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Sample records for dyserythropoietic anemia type

  1. A case of successful management with splenectomy of intractable ascites due to congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II-induced cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Vassiliadis, Themistoklis; Garipidou, Vassilia; Perifanis, Vassilios; Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Giouleme, Olga; Patsiaoura, Kalliopi; Avramidis, Michalis; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos; Vakalopoulou, Sofia; Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Antoniadis, Antonios; Semertzidis, Panagiotis; Kioumi, Anna; Premetis, Evangelos; Eugenidis, Nikolaos

    2006-01-01

    The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias comprise a group of rare hereditary disorders of erythropoiesis, characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis as the predominant mechanism of anemia and by characteristic morphological aberrations of the majority of erythroblasts in the bone marrow. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II is the most frequent type. All types of congenital dyserythropoietic anemias distinctly share a high incidence of iron loading. Iron accumulation occurs even in untransfused patients and can result in heart failure and liver cirrhosis. We have reported about a patient who presented with liver cirrhosis and intractable ascites caused by congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II. Her clinical course was further complicated by the development of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Splenectomy was eventually performed which achieved complete resolution of ascites, increase of hemoglobin concentration and abrogation of transfusion requirements. PMID:16521204

  2. Homozygous mutations in a predicted endonuclease are a novel cause of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I.

    PubMed

    Babbs, Christian; Roberts, Nigel A; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; McGowan, Simon J; Ahmed, Momin R; Brown, Jill M; Sabry, Mohamed A; Bentley, David R; McVean, Gil A; Donnelly, Peter; Gileadi, Opher; Ponting, Chris P; Higgs, Douglas R; Buckle, Veronica J

    2013-09-01

    The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias are a heterogeneous group of rare disorders primarily affecting erythropoiesis with characteristic morphological abnormalities and a block in erythroid maturation. Mutations in the CDAN1 gene, which encodes Codanin-1, underlie the majority of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I cases. However, no likely pathogenic CDAN1 mutation has been detected in approximately 20% of cases, suggesting the presence of at least one other locus. We used whole genome sequencing and segregation analysis to identify a homozygous T to A transversion (c.533T>A), predicted to lead to a p.L178Q missense substitution in C15ORF41, a gene of unknown function, in a consanguineous pedigree of Middle-Eastern origin. Sequencing C15ORF41 in other CDAN1 mutation-negative congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I pedigrees identified a homozygous transition (c.281A>G), predicted to lead to a p.Y94C substitution, in two further pedigrees of SouthEast Asian origin. The haplotype surrounding the c.281A>G change suggests a founder effect for this mutation in Pakistan. Detailed sequence similarity searches indicate that C15ORF41 encodes a novel restriction endonuclease that is a member of the Holliday junction resolvase family of proteins. PMID:23716552

  3. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II associated with G6PD Seattle in a Sicilian child.

    PubMed

    Gangarossa, S; Romano, V; Miraglia del Giudice, E; Perrotta, S; Iolascon, A; Schiliro, G

    1995-01-01

    A 2-year-old Sicilian boy was investigated because of chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA) associated with hepatosplenomegaly. Appropriate studies revealed deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase type Seattle (G6PD Seattle). In addition, bone marrow morphology, serological studies and analysis of red cell membrane proteins revealed congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) type II (or HEMPAS). Because G6PD Seattle on its own does not cause CNSHA, we believe that the clinical manifestations in this patient are essentially due to the CDA type II abnormality. However, the coexistence of these two different red cell abnormalities may affect the clinical picture specifically by making CDA type II more hemolytic than it would have been otherwise. PMID:7725848

  4. Acute Liver Failure in a Pediatric Patient with Congenital Dysery-Thropoietic Anemia Type I Treated with Deferasirox.

    PubMed

    Ling, Galina; Pinsk, Vered; Golan-Tripto, Inbal; Ling, Eduard

    2015-09-23

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDA) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by morphological abnormalities of erythroid precursor cells and various degrees of hemolysis. Iron overload is a result of continuous hemolysis and recurrent transfusions. It is treated with iron chelators, including deferasirox. We present here a case of acute liver failure in a 12 years old girl with CDA type I treated with deferasirox and discuss the approach to treatment. PMID:26487935

  5. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... 21. Epub 2004 Jul 20. Review. Renella R, Wood WG. The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias. Hematol Oncol Clin ... 2005 Aug;130(4):628-34. Wickramasinghe SN, Wood WG. Advances in the understanding of the congenital ...

  6. Diagnosis and management of congenital dyserythropoietic anemias.

    PubMed

    Gambale, Antonella; Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Russo, Roberta

    2016-03-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are inherited disorders hallmarked by chronic hyporegenerative anemia, relative reticulocytopenia, hemolytic component and iron overload. They represent a subtype of the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, characterized by impaired differentiation and proliferation of the erythroid lineage. Three classical types were defined by marrow morphology, even if the most recent classification recognized six different genetic types. The pathomechanisms of CDAs are different, but all seem to involve the regulation of DNA replication and cell division. CDAs are often misdiagnosed, since either morphological abnormalities or clinical features can be commonly identified in other clinically-related anemias. However, differential diagnosis is essential for guiding both follow up and management of the patients. PMID:26653117

  7. Clinical aspects and pathogenesis of congenital dyserythropoietic anemias: from morphology to molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Iolascon, Achille; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Russo, Roberta

    2012-12-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias belong to a group of inherited conditions characterized by a maturation arrest during erythropoiesis with a reduced reticulocyte production in contrast with erythroid hyperplasia in bone marrow. The latter shows specific morphological abnormalities that allowed for a morphological classification of these conditions mainly represented by congenital dyserythropoietic anemias types I and II. The identification of their causative genes provided evidence that these conditions have different molecular mechanisms that induce abnormal cell maturation and division. Some altered proteins seem to be involved in the chromatin assembly, such as codanin-1 in congenital dyserythropoietic anemia I. The gene involved in congenital dyserythropoietic anemia II, the most frequent form, is SEC23B. This condition seems to belong to a group of diseases attributable to defects in the transport of newly synthesized proteins from endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. This review will analyze recent insights in congenital dyserythropoietic anemias types I and II. It will also attempt to clarify the relationship between mutations in causative genes and the clinical phenotype of these conditions. PMID:23065504

  8. Incomplete synthesis of N-glycans in congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II caused by a defect in the gene encoding. alpha. -mannosidase II

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, M.N.; Masri, K.A. ); Dell, A. ); Luzzatto, L. ); Moremen, K.W. )

    1990-10-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II, or hereditary erythroblastic multinuclearity with a positive acidified-serum-lysis test (HEMPAS), is a genetic anemia in humans inherited by an autosomally recessive mode. The enzyme defect in most HEMPAS patients has previously been proposed as a lowered activity of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II, resulting in a lack of polylactosamine on proteins and leading to the accumulation of polylactosaminyl lipids. A recent HEMPAS case, G.C., has now been analyzed by cell-surface labeling, fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry of glycopeptides, and activity assay of glycosylation enzymes. Significantly decreased glycosylation of polylactosaminoglycan proteins and incompletely processed asparagine-linked oligosaccharides were detected in the erythrocyte membranes of G.C. These results suggest that G.C. cells contain a mutation in {alpha}-ManII-encoding gene that results in inefficient expression of {alpha}-ManII mRNA, either through reduced transcription or message instability. This report demonstrates that HEMPAS is caused by a defective gene encoding an enzyme necessary for the synthesis of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides.

  9. Primary defect of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II. Failure in glycosylation of erythrocyte lactosaminoglycan proteins caused by lowered N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, M N; Dell, A; Scartezzini, P

    1987-05-25

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II or hereditary erythroblastic multinuclearity with positive acidified serum test (HEMPAS) is a genetic disease caused by membrane abnormality. Previously we have found that Band 3 and Band 4.5 are not glycosylated by lactosaminoglycans in HEMPAS erythrocytes, whereas normally these proteins have lactosaminoglycans (Fukuda, M. N., Papayannopoulou, T., Gordon-Smith, E. C., Rochant, H., and Testa, U. (1984) Br. J. Haematol. 56, 55-68). In order to find out where glycosylation of lactosaminoglycans stops, we have analyzed the carbohydrate structures of HEMPAS Band 3. By fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry, methylation analysis, and hydrazinolysis followed by exoglycosidase treatments, the following structure was elucidated: (formula; see text) N-Linked glycopeptides synthesized in vitro by reticulocyte microsomes from HEMPAS were shown to be predominantly the above short oligosaccharide, whereas those from normal reticulocytes contain large molecular weight carbohydrates. The N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II, which transfers N-acetylglucosamine to the C-2 position of the Man alpha 1----6Man beta 1----arm of the biantennary core structure, was therefore examined by using Man alpha 1----6(GlcNAc beta 1----2Man alpha 1----3)Man beta 1----4GlcNAc beta 1----4GlcNAcol as an acceptor. N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase II activity was demonstrated in the lymphocyte microsome fraction from normal individuals. However, this enzyme activity was found to be decreased in those from HEMPAS patients. These results suggest that the primary defect of HEMPAS lies in the lowered activity of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II. PMID:2953718

  10. Erythroid Transcription Factor EKLF/KLF1 Mutation Causing Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia Type IV in a Patient of Taiwanese Origin: Review of All Reported Cases and Development of a Clinical Diagnostic Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Jaffray, Julie A.; Mitchell, W. Beau; Gnanapragasam, Merlin Nithya; Seshan, Surya V; Guo, Xinhuo; Westhoff, Connie M.; Bieker, James J.; Manwani, Deepa

    2013-01-01

    KLF1 is an erythroid specific transcription factor that is involved in erythroid lineage commitment, globin switching and terminal red blood cell maturation. Various mutations of KLF1 have been identified in humans, which has led to both benign and pathological phenotypes. The E325K mutation, within the second zinc finger of the KLF1 gene, has been shown to cause a new form of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) now labeled as CDA type IV. We report the fourth documented case of this mutation, and propose a clinical diagnostic model to better identify this disease in other patients. Our patient is a Taiwanese child who presented to us at 8 years of age with severe hemolytic anemia, splenomegaly, elevated fetal hemoglobin (HbF), iron overload, and dyserythropoiesis in the bone marrow. KLF1 sequence analysis revealed a G-to-A transition in one allele of exon 3, which resulted in the substitution of a glutamate 325 by a lysine. Flow cytometry analysis revealed decreased protein expression of CD44 on the red blood cells, and decreased red blood cell deformability as measured using an ektacytometer. Blood typing revealed his red blood cells to be Co(a−b−), In(b−), LW(ab−) and Lu(b+), even though DNA testing predicted he would be Co(a+b−) and LW(a+b−ab+). This newly discovered CDA combines features of a hemoglobinopathy, RBC membrane defect and hereditary persistence of HbF (HPFH) which is not seen in previous types of CDA. Increased awareness of this phenotype may improve more prompt and accurate diagnosis of these patients. PMID:23522491

  11. A Child With Dyserythropoietic Anemia and Megakaryocyte Dysplasia Due to a Novel 5'UTR GATA1s Splice Mutation.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Jacob; Temm, Constance; Czader, Magdalena; Nalepa, Grzegorz

    2016-05-01

    We describe a child with dyserythropoietic anemia, thrombocytosis, functional platelet defect, and megakaryocyte dysplasia. We show that (i) this constellation of hematopoietic abnormalities was due to a germline mutation within the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of globin transcription factor 1 (GATA1); (ii) the mutation impaired a 5'UTR GATA1 splicing site, with promoted production of the shortened GATA1 isoform lacking the N-terminus; and (iii) expression of the GATA1 N-terminus is restricted to erythroblasts and megakaryocytes in normal marrow, consistent with the patient's abnormal erythropoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. Our findings provide insights into the clinically relevant in vivo function of the N-terminal domain of GATA1 in human hematopoiesis. PMID:26713410

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Conditions Genes Chromosomes Handbook Glossary Resources Conditions > Anemia Related topics on Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic ... syndrome beta thalassemia Coats plus syndrome congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Fanconi anemia Ghosal hematodiaphyseal dysplasia ...

  13. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Anemia Blood Transfusion Rh Incompatibility Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Send a link ... can occur during pregnancy if a woman has Rh-negative blood and her baby has Rh-positive ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: dyserythropoietic anemia and thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Epub 2011 Nov 18. Review. Splendore A, Magalhães IQ, Pombo-de-Oliveira MS. GATA1 mutations in myeloproliferative disorders: nomenclature ... Reviewed : October 2014 Published : May 17, 2016 The resources on this site should not be ...

  15. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... article? What Is Anemia? Blood Loss Iron Deficiency Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Why Teens Get Anemia Symptoms of Anemia ... an infection, chronic illness, or treatments like chemotherapy. Hemolytic Anemia In a person with hemolytic (pronounced: hee-muh- ...

  16. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Reviewed June 4, 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 552 Anemia WHAT IS ANEMIA? WHAT CAUSES ANEMIA? ... part of a complete blood count (CBC). See Fact Sheet 121 for more information on these laboratory tests. ...

  17. Pernicious anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... achylic anemia; Congenital pernicious anemia; Juvenile pernicious anemia; Vitamin B12 deficiency (malabsorption) ... Pernicious anemia is a type of vitamin B12 anemia. The body needs ... cells. You get this vitamin from eating foods such as meat, ...

  18. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle ... them and some neurodevelopmental abnormalities in children. These abnormalities include cognitive, motor, social, and language impairments. ... Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ...

  19. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough ... rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the ...

  20. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... talk to your doctor about trying a different formula or brand. How is normocytic anemia treated? Managing ... in my child? If you use iron-fortified formula, do not give your child vitamin drops with ...

  1. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  2. Iron Deficiency and Other Types of Anemia in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mary

    2016-02-15

    Anemia, defined as a hemoglobin level two standard deviations below the mean for age, is prevalent in infants and children worldwide. The evaluation of a child with anemia should begin with a thorough history and risk assessment. Characterizing the anemia as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic based on the mean corpuscular volume will aid in the workup and management. Microcytic anemia due to iron deficiency is the most common type of anemia in children. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization recommend routine screening for anemia at 12 months of age; the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to assess the benefits vs. harms of screening. Iron deficiency anemia, which can be associated with cognitive issues, is prevented and treated with iron supplements or increased intake of dietary iron. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to recommend screening or treating pregnant women for iron deficiency anemia to improve maternal or neonatal outcomes. Delayed cord clamping can improve iron status in infancy, especially for at-risk populations, such as those who are preterm or small for gestational age. Normocytic anemia may be caused by congenital membranopathies, hemoglobinopathies, enzymopathies, metabolic defects, and immune-mediated destruction. An initial reticulocyte count is needed to determine bone marrow function. Macrocytic anemia, which is uncommon in children, warrants subsequent evaluation for vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies, hypothyroidism, hepatic disease, and bone marrow disorders. PMID:26926814

  3. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) due to a lack of folate. Folate is a type ... B vitamin. It is also called folic acid. Anemia is a condition in which the body does ...

  4. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  5. Hematologically and genetically distinct forms of sickle cell anemia in Africa. The Senegal type and the Benin type.

    PubMed

    Nagel, R L; Fabry, M E; Pagnier, J; Zohoun, I; Wajcman, H; Baudin, V; Labie, D

    1985-04-01

    Patients with sickle cell anemia vary in the hematologic and clinical features of their disease, in part because of variability in the presence of linked and unlinked genes that modify the expression of the disease. The hemoglobin S gene is strongly linked to three different haplotypes of polymorphic endonuclease-restriction sites of the beta-like gene cluster (genes in the vicinity of the beta-globin gene)--one prevalent in Atlantic West Africa, another in central West Africa, and yet another in Bantu-speaking Africa (equatorial, East, and southern Africa). We have studied the differences in the hematologic characteristics of patients with sickle cell anemia from the first two geographical areas. We find that the Senegalese (Atlantic West Africa) patients have higher levels of hemoglobin F, a preponderance of G gamma chains in hemoglobin F, a lower proportion of very dense red cells, and a lower percentage of irreversibly sickled cells than those from Benin (central West Africa). We interpret these data to mean that the gamma-chain composition and the hemoglobin F level are haplotype linked and that the decrease in the percentage of dense cells and irreversibly sickled cells is secondary to the elevation in the hemoglobin F level. Patients with sickle cell anemia in the New World probably correspond to various combinations of these types, in addition to the still hematologically undefined haplotype associated with sickle cell anemia in the Bantu-speaking areas of Africa. PMID:2579336

  6. Primary bone marrow lymphoma presenting with cold-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Shigeki; Watanabe, Mai; Hoshikawa, Masahiro

    2014-09-01

    We report a rare case of primary bone marrow lymphoma with cold-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). A 70-year-old Japanese woman with suspected liver disorder presented to our hospital with palpitation. On physical examination, she had jaundice and signs of anemia. No lymphadenopathy or hepatosplenomegaly was noted. A direct antiglobulin test was positive for complement C3b and C3d. Anti-IgG testing was negative. Cold agglutinin was positive with a titer of 1:≥8,192, and haptoglobin was absent. A diagnosis of cold-type AIHA was made. Bone marrow biopsy revealed involvement with a population of lymphocytes that were positive for CD20 (L-26), CD79a, and Bcl-2. No lymphoma lesion was detected on computerized tomography or on upper and lower endoscopy. The patient was diagnosed with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) presenting with cold-type AIHA. She was treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone, resulting in complete remission after six cycles. As of 22 months after presentation, no signs of cold-type AIHA or lymphoma were present. PMID:25332595

  7. About Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? About Anemia KidsHealth > For Kids > About Anemia Print A A ... to every cell in your body. What Is Anemia? Anemia occurs when a person doesn't have ...

  8. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Aplastic Anemia? Aplastic anemia (a-PLAS-tik uh-NEE-me- ... as aplastic anemia. Updated: August 22, 2012 Aplastic Anemia in the News July 1, 2015 Largest Study ...

  9. T cell deficiency in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia ('warm type').

    PubMed

    Krüger, J; Rahman, A; Mogk, K U; Mueller-Eckhardt, C

    1976-01-01

    19 patients with chronic 'warm type' autoimmune hemolytic anemia were studied for abnormalities of cellular immune reactions. Evidence was obtained for a reduction of rosette-forming cells (RFC). Lymphocytotoxic antibodies were present in only 8 patients and correlated, with only one exception, with a reduced number of RFC. No significant deviation from normal ranges of the three major immunoglobulin classes in the patients' sera were found. C3 and C4 complement components were also, with one exception, within normal limits. In 18 of 19 patients no apparent association existed between the type or the amount of autoantibodies and/or complement components fixed on red cells and the levels of the respective immunoglobulins or complement in the sera. PMID:1084624

  10. Postoperative early hemolytic anemia due to inverted teflon felt strip after emergency repair for type A dissection.

    PubMed

    Hata, M; Yoshitake, I; Wakui, S; Unosawa, S; Hata, H; Shiono, M

    2012-10-01

    A 39-year-old man underwent emergency surgery for type A acute aortic dissection complicated by paraplegia. However, hemolytic anemia increased significantly due to severe stenosis of the proximal anastomosis one month after surgery. He finally underwent a redo procedure 4 months after the initial operation whereupon it was verified that half of the inner felt strip used for proximal stump fixation had turned up and was protruding into the inner lumen. We report here on a rare case of survival of postoperative early hemolytic anemia due to severe graft stenosis caused by an inverted inner Teflon felt strip without any extra vascular compression. PMID:21766281

  11. Pernicious Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Pernicious Anemia? Pernicious anemia (per-NISH-us uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... nervous system working properly. People who have pernicious anemia can't absorb enough vitamin B12 from food. ...

  12. Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Hemolytic Anemia? Hemolytic anemia (HEE-moh-lit-ick uh-NEE-me-uh) ... more blood cells to replace them. However, in hemolytic anemia, the bone marrow can't make red blood ...

  13. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic ... Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow is unable to replace the red blood cells that are being destroyed. Immune hemolytic anemia occurs when the immune system mistakenly sees your ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  15. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn associated with severe congenital anemia of various etiologies.

    PubMed

    Landau, Danielle; Kapelushnik, Josef; Harush, Miri B; Marks, Kyla; Shalev, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Among the many associated features of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate (PPHN), severe congenital anemia has been described only occasionally and is not included in the list of conditions that may cause PPHN in the neonate. We describe the clinical course of a group of 12 full-term neonates with PPHN and congenital anemia due to congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (7/12), α thalasemia (1/12), Diamond-Blackfan (1/12), and epsilon gamma delta beta thalassemia (3/12). The association of congenital anemia and PPHN is more common than previously thought; it can exist with various etiologies and severity of anemia. Congenital anemia has not been described until now as a cause or risk factor for PPHN; it should be considered as such alone or in combination with other known causes to be recognized early and treated appropriately to improve outcome. In families with known cases of congenital anemia due to the above-mentioned diagnosis, closer prenatal follow-up should be offered to anticipate possible fetal distress and/or fetal anemia and PPHN after birth. PMID:24309603

  16. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... infections and bleeding. Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ...

  17. Prevalence of anemia in patients with type II diabetes and mild to moderate chronic kidney disease and the impact of anti-RAS medications.

    PubMed

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Konstantina; Fourtounas, Costas

    2014-05-01

    Anemia is a common feature of diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD) mainly due to erythropoietin (EPO) deficiency and uremic toxicity. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been established as first-choice medications for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy. However, there are conflicting data regarding their impact on hemoglobin levels in patients with diabetic nephropathy. We evaluated the prevalence of anemia in 101 patients with diabetes mellitus type II and CKD at stage III-IV (group A) compared with 101 non-diabetic patients with similar renal function (group B). Moreover, we evaluated the impact of ACE inhibitors and ARBs on patients' anemia. Anemia was observed in 60 patients in group A and in 47 patients in group B (P < 0.01). Thirty-one (31) patients in group A and 19 patients in group B were receiving exogenous EPO for correction of renal anemia (P <0.05). Mean values of hemoglobin did not show significant differences (12.5 ± 1.8 vs 12.6 ± 1.7 g/dL) between the two groups. Seventy-five patients in group A and 52 patients in group B were receiving ACE inhibitors and/or ARBs (P <0.01), but, after multivariate analysis, we could not detect any association between anemia and the prescription of these medications. Anemia is more common in diabetic patients with CKD stage III-IV than in non-diabetic patients with similar renal function. Our results indicate that ACE inhibitors and ARBs are not a significant cause of anemia for both populations. PMID:24821151

  18. What Causes Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease ... to die faster than healthy red blood cells. Hemolytic anemia is another example of a condition in which ...

  19. Aplastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells. But the disease may return (relapse). A bone marrow transplant with an unrelated donor may be tried if ... Untreated, severe aplastic anemia leads to rapid death. Bone marrow transplant can be very successful in young people. Transplant ...

  20. [Hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Tuchscherer, A; Chemnitz, J

    2015-09-01

    Hemolytic anemia can be caused by various hereditary or acquired diseases. Classification is usually based on corpuscular or extracorpuscular defects. Beside the anemia, laboratory testing indicates increased lactate dehydrogenase, unconjugated bilirubin and reticulocytes as well as reduced or absent plasma haptoglobin. Knowledge of further diagnostic procedures (e.g., Coombs test, schistocytes, hemoglobin electrophoresis or flow cytometric analysis) leads in many cases to an underlying disease with differentiated therapeutic options. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is often associated with diseases as HIV, connective tissue disease, lymphomas or malignant tumors and the hemolytic process is preexisting in many cases. Thrombotic microvascular diseases (e.g., thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura or hemolytic-uremic syndrome) are further important causes of hemolytic anemia which need immediate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26245867

  1. Distinct Roles of Urinary Liver-Type Fatty Acid-Binding Protein in Non-Diabetic Patients with Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Naohiko; Yasuda, Takashi; Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Shibagaki, Yugo; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Various stresses including ischemia are known to up-regulate renal L-FABP gene expression and increase the urinary excretion of L-FABP. In diabetic patients with anemia, the urinary excretion of L-FABP is significantly increased. We studied the clinical significance of urinary L-FABP and its relationship with anemia in non-diabetic patients. Subjects and Methods A total of 156 patients were studied in this retrospective cross-sectional analysis. The associations between anemia and urinary L-FABP levels, and the predictors of urinary L-FABP levels in non-diabetic patients were evaluated. Results Urinary L-FABP levels were significantly higher in patients with anemia compared to those in patients without anemia. Similarly, the urinary L-FABP levels were significantly higher in patients with albuminuria compared to those in patients without albuminuria. Urinary L-FABP levels correlated with urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratios, estimated glomerular filtration rates, body mass index, and hemoglobin levels. Multivariate linear regression analysis determined that hemoglobin levels (β = -0.249, P = 0.001) and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratios (β = 0.349, P < 0.001) were significant predictors of urinary L-FABP levels. Conclusions Urinary L-FABP is strongly associated with anemia in non-diabetic patients. PMID:26010898

  2. [Iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disorders].

    PubMed

    Metzgeroth, G; Hastka, J

    2015-09-01

    Hypochromic-microcytic anemias are characterized by a hemoglobin deficiency of the erythrocytes. The main reason for the insufficient hemoglobin synthesis is, with exception of thalassemia and a few other rare conditions, primarily a disorder of iron metabolism. Differential diagnostic considerations are focused on iron deficiency anemia, with approximately 80% the most common form of anemia worldwide. Iron deficiency anemia shows a particularly high prevalence in developing countries, but is also in industrialized Western countries the most common cause of anemia. Infants, toddlers, premenopausal or pregnant women, and elderly people are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency anemia. The most important differential diagnosis for iron deficiency anemia is the anemia of chronic disorders (ACD). This anemia is caused by a disturbance of iron utilization (functional iron deficiency), in which iron absorption and iron release, as a nonspecific defense mechanism, is blocked to restrict iron availability for the inflammatory process but also withhold iron from the erythropoiesis. ACD is not rare, but plays a significant role in hospitalized patients and in the elderly. The differentiation between ACD and iron deficiency anemia is highly important from a clinical point of view, due to different types of further management. The cause for iron deficiency should be clarified in each case, whereas the etiology for ACD is often obvious. The standard treatment of iron deficiency anemia is oral iron supplementation. Intravenous iron application is reserved for problem patients. The best treatment for ACD is the elimination of the underlying chronic disorder. In case of persistent ACD, red blood cell transfusions, erythropoietin, and intravenous iron are used therapeutically. PMID:26228317

  3. Reticulocytopenia in severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) of the warm antibody type.

    PubMed

    Hauke, G; Fauser, A A; Weber, S; Maas, D

    1983-06-01

    A patient with severe AIHA of the warm antibody type, absence of reticulocytes and red cell hyperplasia of the bone marrow is described. In order to maintain a reasonable hemoglobin level 38 units of washed packed red cells were required within 24 days. The treatment with high doses of steroids showed no permanent beneficial effect. After splenectomy the red cell destruction was immediately reduced and the patient went into a remission. Bone marrow culture studies during the acute phase of the disease and at the time of complete hemato- and immunological remission, i.e. 4 months after splenectomy suggested a circulating autoantibody directed to early erythroid progenitors (BFU-E). The inhibitory activity in the patient's plasma did not influence granulocytic or mixed colony formation (CFU-GEMM). In addition to autoantibodies directed to erythroblasts and erythropoietin involved in the pathogenic mechanisms leading to red cell aplasia type I and II the culture studies suggest an unusual autoantibody that might cause the observed reticulocytopenia and erythropoietic hyperplasia of the bone marrow in AIHA. After the splenectomy the patient recovered, he required no further blood transfusions and his disease has not recurred. PMID:6850101

  4. First report of co-morbidity of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and three types of chronic hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Talaat, Iman M.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; El Melegy, Ebtessam H.K.; Alghamdi, Hamed A.; Aljabri, Mohammed F.; Abdallah, Enas A.A.; Sarar, Mohammed; Alshahrani, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), sickle cell anemia, and thalassemia are autosomal recessive disorders that can cause iron deposition in tissues during childhood. PKAN is characterized by accumulation of iron in the basal ganglia causing progressive extrapyramidal manifestations. Thalassemia and sickle cell disease can cause iron overload and deposition in tissues, including central nervous system. Presentation of case we herein report the first report of comorbidity of PKAN, ?-thalassemia-major, sickle cell and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) anemias in a 9 years old Saudi female patient who presented with gait disturbance, speech difficulty, and progressive movement disorders of the neck, upper and lower limbs. Conclusion Although extremely rare, ?-thalassemia-major, sickle cell and G6PD anemias can be associated with PKAN. It is unknown whether this association is random or due to an unknown factor that may have caused several mutations. PMID:26740874

  5. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1981-1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1982-07-19

    Hereditary anemias of mice are the chief objects of investigation, specificially four macrocytic anemias, 3 types of hemolytic anemia, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB mice, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia and a new hypochromic anemia with hemochromatosis. New types of anemia may be analyzed as new mutations appear. Three new mutations have been identified during the past 18 months. These anemias are studied through characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, study of normal and abnormal erythrocyte membrane proteins, histological and biochemical characterization of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem-cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue and parabiosis between individuals of differently affected genotypes. 31 refs.

  6. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia of inflammation; AOCD; ACD ... Anemia is a lower-than-normal number of red blood cells in the blood. Some conditions can lead to anemia of chronic disease include: Autoimmune disorders , such as ...

  7. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    MedlinePlus

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  8. Living with Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Anemia Often, you can treat and control anemia. If ... by an inherited or chronic disease or trauma. Anemia and Children/Teens Infants and young children have ...

  9. Severe Aplastic Anemia (SAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email this page Print this page Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a disease in which the bone ... blood cells for the body. Tweet Severe aplastic anemia Symptoms of SAA How transplant can treat SAA ...

  10. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute -- www. ...

  11. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Fanconi Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Fanconi Anemia? Major Signs and Symptoms Your doctor may suspect ... sisters also should be tested for the disorder. Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  12. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial. PMID:26818422

  13. Anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alfred Ian; Okam, Maureen M

    2011-04-01

    Anemia in pregnancy is a global health problem affecting nearly half of all pregnant women worldwide. High fetal demands for iron render iron deficiency the most common cause of anemia of pregnancy, with other micronutrient deficiencies contributing less frequently. In certain geographical populations, human pathogens such as hookworm, malarial parasite and human immunodeficiency virus are important factors in anemia of pregnancy. The hemoglobinopathies, sickle cell disease and thalassemia, represent diverse causes of anemia of pregnancy, requiring specialized care. Aplastic anemia is a rare, morbid cause of anemia of pregnancy and is managed with transfusions until the completion of pregnancy. PMID:21444028

  14. An extensive DeBakey type IIIb aortic dissection with massive right pleural effusion presenting as abdominal pain and acute anemia: particular case report

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hui-Chun; Wang, Zhen-Qing; Hao, Yuan-Yuan; An, Feng-Ping; Hu, Yu-Chuan; Deng, Rui-Bing; Yu, Peng; Cui, Guang-Bin; Li, He

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 79-year-old male presented with sudden onset of abdominal pain and mild breathlessness, and complicated acute progressive anemia with haemoglobin which declined from 120 g/L to 70 g/L within five days. An urgent computed tomography angiography showed acute thoracic aortic dissection, DeBakey type IIIb, a dissecting aneurysm in the proximal descending thoracic aorta starting immediately after the origin of the left subclavian artery and extending distally below the renal arteries with evidence of rupture into the right pleural cavity for massive pleural effusion. Plasma D-dimer, brain natriuretic peptide and C reactive protein level were elevated. Our case showed that D-dimer can be used as a ‘rule-out’ test in patients with suspected aortic dissection. A raised BNP may exert a protective role through anti-inflammatory endothelial actions in the systemic circulation. PMID:26089858

  15. An extensive DeBakey type IIIb aortic dissection with massive right pleural effusion presenting as abdominal pain and acute anemia: particular case report.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-Chun; Wang, Zhen-Qing; Hao, Yuan-Yuan; An, Feng-Ping; Hu, Yu-Chuan; Deng, Rui-Bing; Yu, Peng; Cui, Guang-Bin; Li, He

    2015-05-01

    We describe the case of a 79-year-old male presented with sudden onset of abdominal pain and mild breathlessness, and complicated acute progressive anemia with haemoglobin which declined from 120 g/L to 70 g/L within five days. An urgent computed tomography angiography showed acute thoracic aortic dissection, DeBakey type IIIb, a dissecting aneurysm in the proximal descending thoracic aorta starting immediately after the origin of the left subclavian artery and extending distally below the renal arteries with evidence of rupture into the right pleural cavity for massive pleural effusion. Plasma D-dimer, brain natriuretic peptide and C reactive protein level were elevated. Our case showed that D-dimer can be used as a 'rule-out' test in patients with suspected aortic dissection. A raised BNP may exert a protective role through anti-inflammatory endothelial actions in the systemic circulation. PMID:26089858

  16. Anemia and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2015 ASH Annual Meeting View all publications Home Anemia and Pregnancy Your body goes through significant changes ... becoming anemic. back to top Is Pregnancy-Related Anemia Preventable? Good nutrition is the best way to ...

  17. Congenital spherocytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... spheres, and premature breakdown of red blood cells ( hemolytic anemia ). ... Schwartz RS. Autoimmune and intravascular hemolytic anemias In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 163.

  18. How Is Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and whether you have family members who have anemia or a history of it. Physical Exam Your doctor will do a physical exam to find out how severe your anemia is and to check for possible causes. He ...

  19. The Anemias of Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  20. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dacie, J V

    1975-10-01

    Warm-type autoantibodies of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) are usually IgG but may be IgM or IgA. They are usual Rh specific. Cold-type antibodies are IgM or IgG (Donath-Landsteiner [DL] antibody). IgM antibodies are usually anit-l (occasionally anti-i) and DL antibodies anti-P. The warm IgG antibodies do not fix complement (C); they cause red blood cell (RBC) destruction predominantly in the spleen as the result of interaction between fixing; they cause RBC destruction either by intravascular lysis (complement sequence completed) or by interaction between C3-coated RBCs and phagocytes in liver and spleen. Gentic factors, immunoglobulin deficiency, somatic mutation, viral infections and drugs, and failure of T-lymphocyte function, all probably play a part in breaking immunological tolerance and the development of AIHA. PMID:1164110

  1. The Global Burden of Anemia.

    PubMed

    Kassebaum, Nicholas J

    2016-04-01

    Anemia is an important cause of health loss. We estimated levels and trends of nonfatal anemia burden for 23 distinct etiologies in 188 countries, 20 age groups, and both sexes from 1990 to 2013. All available population-level anemia data were collected and standardized. We estimated mean hemoglobin, prevalence of anemia by severity, quantitative disability owing to anemia, and underlying etiology for each population using the approach of the Global Burden of Disease, Injuries and Risk Factors 2013 Study. Anemia burden is high. Developing countries account for 89% of all anemia-related disability. Iron-deficiency anemia remains the dominant cause of anemia. PMID:27040955

  2. Inborn anemias in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  3. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated? Doctors treat pernicious anemia by replacing the missing vitamin B12 in the body. People who have pernicious anemia may need lifelong treatment. The goals of treating ...

  4. Homozygous mutations in LPIN2 are responsible for the syndrome of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis and congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia (Majeed syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, P; Chen, S; Tayeh, M; Ochoa, L; Leal, S; Pelet, A; Munnich, A; Lyonnet, S; Majeed, H; El-Shanti, H

    2005-01-01

    Background: Majeed syndrome is an autosomal recessive, autoinflammatory disorder characterised by chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis and congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia. The objectives of this study were to map, identify, and characterise the Majeed syndrome causal gene and to speculate on its function and role in skin and bone inflammation. Methods: Six individuals with Majeed syndrome from two unrelated families were identified for this study. Homozygosity mapping and parametric linkage analysis were employed for the localisation of the gene responsible for Majeed syndrome. Direct sequencing was utilised for the identification of mutations within the genes contained in the region of linkage. Expression studies and in silico characterisation of the identified causal gene and its protein were carried out. Results: The phenotype of Majeed syndrome includes inflammation of the bone and skin, recurrent fevers, and dyserythropoietic anaemia. The clinical picture of the six affected individuals is briefly reviewed. The gene was mapped to a 5.5 cM interval (1.8 Mb) on chromosome 18p. Examination of genes in this interval led to the identification of homozygous mutations in LPIN2 in affected individuals from the two families. LPIN2 was found to be expressed in almost all tissues. The function of LPIN2 and its role in inflammation remains unknown. Conclusions: We conclude that homozygous mutations in LPIN2 result in Majeed syndrome. Understanding the aberrant immune response in this condition will shed light on the aetiology of other inflammatory disorders of multifactorial aetiology including isolated chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis, Sweet syndrome, and psoriasis. PMID:15994876

  5. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  6. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They ... last as long as normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also ...

  7. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  8. Anemia awareness campaign.

    PubMed

    1999-07-01

    The National Minority AIDS Council (NMAC) and model/actress Daisy Fuentes are launching a national awareness campaign to encourage people with HIV/AIDS to discuss anemia with their doctors. The "Celebrate Life" campaign includes public service announcements, a toll-free hotline, and a web site for further information. Anemia is a common complication of HIV treatment, and is easily diagnosed. Persons with anemia often suffer from symptoms including fatigue, shortness of breath, and loss of appetite and sex drive. The campaign contact information is provided. PMID:11367079

  9. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Aplastic Anemia? Damage to the bone marrow's stem ... system attacks its own cells by mistake. Acquired Causes Many diseases, conditions, and factors can cause aplastic ...

  10. Living with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... to support groups that offer help with financial planning, because treatment for aplastic anemia can be ... National Institutes of Health—Dr. Neal Young talks about the importance of conducting and taking part in clinical trials. ...

  11. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the only cure for sickle cell disease is stem cell transplant , but it's a complex and risky procedure. ... About Going Away to College? Blood Blood Transfusions Stem Cell Transplants Anemia Will I Pass Sickle Cell Disease ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ... 18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  13. Living with Fanconi Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Fanconi Anemia Improvements in blood and marrow stem cell transplants have increased the chances of living longer with FA. Also, researchers are studying new and promising treatments for FA. However, the disorder still presents serious ...

  14. Cooley's Anemia Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    Cooley's Anemia Foundation Leading the Fight against Thalassemia About Us Mission/Purpose History Medical Research Board/Staff Contact the Foundation U.S. Patients: Register for Information Learn about Thalassemia ...

  15. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated? Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will depend ... may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  16. Facts about Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Form Controls NCBDDD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare blood disorder ...

  17. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    N ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Anemia “I told my doctor that I was ... or exercise a little every day. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Anemia Eat and drink well. ● ● Talk with your ...

  18. How Is Hemolytic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines rituximab and cyclosporine. If you have severe sickle cell anemia , your doctor may recommend a medicine called hydroxyurea. ... hemoglobin that newborns have. In people who have sickle cell anemia, fetal hemoglobin helps prevent red blood cells from ...

  19. Genetic modulation of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.H.

    1995-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia, a common disorder associated with reduced life span of the red blood cell and vasoocclusive events, is caused by a mutation in the {Beta}-hemoglobin gene. Yet, despite this genetic homogeneity, the phenotype of the disease is heterogeneous. This suggests the modulating influence of associated inherited traits. Some of these may influence the accumulation of fetal hemoglobin, a hemoglobin type that interferes with the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin. Another inherited trait determines the accumulation of {alpha}-globin chains. This review focuses on potential genetic regulators of the phenotype of sickle cell anemia. 125 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. PMID:26575109

  1. [Microcytic and hypochromic anemias].

    PubMed

    Chrobk, L

    2001-03-01

    In the majority of cases, microcytosis is the result of impaired hemoglobin synthesis. Disorders of iron metabolism and protoporphyrin and heme synthesis, as well as impaired globin synthesis, lead to defective hemoglobin production and to the generation of microcytosis and microcytic anemia. Iron deficiency anemie, anemia of chronic diseases, thalassemias, congenital sideroblastic anemias and homozygous HbE disease are the main representatives of microcytosis and microcytic anemias. Serum iron, total iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, serum transferrin receptor, transferrin receptor-ferritin index, and zinc-protoporhyrin concentration in erythrocytes are tests used for assessment of iron deficiency. The convention laboratory test for diagnosing iron deficiency is the measurement of serum ferritin. The most precise method for evaluating body iron stores is the examination for iron on aspirated bone marrow or marrow biopsy. Increased content of Hb A2 over 3.5% is diagnostic for beta-thalassemia. Presence of ringed sideroblasts is characteristic of sideroblastic anemias. Hemoglobin electrophoresis is required for the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathy E. The optimal therapeutic regimen in iron deficiency anemia used in this country is to administer 100 mg of elemental iron twice daily separately from meals. Ferrous sulphate (Ferronat Retard tbl. or Sorbifer Dulures tbl.) which are slow-releasing iron formulations are preferred because of their low cost, high bioavailability and low side-effects. Parenteral iron therapy is justified only in patients who cannot absorb iron, who have blood losses that exceed the maximal absorptive capacity of their intestinal tract or who are totally intolerant of oral iron. However, parenteral iron therapy may be associated with serious and even fatal side-effects. PMID:15635879

  2. Anemia and Oxygen Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    Clinical assessment of tissue oxygenation is challenging. Anemia reflects a decreased oxygen carrying capacity of the blood and its significance in the perioperative setting relates largely to the associated risk of insufficient oxygen delivery and cellular hypoxia. Until meaningful clinical measures of tissue oxygenation are available in veterinary practice, clinicians must rely on evaluation of a patient's hemodynamic and ventilatory performance, along with biochemical and hemogasometric measurements. Blood transfusion is used commonly for treatment of perioperative anemia, and may improve tissue oxygenation by normalizing the rheologic properties of blood and enhancing perfusion, independent of increases in oxygen carrying capacity. PMID:26033442

  3. [Anemia and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Vignot, Stphane; Spano, Jean-Philippe

    2005-05-01

    Colorectal cancers are classically revealed by a low digestive bleeding, which can be occult or exteriorized. They commonly present anemia at the diagnosis leading to particular outcomes. Perioperative blood transfusions are frequently indicated for the treatment of localized tumors and for hepatic resection of metastatic lesions but transfusions seem to have a negative impact on prognosis by increasing infections and potentially recurrence. In this context, various strategies aim at limiting the transfusional risk (autologous transfusion, preoperative use of erythropoietin...). Anemia associated with advanced colorectal cancers provides the same interest as for any metastatic tumor, as quality of life of patients is correlated to the hemoglobin's level. PMID:15932806

  4. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed? People who have Fanconi anemia (FA) are born with the disorder. They may ... questions about: Any personal or family history of anemia Any surgeries you’ve had related to the ...

  5. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ... your primary care doctor thinks you have aplastic anemia, he or she may refer you to a ...

  6. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated? Doctors decide how to treat Fanconi anemia (FA) based on a person's age and how ... Long-term treatments for FA can: Cure the anemia. Damaged bone marrow cells are replaced with healthy ...

  7. Management of Anemia of Inflammation in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia

    2012-01-01

    Anemia of any degree is recognized as a significant independent contributor to morbidity, mortality, and frailty in elderly patients. Among the broad types of anemia in the elderly a peculiar role seems to be played by the anemia associated with chronic inflammation, which remains the most complex form of anemia to treat. The origin of this nonspecific inflammation in the elderly has not yet been clarified. It seems more plausible that the oxidative stress that accompanies ageing is the real cause of chronic inflammation of the elderly and that the same oxidative stress is actually a major cause of this anemia. The erythropoietic agents have the potential to play a therapeutic role in this patient population. Despite some promising results, rHuEPO does not have a specific indication for the treatment of anemia in the elderly. Moreover, concerns about their side effects have spurred the search for alternatives. Considering the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of anemia of inflammation in the elderly population, an integrated nutritional/dietetic approach with nutraceuticals that can manipulate oxidative stress and related inflammation may prevent the onset of this anemia and its negative impact on patients' performance and quality of life. PMID:23091709

  8. Preoperative Anemia: Evaluation and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kansagra, Ankit J; Stefan, Mihaela S

    2016-03-01

    Previously undiagnosed anemia is often identified during routine assessment of surgical patients. Although studies suggest that perioperative anemia is associated with worse outcomes and a strong predictor for postoperative red cell transfusions, anemia is frequently ignored. Preoperative optimization of patients undergoing elective surgical procedures associated with significant blood loss, along with strategies to minimize intraoperative blood loss, shows promise for reducing postoperative transfusions and improving outcomes. In most situations, anemia can be corrected prior to elective surgeries and interventions. Future research should assess the timing and methods of optimization of preoperative anemia in surgery and which patients are best candidates for therapy. PMID:26927743

  9. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... in hemochromatosis, which is another type of iron overload disorder. Learn more about the genes associated with X-linked sideroblastic anemia ALAS2 HFE Related Information What is a gene? What is a gene ...

  10. Hepcidin and sports anemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important mineral element used by the body in a variety of metabolic and physiologic processes. These processes are highly active when the body is undergoing physical exercises. Prevalence of exercise-induced iron deficiency anemia (also known as sports anemia) is notably high in athletic populations, particularly those with heavy training loads. The pathogenesis of sports anemia is closely related to disorders of iron metabolism, and a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of iron metabolism in the course of physical exercises could expand ways of treatment and prevention of sports anemia. In recent years, there have been remarkable research advances regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying changes of iron metabolism in response to physical exercises. This review has covered these advances, including effects of exercise on duodenum iron absorption, serum iron status, iron distribution in organs, erythropoiesis, and hepcidin’s function and its regulation. New methods for the treatment of exercise-induced iron deficiency are also discussed. PMID:24731443

  11. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.

  12. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  13. Anemia and School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  14. Anemia and School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among

  15. Prevalence, severity, and related factors of anemia in HIV/AIDS patients

    PubMed Central

    Meidani, Mohsen; Rezaei, Farshid; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Avijgan, Majid; Tayeri, Katayoun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The prevalence of anemia in HIV infected patients has not been well characterized in Iran. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of anemia and related factors in HIV positive patients. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, anemia prevalence and risk factors of 212 HIV positive patients were assessed, at the behavioral disease consulting center in Isfahan. The relationship between anemia, demographic variables, and clinical histories were analyzed. Mild to moderate anemia was defined as hemoglobin 8–13 g/dL for men and 8–12 g/dL for women. Severe anemia was defined as hemoglobin, 8 g/dL. Results: A total of 212 HIV positive patients with a mean±SD age of 36.1 ± 9.1 years were assessed. We found that hemoglobin levels were between 4.7 and 16.5 gr/dL. In this study, the overall prevalence of anemia was 71%, with the majority of patients having mild to moderate anemia. Mild to moderate anemia and severe anemia occurred in 67% and 4% of patients, respectively. The mean absolute CD4 count was 348 ± 267.8 cells/cubic mm. Sixty one of 212 patients were at late stage of HIV infection (males=51 and female=10). Of the 212 HIV positive patients enrolled, 17 (8%) had a positive history of tuberculosis. We found a strong association between anemia and death. Conclusion: Normocytic anemia with decreased reticulocyte count was the most common type of anemia in overall. Prevalence of anemia in this study is relatively higher than other similar studies. Such a high prevalence of anemia needs close monitoring of patients on a zidovudine-based regimen. Better screening for anemia and infectious diseases, and modified harm reduction strategy (HRS) for injection drug users are primary needs in HIV seropositive patients. PMID:23264786

  16. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  17. Nutritional anemia and its control.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Deeksha; Agarwal, Kailash Nath; Agarwal, Dev Kumari

    2002-07-01

    Available studies on prevalence of nutritional anemia in India show that 65% infant and toddlers, 60% 1-6 years of age, 88% adolescent girls (3.3% had hemoglobin < 7.0 g/dl; severe anemia) and 85% pregnant women (9.9% having severe anemia) were anemic. The prevalence of anemia was marginally higher in lactating women as compared to pregnancy. The commonest is iron deficiency anemia. National programmes to control and prevent anemia have not been successful. Experiences from other countries in controlling moderately-severe anemia guide to adopt long-term measures i.e. fortification of food items like milk, cereal, sugar, salt with iron. Use of iron utensils in boiling milk, cooking vegetables etc may contribute significant amount of dietary iron. Nutrition education to improve dietary intakes in family for receiving needed macro/micro nutrients as protein, iron and vitamins like folic acid, B12, A and C etc. for hemoglobin synthesis is important. As an immediate measure medicinal iron is necessary to control anemia. Addition of folate with iron controls anemia and is neuroprotective. Evidence in early childhood suggests vitamin B12 deficiency anemia; thus it may also be given along with iron and folate. PMID:12173702

  18. Anemia in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, K U

    2001-02-15

    Anemia is a frequent finding in patients treated in ICUs and results in a high number of red blood cell transfusions. Many patients are already admitted to ICUs with subnormal hemoglobin values. Surgery, frequent phlebotomies and overt bleeding episodes are obvious reasons for continuous blood loss during the ICU stay. However, these causes are usually not sufficient to explain the total blood consumption of critically ill patients, which may amount to several liters. Reduced red cell life span and occult gastrointestinal bleeding are possibly important contributory factors. Irrespective of the cause the erythropoietic response to anemia is severely blunted, as a consequence of an inappropriate increase in erythropoietin production, diminished iron availability and direct inhibitory effects of inflammatory cytokines. The importance of anemia for the course and outcome of critically ill patients and its optimal therapy remain to be defined. Considering red blood cell transfusions recent evidence indicates that a target range of 7-9 g/dl hemoglobin is at least as safe and may even be superior compared to a more liberal transfusion strategy. However, the optimal transfusion trigger in relation to patient comorbidity requires further investigation. Rigorous strategies of blood conservation may help to avoid transfusions. Red blood cell substitutes and recombinant erythropoietin are promising treatment options that are currently under investigation. PMID:11253745

  19. Understanding anemia of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Paula G

    2015-01-01

    The anemia of chronic disease is an old disease concept, but contemporary research in the role of proinflammatory cytokines and iron biology has shed new light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Recent epidemiologic studies have connected the anemia of chronic disease with critical illness, obesity, aging, and kidney failure, as well as with the well-established associations of cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmune disease. Functional iron deficiency, mediated principally by the interaction of interleukin-6, the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin, and the iron exporter ferroportin, is a major contributor to the anemia of chronic disease. Although anemia is associated with adverse outcomes, experimental models suggest that iron sequestration is desirable in the setting of severe infection. Experimental therapeutic approaches targeting interleukin-6 or the ferroportin-hepcidin axis have shown efficacy in reversing anemia in either animal models or human patients, although these agents have not yet been approved for the treatment of the anemia of chronic disease. PMID:26637695

  20. Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Spano, Filippo; Giardina, Irene; Brillo, Eleonora; Clerici, Graziano; Roura, Luis Cabero

    2015-11-01

    Anemia is the most frequent derailment of physiology in the world throughout the life of a woman. It is a serious condition in countries that are industrialized and in countries with poor resources. The main purpose of this manuscript is to give the right concern of anemia in pregnancy. The most common causes of anemia are poor nutrition, iron deficiencies, micronutrients deficiencies including folic acid, vitamin A and vitamin B12, diseases like malaria, hookworm infestation and schistosomiasis, HIV infection and genetically inherited hemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia. Depending on the severity and duration of anemia and the stage of gestation, there could be different adverse effects including low birth weight and preterm delivery. Treatment of mild anemia prevents more severe forms of anemia, strictly associated with increased risk of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity. PMID:26472066

  1. Dyserythropoiesis in a child with pyruvate kinase deficiency and coexistent unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney.

    PubMed

    Haija, Marwa Abu El; Qian, You-Wen; Muthukumar, Akila

    2014-08-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency is the commonest enzyme deficiency in the glycolytic pathway leading to hemolytic anemia secondary to decreased Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) synthesis in the red cells. synthesis. PK deficiency due to mutations in the PKLR (1q21) gene leads to highly variable clinical presentation ranging from severe fetal anemia to well compensated anemia in adults. We describe dyserythropoiesis in the bone marrow of a child with transfusion dependent anemia and unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK) mimicking Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia type I (CDA type I). Persistently low erythrocyte PK levels and double heterozygous mutations present in the PKLR gene confirmed the diagnosis of PK deficiency. PMID:24481986

  2. Who Is at Risk for Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Anemia? Anemia is a common condition. It ... people have other medical conditions as well. Major Risk Factors Factors that raise your risk for anemia ...

  3. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 270 KB). Alternate Language URL Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease Page Content On ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which a person ...

  4. Anemia as the Main Manifestation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Valeria

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a constellation of different diseases sharing anemia in the great majority of cases, and this cytopenia defines these pathologies and their most dramatic clinical manifestations. Anemia in MDS is due to ineffective erythropoiesis, with a high degree of apoptosis of marrow erythroid progenitors. These progenitors show distinctive dysplastic features that consent diagnosis, and are recognizable and differentiated, although not easily, from other morphologic alterations present in other types of anemia. Reaching the diagnosis of MDS in a macrocytic anemia and alleviating the symptoms of anemia are therefore an essential objective of the treating physician. In this work, the signs and symptoms of anemia in MDS, as well as its peculiar pathophysiology, are discussed. Erythopoietic stimulating agents (ESAs) are providing the best treatment for anemic MDS patients, but their use is still not approved by health agencies. While still waiting for this waiver, their clinical use is widespread and their effectivness is well known, as well as the dismal prognosis of patients who do not respond to ESAs and require transfusions. MDS with del5q constitute a unique model of anemia whose complex pathophysiology has been clarified at least partially, defining its link to ribosomal alterations likewise what observed in hereditary anemias like Blackfan Diamond anemia. Lenalidomide is the agent that has shown striking and specific erythropoietic activity in del5q MDS, and the basis of this response is starting to be understood. Several new agents are under evaluation for ESA refractory/relapsed MDS patients, targeting different putative mechanisms of ineffective erythropoiesis, and are here reviewed. PMID:26404446

  5. Congenital Anomalies in Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA)

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital Anomalies In Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) CS217857 National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities Division of Blood Disorders Congenital Anomalies In Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) ...

