels are related to decreased hemoglobin levels in these patients. In this study, we investigated the time period of anemia and iron metabolism during different stages of KD. A total of 100 patients with KD and 20 control subjects were enrolled in this study for red blood cell and hemoglobin analysis. Furthermore, plasma, urine hepcidin, and plasma IL-6 levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 20 KD patients and controls. Changes in hemoglobin, plasma iron levels, and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) were also measured in patients with KD. Hemoglobin, iron levels, and TIBC were lower (p < 0.001, p = 0.009, and p < 0.001, respectively) while plasma IL-6 and hepcidin levels (both p < 0.001) were higher in patients with KD than in the controls prior to IVIG administration. Moreover, plasma hepcidin levels were positively and significantly correlated with urine hepcidin levels (p < 0.001) prior to IVIG administration. After IVIG treatment, plasma hepcidin and hemoglobin levels significantly decreased (both p < 0.001). Of particular note was a subsequent gradual increase in hemoglobin levels during the three weeks after IVIG treatment; nevertheless, the hemoglobin levels stayed lower in KD patients than in the controls (p = 0.045). These findings provide a longitudinal study of hemoglobin changes and among the first evidence that hepcidin induces transient anemia and hypoferremia during KD’s acute inflammatory phase. PMID:27187366

  6. Prevalence and classification of anemia in elective orthopedic surgery patients: implications for blood conservation programs.

    PubMed

    Goodnough, L T; Vizmeg, K; Sobecks, R; Schwarz, A; Soegiarso, W

    1992-01-01

    We audited 281 consecutive orthopedic patients scheduled for surgery for whom blood type/cross-matching was requested over a 6-month period. One hundred and sixty-two patients predonated autologous blood at University Hospitals of Cleveland, and 34 (21%) of these were anemic [hematocrit (Hct) less than or equal to 39%] at initial donation. Twelve (35%) of these 34 anemic autologous blood donors subsequently received homologous blood. In contrast, 18 (15%) of 128 nonanemic autologous blood donors received homologous blood (p = 0.05). In 119 patients who did not donate autologous blood, 39 (33%) were anemic at admission. Of these, 22 (56%) received homologous blood. In the 80 remaining nonanemic patients, 33 (41%) received homologous blood (p = 0.119). Analysis of discharge Hct indicates that 31 (12%) of 263 evaluable patients were possibly transfused inappropriately. The anemias of a cohort of 30 autologous donors were analyzed: 5 had rheumatoid arthritis without iron deficiency. Nine (30%) others had evidence of iron deficiency. Sixteen (53%) had an unclassified anemia of chronic disease. We conclude: (1) the high rates of homologous blood exposure indicate a need for innovative blood conservation strategies in anemic autologous blood donors; (2) the prevalence of anemia and the high rates of homologous blood exposure in anemic patients who did not donate autologous blood demonstrate a need for early recognition and treatment in order to procure autologous blood and reduce homologous blood exposure; (3) the presence of inappropriate autologous and homologous transfusions demonstrates a need for more effective physician education programs that emphasize 'no blood transfusion' as an alternative to enhance blood conservation effectiveness. PMID:1441312

  7. Blood Group Discrepancy-First Sign of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in a Child.

    PubMed

    Datta, Suvro Sankha; Reddy, Mahua; Basu, Sabita; Krishnan, Shekhar

    2016-06-01

    A 12-year-old male child was presented in the emergency with features of anemia and mild icterus on day+67 of HSCT. The child was suffering from Fanconi anemia and undergone HSCT from ABO-matched, fully HLA matched sibling donor. The diagnosis of mixed type AIHA due to cytomegalovirus reactivation was made in the immunohematology laboratory and blood group discrepancy was the first sign of AIHA in this patient. Though the cold agglutinin titer was not significant but the clinical symptoms and laboratory evidences were suggestive of significant hemolysis due to underlying IgG autoantibody. In addition the high complement avidity of IgM autoantibody might also be a contributing factor for clinically significant hemolysis in this case. The patient was successfully treated with phenotype matched blood transfusion, rituximab and oral steroid therapy. PMID:27408394

  8. Colon cancer in a patient with underlying aplastic anemia: A clinical challenge

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hilda; Chan, Pierre; Yau, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The association of gastrointestinal malignancy with aplastic anemia has rarely been reported in the literature. Although it is not clear whether there is any direct relationship between aplastic anemia and gastrointestinal cancers, a retrospective analysis did suggest the notion that patients with aplastic anemia might have a higher incidence of colorectal cancer. Here, we report the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in managing a patient with aplastic anemia and advanced colorectal cancer. Early diagnosis is challenging due to overlapping symptomatology and clinical features, increased risk of diagnostic procedures, and confounding complications arising from aplastic anemia and its treatment. A high index of suspicion and multidisciplinary input are essential. PMID:22347693

  9. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  10. "What an Affliction": Mary Todd Lincoln's Fatal Pernicious Anemia.

    PubMed

    Sotos, John G

    2015-01-01

    To date, no single diagnosis has unified the psychiatric illness and the numerous poorly defined physical complaints that Mary Lincoln (née Todd, 1818-1882) suffered in adulthood. Here, I show that her physical ailments spanned 30 years and included sore mouth, pallor, paresthesias, the Lhermitte symptom, fever, headaches, fatigue, resting tachycardia, edema, episodic weight loss, progressive weakness, ataxia, and visual impairment. Long thought hypochondriacal, these findings, plus their time course and her psychopathology (irritability, delusions, hallucinations, with preserved clarity), are all consistent with vitamin B12 deficiency. Pernicious anemia most probably caused this deficiency: she lacked risk factors for other causes, and her consanguineous parents both derived from a region of Scotland having a high incidence of pernicious anemia. A diagnosis of chronic multisystem pernicious anemia would clarify the conduct of Mary Lincoln as First Lady and widow, and illuminate challenges faced by her husband, President Abraham Lincoln. Her case highlights many forgotten features of the natural history of untreated pernicious anemia and is unique in the medical literature in demonstrating such a course extending over a lifetime. PMID:27397049

  11. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-03-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms "iron deficiency" and "iron deficiency anemia" are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake together with rapid growth, low birth weight and gastrointestinal losses related to excessive intake of cow's milk. If insufficient intake can be excluded and there is insufficient response to oral iron treatment in patients with iron deficiency especially in older children, blood loss should be considered as the underlying cause. The main principles in management of iron deficiency anemia include investigation and elimination of the cause leading to iron deficiency, replacement of deficiency, improvement of nutrition and education of the patient and family. In this article, the practical approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and the experience of our center have been reviewed. PMID:26078692

  12. Disorders of Iron Metabolism and Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulated iron homeostasis plays a central role in the development of anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a major contributor toward resistance to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology requires an in-depth understanding of normal iron physiology and regulation. Recent discoveries in the field of iron biology have greatly improved our understanding of the hormonal regulation of iron trafficking in human beings and how its alterations lead to the development of anemia of CKD. In addition, emerging evidence has suggested that iron homeostasis interacts with bone and mineral metabolism on multiple levels, opening up new avenues of investigation into the genesis of disordered iron metabolism in CKD. Building on recent advances in our understanding of normal iron physiology and abnormalities in iron homeostasis in CKD, this review characterizes how anemia related to disordered iron metabolism develops in the setting of CKD. In addition, this review explores our emerging recognition of the connections between iron homeostasis and mineral metabolism and their implications for the management of altered iron status and anemia of CKD. PMID:27475656

  13. Perioperative anemia management in colorectal cancer patients: A pragmatic approach

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; Martín-Montañez, Elisa; Auerbach, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Anemia, usually due to iron deficiency, is highly prevalent among patients with colorectal cancer. Inflammatory cytokines lead to iron restricted erythropoiesis further decreasing iron availability and impairing iron utilization. Preoperative anemia predicts for decreased survival. Allogeneic blood transfusion is widely used to correct anemia and is associated with poorer surgical outcomes, increased post-operative nosocomial infections, longer hospital stays, increased rates of cancer recurrence and perioperative venous thromboembolism. Infections are more likely to occur in those with low preoperative serum ferritin level compared to those with normal levels. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management, minimizes or eliminates allogeneic blood transfusion. This includes restrictive transfusion policy, thromboprophylaxis and anemia management to improve outcomes. Normalization of preoperative hemoglobin levels is a World Health Organization recommendation. Iron repletion should be routinely ordered when indicated. Oral iron is poorly tolerated with low adherence based on published evidence. Intravenous iron is safe and effective but is frequently avoided due to misinformation and misinterpretation concerning the incidence and clinical nature of minor infusion reactions. Serious adverse events with intravenous iron are extremely rare. Newer formulations allow complete replacement dosing in 15-60 min markedly facilitating care. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents may improve response rates. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management used to minimize or eliminate allogeneic blood transfusion is indicated to improve outcomes. PMID:24587673

  14. Prevention of Iatrogenic Anemia in Critical and Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Jakacka, Natalia; Snarski, Emilian; Mekuria, Selamawit

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic anemia caused by diagnostic blood sampling is a common problem in the intensive care unit, where continuous monitoring of blood parameters is very often required. Cumulative blood loss associated with phlebotomy along with other factors render this group of patients particularly susceptible to anemia. As it has been proven that anemia in this group of patients leads to inferior outcomes, packed red blood cell transfusions are used to alleviate possible threats associated with low hemoglobin concentration. However, the use of blood components is a procedure conferring a set of risks to the patients despite improvements in safety. Iatrogenic blood loss has also gained particular attention in neonatal care, where cumulative blood loss due to samples taken during the first week of life could easily equal or exceed circulating blood volume. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the causes of iatrogenic anemia and discusses the most common preventive measures taken to reduce diagnostic blood loss and the requirement for blood component transfusions in the aforementioned clinical situations. PMID:26935514

  15. An unusual presentation of listeriosis: anemia and cutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Teo, Hooi Khee; Yap, Jonathan; Fong, Yuke Tien

    2014-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular pathogen causing food-borne disease. It usually affects the young as well as immunocompromised individuals and is associated with high mortality rates. Cutaneous manifestations have rarely been described. We describe an interesting case of a traveller from the tropics presenting with cutaneous listeriosis and anemia. PMID:24968680

  16. Behavior of Infants with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozoff, Betsy; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Compared behavior of 52 Costa Rican 12- to 23-month-olds with iron-deficiency anemia to that of 139 infants with better iron status. Found that iron-deficient infants maintained closer contact with caregivers; showed less pleasure and playfulness; were more wary, hesitant, and easily tired; made fewer attempts at test items; and attended less to…

  17. Genetics Home Reference: thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) THIAMINE-RESPONSIVE MEGALOBLASTIC ANEMIA SYNDROME Sources for This Page Baron D, Assaraf YG, Cohen N, Aronheim A. Lack of plasma membrane targeting of a G172D mutant thiamine transporter ...

  18. Anemia in a neonate with placental mesenchymal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Satoshi; Morikawa, Mamoru; Umazume, Takeshi; Yamada, Takahiro; Kanno, Hiromi; Takakuwa, Emi; Minakami, Hisanori

    2016-05-01

    Causes of intrauterine fetal death (IUFD) are uncertain in most placental mesenchymal dysplasia (PMD) cases. Our case showed high α-fetoprotein levels in the maternal circulation, markedly dilated subchorionic vessels, and neonatal hemoglobin concentration of 8.4 g/dL, suggesting that fetal anemia may explain some adverse outcomes in PMD pregnancies. PMID:27190607

  19. Effect of 131I on the anemia of hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Perlman, J.A.; Sternthal, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    Data from the National Thyrotoxicosis Therapy Follow-Up Study (NTTFS) are presented here to document the existence of anemia in hyperthyroidism, a mild and reversible anemia that is simultaneously ameliorated with reversal of the hyperthyroid state. Among 20,600 women entered into the NTTF study with no previous history of hematological disorders, the prevalence of anemia was found to range from 10-15%, appearing to be higher in those selected for treatment with 131I when compared to those selected for surgery. An attempt is made to verify the recent hypothesis that thyroid hormone levels in the supraphysiologic range may suppress erythrogenesis. Two statistically significant regression models are consistent with a hypothesis of thyrotoxic bone marrow suppression. However, both associations are weak enough to suggest that some other physiologic improvement underlies the amelioration of anemia when hyperthyroidism is reversed. The degree of improvement in hematological status is similar for women in both treatment groups. Among 4464 women for whom serial hematological tests are obtained, over 3/4 of anemic patients are no longer anemic after an average 6.2 yr of follow-up. Clinicians are reassured that radioactive iodine exposure causes no further insult to the bone marrow, no matter what the cumulative dosage. The highly fractionated low dose bone marrow exposures to radiation account for the minimal hematological risks of 131I treatment.

  20. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  1. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15mg/kg; maximum of 1000mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  2. Studies of the pathogenesis of anemia of inflammation: erythrocyte survival

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, D.J.; Krehbiel, J.D.

    1983-10-01

    Erythrocyte survival was investigated in healthy cats and in cats with sterile abscesses. Erythrocyte survival time in cats with sterile abscesses was found to be significantly reduced. The erythrocyte destruction appeared to be the major factor in the early stages of anemia of inflammation.