  6. Cardio-renal anemia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Efstratiadis, G; Konstantinou, D; Chytas, I; Vergoulas, G

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between cronic heart failure, cronic kidney insufficiency and anemia, form a vicious cycle, termed as the cardio-renal anemia syndrome. The interaction between these three conditions causes deterioration of the cardiac and renal function and increases anemia. Each of the three can cause or be caused by the others. We herein analyze and speculate the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of this new syndrome highlighting the main points of interest that seem to expand upon more than one specialty. The cardio-renal anemia syndrome is emerging in the area of clinical investigation with progressively elevated significance. Additionaly we report the data related to anemia treatment as part of therapeutic perspective concerning the management of patients manifesting the profile of this syndrome. PMID:18923761

  7. [Early anemia in diabetic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Judit; Kiss, István; Wittmann, István

    2005-02-27

    The number of diabetic patients with renal disease increased significantly in the last years worldwide. Anemia is an important and frequent component of diabetic nephropathy that may begin early in the course of the chronic renal disease of diabetics, and is more severe in diabetic patients with renal disease than in non - diabetic renal patients controlled for the same level of renal function. The reason for the anemia is decreased erythropoietin level caused by diminished production and, in a lesser degree, by increased excretion of erythropoietin in the urine. There is a close connection between diabetic nephropathy, anemia and cardiovascular complications. On the basis of small studies correction of anemia may decrease the progression of diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular complications. However, the result of ongoing large randomised controlled studies are required to get "evidence-based" data to prove that correction of anemia has beneficial effects on microvascular and macrovascular diabetic complications, particularly cardiac disease, and on progression of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:15830606

  8. Concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves’ disease, and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Clifford D

    2009-01-01

    Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia is due to the presence of warm agglutinins that react with protein antigens on the surface of red blood cells causing premature destruction of circulating red blood cells. We report the first case of concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves’ disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. A 40-year-old man with reactive arthritis, Graves’ disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, mitral valve prolapse, and Gilbert’s disease presented with a one month history of jaundice, fatigue, and black stools. After diagnosis of warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, the patient was started on prednisone 1 mg/kg with rapid improvement in his anemia and jaundice. Our subject’s mother and possibly his maternal grandmother also had autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which raises the possibility of hereditary autoimmune hemolytic anemia, a rarely reported condition. PMID:19918501

  9. Anemia in Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Prevalence, pathogenesis, and potential impact

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Rajta, Puja Negi; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common preventable and treatable lifestyle-related disease with high global prevalence. COPD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Comorbidities are important events in the natural history of the disease and have a negative effect on the morbidity and mortality of COPD patients. Cardiac diseases, lung cancer, osteoporosis, and depression are common comorbidities reported for COPD. Recently, anemia has been recognized as a frequent comorbidity in COPD patients. The prevalence of anemia in patients with COPD varies from 7.5% to 33%. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is probably the most common type of anemia associated with COPD. ACD is driven by COPD-mediated systemic inflammation. Anemia in COPD is associated with greater healthcare resource utilization, impaired quality of life, decreased survival, and a greater likelihood of hospitalization. We need large prospective studies to discern the association between anemia and COPD. PMID:25814799

  10. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... need for blood transfusions. Medicines To Suppress the Immune System Research suggests that aplastic anemia may sometimes occur because the body's immune system attacks its own cells by mistake. For this ...

  11. Sexuality and sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Côbo, Viviane de Almeida; Chapadeiro, Cibele Alves; Ribeiro, João Batista; Moraes-Souza, Helio; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano

    2013-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease, the most common hereditary blood disease in the world, is the result of an atypical hemoglobin called S (Hb S) which, when homozygous (Hb SS) is the cause of sickle cell anemia. Changes of puberty, correlated with a delayed growth spurt, begin late in both male and female sickle cell anemia individuals with repercussions on sexuality and reproduction. The objectives of this exploratory and descriptive study were to characterize the development of sexuality in adults with sickle cell anemia by investigating the patient's perception of their sex life, as well as the information they had and needed on this subject. Methods Twenty male and female sickle cell anemia patients treated at the Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba (UFTM) with ages between 19 and 47 years old were enrolled. A socioeconomic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview on sexuality, reproduction and genetic counseling were applied. Results This study shows that the sickle cell anemia patients lacked information on sexuality especially about the risks of pregnancy and the possible inheritance of the disease by their children. Moreover, the sexual life of the patients was impaired due to pain as well as discrimination and negative feelings experienced in close relationships. Conclusion The health care of sickle cell anemia patients should take into account not only the clinical aspects of the disease, but also psychosocial aspects by providing counseling on sexuality, reproduction and genetics, in order to give this population the possibility of a better quality of life. PMID:23741184

  12. Erythroferrone contributes to recovery from anemia of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kautz, Lon; Jung, Grace; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2014-01-01

    Erythroferrone (ERFE) is an erythropoiesis-driven regulator of iron homeostasis. ERFE mediates the suppression of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin to increase iron absorption and mobilization of iron from stores. We examined the role of ERFE in the recovery from anemia of inflammation (AI) induced by injection of heat-killed Brucella abortus. B abortustreated wild-type mice developed a moderate anemia and reached nadir hemoglobin 14 days after injection and partially recovered by 28 days. We observed that Erfe expression in the bone marrow and the spleen was greatly increased during anemia and peaked at 14 days after injection, a time course similar to serum erythropoietin. To determine whether ERFE facilitates the recovery from anemia, we analyzed Erfe-deficient mice injected with B abortus. Compared with wild-type mice, Erfe-deficient mice exhibited a more severe anemia, had higher hepcidin levels and consequently lower serum iron concentration on days 14 and 21, and manifested impaired mobilization of iron from stores (liver and spleen). Erfe?/? mice eventually compensated by further stimulating erythropoiesis and reticulocyte production. Thus, ERFE contributes to the recovery from AI by suppressing hepcidin and increasing iron availability. PMID:25193872

  13. [The importance of genetic counseling at sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Cínthia Tavares Leal; Coelho, Gabriela Ortega

    2010-06-01

    The genetic counseling has the purpose of guiding people through a conscientious and balanced decision making process regarding procreation, helping them to understand how the hereditary succession can contribute for the occurrence or risk of recurrence of genetic illnesses, as it is the case of the sickle cell anemia. This type of anemia is the most prevalence hereditary illness in Brazil and has clinical complications that can harm the development, the quality of life and lead to death. The present article has the objective to clarify the importance of the genetic counseling for the anemia carriers or falciform trace, aiming at to point out the main characteristics of this illness, its complications and how the diagnosis is made. The study was based on the bibliographical method, looking for studies that deal with this type of anemia and genetic counseling, relating them with guidelines and data from the Health Ministry. Based on the found data, we infer the importance of genetic counseling for the individuals who present the heterozygote form of sickle cell anemia - the falcemic trace - and highlight the need to implement precocious diagnostics programs and genetic and social/psychological orientation for those with the disease or falciform trace. PMID:20640335

  14. Isolated microcytic anemia disclosing a unicentric Castleman disease: The interleukin-6/hepcidin pathway?

    PubMed

    Vinzio, Stéphane; Ciarloni, Laetitia; Schlienger, Jean-Louis; Rohr, Serge; Méchine, Agnès; Goichot, Bernard

    2008-07-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder of uncertain origin. Anemia is commonly reported and is related to an inflammatory mechanism. Occasionally an autoimmune hemolytic anemia appears as the leading clinical feature. Three histological types have been differentiated, a hyaline-vascular type (HV), a plasma cell type (PC), and a mixed type. Clinically CD is separated into unicentric (localized) or multicentric (generalized) forms. The former is most frequently of HV type (80-90%), affecting a single lymph node. The PC type is encountered in 10-20% of the unicentric CD and in almost all of the multicentric cases. Numerous systemic manifestations have been described usually associated with PC type. An isolated and markedly microcytic anemia revealing a unicentric CD has never been reported in English literature. Recent data concerning iron metabolism, interleukin-6 and hepcidin provide interesting clues to understand the particular microcytic anemia of CD. PMID:18549942

  15. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia? The most common symptom of anemia is fatigue ( ... mild symptoms or none at all. Complications of Anemia Some people who have anemia may have arrhythmias ( ...

  16. Impairment of Bone Health in Pediatric Patients with Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Schündeln, Michael M.; Goretzki, Sarah C.; Hauffa, Pia K.; Wieland, Regina; Bauer, Jens; Baeder, Lena; Eggert, Angelika; Hauffa, Berthold P.; Grasemann, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia result in impaired bone health in both adults and youths. Children with other types of chronic hemolytic anemia may also display impaired bone health. Study Design To assess bone health in pediatric patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, a cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 patients with different forms of hemolytic anemia (i.e., 17 homozygous sickle cell disease and 14 hereditary spherocytosis patients). Biochemical, radiographic and anamnestic parameters of bone health were assessed. Results Vitamin D deficiency with 25 OH-vitamin D serum levels below 20 ng/ml was a common finding (80.5%) in this cohort. Bone pain was present in 31% of patients. Analysis of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteocalcin levels indicated an alteration in bone modeling with significantly elevated RANKL/OPG ratios (control: 0.08+0.07; patients: 0.26+0.2, P = 0.0007). Osteocalcin levels were found to be lower in patients compared with healthy controls (68.5+39.0 ng/ml vs. 118.0+36.6 ng/ml, P = 0.0001). Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant (P<0.025) influence of LDH (partial r2 = 0.29), diagnosis of hemolytic anemia (partial r2 = 0.05) and age (partial r2 = 0.03) on osteocalcin levels. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were more frequently and more severely affected by impaired bone health than patients with hereditary spherocytosis. Conclusion Bone health is impaired in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia. In addition to endocrine alterations, an imbalance in the RANKL/OPG system and low levels of osteocalcin may contribute to this impairment. PMID:25299063

  17. [Diagnosis and treatment of anemia in heart failure patients].

    PubMed

    Santilli, Giovanna; Tarantini, Luigi; Baio, Pierangelo; Senni, Michele

    2011-05-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in patients with acute and chronic heart failure (HF) with preserved and reduced systolic function. It is recognized as a new therapeutic goal in HF since the reduction in hemoglobin levels is considered a significant independent predictive factor of mortality and hospitalization. At present, it is difficult to determine the real magnitude of the problem in terms of actual incidence and prevalence as no consistent definition of anemia associated with HF does exist, and a variety of hemoglobin thresholds have been used in clinical trials and epidemiological studies. The etiology of anemia is multifactorial with the main causes including renal failure, gastrointestinal bleeding and nutritional deficiency. Nevertheless, such criteria are not present in some patients, who show a peculiar type of anemia that may be classified as anemia of chronic diseases, likely due to the chronic inflammatory process of HF. No guidelines for the treatment of anemia in HF patients are available. Most of the previous studies in the literature are limited by small sample sizes. The very few randomized multicenter studies that evaluated the effects of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents associated with intravenous iron therapy did not provide the expected results. Indeed, despite an increase in hemoglobin levels, they did not show any improvement of NYHA functional class, nor of left ventricular ejection fraction. In addition, reasonable hemoglobin levels as a goal of therapy have not been established yet, in particular in relation to the side effects and the cardiovascular risk observed after the administration of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in oncologic patients. Further studies are warranted to define the magnitude of the problem and establish appropriate therapeutic strategies. It is likely that more reliable data will be derived from an ongoing randomized, double-blind, multicenter study, the RED-HF (Reduction Event with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure), which aims at evaluating morbidity and mortality in a cohort of 2600 HF patients with anemia treated with darbepoetin alfa. PMID:21593950

  18. Different substitutions at residue D218 of the X-linked transcription factor GATA1 lead to altered clinical severity of macrothrombocytopenia and anemia and are associated with variable skewed X inactivation.

    PubMed

    Freson, Kathleen; Matthijs, Gert; Thys, Chantal; Mariën, Paul; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Vermylen, Jos; Van Geet, Chris

    2002-01-15

    GATA1 is the X-linked transcriptional activator required for megakaryocyte and erythrocyte differentiation. Missense mutations in the N-terminal zinc finger (Nf) of GATA1 result in abnormal hematopoiesis, as documented in four families: the mutation V205M leads to both severe macrothrombocytopenia and dyserythropoietic anemia, D218G to macrothrombocytopenia and mild dyserythropoiesis without anemia, G208S to macrothrombocytopenia and R216Q to macrothrombocytopenia with beta-thalassemia. The three first GATA1 mutants display a disturbed binding to their essential transcription cofactor FOG1, whereas the fourth mutant shows an abnormal direct DNA binding. In this study, we describe a new family with deep macrothrombocytopenia, marked anemia and early mortality, if untreated, due to a different GATA1 mutation (D218Y) in the same residue 218 also implicated in the above mentioned milder phenotype. Zinc finger interaction studies revealed a stronger loss of affinity of D218Y-GATA1 than of D218G-GATA1 for FOG1 and a disturbed GATA1 self-association. Comparison of the phenotypic characteristics of patients from both families revealed that platelet and erythrocyte morphology as well as expression levels of the platelet GATA1-target gene products were more profoundly disturbed for the hemizygote D218Y mutation. The D218Y allele (as opposed to the D218G allele) was not expressed in the platelets of a female carrier while her leukocytes showed a skewed X-inactivation pattern. We conclude that the nature of the amino acid substitution at position 218 of the Nf of GATA1 is of crucial importance in determining the severity of the phenotype in X-linked macrothrombocytopenia patients and possibly also in inducing skewed X inactivation. PMID:11809723

  19. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1980-1981)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1981-07-02

    The basic purpose of this study is the delineation and exploitation of inborn anemias of the laboratory mouse, carried out by utilization of genetically homogeneous stocks segregating only for anemia-producing genes; by physiological and histological descriptions of each condition at all stages in the life history; by determination of tissue sites of primary gene action through tissue culture studies, tissue transplantation and parabiosis experiments; by analysis of reactions of normal and anemic mice to a variety of stressful stimuli, including x-irradiation, hypoxia, and toxic chemicals, and by biochemical comparisons between tissues, especially erythrocytes and hemopoietic cells of normal vs each type of anemic mouse. At present 16 single-locus anemias are known in the mouse, plus one with multifactorial inheritance (the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB inbred mice). Of these, six are maintained only by the Jackson Laboratory, and two others have but one additional source. Effects of anemia-producing mutant alleles of these loci (an; f; ja; ha; Hba/sup th/; mk; nb; Sl and Sl/sup d/; sla; sph; and W, W/sup v/, W/sup J/ and 10 other putative W-alleles) are currently under investigation at the Jackson Laboratory. 15 refs.

  20. FastStats: Anemia or Iron Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Anemia or Iron Deficiency Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... visits Number of visits to emergency departments with anemia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 237,000 ...

  1. Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - hemolytic - caused by chemicals or toxins ... Possible substances that can cause hemolytic anemia include: Anti-malaria drugs (quinine compounds) Arsenic Dapsone Intravenous water infusion (not half-normal saline or normal saline) Metals (chromium/chromates, ...

  2. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  3. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency. PMID:25636824

  4. [Causes, diagnostics and course of disease in 194 cats with anemia].

    PubMed

    Merten, Nina; Weingart, Christiane; Kohn, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common hematological alteration in cats. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of different types of anemia and the course of disease in cats with a hematocrit (hct) < 0.26 l/l. In a period of 18 months 194 cats were included and assigned to different anemia groups based on history, physical examination and laboratory parameters. Most cats had acute blood loss anemia (BA; 75/194; 38.7%). Frequent causes were trauma (39/75), hematuria (13/75) and hemostatic disorders (9/75). Anemia of inflammatory and neoplastic disease (AID) occurred in 22.2% (43/194) and hemolytic anemia (HA) in 18% (35/194). Half of those were presumptively immune-mediated (IHA). Four cats were diagnosed with hemotropic mycoplasma infection. Rare causes of anemia included anemia of renal disease (ARD; 18/194; 9.3%) and intramedullary non-regenerative anemia (INR; 13/194; 6.7%). The latter either had retroviral infection (6/13) or neoplasia (6/13). In cats with HA and INR anemia was often severe and very severe (Hct < 0.14 l/l) and in cats with AID and ARD usually mild (Hct 0.20-0.25 l/l). Cats with BA had significantly lower total protein concentrations than those with INR (p = 0,001), HA, AID and CNE (p < 0,001) and those with HA most often had hyperbilirubinemia (21/27). Blood transfusions were primarily given to cats with BA (37/75) and HA (19/35), especially those with IHA (13/17). 69% of the patients survived the first 14 days after the anemia was detected for the first time. Cats with HA had the highest survival rate. PMID:26591384

  5. Mitochondrial myopathy and sideroblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Casas, Kari A; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan

    2004-03-01

    We report four new cases of mitochondrial myopathy and sideroblastic anemia (MSA). Hallmark features of MSA include progressive exercise intolerance during childhood, onset of sideroblastic anemia around adolescence, basal lactic acidemia, and mitochondrial myopathy. Autosomal recessive inheritance of MSA in the family we describe is assumed due to the presence of two affected sibling pairs, unaffected parents, an unaffected sibling, and parental consanguinity. The nuclear families we describe are paternally related and originate from the same Iranian city as a family with MSA described by [Inbal et al., 1995]. These families provide an opportunity to clarify the molecular basis of tissue specific expression of mitochondrial disorders. PMID:14981724

  6. Phenacetin-induced hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Millar, John; Ploquin, Robert; de Leeuw, Nannie K. M.

    1972-01-01

    The hematological features of phenacetin-induced hemolytic anemia are presented in order to make the physician aware of the abnormalities which suggest the use of an oxidant drug. The presence of bitten out red cells is the commonest initial clue to the existence of drug-induced hemolytic anemia. The diagnosis is confirmed by the demonstration of Heinz bodies and sulfhemoglobinemia. Early recognition of this form of drug-abuse may avert the development or progression of analgesic nephropathy. ImagesFIG. 2 PMID:5016923

  7. Anemia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... العربية) Anemia (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Anemia Anemija - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Anemia 贫血 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) ...

  8. (Inborn anemias of mice): Terminal progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations located at 11 different chromosomal locations in the mouse all affecting hemopoiesis have been studied. These include: Hertwig's anemia (an), W-anemias (W, W/sup v/, W/sup 17J/ to W/sup 41J/), Steel anemias (Sl, Sl/sup d/, etc.), Normoblastic anemia (nb), Jaundiced (ja), Spherocytic anemias (sph, sph/sup ha/), sph/sup 2J/, sph/sup 2BC/, Flexed-tail anemia (f), Microcytic anemia (mk), Sex-linked anemia (Sla), Alpha thallasemia (Hba/sup th/), and a hypochromic anemia associated with low transferrin levels (hpx). Our findings indicate that the erythroid defect in W-anemias stem from an intrinsic defect in the erythroid progenitor cells, and that all other erythroid hemostatic mechanisms are fully functional. Hertwig's anemia (an) is affected in a similar fashion. However, in the case of Steel anemias, the erythroid progenitors are repressed, but when transplanted to appropriate recipients were found to be fully functional. 70 refs., 4 tabs.

  9. [Approach to the diagnosis and treatment of chronic anemia secondary to gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Rodríguez-Alonso, Lorena; Guardiola Capón, Jordi

    2014-12-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia and can cause asthenia, cognitive and functional impairment, and decompensation of underlying diseases. Iron deficiency anemia is not a disease but is the result of a potentially serious medical problem. Consequently, patients should always undergo investigation of the underlying cause. In men and postmenopausal women, the condition is caused by gastrointestinal loss and malabsorption of iron. In this group, recommended procedures are gastroscopy, colonoscopy and serological testing for celiac disease. If the results of these tests are negative, repeat examinations and iron therapy should be considered. In treatment-refractory or recurrent anemia, the small intestine should be investigated. In this case, the procedure of choice is capsule endoscopy. Iron deficiency anemia should always be treated until iron deposits have returned to normal levels. A wide variety of preparations are available, in both oral and parental formulations. PMID:25443541

  10. Incidence of anemia in patients diagnosed with solid tumors receiving chemotherapy, 2010–2013

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hairong; Xu, Lanfang; Page, John H; Cannavale, Kim; Sattayapiwat, Olivia; Rodriguez, Roberto; Chao, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate and characterize the risk of anemia during the course of chemotherapy among patients with five common types of solid tumors. Patients and methods Patients diagnosed with incident cancers of breast, lung, colon/rectum, stomach, and ovary who received chemotherapy were identified from Kaiser Permanente Southern California Health Plan (2010–2012). All clinical data were collected from the health plan’s electronic medical records. Incidence proportions of patients developing anemia and 95% confidence intervals were calculated overall and by anemia severity and type, as well as by stage at cancer diagnosis, and by chemotherapy regimen and cycle. Results A total of 4,426 patients who received chemotherapy were included. Across cancers, 3,962 (89.5%) patients developed anemia during the course of chemotherapy (normocytic 85%, macrocytic 10%, microcytic 5%; normochromic 47%, hyperchromic 44%, hypochromic 9%). The anemia grades were distributed as follows: 58% were grade 1, 34% grade 2, 8% grade 3, and <1% grade 4. The incidence of grade 2+ anemia ranged from 26.3% in colorectal cancer patients to 59.2% in ovarian cancer patients. Incidence of grade 2+ anemia increased from 29% in stage I to 49% in stage IV. Incidence of grade 2+ anemia varied from 18.2% in breast cancer patients treated with cyclophosphamide + docetaxel regimen to 59.7% in patients with ovarian cancer receiving carboplatin + paclitaxel regimen. Conclusion The incidence of moderate-to-severe anemia (hemoglobin <10 g/dL) remained considerably high in patients with solid tumors receiving chemotherapy. The risk of anemia was greater in patients with distant metastasis. PMID:27186078

  11. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  12. An anemia of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Faux, N G; Rembach, A; Wiley, J; Ellis, K A; Ames, D; Fowler, C J; Martins, R N; Pertile, K K; Rumble, R L; Trounson, B; Masters, C L; Bush, A I

    2014-11-01

    Lower hemoglobin is associated with cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since brain iron homeostasis is perturbed in AD, we investigated whether this is peripherally reflected in the hematological and related blood chemistry values from the Australian Imaging Biomarker and Lifestyle (AIBL) study (a community-based, cross-sectional cohort comprising 768 healthy controls (HC), 133 participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 211 participants with AD). We found that individuals with AD had significantly lower hemoglobin, mean cell hemoglobin concentrations, packed cell volume and higher erythrocyte sedimentation rates (adjusted for age, gender, APOE-ɛ4 and site). In AD, plasma iron, transferrin, transferrin saturation and red cell folate levels exhibited a significant distortion of their customary relationship to hemoglobin levels. There was a strong association between anemia and AD (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=2.43, confidence interval (CI) (1.31, 4.54)). Moreover, AD emerged as a strong risk factor for anemia on step-down regression, even when controlling for all other available explanations for anemia (adjusted OR=3.41, 95% CI (1.68, 6.92)). These data indicated that AD is complicated by anemia, which may itself contribute to cognitive decline. PMID:24419041

  13. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney Foundation U.S. Food and Drug Administration MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is ...

  14. Cerebral infarction in acute anemia.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Fen; Yip, Ping-Keung; Chen, Chao-Ching; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Chung, Shih-Tze; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2010-12-01

    There are few previous studies on the relationship between cerebral infarction and acute anemia. This study presents patients with cerebral infarction in acute anemia due to marked blood loss and aims to clarify the stroke nature and possible mechanism. Patients with acute cerebral infarction and anemia following marked blood loss without systemic hypotension were recruited from 2001 to 2009. Clinical characteristics, particularly hemoglobin level, and neuroimaging findings were reviewed in detail to analyze the stroke nature and verify the possible pathogenesis. Twelve patients (males 8; mean age 74.9 years) were included. Eleven patients had cerebral infarction after acute massive gastrointestinal bleeding, and one had cerebral infarction following postoperative extensive hematoma during hospitalization. In all patients, borderzone infarction was the most characteristic finding: six had unilateral and six had bilateral borderzone infarction. Mean hemoglobin at infarction after acute blood loss was 5.8 g/dl, with 46% reduction from baseline. Of nine patients receiving detailed extracranial and intracranial vascular studies, none had severe carotid stenosis and six had intracranial stenosis. The arterial borderzones are the most vulnerable regions to a fall in cerebral perfusion. Acute anemia may produce cerebral blood flow insufficiency, reduce oxygen-carrying capacity, and result in distal-field tissue ischemic injury when hemoglobin level decreases below a critical level, especially in patients with intracranial stenosis. PMID:20635184

  15. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  16. Prevalence of Iron deficiency anemia in children with liver cirrhosis: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zareifar, Soheila; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Rahanjam, Najmeh; Farahmand Far, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among the many complications reported for cirrhosis, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has attracted much attention. This type of anemia, in contrast to other types of anemia, is easy to treat prophylactically, but if left untreated can lead to a poor quality of life. The aim of this study was to estimate the hemoglobin and serum iron levels among patients with liver cirrhosis for the early diagnosis of IDA and to avoid unnecessary testing and iron supplementation. Subjects and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 88 children diagnosed with cirrhosis were included, and the values of hemoglobin, serum iron levels and relationship between serum iron (SI), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), prothrombine time (PT), international normalization ratio (INR), total and direct bilirubin and hepatic enzymes were estimated using paired t test, Mann-Whitney, Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: Forty-six (52.3%) of 88 children were girls and 42 (47.7%) were boys. Forty-eight (54.5%) patients had anemia and 8 (9%) had iron deficiency anemia (5 boys, 5.6%, and 3 girls, 3.4%). No relationships were observed between iron deficiency anemia and the patient’s age or gender, whereas there was a relationship between iron deficiency and severity and duration of the disease, although the correlation was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The high frequency of iron deficiency anemia in children with cirrhosis (9%) suggests that timely screening should be used for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26261697

  17. Refractory Sideroblastic and Nonsideroblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Geschke, Wilfred; Beutler, Ernest

    1977-01-01

    A study was done with 27 patients who met the following criteria: (1) anemia, (2) cellular bone marrow not diagnostic of leukemia, (3) absence of underlying disease that could account for the hematologic abnormalities at time of initial study and (4) absence of iron, B12 or folate deficiency. Of the 27 patients, 13 had ringed sideroblasts and 14 did not. Eleven patients received corticosteroids, 18 received folate, 23 pyridoxine and 12 androgens. Two partial responses occurred in the sideroblastic group and were attributed to androgen therapy in one patient and pyridoxine therapy in the other. In the nonsideroblastic group, two partial responses occurred which were attributed to prednisone therapy. Transfusions were required in 23 patients. Leukemia developed in six patients. It is concluded that currently used treatments have little effect on refractory anemia and that in most patients continuing transfusions are required. In a small percentage of patients, there is transformation to leukemia. PMID:898952

  18. Pagophagia in iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tatsumi; Kawati, Yasunori

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between pagophagia (ice pica) and iron deficiency anemia was studied. All 81 patients with iron deficiency anemia defined as hemoglobin <12.0 g/dl and ferritin level <12 ng/ml were interviewed about their habits of eating ice or other non-food substances. Pagophagia was defined as compulsive and repeated ingestion of at least one tray of ice or ice eating which was relieved after iron administration. Pagophagia was present in 13 patients (16.0%). All patients who received oral iron were periodically assessed employing a questionnaire on pagophagia and laboratory data. Iron therapy can cure the pagophagia earlier than hemoglobin recovery and repair of tissue iron deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of pagophagia is unclear, a biochemical approach involving the central nervous system might elucidate the mechanism underlying these abnormal behaviors. PMID:24850454

  19. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1982-1983)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1983-09-09

    The nature of the defects that shorten the effective lifespan of red blood cells in the circulation and which gave rise to anemia, jaundice and to spleen, liver and heart enlargement are studied because they so closely parallel inherited hemolytic anemias in man. In mice, ''hemolytic disease'' initiated by the ja, sph, sph/sup ha/, or the nb genes has been traced to abnormalities in the protein components of their red cell membranes. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of detergent solubilized membranes reveal that in the different genetic types one or more of the major high molecular weight proteins called spectrins is decreased or totally missing. It is one thing to observe a correlation between missing or defective components in selected analytical procedures, and another to establish a causal relationship between the two. To investigate the possible interrelationships, we examined the associations between spectrin or ankyrin content, the severity of the resulting anemia, red cell osmotic fragilities, and the capacity of cells from each genotype to be deformed in a continuous osmotic gradient at constant sheer stress. Our findings indicate that sensitivity to osmotic stress, cell rigidity (inadequate deformability), deficiency of spectrin or ankyrin, and the severity of the anemia, are statistically highly correlated. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Diamond-Blackfan anemia and nutritional deficiency-induced anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Gelbart, David

    2014-04-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare, inherited disease that characteristically presents as a chronic, normochromic macrocytosis due to red cell lineage bone marrow failure. Although studies are elaborating on the genetic basis for its associated comorbidities, little has been published comparing this anemia to other chronic anemias that have similar laboratory results in children. This article offers a global perspective of the disease and compares it with anemia due to vitamin B12 and folate deficiency in children. PMID:24662257

  1. Anemia Among Hospitalized Children at a Multispecialty Hospital, Bangalore (Karnataka), India

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Firdos; Poornima, Siddaraju; Balaji, Pishey Ashwathnarayan Rao; Varne, Smitha Ranoji Rao; Jayashree, Krishnamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to the limited availability of data related to anemia in hospitalized children, this research was conducted to study the occurrence, morphological patterns, distribution in different age groups, sex, and severity of anemia among children aged 6 months-12 years. Setting: Inpatients in department of pediatrics at a multispecialty hospital, Bangalore. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study from Oct, 2011 to Sep, 2012. Materials and Methods: Ethical clearance was obtained from the ethical committee of the hospital as per 1964 Declaration of Helsinki. Unrestricted random sampling method was used to select the study group consisting of 882 children between the age of 6 months and 12 years. After obtaining the consent, data were obtained and statistically analyzed using statistical tools like mean, median, standard deviation, and Chi-square test. Results: Out of 882 children selected, 642 (72.79%) were anemic, out of which a majority of 629 (98%) children suffered from nonhemoglobinopathies and a meagre 13 (2%) suffered from hemoglobinopathies. Children in the age group of 6 months-1 year were most affected with nonhemoglobinopathies (33%). Moderate degree of anemia (hemoglobin = 7-9.9 g/dL) was the commonest grade of anemia (80%), while microcytic hypochromic anemia was commonest morphological type of anemia (48%). Among hemoglobinopathies, thalassemia major was the most common (69%, that is 9 out of 13 patients). Conclusion: The occurrence of anemia among children aged between 6 months and 12 years is high and nonhemoglobinopathies predominate over the hemoglobinopathies. PMID:24791237

  2. Chronic autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children: a report of four patients.

    PubMed

    Duru, F; Grgey, A; Cetin, M; Kanra, T; Altay, C

    1994-01-01

    Four children, ages seven to ten years, with direct antiglobulin test (DAT)-positive chronic hemolytic anemia are presented. The patients were followed for 3 to 10 years. Autoantibody against red cell antigens was nonspecific IgG type in all of the patients. In one of the four patients, anemia was associated with splenomegaly and jaundice. In this patient, the third component of the complement was also detected on the red cell surface. In one patient, serum IgA deficiency and frequent pulmonary infections were associated with the disease. This patient developed rheumatoid arthritis five years after diagnosis of hemolytic anemia. The third patient initially had thrombocytopenia subsequently developed DAT-positive hemolytic anemia, vitiligo and alopecia without any evidence of serologic changes suggestive of collagen vascular disorders. In these three patients, partial response was obtained with steroid therapy. The fourth patient developed DAT-positive hemolytic anemia twice during the five year follow-up period. Anemia resolved completely with steroid therapy in two months during the first episode, and in five months in the second. Generalized and peripheral lymphadenopathies which developed at the time of the second hemolytic anemia episode have persisted for the last three years. Administration of cyclosporine in two of the four patients did not result in any amelioration of the symptoms. PMID:7996066

  3. Hepcidin-Dependent Regulation of Erythropoiesis during Anemia in a Teleost Fish, Dicentrarchus labrax

    PubMed Central

    Caldas, Carolina; Ramos, Miguel F.; Rodrigues, Pedro N. S.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is a common disorder, characterized by abnormally low levels of red blood cells or hemoglobin. The mechanisms of anemia development and response have been thoroughly studied in mammals, but little is known in other vertebrates, particularly teleost fish. In this study, different degrees of anemia were induced in healthy European sea bass specimens (Dicentrarchus labrax) and at pre-determined time points hematological parameters, liver iron content and the expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis and hematopoiesis, with particular attention on hepcidins, were evaluated. The experimental anemia prompted a decrease in hamp1 expression in all tested organs, in accordance to an increased need for iron absorption and mobilization, with slight increases in hamp2 in the kidney and intestine. The liver was clearly the major organ involved in iron homeostasis, decreasing its iron content and showing a gene expression profile consistent with an increased iron release and mobilization. Although both the spleen and head kidney are involved in erythropoiesis, the spleen was found to assume a more preponderant role in the recovery of erythrocyte levels. The intestine was also involved in the response to anemia, through the increase of iron transporting genes. Administration of Hamp1 or Hamp2 mature peptides showed that only Hamp1 affects hematological parameters and liver iron content. In conclusion, the molecular mechanisms of response to anemia present in sea bass are similar to the ones described for mammals, with these results indicating that the two hepcidin types from teleosts assume different roles during anemia. PMID:27100629

  4. [Management of renal anemia in 2013].

    PubMed

    Gianella, P; Martin, P-Y; Stucker, F

    2013-02-27

    Anemia occurs frequently in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), especially in the later stages, and the main etiologies are decreased production of erythropoietin (EPO) as well as iron and vitamin deficiencies. For these reasons, it is essential to detect anemia in patients with CKD and to investigate the etiology. If anemia (Hb < 100 g/l) persists after substitution of deficiencies, treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) should be considered. New guidelines (KDIGO - August 2012) have just been published by the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) for the management of anemia in patients with renal failure. This article reviews the principles and innovations in management in 2013. PMID:23539813

  5. Anemia in the frail, elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Röhrig, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Anemia and frailty are two common findings in geriatric patients and have been shown to be associated with poor outcomes in this patient group. Recent studies have contributed to the growing evidence of a possible association with the age-related chronic inflammatory status known as “inflammaging”. These findings do not only give a better insight into the pathogenesis of anemia in frailty, but also offer new treatment options. The present article focuses on this assumed association between anemia, frailty, and inflammaging and summarizes current management options for anemia in frail patients. PMID:27051279

  6. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by ...

  7. Management of Anemia in Children Receiving Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Borzych-Duzalka, Dagmara; Bilginer, Yelda; Ha, Il Soo; Bak, Mustafa; Rees, Lesley; Cano, Francisco; Munarriz, Reyner Loza; Chua, Annabelle; Pesle, Silvia; Emre, Sevinc; Urzykowska, Agnieszka; Quiroz, Lily; Ruscasso, Javier Darío; White, Colin; Pape, Lars; Ramela, Virginia; Printza, Nikoleta; Vogel, Andrea; Kuzmanovska, Dafina; Simkova, Eva; Müller-Wiefel, Dirk E.; Sander, Anja; Warady, Bradley A.

    2013-01-01

    Little information exists regarding the efficacy, modifiers, and outcomes of anemia management in children with CKD or ESRD. We assessed practices, effectors, and outcomes of anemia management in 1394 pediatric patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) who were prospectively followed in 30 countries. We noted that 25% of patients had hemoglobin levels below target (<10 g/dl or <9.5 g/dl in children older or younger than 2 years, respectively), with significant regional variation; levels were highest in North America and Europe and lowest in Asia and Turkey. Low hemoglobin levels were associated with low urine output, low serum albumin, high parathyroid hormone, high ferritin, and the use of bioincompatible PD fluid. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) were prescribed to 92% of patients, and neither the type of ESA nor the dosing interval appeared to affect efficacy. The weekly ESA dose inversely correlated with age when scaled to weight but did not correlate with age when normalized to body surface area. ESA sensitivity was positively associated with residual diuresis and serum albumin and inversely associated with serum parathyroid hormone and ferritin. The prevalence of hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy increased with the degree of anemia. Patient survival was positively associated with achieved hemoglobin and serum albumin and was inversely associated with ESA dose. In conclusion, control of anemia in children receiving long-term PD varies by region. ESA requirements are independent of age when dose is scaled to body surface area, and ESA resistance is associated with inflammation, fluid retention, and hyperparathyroidism. Anemia and high ESA dose requirements independently predict mortality. PMID:23471197

  8. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Hodgkin's Disease: An Unusual Pediatric Association.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Maria Miguel; Oliva, Tereza; Pinto, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. AIHA associated with Hodgkin's disease (HD) is uncommon especially in the pediatric population. The diagnosis of AIHA is usually associated with HD at the time of initial presentation or during the course of disease, but it could precede it by years to months. In adults the association of AIHA and HD is more frequent in advanced stages and in the nodular sclerosis and mixed cellularity type HD. Warm immune hemolytic anemia is mainly controlled with steroids and chemotherapy. We report a case of a pediatric patient with direct antiglobulin positive test at the diagnosis of a late relapse of stage III B mixed cellularity type HD. PMID:26904342

  9. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Hodgkin's Disease: An Unusual Pediatric Association

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maria Miguel; Oliva, Tereza; Pinto, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. AIHA associated with Hodgkin's disease (HD) is uncommon especially in the pediatric population. The diagnosis of AIHA is usually associated with HD at the time of initial presentation or during the course of disease, but it could precede it by years to months. In adults the association of AIHA and HD is more frequent in advanced stages and in the nodular sclerosis and mixed cellularity type HD. Warm immune hemolytic anemia is mainly controlled with steroids and chemotherapy. We report a case of a pediatric patient with direct antiglobulin positive test at the diagnosis of a late relapse of stage III B mixed cellularity type HD. PMID:26904342

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding.

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eivindson, Martin; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius; Jensen, Nanna Martin; Jørgensen, Søren Peter; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Rasmussen, Morten; Nathan, Torben

    2015-04-01

    A general overview is given of the causes of anemia with iron deficiency as well as the pathogenesis of anemia and the para-clinical diagnosis of anemia. Anemia with iron deficiency but without overt GI bleeding is associated with a risk of malignant disease of the gastrointestinal tract; upper gastrointestinal cancer is 1/7 as common as colon cancer. Benign gastrointestinal causes of anemia are iron malabsorption (atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, chronic inflammation, and bariatric surgery) and chronic blood loss due to gastrointestinal ulcerations. The following diagnostic strategy is recommended for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency: conduct serological celiac disease screening with transglutaminase antibody (IgA type) and IgA testing and perform bidirectional endoscopy (gastroscopy and colonoscopy). Bidirectional endoscopy is not required in premenopausal women < 40 years of age. Small intestine investigation (capsule endoscopy, CT, or MRI enterography) is not recommended routinely after negative bidirectional endoscopy but should be conducted if there are red flags indicating malignant or inflammatory small bowel disease (e.g., involuntary weight loss, abdominal pain or increased CRP). Targeted treatment of any cause of anemia with iron deficiency found on diagnostic assessment should be initiated. In addition, iron supplementation should be administered, with the goal of normalizing hemoglobin levels and replenishing iron stores. Oral treatment with a 100-200 mg daily dose of elemental iron is recommended (lower dose if side effects), but 3-6 months of oral iron therapy is often required to achieve therapeutic goals. Intravenous iron therapy is used if oral treatment lacks efficacy or causes side effects or in the presence of intestinal malabsorption or prolonged inflammation. Three algorithms are given for the following conditions: a) the paraclinical diagnosis of anemia with iron deficiency; b) the diagnostic work-up for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding; and c) how to proceed after negative bidirectional endoscopy of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25872536

  11. Prevalence and Predictors of Maternal Anemia during Pregnancy in Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia: An Institutional Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Alem, Meseret; Enawgaw, Bamlaku

    2014-01-01

    Background. Anaemia is a global public health problem which has an eminence impact on pregnant mother. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and predictors of maternal anemia. Method. A cross-sectional study was conducted from March 1 to April 30, 2012, on 302 pregnant women who attended antenatal care at Gondar University Hospital. Interview-based questionnaire, clinical history, and laboratory tests were used to obtain data. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to identify predictors. Result. The prevalence of anemia was 16.6%. Majority were mild type (64%) and morphologically normocytic normochromic (76%) anemia. Anemia was high at third trimester (18.9%). Low family income (AOR [95% CI] = 3.1 [1.19, 8.33]), large family size (AOR [95% CI] = 4.14 [4.13, 10.52]), hookworm infection (AOR [95% CI] = 2.72 [1.04, 7.25]), and HIV infection (AOR [95% CI] = 5.75 [2.40, 13.69]) were independent predictors of anemia. Conclusion. The prevalence of anemia was high; mild type and normocytic normochromic anemia was dominant. Low income, large family size, hookworm infection, and HIV infection were associated with anemia. Hence, efforts should be made for early diagnosis and management of HIV and hookworm infection with special emphasis on those having low income and large family size. PMID:24669317

  12. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  13. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  14. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  15. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  16. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  17. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  18. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  19. Anemia following Roux-en-Y surgery for morbid obesity: a review.

    PubMed

    Marinella, Mark A

    2008-10-01

    Morbid obesity is a significant problem in the Western world. Recently, there has been an increase in the number of patients undergoing surgical weight loss procedures. Currently, the most widely performed procedure is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass operation which combines restriction of food intake with malabsorption of calories and various nutrients, resulting in weight loss and nutritional deficiencies, respectively. Various types of anemia may complicate Roux-en-Y and commonly include deficiencies of iron, folate, and vitamin B12. Iron deficiency is particularly common and may result from many mechanisms including poor intake, malabsorption, and mucosal bleeding from marginal ulceration. However, less appreciated etiologies of nutritional anemia include deficiencies of B-complex vitamins, ascorbic acid, and copper. Replacement of the missing or decreased constituent usually reverses the anemia. Since physicians of various medical and surgical specialties are often involved with the postoperative care of bariatric patients, a review of anemia in this patient population is warranted. PMID:18791538

  20. Homozygosity mapping of Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, M.; Botstein, D.; Kruglyak, L.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare, recessive, genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by progressive insufficiency of the bone marrow and increased cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. Complementation tests among different FA cells have indicated the presence of at least 4 FA-causing genes. One of the genes, FACC, was identified by functional complementation but appears unlikely to account for many phenotypically indistinguishable FA caes. We have begun a linkage study of FA using {open_quotes}homozygosity mapping{close_quotes}, a method that involves genotyping with DNA markers on affected individuals whose parents are related. Because FA is a rare recessive disease, it is most likely that probands are homozygous by descent at the disease locus and, therefore, at nearby DNA markers. Although the probability that any given marker will be homozygous in an inbred individual is high, given markers with moderate heterozygosities, the chance that two unrelated inbred individuals will be homozygous at the same marker is considerably lower. By locating overlapping regions of homozygosity between different families we hope to identify genes that cause FA. Sixteen consanguineous non-FACC FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry at Rockefeller University are under study. An efficient algorithm for data analysis was developed and incorporated into software that can quickly compute exact multipoint lod scores using all markers on an entire chromosome. At the time of this writing, 171 of 229 microsatellite markers spaced at 20 cM intervals across the genome have been analyzed.

  1. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70–85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6–12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80–90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

  2. Treating leukemia at the risk of inducing severe anemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wendy S; Zhu, Helen He; Feng, Gen-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Anemia is a frequently observed adverse effect in cancer patients who receive chemotherapy or drugs designed to block specific oncogenic signaling pathways, although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. An article first published online (Zhu HH, Luo X, Zhang K, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2015;112:13342-13347) presented data indicating that cell type-specific pathway cross-talk is likely an important mechanism to consider. Shp2 and Pten, two master regulators of central cytoplasmic signaling pathways, oppose each other in myeloproliferation and leukemogenesis, but cooperate in promoting erythropoiesis. Thus, genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of Shp2 suppresses the leukemogenic effect of Pten loss, yet simultaneously induces severe anemia in mice with Pten deficiency in blood cells. PMID:26826310

  3. Spatial and social factors drive anemia in Congolese women

    PubMed Central

    Messina, JP; Mwandagalirwa, K; Taylor, SM; Emch, M; Meshnick, SR

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is common in women of child-bearing age in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). As part of the 2007 DRC Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), 4,638 women of childbearing age (including 526 pregnant women) were tested for HIV and had the hemoglobin content of their blood recorded. We assessed malaria prevalence using laboratory methods. The DHS provided extensive information for individuals, as well as household cluster coordinates which enabled us to derive several spatial variables. Multilevel analyses were conducted to determine individual and contextual risk factors for anemia. Prevalence varied geographically and was associated with both one's ethnic group and the amount and type of nearby agriculture. In contrast, prevalence was not affected by HIV or malaria status. PMID:24042090

  4. Effects of ionizing radiation on cells from Fanconi's anemia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth-Rysiecki, G.; Taylor, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The lymphocytes from some Fanconi's anemia patients appeared to be more radiosensitive than normal as measured by the number of X-ray-(or bleomycin-) induced chromosome aberrations seen following G2 treatment. Fibroblasts from the same patients, however, all showed the same degree of colony survival as normals following exposure to gamma-rays (Do, 1.13 +/- 0.072 (S.E.) Gy and 1.14 +/- 0.077 Gy for Fanconi's anemia and normal fibroblasts, respectively). The lack of increased radiosensitivity in Fanconi's fibroblasts was also observed by the same degree of inhibition of DNA synthesis as seen in normals following gamma-irradiation. The results show clearly that there is no increase in radiosensitivity common to all cell types from Fanconi's patients, although an apparent increase in chromosomal radiosensitivity may be seen in the lymphocytes from an occasional patient.

  5. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... body gets more iron than it needs? Iron overload happens when too much iron builds up in ... heart, and pancreas. Many problems can cause iron overload. Most people with hemochromatosis inherit it from their ...

  6. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... affect how well nutrients are absorbed (for example, celiac disease ) Poor diet Slow blood loss (for example, from ... Long-term (chronic) diseases such as chronic kidney disease, ... such as lymphoma, leukemia, myelodysplasia, multiple myeloma, ...

  7. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical News Society News Clinical News Features ASH Self-Assessment Program Read the ASH-SAP, Fifth Edition Pre- ... Publications Blood The Hematologist ASH Clinical News ASH Self-Assessment Program Hematology , ASH Education Program About Awards Membership ...

  8. Anemia in pregnancy in Malaysia: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Haniff, Jamaiyah; Das, Anita; Onn, Lim Teck; Sun, Chen Won; Nordin, Noraihan Mohd; Rampal, Sanjay; Bahrin, Safiah; Ganeslingam, Muralitharan; Kularatnam, Kumar Iswaran K; Zaher, Zaki Morad Mohamad

    2007-01-01

    Anemia is the most prevalent nutritional deficiency during pregnancy. Except for a study conducted 10 years ago in Kelantan, Malaysia's available statistics are based on isolated small urban maternity hospital studies from the 1980s. There was therefore, a need for a large study at national level to estimate the magnitude of the problem in the country as well as to understand its epidemiology. This multi-center, cross-sectional study was conducted from February to March 2005, to assess the prevalence of anemia. Multistage stratified random sampling technique was used and 59 Ministry of Health (MOH) primary health care clinics were selected. Our final dataset consisted of 1,072 antenatal mothers from 56 clinics. The overall prevalence of anemia in this population was 35 % (SE 0.02) if the cut off level is 11 g/dL and 11 % (SE 0.03) if the cut-off level is 10 g/dL. The majority was of the mild type. The prevalence was higher in the teenage group, Indians followed by Malays and Chinese being the least, grandmultiparas, the third trimester and from urban residence. After multiple linear regression analysis, only gestational age remained significant. These findings are useful for our Maternal Health program planners and implementers to target and evaluate interventions. Work is in progress for outcomes and cost-effectiveness studies to best tackle this problem. In conclusion, the prevalence of anemia is 35% and mostly of the mild type and more prevalent in the Indian and Malays. PMID:17704035

  9. Erythrocyte Catalase Activity in More Frequent Microcytic Hypochromic Anemia: Beta-Thalassemia Trait and Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lazarte, Sandra Stella; Mónaco, María Eugenia; Jimenez, Cecilia Laura; Ledesma Achem, Miryam Emilse; Terán, Magdalena María; Issé, Blanca Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Most common microcytic hypochromic anemias are iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and β-thalassemia trait (BTT), in which oxidative stress (OxS) has an essential role. Catalase causes detoxification of H2O2 in cells, and it is an indispensable antioxidant enzyme. The study was designed to measure erythrocyte catalase activity (ECAT) in patients with IDA (10) or BTT (21), to relate it with thalassemia mutation type (β0 or β+) and to compare it with normal subjects (67). Ninety-eight individuals were analyzed since September 2013 to June 2014 in Tucumán, Argentina. Total blood count, hemoglobin electrophoresis at alkaline pH, HbA2, catalase, and iron status were performed. β-thalassemic mutations were determined by real-time PCR. Normal range for ECAT was 70,0–130,0 MU/L. ECAT was increased in 14% (3/21) of BTT subjects and decreased in 40% (4/10) of those with IDA. No significant difference (p = 0,245) was shown between normal and BTT groups, while between IDA and normal groups the difference was proved to be significant (p = 0,000). In β0 and β+ groups, no significant difference (p = 0,359) was observed. An altered ECAT was detected in IDA and BTT. These results will help to clarify how the catalase activity works in these anemia types. PMID:26527217

  10. Erythrocyte Catalase Activity in More Frequent Microcytic Hypochromic Anemia: Beta-Thalassemia Trait and Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Lazarte, Sandra Stella; Mónaco, María Eugenia; Jimenez, Cecilia Laura; Ledesma Achem, Miryam Emilse; Terán, Magdalena María; Issé, Blanca Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Most common microcytic hypochromic anemias are iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and β-thalassemia trait (BTT), in which oxidative stress (OxS) has an essential role. Catalase causes detoxification of H2O2 in cells, and it is an indispensable antioxidant enzyme. The study was designed to measure erythrocyte catalase activity (ECAT) in patients with IDA (10) or BTT (21), to relate it with thalassemia mutation type (β (0) or β (+)) and to compare it with normal subjects (67). Ninety-eight individuals were analyzed since September 2013 to June 2014 in Tucumán, Argentina. Total blood count, hemoglobin electrophoresis at alkaline pH, HbA2, catalase, and iron status were performed. β-thalassemic mutations were determined by real-time PCR. Normal range for ECAT was 70,0-130,0 MU/L. ECAT was increased in 14% (3/21) of BTT subjects and decreased in 40% (4/10) of those with IDA. No significant difference (p = 0,245) was shown between normal and BTT groups, while between IDA and normal groups the difference was proved to be significant (p = 0,000). In β (0) and β (+) groups, no significant difference (p = 0,359) was observed. An altered ECAT was detected in IDA and BTT. These results will help to clarify how the catalase activity works in these anemia types. PMID:26527217

  11. [Association of anemia with nutrition in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yasuko; Katsuta, Sayaka; Kitagawa, Chihiro; Kondo, Seiji

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed the data for 59 cases in which elderly patients receiving home medical care presented with anemia. Our results demonstrated that the cause of anemia was iron deficiency, chronic inflammation, or chronic kidney disease in 75% of the patients, and that anemia was improved in more than 80% of the patients after appropriate therapeutic treatment. We also found so-called senile anemia with no particular causes in 20% of the patients, and in some of them, both nutrition and anemia have improved. We concluded that not only the treatment of anemia, but also the improvement of nutrition, is important in elderly patients with anemia. PMID:23268911

  12. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  13. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Packman, Charles H

    2015-09-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  14. Protrusio acetabuli in sickle-cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.; Apple, J.S.; Baber, C.; Putman, C.E.; Rosse, W.F.

    1984-04-01

    Of 155 adults with sickle-cell anemia (SS, SC), radiographs of the pelvis or hip demonstrated protrusio acetabuli on at least one side in 14 (3 men and 11 women), as indicated by projection of the acetabular line medial to the ilio-ischial line. All 14 patients had bone changes attributable to sickle-cell anemia, including marrow hyperplasia and osteonecrosis; however, the severity of femoral or acetabular osteonecrosis did not appear directly related to the protrusion. The authors conclude that sickle-cell anemia can predispose to development of protrusio acetabuli.

  15. [Hemolytic anemia under erlotinib treatment].