  3. Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Outpatients: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Carla Valéria de Alvarenga; Hallack Neto, Abrahão Elias; Nascimento, Cristiano Rodrigo de Alvarenga; Chebli, Liliana Andrade; Moutinho, Ivana Lúcia Damásio; Pinheiro, Bruno do Valle; Reboredo, Maycon Moura; Malaguti, Carla; Castro, Antonio Carlos Santana; Chebli, Júlio Maria Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, epidemiological studies of nonwestern IBD populations are limited and may be confounded by demographic, socioeconomic, and disease-related influences. This study evaluated the prevalence, risk factors, and etiology of anemia in Brazilian outpatients with IBD. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, 100 Crohn's disease (CD) patients and 100 ulcerative colitis (UC) subjects were assessed. Anemia workup included complete blood count, ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum levels of folic acid and vitamin B12, and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration. Results. The overall prevalence of anemia in IBD was 21%. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of anemia between CD subjects (24%) and UC (18%). Moderate disease activity (OR: 3.48, 95% CI, 1.95–9.64, P = 0.002) and elevated CRP levels (OR: 1.8, 95% CI, 1.04–3.11, P = 0.02) were independently associated with anemia. The most common etiologies of anemia found in both groups were iron deficiency anemia (IDA; 10% on CD and 6% on UC) followed by the anemia of chronic disease (ACD; 6% for both groups). Conclusions. In Brazilian IBD outpatients, anemia is highly concurrent condition. Disease moderate activity as well as increased CRP was strongly associated with comorbid anemia. IDA and/or ACD were the most common etiologies. PMID:25705682

  4. Cost-effectiveness of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator in anemia

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Background Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are the mainstay of anemia therapy. Continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) is a highly effective, long-acting ESA developed for once-monthly dosing. A multitude of clinical studies has evaluated the safety and efficiency of this treatment option for patients with renal anemia. In times of permanent financial pressure on health care systems, the cost-effectiveness of CERA should be of particular importance for payers and clinicians. Objective To critically analyze, from the nephrologists’ point of view, the published literature focusing on the cost-effectiveness of CERA for anemia treatment. Methods The detailed literature search covered electronic databases including MEDLINE, PubMed, and Embase, as well as international conference abstract databases. Results Peer-reviewed literature analyzing the definite cost-effectiveness of CERA is scarce, and most of the available data originate from conference abstracts. Identified data are restricted to the treatment of anemia due to chronic kidney disease. Although the majority of studies suggest a considerable cost advantage for CERA, the published literature cannot easily be compared. While time and motion studies clearly indicate that a switch to CERA could minimize health care staff time in dialysis units, the results of studies comparing direct costs are more ambivalent, potentially reflecting the differences between health care systems and variability between centers. Conclusion Analyzed data are predominantly insufficient; they miss clear evidence and have to thus be interpreted with great caution. In this day and age of financial restraints, results from well-designed, head-to-head studies with clearly defined endpoints have to prove whether CERA therapy can achieve cost savings without compromising anemia management. PMID:25050070

  5. Dhatrilauha: Right choice for iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Anuradha; Dwivedi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anemia in pregnancy is multi-factorial. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common one. Major cause is increased demand of iron during pregnancy. In Ayurveda, under Pandu-Roga the features of anemia are described. It is characterized by Vaivarnyata or Varnanasha (change/destruction in normal color of the body), a disorder of Pitta vitiation. Ayurvedic management is an effective way of curing anemia in general by a large number of Lauha preparations of which Dhatrilauha has been used widely for centuries. Aim: To evaluate the effect of Dhatrilauha in the management of IDA based on the scientific parameters among pregnant patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 58 cases were selected by simple randomized sampling method as per inclusion criteria of pregnant women between 4th and 7th months of pregnancy with a clinical diagnosis and laboratory confirmation of IDA. Dhatrilauha 500 mg in two divided doses after food with normal potable water were given for 45 days with three follow-ups, each of 15 days intervals. Final assessment was done after completion of 45 days and results were statistically analyzed by using Cochran's Q-test and Student's t-test. Results: Dhatrilauha showed statistically significant (P < 0.01) improvement in the majority of sign-symptoms and objective parameters such as weakness, fatigue, palpitation, effort intolerance, breathlessness, heartburn, pallor, constipation, hemoglobin, red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, RBC distribution width, mean platelet volume, serum iron, and total iron binding capacity. Conclusion: Dhatrilauha possesses many fold effectiveness in anemia (IDA), which was evidenced with the significant results obtained in the majority of parameters in this study. PMID:25972720

  6. Successful treatment of severe immune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation with bortezomib: report of a case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Hosoba, Sakura; Jaye, David L; Cohen, Cynthia; Roback, John D; Waller, Edmund K

    2015-01-01

    Background Immune hemolytic anemia is a well-known complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Posttransplant hemolytic anemia results in increased red blood cell transfusions and medical sequelae including iron overload. Case Report We present a case report of immune hemolytic anemia that occurred after allogeneic HSCT from an ABO major–mismatched, HLA-matched unrelated donor. The patient had high anti-donor A type antibodies that were unresponsive to treatment with steroids and rituximab, resulting in persistent transfusion dependence. A detailed time course of anti-A titers, plasma cell content of the marrow, and B-cell content of the blood is presented. Treatment with bortezomib, a protease inhibitor, eliminated residual host-type plasma cells secreting anti-A and restored normal donor-derived erythropoiesis. Conclusion This report, and a review of literature for treatment of immune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic HSCT, supports the utility of bortezomib as plasma cell–targeted therapy in this setting. PMID:25156334

  7. Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO): more than just the correction of uremic anemia.

    PubMed

    Buemi, Michele; Aloisi, Carmela; Cavallaro, Emanuela; Corica, Francesco; Floccari, Fulvio; Grasso, Giovanni; Lasco, Antonino; Pettinato, Giuseppina; Ruello, Antonella; Sturiale, Alessio; Frisina, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is controlled by numerous interdependent humoral and endocrine factors. Erythropoietin (EPO), a hydrophobic sialoglycoproteic hormone, plays a crucial role in the regulation of hematopoiesis, and induces proliferation, maturation and differentiation of the erythroid cell line precursors. Thanks to recombinant DNA techniques, different recombinant hormones can now be produced at low cost and in large amounts. This has led to greater understanding of the pathophysiological factors regulating hematopoiesis. This in turn, hasprompted the search for new therapeutic approaches. EPO might also be used to treat patients with different types of anemia: uremics, newborns, patients with anemia from cancer or myeloproliferative disease, thalassemia, bone marrow transplants, chronic infectious diseases. Besides erythroid cells, EPO affects other blood cell lines, such as myeloid cells, lymphocytes and megakaryocytes. It can also enhance polymorphonuclear cell phagocytosis and reduce macrophage activation, thus modulating the inflammatory process. Hematopoietic and endothelial cells probably have the same origin, and the discovery of eyrthropoietin receptors also on mesangial, myocardial and smooth muscle cells has prompted research into the non-erythropoietic function of the hormone. EPO has an important, direct, hemodynamic and vasoactive effect, which does not depend only on an increase in hematocrit and viscosity. Moreover, EPO and its receptors have been found in the brain, suggesting a role in preventing neuronal death. Finally, the recently discovered interaction between EPO and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and the ability of EPO to stimulate endothelial cell mitosis and motility may be of importance in neovascularization and wound healing. PMID:12018644

  8. Origin, functional role, and clinical impact of Fanconi anemia FANCA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Castella, Maria; Pujol, Roser; Callén, Elsa; Trujillo, Juan P.; Casado, José A.; Gille, Hans; Lach, Francis P.; Auerbach, Arleen D.; Schindler, Detlev; Benítez, Javier; Porto, Beatriz; Ferro, Teresa; Muñoz, Arturo; Sevilla, Julián; Madero, Luis; Cela, Elena; Beléndez, Cristina; de Heredia, Cristina Díaz; Olivé, Teresa; de Toledo, José Sánchez; Badell, Isabel; Torrent, Montserrat; Estella, Jesús; Dasí, Ángeles; Rodríguez-Villa, Antonia; Gómez, Pedro; Barbot, José; Tapia, María; Molinés, Antonio; Figuera, Ángela; Bueren, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is characterized by congenital abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and cancer predisposition. To investigate the origin, functional role, and clinical impact of FANCA mutations, we determined a FANCA mutational spectrum with 130 pathogenic alleles. Some of these mutations were further characterized for their distribution in populations, mode of emergence, or functional consequences at cellular and clinical level. The world most frequent FANCA mutation is not the result of a mutational “hot-spot” but results from worldwide dissemination of an ancestral Indo-European mutation. We provide molecular evidence that total absence of FANCA in humans does not reduce embryonic viability, as the observed frequency of mutation carriers in the Gypsy population equals the expected by Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. We also prove that long distance Alu-Alu recombination can cause Fanconi anemia by originating large interstitial deletions involving FANCA and 2 adjacent genes. Finally, we show that all missense mutations studied lead to an altered FANCA protein that is unable to relocate to the nucleus and activate the FA/BRCA pathway. This may explain the observed lack of correlation between type of FANCA mutation and cellular phenotype or clinical severity in terms of age of onset of hematologic disease or number of malformations. PMID:21273304

  9. Intravenous Iron Carboxymaltose as a Potential Therapeutic in Anemia of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Traeger, Lisa; Bäumer, Nicole; Schulze, Isabell; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Müller-Tidow, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous iron supplementation is an effective therapy in iron deficiency anemia (IDA), but controversial in anemia of inflammation (AI). Unbound iron can be used by bacteria and viruses for their replication and enhance the inflammatory response. Nowadays available high molecular weight iron complexes for intravenous iron substitution, such as ferric carboxymaltose, might be useful in AI, as these pharmaceuticals deliver low doses of free iron over a prolonged period of time. We tested the effects of intravenous iron carboxymaltose in murine AI: Wild-type mice were exposed to the heat-killed Brucella abortus (BA) model and treated with or without high molecular weight intravenous iron. 4h after BA injection followed by 2h after intravenous iron treatment, inflammatory cytokines were upregulated by BA, but not enhanced by iron treatment. In long term experiments, mice were fed a regular or an iron deficient diet and then treated with intravenous iron or saline 14 days after BA injection. Iron treatment in mice with BA-induced AI was effective 24h after iron administration. In contrast, mice with IDA (on iron deficiency diet) prior to BA-IA required 7d to recover from AI. In these experiments, inflammatory markers were not further induced in iron-treated compared to vehicle-treated BA-injected mice. These results demonstrate that intravenous iron supplementation effectively treated the murine BA-induced AI without further enhancement of the inflammatory response. Studies in humans have to reveal treatment options for AI in patients. PMID:27404499

  10. Linkage analysis of the Fanconi anemia gene FACC with chromosome 9q markers

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, A.D.; Shin, H.T.; Kaporis, A.G.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous syndrome, with at least four different complementation groups as determined by cell fusion studies. The gene for complementation group C, FACC, has been cloned and mapped to chromosome 9q22.3 by in situ hybridization, while linkage analysis has supported the placement of another gene on chromosome 20q. We have analyzed five microsatellite markers and one RFLP on chromosome 9q in a panel of FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry (IFAR) in order to place FACC on the genetic map. Polymorphisms were typed in 308 individuals from 51 families. FACC is tightly linked to both D9S151 [{Theta}{sub max}=0.025, Z{sub max}=7.75] and to D9S196 [{Theta}{sub max}=0.041, Z{sub max}=7.89]; multipoint analysis is in progress. We are currently screening a YAC clone that contains the entire FACC gene for additional microsatellite markers suitable for haplotype analysis of FA families.

  11. Clostridium Perfringens Infection in a Febrile Patient with Severe Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hashiba, Masamitsu; Tomino, Atsutoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyoshi; Hattori, Tomonori; Kano, Hideki; Tsuda, Masanobu; Takeyama, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 82 Final Diagnosis: Clostridium perfringens infection Symptoms: Anemia • fever • shock Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Antimicrobial chemotherapy Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) can cause various infections, including gas gangrene, crepitant cellulitis, and fasciitis. While C. perfringens sepsis is uncommon, it is often rapidly fatal because the alpha toxin of this bacterium induces massive intravascular hemolysis by disrupting red blood cell membranes. Case Report: We present the case of a male patient with diabetes who developed a fatal liver abscess with massive intravascular hemolysis and septic shock caused by toxigenic C. perfringens. The peripheral blood smear showed loss of central pallor, with numerous spherocytes. Multiplex PCR only detected expression of the cpa gene, indicating that the pathogen was C. perfringens type A. Conclusions: C. perfringens infection should be considered in a febrile patient who has severe hemolytic anemia with a very low MCV, hemolyzed blood sample, and negative Coombs test. The characteristic peripheral blood smear findings may facilitate rapid diagnosis. PMID:27049736

  12. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses.

    PubMed

    Bolfa, Pompei; Nolf, Marie; Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Catoi, Cornel; Archer, Fabienne; Dolmazon, Christine; Mornex, Jean-François; Leroux, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inflammation, and thickness of the alveolar septa. Expression of the p26 EIAV capsid (CA) protein has been evaluated by immunostaining. Compared to EIAV-negative horses, 52% of the EIAV-positive horses displayed a mild inflammation around the bronchioles, 22% had a moderate inflammation with inflammatory cells inside the wall and epithelial bronchiolar hyperplasia and 6.5% had a moderate to severe inflammation, with destruction of the bronchiolar epithelium and accumulation of smooth muscle cells within the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in the thickness of the alveolar septa were also present. Expression of EIAV capsid has been evidenced in macrophages, endothelial as well as in alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, as determined by their morphology and localization. To summarize, we found lesions of interstitial lung disease similar to that observed during other lentiviral infections such as FIV in cats, SRLV in sheep and goats or HIV in children. The presence of EIAV capsid in lung epithelial cells suggests that EIAV might be responsible for the broncho-interstitial damages observed. PMID:24289102

  13. Origin, functional role, and clinical impact of Fanconi anemia FANCA mutations.

    PubMed

    Castella, Maria; Pujol, Roser; Callén, Elsa; Trujillo, Juan P; Casado, José A; Gille, Hans; Lach, Francis P; Auerbach, Arleen D; Schindler, Detlev; Benítez, Javier; Porto, Beatriz; Ferro, Teresa; Muñoz, Arturo; Sevilla, Julián; Madero, Luis; Cela, Elena; Beléndez, Cristina; de Heredia, Cristina Díaz; Olivé, Teresa; de Toledo, José Sánchez; Badell, Isabel; Torrent, Montserrat; Estella, Jesús; Dasí, Angeles; Rodríguez-Villa, Antonia; Gómez, Pedro; Barbot, José; Tapia, María; Molinés, Antonio; Figuera, Angela; Bueren, Juan A; Surrallés, Jordi

    2011-04-01

    Fanconi anemia is characterized by congenital abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and cancer predisposition. To investigate the origin, functional role, and clinical impact of FANCA mutations, we determined a FANCA mutational spectrum with 130 pathogenic alleles. Some of these mutations were further characterized for their distribution in populations, mode of emergence, or functional consequences at cellular and clinical level. The world most frequent FANCA mutation is not the result of a mutational "hot-spot" but results from worldwide dissemination of an ancestral Indo-European mutation. We provide molecular evidence that total absence of FANCA in humans does not reduce embryonic viability, as the observed frequency of mutation carriers in the Gypsy population equals the expected by Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. We also prove that long distance Alu-Alu recombination can cause Fanconi anemia by originating large interstitial deletions involving FANCA and 2 adjacent genes. Finally, we show that all missense mutations studied lead to an altered FANCA protein that is unable to relocate to the nucleus and activate the FA/BRCA pathway. This may explain the observed lack of correlation between type of FANCA mutation and cellular phenotype or clinical severity in terms of age of onset of hematologic disease or number of malformations. PMID:21273304

  14. Structure of equine infectious anemia virus proteinase complexed with an inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Gustchina, A.; Kervinen, J.; Powell, D. J.; Zdanov, A.; Kay, J.; Wlodawer, A.

    1996-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), the causative agent of infectious anemia in horses, is a member of the lentiviral family. The virus-encoded proteinase (PR) processes viral polyproteins into functional molecules during replication and it also cleaves viral nucleocapsid protein during infection. The X-ray structure of a complex of the 154G mutant of EIAV PR with the inhibitor HBY-793 was solved at 1.8 A resolution and refined to a crystallographic R-factor of 0.136. The molecule is a dimer in which the monomers are related by a crystallographic twofold axis. Although both the enzyme and the inhibitor are symmetric, the interactions between the central part of the inhibitor and the active site aspartates are asymmetric, and the inhibitor and the two flaps are partially disordered. The overall fold of EIAV PR is very similar to that of other retroviral proteinases. However, a novel feature of the EIAV PR structure is the appearance of the second alpha-helix in the monomer in a position predicted by the structural template for the family of aspartic proteinases. The parts of the EIAV PR with the highest resemblance to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 PR include the substrate-binding sites; thus, the differences in the specificity of both enzymes have to be explained by enzyme-ligand interactions at the periphery of the active site as well. PMID:8844837

  15. Local concepts of anemia-related illnesses and public health implications in the Taabo health demographic surveillance system, Côte d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A 14-month prospective longitudinal study conducted in the Taabo health demographic surveillance system (HDSS), south-central Côte d’Ivoire, revealed high prevalence of anemia in different population groups in three types of settings (i.e., small town, village, and hamlet). Demographic parameters and several variables related to parasitic infections, micronutrient status, and inflammation were significantly associated with higher odds of anemia. However, cultural concepts and knowledge of various anemia-related illnesses and their relation with people’s behaviors have not been investigated. Methods Sixteen focus group discussions and six key informant interviews were performed with village authorities, health workers, and traditional healers. Questionnaires were administrated to 200 school-aged children and 115 young women. Of these individuals, 206 participated in the preceding longitudinal study, whereas the remaining 109 people were not exposed to prior research, but had similar age and sex profiles. Mean prominence of participants’ responses was compared between groups of participants and across study settings. Results Local concepts of anemia-related illnesses referred to its perceived causes based on two logical frameworks – biomedical and sociocultural – although a clear distinction was often blurred. We found few differences in knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors across study settings and between participants who were exposed to prior research and newly recruited ones. Malaria und nutritional issues as understood and managed by the population differed from definitions and recommendations provided by the health system. Malaria was not acknowledged as an exclusive mosquito-transmitted disease and participants referred to the quantity, rather than the quality, of food when talking about nutritional issues. Conclusions Local concepts and ideas about anemia have public health implications, inasmuch as they are related to people’s attitudes

  16. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a kidney transplant or blood-filtering treatments called dialysis. People with kidney failure can also develop iron ... to blood loss during hemodialysis, a type of dialysis that uses a special filter called a dialyzer ...

  17. Investigation of the Etiology of Anemia in Thromboangiitis Obliterans.

    PubMed

    Akbarin, Mohammad Mehdi; Ravari, Hassan; Rajabnejad, Ataollah; Valizadeh, Narges; Fazeli, Bahare

    2016-09-01

    During a review of patients admitted with thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO), there was evidence of normochromic normocytic anemia and abrupt changes in hemoglobin (Hgb) levels in patients with several hospital admissions. Therefore, the evidence of hemolytic anemia was evaluated based on 37 banked plasma samples taken from Caucasian male TAO patients during disease exacerbation between 2012 and 2014. The patients' hospital records, including clinical manifestations and complete blood count, were evaluated. The following tests were performed on all samples: indirect antiglobulin test (IAT), C-reactive protein (CRP), high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), haptoglobin, indirect bilirubin, d-aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and d-alanine aminotransferase (ALT). The mean age of the patients was 40 ± 7 years. Two patients underwent below-knee amputation. The mean hospital-documented Hgb of the patients was 12.9 ± 2.6 g/dL. CRP and IAT were positive in 75.6 and 70.2% of the samples, respectively. The tests and corresponding results were as follows: hsCRP, 14.07 ± 2.37 µg/mL; LDH, 2,552 ± 315 u/L; haptoglobin, 2.27 ± 1.1 g/L; indirect bilirubin, 0.09 ± 0.04 mg/dL; AST, 67 ± 7 u/L; and ALT, 26 ± 3 u/L. There was a significant inverse correlation between hsCRP and hospital-documented Hgb level (p = 0.03). Anemia with the positive IAT in most of the samples, high LDH and AST, and normal ALT are suggestive of hemolytic anemia. Normal indirect bilirubin is consistent with intravascular hemolysis. The positive CRP and elevated haptoglobin levels could be due to systemic inflammation in TAO. However, it is not known if an autoantigen or an infectious antigen is responsible for TAO systemic inflammation and induction hemolytic anemia. As such, the underlying mechanism of anemia in TAO could be part of the footprint of its main etiology. PMID:27574381

  18. [Impact of nutritional deficiencies on anemia in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Leke, L; Kremp, D

    1989-12-01

    Dietary deficiency in iron and to a lesser extent folic acid is the principle cause of anemia in the world. Reproductive aged women and growing children are the principle groups at risk of anemia. About half of nonpregnant reproductive aged women in tropical countries have hemoglobin levels lower than 12 g/100 ml, the level used by the World Health Organization to define anemia. Nutritional anemia is even more widespread among pregnant and lactating women because of the increased needs for iron during those periods. Pregnant women need almost 500 mg of iron for their increased red blood cell mass, 220 mg for routine iron loss through the urine, bile, sweat, and other routes; 290 mg for the fetus, and almost 25 mg for the placenta. In all, the pregnant women theoretically requires over 1000 mg of iron through diet or bodily reserves. Healthy, well-nourished women have total iron reserves of 2500 mg, but according to published data almost 2/3 of pregnant women even in favorable circumstances end their pregnancies with no remaining iron reserves. In tropical regions the lack of iron reserves is aggravated by parasites and infections, closely spaced pregnancies that do not allow restoration of reserves, and poor dietary availability of iron. Anemia during pregnancy is associated with elevated risks of maternal morbidity and mortality. Fatigue, dyspnea, palpitations and tachycardia, vertigo, loss of appetite and cravings for soil or other inappropriate substances are frequently observed in anemic women. The risks of prematurity and low weight are increased for infants of anemic women. Fetal malformation may be associated with folic acid deficiency. Nutrition education is needed for pregnant women. Local foods may be enriched with iron, and pregnant women may be given iron and vitamin B12 supplements directly. Iron supplements may rapidly increase iron reserves, but they are poorly tolerated by many women. The supplements should be avoided if possible early in the

  19. Iron deficient erythropoiesis might play key role in development of anemia in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Silvia; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Kihyun; Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Won Seog; Jang, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multifactorial pathogenesis is involved in anemia of cancer patients and defining the causes of anemia is not always simple. Methods The incidence of anemia among 4 major cancers (gastric, colorectal, lung cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma), and biochemical features of anemia using ferritin, CRP, hepcidin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) were assessed. Anemia was defined either by hemoglobin (Hb) ≤11 g/dL or a drop of Hb 2 g/dL or more during anticancer treatment. Results Among the 345 patients including 152 lung cancer, 101 gastric cancer, 69 colorectal cancer and 23 hepatocellular carcinoma, 49 patients (14.2%) had anemia at their initial diagnosis of cancer. During treatment, 129 (37.4%) experienced anemia, and 34 (26.4%) were treated mostly by transfusion. Biochemical feature of anemia was examined with 39 patients' samples. When comparing to the reference value from general population, cancer patients showed numerically higher ferritin, sTfR, CRP and hepcidin level. Among the cancer patients, anemic patients had significantly higher ferritin (p = 0.050) and sTfR (p = 0.009) level compared to non-anemic patients. Conclusion Anemia is a common issue in cancer patients and is largely undertreated with sub-optimal diagnoses of cause. The rates of anemia increase significantly during anti-cancer treatment and appear to be largely associated with iron deficiency. PMID:26517509

  20. Equine Endothelial Cells Support Productive Infection of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Maury, Wendy; Oaks, J. Lindsay; Bradley, Sarahann

    1998-01-01

    Previous cell infectivity studies have demonstrated that the lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infects tissue macrophages in vivo and in vitro. In addition, some strains of EIAV replicate to high titer in vitro in equine fibroblasts and fibroblast cell lines. Here we report a new cell type, macrovascular endothelial cells, that is infectible with EIAV. We tested the ability of EIAV to infect purified endothelial cells isolated from equine umbilical cords and renal arteries. Infectivity was detected by cell supernatant reverse transcriptase positivity, EIAV antigen positivity within individual cells, and the detection of viral RNA by in situ hybridization. Virus could rapidly spread through the endothelial cultures, and the supernatants of infected cultures contained high titers of infectious virus. There was no demonstrable cell killing in infected cultures. Three of four strains of EIAV that were tested replicated in these cultures, including MA-1, a fibroblast-tropic strain, Th.1, a macrophage-tropic strain, and WSU5, a strain that is fibroblast tropic and can cause disease. Finally, upon necropsy of a WSU5-infected horse 4 years postinfection, EIAV-positive endothelial cells were detected in outgrowths of renal artery cultures. These findings identify a new cell type that is infectible with EIAV. The role of endothelial cell infection in the course of equine infectious anemia is currently unknown, but endothelial cell infection may be involved in the edema that can be associated with infection. Furthermore, the ability of EIAV to persistently infect endothelial cultures and the presence of virus in endothelial cells from a long-term carrier suggest that this cell type can serve as a reservoir for the virus during subclinical phases of infection. PMID:9765477

  1. Adult patent Ductus Arteriosus complicated by endocarditis and hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun

    2015-01-01

    An adult with a large patent ductus arteriosus may present with fatigue, dyspnea or palpitations or in rare presentation with endocarditis. The case illustrated unique role of vegetation of endocarditis in hemolytic anemia in adult with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Despite treatment of endocarditis with complete course of appropriate antibiotic therapy and normality of C- reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and leukocytosis and wellness of general condition, transthoracic echocardiography revealed large vegetation in PDA lumen, surgical closure of PDA completely relieved hemolysis, and fragmented red cell disappeared from peripheral blood smear. The 3-month follow-up revealed complete occlusion of PDA and abolishment of hemolytic anemia confirmed by clinical and laboratory examination. PMID:26309344

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxian; Li, Chenglong; Li, Qiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is the result of altered genetic make up due to hereditary encounter and its form as homozygous sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe. The disease is characterized by chronic anemia, recurrent pain crises and vascular occlusion. Neurologically, there is a high incidence of stroke in childhood, as well as cognitive dysfunction. Newborn screening programmes and preventative treatments have allowed a much longer lifespan. However, recently, neurological research has shifted to characterizing more subtle aspects of brain development and functioning that may be critically important to the individual's quality of life. The present review article examines the neurological and neurocognitive complications of sickle cell disease, and discusses the importance of magnetic resonance imaging scans in the management of the disease. PMID:27446243

  3. Adult patent ductus arteriosus complicated by endocarditis and hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    An adult with a large patent ductus arteriosus may present with fatigue, dyspnea or palpitations or in rare presentation with endocarditis. The case illustrated unique role of vegetation of endocarditis in hemolytic anemia in adult with patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Despite treatment of endocarditis with complete course of appropriate antibiotic therapy and normality of C- reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and leukocytosis and wellness of general condition, transthoracic echocardiography revealed large vegetation in PDA lumen, surgical closure of PDA completely relieved hemolysis, and fragmented red cell disappeared from peripheral blood smear. The 3-month follow-up revealed complete occlusion of PDA and abolishment of hemolytic anemia confirmed by clinical and laboratory examination. PMID:26309344

  4. [Results of treatment for severe acquired aplastic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Ochocka, M; Karwacki, M; Matysiak, M; Armata, J; Dłuzniewska, A; Bogusławska-Jaworska, J; Pejcz, J; Kowalczyk, J; Skomra, S; Radwańska, U

    1995-03-01

    The authors evaluated results of treatment of 106 children with acquired aplastic anemia. The patients were divided into 3 groups depending on the severity of their disease. Thirty-nine patients were classified as very severe, 30 as severe and 37 as non-severe according to the modified Camitta criteria. Among them, 47 children were treated with oxymetholone and prednisolone. In this group 32 died. Antilymphocyte globulin (ALG) was given to 48 patients and 20 received cyclosporin A (CsA). The results obtained by these two methods are nearly the same and 5 year survival was 61% and 59% respectively. Bone marrow was transplanted in only one child, who is still in complete remission. Statistical analysis showed a steady increase in incidence of aplastic anemia in the years 1987-1989, which might coincide with the Czarnobyl explosion. However, further research is required to prove this point. PMID:8657487

  5. Vitamin D, Race, and Risk for Anemia in Children

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Meredith A.; Melamed, Michal L.; Kumar, Juhi; Roy, Cindy N.; Miller, Edgar R.; Furth, Susan L.; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency and anemia in a cohort of otherwise healthy children, and to determine whether race modifies the association between 25(OH)D status and hemoglobin (Hgb). Study design Cross-sectional study of 10,410 children and adolescents aged 1-21 years from the 2001-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin less than the 5th percentile for age and sex based on NHANES III data. Results Lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with increased risk for anemia; < 30 ng/mL, adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21, 3.08, p=0.006, and < 20 ng/mL, OR 1.47, 95%CI 1.14-1.89, p=0.004. In linear regression, small but significant increases in Hgb were noted in the upper quartiles of 25(OH)D compared with the lowest quartile (< 20 ng/mL) in the full cohort. Results of race-stratified linear regression by 25(OH)D quartile in white children were similar to those observed in the full cohort, but in black children, increase in Hgb in the upper 25(OH)D quartiles was only apparent compared with the lowest black race specific quartile (<12 ng/mL). Conclusions 25(OH)D deficiency is associated with increased risk of anemia in a healthy U.S. children, but the 25(OH)D threshold levels for lower Hgb are lower in black children in comparison with white children. PMID:24112861

  6. Enhanced eryptosis contributes to anemia in lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Bissinger, Rosi; Schumacher, Carla; Qadri, Syed M.; Honisch, Sabina; Malik, Abaid; Götz, Friedrich; Kopp, Hans-Georg; Lang, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Anemia is a common complication of malignancy, which could result from either compromised erythropoiesis or decreased lifespan of circulating erythrocytes. Premature suicidal erythrocyte death, characterized by cell shrinkage and phosphatidylserine (PS) externalization, decreases erythrocyte lifespan and could thus cause anemia. Here, we explored whether accelerated eryptosis participates in the pathophysiology of anemia associated with lung cancer (LC) and its treatment. Methods Erythrocytes were drawn from healthy volunteers and LC patients with and without cytostatic treatment. PS exposure (annexin V-binding), cell volume (forward scatter), cytosolic Ca2+ (Fluo3 fluorescence), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (DCFDA fluorescence) and ceramide formation (anti-ceramide antibody) were determined by flow cytometry. Results Hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit were significantly lower in LC patients as compared to healthy controls, even though reticulocyte number was higher in LC (3.0±0.6%) than in controls (1.4±0.2%). The percentage of PS-exposing erythrocytes was significantly higher in LC patients with (1.4±0.1%) and without (1.2±0.3%) cytostatic treatment as compared to healthy controls (0.6±0.1%). Erythrocyte ROS production and ceramide abundance, but not Fluo3 fluorescence, were significantly higher in freshly drawn erythrocytes from LC patients than in freshly drawn erythrocytes from healthy controls. PS exposure of erythrocytes drawn from healthy volunteers was significantly more pronounced following incubation in plasma from LC patients than following incubation in plasma from healthy controls. Conclusion Anemia in LC patients with and without cytostatic treatment is paralleled by increased eryptosis, which is triggered, at least in part, by increased oxidative stress and ceramide formation. PMID:26872376

  7. Aplastic anemia and membranous nephropathy induced by intravenous mercury

    PubMed Central

    Priya, N.; Nagaprabhu, V. N.; Kurian, G.; Seethalakshmi, N.; Rao, G. G.; Unni, V. N.