    PubMed

    Sakhri, L; Mennecier, B; Quoix, A

    2013-12-01

    Erlotinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor widely prescribed of which the most common sides effects are grade I or II rash and diarrhea. We report two cases of hemolytic anemia (HA) induced by erlotinib. Our two patients were treated with erlotinib after a prior line of systemic platinum-doublet therapy for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Both patients presented, shortly after starting treatment with erlotinib, an HA which was fatal for one of them. To our knowledge, this major side effect of erlotinib has not been reported in the literature. We will try through this article to make a literature review of the most important side effects of erlotinib and we will also focus on the HA induced by other molecules used in oncology. PMID:24183296

  16. Association between food insecurity and anemia among women of reproductive age

    PubMed Central

    Ghose, Bishwajit; Tang, Shangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Food insecurity and hidden hunger (micronutrient deficiency) affect about two billion people globally. Household food insecurity (HFI) has been shown to be associated with one or multiple micronutrient (MMN) deficiencies among women and children. Chronic food insecurity leads to various deficiency disorders, among which anemia stands out as the most prevalent one. As a high malnutrition prevalent country, Bangladesh has one of the highest rates of anemia among all Asian countries. In this study, we wanted to investigate for any association exists between HFI and anemia among women of reproductive age in Bangladesh. Methodology: Information about demographics, socioeconomic and anemia status on 5,666 married women ageing between 13 and 40 years were collected from a nationally representative cross-sectional survey Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS 2011). Food security was measured by the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS). Capillary hemoglobin concentration (Hb) measured by HemoCue® was used as the biomarker of anemia. Data were analysed using cross-tabulation, chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression methods. Results: Anemia prevalence was 41.7%. Logistic regression showed statistically significant association with anemia and type of residency (p = 0.459; OR = 0.953, 95%CI = 0.840–1.082), wealth status (Poorest: p < 0.001; OR = 1.369, 95%CI = 1.176–1.594; and average: p = 0.030; 95%CI = 1.017–1.398), educational attainment (p < 0.001; OR = 1.276, 95%CI = 1.132–1.439) and household food insecurity (p < 0.001; 95%CI = 1.348–1.830). Women who reported food insecurity were about 1.6 times more likely to suffer from anemia compared to their food secure counterparts. Conclusion: HFI is a significant predictor of anemia among women of reproductive age in Bangladesh. Programs targeting HFI could prove beneficial for anemia reduction strategies. Gender aspects of food and nutrition insecurity should be taken into consideration in designing national anemia prevention frameworks. PMID:27168968

  17. Hematopoietic niches, erythropoiesis and anemia of chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana Cordeiro; Gomes, Maria Salomé

    2016-02-01

    Anemia is a significant co-morbidity of chronic infections, as well as other inflammatory diseases. Anemia of chronic infection results from defective bone marrow erythropoiesis. Although the limitation of iron availability has been considered a key factor, the exact mechanisms underlying blockade in erythroid generation during infection are not fully understood. Erythropoiesis is a tightly regulated process that is very sensitive to environmental changes. During the last decade, the importance of the bone marrow hematopoietic niche has been progressively acknowledged. Several bone marrow cell types (such as macrophages, mesenchymal stem cells, and progenitor cells) and molecular mediators (such as CXCL12) have been identified as fundamental for both the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell pluripotency and their most adequate differentiation into each hematopoietic cell lineage. Importantly, both niche-supporting cells and hematopoietic progenitors were found to be able to sense local and systemic cues to adapt the hematopoietic output to needs of the organism. Here, we review how hematopoietic progenitors and niche-supporting cells sense and respond to stress cues and suggest a potential role for the hematopoietic niche in the development of anemia of chronic infection. PMID:26615156

  18. Iron sequestration and anemia of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2009-01-01

    Anemia of chronic disease, also called anemia of inflammation, is characterized by hypoferremia due to iron sequestration that eventually results in iron-restricted erythropoiesis. During the last decade, the molecular mechanisms of iron sequestration have been found to center on cytokine-stimulated overproduction of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. The inflammatory cytokine IL-6 is a particularly prominent inducer of hepcidin but other cytokines are likely to contribute as well. Hepcidin excess causes the endocytosis and proteolysis of the sole known cellular iron exporter, ferroportin, trapping iron in macrophages and iron-absorbing enterocytes. The supply of iron to hemoglobin synthesis becomes limiting, eventually resulting in anemia. Depending on the details of the underlying disease, other inflammation-related mechanisms may also contribute to anemia. PMID:19786207

  19. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency - children ... able to absorb iron well, even though the child is eating enough iron Slow blood loss over ... bleeding in the digestive tract Iron deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning .

  20. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and High Altitudes The farther you get from Earth, the less oxygen there is. If you have aplastic anemia, flying in an airplane or going up high ... in Philanthropy Leadership in Service Financials Code ...

  1. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells If you’re feeling constantly exhausted ... when your body doesn’t have enough healthy red blood cells. You may either have too few ...

  2. Alleviating anemia and thrombocytopenia in myelofibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Francisco; Correa, Juan-Gonzalo; Hernandez-Boluda, Juan Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Anemia and thrombocytopenia are frequent clinical manifestations of myelofibrosis as well as important prognostic factors of the disease. Concerning the treatment of anemia, the first step should be the correction of reversible contributing factors, such as possible iron, folate and vitamin B12 deficiency. Then, treatment options include erythropoiesis stimulating agents, androgens, immunomodulating drugs, corticosteroids, and splenectomy. Anemia responses may also be observed in some patients treated with JAK inhibitors. However, most patients eventually fail to such therapies and become transfusion dependent. Some of the aforementioned therapies can also improve thrombocytopenia, but the responses are usually observed in patients with moderate platelet count decrease. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the only curative treatment of myelofibrosis, can be an alternative for selected patients with cytopenias who are refractory to conventional therapies. However, for the majority of patients, the management of anemia and severe thrombocytopenia remains an unmet need. PMID:26891375

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... developing certain cancers, including a cancer of blood-forming tissue known as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and ... proteins may increase the self-destruction of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow, resulting in anemia. ...

  4. Do You Know about Sickle Cell Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Do You Know About Sickle Cell Anemia? KidsHealth > For Kids > Do ... cell genes, too. previous continue How Do Doctors Know a Kid Has It? Special blood tests can ...

  5. Anemia: Progress in molecular mechanisms and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to understanding frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that may stand to benefit from the new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease), rare genetic disorders of red blood cell production, and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new treatment approaches include drugs that target recently defined pathways in red blood cell production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin gene expression, as well as gene therapies using improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies. PMID:25742458

  6. Anemia among Muslim Bedouin and Jewish women of childbearing age in Southern Israel.

    PubMed

    Treister-Goltzman, Yulia; Peleg, Roni; Biderman, Aya

    2015-11-01

    There are inequalities in health indicators among different ethnic groups living in the same region and receiving the same medical services. Anemia is a global problem. Although the prevalence of anemia is not high in Israel, differences among ethnic groups have not been studied. Our objective was to assess anemia among Bedouin and Jewish women of childbearing age in southern Israel. A retrospective observational study was conducted based on data from computerized medical records. Seven thousand eight hundred seventy-one women in the study clinics underwent complete blood counts and had blood hemoglobin levels of 11 g/dl or below. The Jewish patients were older (31.7 vs. 29.7 years, P < 0.001), practiced birth control more (24.2 vs. 9.9 %, P < 0.001), and adhered to it more (81.1 vs. 61.9 %, P < 0.001). Bedouin women had more children (3.7 vs. 1.9, P < 0.001), and more Bedouin women were pregnant during the study period (49.3 vs. 35.0 %, P < 0.001). The most prevalent types of anemia were iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease. Two types of anemia were proportionally higher among Jewish women, anemia of chronic disease (18.1 vs. 9.7 %, P < 0.001) and folic acid deficiency (3.3 vs. 2.2 %, P > 0.001). The adherence rates for treatment were very low. Three factors associated with severe anemia (hemoglobin below 8 g/dl) were being Bedouin (odds ratio (OR) = 1.295, P < 0.001), use of birth control (OR = 0.419, P < 0.001), and pregnancy (OR = 0.447, P < 0.001). Being a Bedouin woman is a risk factor for severe anemia, and adherence to treatment for anemia is very low in both groups. These findings should be addressed in a national program to reduce health inequalities. PMID:26211919

  7. Cerebral Microcirculation during Experimental Normovolaemic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bellapart, Judith; Cuthbertson, Kylie; Dunster, Kimble; Diab, Sara; Platts, David G.; Raffel, O. Christopher; Gabrielian, Levon; Barnett, Adrian; Paratz, Jenifer; Boots, Rob; Fraser, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is accepted among critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anemia. Experimental studies suggest that anemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise, when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion among critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure, and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anemia does not result in short-term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain. PMID:26869986

  8. [Anemia in obstetrics and gynecological surgery].

    PubMed

    Gredilla Díaz, E

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is more common in women due to uterine bleeding, which affects them throughout their fertile life. Additionally, iron needs increase physiologically during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Pregnant women therefore constitute one of the risk groups for iron deficiency. During the postpartum period, iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia. Longer hospital stays and greater susceptibility to infections are potential consequences of postpartum anemia. PMID:26320347

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, Andrea; Passweg, Jakob

    2009-04-01

    Acquired severe aplastic anemia can be treated successfully with either immunosuppressive therapy or bone marrow transplantation. Although immunosuppressive therapy can be readily administered to all patients, it is not a curative approach and is associated with a higher risk of clonal evolution than is transplantation, which yields rapid and long-lasting hematologic remission. This article reviews the key diagnostic and prognostic factors that influence the choice of therapy in patients with acquired aplastic anemia. PMID:19327577

  10. Cerebral Microcirculation during Experimental Normovolaemic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Bellapart, Judith; Cuthbertson, Kylie; Dunster, Kimble; Diab, Sara; Platts, David G; Raffel, O Christopher; Gabrielian, Levon; Barnett, Adrian; Paratz, Jenifer; Boots, Rob; Fraser, John F

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is accepted among critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anemia. Experimental studies suggest that anemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise, when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion among critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure, and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anemia does not result in short-term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain. PMID:26869986

  11. Mouse Models of Anemia of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Airie; Rivera, Seth; Shprung, Dana; Limbrick, Donald; Gabayan, Victoria; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Anemia of cancer (AC) may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and impair quality of life. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of AC could facilitate better treatment, but animal models to study AC are lacking. We characterized four syngeneic C57BL/6 mouse cancers that cause AC. Mice with two different rapidly-growing metastatic lung cancers developed the characteristic findings of anemia of inflammation (AI), with dramatically different degrees of anemia. Mice with rapidly-growing metastatic melanoma also developed a severe anemia by 14 days, with hematologic and inflammatory parameters similar to AI. Mice with a slow-growing peritoneal ovarian cancer developed an iron-deficiency anemia, likely secondary to chronically impaired nutrition and bleeding into the peritoneal cavity. Of the four models, hepcidin mRNA levels were increased only in the milder lung cancer model. Unlike in our model of systemic inflammation induced by heat-killed Brucella abortus, ablation of hepcidin in the ovarian cancer and the milder lung cancer mouse models did not affect the severity of anemia. Hepcidin-independent mechanisms play an important role in these murine models of AC. PMID:24681760

  12. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  13. Mutated Fanconi anemia pathway in non-Fanconi anemia cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yihang; Lee, Yuan-Hao; Panneerselvam, Jayabal; Zhang, Jun; Loo, Lenora W. M.; Fei, Peiwen

    2015-01-01

    An extremely high cancer incidence and the hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents associated with Fanconi Anemia (FA) have marked it to be a unique genetic model system to study human cancer etiology and treatment, which has emerged an intense area of investigation in cancer research. However, there is limited information about the relationship between the mutated FA pathway and the cancer development or/and treatment in patients without FA. Here we analyzed the mutation rates of the seventeen FA genes in 68 DNA sequence datasets. We found that the FA pathway is frequently mutated across a variety of human cancers, with a rate mostly in the range of 15 to 35 % in human lung, brain, bladder, ovarian, breast cancers, or others. Furthermore, we found a statistically significant correlation (p < 0.05) between the mutated FA pathway and the development of human bladder cancer that we only further analyzed. Together, our study demonstrates a previously unknown fact that the mutated FA pathway frequently occurs during the development of non-FA human cancers, holding profound implications directly in advancing our understanding of human tumorigenesis as well as tumor sensitivity/resistance to crosslinking drug-relevant chemotherapy. PMID:26015400

  14. Anemia in elderly hospitalized patients: prevalence and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Migone De Amicis, Margherita; Poggiali, Erika; Motta, Irene; Minonzio, Francesca; Fabio, Giovanna; Hu, Cinzia; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2015-08-01

    Anemia is a common finding in elderly individuals. Several studies have shown a strong relationship between anemia, morbidity and mortality, suggesting anemia as a significant independent predictor of adverse outcome in elderly hospitalized patients. The pathophisiology of anemia in the elderly is not yet completely understood. Several mechanisms are involved. We investigated the prevalence of anemia in a cohort of 193 elderly patients admitted to the Internal Medicine Ward of Ca'Granda Policlinico Hospital along 6 months, and its relationship to comorbidities and to the length of hospitalization. Anemia was classified according to the WHO criteria. The majority of patients (48 %) had a mildmoderate, normocytic anemia; severe anemia was found in 8 out of 92 anemic patients. In a subgroup of patients erythropoietin was tested and resulted statistically higher if compared to non-anemic controls (p = 0.003). Considering the most common cause of anemia, nutritional deficiency, chronic renal disease and anemia of chronic disease were found respectively in 36, 15 and 25 % of cases. Unexplained anemia was diagnosed in 24 % of patients, according to the literature. Anemia was independently associated with increased length of hospital stay. Our study confirmed a high prevalence of anemia in elderly patients, and its association with a higher number of comorbidities and a longer stay. A correct clinical approach to anemia in elderly hospitalized patients is essential, considering its negative impact on patients' quality of life, and its social burden in term of healthcare needs and costs. PMID:25633233

  15. Erythroblast apoptosis and microenvironmental iron restriction trigger anemia in the VK*MYC model of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bordini, Jessica; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa Sabrina; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Fermo, Isabella; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P Leif; Camaschella, Clara; Campanella, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant disorder characterized by bone marrow proliferation of plasma cells and by overproduction of monoclonal immunoglobulin detectable in the sera (M-spike). Anemia is a common complication of multiple myeloma, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. We aimed to identify the different determinants of anemia using the Vk*MYC mouse, which spontaneously develops an indolent bone marrow localized disease with aging. Affected Vk*MYC mice develop a mild normochromic normocytic anemia. We excluded the possibility that anemia results from defective erythropoietin production, inflammation or increased hepcidin expression. Mature erythroid precursors are reduced in Vk*MYC bone marrow compared with wild-type. Malignant plasma cells express the apoptogenic receptor Fas ligand and, accordingly, active caspase 8 is detected in maturing erythroblasts. Systemic iron homeostasis is not compromised in Vk*MYC animals, but high expression of the iron importer CD71 by bone marrow plasma cells and iron accumulation in bone marrow macrophages suggest that iron competition takes place in the local multiple myeloma microenvironment, which might contribute to anemia. In conclusion, the mild anemia of the Vk*MYC model is mainly related to the local effect of the bone marrow malignant clone in the absence of an overt inflammatory status. We suggest that this reproduces the initial events triggering anemia in patients. PMID:25715406

  16. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John . E-mail: jvarlott@bidmc.harvard.edu; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization has met with limited success via the use of hyperbaric oxygen, electron-affinic radiosensitizers, and mitomycin. Improvements in tumor oxygenation via the use of carbogen and nicotinamide, RSR13, and tirapazamine have shown promising clinical results and are all currently being tested in Phase III trials. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommend transfusion or erythropoietin for symptomatic patients with a hemoglobin of 10-11 g/dl and state that erythropoietin should strongly be considered if hemoglobin falls to less than 10 g/dl. These recommendations were based on studies that revealed an improvement in the quality of life of cancer patients, but not patient survival with anemia correction. Phase III studies evaluating the correction of anemia via erythropoietin have shown mixed results with some studies reporting a decrease in patient survival despite an improvement in hemoglobin levels. Diverse functions of erythropoietin are reviewed, including its potential to inhibit apoptosis via the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Correction of anemia by the use of blood transfusions has also shown a decrement in patient survival, possibly through inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive pathways. Conclusions: Anemia is a prevalent condition associated with cancer and its therapies. Proper Phase III trials are necessary to find the best way to correct anemia for specific patients. Future studies of erythropoietin must evaluate the possible anti-apoptotic effects by directly assessing the tumor for erythropoietin receptors or the presence of the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Due to the ability of transfusions to cause immunosuppression, most probably through inflammatory pathways, it may be best to study the effects of transfusion with the prolonged use of anti-inflammatory medications.

  17. Frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatry patients

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Sevda; Yıldız, Sevler; Korucu, Tuba; Gundogan, Burcu; Sunbul, Zehra Emine; Korkmaz, Hasan; Atmaca, Murad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anemia could cause psychiatric symptoms such as cognitive function disorders and depression or could deteriorate an existing psychiatric condition when it is untreated. The objective of this study is to scrutinize the frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatric patients and the clinical and sociodemographic factors that could affect this frequency. Methods All inpatients in our clinic who satisfied the study criteria and received treatment between April 2014 and April 2015 were included in this cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic data for 378 patients included in the study and hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit values observed during their admission to the hospital were recorded in the forms. Male patients with an Hb level of <13 g/dL and nonpregnant female patients with an Hb level of <12 g/dL were considered as anemic. Findings Axis 1 diagnoses demonstrated that 172 patients had depressive disorder, 51 patients had bipolar disorder, 54 patients had psychotic disorder, 33 patients had conversion disorder, 19 patients had obsessive-compulsive disorder, 25 patients had generalized anxiety disorder, and 24 patients had other psychiatric conditions. It was also determined that 25.4% of the patients suffered from anemia. Thirty-five percent of females and 10% of males were considered as anemic. The frequency of anemia was the highest among psychotic disorder patients (35%), followed by generalized anxiety disorder patients (32%), and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (26%). Anemia was diagnosed in 22% of depressive disorder patients, 25% of bipolar disorder patients, and 24% of conversion disorder patients. Results The prevalence of anemia among chronic psychiatry patients is more frequent than the general population. Thus, the study concluded that it would be beneficial to consider the physical symptoms and to conduct the required examinations to determine anemia among this patient group. PMID:26543367

  18. Iron deficiency anemia among kindergarten children living in the marginalized areas of Gaza Strip, Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Sirdah, Mahmoud Mohammed; Yaghi, Ayed; Yaghi, Abdallah R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of nutritional anemia; it has been recognized as an important health problem in Palestine. This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence and to identify possible risk factors of iron deficiency anemia among kindergarten children living in the marginalized areas of the Gaza Strip and to evaluate the effectiveness of supplementing oral iron formula in the anemic children. Methods: the study included 735 (384 male and 351 female) kindergarten children. Data was collected by questionnaire interviews, anthropometric measurements, and complete blood count analysis. All iron deficient anemic children were treated using an oral iron formula (50 mg ferrous carbonate + 100 mg vitamin C /5 mL) and the complete blood count was reassessed after three months. A univariate analysis and a multiple logistic regression model were constructed; crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR), and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. Results: the overall prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was 33.5% with no significant differences between boys and girls. Significantly different prevalences of iron deficiency anemia were reported between different governorates of the Gaza Strip. Governorate, low education level of the parents and smoking are significant risk factors for children developing anemia. Significantly lower complete blood count parameters, except for WBC, were reported in anemic children. The oral iron treatment significantly improved hemoglobin concentrations, and normalized the iron deficiency marker. Conclusions: iron deficiency anemia is a serious health problem among children living in the marginalized areas of the Gaza Strip, which justifies the necessity for national intervention programs to improve the health status for the less fortunate development areas. PMID:24790539

  19. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the “atypical” microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  20. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  1. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia? Lower than normal numbers of red blood cells, ... most of the signs and symptoms of aplastic anemia. Signs and Symptoms of Low Blood Cell Counts ...

  2. Anemia Drugs May Not Boost Kidney Patients' Well-Being

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157257.html Anemia Drugs May Not Boost Kidney Patients' Well-Being: ... MONDAY, Feb. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The pricey anemia drugs often given to people with chronic kidney ...

  3. Nucleolar stress in Diamond Blackfan anemia pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R

    2014-06-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia is a red cell hypoplasia that typically presents within the first year of life. Most cases of Diamond Blackfan anemia are caused by ribosome assembly defects linked to haploinsufficiency for structural proteins of either ribosomal subunit. Nucleolar stress associated with abortive ribosome assembly leads to p53 activation via the interaction of free ribosomal proteins with HDM2, a negative regulator of p53. Significant challenges remain in linking this nucleolar stress signaling pathway to the clinical features of Diamond Blackfan anemia. Defining aspects of disease presentation may relate to developmental and physiological triggers that work in conjunction with nucleolar stress signaling to heighten the p53 response in the developing erythron after birth. The growing number of ribosomopathies provides additional challenges for linking molecular mechanisms with clinical phenotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease. PMID:24412987

  4. Very severe aplastic anemia appearing after thymectomy.

    PubMed

    Park, Chi Young; Kim, Hee Je; Kim, Yoo Jin; Park, Yoon Hee; Lee, Jong Wook; Min, Woo Sung; Kim, Chun Choo

    2003-03-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare complication of thymoma and is extremely infrequent after thymectomy. We present a case of a 60-year-old woman with very severe aplastic anemia appearing sixteen months after thymectomy for a thymoma. She underwent thymectomy for a thymoma in April 2000. Preoperative examination revealed no hematologic abnormality. About sixteen months after the operation, she was readmitted because of pancytopenia with cough and fever. Bone marrow aspiration revealed a very severe hypoplasia in all the three cell lines with over 80% fatty tissue, and chest CT revealed no recurrence of thymoma. Her aplastic anemia had responded to cyclosporine A and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). PMID:12760272

  5. Iron deficiency anemia: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Short, Matthew W; Domagalski, Jason E

    2013-01-15

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder worldwide and accounts for approximately one-half of anemia cases. The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia is confirmed by the findings of low iron stores and a hemoglobin level two standard deviations below normal. Women should be screened during pregnancy, and children screened at one year of age. Supplemental iron may be given initially, followed by further workup if the patient is not responsive to therapy. Men and postmenopausal women should not be screened, but should be evaluated with gastrointestinal endoscopy if diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia. The underlying cause should be treated, and oral iron therapy can be initiated to replenish iron stores. Parenteral therapy may be used in patients who cannot tolerate or absorb oral preparations. PMID:23317073

  6. Diagnosis of Fanconi Anemia by Diepoxybutane Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Arleen D.

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disorder characterized by congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure, and predisposition to cancer, particularly hematological malignancies and solid tumors of the head and neck. The main role of FA proteins is in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). FA results from pathogenic variants in at least 16 distinct genes, causing genomic instability. Although the highly variable phenotype makes accurate diagnosis on the basis of clinical manifestations difficult in some patients, diagnosis based on a profound sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents can be used to identify the pre-anemia patient as well as patients with aplastic anemia or leukemia who may or may not have the physical stigmata associated with the syndrome. Diepoxybutane (DEB) analysis is the preferred test for FA because other agents have higher rates of false-positive and false-negative results. PMID:25827349

  7. Aplastic anemia associated with severe hemorrhagic cystitis following radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    NAKANO, TAITO; IZUMI, KOUJI; MAOLAKE, AERKEN; NATSAGDORJI, ARIUNBOLD; IWAMOTO, HIROAKI; KITAGAWA, YASUHIDE; KADONO, YOSHIFUMI; KONAKA, HIROYUKI; MIZOKAMI, ATSUSHI; NAMIKI, MIKIO

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is a rare complication following radiotherapy for intrapelvic cancer types, including cervical cancer, bladder cancer and prostate cancer. The severity of hemorrhagic cystitis is different in each case, although symptoms improve spontaneously in certain cases, and often significant morbidity requiring numerous interventions occurs. Since no treatment strategy exists with high evidences for such severe hemorrhagic cystitis, urologists have difficulty in solving the bleeding and pain, which the patients suffer. Aplastic anemia is a rare blood disorder, with an incidence reported as 2/1 million individuals annually. Patients have a risk of diffuse bleeding for presentation with anemia, thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. The present report presented a case of severe hemorrhagic cystitis remitted successfully by the treatment for underlying aplastic anemia. PMID:27123281

  8. Rituximab for immune hemolytic anemia following T- and B-Cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Corti, P; Bonanomi, S; Vallinoto, C; Balduzzi, A; Uderzo, C; Cazzaniga, G; Gaipa, G; Dassi, M; Perseghin, P; Rovelli, A

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IHA) complicating hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is often unsatisfactory. We report a case of IHA which occurred after T- and B-cell depleted unrelated donor HSCT carried out for mucopolysaccharidosis type I-H (Hurler syndrome) which was successfully treated with anti-CD20+ monoclonal antibody PMID:12486323

  9. Iron deficiency anemia in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arora, Natasha P; Ghali, Jalal K

    2013-07-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are quite prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF) and may overlap. Both anemia and iron deficiency are associated with worse symptoms and adverse clinical outcomes. In the past few years, there has been an enormous interest in the subject of iron deficiency and its management in patients with HF. In this review, the etiology and relevance of iron deficiency, iron metabolism in the setting of HF, studies on iron supplementation in patients with HF and potential cardiovascular effects of subclinical iron overload are discussed. PMID:22948485

  10. Anti-hepcidin therapy for iron-restricted anemias.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2013-10-24

    In this issue of Blood, Cooke et al demonstrate the potential of a fully human anti-hepcidin antibody as a novel therapeutic for iron-restricted anemias such as anemia of inflammation, cancer, or chronic kidney disease (formerly known as “anemia of chronic diseases”). PMID:24159166

  11. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. PMID:26011426

  12. Macrocytic Anemia and Thrombocytopenia Induced by Orlistat

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Martinez, David; Garcia-Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Montero-Santamaria, Nieves; Villar-Ruiz, Olga Patricia; Ruiz-Garcia, Antonio; Diaz-Alonso, Raquel Asuncion

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The overall incidence of obesity and its prevalence is increasing continuously. The obesity is a cardiovascular risk factor whose importance is increasing too. It is associated with many chronic conditions such as type II diabetes mellitus or cardiovascular diseases. The obesity is also implicated as a risk factor for several kinds of cancer such as esophagus, pancreas, colon, rectum, breast cancer in menopausal women. The treatment of the obesity may reduce the incidence of these diseases. The mainstray of the treatment of obesity is changing the lifestyles, but obesity´s treatment may need drug therapy or even though surgical treatment. Orlistat is a specific inhibitor of gastrointestinal lipases, which stops fat absortion. It is used along with a hypocaloric diet, for obesity´s treatment. The beneficial effects of orlistat include weight loss, the improvement of blood pressure´s control, it may delay the development of diabetes mellitus, and it may reduce HbA1c. Case Report: Besides the interaction with other drugs (mainly warfarin and amiodarone). Orlistat´s mainly side effects are gastrointestinal disorders such as the existence of oily spotting from the rectum, abdominal pain or discomfort, fecal urgency. There are also side effects at other levels, like flu symptoms, hypoglycemia, heathache or upper respiratory infections. There are other side effects with very low incidence but clinically relevant like pancreatitis, subacute liver failure, severe liver disease, myopathy, or tubular necrosis secondary to oxalate nephropathy induced by Orlistat. Discussion: In this case report appears a new adverse effect of Orlistat that has not been described above: thrombopenia and macrocytic anemia. PMID:24719628

  13. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Children: Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Janani; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Jacob, Eapen K; Kreuter, Justin D; Go, Ronald S

    2016-04-01

    We studied 35 pediatric patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia seen at Mayo Clinic from 1994 to 2014. The median age was 10.0 years and 65.7% were males. Most had warm antibodies (80.0%) and some secondary to viral (14.3%) or autoimmune disorders (31.4%). Seven (20.0%) patients presented with Evans syndrome, 3 of whom also had common variable immunodeficiency. The median hemoglobin at diagnosis was 6.1 g/dL and 62.8% patients required red cell transfusions. The severity of anemia was worse among children below 10 years (median 5.5 vs. 7.0 g/dL, P=0.01). Steroid was the initial treatment for 88.5% patients, with overall response rate of 82.7% (68.5% complete, 14.2% partial) and median response duration of 10.7 months (range, 0.2 to 129.7+ mo). After median follow-up of 26.6 months, 8 (22.8%) patients relapsed. Salvage treatments included splenectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and mycophenolate mofetil. Infectious complications occurred in 9 (25.7%) patients and 1 patient died of cytomegalovirus infection. Four patients had cold agglutinin disease and 3 (75.0%) responded to steroids. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder in pediatric population and most respond well to steroids regardless of the type of antibody. Infectious complications are common and screening for immunodeficiency is recommended among those with Evans syndrome. PMID:26925716

  14. Iron deficiency and hemolytic anemia reversed by ventricular septal myectomy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Steven M.; Cable, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia has been reported to occur in the setting of aortic stenosis and prosthetic heart valves, but much more rarely in association with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Of the few descriptions of hemolytic anemia secondary to HC, all but one case involved bacterial endocarditis contributing to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. We present the case of a 67-year-old man with recurrent hemolytic anemia and HC, without infective endocarditis. Attempts at iron repletion and augmentation of beta-blocker therapy proved his anemia to be refractory to medical management. Ventricular septal myectomy led to the resolution of hemolysis, anemia, and its coexisting symptoms. PMID:26424952

  15. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  16. Fanconi Anemia Genes, of Menders and Sweepers.

    PubMed

    Campello, Silvia; Cecconi, Francesco

    2016-05-23

    Reporting recently in Cell, Sumpter et al. (2016) provide evidence that Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway genes, which are mutated in the homonymous disease and are tumor suppressors known as damaged nuclear DNA "menders," also act as intracellular sweepers in selective virophagy and mitophagy. PMID:27219059

  17. Indirect hemagglutination test in equine infectious anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, T; Nakajima, H

    1982-01-01

    An indirect hemagglutination was developed for the diagnosis of equine infectious anemia using sheep red blood cells coated with group specific virus antigen which had been highly purified by affinity chromatography. The presence of indirect hemagglutination antibodies was demonstrated in horses with equine infectious anemia since the cells were specifically agglutinated by all the serum samples obtained from experimentally infected horses. Antibodies appeared within 35 days after inoculation, and development of which coincided well with that of precipitating and complement fixing antibodies. Titer of indirect hemagglutination antibodies were ten to 320 times greater than those of precipitating antibodies. Test results could be read more clearly by the indirect hemagglutination test especially in weakly positive cases. Ninety-six samples from suspected field cases collected from every region of Japan which were positive on the immunodiffusion test were also positive on indirect hemagglutination test. Serum samples from 420 horses in one race track were examined by both the indirect hemagglutination and immunodiffusion tests to determine the reliability of the indirect hemagglutination test for diagnosis of equine infectious anemia. The same result was obtained on both tests. Based on this evidence, the indirect hemagglutination test can be employed as a very sensitive serological test for the diagnosis of equine infectious anemia. Images Fig. 3. PMID:6280821

  18. Cyclical iron supplementation to reduce anemia among Brazilian preschoolers: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common type of nutritional disorder. New strategies for the treatment of anemia are very important for its reduction. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and feasibility of cyclical iron supplementation as a strategy to reduce the prevalence of anemia among preschoolers. Methods A randomized controlled trial was performed in the entire population of under five-year-old children who attended government daycare centers in a small town in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The children were randomly allocated into two intervention groups: the Weekly and Cyclical Groups. During a ten-month period, the Weekly Group (n = 51) received weekly doses of 30 mg elemental iron (40 doses) and the Cyclical Group (n = 48) received two cycles of 20 daily doses of 30 mg elemental iron separated by a four-month period (40 doses). Results Overall, at the end of ten months, the prevalence of anemia of the children on both supplementation regimens showed a significant decrease from 20.20% to 5.05% (p-value < 0.0005). There was no significant difference in the anemia between the two groups (p-value = 0.35). The mean hemoglobin concentration increased by 0.27 g/dL (p-value < 0.016) and 0.47 g/dL (p-value < 0.0005) in the Weekly and Cyclical Groups, respectively; again there was no significant difference between groups (p-value = 0.17). However, the cyclical regimen was easier to manage. Conclusions Both supplementation regimens significantly reduced the prevalence of anemia however administration of the Cyclical Group was easier to carry out and control. Clinical trial registration number NCT00992823 PMID:23305566

  19. Anemia in a cohort of HIV-infected Hispanics: prevalence, associated factors and impact on one-year mortality

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anemia occurs frequently in HIV-infected patients and has been associated with an increased risk of death in this population. For Hispanic subjects, information describing this blood disorder during HIV is scarce. Therefore, the present study examined data from a cohort of HIV-positive Hispanics to determine the prevalence of anemia, identify its associated factors, and evaluate its relationship with one-year mortality. Methods This study included 1,486 patients who enrolled between January, 2000 and December, 2010 in an HIV-cohort in Bayamn, Puerto Rico. Data were collected through personal interviews and medical record abstractions. To determine the factors independently associated with anemia, a multivariable logistic regression model was used. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were also performed to estimate survival time and to predict death risk. Results The prevalence of anemia at enrollment was 41.5%. Factors independently associated with increased odds of anemia were: unemployment (OR?=?2.02; 95% CI 1.45-2.79), CD4 count <200 cells/?L (OR?=?2.66; 95% CI 1.94-3.66), HIV viral load ?100,000 copies/mL (OR?=?1.94; 95% CI 1.36-2.78), white blood cell count <4,000 cells/?L (OR?=?2.42; 95% CI 1.78-3.28) and having clinical AIDS (OR?=?2.39; 95% CI 1.39-4.09). Overweight (OR?=?0.43; 95% CI 0.32-0.59) and obese (OR?=?0.44; 95% CI 0.29-0.67) BMIs were independently associated with reduced odds of anemia. Survival differed significantly by anemia status (log-rank test: p?anemia, respectively. Having anemia at baseline was independently associated with an increased one-year mortality risk (severe anemia: HR?=?9.06; 95% CI: 4.16-19.72; moderate anemia: HR?=?6.51; 95% CI: 3.25-13.06; mild anemia: HR?=?2.53; 95% CI: 1.35-4.74). Conclusions A high prevalence of anemia at enrollment was observed in this cohort of HIV-infected Hispanics. Unemployment and several adverse prognostic features of HIV infection were independently associated with this blood disorder. Anemia resulted to be the strongest predictor of one-year mortality, evidencing a doseresponse effect. Further investigations are needed to evaluate whether recovering from anemia is associated with longer survival, and to identify the types of anemia affecting this particular group of HIV patients. PMID:25005803

  20. Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... spongelike tissue inside the bones. Bone marrow makes stem cells that develop into one of the three types ... stops. Blood cell production declines because bone marrow stem cells are damaged. The number of stem cells also ...

  1. The Senegal DNA haplotype is associated with the amelioration of anemia in African-American sickle cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Nagel, R L; Erlingsson, S; Fabry, M E; Croizat, H; Susuka, S M; Lachman, H; Sutton, M; Driscoll, C; Bouhassira, E; Billett, H H

    1991-03-15

    We have previously determined that in African sickle cell anemia (SS) patients three different beta-like globin gene cluster haplotypes are associated with different percent G gamma (one of the two types of non-alpha chains comprising hemoglobin F [HbF]), mean percent HbF, and percent dense cells. We report now that in adult New York SS patients, the presence of at least one chromosome with the Senegal haplotype is associated with higher Hb levels (1.2 g/dL higher) than is found for any other non-Senegal haplotype (P less than .004). The percent reticulocytes and the serum bilirubin levels were lower in these patients. When the effect of alpha-gene number was analyzed by examining a sample of SS patients with concomitant alpha-thalassemia, the same results were obtained. Because the HbF level is significantly higher among the Senegal haplotype carriers in this sample, the inhibitory effect on sickling of this Hb variant may be one of the reasons for the haplotype effect. We conclude that the Senegal beta-like globin gene cluster haplotype is associated with an amelioration of the hemolytic anemia that characterizes sickle cell disease. PMID:2001460

  2. Anemia among Primary School Children in Eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Anemia during childhood impairs physical growth, cognitive development and school performance. Identifying the causes of anemia in specific contexts can help efforts to prevent negative consequences of anemia among children. The objective of this study was to assess prevalence and identify correlates of anemia among school children in Eastern Ethiopia. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted from January 2012 to February 2012 in Kersa, Eastern Ethiopia. The study included randomly selected primary school students. Hemoglobin concentration was measured using a Hemocue haemoglobinometer. A child was identified as anemic if the hemoglobin concentration was <11.5 g/dl for children (5–11 yrs) and < 12 g/dl for child older than 12 years age. Poisson regression model with robust variance was used to calculate prevalence ratios. Result The overall prevalence of anemia was 27.1% (95% CI: 24.98, 29.14): 13.8% had mild, 10.8% moderate, and 2.3% severe anemia. Children with in the age group of 5-9 years (APR, 1.083; 95% CI, 1.044- 1.124) were at higher risk for anemia. Paternal education (Illiterate, 1.109; 1.044 - 1.178) was positively associated with anemia. Children who had irregular legume consumption (APR, 1.069; 95% CI, 1.022 -1.118) were at higher risk for anemia. Conclusion About a quarter of school children suffer from anemia and their educational potential is likely to be affected especially for those with moderate and severe anemia. Child age, irregular legume consumption, and low paternal schooling were associated with anemia. Intervention programmes aimed to reduce anemia among school children are crucial to ensure proper growth and development of children. PMID:25902055

  3. Body proportions in Fanconi anemia heterozygotes.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S; Lakshminarayanan, P; Sowmya, P; Venkatadesikalu, M; Pushpa, V

    2000-11-01

    To study the anthropometric ratios in parents (heterozygotes) of children with Fanconi anemia. The study was carried out in the Department of Hematology, Institute of Child Health & Hospital for Children, Chennai. Parents of children with Fanconi anemia were the subjects of the study. Applying standard instruments and methods, various body measurements were recorded. 31 fathers and 37 mothers were included in the study. A hundred male and female controls of the same ethnic group were also studied for the same parameters. The ratios were calculated and statistically analyzed. It was observed that fathers (male heterozygotes) had shorter forearms, the ratio of upper arm: forearm was significantly increased compared to male controls. In mothers (female heterozygotes) the inter-pupillary distance was increased, the ratio of head circumference to inter-pupillary distance was decreased compared to female controls. PMID:11216377

  4. Animal Models of Anemia of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Seth; Ganz, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    Anemia of inflammation (AI) is a complex multi-organ response to inflammatory disorders. Because AI can result from many infectious and non-infectious inflammatory diseases, multiple mechanisms may contribute to its pathogenesis including iron restriction, direct erythropoietic suppression, shortened red cell survival or frank hemolysis. Animal models have been helpful in the study of the mechanisms of AI and its potential treatments but each model reflects distinct aspects of this heterogeneous syndrome. It is therefore important to study a variety of models of AI. This review focuses on the use of infectious and noninfectious mouse models of inflammation that have been shown to manifest anemia. We review many of the models reported in the literature or developed in our laboratory, and discuss their respective merits and drawbacks. PMID:19786203

  5. Schilling evaluation of pernicious anemia: current status

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckier, L.S.; Chervu, L.R.

    1984-09-01

    The Schilling examination remains a popular means of evaluating in vivo absorption of vitamin B/sub 12/. When absorption is abnormally low, the test may be repeated with addition to exogenous intrinsic factor (IF) in order to correct the IF deficiency that characterizes pernicious anemia. A dual-isotope variation provides a means of performing both stages of the test simultaneously, thereby speeding up the test and reducing dependence on complete urine collection. In vivo studies indicate that, when administered simultaneously, the absorption of unbound B/sub 12/ is elevated, and IF-bound B/sub 12/ is reduced, in pernicious-anemia patients, relative to the classic two-stage examination. A number of clinical studies indicate significant difficulty in resolving clincial diagnoses with the dual-tracer test. An algorithm is offered for selecting the most suitable variation of the Schilling test to improve the accuracy of test results and the ease of performance.

  6. [Copper deficiency anemia morphologically mimicking myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Taku; Mori, Takehiko; Shimizu, Takayuki; Morita, Shinya; Kono, Hidaka; Nakagawa, Ken; Mitsuhasi, Takayuki; Murata, Mitsuru; Okamoto, Shinichiro

    2014-03-01

    A 64-year-old man underwent kidney transplantation for progressive chronic renal failure which had developed 8 years after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia. Because of post-operative complications, he had been placed on intravenous hyperalimentation. Three months after the transplantation, anemia rapidly progressed (hemoglobin, 7.9 g/dl). The proportion of reticulocytes was 0.2%, but white blood cell and platelet counts remained within normal ranges. Serum iron, vitamin B12, and folate levels were normal. Bone marrow examination showed the presence of ringed sideroblasts and cytoplasmic vacuoles in a fraction of erythroid cells. Megakaryocytes were adequate in number with normal morphology. Although the findings were consistent with refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts according to the WHO classification, cytoplasmic vacuolations were also observed in myeloid cells, suggesting copper deficiency. Indeed, serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels were found to be low (33 μg/dl and 11 mg/dl, respectively), and oral copper supplementation at a daily dose of 1 mg was initiated. There was a prompt increase in reticulocytes, and the hemoglobin level was normalized within one month, in response to this regimen. In progressive anemia cases with ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow, copper deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:24681939

  7. Urology and nephrology update: anemia of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fiore, David C; Fox, Cara-Louise

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) at all stages, and it is nearly universal among patients with stage 5 CKD. Nonetheless, anemia of CKD is a diagnosis of exclusion. When anemia is detected in a patient with CKD, etiologies other than CKD must be considered and ruled out. Iron deficiency also is common among patients with CKD, and iron replenishment improves the anemia and the response to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Current guidelines for managing anemia of CKD recommend a hemoglobin goal of 11 to 12 g/dL, but lower hemoglobin may be acceptable for asymptomatic patients. Some patients do not benefit from erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, or they lose their responsiveness to treatment and transfusions must be considered. Other agents are being investigated as management for anemia of CKD, with vitamin C (ascorbic acid) showing some promise. PMID:24432707

  8. Reassessment of the microcytic anemia of lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.R.; Trotzky, M.S.; Pincus, D.

    1981-06-01

    Hematologic abnormalities in childhood lead poisoning may be due, in part, to the presence of other disorders, such as iron deficiency or thalassemia minor. In order to reassess increased lead burden as a cause of microcytic anemia, we studied 58 children with class III or IV lead poisoning, normal iron stores, and no inherited hemoglobinopathy. Anemia occurred in 12% and microcytosis in 21% of these children. The combination of anemia and microcytosis was found in only one of 58 patients (2%). When only children with class IV lead poisoning were studied, the occurrence of microcytosis increased to 46%. However, the combination of microcytosis and anemia was found in only one of these 13 more severely affected patients. Microcytic anemia was similarly uncommon in children with either blood lead concentration greater than or equal to 50 microgram/100 ml. These data indicate that microcytosis and anemia occur much less commonly than previously reported in childhood lead poisoning uncomplicated by other hematologic disorders.

  9. [Spontaneous remission of aplastic anemia occurring during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Nafil, Hatim; Tazi, Illias; Mahmal, Lahoucine

    2012-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare disease caused by destruction of pluripotent stem cells in bone marrow. The occurrence of aplastic anemia during pregnancy is rare and can be fatal for both mother and child. The association is not well explained and there is no consensus on optimal management. We report the case of 30 years-old women treated for aplastic anemia during pregnancy, the evolution is favorable. PMID:22796618

  10. Anemia Among Children Exposed to Polyparasitism in Coastal Kenya.

    PubMed

    Chang Cojulun, Alicia; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Sutherland, Laura J; Mungai, Peter L; Mutuku, Francis; Muchiri, Eric; Kitron, Uriel; King, Charles H

    2015-11-01

    Anemia represents a substantial problem for children living in areas with limited resources and significant parasite burden. We performed a cross-sectional study of 254 Kenyan preschool- and early school-age children in a setting endemic for multiple chronic parasitic infections to explore mechanisms of their anemia. Complete venous blood cell counts revealed a high prevalence of local childhood anemia (79%). Evaluating the potential links between low hemoglobin and socioeconomic factors, nutritional status, hemoglobinopathy, and/or parasite infection, we identified age < 9 years (odds ratio [OR]: 12.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4, 33) and the presence of asymptomatic malaria infection (OR: 6.8, 95% CI: 2.1, 22) as the strongest independent correlates of having anemia. A total of 130/155 (84%) of anemic children with iron studies had evidence of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), 16% had non-IDA; 50/52 of additionally tested anemic children met soluble transferrin-receptor (sTfR) criteria for combined anemia of inflammation (AI) with IDA. Children in the youngest age group had the greatest odds of iron deficiency (OR: 10.0, 95% CI: 3.9, 26). Although older children aged 9-11 years had less anemia, they had more detectable malaria, Schistosoma infection, hookworm, and proportionately more non-IDA. Anemia in this setting appears multifactorial such that chronic inflammation and iron deficiency need to be addressed together as part of integrated management of childhood anemia. PMID:26324733

  11. Predictors of anemia among pregnant women in Westmoreland, Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Alyson M.; Campbell-Stennett, Dianne; Yatich, Nelly; Jolly, Pauline E.

    2010-01-01

    Anemia in pregnancy is a worldwide problem, but it is most prevalent in the developing world. This research project was conducted to determine the predictors of anemia in pregnant women in Westmoreland, Jamaica. A cross-sectional study design was conducted and descriptive, bivariate, and multiple logistic regression analyses were used. Body mass index, Mid-upper arm circumference, and the number of antenatal care visits showed a statistically significant association with anemia. Based on the results, we believe that maintaining a healthy body weight, and frequently visiting an antenatal clinic, will help to lower the prevalence of anemia among pregnant women in Westmoreland. PMID:20526925

  12. [Anemia in chronic kidney disease--reasons and treatment].

    PubMed

    Dylewska, Magdalena; Wieliczko, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Anemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) may affect up to 90% of the patients. It is one of the non typical risk factors of cardiovascular disease, specific for this population. The main reasons of the anemia in CKD are iron and erythropoietin deficiency. It is recognized in women with hemoglobin concentration < 11 g/dl and in men and postmenopausal women with hemoglobin concentration < 12 g/dl. Other potentially reversible reasons of anemia should be excluded in differential diagnosis. Iron and erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESA) constitute the main treatment of anemia of CKD. PMID:25782200

  13. Iron deficiency anemia--bridging the knowledge and practice gap.

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh; Goodnough, Lawrence T; Javidroozi, Mazyar; Auerbach, Michael; Carson, Jeffrey; Ershler, William B; Ghiglione, Mary; Glaspy, John; Lew, Indu

    2014-07-01

    Despite its high prevalence, anemia often does not receive proper clinical attention, and detection, evaluation, and management of iron deficiency anemia and iron-restricted erythropoiesis can possibly be an unmet medical need. A multidisciplinary panel of clinicians with expertise in anemia management convened and reviewed recent published data on prevalence, etiology, and health implications of anemia as well as current therapeutic options and available guidelines on management of anemia across various patient populations and made recommendations on the detection, diagnostic approach, and management of anemia. The available evidence confirms that the prevalence of anemia is high across all populations, especially in hospitalized patients. Anemia is associated with worse clinical outcomes including longer length of hospital stay, diminished quality of life, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality, and it is a modifiable risk factor of allogeneic blood transfusion with its own inherent risks. Iron deficiency is usually present in anemic patients. An algorithm for detection and management of anemia was discussed, which incorporated iron study (with primary emphasis on transferrin saturation), serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate, and vitamin B12 and folic acid measurements. Management strategies included iron therapy (oral or intravenous), erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and referral as needed. PMID:24931617

  14. Antibody Escape Kinetics of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Infection of Horses

    PubMed Central

    Mealey, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Lentivirus escape from neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is not well understood. In this work, we quantified antibody escape of a lentivirus, using antibody escape data from horses infected with equine infectious anemia virus. We calculated antibody blocking rates of wild-type virus, fitness costs of mutant virus, and growth rates of both viruses. These quantitative kinetic estimates of antibody escape are important for understanding lentiviral control by antibody neutralization and in developing NAb-eliciting vaccine strategies. PMID:25878104

  15. Maternal anti-M induced hemolytic disease of newborn followed by prolonged anemia in newborn twins.

    PubMed

    Arora, Satyam; Doda, Veena; Maria, Arti; Kotwal, Urvershi; Goyal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Allo-anti-M often has an immunoglobulin G (IgG) component but is rarely clinically significant. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn along with prolonged anemia in newborn twins that persisted for up to 70 days postbirth. The aim was to diagnose and successfully manage hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) due to maternal alloimmunization. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antigen typing, irregular antibody screening and identification were done by polyspecific antihuman globulin cards and standard tube method. At presentation, the newborn twins (T1, T2) had HDN with resultant low reticulocyte count and prolonged anemia, which continued for up to 70 days of life. Blood group of the twins and the mother was O RhD positive. DAT of the both newborns at birth was negative. Anti-M was detected in mothers as well as newborns. Type of antibody in mother was IgG and IgM type whereas in twins it was IgG type only. M antigen negative blood was transfused thrice to twin-1 and twice to twin-2. Recurring reduction of the hematocrit along with low reticulocyte count and normal other cell line indicated a pure red cell aplastic state. Anti-M is capable of causing HDN as well as prolonged anemia (red cell aplasia) due to its ability to destroy the erythroid precursor cells. Newborns with anemia should be evaluated for all the possible causes to establish a diagnosis and its efficient management. Mother should be closely monitored for future pregnancies as well. PMID:25722586

  16. Antibody escape kinetics of equine infectious anemia virus infection of horses.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Elissa J; Nanda, Seema; Mealey, Robert H

    2015-07-01

    Lentivirus escape from neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is not well understood. In this work, we quantified antibody escape of a lentivirus, using antibody escape data from horses infected with equine infectious anemia virus. We calculated antibody blocking rates of wild-type virus, fitness costs of mutant virus, and growth rates of both viruses. These quantitative kinetic estimates of antibody escape are important for understanding lentiviral control by antibody neutralization and in developing NAb-eliciting vaccine strategies. PMID:25878104

  17. Maternal anti-M induced hemolytic disease of newborn followed by prolonged anemia in newborn twins

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Satyam; Doda, Veena; Maria, Arti; Kotwal, Urvershi; Goyal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Allo-anti-M often has an immunoglobulin G (IgG) component but is rarely clinically significant. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn along with prolonged anemia in newborn twins that persisted for up to 70 days postbirth. The aim was to diagnose and successfully manage hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) due to maternal alloimmunization. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antigen typing, irregular antibody screening and identification were done by polyspecific antihuman globulin cards and standard tube method. At presentation, the newborn twins (T1, T2) had HDN with resultant low reticulocyte count and prolonged anemia, which continued for up to 70 days of life. Blood group of the twins and the mother was O RhD positive. DAT of the both newborns at birth was negative. Anti-M was detected in mothers as well as newborns. Type of antibody in mother was IgG and IgM type whereas in twins it was IgG type only. M antigen negative blood was transfused thrice to twin-1 and twice to twin-2. Recurring reduction of the hematocrit along with low reticulocyte count and normal other cell line indicated a pure red cell aplastic state. Anti-M is capable of causing HDN as well as prolonged anemia (red cell aplasia) due to its ability to destroy the erythroid precursor cells. Newborns with anemia should be evaluated for all the possible causes to establish a diagnosis and its efficient management. Mother should be closely monitored for future pregnancies as well. PMID:25722586

  18. Aplastic Anemia in Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    DeZern, Amy E.; Guinan, Eva C.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent and young adult patient presentations of aplastic anemia require a particular perspective on both diagnosis and treatment. This unique age group necessitates a thorough diagnostic evaluation to ensure the etiology, acquired or inherited, is sufficiently determined. The treatment options include human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling hematopoietic cell transplantation or immunosuppressive therapy, and both require attention to the specific medical and social needs of these adolescents and young adults. Longitudinal surveillance throughout life for the development of late complications of the disease and treatment is mandatory. PMID:25228559

  19. Diagnosis and management of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Buchanan, George R

    2014-08-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a common hematologic condition, affecting a substantial proportion of the world's women and young children. Optimal management of IDA requires an accurate diagnosis, identification and correction of the underlying cause, provision of medicinal iron therapy, and confirmation of treatment success. There are limited data to support current treatment approaches regarding oral iron preparation, dosing, monitoring, and duration of therapy. New intravenous iron agents have improved safety profiles, which may foster their increased utilization in the treatment of patients with IDA. Clinical trials focused on improving current treatment standards for IDA are sorely needed. PMID:25064710

  20. Etiology of Strokes in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBaun, Michael R.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; McKinstry, Robert C., III

    2006-01-01

    The most devastating complication of sickle cell anemia is cerebral infarction, affecting [approximately]30% of all individuals with sickle cell anemia. Despite being one of the most common causes of stroke in infants and children, the mechanism of cerebral infarction in this population has not been extensively studied and is poorly understood.