    2012-01-01

    Self-injection of mercury can be life-threatening. We report a case of attempted suicide by self-intravenous injection of elemental mercury. The patient suffered from two side effects : membranous nephropathy and aplastic anemia. She was treated and the systemic effects of mercury were reversed after 4 years. The toxicology of mercury, mechanisms of renal and systemic toxicities, and the various therapeutic measures for mercury poisoning are discussed. PMID:23439491

  8. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1983-1984)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1984-09-01

    The hypotranserrinemic-hemochromatosis mutation in mice discovered in our laboratory is an almost exact duplicate of human atransferrinemia. Just as in man, the condition is inherited as a recessive lethal. The disease appears to stem from a congenital deficiency in transferrin. The new mutation arose spontaneously in BALB/c mice and results in death before 12 days of age. It is characterized by stunted growth, low numbers of erythrocytes, hypochromia, and in the absence of jaundice. Treatments with Imferon or other iron preparations were uniformly unsuccessful, but the use of normal mouse serum proved successful as a therapeutic measure. We find that we are able to keep these afflicted mice alive for more than a year with small amounts of normal serum, and transferrin bands are missing on cellulose acetate electrophoresis of serum proteins from affected individuals receiving no treatment. Genetic tests indicated that the new mutation was not an allele of any of the other known iron deficiency anemias in the mouse: sex linked anemia (sla), microcytic anemia (mk), or flexed anemia (f) or any of the members of the hemolytic disease group (sph, sph/sup ha/, nb, or ja). Biochemical and genetic analyses carried out during the past year indicate that the new mutation, tentatively designated hpx is not likely to be a mutation at the transferrin (Trf) locus on Chromosome 9. We observed no unusual serum proteins on cellulose acetate electrophoresis, such as might be expected if the Trf gene had mutated. Moreover, radial immunodiffusion examination and Ouchterlony analysis did not show the presence of smaller molecules (or fragments) with transferrin antigenic specificities. Instead they showed a total loss in serum transferrin. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  9. Johanson-Blizzard syndrome with Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Muhammad; Rana, Muhammad Nasir; Ahmad, Tahir Masood

    2010-09-01

    Johanson Blizzard syndrome (JBS) is a rare multi-system disorder characterized by congenital aplasia or hypoplasia of alae nasi, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, hypothyroidism, deafness, growth retardation, varying degree of mental retardation, alopecia, wide open fontanels, anti-mongoloid slant, café-au-lait spots and absent of permanent teeth. We report a 3 months old male child having Johanson Blizzard syndrome with classical clinical features, pancreatic insufficiency and Diamond-Blackfan anemia. PMID:20810061

  10. Neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Hachey, D. L.; Suki, W.

    1999-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiological process affecting the selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin (EPO) depression appears to initiate the process, providing the rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When EPO therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients showed chromium 51 (51Cr)-red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these four patients received oral 13C-glycine and 15N-glycine, and there was a suggestion of pathological isotope enrichment of stool porphyrins when EPO therapy was held, again supporting selective hemolysis of newly released red cells that take up the isotope (one patient had chronic hemolysis indicated by isotope studies of blood and stool). Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explain some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus EPO therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared with lower doses administered more frequently subcutaneously.

  11. Neocytolysis Contributes to the Anemia of Renal Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P.; Driscoll, Theda; Whitley, Carl E.; Hachey, David; Suki, Wadi

    1997-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiologic process effecting selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin depression appears to initiate the process, providing rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When erythropoietin therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients demonstrated Cr-51 red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these patients received oral (13)C-glycine and (15)N-glycine and showed pathologic enrichment of stool porphyrins by the most recently ingested isotope when EPO therapy was held. This confirms selective hemolysis of newly-released red cells. (One patient had chronic hemolysis by isotope studies of blood and stool.) Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explains some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus erythropoietin therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared to lower doses given more frequently subcutaneously.

  12. Phytomedicines and nutraceuticals: alternative therapeutics for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Imaga, Ngozi Awa

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the "SS" individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human β -globin subunit results in replacement of β 6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro). The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper. PMID:23476125

  13. Individualized model discovery: the case of anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Akabua, Elom; Inanc, Tamer; Gaweda, Adam; Brier, Michael E; Kim, Seongho; Zurada, Jacek M

    2015-01-01

    The universal sequel to chronic kidney condition (CKD) is anemia. Patients of anemia have kidneys that are incapable of performing certain basic functions such as sensing of oxygen levels to secrete erythropoietin when red blood cell counts are low. Under such conditions, external administration of human recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) is administered as alternative to improve conditions of CKD patients by increasing their hemoglobin (Hb) levels to a given therapeutic range. Presently, EPO dosing strategies extensively depend on packet inserts and on "average" responses to the medication from previous patients. Clearly dosage strategies based on these approaches are, at best, nonoptimal to EPO medication and potentially dangerous to patients that do not adhere to the notion of expected "average" response. In this work, a technique called semi-blind robust identification is provided to uniquely identify models of the individual patients of anemia based on their actual Hb responses and EPO administration. Using the a priori information and the measured input-output data of the individual patients, the procedure identifies a unique model consisting of a nominal model and the associated model uncertainty for the patients. By incorporating the effects of unknown system initial conditions, considerably small measurement samples can be used in the modeling process. PMID:25459523

  14. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms “iron deficiency” and “iron deficiency anemia” are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake together with rapid growth, low birth weight and gastrointestinal losses related to excessive intake of cow’s milk. If insufficient intake can be excluded and there is insufficient response to oral iron treatment in patients with iron deficiency especially in older children, blood loss should be considered as the underlying cause. The main principles in management of iron deficiency anemia include investigation and elimination of the cause leading to iron deficiency, replacement of deficiency, improvement of nutrition and education of the patient and family. In this article, the practical approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and the experience of our center have been reviewed. PMID:26078692

  15. The relation of maternal blood arsenic to anemia during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vigeh, Mohsen; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Matsukawa, Takehisa; Shinohara, Atsuko; Ohtani, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the relationship of prenatal arsenic exposure to hemoglobin concentrations and anemia during pregnancy, a longitudinal study was conducted of 364 participants during early pregnancy from October 2006 to March 2011 in Tehran, Iran. Maternal whole blood (taken between 8-12 and 20-24 weeks of gestation, and at delivery) and umbilical cord blood samples were collected for arsenic measurement. The mean concentration of maternal blood arsenic in the first trimester of pregnancy was significantly lower in anemic women compared with non-anemic participants (mean ± SD: 12.4 ± 3.4 versus 14.8 ± 4.0 μg/L, respectively, p < 0.001). Maternal whole blood arsenic levels in the first and third trimesters were significantly (p < 0.05) correlated with hemoglobin concentrations measured throughout gestation (r = 0.312, 0.424, and 0.183). Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that increased maternal blood arsenic levels in the first trimester were significantly negatively associated to anemia during pregnancy (OR = 0.85, CI: 0.77-0.94, p < 0.01). The present study showed that prenatal blood arsenic exposure was not a risk factor for the occurrence of anemia. PMID:25402686

  16. The Impact of Anemia on Child Mortality: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Samuel P.; Chen-Edinboro, Lenis P.; Caulfield, Laura E.; Murray-Kolb, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia and child mortality are public health problems requiring urgent attention. However, the degree to which iron deficiency anemia contributes to child mortality is unknown. Here, we utilized an exhaustive article search and screening process to identify articles containing both anemia and mortality data for children aged 28 days to 12 years. We then estimated the reduction in risk of mortality associated with a 1-g/dL increase in hemoglobin (Hb). Our meta-analysis of nearly 12,000 children from six African countries revealed a combined odds ratio of 0.76 (0.62–0.93), indicating that for each 1-g/dL increase in Hb, the risk of death falls by 24%. The feasibility of a 1-g/dL increase in Hb has been demonstrated via simple iron supplementation strategies. Our finding suggests that ~1.8 million deaths in children aged 28 days to five years could be avoided each year by increasing Hb in these children by 1 g/dL. PMID:25533005

  17. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis: alveoli are an answer to anemia.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, S; Tullu, M S; Vaideeswar, P; Lahiri, K R

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare disorder (triad of iron-deficiency anemia, hemoptysis, and alveolar infiltrates). A 3-year-old male presented with mild fever, breathlessness, dry cough, and bluish nail discoloration for 8 days. He had required five blood transfusions in the past 1 year (last transfusion was given 4 months ago). He had a respiratory rate of 58/min with respiratory distress, cyanosis, and grade III clubbing. Respiratory system examination was normal. Several previous reports of hemoglobin were as low as 3.6 g/dl with hypochromic and microcytic anemia. There were transient increases in the hemoglobin and normalization of red cell morphology with blood transfusions. Serum iron, G6PD enzyme assay, hemoglobin electrophoresis, the sickling test, Coomb's test, stool and urine analysis, and a Meckel's scan were normal. HIV antibody and dsDNA were negative. The chest radiograph revealed symmetrical patchy infiltrates sparing lung apices (confirmed on high-resolution computed tomography). Lung biopsy diagnosed pulmonary hemosiderosis (interstitial lung disease with hemosiderin-laden macrophages scattered in the alveoli and areas of fibrosis in the alveolar septa). The patient showed marked clinical improvement in 10 days of therapy with prednisolone. IPH should be listed in the differential diagnosis of a child presenting with unexplained hypochromic, microcytic anemia and respiratory symptoms. PMID:21206122

  18. Immunosuppressive therapy for transplant-ineligible aplastic anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Körper, Sixten; Höchsmann, Britta

    2015-02-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare life-threatening bone marrow failure that is characterized by bicytopenia or pancytopenia in the peripheral blood and a hypoplastic or aplastic bone marrow. The patients are at risk of infection and hemorrhage due to neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and suffer from symptoms of anemia. The main treatment approaches are allogeneic stem cell transplantation and immunosuppression. Here, we review current standard immunosuppression and the attempts that have been made in the past two decades to improve results: review of recent developments also reveals that sometimes not only the advent of new drugs, good ideas and well-designed clinical trials decide the progress in the field but also marketing considerations of pharmaceutical companies. Aplastic anemia experts unfortunately had to face the situation that efficient drugs were withdrawn simply for marketing considerations. We will discuss the current options and challenges in first-line treatment and management of relapsing and refractory patients with an emphasis on adult patients. Some promising new approaches are currently under investigation in prospective, randomized trials. PMID:25572607

  19. Phytomedicines and Nutraceuticals: Alternative Therapeutics for Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Imaga, Ngozi Awa

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the “SS” individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human β-globin subunit results in replacement of β6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro). The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper. PMID:23476125

  20. Biology of anemia, differential diagnosis, and treatment options in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Claster, Susan

    2002-05-15

    Anemia is the most common hematologic manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The causes of HIV-related anemia are multifactorial and include direct and indirect effects of HIV infection. HIV-related anemia generally is due to reduced red blood cell (RBC) production, secondary to a variety of causes, but it may also involve nutritional deficiencies, increased RBC destruction, or a combination of these problems. Evaluation of hemoglobin level, reticulocyte count, bilirubin, and mean corpuscular volume value and review of the peripheral blood smear are necessary for diagnosis. Treatment of HIV-related anemia should address the correctable underlying causes of this disorder, such as modifications of offending medications, nutritional deficiencies, and parvovirus infection. Patients with HIV infection have a blunted erythropoietin response to anemia. Therapeutic modalities for anemia that is not amenable to correction include blood transfusion and recombinant human erythropoietin (epoetin alfa). PMID:12001030

  1. Establishment of permanent chimerism in a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mouse mutant with hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, T.; Doermer, P.

    1987-12-01

    Pluripotent hemopoietic stem cell function was investigated in the homozygous muscle type lactate dehydrogenase (LDH-A) mutant mouse using bone marrow transplantation experiments. Hemopoietic tissues of LDH-A mutants showed a marked decreased in enzyme activity that was associated with severe hemolytic anemia. This condition proved to be transplantable into wild type mice (+/+) through total body irradiation (TBI) at a lethal dose of 8.0 Gy followed by engraftment of mutant bone marrow cells. Since the mutants are extremely radiosensitive (lethal dose50/30 4.4 Gy vs 7.3 Gy in +/+ mice), 8.0-Gy TBI followed by injection of even high numbers of normal bone marrow cells did not prevent death within 5-6 days. After a nonlethal dose of 4.0 Gy and grafting of normal bone marrow cells, a transient chimerism showing peripheral blood characteristics of the wild type was produced that returned to the mutant condition within 12 weeks. The transfusion of wild type red blood cells prior to and following 8.0-Gy TBI and reconstitution with wild type bone marrow cells prevented the early death of the mutants and permanent chimerism was achieved. The chimeras showed all hematological parameters of wild type mice, and radiosensitivity returned to normal. It is concluded that the mutant pluripotent stem cells are functionally comparable to normal stem cells, emphasizing the significance of this mouse model for studies of stem cell regulation.

  2. [Transitory acute atrioventricular block in an African patient: consider sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Gacon, P-H; Jourdain, P; Funck, F; Amara, W

    2012-11-01

    This case report shows a rare cardiac complication of sickle cell anemia in a young African patient which was an acute paroxysmal atrio-ventricular block. Acute paroxysmal atrioventricular block is a rare complication of polymerization of hemoglobin S during sickle cell disease. Hence, sickle cell anemia should be considered as a cause of auriculoventricular block in black African patients. Cardiac complications of sickle cell anemia are presented in this article. PMID:22980397

  3. Insights and perspectives in the clinical and operational management of cancer-related anemia.

    PubMed

    Hinkel, Jennifer M; Li, Edward C; Sherman, Stephen L

    2010-09-01

    Management of anemia in patients with cancer presents challenges from clinical, operational, and economic perspectives. Clinically, anemia in these patients may result from treatment (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgical interventions) or from the malignancy itself. Anemia not only contributes to cancer-related fatigue and other quality of life issues, but also affects prognosis. From the operational perspective, a patient with cancer who is also anemic may consume more laboratory, pharmacy, and clinical resources than other patients with cancer. PMID:20947722

  4. A polymorphism in the leptin gene promoter is associated with anemia in patients with HIV disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jee-Yeong; Tate, Janet; Bathulapalli, Harini; Anderson, Damon; Steen, Hanno; Fleming, Mark; Mattocks, Kristin; Telenti, Amalio; Fellay, Jacques; Justice, Amy C.; Berliner, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    To study factors associated with anemia and its effect on survival in HIV-infected persons treated with modern combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), we characterized the prevalence of anemia in the Veterans Aging Cohort Study (VACS) and used a candidate gene approach to identify proinflammatory gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with anemia in HIV disease. The study comprised 1597 HIV+ and 865 HIV− VACS subjects with DNA, blood, and annotated clinical data available for analysis. Anemia was defined according to World Health Organization criteria (hemoglobin < 13 g/dL and < 12 g/dL in men and women, respectively). The prevalence of anemia in HIV+ and HIV− subjects was 23.1% and 12.9%, respectively. Independent of HIV status, anemia was present in 23.4% and 8% in blacks and whites, respectively. Analysis of our candidate genes revealed that the leptin −2548 G/A SNP was associated with anemia in HIV+, but not HIV−, patients, with the AA and AG genotypes significantly predicting anemia (P < .003 and P < .039, respectively, logistic regression). This association was replicated in an independent cohort of HIV+ women. Our study provides novel insight into the association between genetic variability in the leptin gene and anemia in HIV+ individuals. PMID:21926355

  5. Prevalence and correlates of maternal anemia in rural Sidama, Southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gebremedhin, Samson; Enquselassie, Fikre; Umeta, Melaku

    2014-03-01

    In order to assess the prevalence and correlates of prenatal anemia, a survey was conducted among 700 randomly selected pregnant women in rural Sidama, Southern Ethiopia. The prevalences of anemia, Iron Deficiency (ID) and ID anemia were 31.6%, 17.4% and 8.7%, respectively. The burden of anemia was significantly high among illiterates, women devoid of self-income, lowlanders, multiparas and women aged 25-34 years. Women who weren't on iron-folate supplementation had 1.90 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.14-3.19) times increased odds of anemia. Anemia was associated with ID, zinc deficiency and elevated C-reactive protein with odds ratio of 2.46 (95% CI: 1.63-3.73), 2.29 (95% CI: 1.62-3.23) and 1.98 (95% CI: 1.12-3.47) respectively; however, it was not associated with vitamin A deficiency. Though ID was a significant correlate of anemia, only 11.8% of anemia was attributable to it. Zinc, iron and vitamin A deficiencies did not show synergistic interaction in associating with anemia. PMID:24796168

  6. Anemia on Admission Is an Independent Predictor of Long-Term Mortality in Hip Fracture Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Licheng; Yin, Pengbin; Lv, Houchen; Long, Anhua; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is a disputable factor for long-term mortality in hip fracture population in previous studies. Previous studies indicated that the level of hemoglobin (Hb) might fluctuate due to various factors, such as comorbidities and in-hospital interventions, and the changing level of Hb, may lead to discordance diagnosis of anemia and thus to the conflicting conclusions on prognostic value of anemia. So in this study, we aim to compare factors affecting the diagnosis of anemia at different time-points, admission, postoperation, and discharge, and to determine which the time point is most suitable for mortality prediction. This prospective cohort study included 1330 hip fracture patients from 1 January 2000 to 18 November 2012. Hb levels at 3 different time points, such as admission, postoperation, and discharge, were collected and used to stratify the cohort into anemia and nonanemia groups. Candidate factors including commodities, perioperative factors, blood transfusion, and other in-hospital interventions were collected before discharge. Logistic regression analyses were performed to detect risk factors for anemia for the 3 time points separately. Kaplan–Meier and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between anemia and 2-year mortality. Factors affecting the diagnosis of anemia were different for the 3 time points. Age, female sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists score (ASA), and intertrochanteric fracture were associated with admission anemia, while surgical procedure, surgical duration, blood transfusion, blood loss during the operation, and drainage volume were major risk factors for postoperation anemia. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis suggested that the risk of all-cause mortality was higher in the anemia group on admission (1.680, 95%CI: 1.201–2.350, P < 0.01), but not postoperation or on discharge, after adjustment for confounding factors. Our study showed that risk factors for anemia

  7. Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and Anemia among Young Children with Acute Diarrhea in Bhaktapur, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Chandyo, Ram K.; Ulak, Manjeswori; Adhikari, Ramesh K.; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Strand, Tor A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is still common in children under five years of age and may impair their growth and cognitive development. Diarrhea is the second most common reason for seeking medical care for young children in Nepal. However, neither screening programs nor effective preventive measures for anemia and iron deficiencies are in place among children with diarrhea in many developing countries. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency and explore their associations with clinical, socioeconomic, and anthropometric parameters in Nepalese children. This was a cross-sectional study based on 1232 children, six to 35 months old, with acute diarrhea participating in a zinc supplementation trial. The mean (SD) hemoglobin was 11.2 g/dL (1.2). Anemia was found in 493 children (40%); this estimate increased to 641 (52%) when we adjusted for the altitude of the study area (hemoglobin <11.3 g/dL). One in every three children had depleted iron stores and 198 (16%) of the children had both depleted iron stores and anemia, indicating iron deficiency anemia. The prevalence of anemia among children presenting with acute diarrhea was high but the degree of severity was mainly mild or moderate. Iron deficiency explained less than half of the total anemia, indicating other nutritional deficiencies inducing anemia might be common in this population. PMID:27417782

  8. Prevalence and incidence of anemia in the German Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study.

    PubMed

    Eisele, Lewin; Dürig, Jan; Broecker-Preuss, Martina; Dührsen, Ulrich; Bokhof, Beate; Erbel, Raimund; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz

    2013-06-01

    This study aims to determine prevalence and incidence of anemia in the general population in Germany and evaluate a potential role of serum-free light chains (FLC) as biomarker in anemia. The population-based Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study comprises 4,814 men and women aged 45-75 years. Hemoglobin <13 g/dl in men and <12 g/dl in women defined anemia. Laboratory data was used to classify cases into renal, iron deficiency (IDA), vitamin B12/folic acid deficiency, anemia of chronic disease (ACD), and unexplained anemia (UA). Follow-up data was available from annual questionnaires, death certificates, and 5-year follow-up visit (5-year FU). Anemia cases (152) were identified (prevalence 3.2 %, 95 % CI 2.7-3.7). In participants aged 65 or older, prevalence was 4.3 % (95 % CI 2.9-6.0) in both men and women. Main anemia subtypes were: IDA 19 %, ACD 25 %, and UA 44 %. Incidence increased with age and was 12.8/1,000 person-years and 10.9/1,000 person-years in men and women aged 65 or older, respectively. UA was characterized by elevated FLC. Participants with elevated FLC and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) had an increased risk of anemia at 5-year FU. FLC-alone or in combination with hsCRP-may serve as biomarker indicating an increased risk of developing anemia. PMID:23430088

  9. Aplastic anemia in rural Thailand: its association with grain farming and agricultural pesticide exposure. Aplastic Anemia Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Issaragrisil, S; Chansung, K; Kaufman, D W; Sirijirachai, J; Thamprasit, T; Young, N S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A population-based case-control study was conducted to elucidate the incidence and etiology of aplastic anemia in Thailand. METHODS: Case patients and hospital control patients were enrolled in three regions from 1989 to 1994; data were collected by interview. RESULTS: Forty-six percent of 81 case patients and 19% of 295 control patients from Khonkaen were grain farmers (estimated relative risk [RR] = 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4, 5.2). Sixteen percent of case patients and 6% of control patients used agricultural pesticides (estimated RR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.1, 6.6). The association with grain farming remained among those not exposed to pesticides. In Songkla, 16% of 43 case patients and 2% of 181 control patients were grain farmers (crude RR estimate = 11, 95% CI = 3.4, 35). CONCLUSIONS: The relation of aplastic anemia to grain farming may partly explain the high incidence of aplastic anemia in Thailand. PMID:9314815

  10. Prevalence of High Blood Pressure, Heart Disease, Thalassemia, Sickle-Cell Anemia, and Iron-Deficiency Anemia among the UAE Adolescent Population

    PubMed Central

    Barakat-Haddad, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, and medical diagnoses in relation to blood disorders, among 6,329 adolescent students (age 15 to 18 years) who reside in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Findings indicated that the overall prevalence of high blood pressure and heart disease was 1.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence for thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia was 0.9%, 1.6%, and 5%, respectively. Bivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure among the local and expatriate adolescent population in the Emirate of Sharjah. Similarly, statistically significant differences in the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia were observed among the local and expatriate population in Abu Dhabi city, the western region of Abu Dhabi, and Al-Ain. Multivariate analysis revealed the following significant predictors of high blood pressure: residing in proximity to industry, nonconventional substance abuse, and age when smoking or exposure to smoking began. Ethnicity was a significant predictor of heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia. In addition, predictors of thalassemia included gender (female) and participating in physical activity. Participants diagnosed with sickle-cell anemia and iron-deficiency anemia were more likely to experience different physical activities. PMID:23606864

  11. Tailoring iron chelation by iron intake and serum ferritin: the prospective EPIC study of deferasirox in 1744 patients with transfusion-dependent anemias

    PubMed Central

    Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Porter, John; El-Beshlawy, Amal; Li, Chi-Kong; Seymour, John F.; Elalfy, Mohsen; Gattermann, Norbert; Giraudier, Stéphane; Lee, Jong-Wook; Chan, Lee Lee; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Rose, Christian; Taher, Ali; Thein, Swee Lay; Viprakasit, Vip; Habr, Dany; Domokos, Gabor; Roubert, Bernard; Kattamis, Antonis

    2010-01-01

    Background Following a clinical evaluation of deferasirox (Exjade®) it was concluded that, in addition to baseline body iron burden, ongoing transfusional iron intake should be considered when selecting doses. The 1-year EPIC study, the largest ever investigation conducted for an iron chelator, is the first to evaluate whether fixed starting doses of deferasirox, based on transfusional iron intake, with dose titration guided by serum ferritin trends and safety markers, provides clinically acceptable chelation in patients (aged ≥2 years) with transfusional hemosiderosis from various types of anemia. Design and Methods The recommended initial dose was 20 mg/kg/day for patients receiving 2–4 packed red blood cell units/month and 10 or 30 mg/kg/day was recommended for patients receiving less or more frequent transfusions, respectively. Dose adjustments were based on 3-month serum ferritin trends and continuous assessment of safety markers. The primary efficacy end-point was change in serum ferritin after 52 weeks compared with baseline. Results The 1744 patients enrolled had the following conditions; thalassemia (n=1115), myelodysplastic syndromes (n=341), aplastic anemia (n=116), sickle cell disease (n=80), rare anemias (n=43) and other transfused anemias (n=49). Overall, there was a significant reduction in serum ferritin from baseline (−264 ng/mL; P<0.0001), reflecting dosage adjustments and ongoing iron intake. The most common (>5%) adverse events were gastrointestinal disturbances (28%) and skin rash (10%). Conclusions Analysis of this large, prospectively collected data set confirms the response to chelation therapy across various anemias, supporting initial deferasirox doses based on transfusional iron intake, with subsequent dose titration guided by trends in serum ferritin and safety markers (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00171821). PMID:19951979

  12. The pain experience of patients with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Jacob, E

    2001-09-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disorder that affects 1 in 600 black infants in the United States. The painful crisis is one of its most characteristic manifestations and consists of pain in the extremities, back, abdomen, or chest. It may occur in 4 phases and may be precipitated by a variety of factors. The frequency, location, duration, severity, and character of pain differ both within and among patients. The pain may be localized, involve several areas, be diffuse, or be migratory. The intensity of pain varies from mild to excruciating and is perceived to be more intense by those who have experienced other forms of pain such as postoperative pain. Patients with sickle cell anemia who experience frequent painful crises exhibit problems with self-concept and low self-esteem, anxiety, depression, dissatisfaction with body image, poor school performance, social isolation, decreased participation in normal activities of daily living, and poor peer and family relationships. The periodic and unpredictable episodes can be incapacitating and may affect the way children see and feel about themselves, the way they relate to other people, the goals they set for themselves, and the way they approach a range of activities and situations. Research is very limited, and most of the available literature is based on personal observations, opinions, and anecdotal reports. The purpose of this report is to describe the phases of a painful episode as well as to examine the predisposing factors to, defining characteristics of, and patient outcomes associated with a painful crisis from sickle cell anemia. PMID:11710089

  13. Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia and Thrombocytopenia in Patients With Cancer.

    PubMed

    Morton, Jordan M; George, James N

    2016-06-01

    The unexpected occurrence of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia, in a patient with cancer requires urgent diagnosis and appropriate management. TMA is a term used to describe multiple syndromes caused by microvascular thrombosis, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), Shiga toxin-mediated hemolytic uremic syndrome, and complement-mediated TMA. In patients with cancer, systemic microvascular metastases and bone marrow involvement can cause microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. This occurs most often in patients with known metastatic cancer, but microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia may occur unexpectedly in patients without known metastatic disease or be the presenting features of undiagnosed cancer. TMA may also be caused by commonly used chemotherapy agents, either through dose-dependent toxicity or an acute immune-mediated reaction. These causes of TMA must be distinguished from TTP, which results from a severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 and is the most common cause of TMA among adults without cancer. The importance of this distinction is to avoid inappropriate use of plasma exchange, which is associated with major complications. Plasma exchange is the essential treatment for TTP, but it has no known benefit for patients with cancer-induced or drug-induced TMA. We will describe cancer-induced and drug-induced TMA using the experience of the Oklahoma TTP-Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Registry and data from a systematic review of all published reports of drug-induced TMA. We will illustrate the principles of evaluation and management of these disorders with patients' stories. PMID:27288467

  14. Cardiac hypertrophy in anion exchanger 1-null mutant mice with severe hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Bernardo V; Kieller, Dawn M; Quon, Anita L; Robertson, Murray; Casey, Joseph R

    2007-03-01

    Anion exchanger 1 (AE1; SLC4A1), the plasma membrane Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger of erythrocytes, is also expressed in heart. The aim of this study was to assess the role of AE1 in heart function through study of AE1-null (AE1(-/-)) mice, which manifest severe hemolytic anemia resulting from erythrocyte fragility. Heart weight-to-body weight ratios were significantly higher in the AE1(-/-) mice than in wild-type (AE1(+/+)) littermates at both 1-3 days postnatal (3.01 +/- 0.38 vs. 1.45 +/- 0.04) and at 7 days postnatal (9.45 +/- 0.53 vs. 4.13 +/- 0.41), indicating that loss of AE1 led to cardiac hypertrophy. Heterozygous (AE1(+/-)) mice had no signs of cardiac hypertrophy. Morphology of the adult AE1(-/-) mutant heart revealed an increased left ventricular mass, accompanied by increased collagen deposition and fibrosis. M-mode echocardiography revealed dysfunction of the AE1(-/-) hearts, including dilated left ventricle end diastole and systole and expanded left ventricular mass compared with AE1(+/+) hearts. Expression of intracellular pH-regulatory mechanisms in the hypertrophic myocardium of neonate AE1(-/-) mutant mice was indistinguishable from AE1(+/-) and AE1(+/+) mice, as assessed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Confocal immunofluorescence revealed that, in normal mouse myocardium, AE1 is sarcolemmal, whereas AE3 and slc26a6 are found both at the sarcolemma and in internal membranes (T tubules and sarcoplasmic reticulum). These results indicate that AE1(-/-) mice, which suffer from severe hemolytic anemia and spherocytosis, display cardiac hypertrophy and impaired cardiac function, reminiscent of findings in patients with hereditary abnormalities of red blood cells. No essential role for AE1 in heart function was found. PMID:17056673

  15. Pearson syndrome in a Diamond-Blackfan anemia cohort.

    PubMed

    Alter, Blanche P

    2014-07-17

    In this issue of Blood, Gagne et al describe a cohort of 362 patients clinically classified as having Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), in which 175 (48%) were found to have mutations and deletions in ribosomal protein genes or GATA1, and 8 of the remaining patients (2.2% overall) had mitochondrial gene deletions consistent with Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome (PS). The authors propose that all patients with presumptive DBA should be tested for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion during their initial genetic evaluation. PMID:25035146

  16. Fanconi Anemia: A Signal Transduction and DNA Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kupfer, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a fascinating, rare genetic disorder marked by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. Research in recent years has led to the elucidation of FA as a DNA repair disorder and involved multiple pathways as well as having wide applicability to common cancers, including breast, ovarian, and head and neck. This review will describe the clinical aspects of FA as well as the current state of its molecular pathophysiology. In particular, work from the Kupfer laboratory will be described that demonstrates how the FA pathway interacts with multiple DNA repair pathways, including the mismatch repair system and signal transduction pathway of the DNA damage response. PMID:24348213

  17. Deficiencies in the Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Childhood.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Daniel, Catherine L; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R

    2016-04-01

    Limited high-quality evidence supports the management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). To assess our institutional performance in this area, we retrospectively reviewed IDA treatment practices in 195 consecutive children referred to our center from 2006 to mid-2010. The majority of children were ≤4 years old (64%) and had nutritional IDA (74%). In 11- to 18-year-old patients (31%), the primary etiology was menorrhagia (42%). Many were referred directly to the emergency department and/or prescribed iron doses outside the recommended range. Poor medication adherence and being lost-to-follow-up were common. Substantial improvements are required in the management of IDA. PMID:26728130

  18. Diamond Blackfan Anemia: Diagnosis, Treatment and Molecular Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Jeffrey M.; Ellis, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by erythroid failure, congenital anomalies and a predisposition to cancer. Faulty ribosome biogenesis, resulting in pro-apoptotic erythropoiesis leading to erythroid failure, is hypothesized to be the underlying defect. The genes identified to date that are mutated in DBA all encode ribosomal proteins associated with either the small (RPS) or large (RPL) subunit and in these cases haploinsufficiency gives rise to the disease. Extraordinarily robust laboratory and clinical investigations have recently led to demonstrable improvements in clinical care for patients with DBA. PMID:19327583

  19. [Sickle cell anemia causes varied symptoms and high morbidity. Serious prognosis in the most common genetic disease in the world].