  1. Etiology of Strokes in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBaun, Michael R.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; McKinstry, Robert C., III

    2006-01-01

    The most devastating complication of sickle cell anemia is cerebral infarction, affecting [approximately]30% of all individuals with sickle cell anemia. Despite being one of the most common causes of stroke in infants and children, the mechanism of cerebral infarction in this population has not been extensively studied and is poorly understood.…

  2. An etiologic profile of anemia in 405 geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Geisel, Tabea; Martin, Julia; Schulze, Bettina; Schaefer, Roland; Bach, Matthias; Virgin, Garth; Stein, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Background. Anemia is a common condition in the elderly and a significant risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality, reducing not only functional capacity and mobility but also quality of life. Currently, few data are available regarding anemia in hospitalized geriatric patients. Our retrospective study investigated epidemiology and causes of anemia in 405 hospitalized geriatric patients. Methods. Data analysis was performed using laboratory parameters determined during routine hospital admission procedures (hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin saturation, C-reactive protein, vitamin B12, folic acid, and creatinine) in addition to medical history and demographics. Results. Anemia affected approximately two-thirds of subjects. Of 386 patients with recorded hemoglobin values, 66.3% were anemic according to WHO criteria, mostly (85.1%) in a mild form. Anemia was primarily due to iron deficiency (65%), frequently due to underlying chronic infection (62.1%), or of mixed etiology involving a combination of chronic disease and iron deficiency, with absolute iron deficiency playing a comparatively minor role. Conclusion. Greater awareness of anemia in the elderly is warranted due to its high prevalence and negative effect on outcomes, hospitalization duration, and mortality. Geriatric patients should be routinely screened for anemia and etiological causes of anemia individually assessed to allow timely initiation of appropriate therapy. PMID:24707396

  3. How I Diagnose Non-thalassemic Microcytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Mariasole; De Falco, Luigia; Iolascon, Achille

    2015-10-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most common form of anemia, characterized by reduced hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis associated with decreased red blood cell volume (MCV). It is a very heterogeneous group of diseases that may be either acquired or inherited. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from defects in globin (hemoglobinopathies or thalassemias) or heme synthesis or in iron availability, or acquisition by the erythroid precursors. Diagnosis of microcytic anaemia appears to be important in children/adolescents, especially to set, where possible, a treatment plan on the basis of the etiology and pathogenesis. After excluding the acquired causes of microcytic anemia that represent the most frequent etiology, according to the differential diagnosis, the analysis of genetic causes, mostly hereditary, must be considered. This review will consider acquired and hereditary microcytic anemias due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects and their diagnosis. PMID:26404439

  4. Anemia in the Elderly: not Always what it Seems

    PubMed Central

    Cerrano, Marco; Crisà, Elena; Giai, Valentina; Boccadoro, Mario; Ferrero, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Anemia in the elderly is a common but challenging clinical scenario. Here we describe the case of an older woman who presented with anemia and elevated inflammation markers. After a complete diagnostic work-up, a definite etiology of the anemia could not be found so eventually a bone marrow biopsy was performed and she was diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome. She responded well to erythropoietin treatment but her inflammation markers remained elevated thus a positron emission tomography was performed. It turned out that the patient suffered from giant cell artheritis and her anemia completely resolved after steroid treatment. Our case outlines that it is necessary to pay particular attention to anemia of inflammation, which could be due to several and often masked conditions. Myelodysplatic syndromes should be considered when other causes have been ruled out, but their diagnosis can be difficult and requires expertise in the field. PMID:26977276

  5. Anemia in elderly patients: new insight into an old disorder.

    PubMed

    Andrès, Emmanuel; Serraj, Khalid; Federici, Laure; Vogel, Thomas; Kaltenbach, Georges

    2013-07-01

    Anemia is an important healthcare concern among the elderly. In these patients, the anemia is often mild, with a hemoglobin level >10 g/dL. It is usually well tolerated, but might be responsible for several proteiform and/or atypical presenting complaints. In the elderly, anemia is usually of multifactorial origin, including chronic inflammation, chronic kidney disease, nutrient deficiencies and iron deficiency (approximately two-thirds of all cases). The remaining cases are unexplained (unknown etiology). In the elderly, the classic diagnosis of anemia, which is based on the mean corpuscular volume associated with a low hemoglobin level, might not be accurate. A predefined standardized diagnostic procedure should be followed. In the common case of frail elderly patients, all investigations should be carefully considered and invasive examinations undertaken where justified (risk-benefit balance). Nevertheless, most cases of anemia require further investigation and the underlying cause should be identified and treated whenever possible. PMID:23253055

  6. Selection of peptides for serological detection of equine infectious anemia.

    PubMed

    Santos, E M; Cardoso, R; Souza, G R L; Goulart, L R; Heinemann, M B; Leite, R C; Reis, J K P

    2012-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia caused by equine infectious anemia virus is an important disease due to its high severity and incidence in animals. We used a phage display library to isolate peptides that can be considered potential markers for equine infectious anemia diagnosis. We selected peptides using IgG purified from a pool comprised of 20 sera from animals naturally infected with equine infectious anemia virus. The diagnostic potential of these peptides was investigated by ELISA, Western blot and dot blot with purified IgG and serum samples. Based on the results, we chose a peptide mimetic for glycoprotein gp45 epitopes of equine infectious anemia virus, with potential for use as an antigen in indirect diagnostic assays. Synthesis of this peptide has possible applications for the development of new diagnostic tools for this disease. PMID:22653674

  7. Effect of correction of anemia on echocardiographic and clinical parameters in patients with aortic stenosis involving a three-cuspid aortic valve and normal left ventricular ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Gmez, Miquel; Ble, Mireia; Cladellas, Mercedes; Molina, Luis; Comn-Colet, Josep; Enjuanes, Cristina; Roqueta, Cristina; Soler, Cristina; Bruguera, Jordi

    2015-07-15

    The objective of the study is to investigate the impact of anemia (defined as hemoglobin concentration of <12 g/dl in women and 13 g/dl in men) on prognosis and to study the effect of recovery from anemia on echocardiographic and clinical parameters in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). This was a prospective study in 315 patients with moderate or severe AS. Patients with anemia received oral iron (ferrous sulfate with mucoproteose, 160 mg iron/day) and erythropoietin, if needed, or intravenous iron, if necessary. The following tests were performed before and after normalization of hemoglobin values: echocardiogram, 6-minute walk test, N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide, and measures of depression, cognitive impairment, and dependence. Patient mean age was 74 years (SD 9). Mean follow-up was 25 months (SD 8). Anemia prevalence in the overall group was 22% (n = 70). Patients who are anemic had a higher rate of complications at follow-up (mortality, hospital admission, or need for valve procedure; 80% vs 62%, p = 0.009). In total, 89% of patients recovered from anemia, with a mean time to recovery of 4.6 weeks (SD 1.4). Improvements were observed on echocardiographic parameters of peak velocity (4.1 to 3.7 m/s, p = 0.02) and mean gradient (44 to 35 mm Hg, p = 0.02). Performance on the 6-minute walk test improved from 235 to 303 m (p <0.001). Median N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide value decreased from 612 to 189 pg/dl (p <0.001). In conclusion, patients with AS and anemia have a worse prognosis than those without anemia. Resolution of anemia is associated with improvements in echocardiographic parameters and functional status, suggesting that treatment of iron deficiency is a relevant option in the management of patients with AS, particularly in nonoperable cases. PMID:25983280

  8. Microfluidic approach of Sickled Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Loiseau, Etienne; Massiera, Gladys

    2012-11-01

    Sickle Cell Anemia is a disorder of the microcirculation caused by a genetic point mutation that produces an altered hemoglobin protein called HbS. HbS self-assembles reversibly into long rope like fibers inside the red blood cells. The resulting distorded sickled red blood cells are believed to block the smallest capillaries of the tissues producing anemia. Despite the large amount of work that provided a thorough understanding of HbS polymerization in bulk as well as in intact red blood cells at rest, no consequent cellular scale approaches of the study of polymerization and its link to the capillary obstruction have been proposed in microflow, although the problem of obstruction is in essence a circulatory problem. Here, we use microfluidic channels, designed to mimic physiological conditions (flow velocity, oxygen concentration, hematocrit...) of the microcirculation to carry out a biomimetic study at the cellular scale of sickled cell vaso-occlusion. We show that flow geometry, oxygen concentration, white blood cells and free hemoglobin S are essential in the formation of original cell aggregates which could play a role in the vaso-occlusion events.

  9. [Iron supplementation is recommended in renal anemia].

    PubMed

    Stefansson, Bergur

    2015-01-01

    The main causes for renal anemia are insufficient erythropoietin production and absolute and/or functional iron deficiency. Absolute iron deficiency occurs with blood losses (most common are gastro-intestinal bleedings and hemodialysis treatments) or inadequate iron absorption in the gut (mainly due to increased circulating hepcidin or treatment with erythropoiesis stimulating agents). The explanation for functional iron deficiency is the high level of circulating hepcidin found in chronic kidney disease patients. The transmembrane iron transporter ferroportin is internalized and degraded by hepcidin with subsequent decreased iron absorption from the gut and reduced mobilization from iron storing cells. Thus, the bioavailability of iron is decreased despite normal or high total iron content. The diagnosis of iron deficiency in chronic kidney disease can be problematic because inflammation is common, leading to false high circulating ferritin and false low transferrin saturation. Treatment with iron is recommended in chronic kidney disease patients to prevent or minimize anemia symptoms or to reduce the need for treatment with erythropoiesis stimulating agents or blood transfusions. Intravenous iron is recommended in patients on dialysis treatment but in non-dialysis patients, a 1-3 month trial of oral iron can be tried. However, this is seldom sufficient in patients treated with erythropoiesis stimulating agents. PMID:25756713

  10. Diamond-Blackfan anemia, ribosome and erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Costa, L. Da; Moniz, H.; Simansour, M.; Tchernia, G.; Mohandas, N.; Leblanc, T.

    2010-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare inherited bone marrow failure syndrome (5 to 7 cases/million live births) characterized by an are generative, usually macrocytic anemia with an absence or less than 5% of erythroid precursors (erythroblastopenia) in an otherwise normal bone marrow. The platelet and the white cell counts are usually normal but neutropenia, thrombopenia or thrombocytosis have been noted at diagnosis. In 40 to 50% of DBA patients, congenital abnormalities mostly in the cephalic area and in thumbs and upper limbs have been described. Recent analysis did show a phenotype/genotype correlation. Congenital erythroblastopenia of DBA is the first human disease identified to result from defects in ribosomal biogenesis. The first ribosomal gene involved in DBA, ribosomal protein (RP) gene S19 (RPS19 gene), was identified in 1999. Subsequently, mutations in 12 other RP genes out of a total of 78 RP genes have been identified in DBA. All RP gene mutations described to date are heterozygous and dominant inheritance has been documented in 40 to 45% of affected individuals. As RP mutations are yet to be identified in approximately 50% of DBA cases, it is likely that other yet to be identified genes involved in ribosomal biogenesis or other pathways may be responsible for DBA phenotype. PMID:20655265

  11. Maternal anemia associated with walkable distance to healthy food sources in Bronx, New York.

    PubMed

    Bottalico, Danielle M; Johnson, Glen D; Chazotte, Cynthia; Karkowsky, Chavi Eve

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between walkable access to healthy food sources and risk of anemia in pregnancy was evaluated for a cohort of 4678 women who initiated prenatal care in the year 2010 at an academic medical center in Bronx, New York. After geocoding patient residences, street network distances were obtained for the closest healthy food sources, which were identified from multiple databases. For lower-income patients, as indicated by Medicaid or lack of health insurance, those who lived less than 0.25miles from a healthy food source were less likely to be anemic when compared to those who lived farther (adjusted OR=0.65, 95% CI 0.48, 0.88). Patients with commercial insurance showed no effect. These results help to understand how a nutritionally-mediated condition such as anemia during pregnancy can be affected by one's built environment, while also highlighting the importance of conditioning on socioeconomic status for these types of studies. PMID:25779906

  12. Dietary L-leucine improves the anemia in a mouse model for Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaako, Pekka; Debnath, Shubhranshu; Olsson, Karin; Bryder, David; Flygare, Johan; Karlsson, Stefan

    2012-09-13

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital erythroid hypoplasia caused by a functional haploinsufficiency of genes encoding for ribosomal proteins. Recently, a case study reported a patient who became transfusion-independent in response to treatment with the amino acid L-leucine. Therefore, we have validated the therapeutic effect of L-leucine using our recently generated mouse model for RPS19-deficient DBA. Administration of L-leucine significantly improved the anemia in Rps19-deficient mice (19% improvement in hemoglobin concentration; 18% increase in the number of erythrocytes), increased the bone marrow cellularity, and alleviated stress hematopoiesis. Furthermore, the therapeutic response to L-leucine appeared specific for Rps19-deficient hematopoiesis and was associated with down-regulation of p53 activity. Our study supports the rationale for clinical trials of L-leucine as a therapeutic agent for DBA. PMID:22791294

  13. Prevalence and Determinants of Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Al Zenki, Sameer; Alomirah, Husam; Al Hooti, Suad; Al Hamad, Nawal; Jackson, Robert T.; Rao, Aravinda; Al Jahmah, Nasser; Al Obaid, Ina’am; Al Ghanim, Jameela; Al Somaie, Mona; Zaghloul, Sahar; Al Othman, Amani

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency (ID) of a nationally representative sample of the Kuwait population. We also determined if anemia differed by socioeconomic status or by RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. The subjects who were made up of 1830 males and females between the ages of 2 months to 86 years, were divided into the following age groups (0–5, 5–11, 12–14, 15–19, 20–49, ≥50 years). Results showed that the prevalence of anemia was 3% in adult males and 17% in females. The prevalence of ID varied according to age between 4% (≥50 years) and 21% (5–11 years) and 9% (12–14 years) and 23% (15–19 years), respectively, in males and females. The prevalence of anemia and ID was higher in females compared to males. Adults with normal ferritin level, but with low RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels had higher prevalence of anemia than those with normal RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. This first nationally representative nutrition and health survey in Kuwait indicated that anemia and ID are prevalent and ID contributes significantly to anemia prevalence. PMID:26264015

  14. Prevalence and Determinants of Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al Zenki, Sameer; Alomirah, Husam; Al Hooti, Suad; Al Hamad, Nawal; Jackson, Robert T; Rao, Aravinda; Al Jahmah, Nasser; Al Obaid, Ina'am; Al Ghanim, Jameela; Al Somaie, Mona; Zaghloul, Sahar; Al Othman, Amani

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency (ID) of a nationally representative sample of the Kuwait population. We also determined if anemia differed by socioeconomic status or by RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. The subjects who were made up of 1830 males and females between the ages of 2 months to 86 years, were divided into the following age groups (0-5, 5-11, 12-14, 15-19, 20-49, ≥50 years). Results showed that the prevalence of anemia was 3% in adult males and 17% in females. The prevalence of ID varied according to age between 4% (≥50 years) and 21% (5-11 years) and 9% (12-14 years) and 23% (15-19 years), respectively, in males and females. The prevalence of anemia and ID was higher in females compared to males. Adults with normal ferritin level, but with low RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels had higher prevalence of anemia than those with normal RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. This first nationally representative nutrition and health survey in Kuwait indicated that anemia and ID are prevalent and ID contributes significantly to anemia prevalence. PMID:26264015

  15. Prevalence of anemia in First Nations children of northwestern Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, E. A.; Caulfield, L. E.; Harris, S. B.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of anemia among First Nations children of northwestern Ontario. DESIGN: Retrospective review of all hemoglobin determinations between 1990 and 1992 in the Sioux Lookout Zone. SETTING: The Sioux Lookout Zone Hospital, a secondary care referral hospital for 28 remote First Nations communities in northwestern Ontario, affiliated with the University of Toronto's Sioux Lookout Program. PARTICIPANTS: All First Nations children age 3 to 60 months who had produced venipuncture or fingerprick blood samples between 1990 and 1992 (614 children had a total of 1223 hemoglobin determinations). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of anemia by age, sex, geographical location, and diagnosis. Anemia was defined as a hemoglobin value less than 110g/L. RESULTS: Prevalence of anemia peaked in the age range of 6 to 24 months with prevalence rates of 51.7% to 79.3%. Conditions most commonly associated with anemia were respiratory tract infections. Children living in communities in the western part of the Sioux Lookout Zone were 1.64 times more likely to have anemia (95% confidence interval 1.15, 2.35) than children in the other communities. CONCLUSIONS: Anemia appears to be a serious public health problem among preschool children in the Sioux Lookout Zone. PMID:9111982

  16. Anemia and Outcome in Outpatients With Peripheral Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Perez, Paulina; Esteban, Carlos; Caballero, Pedro Enrique Jiménez; Muñoz-Torrero, Juan Francisco Sánchez; Soria, María Teresa Pascual; Aguilar, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Lorenzo Ramón Álvarez; Sahuquillo, Joan Carles; Díaz, Ana María García; Monreal, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    The influence of anemia on outcome in stable outpatients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) has not been consistently investigated. We used data from the Factores de Riesgo y ENfermedad Arterial (FRENA) Registry to compare ischemic events and mortality rates in stable outpatients with symptomatic PAD and anemia. Of 1663 patients with PAD, 208 (12.5%) had anemia. Over 18 months, patients with anemia had a higher rate of myocardial infarction (MI; rate ratio [RR]: 2.10; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04-3.99), limb amputation (RR: 2.98; 95%CI: 1.70-5.05), and higher mortality (RR: 3.58; 95%CI: 2.39-5.28) than those without anemia. The rates of ischemic stroke (RR: 0.75; 95%CI: 0.23-1.93) and major bleeding (RR: 0.93; 95%CI: 0.15-3.51) were similar. On multivariable analysis, anemia was associated with an increased risk to die (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.32; 95%CI: 1.53-3.50) but not to develop MI (HR: 1.49; 95%CI: 0.73-3.05) or to have limb amputation (HR: 1.49; 95%CI: 0.86-2.59). In stable outpatients with PAD, anemia was associated with increased mortality but not with an increased rate of subsequent ischemic events or major bleeding. PMID:26271128

  17. Iron and anemia in human biology: a review of mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Garry J; Levin, Nathan W

    2008-12-01

    The biology of iron in relation to anemia is best understood by a review of the iron cycle, since the majority of iron for erythropoiesis is provided by iron recovered from senescent erythrocytes. In iron-deficiency anemia, storage iron declines until iron delivery to the bone marrow is insufficient for erythropoiesis. This can be monitored with clinical indicators, beginning with low plasma ferritin, followed by decreased plasma iron and transferrin saturation, and culminating in red blood cells with low-Hb content. When adequate dietary iron is provided, these markers show return to normal, indicating a response to the dietary supplement. Anemia of inflammation (also known as anemia of chronic disease, or ACD) follows a different course, because in this form of anemia storage iron is often abundant but not available for erythropoiesis. The diagnosis of ACD is more difficult than the diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia, and often the first identified symptom is the failure to show a response to a dietary iron supplement. Confirmation of ACD is best obtained from elevated markers of inflammation. The treatment of ACD, which typically employs erythropoietin (EPO) supplements and intravenous iron (i.v.-iron), is empirical and often falls shorts of therapeutic goals. Dialysis patients show a complex pattern of anemia, which results from inadequate EPO production by the kidney, inflammation, changes in nutrition, and blood losses during treatment. EPO and i.v.-iron are the mainstays of treatment. Patients with heart failure can be anemic, with incidence as high as 50%. The causes are multifactorial; inflammation now appears to be the primary cause of this form of anemia, with contributions from increased plasma volume, effects of drug therapy, and other complications of heart disease. Discerning the mechanisms of anemia for the heart failure patient may aid rational therapy in each case. PMID:18363095

  18. Anemia management: development of a rapidaccess anemia and intravenous iron service.

    PubMed

    Radia, Deepti; Momoh, Ibrahim; Dillon, Richard; Francis, Yvonne; Cameron, Laura; Fagg, Toni-Lee; Overland, Hannah; Robinson, Susan; Harrison, Claire N

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the initiation and evolution of the Rapid-Access Anemia Clinic (RAAC) at Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals, London, UK. This clinic was set up to provide diagnosis and treatment, and to coordinate investigative procedures, where necessary, into the underlying causes of anemia. Initially piloted with anemic preoperative orthopedic patients, the clinic now treats a wide range of conditions, deriving from both internal and external referrals. Treatment includes dietary advice, supplementation with iron, vitamin B12 and folate, and blood transfusion. Most patients at the RAAC need iron replacement, the majority of which require intravenous (IV) iron. Therefore the first-line IV iron-administration protocol is carefully considered to ensure viability of the service and patient satisfaction. Four IV irons available in the UK are discussed, with explanation of the benefits and drawbacks of each product and the reasoning behind the IV iron choice at different stages of the RAAC's development. Costs to the service, affected by IV iron price and administration regimen, are considered, as well as the product's contraindications. Finally, the authors reflect on the success of the RAAC and how it has improved patients' quality-of-treatment experience, in addition to benefiting the hospital and National Health Service in achieving specific health-care mandates and directives. Drawing from the authors' experiences, recommendations are given to assist others in setting up and providing a successful rapid-access anemia service or similar facility. PMID:23950666

  19. Neonatal anemia and hydrops fetalis after maternal mycophenolate mofetil use.

    PubMed

    Tjeertes, I F A; Bastiaans, D E T; van Ganzewinkel, C J L M; Zegers, S H J

    2007-01-01

    After admitting a patient to our Neonatal Intensive Care with a severe anemia and an ear malformation, we ruled out any other cause than maternal medication use. Knowing she used mycophenolate mofetil during pregnancy, we looked for related articles. Two articles were found describing ear malformations, but no article was ever written about anemia caused by this medication. Consulting the international registers of drug effects through the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, we found out that the anemia was never seen or reported before. PMID:17180133

  20. A microfluidics cytometer for mice anemia detection.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yanrui; Song, Jian; Geng, Zhaoxin; Zhang, Hongze; Wang, Wei; Xie, Lide; Yao, Weijuan; Li, Zhihong

    2012-11-01

    The design and fabrication of a microfluidic cytometer system and its application for reticulocyte detection are described. This chip can count the target cells, which are focused at the detection window without sheath flow. This cytometer system based on optimized epifluoresence has a competitive advantage in the signal-to-noise ratio. Induced fluorescence from the reticulocyte binded with antibody is detected by the optical module and then transformed into the electronic signal by a photo multiplier tube. After signal processing, the results are automatically read out by a digital module and displayed on the system. To evaluate this microfluidic cytometer system, experiments employing polystyrene (PS) micro beads and induced reticulocyte of mice anemia are carried out, respectively, and the results illustrate that the microfluidic cytometer system is effective in detecting the reticulocyte. PMID:22907472

  1. Pernicious anemia. From past to present.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Santiago, E; Ferre Aracil, C; García García de Paredes, A; Moreira Vicente, V F

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is currently the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in Western countries. The histological lesion upon which this condition is based is autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis. The destruction of parietal cells causes a deficiency in intrinsic factor, an essential protein for vitamin B12 absorption in the terminal ileum. Advances in the last two decades have reopened the debate on a disease that seemed to have been forgotten due to its apparent simplicity. The new role of H. pylori, the value of parietal cell antibodies and intrinsic factor antibodies, the true usefulness of serum vitamin B12 levels, the risk of adenocarcinoma and gastric carcinoids and oral vitamin B12 treatment are just some of the current issues analyzed in depth in this review. PMID:25680481

  2. TNF-α signaling in Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Erden, Ozlem; Pang, Qishen

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is a major pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in systemic inflammation and the acute phase reaction. Dysregulation of TNF production has been implicated in a variety of human diseases including Fanconi anemia (FA). FA is a genomic instability syndrome characterized by progressive bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. The patients with FA are often found overproducing TNF-α, which may directly affect hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function by impairing HSC survival, homing and proliferation, or indirectly change the bone marrow microenvironment critical for HSC homeostasis and function, therefore contributing to disease progression in FA. In this brief review, we discuss the link between TNF-α signaling and FA pathway with emphasis on the implication of inflammation in the pathophysiology and abnormal hematopoiesis in FA. PMID:23890415

  3. [Management of adults with sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Bachir, D

    1999-01-01

    The management of adults with sickle cell disease should be geared to the profile of the disease in adulthood. The chronic hemolytic anemia impacts everyday activities. Paroxysmal complications include painful vasoocclusive crises, acute chest syndrome, priapism, and infections. Potentially life-threatening chronic complications should be detected and treated early; they include cardiopulmonary, renal, and hepatic involvement. Osteonecrosis of the hip can result in functional impairment. Pregnancy and anesthesia require special precautions. A multifaceted personalized management program, if possible at a sickle cell disease center working closely with other health care providers and social workers, offers the best hope for providing ever-increasing gains in quality of life for sickle cell disease patients. PMID:10081778

  4. Antibodies in the treatment of aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Almaguer, David; Jaime-Pérez, Jose Carlos; Ruiz-Arguelles, Guillermo J

    2012-04-01

    Antibodies have been the cornerstone of treatment of acquired aplastic anemia for more than 25 years. Treatment with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is considered pivotal and the addition of cyclosporine improves the overall response rate. This antibody is heterogeneous and horse ATG is apparently more effective than rabbit ATG. Several issues remain unsolved in relation to the combination of ATG and cyclosporine: cost, toxicity and late clonal disorders. In recent years, alternative immunosuppressive therapy has been proposed and new antibodies have emerged: porcine ATG, alemtuzumab, daclizumab, and rituximab. Experience with these antibodies is limited to a few studies with alemtuzumab being the most promising, but the results are interesting and provocative. More studies are needed to find the perfect antibody. PMID:22307362

  5. Infantile cytomegalovirus-associated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Murray, J C; Bernini, J C; Bijou, H L; Rossmann, S N; Mahoney, D H; Morad, A B

    2001-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a hematologic disorder that is rarely seen in infants and young children. Most cases are associated with viral or bacterial infection, but the immunologic events leading to hemolysis are poorly understood. We describe two infants with severe cytomegalovirus (CMV)-associated warm antibody AIHA. One case was immunohematologically analyzed and showed suggestive evidence that endogenous anti-CMV IgG antibodies were the pathogenic antibodies leading to hemolysis, implicating a possible causal relationship between AIHA and CMV infection. Both patients were ultimately treated with intravenous CMV immune globulin, with subsequent improvement. These cases suggest that investigation for the presence of CMV in infantile AIHA is warranted and that CMV immune globulin should be considered as a therapeutic option. PMID:11464992

  6. Assessing Chaos in Sickle Cell Anemia Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Wesley; Le Floch, Francois

    2006-11-01

    Recent developments in sickle cell research and blood flow modeling allow for new interpretations of the sickle cell crises. With an appropriate set of theoretical and empirical equations describing the dynamics of the red cells in their environment, and the response of the capillaries to major changes in the rheology, a complete mathematical system has been derived. This system of equations is believed to be of major importance to provide new and significant insight into the causes of the disease and related crises. With simulations, it has been proven that the system transition from a periodic solution to a chaotic one, which illustrates the onset of crises from a regular blood flow synchronized with the heart beat. Moreover, the analysis of the effects of various physiological parameters exposes the potential to control chaotic solutions, which, in turn, could lead to the creation of new and more effective treatments for sickle cell anemia. .

  7. Effect of iron liposomes on anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Geng, Lina; Ge, Lan; Yu, Peng; Duan, Xianglin; Chen, Jun; Chang, Yanzhong

    2013-09-15

    Supplementation with iron-fortified foods is an effective method for treating iron deficiency diseases. However, traditional iron agents used to treat anemia of inflammation (AI) have little effect. In this study, two types of iron liposomes, heme liposomes (HEME-LIP) and ferric citrate liposomes (FAC-LIP), were prepared by the rotary-evaporated film-ultrasonication method, and the encapsulation efficiencies, microstructures, size distributions and zeta potentials were assessed. Both types of iron liposomes showed stable physical characteristics. When used to treat rat models of AI, FAC-LIP and HEME-LIP could increase serum iron levels by 119% and 54% higher than did ferric citrate (FAC) and heme, respectively. Furthermore, the hepcidin, a key regulator of iron homeostasis was up-regulated by these iron liposomes, especially by HEME-LIP. These results indicate that the absorption of iron liposomes was improved over that of unencapsulated iron agents. Thus, iron liposomes may be used to fortify food in treating iron deficiency diseases, especially AI. PMID:23850818

  8. Further acatalasemia mutations in human patients from Hungary with diabetes and microcytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Terez; Paszti, Erika; Kaplar, Miklos; Bhattoa, Harjit Pal; Goth, Laszlo

    2015-02-01

    In blood, the hydrogen peroxide concentration is regulated by catalase. Decreased activity of catalase may lead to increased hydrogen peroxide concentration, which may contribute to the manifestation of age-related disease. The aim of this study is to examine association of decreased blood catalase activity and catalase exon mutations in patients (n=617) with diabetes (n=380), microcytic anemia (n=58), beta-thalassemia (n=43) and presbycusis (n=136) and in controls (n=295). Overall, 51 patients (8.3%) had less than half of normal blood catalase activity. Their genomic DNA was used for mutation screening of all exons and exon/intron boundaries with polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and PCR-heteroduplex analyses, and mutations were verified with nucleotide sequencing. Seven patients (type 2 diabetes (n=3), gestational diabetes (n=1), microcytic anemia (n=2)) had four novel catalase exon mutations namely, c.106_107insC, p.G36Afs*5(n=3, Hungarian type G1), c.379C>T, p.R127Y (n=2, Hungarian type H1), c.390T>C, p.R129L, (n=1, Hungarian type H2) and c.431A>T, p.N143V (n=1, Hungarian type H3). In patients with decreased blood catalase, the incidence of acatalasemia mutations was significantly high (P<0.0002) in microcytic anemia, type 2 and gestational diabetes. The four novel mutations were probably responsible for low blood catalase activity in 7/51 patients. In the remainder of the cases, other polymorphisms and epigenetic/regulatory factors may be involved. PMID:25772105

  9. Metformin-Induced Hemolytic Anemia in a Patient With Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Nicole A; Kish, Troy D; Lee, Mikyung L

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, an oral antidiabetic agent, is considered the preferred first-line therapy for patients with type II diabetes. Between 2010 and 2012, it has been estimated that 14 million Americans were administered an oral antidiabetic agent, suggesting the extensive use of metformin among the diabetic population. There have been few case reports implicating metformin in causing hemolytic anemia. We present a case of a 53-year-old white male who developed hemolytic anemia after the initiation of treatment with metformin 500 mg twice daily. The patient experienced a 1.5 g/dL decrease in hemoglobin from baseline and a 2.8 mg/dL increase in total bilirubin within 1 day of treatment. Laboratory results confirmed that the patient was also glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient. The hemolytic anemia resolved on discontinuation of metformin. Although this adverse effect seems to be rare, it is important to consider its seriousness. Clinicians should be advised to closely monitor patients newly started on metformin. PMID:25756470

  10. Deletion of a Malaria Invasion Gene Reduces Death and Anemia, in Model Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Noé D.; Safeukui, Innocent; Adelani, Aanuoluwa A.; Tewari, Rita; Reddy, Janardan K.; Rao, Sam; Holder, Anthony; Buffet, Pierre; Mohandas, Narla; Haldar, Kasturi

    2011-01-01

    Malaria parasites induce complex cellular and clinical phenotypes, including anemia, cerebral malaria and death in a wide range of mammalian hosts. Host genes and parasite ‘toxins’ have been implicated in malarial disease, but the contribution of parasite genes remains to be fully defined. Here we assess disease in BALB/c mice and Wistar rats infected by the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei with a gene knock out for merozoite surface protein (MSP) 7. MSP7 is not essential for infection but in P. falciparum, it enhances erythrocyte invasion by 20%. In vivo, as compared to wild type, the P. berghei Δmsp7 mutant is associated with an abrogation of death and a decrease from 3% to 2% in peak, circulating parasitemia. The Δmsp7 mutant is also associated with less anemia and modest increase in the size of follicles in the spleen. Together these data show that deletion of a single parasite invasion ligand modulates blood stage disease, as measured by death and anemia. This work is the first to assess the contribution of a gene present in all plasmodial species in severe disease. PMID:21980474

  11. Abnormal erythroid maturation leads to microcytic anemia in the TSAP6/Steap3 null mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Lionel; Papoin, Julien; Debnath, Gargi; Vidal, Michel; Amson, Robert; Telerman, Adam; An, Xiuli; Mohandas, Narla

    2014-01-01

    Genetic ablation of the ferrireductase STEAP3, also known as TSAP6, leads to severe microcytic and hypochromic red cells with moderate anemia in the mouse. However, the mechanism leading to anemia is poorly understood. Previous results indicate that TSAP6/Steap3 is a regulator of exosome secretion. Using TSAP6/Steap3 knockout mice, we first undertook a comprehensive hematologic characterization of the red cell compartment, and confirmed a dramatic decrease in the volume and hemoglobin content of these erythrocytes. We observed marked anisocytosis as well as the presence of fragmenting erythrocytes. Consistent with these observations, we found by ektacytometry decreased membrane mechanical stability of knockout red cells. However, we were unable to document significant changes in the expression levels of the major skeletal and transmembrane proteins to account for this decrease in the membrane stability. Furthermore, there were no differences in red cell survival between wild type and knockout animals. However, when we monitored erythropoiesis, we found a decreased number of proerythroblasts in the bone marrow of TSAP6/Steap3−/− animals. In addition, progression from the proerythroblastic to the orthochromatic stage was affected, with accumulation of cells at the polychromatic stage. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that abnormal erythroid maturation is the main cause of anemia in these mice. PMID:25515317

  12. Association between hypoxemia and anemia following arthroplasty: A pilot clinical study

    PubMed Central

    GAO, FUQIANG; SUN, WEI; GUO, WANSHOU; CHENG, LIMING; LI, ZIRONG; KUSH, NEPALI

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia and anemia are common complications following joint arthroplasty. Whether hypoxia indicates that a patient is anemic and whether anemia causes a decline in arterial oxygen pressure accompanied by hypoxemia are not completely understood. The aim of the present study was to determine the association between hypoxemia and anemia following arthroplasty. A total of 135 patients who underwent arthroplasty at the China-Japan Friendship Hospital between January and May 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into five groups depending on the type of arthroplasty they had experienced: Unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA), bilateral TKA, unilateral total hip arthroplasty (THA), bilateral THA or unilateral unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. Perioperative peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels were assessed, and the associations between the changes in SpO2 (ΔSpO2) and hemoglobin (ΔHb) levels on the first and third postoperative days (PODs) were analyzed using Pearson's correlation test for each group. The perioperative SpO2 curves for the various groups were typically at their lowest on the day of surgery. Significant hypoxemia was observed on POD 0–2, although a stable recovery curve was observed on POD 3–5. Trends in ΔHb were observed among the 5 groups, with the lowest Hb value observed predominantly on POD 2 and 3. By POD 4 and 5 Hb levels had recovered, with a steadily and consistently increasing curve. There was no statistically significant correlation between ΔSpO2 and decrease in Hb levels (P>0.05). SpO2 levels should not serve as a clinical indicator of the incidence and severity of anemia in patients who have undergone primary arthroplasty. To a point, the degree of postoperative anemic status does not affect SpO2 levels. PMID:27168828

  13. Genetics Home Reference: thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... individuals with thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome develop optic atrophy, which is the degeneration (atrophy) of the ... with diabetes mellitus and sensorineural deafness MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Optic nerve atrophy MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Thiamine These resources from ...

  14. [A case report of drepanocytic anemia with "belt syndrome"].

    PubMed

    Ughi, M; Trevenzoli, G; Rubin, R; Lanzone, B

    1998-01-01

    Following article describes the case of a child with painful abdominal symptomatology showing characteristics of an acute abdomen. Following the laboratory tests abdominal crises have been classified as vessel occlusion crises with sickle cell anemia. PMID:10335543

  15. Pathophysiology and treatment of fetal anemia due to placental chorioangioma.

    PubMed

    Haak, M C; Oosterhof, H; Mouw, R J; Oepkes, D; Vandenbussche, F P

    1999-07-01

    Placental chorioangiomas occur in 1% of pregnancies. Large chorioangiomas may cause serious complications such as fetal anemia, hydrops and fetal death. In this case report, a pregnancy complicated by a large placental chorioangioma is described. Severe fetal anemia without the occurrence of hydrops fetalis was suspected using ultrasound and Doppler examinations. Successful intrauterine blood transfusion was performed, with an unusually large amount of blood needed to obtain an adequate rise in fetal hematocrit. Two weeks later, at 32 weeks, the infant was born in good condition. In pregnancies with large chorioangiomas, we advise regular ultrasound and Doppler examinations, with the aim of detecting fetal anemia before hydrops develops. When anemia is suspected, fetal blood sampling is indicated and intrauterine transfusion therapy may be beneficial to preserve fetal health until maturity is reached. PMID:10461342

  16. Diphyllobothrium pacificum infection is seldom associated with megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Juan A; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gamboa, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Lourdes; Garcia, Hector H

    2012-11-01

    Twenty cases of Dyphillobothrium pacificum (fish tapeworm) infections were prospectively studied to determine whether this tapeworm is associated with megaloblastic anemia, as commonly reported for D. latum infections. The most frequent symptoms were fatigue and mild abdominal pain, which were identified in approximately 66.6% of the 18 patients interviewed. Fourteen patients received treatment with niclosamide and all were cured. The other six patients spontaneously eliminated the tapeworms. One patient, who also had chronic diabetes and gastric atrophy, had low vitamin B12 levels and megaloblastic anemia. In all other patients, including three other patients with anemia, baseline vitamin B12 levels were in the reference range and did not significantly change when re-assessed three months later. Unlike D. latum, infection with D. pacificum is seldom associated with megaloblastic anemia or vitamin B12 deficit. PMID:22987655

  17. Hemolytic anemia produced by regurgitation through transposed chordae tendineae.

    PubMed

    Birkbeck, James P; Gorton, Michael E; Vacek, James L

    2005-11-01

    Hemolytic anemia after mitral repair and annuloplasty ring placement is very uncommon, and rarely described. The case is presented of a 53-year-old woman who developed severe mitral regurgitation and transfusion-dependent hemolytic anemia following mitral valve repair with a Carpentier-Edwards annuloplasty ring, which included transposition of chordae tendineae from the posterior leaflet to the anterior leaflet. Transesophageal echocardiography suggested that the transposed chordae tethered the anterior leaflet, causing malcoaptation of the leaflets. This resulted in central regurgitation divided by the chordae tendineae, producing two turbulent flow jets causing hemolysis. At reoperation, these chordae were removed and two longer Gortex neochordae to the anterior leaflet were placed with subsequent resolution of the anemia. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of hemolytic anemia caused by transposed mitral valve chordae tendineae from the posterior to the anterior leaflet. PMID:16359054

  18. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies. PMID:23403618

  19. Conjugated Bilirubin Triggers Anemia by Inducing Erythrocyte Death

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Elisabeth; Gatidis, Sergios; Freise, Noemi F; Bock, Hans; Kubitz, Ralf; Lauermann, Christian; Orth, Hans Martin; Klindt, Caroline; Schuier, Maximilian; Keitel, Verena; Reich, Maria; Liu, Guilai; Schmidt, Sebastian; Xu, Haifeng C; Qadri, Syed M; Herebian, Diran; Pandyra, Aleksandra A; Mayatepek, Ertan; Gulbins, Erich; Lang, Florian; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Karl S; Föller, Michael; Lang, Philipp A

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic failure is commonly associated with anemia, which may result from gastrointestinal bleeding, vitamin deficiency, or liver-damaging diseases, such as infection and alcohol intoxication. At least in theory, anemia during hepatic failure may result from accelerated clearance of circulating erythrocytes. Here we show that bile duct ligation (BDL) in mice leads to severe anemia despite increased reticulocyte numbers. Bilirubin stimulated suicidal death of human erythrocytes. Mechanistically, bilirubin triggered rapid Ca2+ influx, sphingomyelinase activation, formation of ceramide, and subsequent translocation of phosphatidylserine to the erythrocyte surface. Consistent with our in vitro and in vivo findings, incubation of erythrocytes in serum from patients with liver disease induced suicidal death of erythrocytes in relation to their plasma bilirubin concentration. Consistently, patients with hyperbilirubinemia had significantly lower erythrocyte and significantly higher reticulocyte counts compared to patients with low bilirubin levels. Conclusion: Bilirubin triggers suicidal erythrocyte death, thus contributing to anemia during liver disease. (Hepatology 2015;61:275–284) PMID:25065608

  20. Aplastic Anemia in Two Patients with Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Rush, Eric T; Schaefer, G Bradley; Sanger, Warren G; Coccia, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome aneuploidies range in incidence from rather common to exceedingly rare and have a variable phenotype. We report 2 patients with sex chromosome aneuploidies who developed severe aplastic anemia requiring treatment. The first patient had tetrasomy X (48,XXXX) and presented at 9 years of age, and the second patient had trisomy X (47,XXX) and presented at 5 years of age. Although aplastic anemia has been associated with other chromosomal abnormalities, sex chromosome abnormalities have not been traditionally considered a risk factor for this condition. A review of the literature reveals that at least one other patient with a sex chromosome aneuploidy (45,X) has suffered from aplastic anemia and that other autosomal chromosomal anomalies have been described. Despite the uncommon nature of each condition, it is possible that the apparent association is coincidental. A better understanding of the genetic causes of aplastic anemia remains important. PMID:26571231

  1. Fetal faciocervical teratoma with anemia and thrombocytopenia. A case report.

    PubMed

    Brown, G; Baxi, L; Monteagudo, A; Tharakan, T; Saad, A; Sharma, S

    1995-01-01

    A massive teratoma in the faciocervical region was found in a fetus at 21 weeks, with laboratory evidence of anemia and thrombocytopenia. Vaginal delivery was achieved by cardiocentesis followed by Laminaria tent insertion, dilation and evacuation. PMID:7722984

  2. Fanconi anemia pathway defects in inherited and sporadic cancers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Zhang, Shuxia; Wu, Zhanhe

    2014-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive chromosomal instability syndrome. It is a hereditary disorder with defects in DNA repair characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, variable congenital malformations and predisposition to develop hematological or solid tumors. Bi-allelic gene mutations in FA cause not only the FA phenotype but also genome instability and additional mutations in their somatic cells resulting in a high predisposition to many different types of cancers. Mono-allelic mutation in FA genes increases the susceptibility to several types of cancers in a sporadic manner in non-FA patients. The strong link between cancer from bi-allelic and mono-allelic FA gene mutations has been well established. Studies have demonstrated a link between FA and cancer due to gene defects which cause the disruption of the FA pathways in a proportion of familial and sporadic cancers. The convincing evidence is that one of the FA genes, FANCD1 is identical to the well-known breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2. Another three FA genes were found to be associated with genes mutated from breast cancer and other types of cancers such as prostate cancer as well. Studies on FA's biological function in genome instability maintenance, DNA damage/repair and its complex regulation pathways have become the main focus within the genetic cancer research field because of many unique features of FA. The lessons learnt from FA studies provided invaluable information towards the understanding of cancer pathogenesis to be translated into targeting cancer therapies. Studies also demonstrated that FA is a paradigm of cancer-prone inherited monogenic disease, offering insights into the pathogenesis of many types of human diseases, particularly in bone marrow failure, cancer and aging. In this review, brief FA clinical characteristics, identification of FA genes and their protein pathways, the pathogenic linking between cancers from bi-allelic and mono-allelic mutated FA genes will be discussed. PMID:26835350

  3. Iron deficiency anemia in HIV infection: immunologic and virologic response.

    PubMed

    Afacan, Yusuf E; Hasan, Muhammad S; Omene, Jackson A

    2002-02-01

    We report the immunologic and virologic response of iron deficiency anemia in two cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. The findings of this report suggest that caution be exercised in prescribing iron supplements to HIV-infected patients. The treatment of iron deficiency anemia should be combined with antiretroviral agents in people living with HIV/AIDS to avoid adverse immunologic and virologic consequences. PMID:11853049

  4. Iron deficiency anemia in HIV infection: immunologic and virologic response.

    PubMed Central

    Afacan, Yusuf E.; Hasan, Muhammad S.; Omene, Jackson A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the immunologic and virologic response of iron deficiency anemia in two cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. The findings of this report suggest that caution be exercised in prescribing iron supplements to HIV-infected patients. The treatment of iron deficiency anemia should be combined with antiretroviral agents in people living with HIV/AIDS to avoid adverse immunologic and virologic consequences. PMID:11853049

  5. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron. PMID:26061331

  6. The child with sickle cell anemia: implications and management.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, G

    1984-10-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a chronic illness affecting eight percent of the black population in the United States. It is an autosomal recessive, genetic disease. The clinical manifestations include anemia and vaso-occlusion. If these manifestations are properly managed, life threatening side effects can be prevented. Comprehensive medical care can prevent and minimize these crises and identify problem areas of concern before major damage is done to the organ systems of the body. PMID:6493643

  7. [Pancytopenia, Hemolytic Anemia and Schizocytes: a Pragmatic Approach].

    PubMed

    Gökok, Nil; Stalder, Grégoire; Alberio, Lorenzo; Lamy, Olivier; Schwotzer, Nora

    2015-07-01

    A 58 year old woman presents with a progressive fatigue and dyspnea associated with paresthesia. Laboratory tests show pancytopenia with hypersegmented neutrophiles, macrocytic hyporegenerative anemia and arguments for hemolysis, in particular highly increased LDH. This constellation strongly suggests vitamin B12 deficiency, which was confirmed with an undetectable cobalamine concentration in the blood of our patient. The etiologic work up shows the presence of anti-parietal cells antibodies at a titer of 1/640, diagnostic of Biermer anemia. PMID:26135726

  8. Association between anemia and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jun; Kong, Xiangyong; Li, Qiuping; Hua, Shaodong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiaoying; Feng, Zhichun

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is commonly seen in preterm infants. It may reduce the capacity of hemoglobin to transport oxygen throughout the body and may result in tissue and organ dysfunction. This study aimed to investigate the effect of anemia on the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants. 243 infants who were admitted to BaYi Children’s Hospital Affiliated to Clinical Medical College in Beijing Military General Hospital with gestational age (GA) less than 32 weeks from February, 2014 to February, 2015 were included in the study. Maternal and infant data were recorded. Multivarariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between anemia and BPD. Of 243 preterm infants, the incidence of anemia was higher in BPD patients than non-BPD patients (p < 0.001). Mean Hct in BPD patients was lower than non-BPD patients at different time points in 1d, 7d, 14d, and 21d. Controlling for other confounding factors, early anemia was associated with an increased risk of BPD. Number of transfusions is also a significant risk factor for BPD (p = 0.001). Therefore, prevention and treatment of early anemia is necessary and reducing number of transfusions may reduce the incidence of BPD in preterm infants. PMID:26936610

  9. HMGB1 Mediates Anemia of Inflammation in Murine Sepsis Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Ferrer, Sergio I; Papoin, Julien; Dancho, Meghan E; Olofsson, Peder S; Li, Jianhua; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Avancena, Patricia; Yang, Huan; Zou, Yong-Rui; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Volpe, Bruce T; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Diamond, Betty; Andersson, Ulf; Steinberg, Bettie M; Blanc, Lionel; Tracey, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Patients surviving sepsis develop anemia, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. Here we observed that mice surviving polymicrobial gram-negative sepsis develop hypochromic, microcytic anemia with reticulocytosis. The bone marrow of sepsis survivors accumulates polychromatophilic and orthochromatic erythroblasts. Compensatory extramedullary erythropoiesis in the spleen is defective during terminal differentiation. Circulating tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-6 are elevated for 5 d after the onset of sepsis, and serum high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) levels are increased from d 7 until at least d 28. Administration of recombinant HMGB1 to healthy mice mediates anemia with extramedullary erythropoiesis and significantly elevated reticulocyte counts. Moreover, administration of anti-HMGB1 monoclonal antibodies after sepsis significantly ameliorates the development of anemia (hematocrit 48.5 ± 9.0% versus 37.4 ± 6.1%, p < 0.01; hemoglobin 14.0 ± 1.7 versus 11.7 ± 1.2 g/dL, p < 0.01). Together, these results indicate that HMGB1 mediates anemia by interfering with erythropoiesis, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for anemia in sepsis. PMID:26736178

  10. Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Under-Estimated Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Rogler, Gerhard; Vavricka, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most frequent complications and/or extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Iron deficiency is the most important cause of anemia in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis patients. Iron deficiency even without anemia may impact the quality of life of our IBD patients. In the last 10 years, the understanding of the pathology of iron-deficiency anemia and “anemia of chronic diseases” has increased; new diagnostic tools have been developed and new therapeutic strategies have been discussed. Hepcidin has been identified to be a central regulator of iron absorption from the intestine and of iron plasma levels. Hepcidin is regulated by iron deficiency but also as an acute phase protein by pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-6. Innovative diagnostic tools have not been introduced in clinical routine or are not available for routine diagnostics. As iron substitution therapy is easy these days with a preference for intravenous substitution, the impact of differential diagnosis of anemia in IBD patients is underestimated. PMID:25646159

  11. Association between anemia and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jun; Kong, Xiangyong; Li, Qiuping; Hua, Shaodong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiaoying; Feng, Zhichun

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is commonly seen in preterm infants. It may reduce the capacity of hemoglobin to transport oxygen throughout the body and may result in tissue and organ dysfunction. This study aimed to investigate the effect of anemia on the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants. 243 infants who were admitted to BaYi Children's Hospital Affiliated to Clinical Medical College in Beijing Military General Hospital with gestational age (GA) less than 32 weeks from February, 2014 to February, 2015 were included in the study. Maternal and infant data were recorded. Multivarariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between anemia and BPD. Of 243 preterm infants, the incidence of anemia was higher in BPD patients than non-BPD patients (p < 0.001). Mean Hct in BPD patients was lower than non-BPD patients at different time points in 1d, 7d, 14d, and 21d. Controlling for other confounding factors, early anemia was associated with an increased risk of BPD. Number of transfusions is also a significant risk factor for BPD (p = 0.001). Therefore, prevention and treatment of early anemia is necessary and reducing number of transfusions may reduce the incidence of BPD in preterm infants. PMID:26936610

  12. [Management of anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Ok

    2015-03-01

    Anemia is one of the commonest extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The pathogenesis of anemia in IBD is complex but iron deficiency combined with inflammation is the most common factor related to the development of anemia. However, other causes such as vitamin B12 and folate deficiency, hemolysis, myelosuppression and drug also should not be overlooked. In addition to ferritin, inflammatory markers and new biochemical parameters such as hepcidin and ferritin index are being tested as diagnostic a tool. First step for treatment is disease activity control and iron supplementation. Although oral iron is widely used, intravenous iron therapy should be considered in patients who are intolerant to oral iron therapy, have severe and refractory anemia or are in active disease state. Recently, new intravenous iron formulations have been introduced and due to their safety and easy usage, they have become the standard treatment modality for managing anemia in IBD. Erythropoietin and transfusion can be considered in specific situations. Vitamin B12 and folate supplementation is also important in patients who are deficient of these micronutrients. Since anemia in IBD patients could significantly influence the disease outcome, further studies and standard guideline for IBD are needed. PMID:25797377

  13. Nitrite-induced anemia in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, C.S. ); Francis-Floyd, R.; Beleau, M.H. )

    1989-08-01

    Since 1983 numerous cases of anemia have been reported in populations of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque cultured in the southeastern United States. Environmental nitrite-nitrogen concentrations of 4 mg/L or more occur sporadically in channel catfish culture ponds, and the frequency of occurrence is greatest in the fall and spring. The authors have observed that some cases of anemia in populations of pond-raised channel catfish follow prolonged exposure to high concentrations of environmental nitrite. However, there was no evidence that exposure of channel catfish to environmental nitrite was the cause of the observed anemia. Hemolytic anemia following nitrite exposure has been described for sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri, but not for channel catfish. In the present study the authors show that a variable, but generally mild, anemia develops in channel catfish exposed to nitrite. They also offer a management procedure for preventing the development of anemia during periods of elevated environmental nitrite concentrations.

  14. Altered translation of GATA1 in Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Leif S; Gazda, Hanna T; Eng, Jennifer C; Eichhorn, Stephen W; Thiru, Prathapan; Ghazvinian, Roxanne; George, Tracy I; Gotlib, Jason R; Beggs, Alan H; Sieff, Colin A; Lodish, Harvey F; Lander, Eric S; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2014-07-01

    Ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency occurs in diverse human diseases including Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), congenital asplenia and T cell leukemia. Yet, how mutations in genes encoding ubiquitously expressed proteins such as these result in cell-type- and tissue-specific defects remains unknown. Here, we identify mutations in GATA1, encoding the critical hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-binding protein-1, that reduce levels of full-length GATA1 protein and cause DBA in rare instances. We show that ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency, the more common cause of DBA, can lead to decreased GATA1 mRNA translation, possibly resulting from a higher threshold for initiation of translation of this mRNA in comparison with other mRNAs. In primary hematopoietic cells from patients with mutations in RPS19, encoding ribosomal protein S19, the amplitude of a transcriptional signature of GATA1 target genes was globally and specifically reduced, indicating that the activity, but not the mRNA level, of GATA1 is decreased in patients with DBA associated with mutations affecting ribosomal proteins. Moreover, the defective hematopoiesis observed in patients with DBA associated with ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency could be partially overcome by increasing GATA1 protein levels. Our results provide a paradigm by which selective defects in translation due to mutations affecting ubiquitous ribosomal proteins can result in human disease. PMID:24952648

  15. Limitations of a mouse model of sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Ieremia, Jessica; Blau, C Anthony

    2002-01-01

    We aimed to use an established murine model of sickle cell anemia to develop an unambiguous method for testing new therapies, with survival as an end point. Survival rates following various challenges were compared for three different groups of mice: (a) sickle cell mice expressing human hemoglobin-S exclusively ((h)beta(s)); (b) littermates that expressed both human hemoglobin S and murine beta major globin ((h)beta(s)(m)beta); and (c) wild-type C57BL/6 mice (wt). Two types of challenge were tested. The first set of studies was based upon recent observations indicating that granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) can precipitate severe complications in patients with sickle cell disease. While (h)beta(s) mice had higher neutrophil counts than (h)beta(s)(m)beta mice at baseline, (h)beta(s) mice tolerated several different doses and schedules of either human or murine G-CSF without adverse effects. A second type of challenge tested whether sickle cell mice exhibit an enhanced susceptibility to hemoglobin deoxygenation. Acute hemoglobin deoxygenation was accomplished either by a single intraperitoneal injection of sodium bisulfite or by a 1-h exposure to hypoxia. Neither intervention resulted in a significantly different survival rate for (h)beta(s) mice compared to either (h)beta(s)(m)beta or wt mice. Chronic twice-weekly exposures to hypoxia (1 h per exposure) also failed to produce significant differences in survival rates between (h)beta(s) mice, (h)beta(s)(m)beta, and wt mice over a period of 12 weeks. Our results demonstrate that neither G-CSF administration nor hypoxia accentuates survival differences between this model of sickle cell mouse and normal controls. PMID:12064910

  16. Distinct roles for hepcidin and interleukin-6 in the recovery from anemia in mice injected with heat-killed Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Gardenghi, Sara; Renaud, Tom M; Meloni, Alessandra; Casu, Carla; Crielaard, Bart J; Bystrom, Laura M; Greenberg-Kushnir, Noa; Sasu, Barbra J; Cooke, Keegan S; Rivella, Stefano

    2014-02-20

    Anemia of inflammation (AI) is commonly observed in chronic inflammatory states and may hinder patient recovery and survival. Induction of hepcidin, mediated by interleukin 6, leads to iron-restricted erythropoiesis and anemia. Several translational studies have been directed at neutralizing hepcidin overexpression as a therapeutic strategy against AI. However, additional hepcidin-independent mechanisms contribute to AI, which are likely mediated by a direct effect of inflammatory cytokines on erythropoiesis. In this study, we used wild-type, hepcidin knockout (Hamp-KO) and interleukin 6 knockout (IL-6-KO) mice as models of AI. AI was induced with heat-killed Brucella abortus (BA). The distinct roles of iron metabolism and inflammation triggered by interleukin 6 and hepcidin were investigated. BA-treated wild-type mice showed increased expression of hepcidin and inflammatory cytokines, as well as transitory suppression of erythropoiesis and shortened red blood cell lifespan, all of which contributed to the severe anemia of these mice. In contrast, BA-treated Hamp-KO or IL-6-KO mice showed milder anemia and faster recovery compared with normal mice. Moreover, they exhibited different patterns in the development and resolution of anemia, supporting the notion that interleukin 6 and hepcidin play distinct roles in modulating erythropoiesis in AI. PMID:24357729

  17. Distinct roles for hepcidin and interleukin-6 in the recovery from anemia in mice injected with heat-killed Brucella abortus

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Tom M.; Meloni, Alessandra; Casu, Carla; Crielaard, Bart J.; Bystrom, Laura M.; Greenberg-Kushnir, Noa; Sasu, Barbra J.; Cooke, Keegan S.; Rivella, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Anemia of inflammation (AI) is commonly observed in chronic inflammatory states and may hinder patient recovery and survival. Induction of hepcidin, mediated by interleukin 6, leads to iron-restricted erythropoiesis and anemia. Several translational studies have been directed at neutralizing hepcidin overexpression as a therapeutic strategy against AI. However, additional hepcidin-independent mechanisms contribute to AI, which are likely mediated by a direct effect of inflammatory cytokines on erythropoiesis. In this study, we used wild-type, hepcidin knockout (Hamp-KO) and interleukin 6 knockout (IL-6-KO) mice as models of AI. AI was induced with heat-killed Brucella abortus (BA). The distinct roles of iron metabolism and inflammation triggered by interleukin 6 and hepcidin were investigated. BA-treated wild-type mice showed increased expression of hepcidin and inflammatory cytokines, as well as transitory suppression of erythropoiesis and shortened red blood cell lifespan, all of which contributed to the severe anemia of these mice. In contrast, BA-treated Hamp-KO or IL-6-KO mice showed milder anemia and faster recovery compared with normal mice. Moreover, they exhibited different patterns in the development and resolution of anemia, supporting the notion that interleukin 6 and hepcidin play distinct roles in modulating erythropoiesis in AI. PMID:24357729

  18. [History of the therapy of pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Jeney, András

    2013-11-01

    Increased blood cell regeneration in exsanguinated experimental animals treated either with liver or with aqueous liver extracts was reported by Whipple and by Jeney and Jobling, respectively. These findings stimulated Minot and Murphy to provide evidence for the efficacy of liver against anaemia in clinical studies. After oral administration of liver (45-50 g per day) for 45 patients with anaemia perniciosa improvement of the hematological status was demonstrated. Consequently, for proving the therapeutic value of liver therapy Whipple, Minot and Murphy received Nobel price in 1934. The isolation of the antianemic factor from the liver has been succeeded in 1948 and designated as vitamin B12. At the same time Lucy Wills applied yeast for the treatment of pregnant women with anemia related to undernourishment. The conclusions of this study inspired the discovery of folate. The detailed investigation of the mode of action of vitamin B12 and folate enriched our knowledge in the area of pathophysiology and extended the clinical application of these two drugs. PMID:24161600

  19. Genetic counseling for Fanconi anemia: crosslinking disciplines.

    PubMed

    Zierhut, Heather A; Tryon, Rebecca; Sanborn, Erica M

    2014-12-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is the most common of the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes with an incidence of approximately 1/100,000 to 1/200,000 live births. FA is a genetically complex and phenotypically heterogeneous condition involving birth defects, bone marrow failure, and cancer predisposition. This rare disease became well known in the genetic counseling community in 2002, when it was identified that biallelic mutations in BRCA2 can cause FA. Knowledge gained from the growing association between FA and breast cancer pathways has brought even more light to the complex genetic issues that arise when counseling families affected by this disease. Genetic counseling issues surrounding a diagnosis of FA affect many different disciplines. This review will serve as a way to cross-link the various topics important to genetic counselors that arise throughout the life of a patient with FA. Issues covered will include: an overview of FA, phenotypic presentation, management and treatment, the genetics and inheritance of FA, cytogenetic and molecular testing options, and the risks to family members of an individual with FA. PMID:25236480

  20. Elderly female with Autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dey, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare disease with an estimated prevalence of around 17/100,000. It is often difficult to diagnose and treat AIHA, especially in elderly. A 60-year-old female was admitted with the complaints of low grade fever, on-off for 6 months, progressive fatigue and dyspnea on exertion. She was transfused with three units of blood within these 6 months. Examination revealed pallor, edema, hemic murmur, and palpable liver. Hb was 2.9 gm%, T Bil 5.2 mg/dl, ESR 160 mm, and reticulocyte count 44.05%. Direct Coombs test was positive, anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and Anti ds DNA were positive. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with AIHA was considered and patient was transfused with two units of packed red cells and put on steroid (prednisolone) at 1 mg/kg body weight daily. After 3 weeks, her Hb had increased to 10.4 gm% with gross clinical improvement. PMID:26538992

  1. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked. PMID:26935626

  2. Aplastic anemia: management of adult patients.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Risitano, Antonio M

    2005-01-01

    The primary therapeutic approach to acquired aplastic anemia (AA) in older adults differs from the primary approach used in children and younger adults because in the former group, the results of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) are less favorable. With increasing age of the patients, immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) and cyclosporine (CsA) constitutes the primary treatment option and may be better than BMT. There are very few clinical clues as to the selection of patients likely to respond to immunosuppression. Repeated ATG/CsA cycles are often used as salvage regimens, but in refractory patients BMT may be the best treatment option, as the prognosis for non-responders is poor without definitive treatment. Conservative therapy such as intense immunosuppression is associated with a high relapse rate but does not impact the survival and overall prognosis. The inability to eliminate autoimmune T cell clones using current therapeutic strategies suggests that prolonged immunosuppressive maintenance therapy may be needed for a substantial proportion of patients. Late clonal complications of conservatively treated patients include evolution to myelodysplasia and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and may develop in 20% of the patients. However, BMT also has several sequelae including an increased frequency of solid tumors. Novel immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory agents and constantly improving results of allogeneic BMT will further improve the survival rate of adult patients with AA. PMID:16304367

  3. Elderly female with Autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare disease with an estimated prevalence of around 17/100,000. It is often difficult to diagnose and treat AIHA, especially in elderly. A 60-year-old female was admitted with the complaints of low grade fever, on-off for 6 months, progressive fatigue and dyspnea on exertion. She was transfused with three units of blood within these 6 months. Examination revealed pallor, edema, hemic murmur, and palpable liver. Hb was 2.9 gm%, T Bil 5.2 mg/dl, ESR 160 mm, and reticulocyte count 44.05%. Direct Coombs test was positive, anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and Anti ds DNA were positive. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with AIHA was considered and patient was transfused with two units of packed red cells and put on steroid (prednisolone) at 1 mg/kg body weight daily. After 3 weeks, her Hb had increased to 10.4 gm% with gross clinical improvement. PMID:26538992

  4. Infections and inequalities: anemia in AIDS, the disadvantages of poverty

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Lucia; Seley, Celeste; Martorano, Julieta; Garcia-Moreno, Isabella; Troncoso, Alcides

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study anemia in AIDS patients and its relation with socioeconomic, employment status and educational levels. Methods A total number of 442 patients who visited the Infectious Diseases University Hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina were included in the study. Patients were dividied into two groups, i.e. one with anemia and the other without anemia. Anemia epidemiology and its relationship with educational level, housing, job situation, monthly income, total daily caloric intake and weekly intake of meat were evaluated. Results Anemia was found in 228 patients (54%). Comparing patients with or without anemia, a statistically significant difference was found (P<0.000 1) in those whose highest educational level reached was primary school, who lived in a precarious home, who had no stable job or were unable to work, whose income was less than 30 dollars per month, whose meat consumption was less than twice a week or received less than 8 000 calories per day. Conclusions The high prevalence of anemia found in poor patients with AIDS suggests that poverty increases the risk to suffer from this hematological complication. The relationship between economic development policies and AIDS is complex. Our results seem to point to the fact that AIDS epidemic may affect economic development and in turn be affected by it. If we consider that AIDS affects the economically active adult population, despite recent medical progress it usually brings about fatal consequences, especially within the poorest sectors of society where the disease reduces the average life expectancy, increases health care demand and tends to exacerbate poverty and iniquity. PMID:23569955

  5. Infection-stimulated Anemia Results Primarily from Interferon Gamma-dependent, Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1-independent Red Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Dong-Xia; Zhao, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although the onset of anemia during infectious disease is commonly correlated with production of inflammatory cytokines, the mechanisms by which cytokines induce anemia are poorly defined. This study focused on the mechanism research. Methods: Different types of mice were infected perorally with Toxoplasma gondii strain ME49. At the indicated times, samples from each mouse were harvested, processed, and analyzed individually. Blood samples were analyzed using a Coulter Counter and red blood cell (RBC) survival was measured by biotinylation. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and inducible protein 10 (IP-10) mRNA in liver tissue were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: T. gondii-infected mice exhibited anemia due to a decrease in both erythropoiesis and survival time of RBC in the circulation (P < 0.02). In addition, infection-stimulated anemia was associated with fecal occult, supporting previous literature that hemorrhage is a consequence of T. gondii infection in mice. Infection-induced anemia was abolished in interferon gamma (IFNγ) and IFNγ receptor deficient mice (P < 0.05) but was still evident in mice lacking TNF-α, iNOS, phagocyte NADPH oxidase or IP-10 (P < 0.02). Neither signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) deficient mice nor 129S6 controls exhibited decreased erythropoiesis, but rather suffered from an anemia resulting solely from increased loss of circulating RBC. Conclusions: Infection-stimulated decrease in erythropoiesis and losses of RBC have distinct mechanistic bases. These results show that during T. gondii infection, IFNγ is responsible for an anemia that results from both a decrease in erythropoiesis and a STAT1 independent loss of circulating RBC. PMID:25836617

  6. Evaluating treatment of hepatitis C for hemolytic anemia management.

    PubMed

    DebRoy, Swati; Kribs-Zaleta, Christopher; Mubayi, Anuj; Cardona-Melndez, Gloriell M; Medina-Rios, Liana; Kang, MinJun; Diaz, Edgar

    2010-06-01

    The combination therapy of antiviral peg-interferon and ribavirin has evolved as one of the better treatments for hepatitis C. In spite of its success in controlling hepatitis C infection, it has also been associated with treatment-related adverse side effects. The most common and life threatening among them is hemolytic anemia, necessitating dose reduction or therapy cessation. The presence of this side effect leads to a trade-off between continuing the treatment and exacerbating the side effects versus decreasing dosage to relieve severe side effects while allowing the disease to progress. The drug epoietin (epoetin) is often administered to stimulate the production of red blood cells (RBC) in the bone marrow, in order to allow treatment without anemia. This paper uses mathematical models to study the effect of combination therapy in light of anemia. In order to achieve this we introduce RBC concentration and amount of drug in the body as state variables in the usual immunological virus infection model. Analysis of this model provides a quantification of the amount of drug a body can tolerate without succumbing to hemolytic anemia. Indirect estimation of parameters allow us to calculate the necessary increment in RBC production to be > or =2.3 times the patient's original RBC production rate to sustain the entire course of treatment without encountering anemia in a sensitive patient. PMID:20303990

  7. Erythro-megakaryocytic transcription factors associated with hereditary anemia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2014-01-01

    Most heritable anemias are caused by mutations in genes encoding globins, red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteins, or enzymes in the glycolytic and hexose monophosphate shunt pathways. A less common class of genetic anemia is caused by mutations that alter the functions of erythroid transcription factors (TFs). Many TF mutations associated with heritable anemia cause truncations or amino acid substitutions, resulting in the production of functionally altered proteins. Characterization of these mutant proteins has provided insights into mechanisms of gene expression, hematopoietic development, and human disease. Mutations within promoter or enhancer regions that disrupt TF binding to essential erythroid genes also cause anemia and heritable variations in RBC traits, such as fetal hemoglobin content. Defining the latter may have important clinical implications for de-repressing fetal hemoglobin synthesis to treat sickle cell anemia and β thalassemia. Functionally important alterations in genes encoding TFs or their cognate cis elements are likely to occur more frequently than currently appreciated, a hypothesis that will soon be tested through ongoing genome-wide association studies and the rapidly expanding use of global genome sequencing for human diagnostics. Findings obtained through such studies of RBCs and associated diseases are likely generalizable to many human diseases and quantitative traits. PMID:24652993

  8. Iron deficiency anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Neil D

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia worldwide, caused by poor iron intake, chronic blood loss, or impaired absorption. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly likely to have iron deficiency anemia, with an estimated prevalence of 36%-76%. Detection of iron deficiency is problematic as outward signs and symptoms are not always present. Iron deficiency can have a significant impact on a patient's quality of life, necessitating prompt management and treatment. Effective treatment includes identifying and treating the underlying cause and initiating iron replacement therapy with either oral or intravenous iron. Numerous formulations for oral iron are available, with ferrous fumarate, sulfate, and gluconate being the most commonly prescribed. Available intravenous formulations include iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, and ferumoxytol. Low-molecular weight iron dextran and iron sucrose have been shown to be safe, efficacious, and effective in a host of gastrointestinal disorders. Ferumoxytol is the newest US Food and Drug Administration-approved intravenous iron therapy, indicated for iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease. Ferumoxytol is also being investigated in Phase 3 studies for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients without chronic kidney disease, including subgroups with IBD. A review of the efficacy and safety of iron replacement in IBD, therapeutic considerations, and recommendations for the practicing gastroenterologist are presented. PMID:23766655

  9. [Perioperative anemia management: a systematic review and meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Glechner, Anna; Gartlehner, Gerald; Nubaumer, Barbara; Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle

    2014-08-01

    Anemia is a risk factor for increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. International guidelines, therefore, recommend preoperative diagnostic work up and causal treatment of anemia. Iron therapy, however, is suspected to negatively affect disease progression in patients with cancer-associated anemia. The objective of our systematic review was to assess the efficacy and safety of perioperative diagnosis and causal therapy of anemia, and to determine the effect of iron supplement on disease progression of cancer.We systematically searched multiple electronic databases. Two persons independently reviewed abstracts and full-text articles. We rated the risk of bias using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool and assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation). Meta-Analyses were performed using the DerSimonian&Laird random effects method. Results indicate that preoperative therapy of anemia could reduce the need for blood transfusions (relative risk: 0,78; 95% confidence interval 0,61-1,02; number needed to treat: 6) For other patient-relevant outcomes the number of events were too small to detect clinically relevant differences. We could not find any evidence that iron supplements have an influence on the progression of tumors. PMID:25168917

  10. Microcytic anemia in a pregnant woman: beyond iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rollón, Noelia; Fernández-Jiménez, María Cristina; Moreno-Carralero, María Isabel; Murga-Fernández, María José; Morán-Jiménez, María Josefa

    2015-05-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by anemia of varying severity and the presence of ringed sideroblasts in bone marrow. The most common form of inherited sideroblastic anemia is X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA). In many XLSA patients, anemia responds variably to supplementation with pyridoxine (vitamin B6). We describe the case of a pregnant female with XLSA who had a novel mutation on the ALAS2 gene (c.1218G > T, p.Leu406Phe). Oral chelation therapy was contraindicated and high-dose vitamin B6 would have possible side effects in pregnancy. Serum hepcidin level was very low, indicating increased absorption of iron secondary to ineffective erythropoiesis. Therapy was begun with a low dose of pyridoxine that was increased post-partum. The patient's liver showed moderate iron deposits. During a subsequent 3-month period of pyridoxine supplementation, serum ferritin level and transferrin saturation decreased, hemoglobin content and serum hepcidin level normalized, and morphologic red cell abnormalities improved markedly. The patient responded well to treatment, showing the pyridoxine responsiveness of this novel ALAS2 mutation. The baby girl had the same mutation heterozygously, and although she was neither anemic nor showed abnormalities in a peripheral blood smear, she had a mild increment in RDW and her condition is now being followed. PMID:25547425

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Debaun, Michael R.; Strunk, Robert C.; Redline, Susan; Seicean, Sinziana; Craven, Daniel I.; Gavlak, Johanna C.D.; Wilkey, Olu; Inusa, Baba; Roberts, Irene; Goodpaster, R. Lucas; Malow, Beth; Rodeghier, Mark; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the prevalence of and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). METHODS: Cross-sectional baseline data were analyzed from the Sleep and Asthma Cohort Study, a multicenter prospective study designed to evaluate the contribution of sleep and breathing abnormalities to SCA-related morbidity in children ages 4 to 18 years, unselected for OSAS symptoms or asthma. Multivariable logistic regression assessed the relationships between OSAS status on the basis of overnight in-laboratory polysomnography and putative risk factors obtained from questionnaires and direct measurements. RESULTS: Participants included 243 children with a median age of 10 years; 50% were boys, 99% were of African heritage, and 95% were homozygous for βS hemoglobin. OSAS, defined by obstructive apnea hypopnea indices, was present in 100 (41%) or 25 (10%) children at cutpoints of ≥1 or ≥5, respectively. In univariate analyses, OSAS was associated with higher levels of habitual snoring, lower waking pulse oxygen saturation (Spo2), reduced lung function, less caretaker education, and non–preterm birth. Lower sleep-related Spo2 metrics were also associated with higher obstructive apnea hypopnea indices. In multivariable analyses, habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 remained risk factors for OSAS in children with SCA. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of OSAS in children with SCA is higher than in the general pediatric population. Habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 values, data easily obtained in routine care, were the strongest OSAS risk factors. Because OSAS is a treatable condition with adverse health outcomes, greater efforts are needed to screen, diagnose, and treat OSAS in this high-risk, vulnerable population. PMID:25022740

  12. Anemia among HIV-Infected Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa: Improvement in Hemoglobin regardless of Degree of Immunosuppression and the Initiating ART Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Takuva, Simbarashe; Maskew, Mhairi; Brennan, Alana T.; Sanne, Ian; MacPhail, A. Patrick; Fox, Mathew P.

    2013-01-01

    Among those with HIV, anemia is a strong risk factor for disease progression and death independent of CD4 count and viral load. Understanding the role of anemia in HIV treatment is critical to developing strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality. We conducted a prospective analysis among 10,259 HIV-infected adults initiating first-line ART between April 2004 and August 2009 in Johannesburg, South Africa. The prevalence of anemia at ART initiation was 25.8%. Mean hemoglobin increased independent of baseline CD4. Females, lower BMI, WHO stage III/IV, lower CD4 count, and zidovudine use were associated with increased risk of developing anemia during follow-up. After initiation of ART, hemoglobin improved, regardless of regimen type and the degree of immunosuppression. Between 0 and 6 months on ART, the magnitude of hemoglobin increase was linearly related to CD4 count. However, between 6 and 24 months on ART, hemoglobin levels showed a sustained overall increase, the magnitude of which was similar regardless of baseline CD4 level. This increase in hemoglobin was seen even among patients on zidovudine containing regimens. Since low hemoglobin is an established adverse prognostic marker, prompt identification of anemia may result in improved morbidity and mortality of patients initiating ART. PMID:24069036

  13. Treatment of Anemia in Patients with Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ... Physicians The full report is titled “Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ...

  14. Inborn anemias in mice. Progress report, 1 August 1979-15 July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1980-08-01

    Four macrocytic anemias, four hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia are under investigation in mice. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus the wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values; (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions; (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis; (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue; (e) functional tests of the stem cell component; (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli; and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  15. Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Common and Curable Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia arises when the balance of iron intake, iron stores, and the body's loss of iron are insufficient to fully support production of erythrocytes. Iron deficiency anemia rarely causes death, but the impact on human health is significant. In the developed world, this disease is easily identified and treated, but frequently overlooked by physicians. In contrast, it is a health problem that affects major portions of the population in underdeveloped countries. Overall, the prevention and successful treatment for iron deficiency anemia remains woefully insufficient worldwide, especially among underprivileged women and children. Here, clinical and laboratory features of the disease are discussed, and then focus is placed on relevant economic, environmental, infectious, and genetic factors that converge among global populations. PMID:23613366

  16. [Floppy baby with macrocytic anemia and vegan mother].

    PubMed

    Schlapbach, L J; Schütz, B; Nuoffer, J M; Brekenfeld, C; Müller, G; Fluri, S

    2007-08-29

    We report the case of a 7 month-old girl that presented with acute anemia, generalized muscular hypotonia and failure to thrive. Laboratory evaluation revealed cobalamin deficiency, due to a vegan diet of the mother. The clinical triad of an acquired floppy baby syndrome with megaloblastic anemia and failure to thrive is pathognomic for infantile cobalamin deficiency. Neurological abnormalities are often irreversible and may be associated with delayed myelinization in the MRI. A normal cobalamin level in maternal serum and absence of anemia do not exclude subclinical deficiency. If cobalamin deficiency is suspected, e.g. in pregnant women on vegan diet, urinary methylmalonic acid excretion and plasma homocysteine levels should be determined and cobalamin substitution should be started at an early stage to avoid potentially irreversible damage of the fetus. PMID:18293883

  17. Sleep alterations and iron deficiency anemia in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Peirano, Patricio D.; Algarín, Cecilia R.; Chamorro, Rodrigo A.; Reyes, Sussanne C.; Durán, Samuel A.; Garrido, Marcelo I.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2013-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be the most common single nutrient deficiency in the world. An estimated 20-25% of the world’s infants have IDA, with at least as many having iron deficiency without anemia. Infants are at particular risk due to rapid growth and limited dietary sources of iron. We found that infants with IDA showed different motor activity patterning in all sleep-waking states and several differences in sleep states organization. Sleep alterations were still apparent years after correction of anemia with iron treatment in the absence of subsequent IDA. We suggest that altered sleep patterns may represent an underlying mechanism that interferes with optimal brain functioning during sleep and wakefulness in former IDA children. PMID:20620103

  18. Prevention of anemia alleviates heart hypertrophy in copper deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lure, M.D.; Fields, M.; Lewis, C.G. Univ. of Maryland, College Park Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC )

    1991-03-11

    The present investigation was designed to examine the role of anemia in the cardiomegaly and myocardial pathology of copper deficiency. Weanling rats were fed a copper deficient diet containing either starch (ST) or fructose (FRU) for five weeks. Six rats consuming the FRU diet were intraperitoneally injected once a week with 1.0 ml/100g bw of packed red blood cells (RBC) obtained from copper deficient rats fed ST. FRU rats injected with RBC did not develop anemia. Additionally, none of the injected rats exhibited heart hypertrophy or gross pathology and all survived. In contrast, non-injected FRU rats were anemic, exhibited severe signs of copper deficiency which include heart hypertrophy with gross pathology, and 44% died. Maintaining the hematocrit with RBC injections resulted in normal heart histology and prevented the mortality associated with the fructose x copper interaction. The finding suggest that the anemia associated with copper deficiency contributes to heart pathology.

  19. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disease that primarily affects the black population. This anemia is due to a homozygous state of the abnormal hemoglobin S. An alteration occurs on the DNA molecule involving the substitution of the amino acid valine for glutamic acid at the sixth position on the beta polypeptide chain. This biochemical variation on the DNA molecule creates a physiological change that causes sickle-shaped red blood cells to be produced. The sickle-shaped cells are the result of the hemoglobin S being deoxygenated. This case report presents a case of 16-year-old female with sickle cell disease and its dental management. How to cite this article: Acharya S. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):141-144. PMID:26379384

  20. Postpartum aplastic anemia presenting as pancytopenia due to malarial infection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Muhammad Usman; Sundhu, Murtaza Ali; Hussain, Muhammad Zahid

    2013-11-01

    Pancytopenia is a condition with decreased numbers of all cell lines. Aplastic anemia is a common cause although malarial infection causing lysis of RBCs may also partly mimic this condition. The infection may also damage the patient's bone marrow resulting in pancytopenia as well. We present the case of a post-partum female patient who reported with fever, body aches and shortness of breath one month after the delivery of her baby. All blood cell counts were decreased and peripheral blood smear showed malarial parasites. Anti-malarial treatment was initiated following which the fever subsided but, despite regular transfusions, the blood counts remained low. Bone marrow biopsy report revealed P. falciparum pigments along with hypocellularity characteristic of severe aplastic anemia. Consequently, bone marrow transplantation was advised as a therapeutic measure. This case report highlights the increased susceptibility of pregnant women to malaria in endemic areas and subsequent aplastic anemia. PMID:24169391

  1. Is there any relation between Duration of breastfeeding and anemia?

    PubMed Central

    Dalili, H; Baghersalimi, A; Dalili, S; Pakdaman, F; Hassanzadeh Rad, A; Abbasi Kakroodi, M; Rezvany, SM; Koohmanaei, Sh

    2015-01-01

    Background In the early months of life, Breastfeeding increases chance of survival, reduces recovery time after disease and mortality due to infections such as diarrhea and acute respiratory infections. However, infants who are exclusively breast-fed for more than 6 months in developing countries may be at increased risk of anemia. Therefore, the aim of study was to assess the relation between duration of breastfeeding and anemia. Materials and Methods In this analytical cross-sectional study, 400 neonates registered in primary health care system since birth time. Complete blood count and serum ferritin were obtained. Data were analyzed by chi- square test and regression analysis. P-value less than 0.05 was considered significant and 95% confidence interval was noted. Results Results of this study showed that 199 infants were anemic (Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration <11 mg/dl). Ten percent of anemic patients reported Ferritin< 12ng/dl and %25 of anemic children had iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In Binominal logistic regression, merely kind of delivery and duration of breastfeeding were effective factors. Binominal logistic regression also showed that natural vaginal delivery and exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 months had a significant influence on anemia. Exclusive breast feeding for 6 months or more increased the likelihood of anemia. In addition, 4 months exclusive breastfeeding decreased 0.686 fold the likelihood of anemia. Conclusion According to the results, it seems that revision of health program recommendations for iron supplementation can be constructive. National planning to promote the level of knowledge regarding natural vaginal delivery and appropriate period for clamping can be recommended. PMID:26985355

  2. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Dufay, J. Noelia; Steele, Shelby L.; Gaston, Daniel; Nasrallah, Gheyath K.; Coombs, Andrew J.; Liwski, Robert S.; Fernandez, Conrad V.; Berman, Jason N.; McMaster, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala) a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia. PMID:26821380

  3. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID:24379786

  4. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in neurocritical care

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Andreas H; Zygun, David A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Anemia is one of the most common medical complications to be encountered in critically ill patients. Based on the results of clinical trials, transfusion practices across the world have generally become more restrictive. However, because reduced oxygen delivery contributes to 'secondary' cerebral injury, anemia may not be as well tolerated among neurocritical care patients. Methods The first portion of this paper is a narrative review of the physiologic implications of anemia, hemodilution, and transfusion in the setting of brain-injury and stroke. The second portion is a systematic review to identify studies assessing the association between anemia or the use of red blood cell transfusions and relevant clinical outcomes in various neurocritical care populations. Results There have been no randomized controlled trials that have adequately assessed optimal transfusion thresholds specifically among brain-injured patients. The importance of ischemia and the implications of anemia are not necessarily the same for all neurocritical care conditions. Nevertheless, there exists an extensive body of experimental work, as well as human observational and physiologic studies, which have advanced knowledge in this area and provide some guidance to clinicians. Lower hemoglobin concentrations are consistently associated with worse physiologic parameters and clinical outcomes; however, this relationship may not be altered by more aggressive use of red blood cell transfusions. Conclusions Although hemoglobin concentrations as low as 7 g/dl are well tolerated in most critical care patients, such a severe degree of anemia could be harmful in brain-injured patients. Randomized controlled trials of different transfusion thresholds, specifically in neurocritical care settings, are required. The impact of the duration of blood storage on the neurologic implications of transfusion also requires further investigation. PMID:19519893

  5. Noninvasive molecular screening for oral precancer in Fanconi anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Smetsers, Stephanie E; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Wu, Thijs; Brink, Arjen; Buijze, Marijke; Deeg, Dorly J H; Soulier, Jean; Leemans, C Ren; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J M; Brakenhoff, Ruud H

    2015-11-01

    LOH at chromosome arms 3p, 9p, 11q, and 17p are well-established oncogenetic aberrations in oral precancerous lesions and promising biomarkers to monitor the development of oral cancer. Noninvasive LOH screening of brushed oral cells is a preferable method for precancer detection in patients at increased risk for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), such as patients with Fanconi anemia. We determined the prevalence of LOH in brushed samples of the oral epithelium of 141 patients with Fanconi anemia and 144 aged subjects, and studied the association between LOH and HNSCC. LOH was present in 14 (9.9%) nontransplanted patients with Fanconi anemia, whereas LOH was not detected in a low-risk group (n = 50, >58 years, nonsmoking/nonalcohol history) and a group with somewhat increased HNSCC risk (n = 94, >58 years, heavy smoking/excessive alcohol use); Fisher exact test, P = 0.023 and P = 0.001, respectively. Most frequent genetic alteration was LOH at 9p. Age was a significant predictor of LOH (OR, 1.13, P = 0.001). Five patients with Fanconi anemia developed HNSCC during the study at a median age of 39.6 years (range, 24.8-53.7). LOH was significantly associated with HNSCC (Fisher exact test, P = 0.000). Unexpectedly, the LOH assay could not be used for transplanted patients with Fanconi anemia because donor DNA in brushed oral epithelium, most likely from donor leukocytes present in the oral cavity, disturbed the analysis. Noninvasive screening using a LOH assay on brushed samples of the oral epithelium has a promising outlook in patients with Fanconi anemia. However, assays need to be adapted in case of stem cell transplantation, because of contaminating donor DNA. PMID:26276748

  6. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Murray, J Pedro; Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Dufay, J Noelia; Steele, Shelby L; Gaston, Daniel; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Coombs, Andrew J; Liwski, Robert S; Fernandez, Conrad V; Berman, Jason N; McMaster, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala) a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia. PMID:26821380

  7. Association of human papillomavirus with Fanconi anemia promotes carcinogenesis in Fanconi anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang Bin; Chen, Jiezhong; Wu, Zhan He; Zhao, Kong-Nan

    2015-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare recessive disorder associated with chromosomal fragility. FA patients are at very high risk of cancers, especially head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas caused by infection of human papillomaviruses (HPVs). By integrating into the host genome, HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 drive the genomic instability to promote DNA damage and gene mutations necessary for carcinogenesis in FA patients. Furthermore, E6 and E7 oncoproteins not only inhibit p53 and retinoblastoma but also impair the FANC/BRCA signaling pathway to prevent DNA damage repair and alter multiple signals including cell-cycle checkpoints, telomere function, cell proliferation, and interference of the host immune system leading to cancer development in FA patients. In this review, we summarize recent advances in unraveling the molecular mechanisms of FA susceptibility to HPV-induced cancers, which facilitate rational preventive and therapeutic strategies. PMID:25776992

  8. EVALUATION AND MANAGEMENT OF ANEMIA IN THE ELDERLY

    PubMed Central

    Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Schrier, Stanley L.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is now recognized as a risk factor for a number of adverse outcomes in the elderly, including hospitalization, morbidity, and mortality. What constitutes appropriate evaluation and management for an elderly patient with anemia, and when to initiate a referral to a hematologist, are significant issues. Attempts to identify suggested hemoglobin levels for blood transfusion therapy have been confounded for elderly patients with their co-morbidities. Since no specific recommended hemoglobin threshold has stood the test of time, prudent transfusion practices to maintain hemoglobin thresholds of 910 g/dl in the elderly are indicated, unless or until evidence emerges to indicate otherwise. PMID:24122955

  9. Diamond Blackfan anemia treatment: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Narla, Anupama; Vlachos, Adrianna; Nathan, David G

    2011-04-01

    Despite significant improvements in our understanding of the pathophysiology of Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA), there have been few advances in therapy. The cornerstones of treatment remain corticosteroids, chronic red blood cell transfusions, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, each of which is fraught with complications. In this article, we will review the history of therapies that have been offered to patients with DBA, summarize the current standard of care, including management of side effects, and discuss novel therapeutics that are being developed in the context of the research into the roles of ribosomal haplo-insufficiency and p53 activation in Diamond Blackfan anemia. PMID:21435508

  10. [Hemolytic anemia and dysenteric syndrome: a case of ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Claes, G; Colard, M; Benghiat, F S; Maerevoet, M; Bailly, B; De Wilde, V

    2015-01-01

    A 53-years-old man has a dysentery since two weeks. The blood test shows Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia and inflammation. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is treated with corticosteroid. A colonoscopy reveals an ulcerative colitis. The evolution of the patient is complicated by a spontaneous digestive perforation treated by total proctocolectomy. After this intervention, there is a resolution of the AIHA and the patient is gradually weaned from corticosteroids. AIHA is a rare extra-intestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease essentially ulcerative colitis. Identification of this cause of secondary AIHA is important for the therapeutic strategy. However treatment is nonspecific and based on low levels of evidence. PMID:26749635

  11. Correction of the anemia of epidermolysis bullosa with intravenous iron and erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Fridge, J L; Vichinsky, E P

    1998-05-01

    Severe forms of epidermolysis bullosa result in a transfusion-dependent chronic anemia and are fatal. The cause of the anemia is unknown. We evaluated five children whose anemia failed to respond to oral iron but who became transfusion independent after treatment with intravenous iron and human recombinant erythropoietin. PMID:9602203

  12. Severe anemia associated with Mycoplasma wenyonii infection in a mature cow

    PubMed Central

    Genova, Suzanne G.; Streeter, Robert N.; Velguth, Karen E.; Snider, Timothy A.; Kocan, Katherine M.; Simpson, Katharine M.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical findings, diagnostic tests, and treatment of clinical anemia in a mature Angus cow infected with the hemoplasma Mycoplasma wenyonii are described. Mycoplasma wenyonii has been previously reported to cause clinical anemia in young or splenectomized cattle; however, infection has not been associated with severe anemia in mature animals. PMID:22379205

  13. 21 CFR 250.201 - Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... anemia. 250.201 Section 250.201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Drugs and Foods § 250.201 Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia. (a) The ninth announcement of the Anti-anemia Preparations Advisory Board of the United States Pharmacopeia is concerned...

  14. 21 CFR 250.201 - Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... anemia. 250.201 Section 250.201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Drugs and Foods § 250.201 Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia. (a) The ninth announcement of the Anti-anemia Preparations Advisory Board of the United States Pharmacopeia is concerned...

  15. Assessment of Anemia Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors among Pregnant Women in Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    M'Cormack, Fredanna A. D.; Drolet, Judy C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Iron deficiency anemia prevalence of pregnant Sierra Leone women currently is reported to be 59.7%. Anemia is considered to be a direct cause of 3-7% of maternal deaths and an indirect cause of 20-40% of maternal deaths. This study explores knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of urban pregnant Sierra Leone women regarding anemia.…

  16. Oral human papillomavirus is common in individuals with Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Sharon L.; Wells, Susanne I.; Zhang, Xue; Hoskins, Elizabeth E.; Davies, Stella M.; Myers, Kasiani C.; Mueller, Robin; Panicker, Gitika; Unger, Elizabeth R.; Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Brown, Darron R.; Mehta, Parinda A.; Butsch Kovacic, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Background Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder resulting in a loss of function of the FA-related DNA repair pathway. Individuals with FA are predisposed to some cancers including oropharyngeal and gynecological cancers with known associations with human papillomavirus (HPV) in the general population. Since individuals with FA respond poorly to chemotherapy and radiation, prevention of cancer is critical. Methods To determine if individuals with FA are particularly susceptible to oral HPV infection, we analyzed survey-based risk factor data and tested DNA isolated from oral rinses from 126 individuals with FA and 162 unaffected first-degree family members for 37 HPV types. Results Fourteen individuals (11.1%) with FA tested positive, significantly more (p=0.003) than family members (2.5%). While HPV prevalence was even higher for sexually active individuals with FA (17.7% vs. 2.4% in family; p=0.003), HPV positivity also tended to be higher in the sexually inactive (8.7% in FA vs. 2.9% in siblings). Indeed, having FA increased HPV positivity 4.9 fold (95%CI: 1.6–15.4) considering age and sexual experience, but did not differ by other potential risk factors. Conclusion Our studies suggest that oral HPV is more common in individuals with FA. It will be essential to continue to explore associations between risk factors and immune dysfunction on HPV incidence and persistence over time. Impact HPV vaccination should be emphasized in those with FA as a first step to prevent oropharyngeal cancers, although additional studies are needed to determine if the level of protection it offers in this population is adequate. PMID:25809863

  17. Hepcidin-Induced Iron Deficiency Is Related to Transient Anemia and Hypoferremia in Kawasaki Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Hsien; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Fu-Chen; Yu, Hong-Ren; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Ling; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Li, Sung-Chou; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a type of systemic vasculitis that primarily affects children under the age of five years old. For sufferers of KD, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been found to successfully diminish the occurrence of coronary artery lesions. Anemia is commonly found in KD patients, and we have shown that in appropriately elevated hepcidin levels are related to decreased hemoglobin levels in these patients. In this study, we investigated the time period of anemia and iron metabolism during different stages of KD. A total of 100 patients with KD and 20 control subjects were enrolled in this study for red blood cell and hemoglobin analysis. Furthermore, plasma, urine hepcidin, and plasma IL-6 levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 20 KD patients and controls. Changes in hemoglobin, plasma iron levels, and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) were also measured in patients with KD. Hemoglobin, iron levels, and TIBC were lower (p < 0.001, p = 0.009, and p < 0.001, respectively) while plasma IL-6 and hepcidin levels (both p < 0.001) were higher in patients with KD than in the controls prior to IVIG administration. Moreover, plasma hepcidin levels were positively and significantly correlated with urine hepcidin levels (p < 0.001) prior to IVIG administration. After IVIG treatment, plasma hepcidin and hemoglobin levels significantly decreased (both p < 0.001). Of particular note was a subsequent gradual increase in hemoglobin levels during the three weeks after IVIG treatment; nevertheless, the hemoglobin levels stayed lower in KD patients than in the controls (p = 0.045). These findings provide a longitudinal study of hemoglobin changes and among the first evidence that hepcidin induces transient anemia and hypoferremia during KD’s acute inflammatory phase. PMID:27187366

  18. Iron Deficiency and Anemia Predict Mortality in Patients with Tuberculosis123

    PubMed Central

    Isanaka, Sheila; Mugusi, Ferdinand; Urassa, Willy; Willett, Walter C.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Villamor, Eduardo; Spiegelman, Donna; Duggan, Christopher; Fawzi, Wafaie W.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have documented a high prevalence of anemia among tuberculosis (TB) patients and anemia at TB diagnosis has been associated with an increased risk of death. However, little is known about the factors contributing to the development of TB-associated anemia and their importance in TB disease progression. Data from a randomized clinical trial of micronutrient supplementation in patients with pulmonary TB in Tanzania were analyzed. Repeated measures of anemia with iron deficiency, anemia without iron deficiency, and iron deficiency without anemia were assessed as risk factors for treatment failure, TB recurrence, and mortality. The prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin < 110 g/L) at baseline was 64%, more than one-half of which was related to iron deficiency (mean corpuscular volume , 80 fL). We found no evidence of an association between anemia (with or without iron deficiency) or iron deficiency without anemia at baseline and the risk of treatment failure at 1 mo after initiation. Anemia without iron deficiency was associated with an independent, 4-fold increased risk of TB recurrence [adjusted RR = 4.10 (95% CI = 1.88, 8.91); P < 0.001]. Iron deficiency and anemia (with and without iron deficiency) were associated with a 2- to nearly 3-fold independent increase in the risk of death [adjusted RR for iron deficiency without anemia = 2.89 (95% CI = 1.53, 5.47); P = 0.001; anemia without iron deficiency = 2.72 (95% CI = 1.50, 4.93); P = 0.001; iron deficiency anemia = 2.13 (95% CI = 1.10, 4.11); P = 0.02]. Efforts to identify and address the conditions contributing to TB-associated anemia, including iron deficiency, could play an important role in reducing morbidity and mortality in areas heavily affected by TB. PMID:22190024

  19. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  20. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia presenting in association with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Zonder, Jeffrey A; Keating, Michael; Schiffer, Charles A

    2002-12-01

    An unusual case of chronic lymphocytic leukemia presenting in association with aplastic anemia is discussed, along with a review of the few previously reported cases. Possible humoral and cellular autoimmune mechanisms are examined as possible causes of marrow aplasia in this setting. PMID:12447965

  1. [The polybrene test in the diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Tsvetaeva, N V; Kolodeĭ, S V; Zavadenko, M A; Kulagin, M N

    1991-01-01

    The efficacies of Coombs' test and the polybrene test, heretofore not used in this country, for the diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemias are compared in examinations of 27 donors and 62 patients with this condition. The results evidence a high efficacy of the polybrene test. The test is simple and available for wide use at clinical laboratories. PMID:1724488

  2. Behavior of Infants with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozoff, Betsy; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Compared behavior of 52 Costa Rican 12- to 23-month-olds with iron-deficiency anemia to that of 139 infants with better iron status. Found that iron-deficient infants maintained closer contact with caregivers; showed less pleasure and playfulness; were more wary, hesitant, and easily tired; made fewer attempts at test items; and attended less to

  3. Individualized treatment for iron-deficiency anemia in adults.

    PubMed

    Alleyne, Michael; Horne, McDonald K; Miller, Jeffery L

    2008-11-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common disorders affecting humans, and iron-deficiency anemia continues to represent a major public health problem worldwide. It is especially common among women of childbearing age because of pregnancy and menstrual blood loss. Additional patient groups include those with other sources of blood loss, malnutrition, or gut malabsorption. Iron-deficiency anemia remains prevalent despite the widespread ability to diagnose the disease and availability of medicinal iron preparations. Therefore, new approaches are needed to effectively manage these patient populations. In this review, the diagnosis and treatment of iron-deficiency anemia are discussed with emphasis placed on consideration of patient-specific features. It is proposed that all patients participate in their own care by helping their physician to identify a tolerable daily iron dose, formulation, and schedule. Dosing cycles are recommended for iron replacement based on the tolerated daily dose and the total iron deficit. Each cycle consists of 5000 mg of oral elemental iron ingested over at least 1 month with appropriate follow-up. This approach should assist physicians and their patients with the implementation of individualized treatment strategies for patients with iron-deficiency anemia. PMID:18954837

  4. Prevention of Iatrogenic Anemia in Critical and Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Jakacka, Natalia; Snarski, Emilian; Mekuria, Selamawit

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic anemia caused by diagnostic blood sampling is a common problem in the intensive care unit, where continuous monitoring of blood parameters is very often required. Cumulative blood loss associated with phlebotomy along with other factors render this group of patients particularly susceptible to anemia. As it has been proven that anemia in this group of patients leads to inferior outcomes, packed red blood cell transfusions are used to alleviate possible threats associated with low hemoglobin concentration. However, the use of blood components is a procedure conferring a set of risks to the patients despite improvements in safety. Iatrogenic blood loss has also gained particular attention in neonatal care, where cumulative blood loss due to samples taken during the first week of life could easily equal or exceed circulating blood volume. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the causes of iatrogenic anemia and discusses the most common preventive measures taken to reduce diagnostic blood loss and the requirement for blood component transfusions in the aforementioned clinical situations. PMID:26935514

  5. Serum Immunoglobulins in Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi; Ayatollahi, Hossein; Manavifar, Lida; Enaiati, Hoda; Mahmoudi, Masoumeh

    2010-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a common cause of anemia worldwide. Documentation shows that these patients have impaired immunity and are prone to infections. The aim of this study was to confirm whether serum immunoglobulins change in adult nonpregnant females with iron deficiency anemia. Based on patients’ clinical history, CBC results, and serum ferritin, iron and total iron binding capacity, 45 healthy patients and 45 iron deficiency anemia (hypochrom microcytic) patients were entered into this case–control study. Serum IgG, IgA and IgM were measured in patient and control groups using the nephelometry method. Both of the groups were compared using suitable statistical test. Mean serum values of IgG, IgA and IgM in the patient group were 12.47 ± 7.67, 1.93 ± 0.92 and 1.35 ± 0.90 g/l respectively. Mean serum values for the control group were 12.51 ± 6.85, 2.14 ± 0.88 and 1.49 ± 0.73 g/l respectively. Although serum immunoglobulins were slightly lower in the patient group compared to the control group these differences were not significant with the t test. Our study showed serum immunoglobulin levels did not change in iron deficiency anemia. PMID:21629635

  6. Anemia in heart failure: to treat or not to treat?

    PubMed

    Mak, George; Murphy, Niamh F; McDonald, Kenneth

    2008-12-01

    Anemia is a prevalent comorbidity in chronic heart failure (CHF). As studies have demonstrated close links between anemia and a poorer prognosis, there has been an interest in developing treatment strategies for this condition. Anemia is closely associated with disease severity and may be secondary to multiple modifiable causes; therefore, the initial strategies should always include a thorough search for etiology and should focus on optimizing heart failure treatment. Recently, more specific therapies have been assessed, namely erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and iron supplementation therapy. Studies evaluating erythropoietin in heart failure have demonstrated conflicting results to date, with smaller, single-center studies seeming to show a clinical benefit and larger, multicenter trials demonstrating no significant effect on clinical outcome aside from improvement in selected quality-of-life indices. Similarly, studies evaluating iron therapy alone in anemic patients with heart failure have so far shown promising results with regard to clinical and quality-of-life outcomes, but these studies are limited in that they involved small patient numbers. Ongoing studies such as the Reduction of Events With Darbepoetin Alfa in Heart Failure (RED-HF), Iron Supplementation in Heart Failure Patients With Anemia (IRON-HF), and Ferinject Assessment in Patients With Iron Deficiency and Chronic Heart Failure (FAIR-HF) trials will determine the value of darbepoetin alfa and intravenous iron replacement therapy in anemic CHF patients. PMID:19026176

  7. Anemia, heart failure and evidence-based clinical management.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Camila Alves; Roscani, Meliza Goi; Zanati, Silméia Garcia; Matsubara, Beatriz Bojikian

    2013-07-01

    Anemia is a prevalent comorbidity and marker of a poorer prognosis in patients with heart failure (HF). Its clinical relevance, as well as its pathophysiology and the clinical management of these patients are important subjects in the specialized literature. In the present review, we describe the current concepts on the pathophysiology of anemia in HF, its diagnostic criteria, and the recommendations for iron supplementation. Also, we make a critical analysis of the major studies showing evidences on the benefits of this supplementation. The four main components of anemia are addressed: chronic disease, dilutional, "renal" and malabsorption. In patients with HF, the diagnostic criteria are the same as those used in the general population: serum ferritin levels lower than 30 mcg/L in patients without kidney diseases and lower than 100 mcg/L or serum ferritin levels between 100-299 mcg/L with transferring saturation lower than 20% in patients with chronic kidney diseases. Finally, the therapeutic possibilities for anemia in this specific patient population are discussed. PMID:23917508

  8. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children.

    PubMed

    zdemir, Nihal

    2015-03-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms "iron deficiency" and "iron deficiency anemia" are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake together with rapid growth, low birth weight and gastrointestinal losses related to excessive intake of cow's milk. If insufficient intake can be excluded and there is insufficient response to oral iron treatment in patients with iron deficiency especially in older children, blood loss should be considered as the underlying cause. The main principles in management of iron deficiency anemia include investigation and elimination of the cause leading to iron deficiency, replacement of deficiency, improvement of nutrition and education of the patient and family. In this article, the practical approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and the experience of our center have been reviewed. PMID:26078692

  9. Perioperative anemia management in colorectal cancer patients: A pragmatic approach

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; Martín-Montañez, Elisa; Auerbach, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Anemia, usually due to iron deficiency, is highly prevalent among patients with colorectal cancer. Inflammatory cytokines lead to iron restricted erythropoiesis further decreasing iron availability and impairing iron utilization. Preoperative anemia predicts for decreased survival. Allogeneic blood transfusion is widely used to correct anemia and is associated with poorer surgical outcomes, increased post-operative nosocomial infections, longer hospital stays, increased rates of cancer recurrence and perioperative venous thromboembolism. Infections are more likely to occur in those with low preoperative serum ferritin level compared to those with normal levels. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management, minimizes or eliminates allogeneic blood transfusion. This includes restrictive transfusion policy, thromboprophylaxis and anemia management to improve outcomes. Normalization of preoperative hemoglobin levels is a World Health Organization recommendation. Iron repletion should be routinely ordered when indicated. Oral iron is poorly tolerated with low adherence based on published evidence. Intravenous iron is safe and effective but is frequently avoided due to misinformation and misinterpretation concerning the incidence and clinical nature of minor infusion reactions. Serious adverse events with intravenous iron are extremely rare. Newer formulations allow complete replacement dosing in 15-60 min markedly facilitating care. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents may improve response rates. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management used to minimize or eliminate allogeneic blood transfusion is indicated to improve outcomes. PMID:24587673

  10. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  11. Idiopathic hyperzincemia with associated copper deficiency anemia: a diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Merza, Hussein; Sood, Neha; Sood, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Prompt serum copper and zinc in addition to vitamin B12 levels should be measured in patients suffering from refractory anemia with neurological symptoms. A timely copper supplementation can help revert the hematological and possibly the neurological manifestations. PMID:26509015

  12. Isocitrate ameliorates anemia by suppressing the erythroid iron restriction response

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Chanté L.; Delehanty, Lorrie L.; Bullock, Grant C.; Rival, Claudia M.; Tung, Kenneth S.; Kimpel, Donald L.; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Goldfarb, Adam N.

    2013-01-01

    The unique sensitivity of early red cell progenitors to iron deprivation, known as the erythroid iron restriction response, serves as a basis for human anemias globally. This response impairs erythropoietin-driven erythropoiesis and underlies erythropoietic repression in iron deficiency anemia. Mechanistically, the erythroid iron restriction response results from inactivation of aconitase enzymes and can be suppressed by providing the aconitase product isocitrate. Recent studies have implicated the erythroid iron restriction response in anemia of chronic disease and inflammation (ACDI), offering new therapeutic avenues for a major clinical problem; however, inflammatory signals may also directly repress erythropoiesis in ACDI. Here, we show that suppression of the erythroid iron restriction response by isocitrate administration corrected anemia and erythropoietic defects in rats with ACDI. In vitro studies demonstrated that erythroid repression by inflammatory signaling is potently modulated by the erythroid iron restriction response in a kinase-dependent pathway involving induction of the erythroid-inhibitory transcription factor PU.1. These results reveal the integration of iron and inflammatory inputs in a therapeutically tractable erythropoietic regulatory circuit. PMID:23863711

  13. Effect of 131I on the anemia of hyperthyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Perlman, J.A.; Sternthal, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    Data from the National Thyrotoxicosis Therapy Follow-Up Study (NTTFS) are presented here to document the existence of anemia in hyperthyroidism, a mild and reversible anemia that is simultaneously ameliorated with reversal of the hyperthyroid state. Among 20,600 women entered into the NTTF study with no previous history of hematological disorders, the prevalence of anemia was found to range from 10-15%, appearing to be higher in those selected for treatment with 131I when compared to those selected for surgery. An attempt is made to verify the recent hypothesis that thyroid hormone levels in the supraphysiologic range may suppress erythrogenesis. Two statistically significant regression models are consistent with a hypothesis of thyrotoxic bone marrow suppression. However, both associations are weak enough to suggest that some other physiologic improvement underlies the amelioration of anemia when hyperthyroidism is reversed. The degree of improvement in hematological status is similar for women in both treatment groups. Among 4464 women for whom serial hematological tests are obtained, over 3/4 of anemic patients are no longer anemic after an average 6.2 yr of follow-up. Clinicians are reassured that radioactive iodine exposure causes no further insult to the bone marrow, no matter what the cumulative dosage. The highly fractionated low dose bone marrow exposures to radiation account for the minimal hematological risks of 131I treatment.

  14. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15mg/kg; maximum of 1000mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  15. An unusual presentation of listeriosis: anemia and cutaneous manifestations.