    PubMed

    Kjellander, Christian; Sennström, Maria K B; Stiller, Viveka; Ågren, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a life-threatening disease, and the most common genetic disease in the world. The prevalence of sickle cell anemia in Sweden is unknown. Sickle cell anemia is an important disease, because of its variable complications, in many medical and surgical specialties. The overview highlights common medical problems encountered in sickle cell anemia presented through a case report of a pregnant woman. PMID:25734427

  20. Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Anemia in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yen, Chia-Feng; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chien, Wu-Chien; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Chia-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is known to be a significant public health problem in many countries. Most of the available information is incomplete or limited to special groups such as people with intellectual disability. The present study aims to provide the information of anemia prevalence and associated risk factors of children and adolescents with intellectual…

  1. A Group Counseling Approach for Persons Who Work With Sickle Cell Anemia Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvin, Richmond

    Although many workshops on sickle cell anemia have been held, it is still difficult to implement a comprehensive training program for sickle cell anemia clients in many communities. Research data on the topic are somewhat nebulous and insufficient political and social pressure have been exerted to change attitudes and take action towards the…

  2. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia Associated With Methemoglobinemia and Anemia: An Overlooked Association?

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Tawfik; Abu Rmeileh, Ayman; Kornspan, Jonathan David; Abel, Roy; Mizrahi, Meir; Nir-Paz, Ran

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of acute methemoglobinemia and anemia in a patient with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. We suggest that M. pneumoniae secretes a putative protein that can induce methemoglobin in red blood cells. Thus, Mycoplasma pneumoniae may induce methemoglobinemia in patients who have low oxygen saturation and anemia. PMID:26034771

  3. Association of Living Arrangement Conditions and Socioeconomic Differentials with Anemia Status among Women in Rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shangfeng; Hossain, Akmal; Fan, Yang; Akter, Mahmuda

    2016-01-01

    In Bangladesh, iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia and remains a significant public health concern. Being a high anemia prevalent country, numerous efforts have been made to confront the issue especially among women and children by both local and international actors. Though the situation has substantially improved in recent years, a staggering number of adult women are currently living with anemia. The etiology of anemia is a multifactorial problem and has been proposed to be associated with various household, societal, economic, cultural factors apart from dietary habits. However, evidence regarding the household arrangements and socioeconomic determinants of anemia is scarce, especially in the context of Bangladesh. To this end, we utilized the 2011 demographic and health survey data to explore the association between anemia status and selected demographic, socioeconomic, and household characteristics. Our result showed significant correlation of anemia with both sociodemographic and household characteristics. Among the sociodemographic variables the following were found to be significantly associated with anemia status: age (p = 0.014; OR = 1.195; 95% CI = 1.036–1.378) and microcredit membership (p = 0.014; OR = 1.19; 95% CI = 1.037–1.386). Regarding the household arrangements, women utilizing biomass fuel for cooking (p < 0.019; OR = 1.82; 95% CI = 0.981–2.460) were more likely to be anemic. PMID:27517045

  4. Anemia in postmenopausal women: dietary inadequacy or non-dietary factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postmenopausal women are disproportionately affected by anemia, and the prevalence in females > 65 years of age in the United States is approximately 10%. The manifestation of anemia in older populations is associated with dietary inadequacy, blood loss, genetics, alterations in bioavailability, ren...

  5. Age-related changes in adaptation to severe anemia in childhood in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Angela; Premawardhena, A.; Arambepola, M.; Allen, S. J.; Peto, T. E. A.; Fisher, C. A.; Rees, D. C.; Olivieri, Nancy F.; Weatherall, D. J.

    2007-01-01

    Severe forms of anemia in children in the developing countries may be characterized by different clinical manifestations at particular stages of development. Whether this reflects developmental changes in adaptation to anemia or other mechanisms is not clear. The pattern of adaptation to anemia has been assessed in 110 individuals with hemoglobin (Hb) E β-thalassemia, one of the commonest forms of inherited anemia in Asia. It has been found that age and Hb levels are independent variables with respect to erythropoietin response and that there is a decline in the latter at a similar degree of anemia during development. To determine whether this finding is applicable to anemia due to other causes, a similar study has been carried out on 279 children with severe anemia due to Plasmodium falciparum malaria; the results were similar to those in the patients with thalassemia. These observations may have important implications both for the better understanding of the pathophysiology of profound anemia in early life and for its more logical and cost-effective management. PMID:17517643

  6. "Untangling Sickle-Cell Anemia and the Teaching of Heterozygote Protection"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Eric Michael

    2007-01-01

    Introductory biology textbooks often use the example of sickle-cell anemia to illustrate the concept of heterozygote protection. Ordinarily scientists expect the frequency of a gene associated with a debilitating illness would be low owing to its continual elimination by natural selection. The gene that causes sickle-cell anemia, however, has a…

  7. A Case of Fetal Intestinal Volvulus Without Malrotation Causing Severe Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Tomoko; Tachibana, Daisuke; Kitada, Kohei; Kurihara, Yasushi; Terada, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Masayasu; Sakae, Yukari; Morotomi, Yoshiki; Nomura, Shiho; Saito, Mika

    2015-01-01

    Fetal intestinal volvulus without malrotation is a rare, life-threatening disease. Left untreated, hemorrhage from necrotic bowel tissue will lead to severe fetal anemia and even intrauterine death. We encountered a case of fetal intestinal volvulus causing severe anemia, which was diagnosed postnatally and successfully treated with surgical intervention. PMID:25628516

  8. In anemia of multiple myeloma hepcidin is induced by increased bone-morphogenetic protein-2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepcidin is the principal iron-regulatory hormone and pathogenic factor in anemia of inflammation. Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) frequently present with anemia. We showed that MM patients had increased serum hepcidin, which inversely correlated with hemoglobin, suggesting that hepcidin contrib...

  9. Association of Living Arrangement Conditions and Socioeconomic Differentials with Anemia Status among Women in Rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Bishwajit, Ghose; Yaya, Sanni; Tang, Shangfeng; Hossain, Akmal; Fan, Yang; Akter, Mahmuda; Feng, Zhanchun

    2016-01-01

    In Bangladesh, iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia and remains a significant public health concern. Being a high anemia prevalent country, numerous efforts have been made to confront the issue especially among women and children by both local and international actors. Though the situation has substantially improved in recent years, a staggering number of adult women are currently living with anemia. The etiology of anemia is a multifactorial problem and has been proposed to be associated with various household, societal, economic, cultural factors apart from dietary habits. However, evidence regarding the household arrangements and socioeconomic determinants of anemia is scarce, especially in the context of Bangladesh. To this end, we utilized the 2011 demographic and health survey data to explore the association between anemia status and selected demographic, socioeconomic, and household characteristics. Our result showed significant correlation of anemia with both sociodemographic and household characteristics. Among the sociodemographic variables the following were found to be significantly associated with anemia status: age (p = 0.014; OR = 1.195; 95% CI = 1.036-1.378) and microcredit membership (p = 0.014; OR = 1.19; 95% CI = 1.037-1.386). Regarding the household arrangements, women utilizing biomass fuel for cooking (p < 0.019; OR = 1.82; 95% CI = 0.981-2.460) were more likely to be anemic. PMID:27517045

  10. Prevention of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Infants and Children of Preschool Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fomon, Samuel J.

    Iron-deficiency anemia is almost certainly the most prevalent nutritional disorder among infants and young children in the United States. Anemia is frequently seen among children of low socioeconomic status but is probably also the most frequent nutritional deficiency disease seen among children cared for by private doctors. Possible reasons for…

  11. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:27081450

  12. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:27081450

  13. Dramatic remission of anemia after thymectomy in a patient of idiopathic myelofibrosis with thymoma.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ying-Yih; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Yang, Ching-Fen; Wu, Yu-Chung; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye

    2008-01-01

    Anemia is one of the characteristics of idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF), and malignant thymoma is usually associated with various hematologic disorders, including anemia, pancytopenia, and hypogammaglobulinemia. However, the relationship between IMF and malignant thymoma has not been published before. Here, we report a 48-year-old woman who was initially diagnosed of IMF with severe anemia and transfusion dependent. Five years later, malignant thymoma was found when she was examined for chronic cough. After performing extended thymectomy, her anemia dramatically recovered to normal and sustained for 2 years till last follow-up. Her splenomegaly and myelofibrosis were also improved. We hypothesized that her malignant thymoma induced the progression of IMF, especially in anemia. PMID:18224414

  14. Hepatic bilirubin UDP-glucuronyltransferase in patients with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Maddrey, W C; Cukier, J O; Maglalang, A C; Boitnott, J K; Odell, G B

    1978-02-01

    In sickle cell anemia the shortened survival of red blood cells presents the liver with an augmented load of bilirubin for hepatic clearance. To determine the effects of this excessive bilirubin load on the microsomal conjugating enzyme, hepatic bilirubin UDP-glucuronyltransferase, levels of this enzyme were measured in liver biopsies from patients with sickle cell anemia and several comparison groups. UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity in 14 patients with sickle cell anemia was 2-fold greater (P less than 0.005) than in 14 nonjaundiced comparison patients without liver disease. The elevated UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity in sickle cell anemia was similar to that found in 10 patients who chronically ingested drugs (barbiturates or estrogens) known to increase UDP-glucuronyltransferase activity. These observations suggest enhanced conjugation of bilirubin in patients with sickle cell anemia may result from substrate (bilirubin) induction of UDP-glycuronyltransferase. PMID:413760

  15. The first report of cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia in an adolescent with prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Gürbüz, Fatih; Yağcı-Küpeli, Begül; Kör, Yılmaz; Yüksel, Bilgin; Zorludemir, Suzan; Gürbüz, Berrak Bilginer; Küpeli, Serhan

    2014-01-01

    Prolactinomas are common pituitary tumors that can cause gonadal dysfunction and infertility related to hyperprolactinemia. Dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment in these patients. Cabergoline leads to significant reduction in serum prolactin levels and tumor size in patients with prolactinoma. Dopamine agonists have been associated with adverse effects such as nausea, vomiting and psychosis. We report here a case with cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia. The patient had cabergoline treatment history for prolactinoma and presented with weakness, fatigue, nausea, and paleness. Laboratory findings revealed severe anemia-related immune hemolysis. There were no causes identified to explain hemolytic anemia except cabergoline. Therefore, cabergoline therapy was stopped and subsequently hemolytic anemia resolved and did not occur again. This is the first reported pediatric case with prolactinoma and cabergoline-induced hemolytic anemia. Clinicians should be watchful for this rare side effect induced by cabergoline. PMID:23945126

  16. Determinants of Anemia among School-Aged Children in Mexico, the United States and Colombia.

    PubMed

    Syed, Sana; Addo, O Yaw; De la Cruz-Góngora, Vanessa; Ashour, Fayrouz A Sakr; Ziegler, Thomas R; Suchdev, Parminder S

    2016-01-01

    Anemia affects approximately 25% of school-aged children (SAC-aged 5.00-14.99 years) globally. We determined in three countries the prevalence and determinants of anemia in SAC. Data on sociodemographics, inflammation and nutrition status were obtained from the 2006 Mexican National Nutrition Survey, the 2003-6 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, and the 2010 Encuesta Nacional de Nutrición Situación Colombia. In the US, vitamin A and iron deficiency (ID) were available only for girls aged 12.00-14.99 years to which our analysis was limited. Associations were evaluated by country using multivariable logistic regression adjusting for confounders and complex survey design. The prevalence of anemia and ID were: Mexico 12% (ID 18%), n = 3660; US 4% (ID 10%), n = 733; and Colombia 4% (ID 9%), n = 8573. The percentage of anemia associated with ID was 22.4% in Mexico, 38.9% in the US and 16.7% in Colombia. In Mexico, anemia was associated with ID (adjusted OR: 1.5, p = 0.02) and overweight (aOR 0.4, p = 0.007). In the US, anemia was associated with black race/ethnicity (aOR: 14.1, p < 0.0001) and ID (aOR: 8.0, p < 0.0001). In Colombia, anemia was associated with black race/ethnicity (aOR: 1.6, p = 0.005), lowest socio-economic status quintile (aOR: 1.8, p = 0.0005), ID (aOR: 2.7, p < 0.0001), and being stunted (aOR: 1.6, p = 0.02). While anemia was uniformly associated with iron deficiency in Mexico, Columbia, and the United States, other measured factors showed inconsistent associations with anemia. Additional data on anemia determinants in SAC are needed to guide interventions. PMID:27347992

  17. Underlying Factors Associated with Anemia in Amazonian Children: A Population-Based, Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Marly A.; Scopel, Kézia K.G.; Muniz, Pascoal T.; Villamor, Eduardo; Ferreira, Marcelo U.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although iron deficiency is considered to be the main cause of anemia in children worldwide, other contributors to childhood anemia remain little studied in developing countries. We estimated the relative contributions of different factors to anemia in a population-based, cross-sectional survey. Methodology We obtained venous blood samples from 1111 children aged 6 months to 10 years living in the frontier town of Acrelândia, northwest Brazil, to estimate the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency by measuring hemoglobin, erythrocyte indices, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, and C-reactive protein concentrations. Children were simultaneously screened for vitamin A, vitamin B12, and folate deficiencies; intestinal parasite infections; glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency; and sickle cell trait carriage. Multiple Poisson regression and adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were used to describe associations between anemia and the independent variables. Principal Findings The prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency, and iron-deficiency anemia were 13.6%, 45.4%, and 10.3%, respectively. Children whose families were in the highest income quartile, compared with the lowest, had a lower risk of anemia (aPR, 0.60; 95%CI, 0.37–0.98). Child age (<24 months, 2.90; 2.01–4.20) and maternal parity (>2 pregnancies, 2.01; 1.40–2.87) were positively associated with anemia. Other associated correlates were iron deficiency (2.1; 1.4–3.0), vitamin B12 (1.4; 1.0–2.2), and folate (2.0; 1.3–3.1) deficiencies, and C-reactive protein concentrations (>5 mg/L, 1.5; 1.1–2.2). Conclusions Addressing morbidities and multiple nutritional deficiencies in children and mothers and improving the purchasing power of poorer families are potentially important interventions to reduce the burden of anemia. PMID:22574149

  18. Determinants of Anemia among School-Aged Children in Mexico, the United States and Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Sana; Addo, O. Yaw; De la Cruz-Góngora, Vanessa; Ashour, Fayrouz A. Sakr; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Suchdev, Parminder S.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia affects approximately 25% of school-aged children (SAC—aged 5.00–14.99 years) globally. We determined in three countries the prevalence and determinants of anemia in SAC. Data on sociodemographics, inflammation and nutrition status were obtained from the 2006 Mexican National Nutrition Survey, the 2003-6 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, and the 2010 Encuesta Nacional de Nutrición Situación Colombia. In the US, vitamin A and iron deficiency (ID) were available only for girls aged 12.00–14.99 years to which our analysis was limited. Associations were evaluated by country using multivariable logistic regression adjusting for confounders and complex survey design. The prevalence of anemia and ID were: Mexico 12% (ID 18%), n = 3660; US 4% (ID 10%), n = 733; and Colombia 4% (ID 9%), n = 8573. The percentage of anemia associated with ID was 22.4% in Mexico, 38.9% in the US and 16.7% in Colombia. In Mexico, anemia was associated with ID (adjusted OR: 1.5, p = 0.02) and overweight (aOR 0.4, p = 0.007). In the US, anemia was associated with black race/ethnicity (aOR: 14.1, p < 0.0001) and ID (aOR: 8.0, p < 0.0001). In Colombia, anemia was associated with black race/ethnicity (aOR: 1.6, p = 0.005), lowest socio-economic status quintile (aOR: 1.8, p = 0.0005), ID (aOR: 2.7, p < 0.0001), and being stunted (aOR: 1.6, p = 0.02). While anemia was uniformly associated with iron deficiency in Mexico, Columbia, and the United States, other measured factors showed inconsistent associations with anemia. Additional data on anemia determinants in SAC are needed to guide interventions. PMID:27347992