    PubMed

    Teo, Hooi Khee; Yap, Jonathan; Fong, Yuke Tien

    2014-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular pathogen causing food-borne disease. It usually affects the young as well as immunocompromised individuals and is associated with high mortality rates. Cutaneous manifestations have rarely been described. We describe an interesting case of a traveller from the tropics presenting with cutaneous listeriosis and anemia. PMID:24968680

  16. Hemolytic anemia associated with heterograft replacement of the mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Myers, T J; Hild, D H; Rinaldi, M J

    1978-08-01

    The first case of overt hemolytic anemia following mitral valve replacement with a porcine heterograft is reported. Cardiac catheterization failed to reveal a paravalvular leak or valvular incompetence to account for the hemolysis. Red cell traumatization by the Dacron-covered Stellite ring and stent is suggested as the cause of hemolysis with the porcine heterograft. PMID:567264

  17. Studies of the pathogenesis of anemia of inflammation: erythrocyte survival

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, D.J.; Krehbiel, J.D.

    1983-10-01

    Erythrocyte survival was investigated in healthy cats and in cats with sterile abscesses. Erythrocyte survival time in cats with sterile abscesses was found to be significantly reduced. The erythrocyte destruction appeared to be the major factor in the early stages of anemia of inflammation.

  18. Behavior of Infants with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozoff, Betsy; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Compared behavior of 52 Costa Rican 12- to 23-month-olds with iron-deficiency anemia to that of 139 infants with better iron status. Found that iron-deficient infants maintained closer contact with caregivers; showed less pleasure and playfulness; were more wary, hesitant, and easily tired; made fewer attempts at test items; and attended less to…

  19. Combatting anemia in adolescent girls: a report from India.

    PubMed

    Kanani, S

    1994-01-01

    In a study on anemia in adolescent girls living in slum areas, 105 girls, aged 10 to 18, participated in qualitative (focus group discussions; open ended, in depth interviews) and quantitative (structured survey and hemoglobin estimation) research activities before and after intervention. Perceptions of mothers were also surveyed. The qualitative methods were used on selected subsamples in order to represent all age and ethnic groups and geographic areas of the slum. Quantitative methods were used on all 105 girls. The prevalence of anemia was 98%. The patterns of responses were similar for the focus groups, interviews, and surveys. Mothers and their daughters believed the girls were healthy (" one who ate well, worked without tiring easily and did not fall sick often"). There was no major connection made between menstruation and health, or between present and future health. Most of the girls were unaware of the Gujarati term for anemia, pandurog, which is used in awareness campaigns. The girls described symptoms (weakness = kamshakti) associated with anemia and knew these could be remedied with green leafy vegetables, fruit, milk, meat, tonics from the doctor, and iron tablets (shakti ni goli). Based on these results, a puppet show, using local terms and events, was developed that covered the causes, symptoms, treatment, and prevention of anemia. The term, pandurog, was introduced and reinforced. The girls were encouraged to have their blood tested and to take iron tablets. The hemoglobin levels of the girls were taken after the show and after an iron supplement program lasting three months. Compliance with the supplementation program was monitored biweekly. Group discussions with flash cards reinforced the information in the puppet show. Results from the last hemoglobin level showed a significant increase; however, the prevalence of anemia was 87%. About half of the girls consumed at least 60% of the tablets; one-fifth consumed 80%. Forgetfulness and fasting during Ramzaan were cited as reasons for noncompliance. There was a significant increase in awareness of the term, pandurog; the symptoms of anemia; the importance of diet in preventing pandurog; and the role of menstruation in increasing iron needs and contributing to pandurog. PMID:12287929

  20. Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Outpatients: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Carla Valéria de Alvarenga; Hallack Neto, Abrahão Elias; Nascimento, Cristiano Rodrigo de Alvarenga; Chebli, Liliana Andrade; Moutinho, Ivana Lúcia Damásio; Pinheiro, Bruno do Valle; Reboredo, Maycon Moura; Malaguti, Carla; Castro, Antonio Carlos Santana; Chebli, Júlio Maria Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is common in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, epidemiological studies of nonwestern IBD populations are limited and may be confounded by demographic, socioeconomic, and disease-related influences. This study evaluated the prevalence, risk factors, and etiology of anemia in Brazilian outpatients with IBD. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, 100 Crohn's disease (CD) patients and 100 ulcerative colitis (UC) subjects were assessed. Anemia workup included complete blood count, ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum levels of folic acid and vitamin B12, and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration. Results. The overall prevalence of anemia in IBD was 21%. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of anemia between CD subjects (24%) and UC (18%). Moderate disease activity (OR: 3.48, 95% CI, 1.95–9.64, P = 0.002) and elevated CRP levels (OR: 1.8, 95% CI, 1.04–3.11, P = 0.02) were independently associated with anemia. The most common etiologies of anemia found in both groups were iron deficiency anemia (IDA; 10% on CD and 6% on UC) followed by the anemia of chronic disease (ACD; 6% for both groups). Conclusions. In Brazilian IBD outpatients, anemia is highly concurrent condition. Disease moderate activity as well as increased CRP was strongly associated with comorbid anemia. IDA and/or ACD were the most common etiologies. PMID:25705682

  1. Risk and Prevalence of Anemia among Women Attending Public and Private Universities.

    PubMed

    Marques, Marcelo Rodrigues; De Oliveira E Silva, Lília Maria Monteiro; Dos Santos Beserra Pessoa, Marcia Luiza; Da Mota Araújo, Marcos Antônio; Dos Reis Moreira-Araújo, Regilda Saraiva

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a global public health problem. Women are known to be more susceptible to anemia; however, no controlled study has yet assessed differences in the prevalence of anemia exclusively among women with higher education. The aim of the study was to establish the prevalence of anemia among women attending universities. The hemoglobin concentration of 140 women aged 18 to 45 years old from a private and a public university was measured. Anthropometric and socioeconomic data were also collected. The risk of developing anemia was almost threefold higher among the students attending the public university (OR: 2.71; p=.0248). The prevalence of anemia was much higher than in the overall female population (79%). The higher education was not a protective factor for anemia in women when analysed separately from the total population of women. PMID:25976426

  2. Outcomes of Patients with Anemia and Acute Decompensated Heart Failure with Preserved versus Reduced Ejection Fraction (From the ARIC Study Community Surveillance)

    PubMed Central

    Caughey, Melissa C.; Avery, Christy L.; Ni, Hanyu; Solomon, Scott D.; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Wruck, Lisa M.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Loehr, Laura R.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is associated with poor prognosis in patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). Whether the impact of anemia differs by heart failure with preserved (HFpEF) or reduced (HFrEF) ejection fraction is uncertain. We examined hospital surveillance data captured by the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study from January 1, 2005 – December 31, 2010. Diagnoses of ADHF were validated by standardized physician review of the medical record. Anemia was classified using WHO criteria (<12 g/dL for women, < 13 g/dL for men), and heart failure type was determined by the ejection fraction (<40% for HFrEF, ≥ 40% for HFpEF). Hospital length of stay and 1-year mortality outcomes were analyzed by multivariable regression, weighted to account for the sampling design, and adjusted for demographics and clinical covariates. Over 6 years, 15,461 (weighted) hospitalized events for ADHF (59% HFrEF) occurred in the ARIC catchment, based on 3,309 sampled events. Anemia was associated with a mortality hazard ratio of 2.1 (95% CI: 1.6 – 2.7) in patients classified with HFpEF, and 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1 – 1.7) among those with HFrEF; p for interaction = 0.05. The mean increase in length of hospital stay associated with anemia was 3.5 days (95% CI: 3.4 – 3.6) for patients with HFpEF, compared with 1.8 days (95% CI: 1.7 – 1.9) for those with HFrEF; p for interaction <0.0001. In conclusion, the incremental risks of death and lengthened hospital stay associated with anemia are more pronounced in ADHF patients classified with HFpEF than HFrEF. PMID:25438912

  3. Dhatrilauha: Right choice for iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Anuradha; Dwivedi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anemia in pregnancy is multi-factorial. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common one. Major cause is increased demand of iron during pregnancy. In Ayurveda, under Pandu-Roga the features of anemia are described. It is characterized by Vaivarnyata or Varnanasha (change/destruction in normal color of the body), a disorder of Pitta vitiation. Ayurvedic management is an effective way of curing anemia in general by a large number of Lauha preparations of which Dhatrilauha has been used widely for centuries. Aim: To evaluate the effect of Dhatrilauha in the management of IDA based on the scientific parameters among pregnant patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 58 cases were selected by simple randomized sampling method as per inclusion criteria of pregnant women between 4th and 7th months of pregnancy with a clinical diagnosis and laboratory confirmation of IDA. Dhatrilauha 500 mg in two divided doses after food with normal potable water were given for 45 days with three follow-ups, each of 15 days intervals. Final assessment was done after completion of 45 days and results were statistically analyzed by using Cochran's Q-test and Student's t-test. Results: Dhatrilauha showed statistically significant (P < 0.01) improvement in the majority of sign-symptoms and objective parameters such as weakness, fatigue, palpitation, effort intolerance, breathlessness, heartburn, pallor, constipation, hemoglobin, red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, RBC distribution width, mean platelet volume, serum iron, and total iron binding capacity. Conclusion: Dhatrilauha possesses many fold effectiveness in anemia (IDA), which was evidenced with the significant results obtained in the majority of parameters in this study. PMID:25972720

  4. Cost-effectiveness of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator in anemia

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Background Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are the mainstay of anemia therapy. Continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) is a highly effective, long-acting ESA developed for once-monthly dosing. A multitude of clinical studies has evaluated the safety and efficiency of this treatment option for patients with renal anemia. In times of permanent financial pressure on health care systems, the cost-effectiveness of CERA should be of particular importance for payers and clinicians. Objective To critically analyze, from the nephrologists’ point of view, the published literature focusing on the cost-effectiveness of CERA for anemia treatment. Methods The detailed literature search covered electronic databases including MEDLINE, PubMed, and Embase, as well as international conference abstract databases. Results Peer-reviewed literature analyzing the definite cost-effectiveness of CERA is scarce, and most of the available data originate from conference abstracts. Identified data are restricted to the treatment of anemia due to chronic kidney disease. Although the majority of studies suggest a considerable cost advantage for CERA, the published literature cannot easily be compared. While time and motion studies clearly indicate that a switch to CERA could minimize health care staff time in dialysis units, the results of studies comparing direct costs are more ambivalent, potentially reflecting the differences between health care systems and variability between centers. Conclusion Analyzed data are predominantly insufficient; they miss clear evidence and have to thus be interpreted with great caution. In this day and age of financial restraints, results from well-designed, head-to-head studies with clearly defined endpoints have to prove whether CERA therapy can achieve cost savings without compromising anemia management. PMID:25050070

  5. Treatment Options for Primary Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Short Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Until now, treatment of primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm type (wAIHA) is primarily based on immunosuppression. However, many patients do not respond adequately to treatment, and treated patients may develop severe side effects due to uncontrolled, mixed and/or long-lasting immunosuppression. Unfortunately, the newly used therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are unspecific and remain frequently ineffective. Thus, development of a specific therapy for AIHA is necessary. The ideal therapy would be the identification and elimination of the causative origin of autoimmunization and/or the correction or reprogramming of the dysregulated immune components. Blood transfusion is the most rapidly effective measure for patients who develop or may develop hypoxic anemia. Although some effort has been made to guide physicians on how to adequately treat patients with AIHA, a number of individual aspects should be considered prior to treatment. Based on my serological and clinical experience and the analysis of evidence-based studies, we remain far from any optimized therapeutic measures for all AIHA patients. Today, the old standard therapy using controlled steroid administration, with or without azathioprine or cyclophosphamide, is, when complemented with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, still the most effective therapy in wAIHA. Rituximab or other monoclonal antibodies may be used instead of splenectomy in therapy-refractory patients. PMID:26696797

  6. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses.

    PubMed

    Bolfa, Pompei; Nolf, Marie; Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Catoi, Cornel; Archer, Fabienne; Dolmazon, Christine; Mornex, Jean-François; Leroux, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inflammation, and thickness of the alveolar septa. Expression of the p26 EIAV capsid (CA) protein has been evaluated by immunostaining. Compared to EIAV-negative horses, 52% of the EIAV-positive horses displayed a mild inflammation around the bronchioles, 22% had a moderate inflammation with inflammatory cells inside the wall and epithelial bronchiolar hyperplasia and 6.5% had a moderate to severe inflammation, with destruction of the bronchiolar epithelium and accumulation of smooth muscle cells within the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in the thickness of the alveolar septa were also present. Expression of EIAV capsid has been evidenced in macrophages, endothelial as well as in alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, as determined by their morphology and localization. To summarize, we found lesions of interstitial lung disease similar to that observed during other lentiviral infections such as FIV in cats, SRLV in sheep and goats or HIV in children. The presence of EIAV capsid in lung epithelial cells suggests that EIAV might be responsible for the broncho-interstitial damages observed. PMID:24289102

  7. Successful desensitization of a patient with aplastic anemia to antithymocyte globulin

    PubMed Central

    Wolanin, Stephanie A.; Meier, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is a polyclonal gamma immunoglobulin derived from either rabbit or equine serum that serves as therapy for aplastic anemia; however, ATG causes serum sickness in up to 70% and anaphylaxis in up to 5% of recipients. Intradermal (ID) skin testing has been the primary technique used to evaluate for a preexisting Gell and Coombs type I hypersensitivity reaction to ATG. There are no data reporting the predictive value of delayed reactions to ID testing on the risk of serum sickness. This study was designed to establish the importance of epicutaneous and ID skin testing before the administration of ATG through a case report and literature discussion. We report a patient with severe aplastic anemia that was successfully desensitized to ATG after a negative epicutaneous skin test and positive ID skin test. The patient had neither systemic nor localized reactions during the desensitization. Desensitization to ATG in patients with positive epicutaneous skin testing has been shown to be associated with serious and potentially life-threatening complications and should only be considered when the benefits outweigh the risks. Epicutaneous skin testing should be considered in conjunction with ID skin testing when screening for potential sensitivity to ATG. Because of the serious risk of anaphylaxis, desensitization should be performed in an intensive care unit setting in conjunction with a physician familiar with drug desensitization and the management of anaphylaxis. PMID:25730287

  8. Linkage analysis of the Fanconi anemia gene FACC with chromosome 9q markers

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, A.D.; Shin, H.T.; Kaporis, A.G.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous syndrome, with at least four different complementation groups as determined by cell fusion studies. The gene for complementation group C, FACC, has been cloned and mapped to chromosome 9q22.3 by in situ hybridization, while linkage analysis has supported the placement of another gene on chromosome 20q. We have analyzed five microsatellite markers and one RFLP on chromosome 9q in a panel of FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry (IFAR) in order to place FACC on the genetic map. Polymorphisms were typed in 308 individuals from 51 families. FACC is tightly linked to both D9S151 [{Theta}{sub max}=0.025, Z{sub max}=7.75] and to D9S196 [{Theta}{sub max}=0.041, Z{sub max}=7.89]; multipoint analysis is in progress. We are currently screening a YAC clone that contains the entire FACC gene for additional microsatellite markers suitable for haplotype analysis of FA families.

  9. Clostridium Perfringens Infection in a Febrile Patient with Severe Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hashiba, Masamitsu; Tomino, Atsutoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyoshi; Hattori, Tomonori; Kano, Hideki; Tsuda, Masanobu; Takeyama, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 82 Final Diagnosis: Clostridium perfringens infection Symptoms: Anemia • fever • shock Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Antimicrobial chemotherapy Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) can cause various infections, including gas gangrene, crepitant cellulitis, and fasciitis. While C. perfringens sepsis is uncommon, it is often rapidly fatal because the alpha toxin of this bacterium induces massive intravascular hemolysis by disrupting red blood cell membranes. Case Report: We present the case of a male patient with diabetes who developed a fatal liver abscess with massive intravascular hemolysis and septic shock caused by toxigenic C. perfringens. The peripheral blood smear showed loss of central pallor, with numerous spherocytes. Multiplex PCR only detected expression of the cpa gene, indicating that the pathogen was C. perfringens type A. Conclusions: C. perfringens infection should be considered in a febrile patient who has severe hemolytic anemia with a very low MCV, hemolyzed blood sample, and negative Coombs test. The characteristic peripheral blood smear findings may facilitate rapid diagnosis. PMID:27049736

  10. Abnormalities of the large ribosomal subunit protein, Rpl35a, in Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    PubMed Central

    Farrar, Jason E.; Nater, Michelle; Caywood, Emi; McDevitt, Michael A.; Kowalski, Jeanne; Takemoto, Clifford M.; Talbot, C. Conover; Meltzer, Paul; Esposito, Diane; Beggs, Alan H.; Schneider, Hal E.; Grabowska, Agnieszka; Ball, Sarah E.; Niewiadomska, Edyta; Sieff, Colin A.; Vlachos, Adrianna; Atsidaftos, Eva; Ellis, Steven R.; Lipton, Jeffrey M.; Gazda, Hanna T.

    2008-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by anemia, congenital abnormalities, and cancer predisposition. Small ribosomal subunit genes RPS19, RPS24, and RPS17 are mutated in approximately one-third of patients. We used a candidate gene strategy combining high-resolution genomic mapping and gene expression microarray in the analysis of 2 DBA patients with chromosome 3q deletions to identify RPL35A as a potential DBA gene. Sequence analysis of a cohort of DBA probands confirmed involvement RPL35A in DBA. shRNA inhibition shows that Rpl35a is essential for maturation of 28S and 5.8S rRNAs, 60S subunit biogenesis, normal proliferation, and cell survival. Analysis of pre-rRNA processing in primary DBA lymphoblastoid cell lines demonstrated similar alterations of large ribosomal subunit rRNA in both RPL35A-mutated and some RPL35A wild-type patients, suggesting additional large ribosomal subunit gene defects are likely present in some cases of DBA. These data demonstrate that alterations of large ribosomal subunit proteins cause DBA and support the hypothesis that DBA is primarily the result of altered ribosomal function. The results also establish that haploinsufficiency of large ribosomal subunit proteins contributes to bone marrow failure and potentially cancer predisposition. PMID:18535205

  11. Successful desensitization of a patient with aplastic anemia to antithymocyte globulin.

    PubMed

    Wolanin, Stephanie A; Demain, Jeffrey G; Meier, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is a polyclonal gamma immunoglobulin derived from either rabbit or equine serum that serves as therapy for aplastic anemia; however, ATG causes serum sickness in up to 70% and anaphylaxis in up to 5% of recipients. Intradermal (ID) skin testing has been the primary technique used to evaluate for a preexisting Gell and Coombs type I hypersensitivity reaction to ATG. There are no data reporting the predictive value of delayed reactions to ID testing on the risk of serum sickness. This study was designed to establish the importance of epicutaneous and ID skin testing before the administration of ATG through a case report and literature discussion. We report a patient with severe aplastic anemia that was successfully desensitized to ATG after a negative epicutaneous skin test and positive ID skin test. The patient had neither systemic nor localized reactions during the desensitization. Desensitization to ATG in patients with positive epicutaneous skin testing has been shown to be associated with serious and potentially life-threatening complications and should only be considered when the benefits outweigh the risks. Epicutaneous skin testing should be considered in conjunction with ID skin testing when screening for potential sensitivity to ATG. Because of the serious risk of anaphylaxis, desensitization should be performed in an intensive care unit setting in conjunction with a physician familiar with drug desensitization and the management of anaphylaxis. PMID:25730287

  12. Local concepts of anemia-related illnesses and public health implications in the Taabo health demographic surveillance system, Côte d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A 14-month prospective longitudinal study conducted in the Taabo health demographic surveillance system (HDSS), south-central Côte d’Ivoire, revealed high prevalence of anemia in different population groups in three types of settings (i.e., small town, village, and hamlet). Demographic parameters and several variables related to parasitic infections, micronutrient status, and inflammation were significantly associated with higher odds of anemia. However, cultural concepts and knowledge of various anemia-related illnesses and their relation with people’s behaviors have not been investigated. Methods Sixteen focus group discussions and six key informant interviews were performed with village authorities, health workers, and traditional healers. Questionnaires were administrated to 200 school-aged children and 115 young women. Of these individuals, 206 participated in the preceding longitudinal study, whereas the remaining 109 people were not exposed to prior research, but had similar age and sex profiles. Mean prominence of participants’ responses was compared between groups of participants and across study settings. Results Local concepts of anemia-related illnesses referred to its perceived causes based on two logical frameworks – biomedical and sociocultural – although a clear distinction was often blurred. We found few differences in knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors across study settings and between participants who were exposed to prior research and newly recruited ones. Malaria und nutritional issues as understood and managed by the population differed from definitions and recommendations provided by the health system. Malaria was not acknowledged as an exclusive mosquito-transmitted disease and participants referred to the quantity, rather than the quality, of food when talking about nutritional issues. Conclusions Local concepts and ideas about anemia have public health implications, inasmuch as they are related to people’s attitudes, risk-related and help-seeking behaviors, which in turn might affect their health status. Local terminology and beliefs about anemia and malaria should be carefully considered when developing health intervention and education programs. The similarity in knowledge about anemia-related illnesses and associated behaviors, regardless of study setting and prior exposure to research, suggests that a uniform communication strategy may be used to develop education programs and awareness campaigns aimed at the prevention and control of anemia in south-central Côte d’Ivoire. PMID:24499516

  13. Iron deficient erythropoiesis might play key role in development of anemia in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Silvia; Jung, Chul Won; Kim, Kihyun; Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Won Seog; Jang, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multifactorial pathogenesis is involved in anemia of cancer patients and defining the causes of anemia is not always simple. Methods The incidence of anemia among 4 major cancers (gastric, colorectal, lung cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma), and biochemical features of anemia using ferritin, CRP, hepcidin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) were assessed. Anemia was defined either by hemoglobin (Hb) ≤11 g/dL or a drop of Hb 2 g/dL or more during anticancer treatment. Results Among the 345 patients including 152 lung cancer, 101 gastric cancer, 69 colorectal cancer and 23 hepatocellular carcinoma, 49 patients (14.2%) had anemia at their initial diagnosis of cancer. During treatment, 129 (37.4%) experienced anemia, and 34 (26.4%) were treated mostly by transfusion. Biochemical feature of anemia was examined with 39 patients' samples. When comparing to the reference value from general population, cancer patients showed numerically higher ferritin, sTfR, CRP and hepcidin level. Among the cancer patients, anemic patients had significantly higher ferritin (p = 0.050) and sTfR (p = 0.009) level compared to non-anemic patients. Conclusion Anemia is a common issue in cancer patients and is largely undertreated with sub-optimal diagnoses of cause. The rates of anemia increase significantly during anti-cancer treatment and appear to be largely associated with iron deficiency. PMID:26517509

  14. Prevalence of Anemia among Adults with Newly Diagnosed HIV/AIDS in China

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yinzhong; Wang, Zhenyan; Lu, Hongzhou; Wang, Jiangrong; Chen, Jun; Liu, Li; Zhang, Renfang; Zheng, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of anemia among antiretroviral-naïve HIV-infected patients in China has not been well characterized. We conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate the prevalence of anemia among Chinese adults with newly diagnosed HIV/AIDS. Methods One thousand nine hundred and forty-eight newly diagnosed HIV-infected patients in China were selected during 2009 and 2010. Serum samples obtained from each individual were collected to measure hemoglobin levels. Demographics and medical histories were recorded. Factors associated with the presence of anemia were analysed by logistic regression. Results Among the 1948 patients, 75.8% were male. Median age was 40 years (range: 18–80 years). The overall prevalence of anemia among HIV-infected patients was 51.9% (51.5% among men, 53.2% among women). The prevalences of mild anemia, of moderate anemia, of severe anemia were 32.4%, 17.0%, and 2.5%, respectively. The prevalence of anemia was higher among ethnic minority patients than among the Han patients (70.9% versus 45.9%). The prevalence of anemia increased with increasing age (49.6%, 53.5% and 60.1% among patients who were 18–39, 40–59, and ≥60 years of age respectively) and with decreasing CD4 count (14.0%, 22.4%, 50.7%, and 74.6% among patients with CD4 count of ≥350, 200–349, 50–199, and <50 cells/mm3 respectively). The logistic regression analysis showed that older age, lower CD4 count and minority ethnicity were significantly associated with an increased risk of anemia. Conclusions Anemia is highly prevalent among Chinese adults with newly diagnosed HIV/AIDS, but severe anemia is less prevalent in this population. Older age, lower CD4 count and minority ethnicity are associated with an increased risk of anemia. PMID:24058490

  15. [Results of treatment for severe acquired aplastic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Ochocka, M; Karwacki, M; Matysiak, M; Armata, J; Dłuzniewska, A; Bogusławska-Jaworska, J; Pejcz, J; Kowalczyk, J; Skomra, S; Radwańska, U

    1995-03-01

    The authors evaluated results of treatment of 106 children with acquired aplastic anemia. The patients were divided into 3 groups depending on the severity of their disease. Thirty-nine patients were classified as very severe, 30 as severe and 37 as non-severe according to the modified Camitta criteria. Among them, 47 children were treated with oxymetholone and prednisolone. In this group 32 died. Antilymphocyte globulin (ALG) was given to 48 patients and 20 received cyclosporin A (CsA). The results obtained by these two methods are nearly the same and 5 year survival was 61% and 59% respectively. Bone marrow was transplanted in only one child, who is still in complete remission. Statistical analysis showed a steady increase in incidence of aplastic anemia in the years 1987-1989, which might coincide with the Czarnobyl explosion. However, further research is required to prove this point. PMID:8657487

  16. Cryptococcal meningitis in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, YaLi; Sang, Junjun; Pan, Weihua; Du, Lin; Liao, Wanqing; Chen, Jianghan; Zhu, Yuanjie

    2014-08-01

    To summarize the epidemiology, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of cryptococcal meningitis (CM) in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) patients and to provide a reference for the prevention and control of AIHA complicated with CM, we evaluated five cases of CM in patients with AIHA treated in our hospital from 2003 to 2013 and eight related foreign cases. All of the clinical isolates were Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii and grouped into the VNI genotype and serotype A. The clinical features exhibit significant features. Headache, nausea, and fever are common symptoms of AIHA complicated with CM. The early clinical manifestations lack specificity, which may lead to delayed diagnosis and treatment. Long-term use of prednisone (≥15 mg day(-1)), poor control of anemia, and splenectomy are risk factors for AIHA complicated with cryptococcal infection. The combination of intravenous amphotericin B and oral 5-fluorocytosine remains the preferred treatment for AIHA complicated with CM. PMID:24952011

  17. Equine Endothelial Cells Support Productive Infection of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Maury, Wendy; Oaks, J. Lindsay; Bradley, Sarahann

    1998-01-01

    Previous cell infectivity studies have demonstrated that the lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infects tissue macrophages in vivo and in vitro. In addition, some strains of EIAV replicate to high titer in vitro in equine fibroblasts and fibroblast cell lines. Here we report a new cell type, macrovascular endothelial cells, that is infectible with EIAV. We tested the ability of EIAV to infect purified endothelial cells isolated from equine umbilical cords and renal arteries. Infectivity was detected by cell supernatant reverse transcriptase positivity, EIAV antigen positivity within individual cells, and the detection of viral RNA by in situ hybridization. Virus could rapidly spread through the endothelial cultures, and the supernatants of infected cultures contained high titers of infectious virus. There was no demonstrable cell killing in infected cultures. Three of four strains of EIAV that were tested replicated in these cultures, including MA-1, a fibroblast-tropic strain, Th.1, a macrophage-tropic strain, and WSU5, a strain that is fibroblast tropic and can cause disease. Finally, upon necropsy of a WSU5-infected horse 4 years postinfection, EIAV-positive endothelial cells were detected in outgrowths of renal artery cultures. These findings identify a new cell type that is infectible with EIAV. The role of endothelial cell infection in the course of equine infectious anemia is currently unknown, but endothelial cell infection may be involved in the edema that can be associated with infection. Furthermore, the ability of EIAV to persistently infect endothelial cultures and the presence of virus in endothelial cells from a long-term carrier suggest that this cell type can serve as a reservoir for the virus during subclinical phases of infection. PMID:9765477

  18. Johanson-Blizzard syndrome with Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Muhammad; Rana, Muhammad Nasir; Ahmad, Tahir Masood

    2010-09-01

    Johanson Blizzard syndrome (JBS) is a rare multi-system disorder characterized by congenital aplasia or hypoplasia of alae nasi, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, hypothyroidism, deafness, growth retardation, varying degree of mental retardation, alopecia, wide open fontanels, anti-mongoloid slant, café-au-lait spots and absent of permanent teeth. We report a 3 months old male child having Johanson Blizzard syndrome with classical clinical features, pancreatic insufficiency and Diamond-Blackfan anemia. PMID:20810061

  19. Aplastic anemia and membranous nephropathy induced by intravenous mercury

    PubMed Central

    Priya, N.; Nagaprabhu, V. N.; Kurian, G.; Seethalakshmi, N.; Rao, G. G.; Unni, V. N.

    2012-01-01

    Self-injection of mercury can be life-threatening. We report a case of attempted suicide by self-intravenous injection of elemental mercury. The patient suffered from two side effects : membranous nephropathy and aplastic anemia. She was treated and the systemic effects of mercury were reversed after 4 years. The toxicology of mercury, mechanisms of renal and systemic toxicities, and the various therapeutic measures for mercury poisoning are discussed. PMID:23439491

  20. Vitamin D, Race, and Risk for Anemia in Children

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Meredith A.; Melamed, Michal L.; Kumar, Juhi; Roy, Cindy N.; Miller, Edgar R.; Furth, Susan L.; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency and anemia in a cohort of otherwise healthy children, and to determine whether race modifies the association between 25(OH)D status and hemoglobin (Hgb). Study design Cross-sectional study of 10,410 children and adolescents aged 1-21 years from the 2001-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin less than the 5th percentile for age and sex based on NHANES III data. Results Lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with increased risk for anemia; < 30 ng/mL, adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21, 3.08, p=0.006, and < 20 ng/mL, OR 1.47, 95%CI 1.14-1.89, p=0.004. In linear regression, small but significant increases in Hgb were noted in the upper quartiles of 25(OH)D compared with the lowest quartile (< 20 ng/mL) in the full cohort. Results of race-stratified linear regression by 25(OH)D quartile in white children were similar to those observed in the full cohort, but in black children, increase in Hgb in the upper 25(OH)D quartiles was only apparent compared with the lowest black race specific quartile (<12 ng/mL). Conclusions 25(OH)D deficiency is associated with increased risk of anemia in a healthy U.S. children, but the 25(OH)D threshold levels for lower Hgb are lower in black children in comparison with white children. PMID:24112861

  1. Worsening Bradycardia Following Antithymocyte Globulin Treatment of Severe Aplastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Godown, Justin; Deal, Allison M.; Riley, Kathy; Bailliard, Frederique; Blatt, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Immunosuppressive regimens, which include antithymocyte globulin (ATG), are widely used for the treatment of severe aplastic anemia (SAA). However, bradycardia has been reported only as a rare side effect of ATG therapy in the manufacturer's product information and, in rare cases, in the adult literature. We present an adolescent with SAA and preexisting bradycardia who underwent immunosuppression therapy with ATG, methylprednisolone, and tacrolimus and developed profound sinus bradycardia with successive doses of ATG. PMID:22479166

  2. How the Target Hemoglobin of Renal Anemia Should Be.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Imari; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Renal anemia is caused by the deficiency of endogenous erythropoietin (Epo) due to renal dysfunction. We think that it is possible to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in case we initiate Epo early in pre-dialysis patients, especially in the non-diabetic population. Erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA) treatments targeting mild anemia (10-12 g/dl) can decrease the risk of occurrence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and congestive heart failure. As the large randomized controlled trials such as Cardiovascular Risk Reduction by Early Anemia Treatment with Epoetin Beta, Correction of Hemoglobin and Outcomes in Renal Insufficiency and Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events with Aranesp Thearpy in the Western countries suggested, we do not recommend high doses of ESA to achieve the target hemoglobin (Hb) level. The target Hb of >13 g/dl might lead to increase in the risk of CVD although maintaining a high Hb of >12 g/dl without ESA is not harmful for CKD patients. It is desirable to determine the target Hb in dialysis patients depending on their ages. Renal anemia should be monitored constantly to start ESA and iron replacement therapy at an appropriate time, while avoiding their excess in order to minimize the occurrence of CVD and other complications. Taken all the international guidelines and our clinical experiences together, we should consider administration of ESA when the Hb level becomes <11 g/dl in pre-dialysis patients and <10 g/dl in dialysis patients. PMID:26381503

  3. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1983-1984)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1984-09-01

    The hypotranserrinemic-hemochromatosis mutation in mice discovered in our laboratory is an almost exact duplicate of human atransferrinemia. Just as in man, the condition is inherited as a recessive lethal. The disease appears to stem from a congenital deficiency in transferrin. The new mutation arose spontaneously in BALB/c mice and results in death before 12 days of age. It is characterized by stunted growth, low numbers of erythrocytes, hypochromia, and in the absence of jaundice. Treatments with Imferon or other iron preparations were uniformly unsuccessful, but the use of normal mouse serum proved successful as a therapeutic measure. We find that we are able to keep these afflicted mice alive for more than a year with small amounts of normal serum, and transferrin bands are missing on cellulose acetate electrophoresis of serum proteins from affected individuals receiving no treatment. Genetic tests indicated that the new mutation was not an allele of any of the other known iron deficiency anemias in the mouse: sex linked anemia (sla), microcytic anemia (mk), or flexed anemia (f) or any of the members of the hemolytic disease group (sph, sph/sup ha/, nb, or ja). Biochemical and genetic analyses carried out during the past year indicate that the new mutation, tentatively designated hpx is not likely to be a mutation at the transferrin (Trf) locus on Chromosome 9. We observed no unusual serum proteins on cellulose acetate electrophoresis, such as might be expected if the Trf gene had mutated. Moreover, radial immunodiffusion examination and Ouchterlony analysis did not show the presence of smaller molecules (or fragments) with transferrin antigenic specificities. Instead they showed a total loss in serum transferrin. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  4. Urinary schistosomiasis and malaria associated anemia in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Deribew, Ketema; Tekeste, Zinaye; Petros, Beyene

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of anemia in children with urinary schistosomiasis, malaria and concurrent infections by the two diseases. Methods Urine and blood samples were collected from 387 children (216 males and 171 females) to examine urinary schistosomiasis and malaria and to determine hemoglobin concentration at Hassoba and Hassoba Buri village in Amibara woreda, Afar region, Ethiopia. Results The overall prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis and Plasmodium falciparum malaria was 24.54% and 6.20% respectively. Only 2.84% of children carried concurrent infections of both parasites. There was high percentage of anemic patients (81.81%) in the coinfected cases than in either malaria (33.3%) or schistosomiasis (38.94%) cases. There was significantly low mean hemoglobin concentration in concurrently infected children than non-infected and single infected (P<0.05). The mean hemoglobin concentration between Plasmodium falciparum and S. haematobium infected children showed no significant difference (P>0.05). The level of hemoglobin was negatively correlated with the number of S. haematobium eggs/10 mL urine (r=-0.6) and malaria parasitemia (r=-0.53). Conclusions The study showed that anemia is higher in concurrently infected children than non-infected and single infected. Furthermore, level of hemoglobin was negatively correlated with the number of S. haematobium eggs and malaria parsitemia. Therefore, examination of hemoglobin status in patients co-infected with malaria and schistosomiasis is important to reduce the risk of anemia and to improve health of the community. PMID:23620856

  5. Neocytolysis Contributes to the Anemia of Renal Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P.; Driscoll, Theda; Whitley, Carl E.; Hachey, David; Suki, Wadi

    1997-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiologic process effecting selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin depression appears to initiate the process, providing rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When erythropoietin therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients demonstrated Cr-51 red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these patients received oral (13)C-glycine and (15)N-glycine and showed pathologic enrichment of stool porphyrins by the most recently ingested isotope when EPO therapy was held. This confirms selective hemolysis of newly-released red cells. (One patient had chronic hemolysis by isotope studies of blood and stool.) Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explains some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus erythropoietin therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared to lower doses given more frequently subcutaneously.

  6. Aplastic anemia and dental implant rehabilitation: a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Hwa; Shet, Uttom Kumar; Kim, Byeong-Guk; Kim, Myung-In; Kook, Min-Suk; Oh, Hee-Kyun; Ryu, Sun-Youl; Park, Hong-Ju; Jung, Seunggon

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate implant-supported restoration as a technique for restoring missing teeth in patients with aplastic anemia. Recurrent bleeding from wound sites leads to persistent release of iron in the tissue. Excessive iron in tissue is related to clinical findings, including fibrosis, poor wound healing, and high level of angiogenesis, which are possible etiological factors of reduced osseointegration. A 44-year-old female patient with aplastic anemia was treated with multiple endosseous implants throughout the mandible and in the posterior region of the maxilla. After 14 implants were placed, radiological and clinical parameters were assessed during the follow-up period. Marginal bone did not change significantly during the follow-up period. The fine trabecular bone in intimate contact and enclosing the implant fixture was sufficient for successful osseointegration. None of the 14 implants were associated with compilations during the seven-year experimental period. This study suggests that dental implant procedures are a safe and reliable treatment option for restoration of missing dentition in patients with aplastic anemia. PMID:26568929

  7. The Impact of Anemia on Child Mortality: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Samuel P.; Chen-Edinboro, Lenis P.; Caulfield, Laura E.; Murray-Kolb, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia and child mortality are public health problems requiring urgent attention. However, the degree to which iron deficiency anemia contributes to child mortality is unknown. Here, we utilized an exhaustive article search and screening process to identify articles containing both anemia and mortality data for children aged 28 days to 12 years. We then estimated the reduction in risk of mortality associated with a 1-g/dL increase in hemoglobin (Hb). Our meta-analysis of nearly 12,000 children from six African countries revealed a combined odds ratio of 0.76 (0.62–0.93), indicating that for each 1-g/dL increase in Hb, the risk of death falls by 24%. The feasibility of a 1-g/dL increase in Hb has been demonstrated via simple iron supplementation strategies. Our finding suggests that ~1.8 million deaths in children aged 28 days to five years could be avoided each year by increasing Hb in these children by 1 g/dL. PMID:25533005

  8. Alternative treatment for iron deficiency anemia: Irocbin versus Sherbat Faulad.

    PubMed

    Ayaz, Sultan; Usmanghani, Khan; Nazar, Halima

    2016-01-01

    The wide spread reason of anemia is Iron deficiency in Pakistan and even worldwide. A clinical trial was undertaken to assess the efficacy of Irocbin formulation for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia as compared to Sherbat Faulad. The curative evaluations of these medicines were recorded in clinically and biochemically identified cases of iron deficiency anemia. The therapeutic evaluation of the different drugs both test and control drug were conducted on the bases of improvement in the subjective signs and symptoms, clinical observations and biochemical investigations at periodic intervals during the course of therapy. This data was collected in the period November 2010 to November 2012 and completed the clinical trials. According to the statistical analysis comparison of data recorded by patients concerning to different variables, showed significant results between test and control groups (p<0.05). By applying ANOVA test, the p values for multiple comparisons of the levels of improvement of Hemoglobin after treatment exhibited significant difference as compared Sherbat Faulad and Irocbin. The control drug Sherbat Faulad with only iron component improves Hemoglobin level and the sign and symptoms but associated with side adverse effects. PMID:26826829

  9. Aplastic anemia and dental implant rehabilitation: a clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Hwa; Shet, Uttom Kumar; Kim, Byeong-Guk; Kim, Myung-In; Kook, Min-Suk; Oh, Hee-Kyun; Ryu, Sun-Youl; Park, Hong-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate implant-supported restoration as a technique for restoring missing teeth in patients with aplastic anemia. Recurrent bleeding from wound sites leads to persistent release of iron in the tissue. Excessive iron in tissue is related to clinical findings, including fibrosis, poor wound healing, and high level of angiogenesis, which are possible etiological factors of reduced osseointegration. A 44-year-old female patient with aplastic anemia was treated with multiple endosseous implants throughout the mandible and in the posterior region of the maxilla. After 14 implants were placed, radiological and clinical parameters were assessed during the follow-up period. Marginal bone did not change significantly during the follow-up period. The fine trabecular bone in intimate contact and enclosing the implant fixture was sufficient for successful osseointegration. None of the 14 implants were associated with compilations during the seven-year experimental period. This study suggests that dental implant procedures are a safe and reliable treatment option for restoration of missing dentition in patients with aplastic anemia. PMID:26568929

  10. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms “iron deficiency” and “iron deficiency anemia” are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake together with rapid growth, low birth weight and gastrointestinal losses related to excessive intake of cow’s milk. If insufficient intake can be excluded and there is insufficient response to oral iron treatment in patients with iron deficiency especially in older children, blood loss should be considered as the underlying cause. The main principles in management of iron deficiency anemia include investigation and elimination of the cause leading to iron deficiency, replacement of deficiency, improvement of nutrition and education of the patient and family. In this article, the practical approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and the experience of our center have been reviewed. PMID:26078692

  11. Immunosuppressive therapy for transplant-ineligible aplastic anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Körper, Sixten; Höchsmann, Britta

    2015-02-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare life-threatening bone marrow failure that is characterized by bicytopenia or pancytopenia in the peripheral blood and a hypoplastic or aplastic bone marrow. The patients are at risk of infection and hemorrhage due to neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and suffer from symptoms of anemia. The main treatment approaches are allogeneic stem cell transplantation and immunosuppression. Here, we review current standard immunosuppression and the attempts that have been made in the past two decades to improve results: review of recent developments also reveals that sometimes not only the advent of new drugs, good ideas and well-designed clinical trials decide the progress in the field but also marketing considerations of pharmaceutical companies. Aplastic anemia experts unfortunately had to face the situation that efficient drugs were withdrawn simply for marketing considerations. We will discuss the current options and challenges in first-line treatment and management of relapsing and refractory patients with an emphasis on adult patients. Some promising new approaches are currently under investigation in prospective, randomized trials. PMID:25572607

  12. Phytomedicines and Nutraceuticals: Alternative Therapeutics for Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Imaga, Ngozi Awa

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the “SS” individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human β-globin subunit results in replacement of β6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro). The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper. PMID:23476125

  13. Neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Hachey, D. L.; Suki, W.

    1999-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiological process affecting the selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin (EPO) depression appears to initiate the process, providing the rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When EPO therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients showed chromium 51 (51Cr)-red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these four patients received oral 13C-glycine and 15N-glycine, and there was a suggestion of pathological isotope enrichment of stool porphyrins when EPO therapy was held, again supporting selective hemolysis of newly released red cells that take up the isotope (one patient had chronic hemolysis indicated by isotope studies of blood and stool). Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explain some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus EPO therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared with lower doses administered more frequently subcutaneously.

  14. Massive Esophageal Variceal Bleeding as a Rare Complication of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Gregory; Malik, Zubair; Mathur, Malini

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old man with sickle cell anemia presented with fatigue, dark stool, and coffee ground emesis. He was found to have large esophageal varices and experienced massive variceal hemorrhage in the hospital. The varices were caused by diffuse splanchnic venous thrombosis, and his only risk factor for hypercoagulability was sickle cell anemia. Splanchnic venous thrombosis due to sickle cell anemia is exceedingly rare. PMID:26958556

  15. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus as a Rare Cause of Anemia Resistant to Erythropoiesis-stimulating Agents.

    PubMed

    Yenigun, Ezgi Coskun; Bayrakci, Nergiz; Cevher, Simal Koksal; Ozkayar, Nihal; Dede, Fatih

    2016-03-01

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) play an important role in the management of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease, but the goals cannot be reached in 5% to 10% of the patients despite high-dose ESA treatment. In case of ESA resistance, all causes of anemia encountered in the general population should be carefully reviewed. We present a patient examined for ESA resistance that was diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus and subsequently showed improvement of anemia with systemic corticosteroids. PMID:26921753

  16. Massive Esophageal Variceal Bleeding as a Rare Complication of Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Malamood, Mark; Bernstein, Gregory; Malik, Zubair; Mathur, Malini

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old man with sickle cell anemia presented with fatigue, dark stool, and coffee ground emesis. He was found to have large esophageal varices and experienced massive variceal hemorrhage in the hospital. The varices were caused by diffuse splanchnic venous thrombosis, and his only risk factor for hypercoagulability was sickle cell anemia. Splanchnic venous thrombosis due to sickle cell anemia is exceedingly rare. PMID:26958556

  17. Clostridium Perfringens Infection in a Febrile Patient with Severe Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hashiba, Masamitsu; Tomino, Atsutoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyoshi; Hattori, Tomonori; Kano, Hideki; Tsuda, Masanobu; Takeyama, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) can cause various infections, including gas gangrene, crepitant cellulitis, and fasciitis. While C. perfringens sepsis is uncommon, it is often rapidly fatal because the alpha toxin of this bacterium induces massive intravascular hemolysis by disrupting red blood cell membranes. CASE REPORT We present the case of a male patient with diabetes who developed a fatal liver abscess with massive intravascular hemolysis and septic shock caused by toxigenic C. perfringens. The peripheral blood smear showed loss of central pallor, with numerous spherocytes. Multiplex PCR only detected expression of the cpa gene, indicating that the pathogen was C. perfringens type A. CONCLUSIONS C. perfringens infection should be considered in a febrile patient who has severe hemolytic anemia with a very low MCV, hemolyzed blood sample, and negative Coombs test. The characteristic peripheral blood smear findings may facilitate rapid diagnosis. PMID:27049736

  18. Anemia in Cambodia: a cross-sectional study of anemia, socioeconomic status and other associated risk factors in rural women.

    PubMed

    Charles, Christopher V; Dewey, Cate E; Hall, Ann; Hak, Chantharith; Channary, Son; Summerlee, Alastair J S

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency and associated anemia are severe public health problems, which are prevalent in the developing world. We conducted a cross-sectional survey, comprised of written interview questions and laboratory analysis of blood biomarkers, in Kandal Province, Cambodia. The objective of this study is to examine possible factors that are associated with anemia in rural Cambodia. Data on socioeconomic status, water source/treatment practices, and meat consumption was also collected. Of the 297 women surveyed, 51.2% were anemic. Of those women found to be anemic, iron deficiency was implicated in 9.7% of cases (SF <15 ng/L), with an additional 18.5% reported to be borderline iron deficient (serum ferritin=15-30 ng/L). Meat consumption was very low, with nearly one-half of the women consuming meat one time per month or less. This study highlights the multi-faceted etiology of anemia in Cambodia and emphasizes the need for comprehensive nutrition surveying in order to better inform prevention and treatment programming and policy development. PMID:26078242

  19. [Integral evaluation of redox metabolism in erythrocytes from patients with various anemias].

    PubMed

    Ermakova, T A; Tsvetaeva, N V

    2003-03-01

    The potentiometric determination method (Vmax NADP.H) was made use of to make an integral evaluation of the status of the oxidant-restorative metabolism of erythrocytes; the method facilitates essentially the diagnostics in certain hemolytic processes like G-6-PD-insufficiency, toxic hemolytic anemia and auto-immune hemlytic anemia. Essential differences of the oxidant-restorative potential of erythrocytes (Vmax NADP.H) at congenital and acquired hemolytic anemias were detected, which can be used in the hematological practice alongside with other laboratory tests in the differentiated diagnostics of hemolytic anemias of unclear etiologies. PMID:12715393

  20. Prevalence and correlates of maternal anemia in rural Sidama, Southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gebremedhin, Samson; Enquselassie, Fikre; Umeta, Melaku

    2014-03-01

    In order to assess the prevalence and correlates of prenatal anemia, a survey was conducted among 700 randomly selected pregnant women in rural Sidama, Southern Ethiopia. The prevalences of anemia, Iron Deficiency (ID) and ID anemia were 31.6%, 17.4% and 8.7%, respectively. The burden of anemia was significantly high among illiterates, women devoid of self-income, lowlanders, multiparas and women aged 25-34 years. Women who weren't on iron-folate supplementation had 1.90 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.14-3.19) times increased odds of anemia. Anemia was associated with ID, zinc deficiency and elevated C-reactive protein with odds ratio of 2.46 (95% CI: 1.63-3.73), 2.29 (95% CI: 1.62-3.23) and 1.98 (95% CI: 1.12-3.47) respectively; however, it was not associated with vitamin A deficiency. Though ID was a significant correlate of anemia, only 11.8% of anemia was attributable to it. Zinc, iron and vitamin A deficiencies did not show synergistic interaction in associating with anemia. PMID:24796168

  1. Anemia on Admission Is an Independent Predictor of Long-Term Mortality in Hip Fracture Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Licheng; Yin, Pengbin; Lv, Houchen; Long, Anhua; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is a disputable factor for long-term mortality in hip fracture population in previous studies. Previous studies indicated that the level of hemoglobin (Hb) might fluctuate due to various factors, such as comorbidities and in-hospital interventions, and the changing level of Hb, may lead to discordance diagnosis of anemia and thus to the conflicting conclusions on prognostic value of anemia. So in this study, we aim to compare factors affecting the diagnosis of anemia at different time-points, admission, postoperation, and discharge, and to determine which the time point is most suitable for mortality prediction. This prospective cohort study included 1330 hip fracture patients from 1 January 2000 to 18 November 2012. Hb levels at 3 different time points, such as admission, postoperation, and discharge, were collected and used to stratify the cohort into anemia and nonanemia groups. Candidate factors including commodities, perioperative factors, blood transfusion, and other in-hospital interventions were collected before discharge. Logistic regression analyses were performed to detect risk factors for anemia for the 3 time points separately. Kaplan–Meier and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between anemia and 2-year mortality. Factors affecting the diagnosis of anemia were different for the 3 time points. Age, female sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists score (ASA), and intertrochanteric fracture were associated with admission anemia, while surgical procedure, surgical duration, blood transfusion, blood loss during the operation, and drainage volume were major risk factors for postoperation anemia. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis suggested that the risk of all-cause mortality was higher in the anemia group on admission (1.680, 95%CI: 1.201–2.350, P < 0.01), but not postoperation or on discharge, after adjustment for confounding factors. Our study showed that risk factors for anemia varied at different time points, and therapy interventions would greatly affect the status of postoperation and discharge anemia in hip fracture patients. The take-home message is when anemia is used for mortality prediction in these patients, a specific time point should be chosen. We suggest that only admission anemia should be used for mortality prediction, but not postoperation nor discharge anemia. PMID:26844456

  2. Positive Correlation of STAT1 and miR-146a with Anemia in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez Gutierrez, Paul R.; Ceribelli, Angela; Satoh, Minoru; Sobel, Eric S.; Reeves, Westley H.; Chan, Edward K.L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Anemia is one of the most common hematological manifestations in SLE patients, occurring in about 50% of active cases. STAT1 is a critical signaling molecule required for the production of type-1 interferon (I-IFN), CCL2, and CXCL10, all of which are upregulated in SLE. Overexpression of STAT1 has been described to be involved in anemia in animal models. The aim of this study is to analyze how these components are involved in SLE-associated anemia. Methods Blood samples were collected from 39 healthy donors and 101 SLE patients fulfilling ACR criteria. Samples were collected from a total of 180 visits (58 patients had 2 or more visits) of which 52 visits included a diagnosisof anemia. Healthy donors had only single visit. Total RNA, isolated from leukocytes, was analyzed by Taqman qPCR. Relative expression levels of I-IFN signature genes, chemokines, and miR-146a were determined by the ΔΔCT method. Results were correlated with clinical data and analyzed by the Wilcoxon/Kruskal-Wallis test and Fisher’s exact test. Results Significant increases in IFN score (p<0.0001), STAT1 (p<0.0001), miR-146a (p<0.0005), CCL2 (p=0.0047), and CXCL10 (p=0.017), as well as a significant decrease in pri-miR-146a (p=0.0002), were detected in the anemic SLE patient visits (n=52) compared to non-anemic SLE visits (n=128). Regardless of disease activity, lupus nephritis, or race, anemic SLE patients displayed significantly elevated levels of STAT1 and miR-146a compared to non-anemic SLE patients. Conclusions STAT1 and miR-146a may be upregulated during inflammation and via proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in SLE. Prolonged upregulation of STAT1 and miR-146a appears to play an important role in anemia in SLE patients. PMID:24292724

  3. Prevalence of High Blood Pressure, Heart Disease, Thalassemia, Sickle-Cell Anemia, and Iron-Deficiency Anemia among the UAE Adolescent Population

    PubMed Central

    Barakat-Haddad, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, and medical diagnoses in relation to blood disorders, among 6,329 adolescent students (age 15 to 18 years) who reside in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Findings indicated that the overall prevalence of high blood pressure and heart disease was 1.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence for thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia was 0.9%, 1.6%, and 5%, respectively. Bivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure among the local and expatriate adolescent population in the Emirate of Sharjah. Similarly, statistically significant differences in the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia were observed among the local and expatriate population in Abu Dhabi city, the western region of Abu Dhabi, and Al-Ain. Multivariate analysis revealed the following significant predictors of high blood pressure: residing in proximity to industry, nonconventional substance abuse, and age when smoking or exposure to smoking began. Ethnicity was a significant predictor of heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia. In addition, predictors of thalassemia included gender (female) and participating in physical activity. Participants diagnosed with sickle-cell anemia and iron-deficiency anemia were more likely to experience different physical activities. PMID:23606864

  4. Tailoring iron chelation by iron intake and serum ferritin: the prospective EPIC study of deferasirox in 1744 patients with transfusion-dependent anemias

    PubMed Central

    Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Porter, John; El-Beshlawy, Amal; Li, Chi-Kong; Seymour, John F.; Elalfy, Mohsen; Gattermann, Norbert; Giraudier, Stéphane; Lee, Jong-Wook; Chan, Lee Lee; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Rose, Christian; Taher, Ali; Thein, Swee Lay; Viprakasit, Vip; Habr, Dany; Domokos, Gabor; Roubert, Bernard; Kattamis, Antonis

    2010-01-01

    Background Following a clinical evaluation of deferasirox (Exjade®) it was concluded that, in addition to baseline body iron burden, ongoing transfusional iron intake should be considered when selecting doses. The 1-year EPIC study, the largest ever investigation conducted for an iron chelator, is the first to evaluate whether fixed starting doses of deferasirox, based on transfusional iron intake, with dose titration guided by serum ferritin trends and safety markers, provides clinically acceptable chelation in patients (aged ≥2 years) with transfusional hemosiderosis from various types of anemia. Design and Methods The recommended initial dose was 20 mg/kg/day for patients receiving 2–4 packed red blood cell units/month and 10 or 30 mg/kg/day was recommended for patients receiving less or more frequent transfusions, respectively. Dose adjustments were based on 3-month serum ferritin trends and continuous assessment of safety markers. The primary efficacy end-point was change in serum ferritin after 52 weeks compared with baseline. Results The 1744 patients enrolled had the following conditions; thalassemia (n=1115), myelodysplastic syndromes (n=341), aplastic anemia (n=116), sickle cell disease (n=80), rare anemias (n=43) and other transfused anemias (n=49). Overall, there was a significant reduction in serum ferritin from baseline (−264 ng/mL; P<0.0001), reflecting dosage adjustments and ongoing iron intake. The most common (>5%) adverse events were gastrointestinal disturbances (28%) and skin rash (10%). Conclusions Analysis of this large, prospectively collected data set confirms the response to chelation therapy across various anemias, supporting initial deferasirox doses based on transfusional iron intake, with subsequent dose titration guided by trends in serum ferritin and safety markers (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00171821). PMID:19951979

  5. Anemia in Clinical Practice-Definition and Classification: Does Hemoglobin Change With Aging?

    PubMed

    Cappellini, M Domenica; Motta, Irene

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a global public health problem affecting both developing and developed countries at all ages. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), anemia is defined as hemoglobin (Hb) levels <12.0 g/dL in women and <13.0 g/dL in men. However, normal Hb distribution varies not only with sex but also with ethnicity and physiological status. New lower limits of normal Hb values have been proposed, according to ethnicity, gender, and age. Anemia is often multifactorial and is not an independent phenomenon. For the classification and diagnosis the hematologic parameters, the underlying pathological mechanism and patient history should be taken into account. The aging of population, especially in Western countries, causes an increase of anemia in elderly people. In this population, anemia, recently defined by levels of Hb <12 g/dL in both sexes, is mostly of mild degree (10-12 g/dL). Understanding the pathophysiology of anemia in this population is important because it contributes to morbidity and mortality. In one third of the patients, anemia is due to nutritional deficiency, including iron, folate, or vitamin B12 deficiency; moreover, anemia of chronic disease accounts for about another third of the cases. However, in one third of patients anemia cannot be explained by an underlying disease or by a specific pathological process, and for this reason it is defined "unexplained anemia". Unexplained anemia might be due to the progressive resistance of bone marrow erythroid progenitors to erythropoietin, and a chronic subclinical pro-inflammatory state. PMID:26404438

  6. Pearson syndrome in a Diamond-Blackfan anemia cohort.

    PubMed

    Alter, Blanche P

    2014-07-17

    In this issue of Blood, Gagne et al describe a cohort of 362 patients clinically classified as having Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), in which 175 (48%) were found to have mutations and deletions in ribosomal protein genes or GATA1, and 8 of the remaining patients (2.2% overall) had mitochondrial gene deletions consistent with Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome (PS). The authors propose that all patients with presumptive DBA should be tested for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion during their initial genetic evaluation. PMID:25035146

  7. Deficiencies in the Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Childhood.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Daniel, Catherine L; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R

    2016-04-01

    Limited high-quality evidence supports the management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). To assess our institutional performance in this area, we retrospectively reviewed IDA treatment practices in 195 consecutive children referred to our center from 2006 to mid-2010. The majority of children were ≤4 years old (64%) and had nutritional IDA (74%). In 11- to 18-year-old patients (31%), the primary etiology was menorrhagia (42%). Many were referred directly to the emergency department and/or prescribed iron doses outside the recommended range. Poor medication adherence and being lost-to-follow-up were common. Substantial improvements are required in the management of IDA. PMID:26728130

  8. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia during adalimumab treatment for plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Harada, Yukinori; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Sato, Midori; Kodaira, Mutsuki; Kono, Tsunesuke

    2015-01-01

    Adalimumab is commonly used to treat autoimmune diseases with few reported hematological adverse reactions. We herein describe the case of an 85-year-old Japanese man with plaque psoriasis who developed autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) after 3 years of adalimumab treatment. The patient suddenly developed hematuria and dyspnea on exertion while receiving adalimumab treatment. Laboratory data showed low hemoglobin levels and slightly increased reticulocyte counts, while direct and indirect antiglobulin tests were positive. The patient was diagnosed with AIHA which resolved after replacing the adalimumab treatment with prednisolone therapy. The findings from this case indicate that AIHA may be caused by long-term adalimumab treatment. PMID:25948357

  9. Trichoderma longibrachiatum infection in a pediatric patient with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, F M; Demmler, G J; Travis, W R; Ogden, A K; Rossmann, S N; Rinaldi, M G

    1997-01-01

    Trichoderma longibrachiatum infection of the skin in an 11-year-old child with severe aplastic anemia and prolonged neutropenia is reported. The patient received systemic antifungal therapy and underwent bone marrow transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first description of T. longibrachiatum infection in a pediatric patient. It also is the first case successfully treated with medical therapy. A review of the literature suggests that Trichoderma spp. are recognized as human pathogens with increasing frequency, particularly for immunocompromised patients, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of fungal infections in the pediatric population. PMID:9003627

  10. Aplastic anemia and red cell aplasia due to pentachlorophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Repeated exposure to commercial (technical grade) pentachlorophenol (PCP) preceded aplastic anemia in four patients and pure red cell aplasia in two. Two patients developed concomitant or subsequent Hodgkin's disease and acute leukemia. The hematologic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effect of PCP and its chemical contaminants have been documented in other clinical and experimental reports. In view of the widespread contamination of our environment by PCP, clinicians and public health investigators must seek out such exposure in these and related disorders and initiate measures to reduce it.

  11. Suppression of a novel hematopoietic mediator in children with severe malarial anemia.

    PubMed

    Keller, Christopher C; Ouma, Collins; Ouma, Yamo; Awandare, Gordon A; Davenport, Gregory C; Were, Tom; Hittner, James B; Vulule, John M; Ong'echa, John M; Perkins, Douglas J

    2009-09-01

    In areas of holoendemic Plasmodium falciparum transmission, severe malarial anemia (SMA) is a leading cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality. Although many soluble mediators regulate erythropoiesis, it is unclear how these factors contribute to development of SMA. Investigation of novel genes dysregulated in response to malarial pigment (hemozoin [PfHz]) revealed that stem cell growth factor (SCGF; also called C-type lectin domain family member 11A [CLEC11A]), a hematopoietic growth factor important for development of erythroid and myeloid progenitors, was one of the most differentially expressed genes. Additional experiments with cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) demonstrated that PfHz decreased SCGF/CLEC11A transcriptional expression in a time-dependent manner. Circulating SCGF levels were then determined for Kenyan children (n = 90; aged 3 to 36 months) presenting at a rural hospital with various severities of malarial anemia. SCGF levels in circulation (P = 0.001) and in cultured PBMCs (P = 0.004) were suppressed in children with SMA. Circulating SCGF also correlated positively with hemoglobin levels (r = 0.241; P = 0.022) and the reticulocyte production index (RPI) (r = 0.280; P = 0.029). In addition, SCGF was decreased in children with reduced erythropoiesis (RPI of <2) (P < 0.001) and in children with elevated levels of naturally acquired monocytic PfHz (P = 0.019). Thus, phagocytosis of PfHz promotes a decrease in SCGF gene products, which may contribute to reduced erythropoiesis in children with SMA. PMID:19528216

  12. Cardiac hypertrophy in anion exchanger 1-null mutant mice with severe hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Bernardo V; Kieller, Dawn M; Quon, Anita L; Robertson, Murray; Casey, Joseph R

    2007-03-01

    Anion exchanger 1 (AE1; SLC4A1), the plasma membrane Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger of erythrocytes, is also expressed in heart. The aim of this study was to assess the role of AE1 in heart function through study of AE1-null (AE1(-/-)) mice, which manifest severe hemolytic anemia resulting from erythrocyte fragility. Heart weight-to-body weight ratios were significantly higher in the AE1(-/-) mice than in wild-type (AE1(+/+)) littermates at both 1-3 days postnatal (3.01 +/- 0.38 vs. 1.45 +/- 0.04) and at 7 days postnatal (9.45 +/- 0.53 vs. 4.13 +/- 0.41), indicating that loss of AE1 led to cardiac hypertrophy. Heterozygous (AE1(+/-)) mice had no signs of cardiac hypertrophy. Morphology of the adult AE1(-/-) mutant heart revealed an increased left ventricular mass, accompanied by increased collagen deposition and fibrosis. M-mode echocardiography revealed dysfunction of the AE1(-/-) hearts, including dilated left ventricle end diastole and systole and expanded left ventricular mass compared with AE1(+/+) hearts. Expression of intracellular pH-regulatory mechanisms in the hypertrophic myocardium of neonate AE1(-/-) mutant mice was indistinguishable from AE1(+/-) and AE1(+/+) mice, as assessed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Confocal immunofluorescence revealed that, in normal mouse myocardium, AE1 is sarcolemmal, whereas AE3 and slc26a6 are found both at the sarcolemma and in internal membranes (T tubules and sarcoplasmic reticulum). These results indicate that AE1(-/-) mice, which suffer from severe hemolytic anemia and spherocytosis, display cardiac hypertrophy and impaired cardiac function, reminiscent of findings in patients with hereditary abnormalities of red blood cells. No essential role for AE1 in heart function was found. PMID:17056673

  13. Suspected anemia caused by maternal anti-Jra antibodies: a case report.

    PubMed

    Endo, Yasufumi; Ito, Shoichi; Ogiyama, Yoshiko

    2015-01-01

    Most cases of hemolytic disease of the newborn associated with anti-Jra are mild. However, rare cases of hydrops fetalis and severe anemia have been reported. We treated a neonate with anemia who was born with maternal anti-Jra, which were detected in the umbilical cord plasma. The Jra antigens in the neonate core blood red blood cells (RBCs) exhibited extremely weak reactivity to PEG-IAT, an anti-Jra reagent. However, upon re-examination of Jra antigen using PEG-IAT at 3 months postpartum, positivity was observed. Thereafter, upon performing PCR-SSP analysis of blood relatives targeting ABCG2 at positions 376 and 421, we found that the mother was Jr(a-) with 376 T homozygosity, whereas the father was Jr(a+) with 376 C homozygosity and a carrier of a 421 C > A mutation. The first sibling, like the propositus, was Jr(a+), exhibiting 376 CT heterozygosity. However, the first sibling carried a 421 C > A mutation, whereas the propositus had no mutation at position 421. Setting the normal Jra (a+) type (376 C, 421 C) to 100 %, we identified the amount of Jra in RBC using FCM to be 82 % in the father, 31 % in the first sibling, and 69 % in the propositus. Furthermore, upon comparing peripheral blood and myelograms of the neonate at the time of birth, we found a low myeloid cells/erythroid cells ratio, undifferentiated erythroblasts, and reduced megakaryocytes. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that cell surface antigen is involved in the HDN caused by anti-Jra, and that a cytodifferentiation abnormality is present in the hematopoietic system. PMID:26301094

  14. Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy with myelofibrosis and anemia: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sheyu; Li, Qianrui; Wang, Qin; Chen, Decai; Li, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO) is a rare and usually benign disorder of bone and connective tissue growth. Here we present a 28-year-old male patient presenting to our hospital with PHO and symptomatic anemia. Bone marrow biopsy suggested myelofibrosis, a serious complication of PHO, which is often neglected upon admission, but may lead to life-threatening anemia. PMID:25785156

  15. Anemia in postmenopausal women: dietary inadequacy or non-dietary factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postmenopausal women are disproportionately affected by anemia, and the prevalence in females > 65 years of age in the United States is approximately 10%. The manifestation of anemia in older populations is associated with dietary inadequacy, blood loss, genetics, alterations in bioavailability, ren...

  16. In anemia of multiple myeloma hepcidin is induced by increased bone-morphogenetic protein-2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepcidin is the principal iron-regulatory hormone and pathogenic factor in anemia of inflammation. Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) frequently present with anemia. We showed that MM patients had increased serum hepcidin, which inversely correlated with hemoglobin, suggesting that hepcidin contrib...

  17. Prevention of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Infants and Children of Preschool Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fomon, Samuel J.

    Iron-deficiency anemia is almost certainly the most prevalent nutritional disorder among infants and young children in the United States. Anemia is frequently seen among children of low socioeconomic status but is probably also the most frequent nutritional deficiency disease seen among children cared for by private doctors. Possible reasons for…

  18. Molecular basis of inherited microcytic anemia due to defects in iron acquisition or heme synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Iolascon, Achille; De Falco, Luigia; Beaumont, Carole

    2009-01-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most commonly encountered anemia in general medical practice. Nutritional iron deficiency and ? thalassemia trait are the primary causes in pediatrics, whereas bleeding disorders and anemia of chronic disease are common in adulthood. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from a defect in globin genes, in heme synthesis, in iron availability or in iron acquisition by the erythroid precursors. These microcytic anemia can be sideroblastic or not, a trait which reflects the implications of different gene abnormalities. Iron is a trace element that may act as a redox component and therefore is integral to vital biological processes that require the transfer of electrons as in oxygen transport, oxidative phosphorylation, DNA biosynthesis and xenobiotic metabolism. However, it can also be pro-oxidant and to avoid its toxicity, iron metabolism is strictly controlled and failure of these control systems could induce iron overload or iron deficient anemia. During the past few years, several new discoveries mostly arising from human patients or mouse models have highlighted the implication of iron metabolism components in hereditary microcytic anemia, from intestinal absorption to its final inclusion into heme. In this paper we will review the new information available on the iron acquisition pathway by developing erythrocytes and its regulation, and we will consider only inherited microcytosis due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects. This information could be useful in the diagnosis and classification of these microcytic anemias. PMID:19181781

  19. Less known pathophysiological mechanisms of anemia in patients with diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Pappa, M; Dounousi, E; Duni, A; Katopodis, K

    2015-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is currently considered a modern global epidemic, and diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Anemia is one of the most significant complications of CKD, and it is mainly attributed to insufficient erythropoietin (EPO) production. However, anemia develops earlier in the course of CKD among patients with DM, and the severity of anemia tends to be more marked in these patients compared to nondiabetic subjects, regardless of the stage of CKD. In this review, we focus on the "less known" complex interacting mechanisms which are involved in the pathophysiology of anemia associated with DN. Although the major cause of anemia in DN is considered to be an inappropriate response of the plasma EPO concentration to anemia, several other possible mechanisms have been suggested. Glomerular hyperfiltration, proteinuria, renal tubular dysfunction and interstitial fibrosis are among the main culprits. On the other hand, systemic effects such as chronic inflammation, autonomic neuropathy and the renin-angiotensin system are also involved. Finally, several medications are considered to aggravate anemia associated with DN. Since anemia is an important predictor of quality of life and is implicated in the increased burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, further research is required to elucidate its pathogenesis in diabetic patients. PMID:26017902

  20. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia caused by cold agglutinins in a young pregnant woman.

    PubMed

    Batalias, Labros; Trakakis, Eftihios; Loghis, Costas; Salabasis, Costas; Simeonidis, George; Karanikolopoulos, Panagiotis; Kassanos, Demetrios; Salamalekis, Emmanuel

    2006-04-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder. A 34-year old woman presented with thrombophlebitis after her first delivery, during puerperium. A high titer of cold agglutinins was found. Lymphomas, systemic lupus erythematosus, and tumors were excluded. She conceived again. Due to the anemia she had frequent blood transfusions and she delivered at 38 weeks of gestation. PMID:16854701

  1. Anemia management trends in patients on peritoneal dialysis in the past 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huaye; Yao, Yao; Cao, Yanpei; Yang, Xiaoli; Huang, Bihong; Han, Xin; Ren, Chong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to investigate anemia management trends in patients on peritoneal dialysis in Huashan Hospital in the past 10 years. Methods: A total of 463 cases of patients receiving peritoneal dialysis from July 2004 to March 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. The patients enrolled in this study all were elder than 18 years old, those who had been followed up for at least 1 quarter. Clinical data of anemia including hemoglobin, serum iron, iron saturation, dosage of erythropoietin (EPO) and iron supplements were collected quarterly and then analyzed those data. Results: In the first period of 25 quarters, in a certain range, increased dose of erythropoietin and iron content, can make the patient’s hemoglobin gradually increased to the ideal level, which helps to treat the symptoms of anemia patients. Results of comparation before and after the education program showed that with the enhance the EPO injection compliance and treat anemia with the proper dose of EPO, the PD patients have stable level of Hemoglobin, accompanying with the decreased dose of oral Iron and intravenous iron. Conclusion: It was shown that hemoglobin value was constantly stable. Treat anemia with proper dose of EPO individually could cure anemia effectively with the reducing of iron supplement improvement peritoneal dialysis patients’ anemia related knowledge, and the good compliance of injection of EPO, serum iron and iron saturation could still keep stable, although declined intake of iron supplements. Therefore, optimizing anemia management in peritoneal dialysis patients is helpful to improve their quality of life. PMID:26770400

  2. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: A neglected issue with relevant effects

    PubMed Central

    Guagnozzi, Danila; Lucendo, Alfredo J

    2014-01-01

    Anemia, a common complication associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is frequently overlooked in the management of IBD patients. Unfortunately, it represents one of the major causes of both decreased quality of life and increased hospital admissions among this population. Anemia in IBD is pathogenically complex, with several factors contributing to its development. While iron deficiency is the most common cause, vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiencies, along with the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines, hemolysis, drug therapies, and myelosuppression, have also been identified as the underlying etiology in a number of patients. Each of these etiological factors thus needs to be identified and corrected in order to effectively manage anemia in IBD. Because the diagnosis of anemia in IBD often presents a challenge, combinations of several hematimetric and biochemical parameters should be used. Recent studies underscore the importance of determining the ferritin index and hepcidin levels in order to distinguish between iron deficiency anemia, anemia due to chronic disease, or mixed anemia in IBD patients. With regard to treatment, the newly introduced intravenous iron formulations have several advantages over orally-administered iron compounds in treating iron deficiency in IBD. In special situations, erythropoietin supplementation and biological therapies should be considered. In conclusion, the management of anemia is a complex aspect of treating IBD patients, one that significantly influences the prognosis of the disease. As a consequence, its correction should be considered a specific, first-line therapeutic goal in the management of these patients. PMID:24707137

  3. Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Anemia in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yen, Chia-Feng; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chien, Wu-Chien; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Chia-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is known to be a significant public health problem in many countries. Most of the available information is incomplete or limited to special groups such as people with intellectual disability. The present study aims to provide the information of anemia prevalence and associated risk factors of children and adolescents with intellectual

  4. A Group Counseling Approach for Persons Who Work With Sickle Cell Anemia Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvin, Richmond

    Although many workshops on sickle cell anemia have been held, it is still difficult to implement a comprehensive training program for sickle cell anemia clients in many communities. Research data on the topic are somewhat nebulous and insufficient political and social pressure have been exerted to change attitudes and take action towards the

  5. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: a neglected issue with relevant effects.

    PubMed

    Guagnozzi, Danila; Lucendo, Alfredo J

    2014-04-01

    Anemia, a common complication associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is frequently overlooked in the management of IBD patients. Unfortunately, it represents one of the major causes of both decreased quality of life and increased hospital admissions among this population. Anemia in IBD is pathogenically complex, with several factors contributing to its development. While iron deficiency is the most common cause, vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiencies, along with the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines, hemolysis, drug therapies, and myelosuppression, have also been identified as the underlying etiology in a number of patients. Each of these etiological factors thus needs to be identified and corrected in order to effectively manage anemia in IBD. Because the diagnosis of anemia in IBD often presents a challenge, combinations of several hematimetric and biochemical parameters should be used. Recent studies underscore the importance of determining the ferritin index and hepcidin levels in order to distinguish between iron deficiency anemia, anemia due to chronic disease, or mixed anemia in IBD patients. With regard to treatment, the newly introduced intravenous iron formulations have several advantages over orally-administered iron compounds in treating iron deficiency in IBD. In special situations, erythropoietin supplementation and biological therapies should be considered. In conclusion, the management of anemia is a complex aspect of treating IBD patients, one that significantly influences the prognosis of the disease. As a consequence, its correction should be considered a specific, first-line therapeutic goal in the management of these patients. PMID:24707137

  6. "Untangling Sickle-Cell Anemia and the Teaching of Heterozygote Protection"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Eric Michael

    2007-01-01

    Introductory biology textbooks often use the example of sickle-cell anemia to illustrate the concept of heterozygote protection. Ordinarily scientists expect the frequency of a gene associated with a debilitating illness would be low owing to its continual elimination by natural selection. The gene that causes sickle-cell anemia, however, has a…

  7. Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Anemia in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yen, Chia-Feng; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chien, Wu-Chien; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Chia-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is known to be a significant public health problem in many countries. Most of the available information is incomplete or limited to special groups such as people with intellectual disability. The present study aims to provide the information of anemia prevalence and associated risk factors of children and adolescents with intellectual…

  8. A Group Counseling Approach for Persons Who Work With Sickle Cell Anemia Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvin, Richmond

    Although many workshops on sickle cell anemia have been held, it is still difficult to implement a comprehensive training program for sickle cell anemia clients in many communities. Research data on the topic are somewhat nebulous and insufficient political and social pressure have been exerted to change attitudes and take action towards the…

  9. "Untangling Sickle-Cell Anemia and the Teaching of Heterozygote Protection"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Eric Michael

    2007-01-01

    Introductory biology textbooks often use the example of sickle-cell anemia to illustrate the concept of heterozygote protection. Ordinarily scientists expect the frequency of a gene associated with a debilitating illness would be low owing to its continual elimination by natural selection. The gene that causes sickle-cell anemia, however, has a

  10. Socio-Ecological Factors Affecting Pregnant Women's Anemia Status in Freetown, Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    M'Cormack, Fredanna; Drolet, Judy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sierra Leone has high maternal mortality. Socio-ecological factors are considered contributing factors to this high mortality. Anemia is considered to be a direct cause of 4% of maternal deaths and an indirect cause of 20-40% of maternal deaths. Purpose: The current study explores socio-ecological contributing factors to the anemia

  11. [Sickle cell anemia causes varied symptoms and high morbidity. Serious prognosis in the most common genetic disease in the world].

    PubMed

    Kjellander, Christian; Sennström, Maria K B; Stiller, Viveka; Ågren, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a life-threatening disease, and the most common genetic disease in the world. The prevalence of sickle cell anemia in Sweden is unknown. Sickle cell anemia is an important disease, because of its variable complications, in many medical and surgical specialties. The overview highlights common medical problems encountered in sickle cell anemia presented through a case report of a pregnant woman. PMID:25734427

  12. Burden of anemia in patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis in French secondary care

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Arthritic disorders can be the cause of hospitalizations, especially among individuals 60 years and older. The objective of this study is to investigate associations between health care resource utilization in arthritis patients with and without concomitant anemia in a secondary care setting in France. Methods This retrospective cohort study utilized data on secondary care activity in 2001 from the Programme de Médicalisation des Systèmes d'Information database. Two cohorts were defined using ICD-10 codes: patients with an arthritis diagnosis with a concomitant diagnosis of anemia; and arthritis patients without anemia. Health care resource utilization for both populations was analyzed separately in public and private hospitals. Study outcomes were compared between the cohorts using standard bivariate and multivariable methods. Results There were 300,865 hospitalizations for patients with arthritis only, and 2,744 for those with concomitant anemia. Over 70% of patients with concomitant anemia were in public hospitals, compared with 53.5% of arthritis-only patients. Arthritis patients without anemia were younger than those with concomitant anemia (mean age 66.7 vs 74.6, public hospitals; 67.1 vs 72.2, private hospitals). Patients with concomitant anemia/arthritis only had a mean length of stay of 11.91 (SD 14.07)/8.04 (SD 9.93) days in public hospitals, and 10.68 (SD 10.16)/9.83 (SD 7.76) days in private hospitals. After adjusting for confounders, the mean (95% CI) additional length of stay for arthritis patients with concomitant anemia, compared with those with arthritis only, was 1.56 (1.14-1.98) days in public and 0.69 (0.22-1.16) days in private hospitals. Costs per hospitalization were €;480 (227-734) greater for arthritis patients with anemia in public hospitals, and €;30 (-113-52) less in private hospitals, than for arthritis-only patients. Conclusions Arthritis patients with concomitant anemia have a longer length of stay, undergo more procedures, and have higher hospitalization costs than nonanemic arthritis patients in public hospitals in France. In private hospitals, concomitant anemia was associated with modest increases in length of stay and number of procedures; however, this did not translate into higher costs. Such evidence of anemia-related health care utilization and costs can be considered as a proxy for the clinical significance of anemia. PMID:20796267

  13. [Anemia and iron deficiency in the elderly. Prevalence, diagnostics and new therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Röhrig, G; Doehner, W; Schaefer, R M; Schulz, R J

    2012-04-01

    The prevalence of anemia in geriatric patients is high. With some variation in different patient cohorts, prevalence of anemia can reach 40%. Anemia is not an age-related disease on its own, but is a symptom with multifactorial genesis and high risk potential. It directly influences mortality, morbidity, and the rate of hospitalization, particularly in older patients suffering from chronic heart failure or chronic kidney disease. The high prevalence of anemia in chronic kidney disease is explained by a combination of erythropoietin and iron deficiency. This review summarizes the recommendations of the iron symposium at the 2010 German Geriatric Society Meeting in Potsdam, Germany. It intends to provide current information on prevalence, diagnostic work-up, and therapeutic options for anemia in the rapidly growing group of elderly patients. PMID:22454095

  14. Dramatic remission of anemia after thymectomy in a patient of idiopathic myelofibrosis with thymoma.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ying-Yih; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Yang, Ching-Fen; Wu, Yu-Chung; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye

    2008-01-01

    Anemia is one of the characteristics of idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF), and malignant thymoma is usually associated with various hematologic disorders, including anemia, pancytopenia, and hypogammaglobulinemia. However, the relationship between IMF and malignant thymoma has not been published before. Here, we report a 48-year-old woman who was initially diagnosed of IMF with severe anemia and transfusion dependent. Five years later, malignant thymoma was found when she was examined for chronic cough. After performing extended thymectomy, her anemia dramatically recovered to normal and sustained for 2 years till last follow-up. Her splenomegaly and myelofibrosis were also improved. We hypothesized that her malignant thymoma induced the progression of IMF, especially in anemia. PMID:18224414

  15. The first report of cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia in an adolescent with prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Gürbüz, Fatih; Yağcı-Küpeli, Begül; Kör, Yılmaz; Yüksel, Bilgin; Zorludemir, Suzan; Gürbüz, Berrak Bilginer; Küpeli, Serhan

    2014-01-01

    Prolactinomas are common pituitary tumors that can cause gonadal dysfunction and infertility related to hyperprolactinemia. Dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment in these patients. Cabergoline leads to significant reduction in serum prolactin levels and tumor size in patients with prolactinoma. Dopamine agonists have been associated with adverse effects such as nausea, vomiting and psychosis. We report here a case with cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia. The patient had cabergoline treatment history for prolactinoma and presented with weakness, fatigue, nausea, and paleness. Laboratory findings revealed severe anemia-related immune hemolysis. There were no causes identified to explain hemolytic anemia except cabergoline. Therefore, cabergoline therapy was stopped and subsequently hemolytic anemia resolved and did not occur again. This is the first reported pediatric case with prolactinoma and cabergoline-induced hemolytic anemia. Clinicians should be watchful for this rare side effect induced by cabergoline. PMID:23945126

  16. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:27081450

  17. The prevalence and clinical characteristics of anemia in Korean patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Sung; Bang, Ki Bae; Kim, Ji Yeon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik; Choi, Kyu Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Quality of life is closely related to anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several studies have reported on anemia in patients with IBD in Western countries. This study investigated the prevalence and clinical characteristics of anemia in Korean patients with IBD. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 92 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 76 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) who were followed regularly at a single tertiary medical center in Korea between January 2003 and December 2012. Hemoglobin (Hb) thresholds used to define anemia were <13.0 g/dL in men and <12.0 g/dL in women according to the World Health Organization criteria. We chose the lowest Hb level in each year as a representative value because Hb levels changed at each examination and anemia was associated with disease deterioration. The relationship between clinical variables and lowest Hb level was assessed. Results The prevalence of anemia was 36.3% in patients with UC and 41.6% in patients with CD. Anemia in patients with CD was associated with hospital admission, 5-aminosalicylate (5-ASA) and infliximab treatment in men. Anemia in patients with UC was associated with hospital admission, oral steroid use, thiopurine and infliximab treatment in men. Conclusions The prevalence of anemia in Korean patients with IBD was comparable to that of patients in Western countries. Anemia was associated with male patients with CD who were admitted to the hospital and received medications including 5-ASA and infliximab, and men with UC who were admitted to the hospital and received medications including oral steroids, thiopurine and infliximab. PMID:26884734

  18. Underlying Factors Associated with Anemia in Amazonian Children: A Population-Based, Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Marly A.; Scopel, Kézia K.G.; Muniz, Pascoal T.; Villamor, Eduardo; Ferreira, Marcelo U.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although iron deficiency is considered to be the main cause of anemia in children worldwide, other contributors to childhood anemia remain little studied in developing countries. We estimated the relative contributions of different factors to anemia in a population-based, cross-sectional survey. Methodology We obtained venous blood samples from 1111 children aged 6 months to 10 years living in the frontier town of Acrelândia, northwest Brazil, to estimate the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency by measuring hemoglobin, erythrocyte indices, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, and C-reactive protein concentrations. Children were simultaneously screened for vitamin A, vitamin B12, and folate deficiencies; intestinal parasite infections; glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency; and sickle cell trait carriage. Multiple Poisson regression and adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were used to describe associations between anemia and the independent variables. Principal Findings The prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency, and iron-deficiency anemia were 13.6%, 45.4%, and 10.3%, respectively. Children whose families were in the highest income quartile, compared with the lowest, had a lower risk of anemia (aPR, 0.60; 95%CI, 0.37–0.98). Child age (<24 months, 2.90; 2.01–4.20) and maternal parity (>2 pregnancies, 2.01; 1.40–2.87) were positively associated with anemia. Other associated correlates were iron deficiency (2.1; 1.4–3.0), vitamin B12 (1.4; 1.0–2.2), and folate (2.0; 1.3–3.1) deficiencies, and C-reactive protein concentrations (>5 mg/L, 1.5; 1.1–2.2). Conclusions Addressing morbidities and multiple nutritional deficiencies in children and mothers and improving the purchasing power of poorer families are potentially important interventions to reduce the burden of anemia. PMID:22574149

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of sideroblastic anemias: from defective heme synthesis to abnormal RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Malcovati, Luca

    2015-12-01

    The sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of inherited and acquired disorders characterized by the presence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is caused by germline mutations in ALAS2. Hemizygous males have a hypochromic microcytic anemia, which is generally mild to moderate and is caused by defective heme synthesis and ineffective erythropoiesis. XLSA is a typical iron-loading anemia; although most patients are responsive to pyridoxine, treatment of iron overload is also important in the management of these patients. Autosomal recessive sideroblastic anemia attributable to mutations in SLC25A38, a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, is a severe disease: patients present in infancy with microcytic anemia, which soon becomes transfusion dependent. Conservative therapy includes regular red cell transfusion and iron chelation, whereas allogenic stem cell transplantation represents the only curative treatment. Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) is a myelodysplastic syndrome characterized mainly by anemia attributable to ineffective erythropoiesis. The clinical course of RARS is generally indolent, but there is a tendency to worsening of anemia over time, so that most patients become transfusion dependent in the long run. More than 90% of these patients carry somatic mutations in SF3B1, a gene encoding a core component of the RNA splicing machinery. These mutations cause misrecognition of 3' splice sites in downstream genes, resulting in truncated gene products and/or decreased expression attributable to nonsense-mediated RNA decay; this explains the multifactorial pathogenesis of RARS. Variants of RARS include refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia and ring sideroblasts, and RARS associated with marked thrombocytosis; these variants involve additional genetic lesions. Inhibitors of molecules of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily have been shown recently to target ineffective erythropoiesis and ameliorate anemia both in animal models of myelodysplastic syndrome and in RARS patients. PMID:26637696

  20. The prevalence of nutritional anemia in pregnancy in an east Anatolian province, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anemia is considered a severe public health problem by World Health Organization when anemia prevalence is equal to or greater than 40% in the population. The purpose of this study was to determine the anemia prevalence with the associated factors in pregnant women and to determine the serum iron, folate and B12 vitamin status in anaemic pregnants in Malatya province. Methods This is a cross-sectional survey. A multi-sage stratified probability-proportional-to-size cluster sampling methodology was used. A total of 823 pregnant women from sixty clusters were studied. Women were administered a questionnaire related with the subject and blood samples were drawn. Total blood count was performed within four hours and serum iron, folate and B12 vitamin were studied after storing sera at -20 C for six months. Results Anemia prevalence was 27.1% (Hb < 11.0 gr/dl). Having four or more living children (OR = 2.2), being at the third trimester (OR = 2.3) and having a low family income (OR = 1.6) were determined as the independent predictors of anemia in pregnancy. Anemia was also associated with soil eating (PICA) in the univariate analysis (p < 0.05). Of anaemic women, 50.0% had a transferrin saturation less than 10% indicating iron deficiency, 34.5% were deficient in B12 vitamin and 71.7% were deficient in folate. Most of the anemias were normocytic-normochromic (56.5%) indicating mixed anemia. Conclusions In Malatya, for pregnant women anemia was a moderate public health problem. Coexisting of iron, folate and B vitamin deficiencies was observed among anaemics. To continue anemia control strategies with reasonable care and diligence was recommended. PMID:20537176

  1. Anemia prevalence and treatment practice in patients with non-myeloid tumors receiving chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Merlini, Laura; Cartenì, Giacomo; Iacobelli, Stefano; Stelitano, Caterina; Airoldi, Mario; Balcke, Peter; Keil, Felix; Haslbauer, Ferdinand; Belton, Laura; Pujol, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the prevalence and management of anemia in cancer patients. Methods This cross-sectional, observational survey was conducted in Italy and Austria. Centers prespecified one day, during a 4-month enrollment window, to report specific data collected during normal clinical practice for patients with non-myeloid tumors attending for chemotherapy (±radiotherapy) treatment. The primary endpoint was the prevalence of anemia as determined using a prespecified algorithm: hemoglobin (Hb) ≤10 g/dL on/within 3 days prior to visit; ongoing anemia treatment; physician diagnosis of anemia, together with ≥1 anemia symptom. Results Between November 18, 2010 and March 18, 2011, data for 1412 patients were collected (Italy n = 1130; Austria n = 282). Most patients (n = 1136; 80%) had solid tumors; 809 (57%) had received ≤3 chemotherapy cycles. The prevalence of anemia was 32% (95% confidence interval: 29.4%–34.2%); 196 patients (14%) were deemed anemic based on Hb ≤10 g/dL, 131 (9%) on ongoing anemia treatment, and 121 (9%) on physician diagnosis/anemia symptom. Overall, 1153 patients (82%) had Hb data; mean (standard deviation [SD]) Hb levels were 11.7 (1.7) g/dL. In total, 456 patients (32%) had anemia symptoms: fatigue (n = 392; 28%), depression (n = 122; 9%), and dyspnea (n = 107; 8%) were most common. Fifty-one patients (4%) had had their current chemotherapy cycle delayed due to anemia. On visit day, or ≤28 days prior, 91 (6%), 188 (13%), and 81 patients (6%) had evidence of whole blood/red blood cell transfusion, erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use, or iron use, respectively. Conclusion On the prespecified study day, one-third of patients with non-myeloid tumors undergoing chemotherapy were found to be anemic and 13% had evidence of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use then or in the 28 days prior. PMID:23946669

  2. [Molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of Diamond-Blackfan anemia].

    PubMed

    Toki, Tsutomu; Ito, Etsuro

    2015-07-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare congenital bone marrow failure syndrome, characterized by red blood cell aplasia. Macrocytic anemia is a prominent feature of DBA but the disease is also characterized by growth retardation and congenital anomalies that are present in approximately 40% of affected patients. DBA is associated with single, monoallelic, inactivating mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes. In DBA, mutations or large deletions in RP genes include RPS7, RPS10, RPS17, RPS19, RPS24, RPS26, RPL5, RPL11, RPL26 and RPL35A. These mutations have been reported in up to 60% of DBA patients. To date, no known pathogenic mutations have been found in the remaining patients. In an effort to identify new mutations responsible for DBA, we performed whole-exome sequencing analysis of 48 patients with no documented mutations/deletions in our first screening and identified a de novo splicing error mutation in RPL27 and a frameshift deletion in RPS27 in sporadic patients with DBA. In vitro knockdown of the gene expression disturbed pre-ribosomal RNA processing. Zebrafish models of rpl27 and rps27 mutations showed impairments of erythrocyte production and tail and/or brain development. In this report, we also discuss current knowledge regarding pathways from the impairment of ribosomal biogenesis to the pathology of DBA. PMID:26251151

  3. Helicobacter pylori Infection and Anemia in Taiwanese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Hsiang-Yao; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Wang, Sophie S. W.; Liu, Yi-Chang; Wu, Meng-Chieh; Chiu, Guei-Fen; Chang, Pi-Yu; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Hsieh, Ming-Chia

    2013-01-01

    Background. Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) are common in adults. Although the most common causes of IDA usually arise from the gastrointestinal tract, the association between chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and anemia remains unclear. Aim. To evaluate the association of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and IDA. Materials and Methods. We enrolled 882 patients from January 2010 to April 2013. The status of Helicobacter pylori (H.p) infection was confirmed and blood samples from the same participants were taken on the same day to check the level of hemoglobin, serum iron, ferritin, and total iron-binding capacity (TIBC). Results. No significant difference was noted from the demographic data. The average level of hemoglobin (Hb) was not different between negative and positive groups, pos 13.57 g/dL versus neg 13.65 g/dL (P = 0.699). Although the levels of serum IDA related parameters were expected in positive group (lower serum iron and ferritin and higher TIBC) these differences did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.824 for iron, P = 0.360 for ferritin, and P = 0.252 for TIBC). Conclusion. Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is not attributed to IDA. The levels of hemoglobin, serum iron and ferritin, and TIBC remain unaffected after chronic H.p infection. Large-scale clinical studies are needed to prove the association. PMID:24348534

  4. New Treatment Approaches for the Anemia of CKD.

    PubMed

    Bonomini, Mario; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Sirolli, Vittorio; Locatelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Normocytic normochromic anemia is a common complication in chronic kidney disease and is associated with many adverse clinical consequences. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and adjuvant iron therapy represent the primary treatment for anemia in chronic kidney disease. The introduction of ESAs into clinical practice was a success story, mediating an increase in hemoglobin concentrations without the risk for recurrent blood transfusions and improving quality of life substantially. However, recombinant ESAs are still expensive and require a parenteral route of administration. Moreover, concern has arisen following randomized clinical trials showing that higher hemoglobin targets and/or high ESA doses may cause significant harm. This, together with changes in ESA reimbursement policy in some countries, has resulted in a significant reduction in ESA prescribing and the hemoglobin level targeted during therapy. Several attempts are being made to develop new drugs with improved characteristics and/or easier manufacturing processes compared with currently available ESAs, including new treatment approaches that may indirectly improve erythropoiesis. We give an update on the new investigational strategies for increasing erythropoiesis, examining in depth their characteristics and possible advantages in the clinical setting and the caveats to be aware of at the present stage of development. PMID:26372086

  5. Endocrine Disorders in Fanconi Anemia: Recommendations for Screening and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kanakatti Shankar, Roopa; Giri, Neelam; Hollenberg, Anthony N.; Rutter, Meilan M.; Nathan, Brandon; Lodish, Maya; Alter, Blanche P.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Endocrine problems are common in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA). About 80% of children and adults with FA have at least one endocrine abnormality, including short stature, GH deficiency, abnormal glucose or insulin metabolism, dyslipidemia, hypothyroidism, pubertal delay, hypogonadism, or impaired fertility. The goal of this report is to provide an overview of endocrine abnormalities and guidelines for routine screening and treatment to allow early diagnosis and timely intervention. Evidence Acquisition: This work is based on a comprehensive literature review, including relevant articles published between 1971 and 2014, and proceedings of a Consensus Conference held by the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund in 2013. Evidence Synthesis: The panel of experts collected published evidence and discussed its relevance to reflect current information about the endocrine care of children and adults with FA before the Consensus Conference and through subsequent deliberations that led to the consensus. Conclusions: Individuals with FA should be routinely screened for endocrine abnormalities, including evaluation of growth; glucose, insulin, and lipid metabolism; thyroid function; puberty; gonadal function; and bone mineral metabolism. Inclusion of an endocrinologist as part of the multidisciplinary patient care team is key to providing comprehensive care for patients with FA. PMID:25575015

  6. How we diagnose and treat iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Michael; Adamson, John W

    2016-01-01

    It is estimated that one-third of the world's population is anemic, the majority being due to iron deficiency (ID). In adults, ID is associated with fatigue in the absence of anemia, restless legs syndrome, pica and, in neonates, delayed growth and development. In adolescents, ID is associated with decrements in learning and behavioral abnormalities. In the absence of a clear cause, search for a source of bleeding is indicated. No single test is diagnostic of ID unless the serum ferritin is low or the percent transferrin saturation is low with an elevated total iron binding capacity. Oral iron is considered front line therapy except for conditions such as gastric bypass, heavy uterine bleeding, inflammatory bowel disease, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Oral iron has many unpleasant side effects, resulting in low patient adherence. For patients intolerant of, or unresponsive to, oral iron, intravenous (IV) administration is the preferred route. While early formulations were associated with a high incidence of serious adverse events (SAEs), newer formulations are much safer with SAEs occurring very infrequently. Full replacement doses can be administered in a matter of minutes to a few hours. Nevertheless, there remains a reluctance to use IV iron due to a misunderstanding of the safety of the available formulations. IV iron is safe and effective in all clinical circumstances including pregnancy. The preponderance of published evidence suggests IV iron therapy is underutilized and we believe that IV iron should be moved forward in the treatment of ID and iron deficiency anemia (IDA). PMID:26408108

  7. Anemia induced by high zinc intake in chicks: Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pimentel, J.L.; Greger, J.L.; Cook, M.E. )

    1991-03-15

    The mechanisms by which excess Zn induced anemia in chickens was assessed in 8 studies in which chicks were randomly assigned to a 2 {times} 2 factorial arrangement of treatments with 60 or 2,000 {mu}g Zn and 10 or 250 {mu}g Cu/g diet. Less Fe-59 appeared in the plasma 1 hour after a labeled meal when chicks were fed excess Zn in 1 of 2 studies but less Fe-59 appeared in livers of chicks fed excess Zn in both studies. The decrease of Fe-59 uptake into tissues paralleled a decrease in Fe concentrations in livers and tibiotarsi. These differences in tissue Fe did not reflect differences in Fe excretion because excretion and incorporation into tissues of injected Fe-59 was not affected by high Zn intake. Although excess Zn decreased tissue Cu concentrations, excess Zn, per se, did not affect cytosolic superoxide dismutase activity, the in vivo t 1/2 of erythrocytes, or erythrocyte hemolysis in vitro. The decrease in body weight of chicks fed excess Zn indicated that protein synthesis and/or degradation could be affected. Increased incorporation of C-14 tyrosine into liver and bone marrow of chicks fed excess Zn suggested increased protoporphyrin synthesis or metallothionein synthesis. These results indicated that decreased Fe absorption was the primary mechanism by which excess Zn induced anemia.

  8. Autoantibody to the gastrin receptor in pernicious anemia

    SciTech Connect

    de Aizpurua, H.J.; Ungar, B.; Toh, B.H.

    1985-08-22

    The authors examined serum IgG fractions from 20 patients with pernicious anemia and 25 control subjects for their capacity to inhibit binding of (/sup 125/I)15-leu human gastrin-17 to parietal-cell-enriched gastric mucosal cells. IgG fractions from six patients reduced gastrin binding by 45.6 +/- 12.2 per cent, as compared with a reduction of 1.8 +/- 0.7 per cent by fractions from the 25 controls. The fractions from these six patients also reduced gastrin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake by gastric cells (an index of gastric acid secretory activity in vitro) by 50.2 +/- 8.4 per cent (mean +/- S.D.), as compared with 9.2 +/- 4.1 per cent for the controls. IgG fractions from six other patients that did not reduce gastrin binding also inhibited gastrin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake, by 48.1 +/- 9.1 per cent. These reductions in gastrin binding and aminopyrine uptake were abolished by absorption of the IgG fractions with suspensions of viable gastric mucosal cells but not by absorption with liver or kidney cells. The IgG fractions did not inhibit (/sup 3/H)histamine binding or histamine-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake. These results suggest that serum IgG from some patients with pernicious anemia contains autoantibodies to the gastrin receptor.

  9. Fanconi Anemia Proteins Function in Mitophagy and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Sumpter, Rhea; Sirasanagandla, Shyam; Fernández, Álvaro F; Wei, Yongjie; Dong, Xiaonan; Franco, Luis; Zou, Zhongju; Marchal, Christophe; Lee, Ming Yeh; Clapp, D Wade; Hanenberg, Helmut; Levine, Beth

    2016-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway genes are important tumor suppressors whose best-characterized function is repair of damaged nuclear DNA. Here, we describe an essential role for FA genes in two forms of selective autophagy. Genetic deletion of Fancc blocks the autophagic clearance of viruses (virophagy) and increases susceptibility to lethal viral encephalitis. Fanconi anemia complementation group C (FANCC) protein interacts with Parkin, is required in vitro and in vivo for clearance of damaged mitochondria, and decreases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inflammasome activation. The mitophagy function of FANCC is genetically distinct from its role in genomic DNA damage repair. Moreover, additional genes in the FA pathway, including FANCA, FANCF, FANCL, FANCD2, BRCA1, and BRCA2, are required for mitophagy. Thus, members of the FA pathway represent a previously undescribed class of selective autophagy genes that function in immunity and organellar homeostasis. These findings have implications for understanding the pathogenesis of FA and cancers associated with mutations in FA genes. PMID:27133164

  10. Anemia after gastrectomy for early gastric cancer: Long-term follow-up observational study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Sang Woo; Kim, Won Chul; Kim, Jin Soo; Cho, Yu Kyung; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Song, Kyo-Young; Jeon, Hae Myung; Park, Cho-Hyun

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify the incidence and etiology of anemia after gastrectomy in patients with long-term follow-up after gastrectomy for early gastric cancer. METHODS: The medical records of those patients with early gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent curative gastrectomy between January 2006 and October 2007 were reviewed. Patients with anemia in the preoperative workup, cancer recurrence, undergoing systemic chemotherapy, with other medical conditions that can cause anemia, or treated during follow up with red cell transfusions or supplements for anemia were excluded. Anemia was defined by World Health Organization criteria (Hb < 12 g/dL in women and < 13 g/dL in men). Iron deficiency was defined as serum ferritin < 20 μg/dL. Vitamin B12 deficiency was defined as serum vitamin B12 < 200 pg/mL. Iron deficiency anemia was defined as anemia with concomitant iron deficiency. Anemia from vitamin B12 deficiency was defined as megaloblastic anemia (mean cell volume > 100 fL) with vitamin B12 deficiency. The profile of anemia over 48 mo of follow-up was analyzed. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-one patients with gastrectomy for early gastric cancer were analyzed. The incidence of anemia was 24.5% at 3 mo after surgery and increased up to 37.1% at 48 mo after surgery. The incidence of iron deficiency anemia increased during the follow up and became the major cause of anemia at 48 mo after surgery. Anemia of chronic disease and megaloblastic anemia were uncommon. The incidence of anemia in female patients was significantly higher than in male patients at 12 (40.0% vs 22.0%, P = 0.033), 24 (45.0% vs 25.0%, P = 0.023), 36 (55.0% vs 28.0%, P = 0.004), and 48 mo (52.0% vs 31.0%, P = 0.022) after surgery. Patients with total gastrectomy showed significantly higher incidence of anemia than patients with subtotal gastrectomy at 48 mo after surgery (60.7% vs 31.3%, P = 0.008). The incidence of iron deficiency was significantly higher in female patients than in male patients at 6 (35.4% vs 13.3%, P = 0.002), 12 (45.8% vs 16.8%, P < 0.001), 18 (52.1% vs 22.3%, P < 0.001), 24 (60.4% vs 20.9%, P < 0.001), 36 (62.5% vs 29.2%, P < 0.001), and 48 mo (66.7% vs 34.7%, P = 0.001) after surgery. CONCLUSION: Anemia was frequent after gastrectomy for early gastric cancer, with iron deficiency being the major cause. Evaluation for anemia including iron status should be performed after gastrectomy and appropriate iron replacement should be considered. PMID:23155340

  11. Anomalous cell surface structure of sickle cell anemia erythrocytes as demonstrated by cell surface labeling and endo-beta-galactosidase treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, M.; Fukuda, M.N.; Hakomori, S.; Papayannopoulou, T.

    1981-01-01

    Erythrocyte surface glycoproteins from patients with various types of sickle cell anemia have been analyzed and compared with those from normal individuals. By hemagglutination with various anti-carbohydrate antibodies, sickle cells showed profound increase of i antigens and moderate increase of GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 3 Glc structure, whereas antigenicity toward globosidic structure was unchanged. In parallel to these findings, erythrocytes of sickle cell patients have additional sialylated lactosaminoglycan in Band 3. Thus, it can be concluded that erythrocytes of sickle cell patients are characterized by an altered cell surface structure which does not appear to be due to topographical changes of cell surface membrane. It is possible that the anemia or the ''stress'' hematopoiesis in these patients is responsible for these changes.