  19. The prevalence and clinical characteristics of anemia in Korean patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Sung; Bang, Ki Bae; Kim, Ji Yeon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Choi, Kyu Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Quality of life is closely related to anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several studies have reported on anemia in patients with IBD in Western countries. This study investigated the prevalence and clinical characteristics of anemia in Korean patients with IBD. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 92 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 76 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) who were followed regularly at a single tertiary medical center in Korea between January 2003 and December 2012. Hemoglobin (Hb) thresholds used to define anemia were <13.0 g/dL in men and <12.0 g/dL in women according to the World Health Organization criteria. We chose the lowest Hb level in each year as a representative value because Hb levels changed at each examination and anemia was associated with disease deterioration. The relationship between clinical variables and lowest Hb level was assessed. Results The prevalence of anemia was 36.3% in patients with UC and 41.6% in patients with CD. Anemia in patients with CD was associated with hospital admission, 5-aminosalicylate (5-ASA) and infliximab treatment in men. Anemia in patients with UC was associated with hospital admission, oral steroid use, thiopurine and infliximab treatment in men. Conclusions The prevalence of anemia in Korean patients with IBD was comparable to that of patients in Western countries. Anemia was associated with male patients with CD who were admitted to the hospital and received medications including 5-ASA and infliximab, and men with UC who were admitted to the hospital and received medications including oral steroids, thiopurine and infliximab. PMID:26884734

  20. Anemia prevalence and treatment practice in patients with non-myeloid tumors receiving chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Merlini, Laura; Cartenì, Giacomo; Iacobelli, Stefano; Stelitano, Caterina; Airoldi, Mario; Balcke, Peter; Keil, Felix; Haslbauer, Ferdinand; Belton, Laura; Pujol, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the prevalence and management of anemia in cancer patients. Methods This cross-sectional, observational survey was conducted in Italy and Austria. Centers prespecified one day, during a 4-month enrollment window, to report specific data collected during normal clinical practice for patients with non-myeloid tumors attending for chemotherapy (±radiotherapy) treatment. The primary endpoint was the prevalence of anemia as determined using a prespecified algorithm: hemoglobin (Hb) ≤10 g/dL on/within 3 days prior to visit; ongoing anemia treatment; physician diagnosis of anemia, together with ≥1 anemia symptom. Results Between November 18, 2010 and March 18, 2011, data for 1412 patients were collected (Italy n = 1130; Austria n = 282). Most patients (n = 1136; 80%) had solid tumors; 809 (57%) had received ≤3 chemotherapy cycles. The prevalence of anemia was 32% (95% confidence interval: 29.4%–34.2%); 196 patients (14%) were deemed anemic based on Hb ≤10 g/dL, 131 (9%) on ongoing anemia treatment, and 121 (9%) on physician diagnosis/anemia symptom. Overall, 1153 patients (82%) had Hb data; mean (standard deviation [SD]) Hb levels were 11.7 (1.7) g/dL. In total, 456 patients (32%) had anemia symptoms: fatigue (n = 392; 28%), depression (n = 122; 9%), and dyspnea (n = 107; 8%) were most common. Fifty-one patients (4%) had had their current chemotherapy cycle delayed due to anemia. On visit day, or ≤28 days prior, 91 (6%), 188 (13%), and 81 patients (6%) had evidence of whole blood/red blood cell transfusion, erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use, or iron use, respectively. Conclusion On the prespecified study day, one-third of patients with non-myeloid tumors undergoing chemotherapy were found to be anemic and 13% had evidence of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use then or in the 28 days prior. PMID:23946669

  1. New Treatment Approaches for the Anemia of CKD.

    PubMed

    Bonomini, Mario; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Sirolli, Vittorio; Locatelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Normocytic normochromic anemia is a common complication in chronic kidney disease and is associated with many adverse clinical consequences. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and adjuvant iron therapy represent the primary treatment for anemia in chronic kidney disease. The introduction of ESAs into clinical practice was a success story, mediating an increase in hemoglobin concentrations without the risk for recurrent blood transfusions and improving quality of life substantially. However, recombinant ESAs are still expensive and require a parenteral route of administration. Moreover, concern has arisen following randomized clinical trials showing that higher hemoglobin targets and/or high ESA doses may cause significant harm. This, together with changes in ESA reimbursement policy in some countries, has resulted in a significant reduction in ESA prescribing and the hemoglobin level targeted during therapy. Several attempts are being made to develop new drugs with improved characteristics and/or easier manufacturing processes compared with currently available ESAs, including new treatment approaches that may indirectly improve erythropoiesis. We give an update on the new investigational strategies for increasing erythropoiesis, examining in depth their characteristics and possible advantages in the clinical setting and the caveats to be aware of at the present stage of development. PMID:26372086

  2. Leech bites: massive bleeding, coagulation profile disorders, and severe anemia.

    PubMed

    Kose, Ataman; Zengin, Suat; Kose, Beril; Gunay, Nurullah; Yildirim, Cuma; Kilinc, Hasan; Togun, Ismail

    2008-11-01

    Leeches have been in use for centuries, especially in plastic and reconstructive surgery wound and flap healing, in venous insufficiencies, and in the treatment of many disorders such as hemorrhoids and varicosity. With this study, we aimed to discuss coagulation disorder due to uncontrolled leech bites, consequent excessive skin hemorrhage, and anemia requiring blood transfusion. A 65-year-old male patient was referred to the emergency department because of excessive intractable bleeding that had occurred after leech bites. On physical examination, a total of 130 bites were detected on various regions of the body. In the laboratory findings of the patient, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels were extremely low, and prothrombin time, international normalized ratio, and partial thromboplastin time were markedly increased. The patient received a total of 8 units of fresh frozen plasma and 6 units of erythrocyte suspension. Bleeding stopped by decreasing after the transfusion of fresh frozen plasma. Although the complications due to leech injuries are rare, they may be an important cause of morbidity and mortality when an injury or prolonged bleeding in an internal region occurs. Prolonged skin hemorrhages rarely cause anemia, and deaths are caused by intractable hemorrhages. However, a coagulation disorder and consequent intractable hemorrhage have not been reported previously in the literature. In conclusion, it should be known that uncontrolled, blind, and excessive leech use causes severe hemorrhage and excessive blood loss, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, the awareness of either physicians or people using or recommending alternative medicine should be raised on this subject. PMID:19091286

  3. [Molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of Diamond-Blackfan anemia].

    PubMed

    Toki, Tsutomu; Ito, Etsuro

    2015-07-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare congenital bone marrow failure syndrome, characterized by red blood cell aplasia. Macrocytic anemia is a prominent feature of DBA but the disease is also characterized by growth retardation and congenital anomalies that are present in approximately 40% of affected patients. DBA is associated with single, monoallelic, inactivating mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes. In DBA, mutations or large deletions in RP genes include RPS7, RPS10, RPS17, RPS19, RPS24, RPS26, RPL5, RPL11, RPL26 and RPL35A. These mutations have been reported in up to 60% of DBA patients. To date, no known pathogenic mutations have been found in the remaining patients. In an effort to identify new mutations responsible for DBA, we performed whole-exome sequencing analysis of 48 patients with no documented mutations/deletions in our first screening and identified a de novo splicing error mutation in RPL27 and a frameshift deletion in RPS27 in sporadic patients with DBA. In vitro knockdown of the gene expression disturbed pre-ribosomal RNA processing. Zebrafish models of rpl27 and rps27 mutations showed impairments of erythrocyte production and tail and/or brain development. In this report, we also discuss current knowledge regarding pathways from the impairment of ribosomal biogenesis to the pathology of DBA. PMID:26251151

  4. Serum paraoxonase 1 activity in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Gedikbasi, Asuman; Akalin, Nilgul; Gunaldi, Meral; Yilmaz, Deniz; Mert, Meral; Harmankaya, Ozlem; Soylu, Aliye; Karakaya, Pinar; Kumbasar, Abdulbaki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In this study we aimed to detect paraoxonase 1 (PON-1) activity in iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and to compare it with healthy controls by observing the change after iron therapy. Material and methods In this study, 50 adult patients with IDA and 40 healthy subjects were enrolled. All patients were analyzed at the beginning and after treatment according to laboratory assessments. Results Mean paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in the iron deficiency anemia group were significantly lower than mean activities of the control group (102.4 ±19.2 U/l and 163.3 ±13.68 U/l, respectively and 157.3 ±26.4 U/l and 256.1 ±24.6 U/l, respectively; p = 0.0001 for both). Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities significantly increased after treatment for IDA (143.2 ±13.9 and 197.6 ±27.9 U/l, respectively, p = 0.0001). Mean activities after treatment with iron were significantly lower than mean activities in the control group (p = 0.002; p = 0.0001 respectively). Conclusions Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in patients with IDA significantly increased after treatment with iron therapy. In adults IDA may also be one of the factors associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:27478448

  5. Assembling an orchestra: Fanconi anemia pathway of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fenghua; Song, Limin; Qian, Liangyue; Hu, Jennifer J; Zhang, Yanbin

    2010-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive genetic disorder characterized by developmental defects, bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. The complete set of FA genes has only been identified recently and seems to be uniquely conserved among vertebrates. Fanconi anemia proteins have been implicated in the repair of interstrand DNA crosslinks that block DNA replication and transcription. Although all thirteen FA complementation groups show similar clinical and cellular phenotypes, approximately 85% of patients presented defective FANCA, FANCC, or FANCG. The established DNA interacting components (FANCM, FANCI, FANCD2, and FANCJ) account only for approximately 5% of all FA patients, an observation that raises doubt concerning the roles of FA proteins in DNA repair. In recent years, rapid progress in the area of FA research has provided great insights into the critical roles of FA proteins in DNA repair. However, many FA proteins do not have identifiable domains to indicate how they contribute to biological processes, particularly DNA repair. Therefore, future biochemical studies are warranted to understand the biological functions of FA proteins and their implications in human diseases. PMID:20515746

  6. Autoantibody to the gastrin receptor in pernicious anemia

    SciTech Connect

    de Aizpurua, H.J.; Ungar, B.; Toh, B.H.

    1985-08-22

    The authors examined serum IgG fractions from 20 patients with pernicious anemia and 25 control subjects for their capacity to inhibit binding of (/sup 125/I)15-leu human gastrin-17 to parietal-cell-enriched gastric mucosal cells. IgG fractions from six patients reduced gastrin binding by 45.6 +/- 12.2 per cent, as compared with a reduction of 1.8 +/- 0.7 per cent by fractions from the 25 controls. The fractions from these six patients also reduced gastrin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake by gastric cells (an index of gastric acid secretory activity in vitro) by 50.2 +/- 8.4 per cent (mean +/- S.D.), as compared with 9.2 +/- 4.1 per cent for the controls. IgG fractions from six other patients that did not reduce gastrin binding also inhibited gastrin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake, by 48.1 +/- 9.1 per cent. These reductions in gastrin binding and aminopyrine uptake were abolished by absorption of the IgG fractions with suspensions of viable gastric mucosal cells but not by absorption with liver or kidney cells. The IgG fractions did not inhibit (/sup 3/H)histamine binding or histamine-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake. These results suggest that serum IgG from some patients with pernicious anemia contains autoantibodies to the gastrin receptor.

  7. Anemia induced by high zinc intake in chicks: Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pimentel, J.L.; Greger, J.L.; Cook, M.E. )

    1991-03-15

    The mechanisms by which excess Zn induced anemia in chickens was assessed in 8 studies in which chicks were randomly assigned to a 2 {times} 2 factorial arrangement of treatments with 60 or 2,000 {mu}g Zn and 10 or 250 {mu}g Cu/g diet. Less Fe-59 appeared in the plasma 1 hour after a labeled meal when chicks were fed excess Zn in 1 of 2 studies but less Fe-59 appeared in livers of chicks fed excess Zn in both studies. The decrease of Fe-59 uptake into tissues paralleled a decrease in Fe concentrations in livers and tibiotarsi. These differences in tissue Fe did not reflect differences in Fe excretion because excretion and incorporation into tissues of injected Fe-59 was not affected by high Zn intake. Although excess Zn decreased tissue Cu concentrations, excess Zn, per se, did not affect cytosolic superoxide dismutase activity, the in vivo t 1/2 of erythrocytes, or erythrocyte hemolysis in vitro. The decrease in body weight of chicks fed excess Zn indicated that protein synthesis and/or degradation could be affected. Increased incorporation of C-14 tyrosine into liver and bone marrow of chicks fed excess Zn suggested increased protoporphyrin synthesis or metallothionein synthesis. These results indicated that decreased Fe absorption was the primary mechanism by which excess Zn induced anemia.

  8. Fanconi Anemia Proteins Function in Mitophagy and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Sumpter, Rhea; Sirasanagandla, Shyam; Fernández, Álvaro F; Wei, Yongjie; Dong, Xiaonan; Franco, Luis; Zou, Zhongju; Marchal, Christophe; Lee, Ming Yeh; Clapp, D Wade; Hanenberg, Helmut; Levine, Beth

    2016-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway genes are important tumor suppressors whose best-characterized function is repair of damaged nuclear DNA. Here, we describe an essential role for FA genes in two forms of selective autophagy. Genetic deletion of Fancc blocks the autophagic clearance of viruses (virophagy) and increases susceptibility to lethal viral encephalitis. Fanconi anemia complementation group C (FANCC) protein interacts with Parkin, is required in vitro and in vivo for clearance of damaged mitochondria, and decreases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inflammasome activation. The mitophagy function of FANCC is genetically distinct from its role in genomic DNA damage repair. Moreover, additional genes in the FA pathway, including FANCA, FANCF, FANCL, FANCD2, BRCA1, and BRCA2, are required for mitophagy. Thus, members of the FA pathway represent a previously undescribed class of selective autophagy genes that function in immunity and organellar homeostasis. These findings have implications for understanding the pathogenesis of FA and cancers associated with mutations in FA genes. PMID:27133164

  9. How we diagnose and treat iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Michael; Adamson, John W

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that one-third of the world's population is anemic, the majority being due to iron deficiency (ID). In adults, ID is associated with fatigue in the absence of anemia, restless legs syndrome, pica and, in neonates, delayed growth and development. In adolescents, ID is associated with decrements in learning and behavioral abnormalities. In the absence of a clear cause, search for a source of bleeding is indicated. No single test is diagnostic of ID unless the serum ferritin is low or the percent transferrin saturation is low with an elevated total iron binding capacity. Oral iron is considered front line therapy except for conditions such as gastric bypass, heavy uterine bleeding, inflammatory bowel disease, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Oral iron has many unpleasant side effects, resulting in low patient adherence. For patients intolerant of, or unresponsive to, oral iron, intravenous (IV) administration is the preferred route. While early formulations were associated with a high incidence of serious adverse events (SAEs), newer formulations are much safer with SAEs occurring very infrequently. Full replacement doses can be administered in a matter of minutes to a few hours. Nevertheless, there remains a reluctance to use IV iron due to a misunderstanding of the safety of the available formulations. IV iron is safe and effective in all clinical circumstances including pregnancy. The preponderance of published evidence suggests IV iron therapy is underutilized and we believe that IV iron should be moved forward in the treatment of ID and iron deficiency anemia (IDA). PMID:26408108

  10. Untangling the Phenotypic Heterogeneity of Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Farrar, Jason E; Dahl, Niklas

    2011-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a lineage-selective inherited bone-marrow failure syndrome characterized primarily by anemia and physical malformations. Recent advances in identifying the genetic abnormalities underlying DBA have demonstrated involvement of genes encoding both large (RPL) and small (RPS) ribosomal subunit proteins, including mutations of RPL5, RPL11, RPL35A, RPS7, RPS10, RPS17, RPS19, RPS24, and RPS26 in 50–60% of affected patients. Despite significant progress, identification of gene abnormalities in the remaining patients remains an important question since present data suggests that mutations in other members of the ribosomal protein gene complement do not explain those cases without an identified genetic lesion in these genes. Genetic studies have also raised new questions with the recognition of substantial variability in the manifestations of DBA, ranging from ribosomal protein mutations in otherwise asymptomatic individuals to those with classic severe red-cell aplasia with characteristic malformations, at times within the same kindred. In this review, we summarize the genetic basis of DBA and discuss mechanisms by which the phenotype of DBA might be modified. PMID:21435509

  11. Anomalous cell surface structure of sickle cell anemia erythrocytes as demonstrated by cell surface labeling and endo-beta-galactosidase treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, M.; Fukuda, M.N.; Hakomori, S.; Papayannopoulou, T.

    1981-01-01

    Erythrocyte surface glycoproteins from patients with various types of sickle cell anemia have been analyzed and compared with those from normal individuals. By hemagglutination with various anti-carbohydrate antibodies, sickle cells showed profound increase of i antigens and moderate increase of GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 3 Glc structure, whereas antigenicity toward globosidic structure was unchanged. In parallel to these findings, erythrocytes of sickle cell patients have additional sialylated lactosaminoglycan in Band 3. Thus, it can be concluded that erythrocytes of sickle cell patients are characterized by an altered cell surface structure which does not appear to be due to topographical changes of cell surface membrane. It is possible that the anemia or the ''stress'' hematopoiesis in these patients is responsible for these changes.

  12. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with anorexia.

    PubMed

    Kahara, Toshio; Wakakuri, Hitomi; Takatsuji, Juri; Motoo, Iori; Shima, Kosuke R; Ishikura, Kazuhide; Usuda, Rika; Noda, Yatsugi

    2012-01-01

    A 71-year-old man with diabetes mellitus visited our hospital with complaints of anorexia and weight loss (12 kg/3 months). He had megaloblastic anemia, cobalamin level was low, and autoantibody to intrinsic factor was positive. He was treated with intramuscular cyanocobalamin, and he was able to consume meals. GAD autoantibody and ICA were positive, and he was diagnosed with slowly progressive type 1 diabetes mellitus (SPIDDM). Thyroid autoantibodies were positive. According to these findings, he was diagnosed with autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 3 with SPIDDM, pernicious anemia, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Extended periods of cobalamin deficiency can cause serious complications such as ataxia and dementia, and these complications may not be reversible if replacement therapy with cobalamin is delayed. Although type 1 diabetes mellitus with coexisting pernicious anemia is very rare in Japan, physicians should consider the possibility of pernicious anemia when patients with diabetes mellitus have cryptogenic anorexia with the finding of significant macrocytosis (MCV > 100 fL). PMID:23304573

  13. A Human Embryonic Kidney 293T Cell Line Mutated at the Golgi α-Mannosidase II Locus*

    PubMed Central

    Crispin, Max; Chang, Veronica T.; Harvey, David J.; Dwek, Raymond A.; Evans, Edward J.; Stuart, David I.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Lord, J. Michael; Spooner, Robert A.; Davis, Simon J.

    2009-01-01

    Disruption of Golgi α-mannosidase II activity can result in type II congenital dyserythropoietic anemia and induce lupus-like autoimmunity in mice. Here, we isolated a mutant human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cell line called Lec36, which displays sensitivity to ricin that lies between the parental HEK 293T cells, in which the secreted and membrane-expressed proteins are dominated by complex-type glycosylation, and 293S Lec1 cells, which produce only oligomannose-type N-linked glycans. Stem cell marker 19A was transiently expressed in the HEK 293T Lec36 cells and in parental HEK 293T cells with and without the potent Golgi α-mannosidase II inhibitor, swainsonine. Negative ion nano-electrospray ionization mass spectra of the 19A N-linked glycans from HEK 293T Lec36 and swainsonine-treated HEK 293T cells were qualitatively indistinguishable and, as shown by collision-induced dissociation spectra, were dominated by hybrid-type glycosylation. Nucleotide sequencing revealed mutations in each allele of MAN2A1, the gene encoding Golgi α-mannosidase II: a point mutation that mapped to the active site was found in one allele, and an in-frame deletion of 12 nucleotides was found in the other allele. Expression of the wild type but not the mutant MAN2A1 alleles in Lec36 cells restored processing of the 19A reporter glycoprotein to complex-type glycosylation. The Lec36 cell line will be useful for expressing therapeutic glycoproteins with hybrid-type glycans and as a sensitive host for detecting mutations in human MAN2A1 causing type II congenital dyserythropoietic anemia. PMID:19465480

  14. Elevated Hepcidin Is Part of a Complex Relation That Links Mortality with Iron Homeostasis and Anemia in Men and Women with HIV Infection123

    PubMed Central

    Minchella, Peter A; Armitage, Andrew E; Darboe, Bakary; Jallow, Momodou W; Drakesmith, Hal; Jaye, Assan; Prentice, Andrew M; McDermid, Joann M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early and chronic inflammation is a hallmark of HIV infection, and inflammation is known to increase hepcidin expression. Consequently, hepcidin may be a key determinant of the iron homeostasis and anemia associated with poorer HIV prognoses. Objective: The objective of this study was to understand how hepcidin is related to anemia, iron homeostasis, and inflammation at HIV diagnosis and to investigate associations between hepcidin and all-cause mortality in HIV infection. Methods: In a retrospective cohort, baseline plasma hepcidin was measured by competitive enzyme immunoassay within 3 mo of HIV diagnosis in 196 antiretroviral-naive Gambians. Iron homeostasis [hemoglobin, plasma transferrin, ferritin, iron, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR)] and inflammation [α1-antichymotrypsin (ACT)] from the same plasma sample were available, as were absolute CD4 cell counts, age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and HIV type. Results: Anemia was common across the spectrum of immunosuppression [CD4 cell counts (prevalence of anemia): >500 cells/μL (68%), 200–500 cells/μL (73%), and <200 cells/μL (89%); P = 0.032] and in men (81%) and women (76%). Increasing hepcidin was associated with iron homeostasis biomarkers (higher ferritin and lower transferrin, hemoglobin, and sTfR), inflammation (higher ACT), and key health indicators (lower CD4 or BMI, advancing age, and male gender; P < 0.001 except for hemoglobin, P = 0.021). Elevated hepcidin was associated with greater all-cause mortality in a dose-dependent manner [intermediate vs. lowest tertile: unadjusted HR (95% CI), 1.95 (1.22, 3.10); upper vs. lowest tertile: 3.02 (1.91, 4.78)]. Principal components analysis identified 2 patterns composed of hepcidin-ferritin-transferrin, with or without ACT, and iron-sTfR-hemoglobin that may distinguish inflammation and erythropoiesis iron functions. Conclusions: Elevated hepcidin is independently associated with greater mortality in men and women with HIV infection, and

  15. Anemia and feeding practices among infants in rural Shaanxi Province in China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Renfu; Shi, Yaojiang; Zhou, Huan; Yue, Ai; Zhang, Linxiu; Sylvia, Sean; Medina, Alexis; Rozelle, Scott

    2014-12-01

    Anemia is one of the most prevalent public health problems among infants and iron deficiency anemia has been related to many adverse consequences. The overall goal of this study is to examine the prevalence of anemia among infants in poor rural China and to identify correlates of anemia. In April 2013, we randomly sampled 948 infants aged 6-11 months living in 351 villages across 174 townships in nationally-designated poverty counties in rural areas of southern Shaanxi Province, China. Infants were administered a finger prick blood test for hemoglobin (Hb). Anthropometric measurement and household survey of demographic characteristics and feeding practices were conducted in the survey. We found that 54.3% of 6-11 month old infants in poor rural China are anemic, and 24.3% of sample infants suffer from moderate or severe anemia. We find that children still breastfed over 6 months of age had lower Hb concentrations and higher anemia prevalence than their non-breastfeeding counterparts (p < 0.01), and that children who had ever been formula-fed had significantly higher Hb concentrations and lower anemia prevalence than their non-formula-fed counterparts (p < 0.01). The results suggest the importance of iron supplementation or home fortification while breastfeeding. PMID:25533008

  16. Prevalence of anemia and its risk factors among lactating mothers in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ai; Zhang, Yumei; Li, Bo; Wang, Peiyu; Li, Jiayin; Xue, Yong; Gao, Hongchong

    2014-05-01

    In Myanmar, 60% of the population consists of mothers and children, and they are the groups most vulnerable to anemia. The objectives of this study are to determine (1) the anemia prevalence among lactating women and (2) the risk factors associated with anemia. Convenience sampling was used to select three villages in two different regions (Kachin and Shan) in Myanmar. Hemoglobin and anthropometric indicators were measured for 733 lactating women. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with anemia. The anemia prevalence rate was 60.3% in lactating women, with 20.3% of lactating women having severe anemia. Factors of malnutrition (P = 0.026), self-reported symptoms of night blindness or poor dark adaptation (P < 0.001), lack of primary education experience (P < 0.001), low family annual capita income (< 800 MMK; P < 0.001), drinking spring or river water (P < 0.001), and drinking unboiled water (P = 0.016) were associated with anemia. To promote health in lactating women, a comprehensive intervention is needed in these regions. PMID:24639302

  17. Prevalence of Anemia and Its Risk Factors Among Lactating Mothers in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ai; Zhang, Yumei; Li, Bo; Wang, Peiyu; Li, Jiayin; Xue, Yong; Gao, Hongchong

    2014-01-01

    In Myanmar, 60% of the population consists of mothers and children, and they are the groups most vulnerable to anemia. The objectives of this study are to determine (1) the anemia prevalence among lactating women and (2) the risk factors associated with anemia. Convenience sampling was used to select three villages in two different regions (Kachin and Shan) in Myanmar. Hemoglobin and anthropometric indicators were measured for 733 lactating women. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with anemia. The anemia prevalence rate was 60.3% in lactating women, with 20.3% of lactating women having severe anemia. Factors of malnutrition (P = 0.026), self-reported symptoms of night blindness or poor dark adaptation (P < 0.001), lack of primary education experience (P < 0.001), low family annual capita income (< 800 MMK; P < 0.001), drinking spring or river water (P < 0.001), and drinking unboiled water (P = 0.016) were associated with anemia. To promote health in lactating women, a comprehensive intervention is needed in these regions. PMID:24639302

  18. [Anemia in women of reproductive age. The results of a national probability survey].

    PubMed

    Martínez, H; González-Cossío, T; Flores, M; Rivera-Dommarco, J; Lezana, M A; Sepúlveda-Amor, J

    1995-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most prevalent forms of malnutrition which is clinically known as anemia. Functional consequences of anemia include impairment of cardiovascular performance, limitation in productivity, higher incidence of low birth weight and premature delivery, and increased maternal mortality. This paper presents a descriptive analysis of anemia in women of reproductive age in Mexico. Data were collected by the Ministry of Health through a National Nutrition Survey in 1988, which draw a representative sample from four regions: North, Center, South and Federal District. Anemia was more prevalent in pregnant (18.17%) than in non-pregnant women (15.38%). Those women living in predominantly indigenous communities had higher prevalence of anemia (24.02%) than non-indigenous women (14.67%). Anemia was more prevalent in urban areas (15.54%) than in rural (13.56%). Mean +/- standard deviation values for hemoglobin were lower in pregnant women (12.5 +/- 1.6 g/dL) than in non-pregnant ones (13.7 +/- 1.6 g/dL). Consistently, the Northern and Southern regions were worse off than the Center and the Federal District. These data indicate that anemia is a public health problem in Mexico. The functional consequences of this deficiency justify interventions to treat and prevent it. PMID:7618111

  19. Meta-analysis of Huangqi injection for the adjunctive therapy of aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changtai; Gao, Yulu; Jiang, Ting; Hao, Cao; Gao, Zongshuai; Sun, Yongning

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia therapy remains difficult, due to lack of effective treatment regimens. In recent years, Huangqi injection for the adjunctive therapy of aplastic anemia has been reported in many clinical trials. Considering that Huangqi injection may be a novel approach to aplastic anemia treatment, we conducted a meta-analysis of clinical controlled trials to assess the clinical value of Huangqi injection in the treatment of aplastic anemia. We searched the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Scientific Journals Full-text Database (VIP), Wanfang Database, PubMed and EMBASE database to collect the data about the trials of Huangqi injection combined with androgens for treating aplastic anemia. A total of ten studies involving 720 patients with aplastic anemia were included in this study. The meta-analysis showed significant increases in the pool effectiveness rate, white blood cells (WBC), haematoglobin (Hb), platelets (PLT), and reticulocytes (Ret) between the experimental group versus the control group. No severe side effects were found in this study. However, the lower Jadad scores and asymmetric funnel plot degrades the validity of the meta-analysis as the clinical evidence. Therefore, Huangqi injection may significantly enhance the efficacy of androgens for aplastic anemia, suggesting that the novel approach of Chinese traditional medicine combined with Western medicine is promising. The exact outcome required confirmation with rigorously well-designed multi-center trials. PMID:26379817

  20. Perinatal outcome in sickle cell anemia: a prospective study from India.

    PubMed

    Daigavane, Mayoor M; Jena, Rabindra K; Kar, Tushar J

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia, the homozygous genotype of sickle cell disease is one of the most common heritable diseases in the world. The Arab-Asian haplotype present in India is one of the least severe of all haplotypes. Many sickle cell anemia patients are now leading a symptom-free productive life due to hydroxyurea (HU) and better supportive care. Although pregnancy in sickle cell anemia patients is considered a high-risk category, it perinatal outcome is least studied, particularly among carriers of the Arab-Asian haplotype. Thus, the present prospective, randomized study was performed to assess the perinatal outcome in sickle cell anemia. Neonatal outcome such as low birth weight, perinatal mortality rate, special care newborn unit (SCNU) admission, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) and pre term births were significantly higher in sickle cell anemia mothers. Maternal outcome such as severe anemia, preeclampsia, vasoocclusive crisis (VOC), pulmonary complications, jaundice and blood transfusion requirements were significantly higher in sickle cell anemia mothers, which were successfully managed. Cesarian section rate was not significantly different from normal controls. Successful pregnancies were achieved in 84.44% of cases. However, we strongly recommend that pregnancies in these patients should be managed in an institutional setup. PMID:23952263