  12. Small bowel diverticulitis with severe anemia and abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    De Minicis, Samuele; Antonini, Filippo; Belfiori, Valerio; Lo Cascio, Massimiliano; Marraccini, Barbara; Piergallini, Simona; Mosca, Piergiorgio; Macarri, Giampiero

    2015-05-16

    The current case report is related to a male patient with diabetes, obesity [body mass index (BMI) 33], hypertension and recurrence of anemia associated to melena and deep asthenia. M.P., a 60-year-old obese individual, was referred to our department by the primary care unit (PCU) of our hospital for severe anemia (Hemoglobin 6.5 g/dL) associated to episodes of melena and abdominal pain. In the past 5 mo the patient referred to the local hospital 3 times for episodes of melena (hemoglobin levels showed anemia 9.8 g/dL) but the main gastroenterological exams were completely negative (colonoscopy and gastroscopy). The PCU of our Hospital, after stabilization of the main parameters and blood transfusion for the low levels of hemoglobin, referred the patient to gastroenterologists: the patient was subjected to both colonoscopy and gastroscopy that were negative. Due to the condition of acute severe hemorrhage the patient, during the first 3 h from the access to the PCU, was subjected to arteriography that did not reveal any hemorrhagic foci or vascular alterations. The video capsule for the study of the small bowel showed the presence of blood beginning from the third portion of duodenum but deep gastroscopy did not reveal it. The patient was then subjected to double balloon endoscopy that revealed a severe diverticulosis of the small bowel with blood from the diverticula. The entero-tomografia computerizzata confirmed the diagnosis and revealed an extension of the diverticula for almost the entire small bowel (no diverticula in the colon). The patient was subjected to wide spectrum antibiotic therapy with resolution of the symptoms and stabilization of hemoglobin levels. The surgeon suggests no indication to surgery for the wide area involved from the disease and potential high risk of complication due to the high BMI. At home, the patient started a monthly therapy with rifaximin and probiotics associated to mesalazine. At present, after 12 mo from the last episode of hemorrhage, the patient is in good clinical condition, reduced his body weight of about 7 kg and the hemoglobin levels appear in slow progressive increase (last measurement 13.2 g/dL). PMID:25984521

  13. Small bowel diverticulitis with severe anemia and abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    De Minicis, Samuele; Antonini, Filippo; Belfiori, Valerio; Lo Cascio, Massimiliano; Marraccini, Barbara; Piergallini, Simona; Mosca, Piergiorgio; Macarri, Giampiero

    2015-01-01

    The current case report is related to a male patient with diabetes, obesity [body mass index (BMI) 33], hypertension and recurrence of anemia associated to melena and deep asthenia. M.P., a 60-year-old obese individual, was referred to our department by the primary care unit (PCU) of our hospital for severe anemia (Hemoglobin 6.5 g/dL) associated to episodes of melena and abdominal pain. In the past 5 mo the patient referred to the local hospital 3 times for episodes of melena (hemoglobin levels showed anemia 9.8 g/dL) but the main gastroenterological exams were completely negative (colonoscopy and gastroscopy). The PCU of our Hospital, after stabilization of the main parameters and blood transfusion for the low levels of hemoglobin, referred the patient to gastroenterologists: the patient was subjected to both colonoscopy and gastroscopy that were negative. Due to the condition of acute severe hemorrhage the patient, during the first 3 h from the access to the PCU, was subjected to arteriography that did not reveal any hemorrhagic foci or vascular alterations. The video capsule for the study of the small bowel showed the presence of blood beginning from the third portion of duodenum but deep gastroscopy did not reveal it. The patient was then subjected to double balloon endoscopy that revealed a severe diverticulosis of the small bowel with blood from the diverticula. The entero-tomografia computerizzata confirmed the diagnosis and revealed an extension of the diverticula for almost the entire small bowel (no diverticula in the colon). The patient was subjected to wide spectrum antibiotic therapy with resolution of the symptoms and stabilization of hemoglobin levels. The surgeon suggests no indication to surgery for the wide area involved from the disease and potential high risk of complication due to the high BMI. At home, the patient started a monthly therapy with rifaximin and probiotics associated to mesalazine. At present, after 12 mo from the last episode of hemorrhage, the patient is in good clinical condition, reduced his body weight of about 7 kg and the hemoglobin levels appear in slow progressive increase (last measurement 13.2 g/dL). PMID:25984521

  14. Determinants of Anemia and Hemoglobin Concentration in Haitian School-Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Iannotti, Lora L; Delnatus, Jacques R; Odom, Audrey R; Eaton, Jacob C; Griggs, Jennifer J; Brown, Sarah; Wolff, Patricia B

    2015-11-01

    Anemia diminishes oxygen transport in the body, resulting in potentially irreversible growth and developmental consequences for children. Limited evidence for determinants of anemia exists for school-aged children. We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial in Haiti from 2012 to 2013 to test the efficacy of a fortified school snack. Children (N = 1,047) aged 3-13 years were followed longitudinally at three time points for hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations, anthropometry, and bioelectrical impedance measures. Dietary intakes, infectious disease morbidities, and socioeconomic and demographic factors were collected at baseline and endline. Longitudinal regression modeling with generalized least squares and logit models with random effects identified anemia risk factors beyond the intervention effect. At baseline, 70.6% of children were anemic and 2.6% were severely anemic. Stunting increased the odds of developing anemia (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-2.08) and severe anemia (adjusted OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.30-4.71). Parent-reported vitamin A supplementation and deworming were positively associated with Hb concentrations, whereas fever and poultry ownership showed a negative relationship with Hb concentration and increased odds of severe anemia, respectively. Further research should explore the full spectrum of anemia etiologies in school children, including genetic causes. PMID:26350448

  15. Anemia and Feeding Practices among Infants in Rural Shaanxi Province in China

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Renfu; Shi, Yaojiang; Zhou, Huan; Yue, Ai; Zhang, Linxiu; Sylvia, Sean; Medina, Alexis; Rozelle, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most prevalent public health problems among infants and iron deficiency anemia has been related to many adverse consequences. The overall goal of this study is to examine the prevalence of anemia among infants in poor rural China and to identify correlates of anemia. In April 2013, we randomly sampled 948 infants aged 6–11 months living in 351 villages across 174 townships in nationally-designated poverty counties in rural areas of southern Shaanxi Province, China. Infants were administered a finger prick blood test for hemoglobin (Hb). Anthropometric measurement and household survey of demographic characteristics and feeding practices were conducted in the survey. We found that 54.3% of 6–11 month old infants in poor rural China are anemic, and 24.3% of sample infants suffer from moderate or severe anemia. We find that children still breastfed over 6 months of age had lower Hb concentrations and higher anemia prevalence than their non-breastfeeding counterparts (p < 0.01), and that children who had ever been formula-fed had significantly higher Hb concentrations and lower anemia prevalence than their non-formula-fed counterparts (p < 0.01). The results suggest the importance of iron supplementation or home fortification while breastfeeding. PMID:25533008

  16. Meta-analysis of Huangqi injection for the adjunctive therapy of aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changtai; Gao, Yulu; Jiang, Ting; Hao, Cao; Gao, Zongshuai; Sun, Yongning

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia therapy remains difficult, due to lack of effective treatment regimens. In recent years, Huangqi injection for the adjunctive therapy of aplastic anemia has been reported in many clinical trials. Considering that Huangqi injection may be a novel approach to aplastic anemia treatment, we conducted a meta-analysis of clinical controlled trials to assess the clinical value of Huangqi injection in the treatment of aplastic anemia. We searched the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Scientific Journals Full-text Database (VIP), Wanfang Database, PubMed and EMBASE database to collect the data about the trials of Huangqi injection combined with androgens for treating aplastic anemia. A total of ten studies involving 720 patients with aplastic anemia were included in this study. The meta-analysis showed significant increases in the pool effectiveness rate, white blood cells (WBC), haematoglobin (Hb), platelets (PLT), and reticulocytes (Ret) between the experimental group versus the control group. No severe side effects were found in this study. However, the lower Jadad scores and asymmetric funnel plot degrades the validity of the meta-analysis as the clinical evidence. Therefore, Huangqi injection may significantly enhance the efficacy of androgens for aplastic anemia, suggesting that the novel approach of Chinese traditional medicine combined with Western medicine is promising. The exact outcome required confirmation with rigorously well-designed multi-center trials. PMID:26379817

  17. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H.; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2014-01-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:25107891

  18. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H Joachim

    2014-12-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:25107891

  19. Iron deficiency anemia in a group of Turkish adolescents: frequency and contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Derman, Orhan; Okstüz-Kanbur, Nuray; Yenicesu, Idil; Klink, Ero

    2005-01-01

    Need for iron increases rapidly during adolescence. In girls, this is primarily due to the beginning of menstruation and dieting to loose weight, while in boys increased erythropoetic activity during pubertal period is the major cause. Between November 1999 and June 2000, 2,900 patients, between 9-17 years of age were screened for the presence of anemia in our Adolescent Outpatient Clinic. Tanner's scale of sexual maturation was used to categorize genital development. Those patients diagnosed with anemia were further examined for bone age, history of pica, parasitosis and gastrointestinal symptoms. Complete blood count showed anemia in 44 patients. Twenty one patients (15 girls and 6 boys) were diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia, 19 (15 girls and 4 boys) were diagnosed with anemia associated with infections, 3 (two girls and one boy) were carriers for beta-thalasemia and one girl had acute myeloblastic leukemia. Laboratory parameters alone were not enough in the diagnosis of iron deficiency, but age, sex, growth rate and sexual maturation stage in the pubertal period must be taken into consideration. We suggest that the reason for the lower rate of iron deficiency anemia in our patients, than expected for this age group, could be due to our patient population being more aware and careful about a balanced diet compared to the feeding behaviour of the general population in Turkey. Further studies that include lower socio-economic groups are necessary to conclude the prevalance of iron deficiency anemia among adolescents. PMID:15971737

  20. Malaria-Related Anemia in Patients from Unstable Transmission Areas in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Perez, Mary; Álvarez, Álvaro; Gutierrez, Juan B.; Moreno, Alberto; Herrera, Sócrates; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Information about the prevalence of malarial anemia in areas of low-malaria transmission intensity, like Latin America, is scarce. To characterize the malaria-related anemia, we evaluated 929 malaria patients from three sites in Colombia during 2011–2013. Plasmodium vivax was found to be the most prevalent species in Tierralta (92%), whereas P. falciparum was predominant in Tumaco (84%) and Quibdó (70%). Although severe anemia (hemoglobin < 7 g/dL) was almost absent (0.3%), variable degrees of non-severe anemia were observed in 36.9% of patients. In Tierralta, hemoglobin levels were negatively associated with days of illness. Moreover, in Tierralta and Quibdó, the number of previous malaria episodes and hemoglobin levels were positively associated. Both Plasmodium species seem to have similar potential to induce malarial anemia with distinct cofactors at each endemic setting. The target age in these low-transmission settings seems shifting toward adolescents and young adults. In addition, previous malaria experience seems to induce protection against anemia development. Altogether, these data suggest that early diagnosis and prompt treatment are likely preventing more frequent and serious malaria-related anemia in Colombia. PMID:25510719

  1. Anemia and feeding practices among infants in rural Shaanxi Province in China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Renfu; Shi, Yaojiang; Zhou, Huan; Yue, Ai; Zhang, Linxiu; Sylvia, Sean; Medina, Alexis; Rozelle, Scott

    2014-12-01

    Anemia is one of the most prevalent public health problems among infants and iron deficiency anemia has been related to many adverse consequences. The overall goal of this study is to examine the prevalence of anemia among infants in poor rural China and to identify correlates of anemia. In April 2013, we randomly sampled 948 infants aged 6-11 months living in 351 villages across 174 townships in nationally-designated poverty counties in rural areas of southern Shaanxi Province, China. Infants were administered a finger prick blood test for hemoglobin (Hb). Anthropometric measurement and household survey of demographic characteristics and feeding practices were conducted in the survey. We found that 54.3% of 6-11 month old infants in poor rural China are anemic, and 24.3% of sample infants suffer from moderate or severe anemia. We find that children still breastfed over 6 months of age had lower Hb concentrations and higher anemia prevalence than their non-breastfeeding counterparts (p < 0.01), and that children who had ever been formula-fed had significantly higher Hb concentrations and lower anemia prevalence than their non-formula-fed counterparts (p < 0.01). The results suggest the importance of iron supplementation or home fortification while breastfeeding. PMID:25533008

  2. Prevalence of Anemia and Its Risk Factors Among Lactating Mothers in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ai; Zhang, Yumei; Li, Bo; Wang, Peiyu; Li, Jiayin; Xue, Yong; Gao, Hongchong

    2014-01-01

    In Myanmar, 60% of the population consists of mothers and children, and they are the groups most vulnerable to anemia. The objectives of this study are to determine (1) the anemia prevalence among lactating women and (2) the risk factors associated with anemia. Convenience sampling was used to select three villages in two different regions (Kachin and Shan) in Myanmar. Hemoglobin and anthropometric indicators were measured for 733 lactating women. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with anemia. The anemia prevalence rate was 60.3% in lactating women, with 20.3% of lactating women having severe anemia. Factors of malnutrition (P = 0.026), self-reported symptoms of night blindness or poor dark adaptation (P < 0.001), lack of primary education experience (P < 0.001), low family annual capita income (< 800 MMK; P < 0.001), drinking spring or river water (P < 0.001), and drinking unboiled water (P = 0.016) were associated with anemia. To promote health in lactating women, a comprehensive intervention is needed in these regions. PMID:24639302

  3. Anemia and the Need for Intravenous Iron Infusion after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Kotkiewicz, Adam; Donaldson, Keri; Dye, Charles; Rogers, Ann M; Mauger, David; Kong, Lan; Eyster, M Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of anemia, iron deficiency, and the long-term need for IV iron following Roux-en-y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery has not been well characterized. Three-hundred and nineteen out of 904 consecutive subjects who underwent RYGB at Penn State Hershey Medical Center from 1999 to 2006 met the inclusion criteria for a preoperative complete blood count (CBC) and at least one CBC >6 months following surgery. Cumulative incidence of anemia 7 years post procedure was 58%. Menstruation status and presence of preoperative anemia were predictive of anemia by univariate analysis and multivariable Cox regression (P = 0.0014 and 0.044, respectively). Twenty-seven subjects, primarily premenopausal women, representing 8.5% of the cohort and 22% of the 122 anemic subjects, needed intravenous (IV) iron a mean of 51 months postoperatively for anemia unresponsive or refractory to oral iron. The risk for development of anemia necessitating IV iron therapy following RYGB is highest in menstruating women and continues to increase for many years, even in post-menopausal women. Well-designed prospective studies are needed to identify the incidence of iron deficiency anemia and the patient populations at increased risk for requiring IV iron replacement after RYGB surgery. PMID:26078589

  4. Skin and Mucosal Human Papillomavirus Seroprevalence in Persons with Fanconi Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Joseph J.; Stern, Joshua E.; Butsch Kovacic, Melinda S.; Mehta, Parinda A.; Sauter, Sharon L.; Galloway, Denise A.; Winer, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Persons with Fanconi anemia (FA) are at risk for human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers; however, their natural HPV exposure and infection rates are unknown as is the adequacy with which they mount antibodies to HPV vaccination. This study aimed to determine, in 62 persons with FA, the seroprevalence of skin and mucosal HPV types, the seroprevalence in individuals self-reporting a history of HPV vaccination, and the factors associated with HPV seropositivity. A bead Luminex assay was used to determine seropositivity for HPV1, -2, and -4 (low-risk skin), -6 and -11 (low-risk mucosal, included in one HPV vaccine), -16 and -18 (high-risk mucosal, included in both HPV vaccines), and -52 and -58 (high-risk mucosal). Health- and behavior-related questionnaires were completed. Type-specific seroprevalence estimates and participant characteristics associated with seroprevalence were calculated; 48% reported HPV vaccination. Type-specific seropositivity in unvaccinated persons ranged from 7 to 21% for skin HPV types and 7 to 38% for mucosal HPV types. Among the unvaccinated participants, adults versus children demonstrated increased HPV1, -6, -16, and -58 seroprevalence of 45% versus 6%, 64% versus 22%, 64% versus 17%, and 36% versus 0%, respectively (all P < 0.05). The vaccinated participants versus the nonvaccinated participants demonstrated increased seroprevalence of HPV6, -11, -16, and -18 of 92% versus 38%, 92% versus 24%, 96% versus 34%, and 75% versus 7%, respectively (all P < 0.0001). Our data demonstrate that the unvaccinated participants had serologic evidence of prior skin and mucosal HPV infections and that seroprevalence increased among adults; in self-reported vaccinees, seroprevalence of HPV vaccine types was 75 to 96%. PMID:25651924

  5. Elevated Hepcidin Is Part of a Complex Relation That Links Mortality with Iron Homeostasis and Anemia in Men and Women with HIV Infection123

    PubMed Central

    Minchella, Peter A; Armitage, Andrew E; Darboe, Bakary; Jallow, Momodou W; Drakesmith, Hal; Jaye, Assan; Prentice, Andrew M; McDermid, Joann M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early and chronic inflammation is a hallmark of HIV infection, and inflammation is known to increase hepcidin expression. Consequently, hepcidin may be a key determinant of the iron homeostasis and anemia associated with poorer HIV prognoses. Objective: The objective of this study was to understand how hepcidin is related to anemia, iron homeostasis, and inflammation at HIV diagnosis and to investigate associations between hepcidin and all-cause mortality in HIV infection. Methods: In a retrospective cohort, baseline plasma hepcidin was measured by competitive enzyme immunoassay within 3 mo of HIV diagnosis in 196 antiretroviral-naive Gambians. Iron homeostasis [hemoglobin, plasma transferrin, ferritin, iron, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR)] and inflammation [α1-antichymotrypsin (ACT)] from the same plasma sample were available, as were absolute CD4 cell counts, age, gender, body mass index (BMI), and HIV type. Results: Anemia was common across the spectrum of immunosuppression [CD4 cell counts (prevalence of anemia): >500 cells/μL (68%), 200–500 cells/μL (73%), and <200 cells/μL (89%); P = 0.032] and in men (81%) and women (76%). Increasing hepcidin was associated with iron homeostasis biomarkers (higher ferritin and lower transferrin, hemoglobin, and sTfR), inflammation (higher ACT), and key health indicators (lower CD4 or BMI, advancing age, and male gender; P < 0.001 except for hemoglobin, P = 0.021). Elevated hepcidin was associated with greater all-cause mortality in a dose-dependent manner [intermediate vs. lowest tertile: unadjusted HR (95% CI), 1.95 (1.22, 3.10); upper vs. lowest tertile: 3.02 (1.91, 4.78)]. Principal components analysis identified 2 patterns composed of hepcidin-ferritin-transferrin, with or without ACT, and iron-sTfR-hemoglobin that may distinguish inflammation and erythropoiesis iron functions. Conclusions: Elevated hepcidin is independently associated with greater mortality in men and women with HIV infection, and hepcidin is also part of a complex relation linking iron homeostasis, anemia, and HIV. Understanding the mechanisms and role of hepcidin modulation may further guide evidence-based interventions needed to counter detrimental iron homeostasis and anemia in HIV infection. PMID:25904736

  6. Epoetin alfa corrects anemia and improves quality of life in patients with hematologic malignancies receiving non-platinum chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Timothy J; Nortier, Johan; Rapoport, Bernardo; Pawlicki, Marek; de Wasch, Gilbert; Vercammen, Els; Schuette, Wolfgang; Wils, Jacques; Freund, Mathias

    2003-12-01

    Anemia, a commonly occurring morbidity in patients with cancer, often leads to diminished quality of life (QOL). Numerous clinical trials have shown that epoetin alfa treatment improves hematologic and QOL variables in cancer patients. The clinical trial analysis reported here was performed to assess response to epoetin alfa in patients with hematologic malignancies. Cancer patients with anemia undergoing non-platinum-based chemotherapy who were enrolled in a multinational, randomized (2:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled trial were prospectively stratified by tumor type (hematologic, solid). Efficacy endpoints included proportion of patients transfused after day 28; change in hemoglobin (Hb) level from baseline to last assessment; proportion of treatment responders (increase in Hb > or =2 g/dl unrelated to transfusion) and correctors (patients whose Hb levels reached > or =12 g/dl during the study); and QOL. The protocol was amended before unblinding to prospectively collect and assess survival data 12 months after the last patient completed the study, and survival for the full study cohort was estimated using Kaplan-Meier techniques. Efficacy analyses of hematologic and QOL variables, as well as Kaplan-Meier estimates of survival, were performed post hoc for the hematologic tumor stratum. Among patients with hematologic malignancies, the mean increase in Hb levels was greater with epoetin alfa than with placebo treatment (2.2 vs. 0.3 g/dl). Transfusion requirements were lower in patients who received epoetin alfa versus placebo (25.2 vs. 43.1%), and the proportion of responders and correctors was higher with epoetin alfa than with placebo (75.2 vs. 16.7% and 72.6 vs. 14.8%, respectively). Patients who received epoetin alfa had improved QOL while patients who received placebo had decreased QOL. These results are similar to those seen in the full study cohort, where differences between epoetin alfa and placebo were significant (P<0.05) for all five primary cancer- and anemia-specific QOL domains evaluated. Although the study was not powered for survival, Kaplan-Meier estimates showed a trend in overall survival favoring epoetin alfa in both the full study cohort and the hematologic subgroup. Epoetin alfa treatment was well tolerated. Epoetin alfa therapy increased Hb levels, reduced transfusion requirements, and improved QOL in patients with anemia undergoing non-platinum chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. PMID:14735555

  7. Clinical features and course of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts associated with marked thrombocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Broseus, Julien; Florensa, Lourdes; Zipperer, Esther; Schnittger, Susanne; Malcovati, Luca; Richebourg, Steven; Lippert, Eric; Cermak, Jaroslav; Evans, Jyoti; Mounier, Morgane; Raya, José Maria; Bailly, François; Gattermann, Norbert; Haferlach, Torsten; Garand, Richard; Allou, Kaoutar; Besses, Carlos; Germing, Ulrich; Haferlach, Claudia; Travaglino, Erica; Luno, Elisa; Pinan, Maria Angeles; Arenillas, Leonor; Rozman, Maria; Perez Sirvent, Maria Luz; Favre, Bernardine; Guy, Julien; Alonso, Esther; Ahwij, Nuhri; Jerez, Andrés; Hermouet, Sylvie; Maynadié, Marc; Cazzola, Mario; Girodon, François

    2012-01-01

    Background Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts associated with marked thrombocytosis was proposed as a provisional entity in the 2001 World Health Organization classification of myeloid neoplasms and also in the 2008 version, but its existence as a single entity is contested. We wish to define the clinical features of this rare myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm and to compare its clinical outcome with that of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and essential thrombocythemia. Design and Methods We conducted a collaborative retrospective study across Europe. Our database included 200 patients diagnosed with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and marked thrombocytosis. For each of these patients, each patient diagnosed with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts was matched for age and sex. At the same time, a cohort of 454 patients with essential thrombocythemia was used to compare outcomes of the two diseases. Results In patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and marked thrombocytosis, depending on the Janus Kinase 2 V617F mutational status (positive or negative) or platelet threshold (over or below 600×109/L), no difference in survival was noted. However, these patients had shorter overall survival and leukemia-free survival with a lower risk of thrombotic complications than did patients with essential thrombocythemia (P<0.001) but better survival (P<0.001) and a higher risk of thrombosis (P=0.039) than patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts. Conclusions The clinical course of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and marked thrombocytosis is better than that of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and worse than that of essential thrombocythemia. The higher risk of thrombotic events in this disorder suggests that anti-platelet therapy might be considered in this subset of patients. From a clinical point of view, it appears to be important to consider refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and marked thrombocytosis as a distinct entity. PMID:22532522

  8. [Obesity, overweight and anemia in children from a rural area of Lima, Peru].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Zúñiga, Milton J

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the association between anemia, overweight and obesity in a children population of a rural area in Lima.Demographic, anthropometric and hemoglobin information (from the Information System of Nutritional Status of Children, ISNSC, 2014, of schoolchildren 1-15 attending public schools under the Micro Red Pachacamac jurisdiction) were employed in a cross sectional design. Descriptive statistical and association analysis between anemia and nutritional status were carried out. Logistic regression was used to find significant variables associated to anemia.The prevalence of anemia was 10.8% (CI95% 9.5-12.0), overweight was 17.3% (CI95% 15.8-18.9) and 16.2% of children were obese (CI95% 14.7 - 17.7). No significant association between the diagnosis of anemia, overweight or obesity (chi2 = 1.68, p = 0.432) was found. However, there was an inverse significant association between the diagnosis of anemia and Body Mass Index (BMI) (z =-3.77, p = 0.000); and a higher level of hemoglobin among those over 12 y/o (ANOVA, F = 108.19, p = 0.006). In univariate analysis, only age (OR 1.14, IC95% 1.08-1.20) and IMC (OR 1.08, IC95% 1.04-1.13) were associated to anemia. There is no relationship between nutritional diagnosis of obesity, overweight and anemia in this population. However, children with older age and greater BMI were less likely to present anemia. Public policies in the last five years have focused on reducing this double nutritional problem in children. PMID:26707660

  9. Hepcidin and ferroportin expression in breast cancer tissue and serum and their relationship with anemia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, X.; Lu, Y.; Cheng, X.; Wang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our correlation study investigated the relationships of the expression of hepcidin and ferroportin (fpn) in tissues and serum from breast cancer (bca) patients and the relationships of hepcidin and fpn with anemia. Methods We used elisa and immunohistochemistry to detect the expression of hepcidin and fpn in tissue and serum from 62 individuals with bca, and we analyzed correlations between hepcidin and fpn expression in tissue and in serum. At the same time, we evaluated the relationships between hepcidin, fpn, and anemia. Results Mean serum hepcidin was 8.18 3.75 ?g/L in bca patients with anemia and 4.53 2.07?g/L in those without anemia, a statistically significant difference (t = 3.7090, p < 0.01). Mean serum fpn was obviously lower in the anemia group than in the non-anemia group (1.77 0.51 ?g/L vs. 2.46 0.52 ?g/L, t = 3.5115, p < 0.01). Serum hepcidin and hemoglobin were negatively correlated (r = ?0.502, p < 0.01); however, serum fpn was positively correlated with hemoglobin, and serum hepcidin was negatively correlated with fpn. The rates of hepcidin and fpn expression in bca tissues were 50.0% and 61.2% respectively, but no association with anemia was observed. We also observed no relationship between expression of hepcidin and fpn in serum and in tissue. Conclusions In bca patients, expression of hepcidin in serum was high, but expression of fpn was low, suggesting that serum hepcidin plays a major role in anemia in those patients. Expression of hepcidin and fpn in bca tissue showed no correlation with their expression in serum and no clear relationship with anemia.

  10. The impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on child’s health

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M.; Jan, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common, particularly in the developing world, reaching a state of global epidemic. Iron deficiency during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of anemia in infants and young children. Many women go through the entire pregnancy without attaining the minimum required intake of iron. This review aims to determine the impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on infants and young children. Extensive literature review revealed that iron deficiency is a global nutritional problem affecting up to 52% of pregnant women. Many of these women are symptomatic. Lack of proper weight gain during pregnancy is an important predictor of iron deficiency. PMID:25719576

  11. Periodontal disease and anemias associated with Crohn's disease. A case report.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, Swati; Acharya, Anirudh B; Thakur, Srinath L

    2012-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease with oral findings, including periodontal manifestations. Anemias, such as iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease (ACD), are the most common hematologic complications of CD. Periodontitis has systemic effects, and may tend toward anemia, which can be explained by depressed erythropoiesis. In the report presented here, the authors review a case of Crohn's disease diagnosed 10 years previous to the patient presenting with a changing anemic profile and periodontal disease. A discussion of patient and disease management is included. PMID:22685916

  12. [Management of renal anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: the role of the general practitioner].

    PubMed

    Ruedin, P; Dickenmann, M; Martin, P-Y; Wüthrich, R P

    2012-01-11

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high and diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of CKD. One of the most common complications of CKD is anemia, the frequency and severity of which increase as kidney failure progresses. Renal anemia is primarily caused by reduced renal erythropoietin production. It can also be associated with iron deficiency caused by reduced iron absorption, occult blood loss and impaired iron mobilization. This work provides an overview of the management of renal anemia with focus on intravenous iron therapy, which is more effective than oral iron administration in CKD due to reduced iron absorption. PMID:22303745

  13. Belgian recommendations for the management of anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Hindryckx, P; Amininejad, L; Van De Vijver, E; Bossuyt, P

    2014-09-01

    Anemia is the most common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) which, in most cases, results from an absolute or functional iron deficiency. Although anemia and iron deficiency may have a dramatic impact on the quality of life of IBD patients, they are underdiagnosed and undertreated. This paper provides evidence-based consensus guidelines and practical treatment algorithms that are directly applicable to the Belgian situation. In this way, the Belgian IBD research and development Group (BIRD) aims to increase awareness and knowledge among gastroenterologists in order to improve the management of anemia and iron deficiency in their IBD patients. PMID:25509205

  14. Anemia and transfusion in critically ill pediatric patients: a review of etiology, management, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sloniewsky, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    This article describes the incidence and etiology of anemia in critically ill children. In addition, the article details the pathophysiology and clinical ramifications of anemia in this population. The use of transfused packed red blood cells as a therapy for anemia in critically ill patients is also discussed, including the indications for and complications associated with this practice as well as potential reasons for these complications. Finally, the article lists some therapeutic practices that may lessen the risks associated with transfusion, and briefly discusses the use of blood substitutes. PMID:23537677

  15. Severity of Anemia among Children under 36 Months Old in Rural Western China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wenlong; Yan, Hong; DuolaoWang; Dang, Shaonong; Pei, Leilei

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe severity of anemia and explore its determinants among children under 36 months old in rural western China. Study Design The family information of 6711 children was collected and their hemoglobin was measured in 2005. A generalized estimated equation (GEE) linear model was used to identify the determinants of severity of childhood anemia. Results The prevalence of mild, moderate and severe anemia among these children was 27.4%, 21.9% and 3.2% respectively. GEE model analysis showed that province-level region and severity of maternal anemia affected the severity of childhood anemia not only in 0–5 months but also beyond 5 months. In addition, children aged 0–5 months in families using iron pot (coefficient = −0.26 95%CI −0.41,−0.12) had seldom more severe anemia, and children aged 6–36 months in families more than 4 members (coefficient = −0.03 95%CI −0.06,−0.01) or of Han ethnicity (coefficient = −0.08 95%CI −0.13,−0.04) seldom had more severe anemia but boys (coefficient = 0.03 95%CI 0.01,0.06) or younger children (6–11 month vs 30–36 month: coefficient = 0.23 95%CI 0.17, 0.28; 12–17 month vs 30–36 month: coefficient = 0.19 95%CI 0.15,0.24; 18–23 vs 30–36 month: coefficient = 0.09 95%CI 0.04,0.13) had more severe anemia. Conclusion The prevalence of moderate-to-severe anemia in these children was about 25%. Province-level region, iron pot use, family size, ethnicity, age and gender of children and severity of maternal anemia were important determinants of the severity of childhood anemia. These findings have some important implications for health policy decision for childhood anemia in rural western China. PMID:23626861

  16. Effect of anemia on tumor radiosensitivity under normo and hyperbaric conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rojas, A.; Stewart, F.A.; Smith, K.A.; Soranson, J.A.; Randhawa, V.S.; Stratford, M.R.; Denekamp, J.

    1987-11-01

    The effect of chronic anemia on tumor radiosensitivity in a murine tumor has been investigated. Anemia was induced by bilateral kidney irradiation given several months before tumor implantation. Anemic, anemic transfused, and normal non-anemic age-matched tumor bearing animals were irradiated with X rays (2 F/24 hr) either in air, air plus misonidazole, or under hyperbaric oxygen. The most resistant response was that of tumors grown in normal mice treated in air. Anemia produced an increase in radiosensitivity which was further enhanced by red blood cell replacement. The most sensitive overall response was seen in the anemic-transfused group treated with HBO.

  17. Iron Deficiency Anemia: Problems in Diagnosis and Prevention at the Population Level.

    PubMed

    Pasricha, Sant-Rayn; Drakesmith, Hal

    2016-04-01

    Anemia is common among people living in low- and middle-income countries, and alleviation of the global burden of anemia is an essential global health target over the next decade. Estimates have attributed about half the cases of anemia worldwide to iron deficiency; a range of other causes probably make a similar overall contribution. Individuals living in low-income settings experience a simultaneous high burden of infection with inflammation and iron deficiency. At least in children, iron supplementation exacerbates the risk of infection in both malaria-endemic and nonendemic low-income countries, whereas iron deficiency is protective against clinical and severe malaria. PMID:27040956

  18. Acute lung injury during antithymocyte globulin therapy for aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Goligher, Ewan Christopher; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine; Balter, Meyer; Gupta, Vikas; Brandwein, Joseph E

    2009-01-01

    The case of a 33-year-old man with aplastic anemia who experienced recurrent episodes of hypoxemia and pulmonary infiltrates during infusions of antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is described. With the use of high-dose corticosteroids, the patient’s original episodes resolved, and were subsequently prevented before additional administrations of ATG. Rare reports of an association between ATG and acute lung injury are found in the literature, but this is the first report of successful steroid-supported re-exposure. Although the mechanism of ATG-related acute lung injury remains uncertain, it may be parallel to the mechanism of transfusion-related acute lung injury because the pathogenesis of the latter relies, in part, on antileukocyte antibodies. ATG-related toxicity should be included in the differential diagnosis of new, infusion-associated pulmonary infiltrates, and corticosteroids may be a useful therapeutic consideration in the management. PMID:19399304

  19. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with TAFRO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Edahiro, Yoko; Ichikawa, Kunimoto; Sunami, Yoshitaka; Koike, Michiaki; Komatsu, Norio

    2015-11-01

    TAFRO syndrome is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by low platelet counts, anasarca, fever, reticulin fibrosis, renal dysfunction, and organomegaly. Patients with TAFRO syndrome occasionally have courses complicated by immunological diseases. Herein, we describe a case of TAFRO syndrome associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). The patient was admitted because of menorrhagia. She had thrombocytopenia, pleural effusion and ascites, hepatomegaly, and multiple lymphadenopathies. Her symptoms worsened, especially fever, pleural effusion and ascites, and she developed AIHA. Steroid pulse therapy followed by 45 mg of prednisolone (PSL) improved not only the symptoms of TAFRO syndrome but also those of AIHA. There have been no reports, to our knowledge, of AIHA associated with TAFRO syndrome, and detailed studies on this syndrome are needed. PMID:26666723

  20. Iron homeostasis and anemia markers in early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Pierre-Jean; Durigova, Anna; Jacot, William

    2014-07-01

    Iron plays a fundamental role in cell life and its concentration in living organisms is precisely regulated. Different molecules for iron storage and transport are used to maintain its intracellular homeostasis which is often altered in cancer cells. Specifically, recent studies have demonstrated that in breast cancer cells, the expression/activity of several iron-related proteins, such as ferritin, hepcidin and ferroportin, is deregulated and that these alterations may have a prognostic impact in patients with breast cancer. Moreover, molecules that regulate iron metabolism could become therapeutic targets. This review focuses on recent findings on iron metabolism particularly in breast cancer and on the development of new biomarkers that may be used in the clinical routine for the diagnosis, prognosis and management of cancer-associated anemia as well as for monitoring personalized treatments. PMID:24768787

  1. Kleine–Levin syndrome with comorbid iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rajendra Singh; Kumar, Sunil; Srivastava, Trilochan; Sannegowda, Raghavendra Bakki

    2015-01-01

    Kleine–Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare chronic sleep disorder of unknown etiopathology, which typically occurs in adolescent males. Although the severity of symptoms and disease course varies between the KLS patients, it usually resolves spontaneously, but sometime comorbid conditions may worsen the symptoms. Herein, we report a case of KLS who presented with severe episodic hypersomnia. During episodes, the patient used to sleep as long as 20 h in a day, affecting his daily living activities. All the relevant investigations including electroencephalography, magnetic resonance imaging of brain and cerebrospinal fluid analysis were normal except for severe iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In our patient, the severity of symptoms worsened due to coexistent IDA. The treatment of IDA along with modafinil decreased the severity of symptoms and shortened the hospital stay during episodes. This might be the first case report of KLS with comorbid IDA. PMID:26634130

  2. Kleine-Levin syndrome with comorbid iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rajendra Singh; Kumar, Sunil; Srivastava, Trilochan; Sannegowda, Raghavendra Bakki

    2015-03-01

    Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare chronic sleep disorder of unknown etiopathology, which typically occurs in adolescent males. Although the severity of symptoms and disease course varies between the KLS patients, it usually resolves spontaneously, but sometime comorbid conditions may worsen the symptoms. Herein, we report a case of KLS who presented with severe episodic hypersomnia. During episodes, the patient used to sleep as long as 20 h in a day, affecting his daily living activities. All the relevant investigations including electroencephalography, magnetic resonance imaging of brain and cerebrospinal fluid analysis were normal except for severe iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In our patient, the severity of symptoms worsened due to coexistent IDA. The treatment of IDA along with modafinil decreased the severity of symptoms and shortened the hospital stay during episodes. This might be the first case report of KLS with comorbid IDA. PMID:26634130

  3. Stress and DNA repair biology of the Fanconi anemia pathway

    PubMed Central

    Longerich, Simonne; Li, Jian; Xiong, Yong; Sung, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) represents a paradigm of rare genetic diseases, where the quest for cause and cure has led to seminal discoveries in cancer biology. Although a total of 16 FA genes have been identified thus far, the biochemical function of many of the FA proteins remains to be elucidated. FA is rare, yet the fact that 5 FA genes are in fact familial breast cancer genes and FA gene mutations are found frequently in sporadic cancers suggest wider applicability in hematopoiesis and oncology. Establishing the interaction network involving the FA proteins and their associated partners has revealed an intersection of FA with several DNA repair pathways, including homologous recombination, DNA mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, and translesion DNA synthesis. Importantly, recent studies have shown a major involvement of the FA pathway in the tolerance of reactive aldehydes. Moreover, despite improved outcomes in stem cell transplantation in the treatment of FA, many challenges remain in patient care. PMID:25237197

  4. Exacerbation of Autoantibody-Mediated Hemolytic Anemia by Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Meite, Mory; Léonard, Sabine; Idrissi, Mohammed El Azami El; Izui, Shozo; Masson, Pierre L.; Coutelier, Jean-Paul

    2000-01-01

    Strong enhancement of the pathogenicity of an antierythrocyte monoclonal antibody was observed after infection of mice with lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus. While injection of the antierythrocyte antibody alone induced only moderate anemia, concomitant infection with this virus, which is harmless in most normal mice, led to a dramatic drop in the hematocrit and to death of infected animals. In vitro and in vivo analyses showed a dramatic increase in the ability of macrophages from infected mice to phagocytose antibody-coated erythrocytes. These results indicate that viruses can trigger the onset of autoimmune disease by enhancing the pathogenicity of autoantibodies. They may explain how unrelated viruses could be implicated in the etiology of autoantibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:10846087

  5. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia with normal serum lactate dehydrogenase level].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hideaki; Hangaishi, Akira; Saika, Makoto; Morioka, Takehiko; Ando, Yayoi; Kida, Michiko; Usuki, Kensuke

    2015-11-01

    We herein report two cases of AIHA (autoimmune hemolytic anemia), a 25-year-old woman and a 77-year-old man, who presented with normal serum LDH values. Though in these two cases, low hemoglobin and haptoglobin, high total bilirubin and positive direct Coombs' test results led to the diagnosis of AIHA, both patients had normal LDH levels (218 and 187 IU/l). Both cases were successfully treated with prednisone. In the diagnosis of AIHA, elevated LDH is usually used as a marker of hemolysis. However, medical records of 24 AIHA patients collected in our institute from January 2001 to August 2012 revealed LDH levels to have been normal in 25% of these cases. This report indicates the importance of obtaining complete information about the blood testing of patients and taking these data into account when considering the diagnosis of AIHA. PMID:26666722

  6. Paramagnetic Europium Salen Complex and Sickle-Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynter, Clive I.; Ryan, D. H.; May, Leopold; Oliver, F. W.; Brown, Eugene; Hoffman, Eugene J.; Bernstein, David

    2005-04-01

    A new europium salen complex, Eu(salen)2NH4, was synthesized, and its composition was confirmed by chemical analysis and infrared spectroscopy. Further characterization was carried out by 151 Eu Mössbauer spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements were made at varying temperatures between 9 K and room temperature and a value of Debye temperature of 133 ±5 K was computed. Both Mössbauer and magnetic susceptibility measurements confirmed the paramagnetic behavior of this complex and the trivalent state of the europium ion. In view of the fact that the "odd" paramagnetic molecule NO has been shown to reverse sickling of red blood cells in sickle cell anemia, the interaction between the paramagnetic europium salen complex and sickle cells was examined after incubation with this europium complex and shown to have similar effects.

  7. Types of Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of MDS can live a long time. Refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts (RARS) About 10% to 15% ... will die within 2 years of diagnosis. Refractory anemia with excess blasts-1 (RAEB-1) One or ...

  8. Expansion of CD8+ cells in autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, S Ju; Sidorova, Ju V; Tsvetaeva, N V; Nikulina, O F; Biderman, B V; Nikulina, E E; Kulikov, S M; Sudarikov, A B

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare blood disease associated with the production of auto-antibodies and autoimmune hemolysis. A critical role of B-cells in the development of AIHA has been demonstrated before. Here, we present the analysis of the clonal T-cell populations in patients with AIHA. Thirty-three patients with AIHA were included in this study. Thirteen patients with other anemias, 14 patients with other autoimmune conditions (SLE - 6, RA - 8) and 20 healthy donors were included in the study as a control group. The clonality of T-cell was evaluated by the assessment of the T-cell receptor gamma and beta chain gene rearrangements (TCRG and TCRB). The incidence of T-cell monoclonality detected in patients with AIHA was significantly higher compared to the control group. The persistence of T-cell clones did not correlate with the level of hemoglobin and other signs of remission or relapse and did not disappear after the therapy and clinical improvement (observation period was between 1 and 10 years). There was no correlation between the T-cell clonality and the gender, age, splenectomy, duration or severity of the disease. Fractionation of T-lymphocytes (CD4+, CD8+, CD4+25+) revealed that the monoclonal T-cells belonged to the CD8+ sub-population. We assume that besides a possible causative role of the T-cell clones in AIHA to autoimmune process, these clones do not directly participate in the development and maintenance of hemolysis. Most of the AIHA patients (48.5%) demonstrated a T-cell monoclonality, which requires monitoring and should be distinguished from T-cell tumors. PMID:26829107

  9. Mutation analysis of the Fanconi Anemia Gene FACC

    SciTech Connect

    Verlander, P.C.; Lin, J.D.; Udono, M.U.; Zhang, Q.; Auerbach, A.D. ); Gibson, R.A.; Mathew, C.G. )

    1994-04-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a unique hypersensitivity of cells to DNA cross-linking agents; a gene for complementation group C (FACC) has recently been cloned. The authors have amplified FACC exons with their flanking intron sequences from genomic DNA from 174 racially and ethnically diverse families in the International Fanconi Anemia Registry and have screened for mutations by using SSCP analysis. They have identified eight different variants in 32 families; three were detected in exon 1, one in exon 4, one in intron 4, two in exon 6, and one in exon 14. Two of the eight variants, in seven families, did not segregate with the disease allele in multiplex families, suggesting that these variants represented benign polymorphisms. Disease-associated mutations in FACC were detected in a total of 25 (14.4%) of 174 families screened. The most frequent mutations were IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T (intron 4; 12 families) and 322delG (exon 1; 9 families). Other, less common mutations include Q13X in exon 1, R185X and D195V in exon 6, and L554P in exon 14. The polymorphisms were S26F in exon 1 and G139E in exon 4. All patients in the study with 322delG, Q13X, R185X, and D195V are of northern or eastern European or southern Italian ancestry, and 18 of 19 have a mild form of the disease, while the 2 patients with L554P, both from the same family, have a severe phenotype. All 19 patients with IVS4 + 4 A [yields] T have Jewish ancestry and have a severe phenotype. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. Implications of Medicare Part D in CKD anemia treatment.

    PubMed

    Stefanacci, Richard G

    2006-11-01

    Treating chronic kidney disease (CKD) anemia successfully requires not only making the correct diagnosis and choosing the appropriate treatment but also taking the steps needed to ensure that residents have access to treatment. This can be challenging with regard to the erythropoiesis-stimulating proteins (ESPs). To ensure access to these products, physicians must be health insurance literate, knowing how different Medicare parts cover the erythropoietin (EPO) products. For example, Medicare Part A places the responsibility for medications on the provider. This means that a long-term care facility is responsible for covering the cost of medications used during the Medicare Part A skilled stay. Medicare Part B covers medications that are provided "incident to" a physician service, including injectables provided by physicians in their offices or during dialysis treatments. Managed care plans, which provide coverage under Medicare Part C, are responsible for all of the benefits available under Medicare Parts A and B. The newest Medicare Part is D, the prescription drug benefit introduced in January 2006. Medicare Part D covers most medications administered to residents in a long-term care facility. For the dually eligible-that is, residents covered by both Medicare and Medicaid-the Medicare Part D program replaces Medicaid drug coverage. Unfortunately, the criteria by which these prescription plans choose to cover products such as ESPs are not based on any specific standard but vary greatly by plan as each has the right to determine coverage criteria. In addition to individualized plan criteria, each plan defines its own process for prior authorization, appeals, and exceptions. Understanding the basic rules of coverage is essential to ensuring access to the ESPs for residents with anemia of CKD. PMID:17098632

  11. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Sonani, Rajesh; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Maitrey, Gajjar

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb) was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct) were high. This patient’s blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT), antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2nd day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4th day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this. PMID:24014948

  12. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria.

    PubMed

    Sonani, Rajesh; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Maitrey, Gajjar

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb) was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct) were high. This patient's blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT), antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2(nd) day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4(th) day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this. PMID:24014948

  13. Roxadustat (FG-4592): Correction of Anemia in Incident Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Besarab, Anatole; Chernyavskaya, Elena; Motylev, Igor; Shutov, Evgeny; Kumbar, Lalathaksha M; Gurevich, Konstantin; Chan, Daniel Tak Mao; Leong, Robert; Poole, Lona; Zhong, Ming; Saikali, Khalil G; Franco, Marietta; Hemmerich, Stefan; Yu, Kin-Hung Peony; Neff, Thomas B

    2016-04-01

    Safety concerns with erythropoietin analogues and intravenous (IV) iron for treatment of anemia in CKD necessitate development of safer therapies. Roxadustat (FG-4592) is an orally bioavailable hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor that promotes coordinated erythropoiesis through HIF-mediated transcription. We performed an open-label, randomized hemoglobin (Hb) correction study in anemic (Hb≤10.0 g/dl) patients incident to hemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD). Sixty patients received no iron, oral iron, or IV iron while treated with roxadustat for 12 weeks. Mean±SD baseline Hb was 8.3±1.0 g/dl in enrolled patients. Roxadustat at titrated doses increased mean Hb by ≥2.0 g/dl within 7 weeks regardless of baseline iron repletion status, C-reactive protein level, iron regimen, or dialysis modality. Mean±SEM maximal change in Hb from baseline (ΔHbmax), the primary endpoint, was 3.1±0.2 g/dl over 12 weeks in efficacy-evaluable patients (n=55). In groups receiving oral or IV iron,ΔHbmaxwas similar and larger than in the no-iron group. Hb response (increase in Hb of ≥1.0 g/dl from baseline) was achieved in 96% of efficacy-evaluable patients. Mean serum hepcidin decreased significantly 4 weeks into study: by 80% in HD patients receiving no iron (n=22), 52% in HD and PD patients receiving oral iron (n=21), and 41% in HD patients receiving IV iron (n=9). In summary, roxadustat was well tolerated and corrected anemia in incident HD and PD patients, regardless of baseline iron repletion status or C-reactive protein level and with oral or IV iron supplementation; it also reduced serum hepcidin levels. PMID:26494833

  14. The surface envelope protein gene region of equine infectious anemia virus is not an important determinant of tropism in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, S T; Flaherty, M T; Kelley, M J; Clabough, D L; Tronick, S R; Coggins, L; Whetter, L; Lengel, C R; Fuller, F

    1992-01-01

    Virulent, wild-type equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is restricted in one or more early steps in replication in equine skin fibroblast cells compared with cell culture-adapted virus, which is fully competent for replication in this cell type. We compared the sequences of wild-type EIAV and a full-length infectious proviral clone of the cell culture-adapted EIAV and found that the genomes were relatively well conserved with the exception of the envelope gene region, which showed extensive sequence differences. We therefore constructed several wild-type and cell culture-adapted virus chimeras to examine the role of the envelope gene in replication in different cell types in vitro. Unlike wild-type virus, which is restricted by an early event(s) for replication in equine dermis cells, the wild-type outer envelope gene chimeras are replication competent in this cell type. We conclude that even though there are extensive sequence differences between wild-type and cell culture-adapted viruses in the surface envelope gene region, this domain is not a determinant of the differing in vitro cell tropisms. Images PMID:1318398

  15. Analysis of host- and strain-dependent cell death responses during infectious salmon anemia virus infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Schiøtz, Berit L; Bækkevold, Espen S; Poulsen, Lene C; Mjaaland, Siri; Gjøen, Tor

    2009-01-01

    Background Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is an aquatic orthomyxovirus and the causative agent of infectious salmon anemia (ISA), a disease of great importance in the Atlantic salmon farming industry. In vitro, ISAV infection causes cytophatic effect (CPE) in cell lines from Atlantic salmon, leading to rounding and finally detachment of the cells from the substratum. In this study, we investigated the mode of cell death during in vitro ISAV infection in different Atlantic salmon cell lines, using four ISAV strains causing different mortality in vivo. Results The results show that caspase 3/7 activity increased during the course of infection in ASK and SHK-1 cells, infected cells showed increased surface expression of phosphatidylserine and increased PI uptake, compared to mock infected cells; and morphological alterations of the mitochondria were observed. Expression analysis of immune relevant genes revealed no correlation between in vivo mortality and expression, but good correlation in expression of interferon genes. Conclusion Results from this study indicate that there is both strain and cell type dependent differences in the virus-host interaction during ISAV infection. This is important to bear in mind when extrapolating in vitro findings to the in vivo situation. PMID:19566966

  16. L-Leucine improves the anemia and developmental defects associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia and del(5q) MDS by activating the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Payne, Elspeth M; Virgilio, Maria; Narla, Anupama; Sun, Hong; Levine, Michelle; Paw, Barry H; Berliner, Nancy; Look, A Thomas; Ebert, Benjamin L; Khanna-Gupta, Arati

    2012-09-13

    Haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins (RPs) has been proposed to be the common basis for the anemia observed in Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) and myelodysplastic syndrome with loss of chromosome 5q [del(5q) MDS]. We have modeled DBA and del(5q) MDS in zebrafish using antisense morpholinos to rps19 and rps14, respectively, and have demonstrated that, as in humans, haploinsufficient levels of these proteins lead to a profound anemia. To address the hypothesis that RP loss results in impaired mRNA translation, we treated Rps19 and Rps14-deficient embryos with the amino acid L-leucine, a known activator of mRNA translation. This resulted in a striking improvement of the anemia associated with RP loss. We confirmed our findings in primary human CD34⁺ cells, after shRNA knockdown of RPS19 and RPS14. Furthermore, we showed that loss of Rps19 or Rps14 activates the mTOR pathway, and this is accentuated by L-leucine in both Rps19 and Rps14 morphants. This effect could be abrogated by rapamycin suggesting that mTOR signaling may be responsible for the improvement in anemia associated with L-leucine. Our studies support the rationale for ongoing clinical trials of L-leucine as a therapeutic agent for DBA, and potentially for patients with del(5q) MDS. PMID:22734070

  17. Functional and clinical impact of novel TMPRSS6 variants in iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia patients and genotype-phenotype studies.

    PubMed

    De Falco, Luigia; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Morán, Erica; Oudin, Claire; Rausa, Marco; Bruno, Mariasole; Aranda, Jessica; Argiles, Bienvenida; Yenicesu, Idil; Falcon-Rodriguez, Maria; Yilmaz-Keskin, Ebru; Kocak, Ulker; Beaumont, Carole; Camaschella, Clara; Iolascon, Achille; Grandchamp, Bernard; Sanchez, Mayka

    2014-11-01

    Iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by hypochromic microcytic anemia, low transferrin saturation, and inappropriate high levels of the iron hormone hepcidin. The disease is caused by variants in the transmembrane protease serine 6 (TMPRSS6) gene that encodes the type II serine protease matriptase-2, a negative regulator of hepcidin transcription. Sequencing analysis of the TMPRSS6 gene in 21 new IRIDA patients from 16 families with different ethnic origin reveal 17 novel mutations, including the most frequent mutation in Southern Italy (p.W590R). Eight missense mutations were analyzed in vitro. All but the p.T287N variant impair matriptase-2 autoproteotylic activation, decrease the ability to cleave membrane HJV and inhibit the HJV-dependent hepcidin activation. Genotype-phenotype studies in IRIDA patients have been so far limited due to the relatively low number of described patients. Our genotype-phenotype correlation analysis demonstrates that patients carrying two nonsense mutations present a more severe anemia and microcytosis and higher hepcidin levels than the other patients. We confirm that TMPRSS6 mutations are spread along the gene and that mechanistically they fully or partially abrogate hepcidin inhibition. Genotyping IRIDA patients help in predicting IRIDA severity and may be useful for predicting response to iron treatment. PMID:25156943

  18. [Prevalence of monosymptomatic celiac disease in patients with iron deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Garrido, C; Gayà, J; Liompart, A; Vaquer, P; Sansó, A; Riera, J; Ginard, D; Bonet, L; Obrador, A

    1997-04-01

    A prospective study of the prevalence of monosymptomatic celiac disease presented as ferropenic anemia in patients admitted for study such complication of was carried out. All the patients were evaluated by gastroscopy and biopsy of the distal duodenal segment, regardless of endoscopic appearance. Patients presenting an endoscopic lesion clearly suggestive as the origin of the chronic bleeding were excluded from the study. The prevalence of celiac disease, the only manifestation of which was ferropenic anemia, was 3.3% in this series. What is important to note in this study is the importance of duodenal biopsy in the study of ferropenic anemia, with the aim of avoiding diagnostic delay of a possible monosymptomatic celiac disease as the cause of the anemia. PMID:9280609

  19. Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome in patients suspected to have Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Katelyn E; Ghazvinian, Roxanne; Yuan, Daniel; Zon, Rebecca L; Storm, Kelsie; Mazur-Popinska, Magdalena; Andolina, Laura; Bubala, Halina; Golebiowska, Sydonia; Higman, Meghan A; Kalwak, Krzysztof; Kurre, Peter; Matysiak, Michal; Niewiadomska, Edyta; Pels, Salley; Petruzzi, Mary Jane; Pobudejska-Pieniazek, Aneta; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Fleming, Mark D; Gazda, Hanna T; Agarwal, Suneet

    2014-07-17

    Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome (PS) is a multisystem disorder caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital hypoproliferative anemia in which mutations in ribosomal protein genes and GATA1 have been implicated. Both syndromes share several features including early onset of severe anemia, variable nonhematologic manifestations, sporadic genetic occurrence, and occasional spontaneous hematologic improvement. Because of the overlapping features and relative rarity of PS, we hypothesized that some patients in whom the leading clinical diagnosis is DBA actually have PS. Here, we evaluated patient DNA samples submitted for DBA genetic studies and found that 8 (4.6%) of 173 genetically uncharacterized patients contained large mtDNA deletions. Only 2 (25%) of the patients had been diagnosed with PS on clinical grounds subsequent to sample submission. We conclude that PS can be overlooked, and that mtDNA deletion testing should be performed in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with congenital anemia. PMID:24735966

  20. Epoetin Alfa in Treating Anemia in Patients Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-07

    Anemia; Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Drug/Agent Toxicity by Tissue/Organ; Leukemia; Lung Cancer; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Precancerous Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific