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Sample records for dysfunction bacterial proliferation

  1. Enteral feeding induces diet-dependent mucosal dysfunction, bacterial proliferation, and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs on parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Bjornvad, Charlotte R; Thymann, Thomas; Deutz, Nicolaas E; Burrin, Douglas G; Jensen, Søren K; Jensen, Bent B; Mølbak, Lars; Boye, Mette; Larsson, Lars-Inge; Schmidt, Mette; Michaelsen, Kim F; Sangild, Per T

    2008-11-01

    Preterm neonates have an immature gut and metabolism and may benefit from total parenteral nutrition (TPN) before enteral food is introduced. Conversely, delayed enteral feeding may inhibit gut maturation and sensitize to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intestinal mass and NEC lesions were first recorded in preterm pigs fed enterally (porcine colostrum, bovine colostrum, or formula for 20-40 h), with or without a preceding 2- to 3-day TPN period (n = 435). Mucosal mass increased during TPN and further after enteral feeding to reach an intestinal mass similar to that in enterally fed pigs without TPN (+60-80% relative to birth). NEC developed only after enteral feeding but more often after a preceding TPN period for both sow's colostrum (26 vs. 5%) and formula (62 vs. 39%, both P < 0.001, n = 43-170). Further studies in 3-day-old TPN pigs fed enterally showed that formula feeding decreased villus height and nutrient digestive capacity and increased luminal lactic acid and NEC lesions, compared with colostrum (bovine or porcine, P < 0.05). Mucosal microbial diversity increased with enteral feeding, and Clostridium perfringens density was related to NEC severity. Formula feeding decreased plasma arginine, citrulline, ornithine, and tissue antioxidants, whereas tissue nitric oxide synthetase and gut permeability increased, relative to colostrum (all P < 0.05). In conclusion, enteral feeding is associated with gut dysfunction, microbial imbalance, and NEC in preterm pigs, especially in pigs fed formula after TPN. Conversely, colostrum milk diets improve gut maturation and NEC resistance in preterm pigs subjected to a few days of TPN after birth. PMID:18818317

  2. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Regulates Chronic Alcohol-Induced Alveolar Macrophage Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yeligar, Samantha M; Mehta, Ashish J; Harris, Frank L; Brown, Lou Ann S; Hart, C Michael

    2016-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ is critical for alveolar macrophage (AM) function. Chronic alcohol abuse causes AM phagocytic dysfunction and susceptibility to respiratory infections by stimulating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidases (Nox), transforming growth factor-β1, and oxidative stress in the AM. Because PPARγ inhibits Nox expression, we hypothesized that alcohol reduces PPARγ, stimulating AM dysfunction. AMs were examined from: (1) patients with alcoholism or control patients; (2) a mouse model of chronic ethanol consumption; (3) PPARγ knockout mice; or (4) MH-S cells exposed to ethanol in vitro. Alcohol reduced AM PPARγ levels and increased Nox1, -2, and -4, transforming growth factor-β1, oxidative stress, and phagocytic dysfunction. Genetic loss of PPARγ recapitulated, whereas stimulating PPARγ activity attenuated alcohol-mediated alterations in gene expression and phagocytic function, supporting the importance of PPARγ in alcohol-induced AM derangements. Similarly, PPARγ activation in vivo reduced alcohol-mediated impairments in lung bacterial clearance. Alcohol increased levels of microRNA-130a/-301a, which bind to the PPARγ 3' untranslated region to reduce PPARγ expression. MicroRNA-130a/-301a inhibition attenuated alcohol-mediated PPARγ reductions and derangements in AM gene expression and function. Alcohol-induced Toll-like receptor 4 endocytosis was reversed by PPARγ activation. These findings demonstrate that targeting PPARγ provides a novel therapeutic approach for mitigating alcohol-induced AM derangements and susceptibility to lung infection. PMID:26677910

  3. Wakayama Symposium: Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-gamma (PPARγ) and Meibomian Gland Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jester, James V.; Brown, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Recently we have shown that mouse and human meibomian glands undergo specific age-related changes, including decreased acinar cell proliferation, acinar atrophy, and altered peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) localization from cytoplasmic-vesicular/nuclear in young mice and humans to nuclear in old mice and humans. Since PPARγ is a lipid-sensitive, nuclear receptor implicated in regulating adipocyte and sebocyte differentiation and lipogenesis, our findings suggest that PPARγ may be involved in modulating meibomian gland differentiation during aging. Based on these findings, we propose that aging of the meibomian gland results in downregulation of PPARγ, leading to decreased meibocyte differentiation and lipid synthesis, gland atrophy, and a hyposecretory meibomian gland dysfunction. PMID:23084144

  4. Bacterial Folates Provide an Exogenous Signal for C. elegans Germline Stem Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Snehal N; Mukherjee, Madhumati; Vagasi, Alexandra S; Bi, Gaofeng; Rahman, Mohammad M; Nguyen, Christine Q; Paul, Ligi; Selhub, Jacob; Kipreos, Edward T

    2016-07-11

    Here we describe an in vitro primary culture system for Caenorhabditis elegans germline stem cells. This culture system was used to identify a bacterial folate as a positive regulator of germ cell proliferation. Folates are a family of B-complex vitamins that function in one-carbon metabolism to allow the de novo synthesis of amino acids and nucleosides. We show that germ cell proliferation is stimulated by the folate 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate-Glun both in vitro and in animals. Other folates that can act as vitamins to rescue folate deficiency lack this germ cell stimulatory activity. The bacterial folate precursor dihydropteroate also promotes germ cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, despite its inability to promote one-carbon metabolism. The folate receptor homolog FOLR-1 is required for the stimulation of germ cells by 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate-Glun and dihydropteroate. This work defines a folate and folate-related compound as exogenous signals to modulate germ cell proliferation. PMID:27404357

  5. SGLT1 activity in lung alveolar cells of diabetic rats modulates airway surface liquid glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tales Lyra; Candeia-Medeiros, Návylla; Cavalcante-Araújo, Polliane M; Melo, Igor Santana; Fávaro-Pípi, Elaine; Fátima, Luciana Alves; Rocha, Antônio Augusto; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Machado, Ubiratan Fabres; Campos, Ruy R; Sabino-Silva, Robinson

    2016-01-01

    High glucose concentration in the airway surface liquid (ASL) is an important feature of diabetes that predisposes to respiratory infections. We investigated the role of alveolar epithelial SGLT1 activity on ASL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation. Non-diabetic and diabetic rats were intranasally treated with saline, isoproterenol (to increase SGLT1 activity) or phlorizin (to decrease SGLT1 activity); 2 hours later, glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation (methicillin-resistant Sthaphylococcus aureus, MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. aeruginosa) were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL); and alveolar SGLT1 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. BAL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation increased in diabetic animals: isoproterenol stimulated SGLT1 migration to luminal membrane, and reduced (50%) the BAL glucose concentration; whereas phlorizin increased the BAL glucose concentration (100%). These regulations were accompanied by parallel changes of in vitro MRSA and P. aeruginosa proliferation in BAL (r = 0.9651 and r = 0.9613, respectively, Pearson correlation). The same regulations were observed in in vivo P. aeruginosa proliferation. In summary, the results indicate a relationship among SGLT1 activity, ASL glucose concentration and pulmonary bacterial proliferation. Besides, the study highlights that, in situations of pulmonary infection risk, such as in diabetic subjects, increased SGLT1 activity may prevent bacterial proliferation whereas decreased SGLT1 activity can exacerbate it. PMID:26902517

  6. SGLT1 activity in lung alveolar cells of diabetic rats modulates airway surface liquid glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tales Lyra; Candeia-Medeiros, Návylla; Cavalcante-Araújo, Polliane M.; Melo, Igor Santana; Fávaro-Pípi, Elaine; Fátima, Luciana Alves; Rocha, Antônio Augusto; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Machado, Ubiratan Fabres; Campos, Ruy R.; Sabino-Silva, Robinson

    2016-01-01

    High glucose concentration in the airway surface liquid (ASL) is an important feature of diabetes that predisposes to respiratory infections. We investigated the role of alveolar epithelial SGLT1 activity on ASL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation. Non-diabetic and diabetic rats were intranasally treated with saline, isoproterenol (to increase SGLT1 activity) or phlorizin (to decrease SGLT1 activity); 2 hours later, glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation (methicillin-resistant Sthaphylococcus aureus, MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. aeruginosa) were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL); and alveolar SGLT1 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. BAL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation increased in diabetic animals: isoproterenol stimulated SGLT1 migration to luminal membrane, and reduced (50%) the BAL glucose concentration; whereas phlorizin increased the BAL glucose concentration (100%). These regulations were accompanied by parallel changes of in vitro MRSA and P. aeruginosa proliferation in BAL (r = 0.9651 and r = 0.9613, respectively, Pearson correlation). The same regulations were observed in in vivo P. aeruginosa proliferation. In summary, the results indicate a relationship among SGLT1 activity, ASL glucose concentration and pulmonary bacterial proliferation. Besides, the study highlights that, in situations of pulmonary infection risk, such as in diabetic subjects, increased SGLT1 activity may prevent bacterial proliferation whereas decreased SGLT1 activity can exacerbate it. PMID:26902517

  7. Dysfunctional telomeres induce p53-dependent and independent apoptosis to compromise cellular proliferation and inhibit tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Xinwei; Flores, Elsa R; Yu, Jian; Chang, Sandy

    2016-08-01

    Aging is associated with progressive telomere shortening, resulting in the formation of dysfunctional telomeres that compromise tissue proliferation. However, dysfunctional telomeres can limit tumorigenesis by activating p53-dependent cellular senescence and apoptosis. While activation of both senescence and apoptosis is required for repress tumor formation, it is not clear which pathway is the major tumor suppressive pathway in vivo. In this study, we generated Eμ-myc; Pot1b(∆/∆) mouse to directly compare tumor formation under conditions in which either p53-dependent apoptosis or senescence is activated by telomeres devoid of the shelterin component Pot1b. We found that activation of p53-dependent apoptosis plays a more critical role in suppressing lymphoma formation than p53-dependent senescence. In addition, we found that telomeres in Pot1b(∆/∆) ; p53(-/-) mice activate an ATR-Chk1-dependent DNA damage response to initiate a robust p53-independent, p73-dependent apoptotic pathway that limited stem cell proliferation but suppressed B-cell lymphomagenesis. Our results demonstrate that in mouse models, both p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptosis are important to suppressing tumor formation. PMID:27113195

  8. The FXR agonist obeticholic acid prevents gut barrier dysfunction and bacterial translocation in cholestatic rats.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Len; Farre, Ricard; Verbinnen, Bert; Covens, Kris; Vanuytsel, Tim; Verhaegen, Jan; Komuta, Mina; Roskams, Tania; Chatterjee, Sagnik; Annaert, Pieter; Vander Elst, Ingrid; Windmolders, Petra; Trebicka, Jonel; Nevens, Frederik; Laleman, Wim

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial translocation (BTL) drives pathogenesis and complications of cirrhosis. Farnesoid X-activated receptor (FXR) is a key transcription regulator in hepatic and intestinal bile metabolism. We studied potential intestinal FXR dysfunction in a rat model of cholestatic liver injury and evaluated effects of obeticholic acid (INT-747), an FXR agonist, on gut permeability, inflammation, and BTL. Rats were gavaged with INT-747 or vehicle during 10 days after bile-duct ligation and then were assessed for changes in gut permeability, BTL, and tight-junction protein expression, immune cell recruitment, and cytokine expression in ileum, mesenteric lymph nodes, and spleen. Auxiliary in vitro BTL-mimicking experiments were performed with Transwell supports. Vehicle-treated bile duct-ligated rats exhibited decreased FXR pathway expression in both jejunum and ileum, in association with increased gut permeability through increased claudin-2 expression and related to local and systemic recruitment of natural killer cells resulting in increased interferon-γ expression and BTL. After INT-747 treatment, natural killer cells and interferon-γ expression markedly decreased, in association with normalized permeability selectively in ileum (up-regulated claudin-1 and occludin) and a significant reduction in BTL. In vitro, interferon-γ induced increased Escherichia coli translocation, which remained unaffected by INT-747. In experimental cholestasis, FXR agonism improved ileal barrier function by attenuating intestinal inflammation, leading to reduced BTL and thus demonstrating a crucial protective role for FXR in the gut-liver axis. PMID:25592258

  9. Origin and Proliferation of Multiple-Drug Resistance in Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsiao-Han; Cohen, Ted; Grad, Yonatan H.; Hanage, William P.; O'Brien, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Many studies report the high prevalence of multiply drug-resistant (MDR) strains. Because MDR infections are often significantly harder and more expensive to treat, they represent a growing public health threat. However, for different pathogens, different underlying mechanisms are traditionally used to explain these observations, and it is unclear whether each bacterial taxon has its own mechanism(s) for multidrug resistance or whether there are common mechanisms between distantly related pathogens. In this review, we provide a systematic overview of the causes of the excess of MDR infections and define testable predictions made by each hypothetical mechanism, including experimental, epidemiological, population genomic, and other tests of these hypotheses. Better understanding the cause(s) of the excess of MDR is the first step to rational design of more effective interventions to prevent the origin and/or proliferation of MDR. PMID:25652543

  10. Bacterial Proliferation: Keep Dividing and Don't Mind the Gap.

    PubMed

    Laureti, Luisa; Demol, Julien; Fuchs, Robert P; Pagès, Vincent

    2015-12-01

    DNA Damage Tolerance (DDT) mechanisms help dealing with unrepaired DNA lesions that block replication and challenge genome integrity. Previous in vitro studies showed that the bacterial replicase is able to re-prime downstream of a DNA lesion, leaving behind a single-stranded DNA gap. The question remains of what happens to this gap in vivo. Following the insertion of a single lesion in the chromosome of a living cell, we showed that this gap is mostly filled in by Homology Directed Gap Repair in a RecA dependent manner. When cells fail to repair this gap, or when homologous recombination is impaired, cells are still able to divide, leading to the loss of the damaged chromatid, suggesting that bacteria lack a stringent cell division checkpoint mechanism. Hence, at the expense of losing one chromatid, cell survival and proliferation are ensured. PMID:26713761

  11. Bacterial Proliferation: Keep Dividing and Don't Mind the Gap

    PubMed Central

    Laureti, Luisa; Demol, Julien; Fuchs, Robert P.; Pagès, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    DNA Damage Tolerance (DDT) mechanisms help dealing with unrepaired DNA lesions that block replication and challenge genome integrity. Previous in vitro studies showed that the bacterial replicase is able to re-prime downstream of a DNA lesion, leaving behind a single-stranded DNA gap. The question remains of what happens to this gap in vivo. Following the insertion of a single lesion in the chromosome of a living cell, we showed that this gap is mostly filled in by Homology Directed Gap Repair in a RecA dependent manner. When cells fail to repair this gap, or when homologous recombination is impaired, cells are still able to divide, leading to the loss of the damaged chromatid, suggesting that bacteria lack a stringent cell division checkpoint mechanism. Hence, at the expense of losing one chromatid, cell survival and proliferation are ensured. PMID:26713761

  12. Surface tailored organobentonite enhances bacterial proliferation and phenanthrene biodegradation under cadmium co-contamination.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Asit; Biswas, Bhabananda; Sarkar, Binoy; Patra, Ashok K; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-04-15

    Co-contamination of soil and water with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and heavy metals makes biodegradation of the former extremely challenging. Modified clay-modulated microbial degradation provides a novel insight in addressing this issue. This study was conducted to evaluate the growth and phenanthrene degradation performance of Mycobacterium gilvum VF1 in the presence of a palmitic acid (PA)-grafted Arquad® 2HT-75-based organobentonite in cadmium (Cd)-phenanthrene co-contaminated water. The PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) adsorbed a slightly greater quantity of Cd than bentonite at up to 30mgL(-1) metal concentration, but its highly negative surface charge imparted by carboxylic groups indicated the potential of being a significantly superior adsorbent of Cd at higher metal concentrations. In systems co-contained with Cd (5 and 10mgL(-1)), the Arquad® 2HT-75-modified bentonite (AB) and PA-grafted organobentonite (ABP) resulted in a significantly higher (72-78%) degradation of phenanthrene than bentonite (62%) by the bacterium. The growth and proliferation of bacteria were supported by ABP which not only eliminated Cd toxicity through adsorption but also created a congenial microenvironment for bacterial survival. The macromolecules produced during ABP-bacteria interaction could form a stable clay-bacterial cluster by overcoming the electrostatic repulsion among individual components. Findings of this study provide new insights for designing clay modulated PAH bioremediation technologies in mixed-contaminated water and soil. PMID:26849325

  13. SB-RA-2001 Inhibits Bacterial Proliferation by Targeting FtsZ Assembly

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    FtsZ has been recognized as a promising antimicrobial drug target because of its vital role in bacterial cell division. In this work, we found that a taxane SB-RA-2001 inhibited the proliferation of Bacillus subtilis 168 and Mycobacterium smegmatis cells with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 38 and 60 μM, respectively. Cell lengths of these microorganisms increased remarkably in the presence of SB-RA-2001, indicating that it inhibits bacterial cytokinesis. SB-RA-2001 perturbed the formation of the FtsZ ring in B. subtilis 168 cells and also affected the localization of the late cell division protein, DivIVA, at the midcell position. Flow cytometric analysis of the SB-RA-2001-treated cells indicated that the compound did not affect the duplication of DNA in B. subtilis 168 cells. Further, SB-RA-2001 treatment did not affect the localization of the chromosomal partitioning protein, Spo0J, along the two ends of the nucleoids and also had no discernible effect on the nucleoid segregation in B. subtilis 168 cells. The agent also did not appear to perturb the membrane potential of B. subtilis 168 cells. In vitro, SB-RA-2001 bound to FtsZ with modest affinity, promoted the assembly and bundling of FtsZ protofilaments, and reduced the GTPase activity of FtsZ. GTP did not inhibit the binding of SB-RA-2001 to FtsZ, suggesting that it does not bind to the GTP binding site on FtsZ. A computational analysis indicated that SB-RA-2001 binds to FtsZ in the cleft region between the C-terminal domain and helix H7, and the binding site of SB-RA-2001 on FtsZ resembled that of PC190723, a well-characterized inhibitor of FtsZ. The findings collectively suggested that SB-RA-2001 inhibits bacterial proliferation by targeting the assembly dynamics of FtsZ, and this can be exploited further to develop potent FtsZ-targeted antimicrobials. PMID:24749867

  14. Telmisartan protects against microvascular dysfunction during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury by activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We investigated the potential of telmisartan to improve microvascular dysfunction induced by myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury by activating the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) pathway. Methods Forty-eight male rabbits were randomly allocated into sham-operated, I/R, GW9662, telmisartan, telmisartan–GW9662, or candesartan groups. Rabbits were anesthetized, and the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was ligated for 60 minutes. Following reperfusion for 6 hours, angiotensin II content of the heart was determined using radioimmunoassay. Myocardial neutrophil accumulation and microvessel cross-sectional area were examined histologically. Myocardial capillaries were examined with transmission electron microscopy. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in the myocardium were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot was utilized for investigating the expression of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and PPARG. Results Angiotensin II concentration was significantly increased in all treatment groups compared with the sham-operated group (P < 0.05, all). Accumulation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils was significantly lower, while microvessel cross-sectional area was significantly higher in the telmisartan, telmisartan-GW9662, and candesartan groups compared with the I/R group (P < 0.05). ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 levels were also significantly lower, and correlated with lower NF-κB expression in these groups. The effects were the most significant in the telmisartan group compared with the telmisartan–GW9662 and candesartan groups. Telmisartan significantly increased PPARG protein expression compared with all other groups (P < 0.05, all). Conclusions Except for the typical effects of angiotensin II-receptor blocker, telmisartan improved microvascular dysfunction during myocardial I/R injury via the

  15. Tagging frogs with passive integrated transponders causes disruption of the cutaneous bacterial community and proliferation of opportunistic fungi.

    PubMed

    Antwis, Rachael E; Garcia, Gerardo; Fidgett, Andrea L; Preziosi, Richard F

    2014-08-01

    Symbiotic bacterial communities play a key role in protecting amphibians from infectious diseases including chytridiomycosis, caused by the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Events that lead to the disruption of the bacterial community may have implications for the susceptibility of amphibians to such diseases. Amphibians are often marked both in the wild and in captivity for a variety of reasons, and although existing literature indicates that marking techniques have few negative effects, the response of cutaneous microbial communities has not yet been investigated. Here we determine the effects of passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagging on culturable cutaneous microbial communities of captive Morelet's tree frogs (Agalychnis moreletii) and assess the isolated bacterial strains for anti-B. dendrobatidis activity in vitro. We find that PIT tagging causes a major disruption to the bacterial community associated with the skin of frogs (∼12-fold increase in abundance), as well as a concurrent proliferation in resident fungi (up to ∼200-fold increase). Handling also caused a disruption the bacterial community, although to a lesser extent than PIT tagging. However, the effects of both tagging and handling were temporary, and after 2 weeks, the bacterial communities were similar to their original compositions. We also identify two bacterial strains that inhibit B. dendrobatidis, one of which increased in abundance on PIT-tagged frogs at 1 day postmarking, while the other was unaffected. These results show that PIT tagging has previously unobserved consequences for cutaneous microbial communities of frogs and may be particularly relevant for studies that intend to use PIT tagging to identify individuals involved in trials to develop probiotic treatments. PMID:24878599

  16. Tagging Frogs with Passive Integrated Transponders Causes Disruption of the Cutaneous Bacterial Community and Proliferation of Opportunistic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Gerardo; Fidgett, Andrea L.; Preziosi, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic bacterial communities play a key role in protecting amphibians from infectious diseases including chytridiomycosis, caused by the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Events that lead to the disruption of the bacterial community may have implications for the susceptibility of amphibians to such diseases. Amphibians are often marked both in the wild and in captivity for a variety of reasons, and although existing literature indicates that marking techniques have few negative effects, the response of cutaneous microbial communities has not yet been investigated. Here we determine the effects of passive integrated transponder (PIT) tagging on culturable cutaneous microbial communities of captive Morelet's tree frogs (Agalychnis moreletii) and assess the isolated bacterial strains for anti-B. dendrobatidis activity in vitro. We find that PIT tagging causes a major disruption to the bacterial community associated with the skin of frogs (∼12-fold increase in abundance), as well as a concurrent proliferation in resident fungi (up to ∼200-fold increase). Handling also caused a disruption the bacterial community, although to a lesser extent than PIT tagging. However, the effects of both tagging and handling were temporary, and after 2 weeks, the bacterial communities were similar to their original compositions. We also identify two bacterial strains that inhibit B. dendrobatidis, one of which increased in abundance on PIT-tagged frogs at 1 day postmarking, while the other was unaffected. These results show that PIT tagging has previously unobserved consequences for cutaneous microbial communities of frogs and may be particularly relevant for studies that intend to use PIT tagging to identify individuals involved in trials to develop probiotic treatments. PMID:24878599

  17. The FBPase Encoding Gene glpX Is Required for Gluconeogenesis, Bacterial Proliferation and Division In Vivo of Mycobacterium marinum

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Liangdong; Wang, Chuan; Li, Yang; Gao, Qian; Yang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Lipids have been identified as important carbon sources for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to utilize in vivo. Thus gluconeogenesis bears a key role for Mtb to survive and replicate in host. A rate-limiting enzyme of gluconeogenesis, fructose 1, 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) is encoded by the gene glpX. The functions of glpX were studied in M. marinum, a closely related species to Mtb. The glpX deletion strain (ΔglpX) displayed altered gluconeogenesis, attenuated virulence, and altered bacterial proliferation. Metabolic profiles indicate an accumulation of the FBPase substrate, fructose 1, 6-bisphosphate (FBP) and altered gluconeogenic flux when ΔglpX is cultivated in a gluconeogenic carbon substrate, acetate. In both macrophages and zebrafish, the proliferation of ΔglpX was halted, resulting in dramatically attenuated virulence. Intracellular ΔglpX exhibited an elongated morphology, which was also observed when ΔglpX was grown in a gluconeogenic carbon source. This elongated morphology is also supported by the observation of unseparated multi-nucleoid cell, indicating that a complete mycobacterial division in vivo is correlated with intact gluconeogenesis. Together, our results indicate that glpX has essential functions in gluconeogenesis, and plays an indispensable role in bacterial proliferation in vivo and virulence of M. marinum. PMID:27233038

  18. A Small Volatile Bacterial Molecule Triggers Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Murine Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tzika, A. Aria; Constantinou, Caterina; Bandyopadhaya, Arunava; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Lee, Sangseok; Mindrinos, Michael; Martyn, J. A. Jeevendra; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Rahme, Laurence G.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria integrate distinct signals that reflect specific threats to the host, including infection, tissue damage, and metabolic dysfunction; and play a key role in insulin resistance. We have found that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing infochemical, 2-amino acetophenone (2-AA), produced during acute and chronic infection in human tissues, including in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, acts as an interkingdom immunomodulatory signal that facilitates pathogen persistence, and host tolerance to infection. Transcriptome results have led to the hypothesis that 2-AA causes further harm to the host by triggering mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. As normal skeletal muscle function is essential to survival, and is compromised in many chronic illnesses, including infections and CF-associated muscle wasting, we here determine the global effects of 2-AA on skeletal muscle using high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS), proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics, in vivo 31P NMR, whole-genome expression analysis and functional studies. Our results show that 2-AA when injected into mice, induced a biological signature of insulin resistance as determined by 1H NMR analysis-, and dramatically altered insulin signaling, glucose transport, and mitochondrial function. Genes including Glut4, IRS1, PPAR-γ, PGC1 and Sirt1 were downregulated, whereas uncoupling protein UCP3 was up-regulated, in accordance with mitochondrial dysfunction. Although 2-AA did not alter high-energy phosphates or pH by in vivo 31P NMR analysis, it significantly reduced the rate of ATP synthesis. This affect was corroborated by results demonstrating down-regulation of the expression of genes involved in energy production and muscle function, and was further validated by muscle function studies. Together, these results further demonstrate that 2-AA, acts as a mediator of interkingdom modulation, and likely effects insulin resistance associated with a

  19. Bacterial factors exploit eukaryotic Rho GTPase signaling cascades to promote invasion and proliferation within their host

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, Michel R

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is a main target of many bacterial pathogens. Among the multiple regulation steps of the actin cytoskeleton, bacterial factors interact preferentially with RhoGTPases. Pathogens secrete either toxins which diffuse in the surrounding environment, or directly inject virulence factors into target cells. Bacterial toxins, which interfere with RhoGTPases, and to some extent with RasGTPases, catalyze a covalent modification (ADPribosylation, glucosylation, deamidation, adenylation, proteolysis) blocking these molecules in their active or inactive state, resulting in alteration of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers, which contributes to dissemination of bacteria in the host. Injected bacterial virulence factors preferentially manipulate the RhoGTPase signaling cascade by mimicry of eukaryotic regulatory proteins leading to local actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, which mediates bacterial entry into host cells or in contrast escape to phagocytosis and immune defense. Invasive bacteria can also manipulate RhoGTPase signaling through recognition and stimulation of cell surface receptor(s). Changes in RhoGTPase activation state is sensed by the innate immunity pathways and allows the host cell to adapt an appropriate defense response. PMID:25203748

  20. Fluoroquinolone–macrolide combination therapy for chronic bacterial prostatitis: retrospective analysis of pathogen eradication rates, inflammatory findings and sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Vittorio; Montanari, Emanuele; Škerk, Višnja; Markotić, Alemka; Marras, Emanuela; Restelli, Antonella; Naber, Kurt G; Perletti, Gianpaolo

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the safety and efficacy of fluoroquinolone–macrolide combination therapy in category II chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP). The aim of this study is to retrospectively compare the microbiological and clinical findings of two treatment schemes for CBP based on the combination of azithromycin (500 mg, thrice-weekly) with a once-daily 500- or 750-mg dose of ciprofloxacin (Cipro-500 or Cipro-750 cohort, respectively). Combined administration of azithromycin (1500 mg week−1) with ciprofloxacin at the rate of 750 mg day−1 for 4 weeks rather than at 500 mg day−1 for 6 weeks increased the eradication rates from 62.35% to 77.32% and the total bacteriological success from 71.76% to 85.57%. A significant decrease in pain and voiding signs/symptoms and a significant reduction in inflammatory leukocyte counts and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were sustained throughout an 18-month follow-up period in both groups. Ejaculatory pain, haemospermia and premature ejaculation were significantly attenuated on microbiological eradication in both groups, but the latter subsided more promptly in the Cipro-750 cohort. In total, 59 Cipro-750 patients showed mild-to-severe erectile dysfunction (ED) at baseline, while 22 patients had no ED on microbiological eradication and throughout the follow-up period. In conclusion fluoroquinolone–macrolide therapy resulted in pathogen eradication and CBP symptom attenuation, including pain, voiding disturbances and sexual dysfunction. A once-daily 750-mg dose of ciprofloxacin for 4 weeks showed enhanced eradication rates and lower inflammatory white blood cell counts compared to the 500-mg dose for 6 weeks. Our results are open to further prospective validation. PMID:21765442

  1. An Extracellular Bacterial Pathogen Modulates Host Metabolism to Regulate its Own Sensing and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Baruch, Moshe; Belotserkovsky, Ilia; Hertzog, Baruch B.; Ravins, Miriam; Dov, Eran; McIver, Kevin S.; Le Breton, Yoann S.; Zhou, Yiting; Youting, Catherine Cheng; Hanski, Emanuel

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Successful infection depends on the ability of the pathogen to gain nutrients from the host. The extracellular pathogenic bacterium group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes a vast array of human diseases. By using the quorum sensing sil system as a reporter, we found that during adherence to host cells GAS delivers streptolysin toxins creating endoplasmic reticulum stress. This in turn, increases asparagine (ASN) synthetase expression and the production of ASN. The released ASN is sensed by the bacteria altering the expression of ~17% of GAS genes of which about 1/3 are dependent on the two-component system TrxSR. The expression of the streptolysin toxins is strongly upregulated whereas genes linked to proliferation are downregulated in ASN absence. Asparaginase a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, arrests GAS growth in human blood and blocks GAS proliferation in a mouse model of human bacteremia. These results delineate a pathogenic pathway and propose a new therapeutic strategy against GAS infections. PMID:24439371

  2. Selenium nanoparticles incorporated into titania nanotubes inhibit bacterial growth and macrophage proliferation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenwen; Golshan, Negar H; Deng, Xuliang; Hickey, Daniel J; Zeimer, Katherine; Li, Hongyi; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-08-25

    Since implants often fail due to infection and uncontrolled inflammatory responses, we designed an in vitro study to investigate the antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties of titanium dioxide nanotubes (TNTs) incorporated with selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs). Selenium incorporation was achieved by the reaction of sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) with glutathione (GSH) under a vacuum in the presence of TNTs. Two types of bacteria and macrophages were cultured on the samples to determine their respective antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. The results showed that the TNT samples incorporating SeNPs (TNT-Se) inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus compared to unmodified TNTs, albeit the SeNP concentration still needs to be optimized for maximal effect. At their maximum effect, the TNT-Se samples reduced the density of E. coli by 94.6% and of S. aureus by 89.6% compared to titanium controls. To investigate the underlying mechanism of this effect, the expression of six E. coli genes were tracked using qRT-PCR. Results indicated that SeNPs weakened E. coli membranes (ompA and ompF were down-regulated), decreased the function of adhesion-mediating proteins (csgA and csgG were progressively down-regulated with increasing SeNP content), and induced the production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ahpF was up-regulated). Moreover, TNT-Se samples inhibited the proliferation of macrophages, indicating that they can be used to control the inflammatory response and even prevent chronic inflammation, a condition that often leads to implant failure. In conclusion, we demonstrated that SeNP-TNTs display antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties that are promising for improving the performance of titanium-based implants for numerous orthopedic and dental applications. PMID:27533297

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis dysregulates MMP/TIMP balance to drive rapid cavitation and unrestrained bacterial proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kübler, André; Luna, Brian; Larsson, Christer; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Andrade, Bruno B.; Orandle, Marlene; Bock, Kevin W.; Xu, Ziyue; Bagci, Ulas; Molura, Daniel J.; Marshall, John; Burns, Jay; Winglee, Kathryn; Ahidjo, Bintou Ahmadou; Cheung, Laurene S.; Klunk, Mariah; Jain, Sanjay K.; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Babu, Subash; Sher, Alan; Friedland, Jon S.; Elkington, Paul T. G.; Bishai, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) often presents with advanced pulmonary disease, including irreversible lung damage and cavities. Cavitary pathology contributes to antibiotic failure, transmission, morbidity and mortality. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), in particular MMP-1 are implicated in TB pathogenesis. We explored the mechanisms relating MMP/TIMP imbalance to cavity formation in a modified rabbit model of cavitary TB. Our model results in consistent progression of consolidation to human-like cavities (100% by day 28) with resultant bacillary burdens (>107 CFU/g) far greater than those found in matched granulomatous tissue (105 CFU/g). Using a novel, breath-hold computerized tomography scanning and image analysis protocol. We show that cavities develop rapidly from areas of densely consolidated tissue. Radiological change correlated with a decrease in functional lung tissue as estimated by changes in lung density during controlled pulmonary expansion (R2=0.6356, p<0.0001). We demonstrated that the expression of interstitial collagenase (MMP-1) is specifically greater in cavitary compared to granulomatous lesions (p<0.01), and that TIMP-3 significantly decreases at the cavity surface. Our findings demonstrate that an MMP-1/TIMP imbalance, is associated with the progression of consolidated regions to cavities containing very high bacterial burdens. Our model provided mechanistic insight, correlating with human disease at the pathological, microbiological and molecular levels,. It also provides a strategy to investigate therapeutics in the context of complex TB pathology. We used these findings to predict a MMP/TIMP balance in active TB; and confirmed this in human plasma, revealing the potential of MMP/TIMP levels as key components of a diagnostic matrix aimed at distinguishing active from latent TB (PPV=92.9%; 95%CI 66.1–99.8%, NPV=85.6%; 95%CI 77.0–91.9%). PMID:25186281

  4. Fragmented Lactic Acid Bacterial Cells Activate Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors and Ameliorate Dyslipidemia in Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Futoshi; Ishida, Yu; Sawada, Daisuke; Ashida, Nobuhisa; Sugawara, Tomonori; Sakai, Manami; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kawada, Teruo; Fujiwara, Shigeru

    2016-03-30

    Recent studies suggest that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activation ameliorates metabolic disorders, including dyslipidemia. To identify an effective PPAR agonist, we screened the in vitro PPARα/γ activation ability of organic solvent extracts from food-oriented bacterial strains belonging to 5 genera and 32 species, including lactic acid bacteria, and of these, Lactobacillus amylovorus CP1563 demonstrated the highest PPARα/γ agonist activity. We also found that physical fragmentation of the strain could substitute organic solvent extraction for the expression of CP1563 activity in vitro. For functional food manufacturing, we selected the fragmented CP1563 and conducted subsequent animal experiments. In an obese mouse model, we found that treatment with fragmented CP1563 for 12 weeks decreased the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol and triglyceride in plasma, significantly decreased the atherosclerosis index, and increased the plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol level. Thus, we conclude that fragmented CP1563 may be a candidate for the prevention and treatment of dyslipidemia. PMID:26927959

  5. Early administration of probiotics alters bacterial colonization and limits diet-induced gut dysfunction and severity of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs.

    PubMed

    Siggers, Richard H; Siggers, Jayda; Boye, Mette; Thymann, Thomas; Mølbak, Lars; Leser, Thomas; Jensen, Bent B; Sangild, Per T

    2008-08-01

    Following preterm birth, bacterial colonization and enteral formula feeding predispose neonates to gut dysfunction and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a serious gastrointestinal inflammatory disease. We hypothesized that administration of probiotics would beneficially influence early bacterial colonization, thereby reducing the susceptibility to formula-induced gut atrophy, dysfunction, and NEC. Caesarean-delivered preterm pigs were provided total parenteral nutrition (1.5 d) followed by enteral feeding (2 d) with porcine colostrum (COLOS; n = 5), formula (FORM; n = 9), or formula with probiotics (FORM-P; Bifidobacterium animalis and Lactobacillus: L. acidophilus, L. casei, L. pentosus, L. plantarum; n = 13). Clinical NEC scores were reduced (P < 0.05) in FORM-P (2.0 +/- 0.2) and COLOS groups (1.7 +/- 0.5) compared with FORM pigs (3.4 +/- 0.6). Lower NEC scores were associated with elevated intestinal weight, mucosa proportion, villus height, RNA integrity, and brush border aminopeptidase A and N activities, and lower gastric organic acid concentration in the FORM-P and COLOS groups (P < 0.05). Diversity of the mucosa-associated bacteria in the distal small intestine was similar among formula-fed pigs, yet the abundance of specific bacterial groups differed between FORM-P and FORM pigs. FORM-P pigs had lower colonization density of a potential pathogen, Clostridium perfringens, and had commensal Lactobacillus bacteria more closely associated with enterocytes along the villus-crypt axis relative to FORM pigs. These results suggest that probiotic administration immediately after birth promotes the colonization of a beneficial commensal microbiota capable of limiting the formula-induced mucosal atrophy, dysfunction, and pathogen load in preterm neonates, thereby reducing the incidence and severity of NEC. PMID:18641188

  6. Antagonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} induces cerebellar amyloid-{beta} levels and motor dysfunction in APP/PS1 transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Jing; Sun, Bing; Chen, Kui; Fan, Li; Wang, Zhao

    2009-07-03

    Recent evidences show that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) is involved in the modulation of the amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) cascade causing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and treatment with PPAR{gamma} agonists protects against AD pathology. However, the function of PPAR{gamma} steady-state activity in A{beta} cascade and AD pathology remains unclear. In this study, an antagonist of PPAR{gamma}, GW9662, was injected into the fourth ventricle of APP/PS1 transgenic mice to inhibit PPAR{gamma} activity in cerebellum. The results show that inhibition of PPAR{gamma} significantly induced A{beta} levels in cerebellum and caused cerebellar motor dysfunction in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Moreover, GW9662 treatment markedly decreased the cerebellar levels of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), which is responsible for the cellular degradation of A{beta}. Since cerebellum is spared from significant A{beta} accumulation and neurotoxicity in AD patients and animal models, these findings suggest a crucial role of PPAR{gamma} steady-state activity in protection of cerebellum against AD pathology.

  7. Sendai Virus Induces Persistent Olfactory Dysfunction in a Murine Model of PVOD via Effects on Apoptosis, Cell Proliferation, and Response to Odorants

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jun; Pinto, Jayant M.; Cui, Xiaolan; Zhang, Henghui; Li, Li; Liu, Yulong; Wu, Chan; Wei, Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Viral infection is a common cause of olfactory dysfunction. The complexities of studying post-viral olfactory loss in humans have impaired further progress in understanding the underlying mechanism. Recently, evidence from clinical studies has implicated Parainfluenza virus 3 as a causal agent. An animal model of post viral olfactory disorders (PVOD) would allow better understanding of disease pathogenesis and represent a major advance in the field. Objective To develop a mouse model of PVOD by evaluating the effects of Sendai virus (SeV), the murine counterpart of Parainfluenza virus, on olfactory function and regenerative ability of the olfactory epithelium. Methods C57BL/6 mice (6–8 months old) were inoculated intranasally with SeV or ultraviolet (UV)-inactivated virus (UV-SeV). On days 3, 10, 15, 30 and 60 post-infection, olfactory epithelium was harvested and analyzed by histopathology and immunohistochemical detection of S-phase nuclei. We also measured apoptosis by TUNEL assay and viral load by real-time PCR. The buried food test (BFT) was used to measure olfactory function of mice at day 60. In parallel, cultured murine olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) infected with SeV or UV-SeV were tested for odorant-mixture response by measuring changes in intracellular calcium concentrations indicated by fura-4 AM assay. Results Mice infected with SeV suffered from olfactory dysfunction, peaking on day 15, with no loss observed with UV-SeV. At 60 days, four out of 12 mice infected with SeV still had not recovered, with continued normal function in controls. Viral copies of SeV persisted in both the olfactory epithelium (OE) and the olfactory bulb (OB) for at least 60 days. At day 10 and after, both unit length labeling index (ULLI) of apoptosis and ULLI of proliferation in the SeV group was markedly less than the UV-SeV group. In primary cultured OSNs infected by SeV, the percentage of cells responding to mixed odors was markedly lower in the SeV group

  8. Protective effect of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone agonist in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Czikora, Istvan; Sridhar, Supriya; Gorshkov, Boris; Alieva, Irina B.; Kasa, Anita; Gonzales, Joyce; Potapenko, Olena; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Pillich, Helena; Rick, Ferenc G.; Block, Norman L.; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Lucas, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Antibiotic treatment of patients infected with G− or G+ bacteria promotes release of the toxins lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and pneumolysin (PLY) in their lungs. Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 protects human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC), expressing splice variant 1 (SV-1) of the receptor, from PLY-induced barrier dysfunction. We investigated whether JI-34 also blunts LPS-induced hyperpermeability. Since GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) signaling can potentially stimulate both cAMP-dependent barrier-protective pathways as well as barrier-disruptive protein kinase C pathways, we studied their interaction in GHRH agonist-treated HL-MVEC, in the presence of PLY, by means of siRNA-mediated protein kinase A (PKA) depletion. Methods: Barrier function measurements were done in HL-MVEC monolayers using Electrical Cell substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) and VE-cadherin expression by Western blotting. Capillary leak was assessed by Evans Blue dye (EBD) incorporation. Cytokine generation in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by multiplex analysis. PKA and PKC-α activity were assessed by Western blotting. Results: GHRH agonist JI-34 significantly blunts LPS-induced barrier dysfunction, at least in part by preserving VE-cadherin expression, while not affecting inflammation. In addition to activating PKA, GHRH agonist also increases PKC-α activity in PLY-treated HL-MVEC. Treatment with PLY significantly decreases resistance in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but does so even more in PKA-depleted monolayers. Pretreatment with GHRH agonist blunts PLY-induced permeability in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but fails to improve barrier function in PKA-depleted PLY-treated monolayers. Conclusions: GHRH signaling in HL-MVEC protects from both LPS and PLY-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction and concurrently induces a barrier-protective PKA-mediated and a barrier-disruptive PKC-α-induced pathway in the presence of PLY, the

  9. Protective Capacity of Resveratrol, a Natural Polyphenolic Compound, against Deoxynivalenol-Induced Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction and Bacterial Translocation.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ka-Ho; Wan, Murphy Lam Yim; El-Nezami, Hani; Wang, Mingfu

    2016-05-16

    Contamination of food/feedstuffs by mycotoxins is a serious problem worldwide, causing severe economic losses and serious health problems in animals/humans. Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a major mycotoxin contaminant and is known to impair intestinal barrier function. Grapes and red wine are rich in polyphenols, such as resveratrol (RES), which has striking antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. RES is a food-derived component; therefore, it may be simultaneously present with DON in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to explore in vitro protective effects of RES against DON-induced intestinal damage. The results showed that RES could protect DON-induced bacteria translocation because of enhanced of intestinal barrier function by restoring the DON-induced decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance and increase in paracellular permeability. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that RES protects against DON-induced barrier dysfunction by promoting the assembly of claudin-4 in the tight junction complex. This is probably mediated through modulation of IL-6 and IL-8 secretion via mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways. Our results imply that RES can protect against DON-induced intestinal damage and that RES may be used as a novel dietary intervention strategy to reduce DON toxicity in animals/humans. PMID:27058607

  10. Urinary Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Urinary Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... dysfunction is normal following initial therapy for localized prostate cancer. But it’s important to realize that not all ...

  11. Bacterial senescence: protein oxidation in non-proliferating cells is dictated by the accuracy of the ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, Manuel; Fredriksson, Åsa; Henriksson, Jaqueline; Nyström, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the causal factors behind the age-related oxidation of proteins during arrest of cell proliferation. A proteomic approach demonstrated that protein oxidation in non-proliferating cells is observed primarily for proteins being produced in a number of aberrant isoforms. Also, these cells exhibited a reduced translational fidelity as demonstrated by both proteomic analysis and genetic measurements of nonsense suppression. Mutants harboring hyperaccurate ribosomes exhibited a drastically attenuated protein oxidation during growth arrest. In contrast, oxidation was augmented in mutants with error-prone ribosomes. Oxidation increased concomitantly with a reduced rate of translation, indicating that the production of aberrant, and oxidized proteins, is not the result of titration of the co-translational folding machinery. The age-related accumulation of the chaperones, DnaK and GroEL, was drastically attenuated in the hyperaccurate rpsL mutant, demonstrating that the reduced translational fidelity in growth-arrested cells may also be a primary cause for the induction of the heat shock regulon. The data point to an alternative way of approaching the causal factors involved in protein oxidation in eukaryotic G0 cells. PMID:11566891

  12. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces actin reorganization, intercellular gap formation, and endothelial barrier dysfunction in pulmonary vascular endothelial cells: concurrent F-actin depolymerization and new actin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Goldblum, S E; Ding, X; Brann, T W; Campbell-Washington, J

    1993-10-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) influences pulmonary vascular endothelial barrier function in vitro. We studied whether LPS regulates endothelial barrier function through actin reorganization. Postconfluent bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers were exposed to Escherichia coli 0111:B4 LPS 10 ng/ml or media for up to 6 h and evaluated for: 1) transendothelial 14C-albumin flux, 2) F-actin organization with fluorescence microscopy, 3) F-actin quantitation by spectrofluorometry, and 4) monomeric G-actin levels by the DNAse 1 inhibition assay. LPS induced increments in 14C-albumin flux (P < 0.001) and intercellular gap formation at > or = 2-6 h. During this same time period the endothelial F-actin pool was not significantly changed compared to simultaneous media controls. Mean (+/- SE) G-actin (micrograms/mg total protein) was significantly (P < 0.002) increased compared to simultaneous media controls at 2, 4, and 6 h but not at 0.5 or 1 h. Prior F-actin stabilization with phallicidin protected against the LPS-induced increments in G-actin (P = 0.040) as well as changes in barrier function (P < 0.0001). Prior protein synthesis inhibition unmasked an LPS-induced decrement in F-actin (P = 0.0044), blunted the G-actin increment (P = 0.010), and increased LPS-induced changes in endothelial barrier function (P < 0.0001). Therefore, LPS induces pulmonary vascular endothelial F-actin depolymerization, intercellular gap formation, and barrier dysfunction. Over the same time period, LPS increased total actin (P < 0.0001) and new actin synthesis (P = 0.0063) which may be a compensatory endothelial cell response to LPS-induced F-actin depolymerization. PMID:8408232

  13. Bowel Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Bowel Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... rectal worse. Back to Side Effects Print | Understanding Prostate Cancer Research Faces of Prostate Cancer About PCF Take ...

  14. Down-regulation of the mitochondrial matrix peptidase ClpP in muscle cells causes mitochondrial dysfunction and decreases cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Deepa, Sathyaseelan S; Bhaskaran, Shylesh; Ranjit, Rojina; Qaisar, Rizwan; Nair, Binoj C; Liu, Yuhong; Walsh, Michael E; Fok, Wilson C; Van Remmen, Holly

    2016-02-01

    The caseinolytic peptidase P (ClpP) is the endopeptidase component of the mitochondrial matrix ATP-dependent ClpXP protease. ClpP degrades unfolded proteins to maintain mitochondrial protein homeostasis and is involved in the initiation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)). Outside of an integral role in the UPR(mt), the cellular function of ClpP is not well characterized in mammalian cells. To investigate the role of ClpP in mitochondrial function, we generated C2C12 muscle cells that are deficient in ClpP using siRNA or stable knockdown using lentiviral transduction. Reduction of ClpP levels by ~70% in C2C12 muscle cells resulted in a number of mitochondrial alterations including reduced mitochondrial respiration and reduced oxygen consumption rate in response to electron transport chain (ETC) complex I and II substrates. The reduction in ClpP altered mitochondrial morphology, changed the expression level of mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and blunted UPR(mt) induction. In addition, ClpP deficient cells showed increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased membrane potential. At the cellular level, reduction of ClpP impaired myoblast differentiation, cell proliferation and elevated phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) suggesting an inhibition of translation. Our study is the first to define the effects of ClpP deficiency on mitochondrial function in muscle cells in vitro. In addition, we have uncovered novel effects of ClpP on mitochondrial morphology, cell proliferation and protein translation pathways in muscle cells. PMID:26721594

  15. Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Co-Activator-1α Cooperate to Protect Cells from DNA Damage and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Vascular Senescence.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2015-10-01

    Reduced telomere length with increasing age in dividing cells has been implicated in contributing to the pathologies of human aging, which include cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, through induction of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening results from the absence of telomerase, an enzyme required to maintain telomere length. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the protein subunit of telomerase, is expressed only transiently in a subset of adult somatic cells, which include stem cells and smooth muscle cells. A recent report from Xiong and colleagues demonstrates a pivotal role for the transcription co-factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator-1α (PGC-1α) in maintaining TERT expression and preventing vascular senescence and atherosclerosis in mice. Ablation of PGC-1α reduced TERT expression and increased DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in shortened telomeres and vascular senescence. In the ApoE(-/-) mouse model of atherosclerosis, forced expression of PGC-1α increased expression of TERT, extended telomeres, and reversed genomic DNA damage, vascular senescence, and the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Alpha lipoic acid (ALA) stimulated expression of PGC-1α and TERT and reversed DNA damage, vascular senescence, and atherosclerosis, similarly to ectopic expression of PGC-1α. ALA stimulated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling, which in turn activated the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a co-factor for PGC-1α expression. The possibility that ALA might induce TERT to extend telomeres in human cells suggests that ALA may be useful in treating atherosclerosis and other aging-related diseases. However, further investigation is needed to identify whether ALA induces TERT in human cells, which cell types are susceptible, and whether such changes have clinical significance. PMID:26414604

  16. Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Euy-Myoung; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing number of patients affected, the understanding of diastolic dysfunction and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is still poor. Clinical trials, largely based on successful treatments for systolic heart failure, have been disappointing, suggesting that HFpEF has a different pathology to that of systolic dysfunction. In this review, general concepts, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of diastolic dysfunction are summarized, with an emphasis on new experiments suggesting that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of at least some forms of the disease. This observation has lead to potential new diagnostics and therapeutics for diastolic dysfunction and heart failure caused by diastolic dysfunction. PMID:25746522

  17. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Michelle L.; Chourasia, Aparajita H.; Macleod, Kay F.

    2013-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell growth and tumorigenesis is emerging beyond Warburg as an area of research that is under-explored in terms of its significance for clinical management of cancer. Work discussed in this review focuses less on the Warburg effect and more on mitochondria and how dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cell cycle, gene expression, metabolism, cell viability, and other established aspects of cell growth and stress responses. There is increasing evidence that key oncogenes and tumor suppressors modulate mitochondrial dynamics through important signaling pathways and that mitochondrial mass and function vary between tumors and individuals but the significance of these events for cancer are not fully appreciated. We explore the interplay between key molecules involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion and in apoptosis, as well as in mitophagy, biogenesis, and spatial dynamics of mitochondria and consider how these distinct mechanisms are coordinated in response to physiological stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Importantly, we examine how deregulation of these processes in cancer has knock on effects for cell proliferation and growth. We define major forms of mitochondrial dysfunction and address the extent to which the functional consequences of such dysfunction can be determined and exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24350057

  18. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yafi, Faysal A; Jenkins, Lawrence; Albersen, Maarten; Corona, Giovanni; Isidori, Andrea M; Goldfarb, Shari; Maggi, Mario; Nelson, Christian J; Parish, Sharon; Salonia, Andrea; Tan, Ronny; Mulhall, John P; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a multidimensional but common male sexual dysfunction that involves an alteration in any of the components of the erectile response, including organic, relational and psychological. Roles for nonendocrine (neurogenic, vasculogenic and iatrogenic) and endocrine pathways have been proposed. Owing to its strong association with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, cardiac assessment may be warranted in men with symptoms of erectile dysfunction. Minimally invasive interventions to relieve the symptoms of erectile dysfunction include lifestyle modifications, oral drugs, injected vasodilator agents and vacuum erection devices. Surgical therapies are reserved for the subset of patients who have contraindications to these nonsurgical interventions, those who experience adverse effects from (or are refractory to) medical therapy and those who also have penile fibrosis or penile vascular insufficiency. Erectile dysfunction can have deleterious effects on a man's quality of life; most patients have symptoms of depression and anxiety related to sexual performance. These symptoms, in turn, affect his partner's sexual experience and the couple's quality of life. This Primer highlights numerous aspects of erectile dysfunction, summarizes new treatment targets and ongoing preclinical studies that evaluate new pharmacotherapies, and covers the topic of regenerative medicine, which represents the future of sexual medicine. PMID:27188339

  19. Restoring Functional Status: A Long-Term Case Report of Severe Lung and Ventilatory Muscle Pump Dysfunction Involving Recurrent Bacterial Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Sobush, Dennis C.; Laatsch, Linda; Lipchik, Randolph J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Prolonged mechanical ventilation contributes to immobility and deconditioning making efforts to safely discontinue ventilator support desirable. This case report documents how implementing physical therapy treatment interventions, based on the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, can help to restore a person's functional status even after multiple years of mechanical ventilation dependency. Case Description A patient (female; aged 63 years) with severe restrictive and obstructive ventilatory impairment has survived 34 recurrent pneumonias involving 6 bacterial pathogens while being mechanically ventilated at home. A 3-year study was approved and informed consent obtained for a home exercise program of resistive extremity and inspiratory muscle training along with exercise reconditioning. Tolerable distances walked, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, hours spent on versus off mechanical ventilation, activities performed within and around her home, and community excursions taken were charted. Outcomes Daily time tolerated off the ventilator improved from less than one to 12 hours, distance walked in 6 minutes increased 33%, and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures improved 62% and 9.6% respectively. These improvements made out-of-home social excursions possible. Discussion and Conclusions This patient's functional status improved following multiple physical therapy interventions dictated by the evaluation of initial physical therapy examination findings according to the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. Long term mechanical ventilator dependency in the home environment did not exclude this patient from achieving clinically significant gains in functional status even when having severe restrictive and obstructive ventilator impairment. PMID:22833704

  20. Gustatory dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, T.; Abikshyeet, P.; Sitra, G.; Gokulanathan, S.; Vaithiyanadane, V.; Jeelani, S.

    2014-01-01

    Tastes in humans provide a vital tool for screening soluble chemicals for food evaluation, selection, and avoidance of potentially toxic substances. Taste or gustatory dysfunctions are implicated in loss of appetite, unintended weight loss, malnutrition, and reduced quality of life. Dental practitioners are often the first clinicians to be presented with complaints about taste dysfunction. This brief review provides a summary of the common causes of taste disorders, problems associated with assessing taste function in a clinical setting and management options available to the dental practitioner. PMID:25210380

  1. Memory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Amici, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Memory is the cognitive ability that allows to acquire, store and recall information; its dysfunction is called amnesia and can be a presentation of unilateral ischemic stroke in the territory of the posterior cerebral and anterior choroidal artery as well as subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:22377863

  2. Ejaculatory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Elizabeth; Carpenter, Christina; Oates, Robert D

    2014-02-01

    Ejaculatory dysfunction may occur after many different disorders ranging from traumatic spinal cord injury to diabetes mellitus. With an understanding of the many facets and nuances of the ejaculatory apparatus, both anatomic and neurologic, the well-versed clinician can proceed along a safe, efficient, and appropriate treatment algorithm to help affected men and their partners achieve parenthood. PMID:24286771

  3. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... or vascular problems, will have a more difficult time returning to pre-treatment function. Management of Erectile Dysfunction When a man is sexually aroused, the erectile nerves running alongside the penis stimulate the ... blood to rush in. At the same time, tiny valves at the base of the penis ...

  4. Sensory Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Web version Sensory Dysfunction Overview Why are smell and taste important? Your senses of smell and taste let you fully enjoy the scents ... bitter and sour. Flavor involves both taste and smell. For example, because a person is able to ...

  5. Dysfunctional voiding.

    PubMed

    Chiozza, M L

    2002-01-01

    Wetting may be considered the Cinderella of paediatric medicine. Before discussing dysfunctional voiding, the milestones of the normal development of continence in the child and the definitions used to describe this topic are presented. Bladder storage requires (1): accommodation of increasing volumes of urine at low intravesical pressure and with appropriate sensation; (2): a bladder outlet that is closed and not modified during increase in intra-abdominal pressure; (3): absence of involuntary bladder contractions. Development of continence in the child involves three independent factors maturing concomitantly: (1) development of normal bladder capacity; (2) maturation of urethral sphincter function; (3) development of neural control over bladder-sphincter function. All these processes are discussed. Abnormalities of any of these maturational sequences, which run parallel and overlapping, may result in clinically evident abnormalities of bladder sphincter control. Although dysfunctional voiding (DV) in children is very common its prevalence has not been well studied and, to date, and its origin is not well known. In a correct evaluation of functional voiding we must take into account different elements: the bladder capacity (that increases during the first 8 years of life roughly 30 ml per year), the micturition frequency, post-void residual volumes, bladder dynamics, urinary flow rates. Thus the correct assessment of children with lower urinary tract dysfunction should include a detailed history. Signs of DV range from urge syndrome to complex incontinence patterns during the day and the night. In addition to incontinence problems, children may have frequency, urgency, straining to void, weak or interrupted urinary stream, urinary tract infections (UTIs) and chronic constipation with or without encopresis. DV are also referred in enuretic children who wet the bed more than one time per night and have a functional bladder capacity lower than attended for age

  6. [Revisiting meibomian gland dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Baudouin, C

    2014-12-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunctions (MGD) are frequent affections, sometimes asymptomatic, more often responsible for disabling, potentially severe, manifestations. MGD is indeed the most frequent cause of dry eye, through the induction of tear film instability. However, eyelid inflammation, microbial proliferation that modifies melting temperature of meibum, frequent association with skin diseases, as well as potentially severe corneal complications make them complex multifactorial disorders. Complementary mechanisms combine to actually result in a vicious circle, or more accurately a double vicious cycle. The first one is self-stimulated by the microbiological changes, which create their own conditions for MGD development. The second one is related to tear film instability that results from MGD and is also self-stimulated through hyperosmolarity and inflammatory phenomena, which are both consequence and cause of dry eye. We herein propose a new pathophysiological schema on MGD, in order to better identify mechanisms and more efficiently target therapeutics. PMID:25455142

  7. Carbohydrate Metabolism Is Perturbed in Peroxisome-deficient Hepatocytes Due to Mitochondrial Dysfunction, AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activation, and Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ Coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) Suppression*

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Annelies; Fraisl, Peter; van den Berg, Sjoerd; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Van Kampen, Antoine; Rider, Mark H.; Takemori, Hiroshi; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Carmeliet, Peter; Baes, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic peroxisomes are essential for lipid conversions that include the formation of mature conjugated bile acids, the degradation of branched chain fatty acids, and the synthesis of docosahexaenoic acid. Through unresolved mechanisms, deletion of functional peroxisomes from mouse hepatocytes (L-Pex5−/− mice) causes severe structural and functional abnormalities at the inner mitochondrial membrane. We now demonstrate that the peroxisomal and mitochondrial anomalies trigger energy deficits, as shown by increased AMP/ATP and decreased NAD+/NADH ratios. This causes suppression of gluconeogenesis and glycogen synthesis and up-regulation of glycolysis. As a consequence, L-Pex5−/− mice combust more carbohydrates resulting in lower body weights despite increased food intake. The perturbation of carbohydrate metabolism does not require a long term adaptation to the absence of functional peroxisomes as similar metabolic changes were also rapidly induced by acute elimination of Pex5 via adenoviral administration of Cre. Despite its marked activation, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) was not causally involved in these metabolic perturbations, because all abnormalities still manifested when peroxisomes were eliminated in a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α null background. Instead, AMP-activated kinase activation was responsible for the down-regulation of glycogen synthesis and induction of glycolysis. Remarkably, PGC-1α was suppressed despite AMP-activated kinase activation, a paradigm not previously reported, and they jointly contributed to impaired gluconeogenesis. In conclusion, lack of functional peroxisomes from hepatocytes results in marked disturbances of carbohydrate homeostasis, which are consistent with adaptations to an energy deficit. Because this is primarily due to impaired mitochondrial ATP production, these L-Pex5-deficient livers can also be considered as a model for secondary mitochondrial hepatopathies. PMID

  8. Altered T Lymphocyte Proliferation upon Lipopolysaccharide Challenge Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Poujol, Fanny; Monneret, Guillaume; Pachot, Alexandre; Textoris, Julien; Venet, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Context Sepsis is characterized by the development of adaptive immune cell alterations, which intensity and duration are associated with increased risk of health-care associated infections and mortality. However, pathophysiological mechanisms leading to such lymphocyte dysfunctions are not completely understood, although both intrinsic lymphocyte alterations and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) dysfunctions are most likely involved. Study The aim of the current study was to evaluate whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS, mimicking initial Gram negative bacterial challenge) could directly impact lymphocyte function after sepsis. Therefore, we explored ex-vivo the effect of LPS priming on human T lymphocyte proliferation induced by different stimuli. Results We showed that LPS priming of PBMCs reduced T cell proliferative response and altered IFNγ secretion after stimulation with OKT3 but not with phytohaemagglutinin or anti-CD2/CD3/CD28-coated beads stimulations. Interestingly only LPS priming of monocytes led to decreased T cell proliferative response as opposed to LPS priming of lymphocytes. Importantly, LPS priming was associated with reduced expression of HLA-DR, CD86 and CD64 on monocytes but not with the modification of CD3, CTLA4, PD-1 and CD28 expressions on lymphocytes. Finally, IFNγ stimulation restored monocytes accessory functions and T cell proliferative response to OKT3. Conclusion We conclude that LPS priming does not directly impact lymphocyte functions but reduces APC’s capacity to activate T cells. This recapitulates ex vivo indirect mechanisms participating in sepsis-induced lymphocyte alterations and suggests that monocyte-targeting immunoadjuvant therapies in sepsis may also help to improve adaptive immune dysfunctions. Direct mechanisms impacting lymphocytes being also at play during sepsis, the respective parts of direct versus indirect sepsis-induced lymphocyte alterations remain to be evaluated in clinic. PMID:26642057

  9. Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Society for Reproductive Medicine Sexual dysfunction and infertility What is sexual dysfunction and how common is ... and 40% of women. For couples dealing with infertility, it is even more common. Often, people ignore ...

  10. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  11. Erectile Dysfunction in Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Veronika K; Walker, Ulrich A

    2016-08-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a major issue in systemic sclerosis (SSc) as it is observed in around 80 to 90 % of men with this connective tissue disease. ED greatly impacts the quality of life and should be actively addressed as a common complication. Whereas ED in the general population is usually associated with risk factors for atherosclerosis as well as cardiovascular disease, the main aetiology of ED in SSc is microangiopathic. In SSc, the blood flow is reduced in the small penile arteries due to corporal fibrosis and myointimal proliferation. There are no data on the prevention of ED in SSc. On-demand phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors have little effect in improving erectile function, but daily or alternate day regimens of long-acting phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors provide a measurable, although often limited, benefit. When intracavernous prostaglandin E1 injections are also ineffective, the implantation of a penile prosthesis should be considered as an option. PMID:27402106

  12. Increased Production of Lysozyme Associated with Bacterial Proliferation in Barrett's Esophagitis, Chronic Gastritis, Gluten-induced Atrophic Duodenitis (Celiac Disease), Lymphocytic Colitis, Collagenous Colitis, Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Colitis.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Carlos A

    2015-12-01

    The mucosa of the esophagus, the stomach, the small intestine, the large intestine and rectum are unremittingly challenged by adverse micro-environmental factors, such as ingested pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria, and harsh secretions with digestive properties with disparate pH, as well as bacteria and secretions from upstream GI organs. Despite the apparently inauspicious mixture of secretions and bacteria, the normal GI mucosa retains a healthy state of cell renewal. To by-pass the tough microenvironment, the epithelia of the GI react by speeding-up cell exfoliation, by increasing peristalsis, eliminating bacteria through secretion of plasma cell-immunoglobulins and by increasing production of natural antibacterial enzymes (lysozyme) and host defense peptides (defensin-5). Lysozyme was recently found up-regulated in Barrett's esophagitis, in chronic gastritis, in gluten-induced atrophic duodenitis (celiac disease), in collagenous colitis, in lymphocytic colitis and in Crohn's colitis. This up-regulation is a response directed towards the special types of bacteria thriving in the microenvironment in each of the aforementioned clinical inflammatory maladies. The purpose of that up-regulation is to protect the mucosa affected by the ongoing chronic inflammation. Bacterial antibiotic resistance continues to exhaust our supply of effective antibiotics. The future challenge is how to solve the increasing menace of bacterial resistance to anti-bacterial drugs. Further research on natural anti-bacterial enzymes such as lysozyme, appears mandatory. PMID:26637845

  13. Germ Cells Need Folate to Proliferate.

    PubMed

    Walker, Amy K

    2016-07-11

    In this issue of Developmental Cell, Chaudhari and colleagues (2016) use a novel method to create an in vitro proliferative cell line from tumorous C. elegans germ cells, and in the process discover that bacterial folates act as signals for proliferation, independent of their roles as vitamins. PMID:27404353

  14. [Neurogenic erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Ramos, Antonio Sánchez; Durán, Juan Antonio Godino; Oliviero, Antonio

    2010-10-01

    Neurogenic erectile dysfunction is a consequence of alterations in neural pathways, autonomic, somatic, the combination of both or brain components that induce erection. This review aims to explain the physiopathological mechanisms of the most frequent neurological alterations causing erectile dysfunction and sexual disorders. PMID:20978292

  15. [Pharmacotherapy of erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Kovalev, V A; Koroleva, S V; Kamalov, A A

    2000-01-01

    Among the drugs used to treat erectile dysfunction most common are prostaglandins El, viagra, iochimbin, vasodilators and desaggregants, vitamins, biogenic stimulators, etc. The comparative analysis of their efficacy was made in 360 patients with erectile dysfunction, primarily at subcompensated stage, aged 17-83 years. Organic and psychogenic erectile dysfunctions were diagnosed in 69 and 31% of the patients, respectively. Intracavernous injections of prostaglandin El (Caverject) were effective in 74%, transurethral alprostadil (MUSE) when adjusting the dose--in 38.7% of the patients. Iochimbin in patients with organic and psychogenic forms of erectile dysfunctions was effective in 25 and 40% of patients, respectively. In 26.3 and 19% of such patients the response was obtained after use of the combination including xantinol, nicotinate, trental, biogenic stimulators and adaptogens. Viagra was effective in 60 and 77.3% of patients with psychogenic and organic erectile dysfunctions, respectively. PMID:16856460

  16. Insect endosymbiont proliferation is limited by lipid availability

    PubMed Central

    Herren, Jeremy K; Paredes, Juan C; Schüpfer, Fanny; Arafah, Karim; Bulet, Philippe; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Spiroplasma poulsonii is a maternally transmitted bacterial endosymbiont that is naturally associated with Drosophila melanogaster. S. poulsonii resides extracellularly in the hemolymph, where it must acquire metabolites to sustain proliferation. In this study, we find that Spiroplasma proliferation specifically depletes host hemolymph diacylglyceride, the major lipid class transported by the lipoprotein, Lpp. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Lpp expression, which reduces the amount of circulating lipids, inhibits Spiroplasma proliferation demonstrating that bacterial proliferation requires hemolymph-lipids. Altogether, our study shows that an insect endosymbiont acquires specific lipidic metabolites from the transport lipoproteins in the hemolymph of its host. In addition, we show that the proliferation of this endosymbiont is limited by the availability of hemolymph lipids. This feature could limit endosymbiont over-proliferation under conditions of host nutrient limitation as lipid availability is strongly influenced by the nutritional state. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02964.001 PMID:25027439

  17. Insect endosymbiont proliferation is limited by lipid availability.

    PubMed

    Herren, Jeremy K; Paredes, Juan C; Schüpfer, Fanny; Arafah, Karim; Bulet, Philippe; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Spiroplasma poulsonii is a maternally transmitted bacterial endosymbiont that is naturally associated with Drosophila melanogaster. S. poulsonii resides extracellularly in the hemolymph, where it must acquire metabolites to sustain proliferation. In this study, we find that Spiroplasma proliferation specifically depletes host hemolymph diacylglyceride, the major lipid class transported by the lipoprotein, Lpp. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Lpp expression, which reduces the amount of circulating lipids, inhibits Spiroplasma proliferation demonstrating that bacterial proliferation requires hemolymph-lipids. Altogether, our study shows that an insect endosymbiont acquires specific lipidic metabolites from the transport lipoproteins in the hemolymph of its host. In addition, we show that the proliferation of this endosymbiont is limited by the availability of hemolymph lipids. This feature could limit endosymbiont over-proliferation under conditions of host nutrient limitation as lipid availability is strongly influenced by the nutritional state. PMID:25027439

  18. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions surfactant dysfunction surfactant dysfunction Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Surfactant dysfunction is a lung disorder that causes breathing ...

  19. Bacterial Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Jastrab, Jordan B.; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Interest in bacterial proteasomes was sparked by the discovery that proteasomal degradation is required for the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest pathogens. Although bacterial proteasomes are structurally similar to their eukaryotic and archaeal homologs, there are key differences in their mechanisms of assembly, activation, and substrate targeting for degradation. In this article, we compare and contrast bacterial proteasomes with their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts, and we discuss recent advances in our understanding of how bacterial proteasomes function to influence microbial physiology. PMID:26488274

  20. Endothelial dysfunction: a comprehensive appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Esper, Ricardo J; Nordaby, Roberto A; Vilariño, Jorge O; Paragano, Antonio; Cacharrón, José L; Machado, Rogelio A

    2006-01-01

    The endothelium is a thin monocelular layer that covers all the inner surface of the blood vessels, separating the circulating blood from the tissues. It is not an inactive organ, quite the opposite. It works as a receptor-efector organ and responds to each physical or chemical stimulus with the release of the correct substance with which it may maintain vasomotor balance and vascular-tissue homeostasis. It has the property of producing, independently, both agonistic and antagonistic substances that help to keep homeostasis and its function is not only autocrine, but also paracrine and endocrine. In this way it modulates the vascular smooth muscle cells producing relaxation or contraction, and therefore vasodilatation or vasoconstriction. The endothelium regulating homeostasis by controlling the production of prothrombotic and antithrombotic components, and fibrynolitics and antifibrynolitics. Also intervenes in cell proliferation and migration, in leukocyte adhesion and activation and in immunological and inflammatory processes. Cardiovascular risk factors cause oxidative stress that alters the endothelial cells capacity and leads to the so called endothelial "dysfunction" reducing its capacity to maintain homeostasis and leads to the development of pathological inflammatory processes and vascular disease. There are different techniques to evaluate the endothelium functional capacity, that depend on the amount of NO produced and the vasodilatation effect. The percentage of vasodilatation with respect to the basal value represents the endothelial functional capacity. Taking into account that shear stress is one of the most important stimulants for the synthesis and release of NO, the non-invasive technique most often used is the transient flow-modulate "endothelium-dependent" post-ischemic vasodilatation, performed on conductance arteries such as the brachial, radial or femoral arteries. This vasodilatation is compared with the vasodilatation produced by drugs that

  1. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  2. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management. PMID:25108498

  3. Eustachian Tube Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... flying (because of altitude changes). Riding in elevators, driving through mountains or diving may also make your symptoms worse. Causes & Risk Factors What causes eustachian tube dysfunction? The most common ...

  4. Tibial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... a loss of movement or sensation in the foot from damage to the tibial nerve. ... Tibial nerve dysfunction is an unusual form of peripheral ... the calf and foot muscles. A problem in function with a single ...

  5. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  6. Cellular dysfunction in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Singer, Mervyn

    2008-12-01

    Cellular dysfunction is a commonplace sequelum of sepsis and other systemic inflammatory conditions. Impaired energy production (related to mitochondrial inhibition, damage, and reduced protein turnover) appears to be a core mechanism underlying the development of organ dysfunction. The reduction in energy availability appears to trigger a metabolic shutdown that impairs normal functioning of the cell. This may well represent an adaptive mechanism analogous to hibernation that prevents a massive degree of cell death and thus enables eventual recovery in survivors. PMID:18954700

  7. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Pamela

    1989-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction takes place in the context of women's lives and affects their sexuality and self-esteem. Awareness of these influences are vital to the management of the dysfunction and the promotion of positive sexuality. The family physician's contribution to both the prevention and management of sexual concerns includes an awareness of societal influences and facilitation of a woman's sense of her own power and control over her life. PMID:21248971

  8. Genitourinary dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamanishi, Tomonori; Kishi, Masahiko

    2010-01-15

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency) and sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction) are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, genitourinary autonomic dysfunctions are often nonresponsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine-basal ganglia circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. By contrast, hypothalamic dysfunction is mostly responsible for the sexual dysfunction (decrease in libido and erection) in PD, via altered dopamine-oxytocin pathways, which normally promote libido and erection. The pathophysiology of the genitourinary dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors are used to treat sexual dysfunction in PD. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life. PMID:20077468

  9. Bacterial Keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... very quickly, and if left untreated, can cause blindness. The bacteria usually responsible for this type of ... to intense ultraviolet radiation exposure, e.g. snow blindness or welder's arc eye). Next Bacterial Keratitis Symptoms ...

  10. PGC-1α, Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johri, Ashu; Chandra, Abhishek; Beal, M. Flint

    2013-01-01

    The constant high energy demand of neurons makes them rely heavily on their mitochondria. Dysfunction of mitochondrial energy metabolism leads to reduced ATP production, impaired calcium buffering, and generation of reactive oxygen species. There is strong evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction results in neurodegeneration and may contribute to the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease (HD). Studies over the past few years have implicated an impaired function of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), a transcriptional master co-regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis, metabolism and antioxidant defenses, in causing mitochondrial dysfunction in HD. Here we have attempted to discuss in a nutshell, the key findings on the role of PGC-1α in mitochondrial dysfunction in HD and its potential as a therapeutic target to cure HD. PMID:23602910

  11. Nuclear Proliferation Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Professor William Potter

    2005-11-28

    William C. Potter, Director of the Center for Non Proliferation Studies and the Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, will present nuclear proliferation challenges following the 2005 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. In addition to elucidating reasons for, and implications of, the conference’s failure, Dr. Potter will discuss common ground between nuclear proliferation and terrorism issues and whether corrective action can be taken.

  12. Hop Shoot Proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop shoot proliferation disease has been described in Poland., and is associated with phytoplasma infection. Hop shoot proliferation occurs rarely and seems to be of little economic concern in most regions of hop production. Hop shoot proliferation is thought to be caused by aster yellows phytoplas...

  13. Neutrophil dysfunction and increased susceptibility to infection.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Pastorino, G; Dallegri, F; Sacchetti, C

    1995-09-01

    A critical evaluation of 3 years' experience using laboratory screening to detect neutrophil dysfunction is described. Neutrophil dysfunctions in patients with recurrent bacterial infections were investigated by using the following screening tests: (1) neutrophil chemotaxis towards N-formylmethionyl peptides (FMLP) and the complement fragment C5a; (2) neutrophil production of superoxide anions (O2-) in response to phorbol myristate acetate and opsonized zymosan particles; and (3) examination of May-Grünwald and myeloperoxidase cytochemical staining of peripheral blood smears. These tests were carried out in 100 patients suffering from infections and suspected of having altered neutrophil functional competence. A minority of patients was found to have well defined neutrophil dysfunction syndromes: chronic granulomatous disease (four cases), Chediak-Higashi disease (one case) and myeloperoxidase deficiency (one case). Of the remaining 94 patients, in whom infections localized to airways and/or skin predominated, 53 cases were found to have impaired chemotaxis (41 cases) or partial defects of the O2- production. Defects of chemotaxis toward FMLP and those towards both FLMP and C5a were the most frequent abnormalities. No defect was found in the other 41 patients. Moreover, impaired neutrophil chemotaxis was found in some patients with selective IgA deficiency (five cases) or immotile cilia syndrome (seven cases). The results suggest that (a) additional screening tests are required to ameliorate the efficiency of the diagnostic work-up of the patients suspected to have neutrophil dysfunction; and (b) further evaluation, also at the molecular level, should be considered at least in selected cases of non-classified neutrophil dysfunction in order to clarify diagnosis and plan rational therapeutic strategies. PMID:7498244

  14. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Robert F.

    1983-01-01

    Dysfunctional uterine bleeding is most commonly associated with chronic anovulation. Early diagnosis of anovulation is important; the induction of regular withdrawal periods using a progestin such as Provera prevents the development of endometrial hyperplasia with the subsequent inevitable occurrence of a heavy, frightening vaginal bleed. The etiology of dysfunctional uterine bleeding occurring during ovulatory cycles is unknown and all medical therapies at present are necessarily experimental. Hysterectomy is probably the treatment of choice for women who have finished their childbearing career and in whom persisting menorrhagia during ovulatory cycles results in anemia. PMID:21283453

  15. Dysfunctional endothelial cells directly stimulate cancer inflammation and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Franses, Joseph W.; Drosu, Natalia C.; Gibson, William J.; Chitalia, Vipul C.; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2013-01-01

    Although the influence of context-dependent endothelial cell regulation of vascular disease and repair is well-established, the privileged roles endothelial cells play as paracrine regulators of tumor progression has only recently become appreciated. We hypothesized that if the same endothelial physiology governs vascular and cancer biology then endothelial cell control in cancer should follow endothelial regulation of vascular health. Healthy endothelial cells promote vascular repair and inhibit tumor invasiveness and metastasis; dysfunctional endothelial cells have the opposite effects. We now ask if dysfunctionally activated endothelial cells will promote cancer cell inflammatory signaling and aggressive properties. Indeed, while factors released from quiescent ECs induce balanced inflammatory signaling, correlating with decreased proliferation and invasiveness, factors released from dysfunctional ECs robustly activated NF-κB and STAT3 signaling within cancer cells, correlating with increased in vitro invasiveness and decreased proliferation and survival. Furthermore, matrix-embedded dysfunctional endothelial cells stimulated intratumoral pro-inflammatory signaling and spontaneous metastasis, while simultaneously slowing net primary tumor growth, when implanted adjacent to Lewis lung carcinoma tumors. These studies may broaden our realization of the roles of endothelial function and dysfunction, increase understanding and control of the tumor microenvironment, and facilitate optimization of anti-angiogenic and vascular-modifying therapies in cancer and related diseases. PMID:23463345

  16. Effect of Vibration on Bacterial Growth and Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juergensmeyer, Elizabeth A.; Juergensmeyer, Margaret A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research grant was to provide a fundamental, systematic investigation of the effects of oscillatory acceleration on bacterial proliferation and their responses to antibiotics in a liquid medium.

  17. Perceptual-Motor Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Jean L.

    Discussed are theoretical and treatment aspects of perceptual motor dysfunction and rehabilitation in 4- to 12-year-old academically failing children involved in a 3-year investigation at the University of Kansas. The program is said to stress increasing the amount of stimulation received by sensory receptors of the vestibular, reflex, and haptic…

  18. Endothelin and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Tomoh; Sawamura, Tatsuya

    2006-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin (ET) produced in endothelial cells are leading molecules which regulate vascular function. Failure of the physiological balance between these two molecules is usually referred to as endothelial dysfunction. ET was initially identified as a potent vasoconstrictive peptide. Three ET isoforms and two ET receptors have been identified. One of the isoforms, ET-1, plays a significant role in many cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to induce endothelial dysfunction. The endothelial receptor for oxLDL was cloned, and named lectin-like oxidized receptor-1 (LOX-1). Activation of LOX-1 generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), and acivates a transcriptional factor, nuclear factor κB (NFκB), resulting in down-regulation of NO and up-regulation of ET-1. LOX-1 might be a key molecule in the generation of endothelial dysfunction. In endothelial dysfunction, ET-1 is an aggravating factor of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25792766

  19. Shared Parenting Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkat, Ira Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Joint custody of children is the most prevalent court ordered arrangement for families of divorce. A growing body of literature indicates that many parents engage in behaviors that are incompatible with shared parenting. This article provides specific criteria for a definition of the Shared Parenting Dysfunction. Clinical aspects of the phenomenon…

  20. Bacterial Immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of bacterial agents reside in and around the environment that can cause illness and death in a poultry flock. Many cause disseminated disease while others exert more local effects such as the respiratory or gastrointestinal tract. The host, for our current purposes the laying hen, has de...

  1. Soluble Heparan Sulfate in Serum of Septic Shock Patients Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Murine Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lukas; Peters, Carsten; Schmitz, Susanne; Moellmann, Julia; Martincuks, Antons; Heussen, Nicole; Lehrke, Michael; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Marx, Gernot; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    The heart is one of the most frequently affected organs in sepsis. Recent studies focused on lipopolysaccharide-induced mitochondrial dysfunction; however myocardial dysfunction is not restricted to gram-negative bacterial sepsis. The purpose of this study was to investigate circulating heparan sulfate (HS) as an endogenous danger associated molecule causing cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis. We used an in vitro model with native sera (SsP) and sera eliminated from HS (HS-free), both of septic shock patients, to stimulate murine cardiomyocytes. As determined by extracellular flux analyzing, SsP increased basal mitochondrial respiration, but reduced maximum mitochondrial respiration, compared with unstimulated cells (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively). Cells stimulated with HS-free serum revealed unaltered basal and maximum mitochondrial respiration, compared with unstimulated cells (P = 0.1174 and P = 0.8992, respectively). Cellular ATP-level were decreased in SsP-stimulated cells but unaltered in cells stimulated with HS-free serum compared with unstimulated cells (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.1593, respectively). Live-cell imaging revealed an increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in cells stimulated with SsP compared with cells stimulated with HS-free serum (P < 0.0001). Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα and PPARγ) and their co-activators PGC-1α, which regulate mitochondrial function, were studied using PCR. Cells stimulated with SsP showed downregulated PPARs and PGC-1α mRNA-levels compared with HS-free serum (P = 0.0082, P = 0.0128, and P = 0.0185, respectively). Blocking Toll-like receptor 4 revealed an inhibition of HS-dependent downregulation of PPARs and PGC-1α (all P < 0.0001). In conclusion, circulating HS in serum of septic shock patients cause cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that HS may be targets of therapeutics in septic

  2. [Erectile and Ejaculatory Dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Gross, Oliver; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel

    2015-11-25

    The inability to achieve an erection of the penis sufficient for sexual activity is called erectile dysfunction (ED). In most cases, the diagnosis can be made by medical history. The prevalence of ED in men at the age of 65 has been reported to be up to 50%. Premature ejaculation has a prevalence, up to 20% and is the most frequent ejaculatory dysfunction. The etiology of ED can involve psychological, vascular, neurogenic, hormonal or urogenital pathologies. The main pathophysiological mechanisms of ED are vascular disorders such as diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Because of the common pathophysiology, patients diagnosed with ED should have a diagnostic work-up for systemic vascular pathologies to prevent concomitant cardiac events. Treatment options include invasive and non-invasive procedures. PMID:26602851

  3. Preclinical Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Siu-Hin; Vogel, Mark W.; Chen, Horng H

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical Diastolic Dysfunction (PDD) has been broadly defined as subjects with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, without the diagnosis of congestive heart failure (HF), and with normal systolic function. PDD is an entity which remains poorly understood, yet has definite clinical significance. Although few original studies have focused on PDD, it has been shown that PDD is prevalent, and that there is a clear progression from PDD to symptomatic heart failure including dyspnea, edema, and fatigue. In diabetic patients and patients with coronary artery disease or hypertension, it has been shown that patients with PDD have a significantly higher risk of progression to heart failure and death compared to patients without PDD. Because of these findings and the increasing prevalence of the heart failure epidemic, it is clear that an understanding of PDD is essential to decreasing patients’ morbidity and mortality. This review will focus on what is known concerning preclinical diastolic dysfunction, including definitions, staging, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and the natural history of the disease. In addition, given the paucity of trials focused on PDD treatment, studies targeting risk factors associated with the development of PDD and therapeutic trials for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction will be reviewed. PMID:24291270

  4. Thyroid dysfunction and subfertility

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones act on nearly every cell in the body. Moreover, the thyroid gland continuously interacts with the ovaries, and the thyroid hormones are involved in almost all phases of reproduction. Thyroid dysfunctions are relatively common among women of reproductive age, and can affect fertility in various ways, resulting in anovulatory cycles, high prolactin levels, and sex hormone imbalances. Undiagnosed and untreated thyroid disease can be a cause of subfertility. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), also known as mild thyroid failure, is diagnosed when peripheral thyroid hormone levels are within the normal reference laboratory range, but serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels are mildly elevated. Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) is characterized by the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies, which include anti-thyroperoxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. SCH and TAI may remain latent, asymptomatic, or even undiagnosed for an extended period. It has also been demonstrated that controlled ovarian hyperstimulation has a significant impact on thyroid function, particularly in women with TAI. In the current review, we describe the interactions between thyroid dysfunctions and subfertility, as well as the proper work-up and management of thyroid dysfunctions in subfertile women. PMID:26816871

  5. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. PMID:27474242

  6. Role of UCP2 in the protective effects of PPARβ/δ activation on lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Toral, Marta; Romero, Miguel; Jiménez, Rosario; Robles-Vera, Iñaki; Tamargo, Juan; Martínez, María Carmen; Pérez-Vizcaíno, Francisco; Duarte, Juan

    2016-06-15

    Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates inflammatory pathways, induces cytokine expression in the endothelium, augments reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the vascular wall, and induces endothelial dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)β/δ activation on LPS-induced inflammation, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction and to determine whether uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) plays a role in these effects. In vivo, the PPARβ/δ agonist GW0742 treatment prevented the LPS-induced reduction in aortic relaxation, the increase in vascular ROS production, the upregulation of NOX1, NOX2, p47(phox), and p22(phox) mRNA levels, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers in mice. We show that in mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs), GW0742 prevented the decreased A23187-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production, and the increased intracellular ROS levels caused by exposure to LPS in vitro. The PPARβ/δ antagonist GSK0660 abolished all these in vivo and in vitro protective effects induced by GW0742. This agonist also restored the reduced expression of UCP2 and mitofusin-2 induced by LPS. The effects of GW0742 on NO and ROS production in MAEC exposed to LPS were abolished by the UCP2 inhibitor genipin or by siRNA targeting UCP-2. Genipin also suppressed the expressional changes on NADPH oxidase and ER stress markers induced by GW0742. In conclusion, PPARβ/δ activation restored the LPS-induced endothelial dysfunction by upregulation of UCP2, with the subsequent alleviation of ER stress and NADPH oxidase activity, thus reducing intracellular ROS production and increasing NO bioavailability. PMID:27179975

  7. Bacterial cell biology outside the streetlight.

    PubMed

    Bulgheresi, Silvia

    2016-09-01

    As much as vertical transmission of microbial symbionts requires their deep integration into the host reproductive and developmental biology, symbiotic lifestyle might profoundly affect bacterial growth and proliferation. This review describes the reproductive oddities displayed by bacteria associated - more or less intimately - with multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:27306428

  8. Bacterial cell biology outside the streetlight

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary As much as vertical transmission of microbial symbionts requires their deep integration into the host reproductive and developmental biology, symbiotic lifestyle might profoundly affect bacterial growth and proliferation. This review describes the reproductive oddities displayed by bacteria associated – more or less intimately – with multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:27306428

  9. Sirtuin 4 Regulates Lipopolysaccharide Mediated Leydig Cell Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ramatchandirin, Balamurugan; Sadasivam, Mohanraj; Kannan, Arun; Prahalathan, Chidambaram

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the most important contributing factor in pathogenesis of bacterial infection in male accessory glands; and it has shown to inhibit testicular steroidogenesis and induce apoptosis. The present study demonstrates that LPS causes mitochondrial dysfunction via suppression of sirtuin 4 (SIRT4); which in turn affects Leydig cell function by modulating steroidogenesis and apoptosis. LC-540 Leydig cells treated with LPS (10 µg/ml) showed impaired steroidogenesis and increased cellular apoptosis. The mRNA and protein expression of SIRT4 were decreased in LPS treated cells when compared to controls. The obtained data suggest that the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation suppresses SIRT4 expression in LPS treated Leydig cells. Furthermore, the overexpression of SIRT4 prevented LPS induced impaired steroidogenesis and cellular apoptosis by improving mitochondrial function. These findings provide valuable information that SIRT4 regulates LPS mediated Leydig cell dysfunction. PMID:26365714

  10. Environmental enteric dysfunction: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Rosie J.; Jones, Kelsey D. J.; Berkley, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) refers to an incompletely defined syndrome of inflammation, reduced absorptive capacity, and reduced barrier function in the small intestine. It is widespread among children and adults in low- and middle-income countries. Understanding of EED and its possible consequences for health is currently limited. Objective A narrative review of the current understanding of EED: epidemiology, pathogenesis, therapies, and relevance to child health. Methods Searches for key papers and ongoing trials were conducted using PUBMED 1966–June 2014; ClinicalTrials.gov; the WHO Clinical Trials Registry; the Cochrane Library; hand searches of the references of retrieved literature; discussions with experts; and personal experience from the field. Results EED is established during infancy and is associated with poor sanitation, certain gut infections, and micronutrient deficiencies. Helicobacter pylori infection, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), abnormal gut microbiota, undernutrition, and toxins may all play a role. EED is usually asymptomatic, but it is important due to its association with stunting. Diagnosis is frequently by the dual sugar absorption test, although other biomarkers are emerging. EED may partly explain the reduced efficacy of oral vaccines in low- and middle-income countries and the increased risk of serious infection seen in children with undernutrition. Conclusions Despite its potentially significant impacts, it is currently unclear exactly what causes EED and how it can be treated or prevented. Ongoing trials involve nutritional supplements, water and sanitation interventions, and immunomodulators. Further research is needed to better understand this condition, which is of likely crucial importance for child health and development in low- and middle-income settings. PMID:25902619

  11. Management of ejaculatory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    McMahon, C G

    2014-02-01

    Ejaculatory dysfunction is a common complaint and is often associated with a reduced quality of life for sufferer and partner. The spectrum of ejaculatory dysfunction extends from premature ejaculation (PE) to delayed ejaculation (DE) and anejaculation. Over the past 20-30 years, the PE treatment paradigm, previously limited to behavioural psychotherapy, has expanded to include drug treatment. Multiple well-controlled, evidence-based studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors in delaying ejaculation, confirming their role as first-line agents for the treatment of lifelong and acquired PE. More recently, there has been increased attention to the psychosocial consequences of PE, its epidemiology, its aetiology and its pathophysiology by both clinicians and the pharmaceutical industry. DE and anejaculation are probably the least common, least studied and least understood of the male sexual dysfunctions. However, their impact is significant as they may result in a lack of sexual fulfilment for both the man and his partner, an effect further compounded when procreation is among the couple's goals of sexual intercourse. The causes of DE, anejaculation and anorgasmia are manifold. Numerous psychotherapeutic treatments are described for the management of delayed or anejaculation. Although some appear to be effective, none has been properly evaluated in large-scale samples. Treatment of DE or anejaculation with pharmacotherapy has met with limited success. No drugs have been approved by regulatory agencies for this purpose, and most drugs that have been identified for potential use have limited efficacy, impart significant side-effects or are yet considered experimental in nature. PMID:24528812

  12. Posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Daniel H; Costanzo, Richard M

    2016-04-01

    Impairment of smell may occur following injury to any portion of the olfactory tract, from nasal cavity to brain. A thorough understanding of the anatomy and pathophysiology combined with comprehensively obtained history, physical exam, olfactory testing, and neuroimaging may help to identify the mechanism of dysfunction and suggest possible treatments. Although most olfactory deficits are neuronal mediated and therefore currently unable to be corrected, promising technology may provide novel treatment options for those most affected. Until that day, patient counseling with compensatory strategies and reassurance is essential for the maintenance of safety and QoL in this unique and challenging patient population. PMID:26441369

  13. [Epilepsy with higher brain dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Azusa; Midorikawa, Akira; Koyama, Shinichi; Futamura, Akinori; Kuroda, Takeshi; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Itaya, Kazuhiro; Ishigaki, Seiichiro; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2013-02-01

    Acquired higher brain dysfunction is for the most part due to cerebral vascular disease, but epilepsy may also be a cause. In this study with five patients, we discuss the advantages of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) for persistent higher brain dysfunction. The patients showed chronic amnesia or acute aphasia, with associated symptoms like personality change. All five cases affected automatism or convulsive attack, though only after the emergence of higher brain dysfunction and administration of AEDs. There were underlying diseases like cerebral arteriovenous malformation in four cases, but the other patient had none. Electroencephalogram and single photon emission computed tomography revealed one case of aphasia epilepsy with higher brain dysfunction. These results suggest the potential therapeutic efficacy of AEDs for persistent higher brain dysfunction, and we must differentiate epilepsy with higher brain dysfunction from dementia or cerebral vascular disease. PMID:23399676

  14. Bacterial Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Erwin; Reichenbach, Tobias

    Microbial laboratory communities have become model systems for studying the complex interplay between nonlinear dynamics of evolutionary selection forces, stochastic fluctuations arising from the probabilistic nature of interactions, and spatial organization. Major research goals are to identify and understand mechanisms that ensure viability of microbial colonies by allowing for species diversity, cooperative behavior and other kinds of "social" behavior. A synthesis of evolutionary game theory, nonlinear dynamics, and the theory of stochastic processes provides the mathematical tools and conceptual framework for a deeper understanding of these ecological systems. We give an introduction to the modern formulation of these theories and illustrate their effectiveness, focusing on selected examples of microbial systems. Intrinsic fluctuations, stemming from the discreteness of individuals, are ubiquitous, and can have important impact on the stability of ecosystems. In the absence of speciation, extinction of species is unavoidable, may, however, take very long times. We provide a general concept for defining survival and extinction on ecological time scales. Spatial degrees of freedom come with a certain mobility of individuals. When the latter is sufficiently high, bacterial community structures can be understood through mapping individual-based models, in a continuum approach, onto stochastic partial differential equations. These allow progress using methods of nonlinear dynamics such as bifurcation analysis and invariant manifolds. We conclude with a perspective on the current challenges in quantifying bacterial pattern formation, and how this might have an impact on fundamental research in nonequilibrium physics .

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction during sepsis.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2010-09-01

    Sepsis and multiple organ failure remain leading causes of death in intensive care patients. Recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of these syndromes include a likely prominent role for mitochondria. Patient studies have shown that the degree of mitochondrial dysfunction is related to the eventual outcome. Associated mechanisms include damage to mitochondria or inhibition of the electron transport chain enzymes by nitric oxide and other reactive oxygen species (the effects of which are amplified by co-existing tissue hypoxia), hormonal influences that decrease mitochondrial activity, and downregulation of mitochondrial protein expression. Notably, despite these findings, there is minimal cell death seen in most affected organs, and these organs generally regain reasonably normal function should the patient survive. It is thus plausible that multiple organ failure following sepsis may actually represent an adaptive state whereby the organs temporarily 'shut down' their normal metabolic functions in order to protect themselves from an overwhelming and prolonged insult. A decrease in energy supply due to mitochondrial inhibition or injury may trigger this hibernation/estivation-like state. Likewise, organ recovery may depend on restoration of normal mitochondrial respiration. Data from animal studies show histological recovery of mitochondria after a septic insult that precedes clinical improvement. Stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis could offer a new therapeutic approach for patients in multi-organ failure. This review will cover basic aspects of mitochondrial function, mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis, and approaches to prevent, mitigate or speed recovery from mitochondrial injury. PMID:20509844

  16. Diastolic dysfunction in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Møller, Søren; Wiese, Signe; Halgreen, Hanne; Hove, Jens D

    2016-09-01

    Development of esophageal varices, ascites, and hepatic nephropathy is among the major complications of cirrhosis. The presence of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, which includes a left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (DD), seems to deteriorate the course of the disease and the prognosis. Increased stiffness of the cirrhotic heart may decrease the compliance and result in DD. The prevalence of DD in cirrhotic patients averages about 50 %. It can be evaluated by transmitral Doppler echocardiography, tissue Doppler echocardiography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. There seems to be a relation between DD and the severity of liver dysfunction and the presence of ascites. After liver transplantation, DD worsens the prognosis and increases the risk of graft rejection, but DD improves after few months. Insertion of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt increases left ventricular diastolic volumes, and DD is a predictor of poorer survival in these patients. Future studies should aim at disclosing pathophysiological mechanisms behind the developing of DD in cirrhosis in relation to patient characteristics, development of complications, treatment, and risk associated with interventional procedures. PMID:27075496

  17. Sexual dysfunction in uremia.

    PubMed

    Palmer, B F

    1999-06-01

    In summary, sexual dysfunction is a common finding in both men and women with chronic renal failure. Common disturbances include erectile dysfunction in men, menstrual abnormalities in women, and decreased libido and fertility in both sexes. These abnormalities are primarily organic in nature and are related to uremia as well as the other comorbid conditions that frequently accompany the chronic renal failure patient. Fatigue and psychosocial factors related to the presence of a chronic disease are also contributory factors. Disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis can be detected before the need for dialysis but continue to worsen once dialytic therapy is initiated. Impaired gonadal function is prominent in uremic men, whereas the disturbances in the hypothalamicpituitary axis are more subtle. By contrast, central disturbances are more prominent in uremic women. Therapy is initially directed toward optimizing the delivery of dialysis, correcting anemia with recombinant erythropoietin, and controlling the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism with vitamin D. For many practicing nephrologists, sildenafil has become the first-line therapy in the treatment of impotence. In the hypogonadal man whose only complaint is decreased libido, testosterone may be of benefit. Regular gynecologic follow-up is required in uremic women to guard against potential complications of unopposed estrogen effect. Uremic women should be advised against pregnancy while on dialysis. Successful transplantation is the most effective means of restoring normal sexual function in both men and women with chronic renal failure. PMID:10361878

  18. JPRS report. Proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect

    1992-03-26

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons-relevant technologies.

  19. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong-Ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hui-Hong; Zhou, Yu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  20. Client attributions for sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Fichten, C S; Spector, I; Libman, E

    1988-01-01

    This investigation examined attributions for sexual dysfunctions made by 63 individuals and 21 of their partners who presented at a sex therapy service for the following problems: erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation, and female orgasmic dysfunctions. All participants completed measures of marital adjustment, locus of control, depression and a questionnaire which assessed: attributions of responsibility for the sexual problem, perceived control over sexual functioning, distress, effort made to improve the sexual relationship, and expectations about the efficacy of sex therapy for the problem. Results indicate that both identified patients and their partners, regardless of the dysfunction, blamed the sexual problem on the "dysfunctional individual" rather than on the circumstances or the partner. With respect to the partners, husbands of women with orgasmic dysfunction were more likely to blame themselves than the circumstances, while the opposite was true for wives of males with erectile difficulties. Individuals experiencing the dysfunction perceived themselves and their partners as having little, but equal control over the identified patient's sexuality. Correlational analyses indicate that in identified patients, the better the quality of the marital relationship, the greater the self-blame and the lower the partner blame. Those with happy marriages also made greater efforts to improve their sexual relationship and had higher expectations of success with therapy. The implications of the results for research on the role of attributions in sexual dysfunction and for assessment of cognitive factors in sexually dysfunctional individuals and their partners is discussed. PMID:3172253

  1. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  2. [Towards bacterial detection in labile blood products].

    PubMed

    Morel, P

    2005-06-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood components represents today the highest infectious risk in blood transfusion, the risk is particularly high when it affects platelet concentrates. The prevention methods developed over the past ten years (donor selection, phlebotomy site preparation, first 30 ml diversion, systematic leuko-reduction...) which aimed at limiting the introduction of bacteria in donations and bacterial proliferation, has reduced the risk of transfusion reaction due to the bacterial contamination. Improving strategies for reducing the risks of bacterial contamination is one of the priorities of the French National Blood Transfusion Service (l'Etablissement français du sang - EFS). It is essential to improve existent prevention methods and develop the implication of all the actors (from donation to transfusion) involved in the prevention of this risk. Bacterial detection or pathogens inactivation are now available and are able to reduce (for detection) or prevent (for inactivation) the occurrence of reaction due to bacterial contamination of PC. Up to now, the choice is in favour of bacterial detection. Three methods (BacT/Alert, BioMerieux; eBDS, Pall; ScanSystem, Hemosystem) of detection of bacterial contamination in PC can be generalised now. Adaptations, need for their implementation are acceptable, especially concerning PC availability. PMID:15894499

  3. Meibomian gland dysfunction: hyperkeratinization or atrophy?

    PubMed

    Jester, James V; Parfitt, Geraint J; Brown, Donald J

    2015-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is the major cause of evaporative dry eye disease (EDED) and dysfunction is widely thought to mechanistically involve ductal hyperkeratinization, plugging and obstruction. This review re-evaluates the role of hyperkeratinization in MGD based on more recent findings from mouse models. In these studies, eyelids from normal young and old mice or mice exposed to desiccating stress were evaluated by immunofluorescent tomography and 3-dimensional reconstruction to evaluate gland volume, expression of hyperkeratinization markers and cell proliferation or stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy to assess lipid quality. Results indicate that aging mice show dropout of meibomian glands with loss of gland volume and a forward migration of the mucocutaneous junction anterior to the gland orifice; similar age-related changes that are detected in human subjects. Atrophic glands also showed evidence of epithelial plugging of the orifice without the presence of hyperkeratinization. Mice exposed to desiccating stress showed hyperproliferation of the meibomian gland and ductal dilation suggesting a marked increase in lipid synthesis. Lipid quality was also affected in EDED mice with an increase in the protein content of lipid within the duct of the gland. Overall, age-related changes in the mouse show similar structural and functional correlates with that observed in clinical MGD without evidence of hyperkeratinization suggesting that gland atrophy may be a major cause of EDED. The response of the meibomian gland to desiccating stress also suggest that environmental conditions may accelerate or potentiate age-related changes. PMID:26817690

  4. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  5. [Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costa, R; Orriols, R

    2005-01-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome, better known as RADS, was described as a clinical entity consisting in the appearance of bronchial asthma due to massive toxic inhalation. The term was coined and recognised for the first time in 1985. Since then different publications have verified new cases as well as different causal agents. It usually arises from an accident at the work place and in closed or poorly ventilated spaces, where high concentrations of irritant products are inhaled in the form of gas, smoke or vapour. In the following minutes or hours symptoms of bronchial obstruction appear in an acute form, with bronchial hyperresponsiveness persisting for months or years. The affected patients do not show a recurrence of symptoms following exposure to non-toxic doses of the same agent that started the symptoms. This is why diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations as it is not reproducible through a provocation test. PMID:15915173

  6. Telomere dysfunction and chromothripsis.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Aurélie; Jones, David T W; Maass, Kendra K; Rode, Agata; Deeg, Katharina I; Jebaraj, Billy Michael Chelliah; Korshunov, Andrey; Hovestadt, Volker; Tainsky, Michael A; Pajtler, Kristian W; Bender, Sebastian; Brabetz, Sebastian; Gröbner, Susanne; Kool, Marcel; Devens, Frauke; Edelmann, Jennifer; Zhang, Cindy; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Tabori, Uri; Malkin, David; Rippe, Karsten; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Pfister, Stefan M; Zapatka, Marc; Lichter, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Chromothripsis is a recently discovered form of genomic instability, characterized by tens to hundreds of clustered DNA rearrangements resulting from a single dramatic event. Telomere dysfunction has been suggested to play a role in the initiation of this phenomenon, which occurs in a large number of tumor entities. Here, we show that telomere attrition can indeed lead to catastrophic genomic events, and that telomere patterns differ between cells analyzed before and after such genomic catastrophes. Telomere length and telomere stabilization mechanisms diverge between samples with and without chromothripsis in a given tumor subtype. Longitudinal analyses of the evolution of chromothriptic patterns identify either stable patterns between matched primary and relapsed tumors, or loss of the chromothriptic clone in the relapsed specimen. The absence of additional chromothriptic events occurring between the initial tumor and the relapsed tumor sample points to telomere stabilization after the initial chromothriptic event which prevents further shattering of the genome. PMID:26856307

  7. Sexual dysfunctions and psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Levine, E M; Ross, N

    1977-06-01

    The authors examine the major factors involved in recent changes in the social standards and attitudes related to homosexuality. The principal influences investigated include the misconstrued emphasis given to the humanist ideology, which properly stresses the dignity of the individual; the social sciences' relativization of the cultural norms defining homosexuality; the influence of the mass media in disseminating these perspectives and thereby tending to create an acceptable image of homosexuality, and the tendency of all these changes to result in a substantial increase in public acceptance and tolerance of homosexuality. The authors suggest that this trend in public opinion has begun to isolate psychoanalytic knowledge, to reduce its status and acceptability among the public, and to replace it with popular views concerning the meaning of sexual dysfunctions. PMID:869030

  8. HIV and neurocognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Spudich, Serena

    2013-09-01

    The spectrum of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) has been dramatically altered in the setting of widely available effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). Once culminating in dementia in many individuals infected with HIV, HAND now typically manifests as more subtle, though still morbid, forms of cognitive impairment in persons surviving long-term with treated HIV infection. Despite the substantial improvement in severity of this disorder, the fact that neurologic injury persists despite ART remains a challenge to the community of patients, providers and investigators aiming to optimize quality of life for those living with HIV. Cognitive dysfunction in treated HIV may reflect early irreversible CNS injury accrued before ART is typically initiated, ongoing low-level CNS infection and progressive injury in the setting of ART, or comborbidities including effects of treatment which may confound the beneficial reduction in viral replication and immune activation effected by ART. PMID:23860944

  9. Endothelial dysfunction and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Duvall, W Lane

    2005-03-01

    The vascular endothelium plays a crucial role in the physiology of blood vessels and the pathological processes of atherosclerotic disease and acute coronary syndromes. Endothelial dysfunction is the core problem; it is an impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation caused by a loss of nitric oxide activity in the vessel wall, which results in impairment in the regulation of vascular homeostasis. Further understanding of its mechanisms of action and possible therapeutic targets will be of great importance. The group of antioxidant vitamins, A, C and E, would seem uniquely situated to reduce cardiovascular events by improving endothelial function by reducing the concentration of reactive oxygen species in the vessel wall and by preventing oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein. Unfortunately, despite extensive studies in both observational and randomized trials, the weight of evidence points to little or no benefit from antioxidant therapy. PMID:15770336

  10. [Sexual dysfunction in torture victims].

    PubMed

    Theilade, Lotte D Arlø

    2002-10-01

    Sexual dysfunction is seen in up to 51% of torture victims. The torture victim seldom reports anything about having been tortured but often consults the health care system because of a somatic problem which may seem unrelated to torture. Therefore, it is important that doctors are aware of the possible correlation. Symptoms and findings may be both physical and psychical. The torture may be both sexual and non-sexual as well as physical and non-physical. Social, cultural and individual factors also influence the development of sexual dysfunction in a torture victim. The factors that cause sexual dysfunction and the identification of any direct causal relations are discussed. There are indications that sexual torture has a greater impact on the development of sexual dysfunction than other types of torture and it seems that sexual dysfunction is a result of many factors. PMID:12407879

  11. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB).

    PubMed

    Bulletti, C; Flamigni, C; Prefetto, R A; Polli, V; Giacomucci, E

    1994-09-30

    Cyclic or irregular uterine bleeding is common in perimenarchal and perimenopausal women with or without endometrial hyperplasia. The disturbance often requires surgical treatment because of its negative effects on both blood loss and abnormal endometrial growth including the development of endometrial cancer. The endometrium is often overstimulated during the perimenopausal period when estrogen/progesterone production is unbalanced. A therapeutical approach with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) was proposed in a depot formulation (Zoladex) that induces a sustained and reversible ovarian suppression. To avoid the risk of osteoporosis and to obtain adequate endometrial proliferation and differentiation during ovarian suppression, transdermal 17-beta-estradiol and oral progestin were administered. Results of 20 cases versus 20 controls showed a reduction of metrorrhagia, a normalization of hemoglobin plasma concentration, and an adequate proliferation and secretory differentiation of the endometrium of patients with abnormal endometrial growth. Abnormal uterine bleeding is mainly due to uterine fibrosis and an inadequate estrogen and/or progesterone production or to a disordered estrogen transport from blood into the endometrium. In premenopausal women, endometrial hyperplasia may be part of a continuum that is ultimately manifested in the histological and biological pattern of endometrial carcinoma. The regression of endometrial hyperplasia obtained by using the therapeutic regimen mentioned above represents a preventive measure for endometrial cancer. Finally the normalization of blood loss offers a good medical alternative to surgery for patients with DUB. PMID:7978956

  12. Bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, C A

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common of the vaginitides affecting women of reproductive age. It appears to be due to an alteration in the vaginal ecology by which Lactobacillus spp., the predominant organisms in the healthy vagina, are replaced by a mixed flora including Prevotella bivia, Prevotella disiens, Porphyromonas spp., Mobiluncus spp., and Peptostreptococcus spp. All of these organisms except Mobiluncus spp. are also members of the endogenous vaginal flora. While evidence from treatment trials does not support the notion that BV is sexually transmitted, recent studies have shown an increased risk associated with multiple sexual partners. It has also been suggested that the pathogenesis of BV may be similar to that of urinary tract infections, with the rectum serving as a reservoir for some BV-associated flora. The organisms associated with BV have also been recognized as agents of female upper genital tract infection, including pelvic inflammatory disease, and the syndrome BV has been associated with adverse outcome of pregnancy, including premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, and fetal loss; postpartum endometritis; cuff cellulitis; and urinary tract infections. The mechanisms by which the BV-associated flora causes the signs of BV are not well understood, but a role for H2O2-producing Lactobacillus spp. in protecting against colonization by catalase-negative anaerobic bacteria has been recognized. These and other aspects of BV are reviewed. PMID:1747864

  13. [Hormonal etiology in erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Jabaloyas, José María Martínez

    2010-10-01

    The proper function of erection mechanisms depend on correct interrelationship between psychological, vascular, neurological and hormonal factors. Endocrine diseases affect sexual function, and sexual dysfunction may be one of the symptoms of some hormonal anomalies. Diabetes mellitus is the endocrine disease most frequently causing erectile dysfunction due to the frequent vascular and neurological complications associated. It is important to determine blood glucose in the initial evaluation of a male with erectile dysfunction, as well as to try an adequate control of blood glucose levels to avoid worsening. Diabetic male erectile dysfunction is multifactorial, more severe and has worse response to oral treatment. Hyperprolactinemia causes disorders of the sexual sphere because it produces a descent of testosterone. In these cases, sexual symptoms are treated by correcting the levels of prolactin. Routine determination of prolactin is not clear and it seems it should be determined when testosterone levels are diminished. Thyroid hormone disorders (both hyper and hypotyroidism) are associated with erectile dysfunction, which will subside in half the patients with thyroid hormone normalization. The role of adrenal hormones in erectile function is not clear and their routine determination is not considered in the diagnostic evaluation of erectile dysfunction. The role of estradiol in the regulation of the erection mechanism is not well known either, although it is known that high levels may cause erectile dysfunction. Among endocrine-metabolic disorders we point out dyslipemias, with hypercholesterolemia as an important risk factor for erectile dysfunction and, though its correction may prevent vascular system deterioration, the role of statins in erectile dysfunction is not clear. PMID:20978293

  14. [Thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan J; Iglesias, Pedro; Donnay, Sergio

    2015-10-21

    Recent clinical practice guidelines on thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy have changed health care provided to pregnant women, although their recommendations are under constant revision. Trimester- and area-specific reference ranges for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone are required for proper diagnosis of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. There is no doubt on the need of therapy for overt hypothyroidism, while therapy for subclinical hypothyroidism is controversial. Further research is needed to settle adverse effects of isolated hypothyroxinemia and thyroid autoimmunity. Differentiation between hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease and the usually self-limited gestational transient thyrotoxicosis is critical. It is also important to recognize risk factors for postpartum thyroiditis. Supplementation with iodine is recommended to maintain adequate iodine nutrition during pregnancy and avoid serious consequences in offspring. Controversy remains about universal screening for thyroid disease during pregnancy or case-finding in high-risk women. Opinions of some scientific societies and recent cost-benefit studies favour universal screening. Randomized controlled studies currently under development should reduce the uncertainties that still remain in this area. PMID:25433782

  15. Primary Graft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Jason D

    2014-01-01

    Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) is a syndrome encompassing a spectrum of mild to severe lung injury that occurs within the first 72 hours after lung transplantation. PGD is characterized by pulmonary edema with diffuse alveolar damage that manifests clinically as progressive hypoxemia with radiographic pulmonary infiltrates. In recent years, new knowledge has been generated on risks and mechanisms of PGD. Following ischemia and reperfusion, inflammatory and immunological injury-repair responses appear to be key controlling mechanisms. In addition, PGD has significant impact on short- and long-term outcomes; therefore, the choice of donor organ is impacted by this potential adverse consequence. Improved methods of reducing PGD risk and efforts to safely expand the pool are being developed. Ex-vivo lung perfusion is a strategy which may improve risk assessment and become a promising platform to implement treatment interventions to prevent PGD. This review will detail recent updates in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, molecular and genetic biomarkers and state-of-the-art technical developments affecting PGD. (158 words) PMID:23821506

  16. Bacterial tyrosinases.

    PubMed

    Claus, Harald; Decker, Heinz

    2006-01-01

    Tyrosinases are nearly ubiquitously distributed in all domains of life. They are essential for pigmentation and are important factors in wound healing and primary immune response. Their active site is characterized by a pair of antiferromagnetically coupled copper ions, CuA and CuB, which are coordinated by six histidine residues. Such a "type 3 copper centre" is the common feature of tyrosinases, catecholoxidases and haemocycanins. It is also one of several other copper types found in the multi-copper oxidases (ascorbate oxidase, laccase). The copper pair of tyrosinases binds one molecule of atmospheric oxygen to catalyse two different kinds of enzymatic reactions: (1) the ortho-hydroxylation of monophenols (cresolase activity) and (2) the oxidation of o-diphenols to o-diquinones (catecholase activity). The best-known function is the formation of melanins from L-tyrosine via L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa). The complicated hydroxylation mechanism at the active centre is still not completely understood, because nothing is known about their tertiary structure. One main reason for this deficit is that hitherto tyrosinases from eukaryotic sources could not be isolated in sufficient quantities and purities for detailed structural studies. This is not the case for prokaryotic tyrosinases from different Streptomyces species, having been intensively characterized genetically and spectroscopically for decades. The Streptomyces tyrosinases are non-modified monomeric proteins with a low molecular mass of ca. 30kDa. They are secreted to the surrounding medium, where they are involved in extracellular melanin production. In the species Streptomyces, the tyrosinase gene is part of the melC operon. Next to the tyrosinase gene (melC2), this operon contains an additional ORF called melC1, which is essential for the correct expression of the enzyme. This review summarizes the present knowledge of bacterial tyrosinases, which are promising models in order to get more insights in

  17. Proliferation: Threat and response

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    ;Table of Contents: Section I: The Regional Proliferation Challenge; Northeast Asia; The Middle East and North Africa; The Former Soviet Union: Russia, Ukrane, Kazakstan, And Belarus; South Asia; The International Threat: Dangers from Terrorism, Insurgencies, Civil Wars, And Organized Crime; Section II: Department of Defense Response; Technical Annex: Accessible Technologies; Glossary.

  18. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect

    1991-11-18

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) China; (2) Indonesia; (3) Bulgaria; (4) Brazil, Cuba; (5) Egypt, India, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Pakistan; (6) Soviet Union; and (7) France, Germany, United Kingdom, Italy, Norway.

  19. Cell Proliferation in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Stafman, Laura L; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, continues to carry a dismal prognosis for children diagnosed with advanced stage or relapsed disease. This review focuses upon factors responsible for cell proliferation in neuroblastoma including transcription factors, kinases, and regulators of the cell cycle. Novel therapeutic strategies directed toward these targets in neuroblastoma are discussed. PMID:26771642

  20. Controlling nuclear proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1981-07-17

    Nuclear non-proliferation policy depends on the 1968 Non-Proliferation Treaty, in which countries promise not to acquire nuclear weapons in exchange for open access to peaceful nuclear technology, and a system of international safeguards that are imposed on exported nuclear equipment and facilities operated by parties to the treaty. Critics have feared all along that non-nuclear countries might circumvent or exploit the system to obtain nuclear weapons and that the Atoms for Peace plan would spread the very technology it sought to control. The nuclear weapons states would like everyone else to believe that atomic bombs are undesirable, but they continue to rely on the bombs for their own defense. Israel's raid on Iraq's nuclear reactor focused world attention on the proliferation problem and helped to broaden and sterengthen its prospects. It also highlighted the weakness that there are no effective sanctions against violators. Until the international community can ageee on enforcement measures powerful enough to prevent nuclear proliferation, individual countries may be tempted to follow Israel's example, 19 references.

  1. Cell Proliferation in Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Stafman, Laura L.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, continues to carry a dismal prognosis for children diagnosed with advanced stage or relapsed disease. This review focuses upon factors responsible for cell proliferation in neuroblastoma including transcription factors, kinases, and regulators of the cell cycle. Novel therapeutic strategies directed toward these targets in neuroblastoma are discussed. PMID:26771642

  2. Blockade of Urotensin II Receptor Prevents Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Ae; Lee, Dong Gil; Yi, Kyu Yang; Lee, Byung Ho; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a potent vasoactive peptide and mitogenic agent to induce proliferation of various cells including vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, we examined the effects of a novel UII receptor (UT) antagonist, KR-36676, on vasoconstriction of aorta and proliferation of aortic SMCs. In rat aorta, UII-induced vasoconstriction was significantly inhibited by KR-36676 in a concentration-dependent manner. In primary human aortic SMCs (hAoSMCs), UII-induced cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by KR-36676 in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, KR-36676 decreased UII-induced phosphorylation of ERK, and UII-induced cell proliferation was also significantly inhibited by a known ERK inhibitor U0126. In mouse carotid ligation model, intimal thickening of carotid artery was dramatically suppressed by oral treatment with KR-36676 (30 mg/ kg/day) for 4 weeks compared to vehicle-treated group. From these results, it is indicated that KR-36676 suppress UII-induced proliferation of VSMCs at least partially through inhibition of ERK activation, and that it also attenuates UII-induced vasoconstriction and vascular neointima formation. Our study suggest that KR-36676 may be an attractive candidate for the pharmacological management of vascular dysfunction. PMID:27582556

  3. Blockade of Urotensin II Receptor Prevents Vascular Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ae; Lee, Dong Gil; Yi, Kyu Yang; Lee, Byung Ho; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2016-09-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a potent vasoactive peptide and mitogenic agent to induce proliferation of various cells including vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In this study, we examined the effects of a novel UII receptor (UT) antagonist, KR-36676, on vasoconstriction of aorta and proliferation of aortic SMCs. In rat aorta, UII-induced vasoconstriction was significantly inhibited by KR-36676 in a concentration-dependent manner. In primary human aortic SMCs (hAoSMCs), UII-induced cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by KR-36676 in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, KR-36676 decreased UII-induced phosphorylation of ERK, and UII-induced cell proliferation was also significantly inhibited by a known ERK inhibitor U0126. In mouse carotid ligation model, intimal thickening of carotid artery was dramatically suppressed by oral treatment with KR-36676 (30 mg/ kg/day) for 4 weeks compared to vehicle-treated group. From these results, it is indicated that KR-36676 suppress UII-induced proliferation of VSMCs at least partially through inhibition of ERK activation, and that it also attenuates UII-induced vasoconstriction and vascular neointima formation. Our study suggest that KR-36676 may be an attractive candidate for the pharmacological management of vascular dysfunction. PMID:27582556

  4. Molecular bases of proliferation of Francisella tularensis in Arthropod vectors

    PubMed Central

    Asare, Rexford; Akimana, Christine; Jones, Snake; Kwaik, Yousef Abu

    2010-01-01

    Summary Arthropod vectors are important vehicles for transmission of Francisella tularensis between mammals, but very little is known about the F. tularensis-arthropod vector interaction. Drosophila melanogaster has been recently developed as an arthropod vector model for F. tularensis. We have shown that intracellular trafficking of F. tularensis within human monocytes-derived macrophages and D. melanogaster-derived S2 cells is very similar. Within both evolutionarily distant host cells, the Francisella-containing phagosome matures to a late endosome-like phagosome with limited fusion to lysosomes followed by rapid bacterial escape into the cytosol where the bacterial proliferate. To decipher the molecular bases of intracellular proliferation of F. tularensis within arthropod-derived cells, we screened a comprehensive library of mutants of F. tularensis subsp novicida for their defect in intracellular proliferation within D. melanogaster-derived S2 cells. Our data show that 394 genes, representing 22% of the genome, are required for intracellular proliferation within D. melanogaster-derived S2 cells, including many of the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI) genes that are also required for proliferation within mammalian macrophages. Functional gene classes that exhibit growth defect include metabolic (25%), FPI (2%), Type IV pili (1%), transport (16%) and DNA modification (5%). Among 168 most defective mutants in intracellular proliferation in S2 cells, 80 are defective in lethality and proliferation within adult D. melanogaster. The observation that only 135 of the 394 mutants that are defective in S2 cells are also defective in human macrophages indicates that F. tularensis utilize common as well as distinct mechanisms to proliferate within mammalian and arthropod cells. Our studies will facilitate deciphering the molecular aspects of F. tularensis-arthropod vector interaction and its patho-adaptation to infect mammals. PMID:20482589

  5. Surgical Procedures for Vestibular Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rated Nonprofit! Volunteer. Donate. Review. Surgical Procedures for Vestibular Dysfunction When is surgery necessary? When medical treatment ... organ (cochlea) is also sacrificed with this procedure. Vestibular nerve section A vestibular nerve section is a ...

  6. The Dysfunctions of Bureaucratic Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duttweiler, Patricia Cloud

    1988-01-01

    Numerous dysfunctions result from bureaucratic school organization, including an overemphasis on specialized tasks, routine operating rules, and formal procedures for managing teaching and learning. Such schools are characterized by numerous regulations; formal communications; centralized decision making; and sharp distinctions among…

  7. Diagnostic evaluation of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Miller, T A

    2000-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction, the persistent inability to attain or maintain penile erection sufficient for sexual intercourse, affects millions of men to various degrees. The majority of cases have an organic etiology, most commonly vascular disease that decreases blood flow into the penis. Regardless of the primary cause, erectile dysfunction can have a negative impact on self-esteem, quality of life and interpersonal relationships. The initial step in evaluation is a detailed medical and social history, including a review of medication use. Discussion with the patient's sexual partner may clarify exacerbating issues. The physical examination focuses on the cardiovascular, neurologic and urogenital systems. Laboratory tests are useful to screen for common etiologic factors and, when indicated, to identify hypogonadal syndromes. Appropriate evaluation of erectile dysfunction leads to accurate advice, management and referral of patients with erectile dysfunction. PMID:10643952

  8. Emotional dysfunctions in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Leonie A K; Radke, Sina; Morawetz, Carmen; Derntl, Birgit

    2016-06-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized primarily by motor signs but are also accompanied by emotional disturbances. Because of the limited knowledge about these dysfunctions, this Review provides an overview of emotional competencies in Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and multiple sclerosis (MS), with a focus on emotion recognition, emotion regulation, and depression. Most studies indicate facial emotion recognition deficits in HD and PD, whereas data for MS are inconsistent. On a neural level, dysfunctions of amygdala and striatum, among others, have been linked to these impairments. These dysfunctions also tap brain regions that are part of the emotion regulation network, suggesting problems in this competency, too. Research points to dysfunctional emotion regulation in MS, whereas findings for PD and HD are missing. The high prevalence of depression in all three disorders emphasizes the need for effective therapies. Research on emotional disturbances might improve treatment, thereby increasing patients' and caregivers' well-being. PMID:26011035

  9. Thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nazarpour, Sima; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy has a huge impact on the thyroid function in both healthy women and those that have thyroid dysfunction. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnant women is relatively high. Objective: The objective of this review was to increase awareness and to provide a review on adverse effect of thyroid dysfunction including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmune positivity on pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this review, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched with appropriate keywords for relevant English manuscript. We used a variety of studies, including randomized clinical trials, cohort (prospective and retrospective), case-control and case reports. Those studies on thyroid disorders among non-pregnant women and articles without adequate quality were excluded. Results: Overt hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism has several adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes. Overt hyperthyroidism was associated with miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, preeclampsia and fetal thyroid dysfunction. Overt hypothyroidism was associated with abortion, anemia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, placental abruption, postpartum hemorrhage, premature birth, low birth weight, intrauterine fetal death, increased neonatal respiratory distress and infant neuro developmental dysfunction. However the adverse effect of subclinical hypothyroidism, and thyroid antibody positivity on pregnancy outcomes was not clear. While some studies demonstrated higher chance of placental abruption, preterm birth, miscarriage, gestational hypertension, fetal distress, severe preeclampsia and neonatal distress and diabetes in pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism or thyroid autoimmunity; the other ones have not reported these adverse effects. Conclusion: While the impacts of overt thyroid dysfunction on feto-maternal morbidities have been clearly identified and its long

  10. Nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Yoshino, Koji; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab (ONO-4538) is an anti-programmed death-1 specific monoclonal antibody, which has become a standard treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma. Nivolumab induces autoimmune adverse events, defined as immune-related adverse events. Herein, we report a case of nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction in the clinical setting. Fourteen patients were treated with nivolumab at our institute, of which three developed thyroid dysfunction, an incidence higher than previously reported in the initial clinical trials. Interestingly, one patient achieved complete remission; suggesting that in some patients, the occurrence of immune-related adverse events, including thyroid dysfunction, might reflect the drug's antitumour efficacy. No patient died or discontinued nivolumab treatment owing to thyroid dysfunction. Although thyroid dysfunction first appeared to be asymptomatic, two of the three patients developed symptoms related to hypothyroidism soon after, requiring hormone replacement therapy. Another patient developed hyperthyroidism that was initially asymptomatic; the patient subsequently developed myalgia with fever >39.5°C after two additional courses of nivolumab. Treatment with nivolumab was therefore discontinued, and treatment with prednisolone was initiated. Symptoms resolved within a few days, and thyroid function normalized. Thyroid dysfunction is sometimes difficult to diagnose because its symptoms similar to those of many other diseases. In addition, thyroid-related immune-related adverse events may present with unique symptoms such as myalgia with high fever, abruptly worsening patients' quality of life. Consequently, thyroid dysfunction should be considered as a possible immune-related adverse event. Thus, it is important to test for thyroid dysfunction at baseline and before the administration of each nivolumab dose if possible. PMID:27012985

  11. Management of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Heidelbaugh, Joel J

    2010-02-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common sexual problem in men. The incidence increases with age and affects up to one third of men throughout their lives. It causes a substantial negative impact on intimate relationships, quality of life, and self-esteem. History and physical examination are sufficient to make a diagnosis of ED in most cases, because there is no preferred, first-line diagnostic test. Initial diagnostic workup should usually be limited to a fasting serum glucose level and lipid panel, thyroid-stimulating hormone test, and morning total testosterone level. First-line therapy for ED consists of lifestyle changes, modifying drug therapy that may cause ED, and pharmacotherapy with phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. Obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and smoking greatly increase the risk of ED. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors are the most effective oral drugs for treatment of ED, including ED associated with diabetes mellitus, spinal cord injury, and antidepressants. Intraurethral and intracavernosal alprostadil, vacuum pump devices, and surgically implanted penile prostheses are alternative therapeutic options when phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors fail. Testosterone supplementation in men with hypogonadism improves ED and libido, but requires interval monitoring of hemoglobin, serum transaminase, and prostate-specific antigen levels because of an increased risk of prostate adenocarcinoma. Cognitive behavior therapy and therapy aimed at improving relationships may help to improve ED. Screening for cardiovascular risk factors should be considered in men with ED, because symptoms of ED present on average three years earlier than symptoms of coronary artery disease. Men with ED are at increased risk of coronary, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular diseases. PMID:20112889

  12. Bacterial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L; Agabian-Keshishian, N; Bendis, I

    1971-09-01

    technique can be used to select for mutants blocked in the various stages of morphogenesis. 3) Temperature-sensitive mutants of Caulobacter that are restricted in macromolecular synthesis and development at elevated temperatures have been isolated. 4) Genetic exchange in the Calflobacter genus has been demonstrated and is now being defined. Two questions related to control processes can now readily be approached experimentally. (i) Is the temporal progression of events occurring during bacterial differentiation controlled by regulator gene products? (ii) Is the differentiation cycle like a biosynthetic pathway where one event must follow another? The availability of temperature-sensitive mutants blocked at various stages of development permits access to both questions. An interesting feature of the differentiation cycle is that the polar organelle may represent a special segregated unit which is operative in the control of the differentiation process. Perhaps the sequential morphogenic changes exhibited by Caulobacter are dependent on the initial synthesis of this organelle. Because the ultimate expression of cell changes are dependent on selective protein synthesis, specific messenger RNA production-either from DNA present in an organelle or from the chromosome-may prove to be a controlling factor in cell differentiation. We have begun studies with RNA polymerase purified from Caulobacter crescentus to determine whether cell factors or alterations in the enzyme structure serve to change the specificity of transcription during the cell cycle. Control of sequential cell changes at the level of transcription has long been postulated and has recently been substantiated in the case of Bacillus sporulation (6). The Caulobacter bacteria now present another system in which direct analysis of these control mechanisms is feasible. PMID:5572165

  13. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-13

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) South Africa; (2) China; (3) North and South Korea, Taiwan; (4) Hungary; (5) Brazil; (6) India, Iran, Israel, Pakistan; (7) Soviet Union; and (8) Austria, Germany, United Kingdom.

  14. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect

    1991-11-07

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) South Africa; (2) China; (3) North and South Korea, Japan; (4) Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia; (5) Argentina, Brazil; (6) India, Iran, Israel, Pakistan, Libya, Iraq, Egypt; (7) Soviet Union; and (8) Belgium, Germany, United Kingdom, Netherlands, France.

  15. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-02

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) South Africa; (2) China; (3) North and South Korea, Taiwan; (4) Hungary, Yugoslavia; (5) Brazil, Argentina; (6) Afghanistan, India, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Pakistan; (7) Soviet Union; and (8) France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland.

  16. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-27

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) South Africa, Namibia; (2) China; (3) South Korea, Australia, Indonesia, Japan, Philippines; (4) Yugoslavia; (5) Brazil, Argentina, Cuba; (6) India, Libya, Pakistan; (7) Soviet Union; and (8) France, Germany, Netherlands.

  17. Telomere dysfunction and Tumor Suppression-the Senescence Connection

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yibin; Chan, Suzanne; Chang, Sandy

    2013-01-01

    Long lived organisms such as humans have evolved several intrinsic tumor suppressor mechanisms to combat the slew of oncogenic somatic mutations that constantly arise in proliferating stem cell compartments. One of these anti-cancer barriers is the telomere, a specialized nucleoprotein that caps the ends of eukaryotic chromosome. Impaired telomere function activates the canonical DNA damage response pathway that engages p53 to initiate apoptosis or replicative senescence. Here, we discuss how p53-dependent senescence induced by dysfunctional telomeres may be as potent as apoptosis in suppressing tumorigenesis in vivo. PMID:18500246

  18. Citrobacter rodentium mouse model of bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Crepin, Valerie F; Collins, James W; Habibzay, Maryam; Frankel, Gad

    2016-10-01

    Infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium is a robust model to study bacterial pathogenesis, mucosal immunology, the health benefits of probiotics and the role of the microbiota during infection. C. rodentium was first isolated by Barthold from an outbreak of mouse diarrhea in Yale University in 1972 and was 'rediscovered' by Falkow and Schauer in 1993. Since then the use of the model has proliferated, and it is now the gold standard for studying virulence of the closely related human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively). Here we provide a detailed protocol for various applications of the model, including bacterial growth, site-directed mutagenesis, mouse inoculation (from cultured cells and after cohabitation), monitoring of bacterial colonization, tissue extraction and analysis, immune responses, probiotic treatment and microbiota analysis. The main protocol, from mouse infection to clearance and analysis of tissues and host responses, takes ∼5 weeks to complete. PMID:27606775

  19. Prostatic disease and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae Woong

    2011-06-01

    Prostatitis and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are common prostatic diseases. Furthermore, the incidence of prostate cancer has recently shown a rapid increase, even in Korea. Pain caused by prostatitis may induce sexual dysfunction, including erectile dysfunction and ejaculatory disturbance. And BPH itself, or treatments for BPH, may affect sexual function. In addition, with increased detection of localized prostate cancer, surgical treatments and radiation therapy have also increased, and the treatments may cause sexual dysfunction. Aging is also an important factor in the deterioration of the quality of life of men. Deterioration of quality of life caused by prostate diseases may be affected not only by the prostate diseases themselves but also by the sexual dysfunction caused by the prostate diseases secondarily. Thus, consideration of these points at the time of treatment of prostate disease is required. Therapies suitable to each condition should be selected with an understanding of the close association of prostate diseases and associated sexual dysfunction with the quality of life of males. PMID:21750746

  20. Prostatic Disease and Sexual Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Prostatitis and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are common prostatic diseases. Furthermore, the incidence of prostate cancer has recently shown a rapid increase, even in Korea. Pain caused by prostatitis may induce sexual dysfunction, including erectile dysfunction and ejaculatory disturbance. And BPH itself, or treatments for BPH, may affect sexual function. In addition, with increased detection of localized prostate cancer, surgical treatments and radiation therapy have also increased, and the treatments may cause sexual dysfunction. Aging is also an important factor in the deterioration of the quality of life of men. Deterioration of quality of life caused by prostate diseases may be affected not only by the prostate diseases themselves but also by the sexual dysfunction caused by the prostate diseases secondarily. Thus, consideration of these points at the time of treatment of prostate disease is required. Therapies suitable to each condition should be selected with an understanding of the close association of prostate diseases and associated sexual dysfunction with the quality of life of males. PMID:21750746

  1. [Treatment Options for Executive Dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Müller, S V

    2016-09-01

    The concept of executive function is a so-called umbrella concept, so that it includes many different and in some cases mutually contradictory higher-level organizational abilities such as planning, monitoring, inhibition and control of action. Typically, the cause of an executive dysfunction is an underlying lesion in the prefrontal cortex or subcortical regions. Deficits in executive functions appear in the fields of cognition as well as behavior. Diagnosis requires the use of a wide-ranging repertoire of tests and questionnaires making it a time-consuming process. Different therapeutic approaches addressing the diverse symptoms of executive dysfunction, both positive and negative, are available. These include modification and manipulation of the environment and practice of cognitive repetitive procedures. The former are implemented particularly in cases of severely impaired persons. The latter are used in persons in whom cognitive dysfunctions are the dominating symptoms of the disorder.The operational area of therapeutic approaches using paper and pencil as well as computer programs limits them to treatment of cognitive dysfunction. If behavioral disturbances dominate the clinical picture, other procedures should be used.The effectiveness of cognitive therapy of executive dysfunction is well demonstrated according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine (EBM). PMID:27607068

  2. Endothelial dysfunction in inflammatory bowel diseases: Pathogenesis, assessment and implications.

    PubMed

    Cibor, Dorota; Domagala-Rodacka, Renata; Rodacki, Tomasz; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Mach, Tomasz; Owczarek, Danuta

    2016-01-21

    Endothelial dysfunction is considered one of the etiological factors of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). An inflammatory process leads to functional and structural changes in the vascular endothelium. An increase of leukocyte adhesiveness and leukocyte diapedesis, as well as an increased vascular smooth muscle tone and procoagulant activity is observed. Structural changes of the vascular endothelium comprise as well capillary and venule remodeling and proliferation of endothelial cells. Hypoxia in the inflammatory area stimulates angiogenesis by up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-α. Inflammatory mediators also alter the lymphatic vessel function and impair lymph flow, exacerbating tissue edema and accumulation of dead cells and bacteria. The endothelial dysfunction might be diagnosed by the use of two main methods: physical and biochemical. Physical methods are based on the assessment of large arteries vasodilatation in response to an increased flow and receptors stimulation. Flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) is the method that is the most widely used; however, it is less sensitive in detecting early changes of the endothelium function. Most of the studies demonstrated a decrease of FMD in IBD patients but no changes in the carotic intima-media thickness. Biochemical methods of detecting the endothelial dysfunction are based on the assessment of the synthesis of compounds produced both by the normal and damaged endothelium. The endothelial dysfunction is considered an initial step in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population. In IBD patients, the risk of cardiovascular diseases is controversial. Large, prospective studies are needed to establish the role of particular medications or dietary elements in the endothelial dysfunction as well to determine the real risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26811647

  3. Endothelial dysfunction in inflammatory bowel diseases: Pathogenesis, assessment and implications

    PubMed Central

    Cibor, Dorota; Domagala-Rodacka, Renata; Rodacki, Tomasz; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Mach, Tomasz; Owczarek, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is considered one of the etiological factors of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). An inflammatory process leads to functional and structural changes in the vascular endothelium. An increase of leukocyte adhesiveness and leukocyte diapedesis, as well as an increased vascular smooth muscle tone and procoagulant activity is observed. Structural changes of the vascular endothelium comprise as well capillary and venule remodeling and proliferation of endothelial cells. Hypoxia in the inflammatory area stimulates angiogenesis by up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor and tumor necrosis factor-α. Inflammatory mediators also alter the lymphatic vessel function and impair lymph flow, exacerbating tissue edema and accumulation of dead cells and bacteria. The endothelial dysfunction might be diagnosed by the use of two main methods: physical and biochemical. Physical methods are based on the assessment of large arteries vasodilatation in response to an increased flow and receptors stimulation. Flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) is the method that is the most widely used; however, it is less sensitive in detecting early changes of the endothelium function. Most of the studies demonstrated a decrease of FMD in IBD patients but no changes in the carotic intima-media thickness. Biochemical methods of detecting the endothelial dysfunction are based on the assessment of the synthesis of compounds produced both by the normal and damaged endothelium. The endothelial dysfunction is considered an initial step in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population. In IBD patients, the risk of cardiovascular diseases is controversial. Large, prospective studies are needed to establish the role of particular medications or dietary elements in the endothelial dysfunction as well to determine the real risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26811647

  4. Clinical neurology and executive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Filley, C M

    2000-01-01

    Executive function is a uniquely human ability that permits an individual to plan, carry out, and monitor a sequence of actions that is intended to accomplish a goal. This crucial neurobehavioral capacity depends on the integrity of the frontal lobes, most importantly the dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and their connections. Executive dysfunction is associated with a wide range of neurologic disorders that affect these regions. In this paper, executive dysfunction is considered from the perspective of behavioral neurology, and the lesion method is employed to illustrate this impairment in a diverse group of disorders. Frontal system damage leading to disturbed executive function is common and clinically significant. Recognition of this syndrome is critical for ensuring the correct diagnosis, accurate prognosis, and appropriate treatment of affected patients. Executive dysfunction also represents an intriguing aspect of brain-behavior relationships and offers important insights into one of the highest cerebral functions. PMID:10879543

  5. Cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Joana; Sá, Maria José

    2012-01-01

    In Multiple Sclerosis (MS) prevalence studies of community and clinical samples, indicate that 45-60% of patients are cognitively impaired. These cognitive dysfunctions have been traditionally described as heterogeneous, but more recent studies suggest that there is a specific pattern of MS-related cognitive dysfunctions. With the advent of disease-modifying medications for MS and emphasis on early intervention and treatment, detection of cognitive impairment at its earliest stage becomes particularly important. In this review the authors address: the cognitive domains most commonly impaired in MS (memory, attention, executive functions, speed of information processing, and visual-spatial abilities); the pathophysiological mechanism implied in MS cognitive dysfunction and correlated brain MRI features; the importance of neuropsychological assessment of MS patients in different stages of the disease and the influence of its course on cognitive performance; the most used tests and batteries for neuropsychological assessment; therapeutic strategies to improve cognitive abilities. PMID:22654782

  6. Developmental pathways of motor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kleven, Gale A; Bellinger, Seanceray A

    2015-05-01

    Recent evidence has revealed unique patterns of behavioral development after prenatal insult similar to those outlined in studies of adult metabolic dysfunction after prenatal malnutrition. The hallmark features of this Developmental Pathway include a prenatal insult to the nervous system (environmental or genetic) followed by a period of Silent Vulnerability, where no or few functional deficits are observed, and finally emergence of later dysfunction. Possible mechanisms leading to later dysfunction from prenatal insult may include secondary or cascade effects due to the timing of prenatal insults relative to later developing structures in the brain. Methods best employed to study the mechanisms of these pathways are microgenetic and longitudinal designs that include behavioral assessment during the prenatal period of development, and animal models such as the guinea pig. PMID:25864561

  7. Environmental Enteric Dysfunction Includes a Broad Spectrum of Inflammatory Responses and Epithelial Repair Processes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jinsheng; Ordiz, M. Isabel; Stauber, Jennifer; Shaikh, Nurmohammad; Trehan, Indi; Barnell, Erica; Head, Richard D.; Maleta, Ken; Tarr, Phillip I.; Manary, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED), a chronic diffuse inflammation of the small intestine, is associated with stunting in children in the developing world. The pathobiology of EED is poorly understood because of the lack of a method to elucidate the host response. This study tested a novel microarray method to overcome limitation of RNA sequencing to interrogate the host transcriptome in feces in Malawian children with EED. Methods In 259 children, EED was measured by lactulose permeability (%L). After isolating low copy numbers of host messenger RNA, the transcriptome was reliably and reproducibly profiled, validated by polymerase chain reaction. Messenger RNA copy number then was correlated with %L and differential expression in EED. The transcripts identified were mapped to biological pathways and processes. The children studied had a range of %L values, consistent with a spectrum of EED from none to severe. Results We identified 12 transcripts associated with the severity of EED, including chemokines that stimulate T-cell proliferation, Fc fragments of multiple immunoglobulin families, interferon-induced proteins, activators of neutrophils and B cells, and mediators that dampen cellular responses to hormones. EED-associated transcripts mapped to pathways related to cell adhesion, and responses to a broad spectrum of viral, bacterial, and parasitic microbes. Several mucins, regulatory factors, and protein kinases associated with the maintenance of the mucous layer were expressed less in children with EED than in normal children. Conclusions EED represents the activation of diverse elements of the immune system and is associated with widespread intestinal barrier disruption. Differentially expressed transcripts, appropriately enumerated, should be explored as potential biomarkers. PMID:26973864

  8. Does stress induce bowel dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Ming; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Kao, John Y

    2014-08-01

    Psychological stress is known to induce somatic symptoms. Classically, many gut physiological responses to stress are mediated by the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. There is, however, a growing body of evidence of stress-induced corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) release causing bowel dysfunction through multiple pathways, either through the HPA axis, the autonomic nervous systems, or directly on the bowel itself. In addition, recent findings of CRF influencing the composition of gut microbiota lend support for the use of probiotics, antibiotics, and other microbiota-altering agents as potential therapeutic measures in stress-induced bowel dysfunction. PMID:24881644

  9. Fibrosis and Adipose Tissue Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kai; Tordjman, Joan; Clément, Karine; Scherer, Philipp E.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is increasingly appreciated as a major player in adipose tissue dysfunction. In rapidly expanding adipose tissue, pervasive hypoxia leads to an induction of HIF1α that in turn leads to a potent pro-fibrotic transcriptional program. The pathophysiological impact of adipose tissue fibrosis is likely to play an equally important role on systemic metabolic alterations as fibrotic conditions play in the liver, heart and kidney. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the genesis, modulation and systemic impact of excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in adipose tissue of both rodents and humans and the ensuing impact on metabolic dysfunction. PMID:23954640

  10. Cell proliferation is reduced in the hippocampus in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Katherine M; Fung, Samantha J; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The molecular and cellular basis of structural and functional abnormalities of the hippocampus found in schizophrenia is currently unclear. Postnatal neurogenesis contributes to hippocampal function in animal models and is correlated with hippocampal volume in primates. Reduced hippocampal cell proliferation has been previously reported in schizophrenia, which may contribute to hippocampal dysfunction. Method: We measured the cell proliferation marker, Ki67, in post-mortem hippocampal tissue from patients with schizophrenia (n = 10) and matched controls (n = 16). Ki67-labelled cells were counted within the dentate gyrus and hilus on sections taken from the anterior hippocampus. Results: We replicated the finding of a significant reduction in Ki67+ cells/mm2 in schizophrenia cases compared to controls (t24 = 2.1, p = 0.023). In our relatively small sample, we did not find a relationship between Ki67+ cells and age overall, or between Ki67 + cells and duration of illness or antipsychotic treatment in people with schizophrenia. Conclusion: Our results confirm that reduced hippocampal cell proliferation may be present in schizophrenia. Restoring hippocampal neurogenesis may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of hippocampal dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:26113745

  11. Initiatives for proliferation prevention

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction is a central part of US national security policy. A principal instrument of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) program for securing weapons of mass destruction technology and expertise and removing incentives for scientists, engineers and technicians in the newly independent states (NIS) of the former Soviet Union to go to rogue countries or assist terrorist groups is the Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP). IPP was initiated pursuant to the 1994 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act. IPP is a nonproliferation program with a commercialization strategy. IPP seeks to enhance US national security and to achieve nonproliferation objectives by engaging scientists, engineers and technicians from former NIS weapons institutes; redirecting their activities in cooperatively-developed, commercially viable non-weapons related projects. These projects lead to commercial and economic benefits for both the NIS and the US IPP projects are funded in Russian, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus. This booklet offers an overview of the IPP program as well as a sampling of some of the projects which are currently underway.

  12. Estrogens and Male Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wynder, Jalissa L.; Nicholson, Tristan M.; DeFranco, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are common clinical problems in urology and affect the majority of men at some time during their lives. The development of BPH/LUTS is associated with an increased ratio of estrogen to androgen levels, and this ratio, when mimicked in a variety of animals, induces BPH and lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD). While the precise molecular etiology remains unclear, estrogens have been implicated in the development and maintenance of BPH. Numerous endogenous and exogenous estrogens exist in humans. These estrogens act via multiple estrogen receptors to promote or inhibit prostatic hyperplasia and other BPH-associated processes. The prostate is an estrogen target tissue, and estrogens directly and indirectly affect growth and differentiation of prostate. The precise role of estrogen action directly affecting prostate growth and differentiation in the context of BPH is an understudied area and remains to be elucidated. Estrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have been shown to promote or inhibit prostate proliferation illustrating their potential roles in the development of BPH as therapy. More work will be required to identify estrogen signaling pathways associated with LUTD in order to develop more efficacious drugs for BPH treatment and prevention. PMID:26156791

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiuguo; Tanaka, Naoki . E-mail: naopi@hsp.md.shinshu-u.ac.jp; Nakajima, Takero; Kamijo, Yuji; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2006-08-11

    Hepatic peroxisome proliferation, increases in the numerical and volume density of peroxisomes, is believed to be closely related to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) activation; however, it remains unknown whether peroxisome proliferation depends absolutely on this activation. To verify occurrence of PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation, fenofibrate treatment was used, which was expected to significantly enhance PPAR{alpha} dependence in the assay system. Surprisingly, a novel type of PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation and enlargement was uncovered in PPAR{alpha}-null mice. The increased expression of dynamin-like protein 1, but not peroxisome biogenesis factor 11{alpha}, might be associated with the PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation at least in part.

  14. Soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products mitigates vascular dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Yu, Manli; Zhang, Le; Cao, Qingxin; Song, Ying; Liu, Yuxiu; Gong, Jianbin

    2016-08-01

    Vascular dysfunction including vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction in hypertension often results in poor clinical outcomes and increased risk of vascular accidents. We investigate the effect of treatment with soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) on vascular dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Firstly, the aortic AGE/RAGE pathway was investigated in SHR. Secondly, SHR received intraperitoneal injections of sRAGE daily for 4 weeks. Effect of sRAGE against vascular dysfunction in SHR and underlying mechanism was investigated. SHR aortas exhibited enhanced activity of aldose reductase, reduced activity of glyoxalase 1, accumulation of methylglyoxal and AGE, and upregulated expression of RAGE. Treatment of SHR with sRAGE had no significant effect on blood pressure, but alleviated aortic hypertrophy and endothelial dysfunction. In vitro, treatment with sRAGE reversed the effect of incubation with AGE on proliferation of smooth muscle cells and endothelial function. Treatment of SHR with sRAGE abated oxidative stress, suppressed inflammation and NF-κB activation, improved the balance between Ang II and Ang-(1-7) through reducing angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity and enhancing ACE2 expression, and upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) expression in aortas. In conclusion, treatment with sRAGE alleviated vascular adverse remodeling in SHR, possibly via suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation, improvement in RAS balance, and activation of PPAR-γ pathway. PMID:27426491

  15. [Cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Maruyama, T

    2000-10-01

    The neuropsychological impairments associated with Parkinson's disease(PD) have been often documented. However, the pathological mechanisms underlying cognitive dysfunction are hardly solved, as compared with motor dysfunction. Moreover, the precise relationships between the two dysfunctions have remained aloof. This paper attempts to clarify three specific domains of isolated cognitive impairments: dysexecutive syndrome, memory disturbance, and bradyphrenia, which are specifically observed in PD. It especially discusses the neuropsychological relationships between these impairments and the stages of illness. Several neuropsychological experiments to examine these three domains of cognitive impairments were conducted. Significant results were obtained in the following: set-shifting and divergent thinking were significantly impaired in both the early group and the advanced group; while set-maintaining, procedural learning, and cognitive speed, were only significantly disturbed in the advanced group. The failure to acquire procedural skills and the slowing of cognitive speed, were correlated with decreased attention of working memory in the advanced group. These results indicate that the shifting of cognitive sets maybe disturbed in the embryonic stage of the disease. The results also indicated that other cognitive dysfunctions might manifest themselves during the advanced stages due to attentional deficits. In conclusion, it is possible that other neurotransmitters maybe involved in the progressive degeneration of other systems in addition to the dopaminergic system. For example: serotoninergic, noradrenergic and cholinergic systems. Therefore, further research is required to establish which neurotransmitters are involved in their corresponding cognitive impairments in PD. PMID:11068439

  16. Photobiomodulation on alcohol induced dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Alcohol, which is ubiquitous today, is a major health concern. Its use was already relatively high among the youngest respondents, peaked among young adults, and declined in older age groups. Alcohol is causally related to more than 60 different medical conditions. Overall, 4% of the global burden of disease is attributable to alcohol, which accounts for about as much death and disability globally as tobacco and hypertension. Alcohol also promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or interferes with the body's normal defense mechanisms against these compounds through numerous processes, particularly in the liver. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a cell-specific effect of low intensity monochromatic light or low intensity laser irradiation (LIL) on biological systems. The cellular effects of both alcohol and LIL are ligand-independent so that PBM might rehabilitate alcohol induced dysfunction. The PBM on alcohol induced human neutrophil dysfunction and rat chronic atrophic gastritis, the laser acupuncture on alcohol addiction, and intravascular PBM on alcoholic coma of patients and rats have been observed. The endonasal PBM (EPBM) mediated by Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells is suggested to treat alcohol induced dysfunction in terms of EPBM phenomena, the mechanism of alcohol induced dysfunction and our biological information model of PBM. In our opinion, the therapeutic effects of PBM might also be achieved on alcoholic myopathy.

  17. Current Concepts in Ejaculatory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Jeffrey P; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G

    2006-01-01

    Although erectile dysfunction has recently become the most well-known aspect of male sexual dysfunction, the most prevalent male sexual disorders are ejaculatory dysfunctions. Ejaculatory disorders are divided into 4 categories: premature ejaculation (PE), delayed ejaculation, retrograde ejaculation, and anejaculation/anorgasmia. Pharmacologic treatment for certain ejaculatory disorders exists, for example the off-label use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for PE. Unfortunately, the other ejaculatory disorders are less studied and not as well understood. This review revisits the physiology of the normal ejaculatory response, specifically explores the mechanisms of anejaculation, and presents emerging data. The neurophysiology of the ejaculatory reflex is complex, making classification of the role of individual neurotransmitters extremely difficult. However, recent research has elucidated more about the role of serotonin and dopamine at the central level in the physiology of both arousal and orgasm. Other recent studies that look at differing pharmacokinetic profiles and binding affinities of the α1-antagonists serve as an indication of the centrally mediated role of ejaculation and orgasm. As our understanding of the interaction between central and peripheral modulations and regulation of the process of ejaculation increases, the probability of developing centrally acting pharmaceutical agents for the treatment of sexual dysfunction approaches reality. PMID:17215997

  18. Learning Disabilities: A Neurophysiological Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruickshank, William M.

    1983-01-01

    The author reviews the controversy over definitions of learning disabilities and posits two "givens" in any defintion of the condition: that all learning is neurological, and that learning is conditioning. He proposes a definition based on neuropsychological dysfunction which can be translated into an educational regimen. (CL)

  19. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) Text Size ... the arch, and an inward rolling of the ankle. As the condition progresses, the symptoms will change. ...

  20. Sexual dysfunction in infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Zahra; Amirian, Malihe; Golmakani, Nahid; Mazlom, Reza; Laal Ahangar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sexual problems have different effects on the life of people by influencing their interpersonal and marital relationships and satisfaction. Relationship between sexual dysfunctions and infertility can be mutual. Sexual dysfunction may cause difficulty conceiving but also attempts to conceive, may cause sexual dysfunction. Objective: This paper compares sexual dysfunction in fertile and infertile women. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 110 infertile couples referring to Montasarieh Infertility Clinic and 110 fertile couples referring to five healthcare centers in Mashhad were selected by class cluster sampling method. Data collection tools included demographic questionnaire and Glombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction. Data were analyzed through descriptive and analytical statistical methods by SPSS. Results: There was no significant difference in total score of sexual problems and other dimensions of sexual problems (except infrequency) in fertile 28.9 (15.5) and infertile 29.0 (15.4) women. Fertile women had more infrequency than infertile women (p=0.002). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between fertile and infertile women in terms of sexual problems. Paying attention to sexual aspects of infertility and presence of programs for training of sexual skills seems necessary for couples. PMID:27200422

  1. The changing proliferation threat

    SciTech Connect

    Sopko, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    Technological advances and new adversaries with new motives have reduced the relevancy and effectiveness of the American nonproliferation strategy that was developed during the Cold War. The Cold War`s end and the breakup of the Soviet Union have created new proliferation dangers even as they have reduced others. The familiar balance of nuclear terror that linked the superpowers and their client states for nearly 50 years in a choreographed series of confrontations has given way to a much less predictable situation, where weapons of unthinkable power appear within the grasp of those more willing to use them. Rogue nations and {open_quotes}clientless{close_quotes} states, terrorist groups, religious cults, ethnic minorities, disaffected political groups, and even individuals appear to have jointed a new arms race toward mass destruction. The author describes recent events that suggest the new trends and a serious challenge to US national security.

  2. Activation of GPR30 inhibits cardiac fibroblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Zhao, Zhuo; Lin, Marina; Groban, Leanne

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction significantly increases in postmenopausal women suggesting the association between estrogen loss and diastolic dysfunction. The in vivo activation of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30) attenuates the adverse effects of estrogen loss on cardiac fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction in mRen2.Lewis rats. This study was designed to address the effects of GPR30 on cardiac fibroblast proliferation in rats. The expression of GPR30 in cardiac fibroblasts isolated from adult Sprague-Dawley rats was confirmed by RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence staining. Results from BrdU incorporation assays, cell counting, carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester labeling in conjunction with flow cytometry, and Ki-67 staining showed that treatment with G1, a specific agonist of GPR30, inhibited cardiac fibroblast proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, which was associated with decreases in CDK1 and cyclin B1 protein expressions. In the GPR30-KO cells, BrdU incorporation, and CDK1 and cyclin B1 expressions significantly increased when compared to GPR30-intact cells. G1 had no effect on BrdU incorporation, CDK1 and cyclin B1 mRNA levels in GPR30-KO cells. In vivo studies showed increases in CDK1 and cyclin B1 mRNA levels, Ki-67-positive cells, and the immunohistochemistry staining of vimentin, a fibroblast marker, in the left ventricles from ovariectomized mRen2.Lewis rats versus hearts from ovary-intact littermates; 2 weeks of G1 treatment attenuated these adverse effects of estrogen loss. This study demonstrates that GPR30 is expressed in rat cardiac fibroblasts, and activation of GPR30 limits proliferation of these cells likely via suppression of the cell cycle proteins, cyclin B1, and CDK1. PMID:25893735

  3. [Endothelial dysfunction in patients with primary hypertension and hyperhomocysteinemia].

    PubMed

    Baszczuk, Aleksandra; Kopczyński, Zygmunt; Thielemann, Anna

    2014-01-01

    It is widely accepted that endothelial dysfunction is the basis of the development of cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. With regard to hypertension, endothelial dysfunction is concerned mainly with impaired vascular expansion; however, it is also related to the intensity of the development of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Among the factors that cause damage to the endothelium, along with classic risk factors, is hyperhomocysteinemia. Hyperhomocysteinemia promotes the formation of oxygen radicals, lowering the oxidation-reduction potential, adversely affects the biosynthesis and function of vasodilator factors in the vascular wall, contributes to the inhibition of endothelial cell division with intense myocyte proliferation and migration, and impairs production of extracellular matrix components in the vascular wall. In addition, high levels of homocysteine and its derivatives contribute to the modification of LDL and HDL particles, inflammation and disorders in coagulation and fibrinolysis. Biochemical effects of the impact of hyperhomocysteinemia on endothelium can lead to damage of endothelial cells, dysfunction of diastolic function of vessels and reduction of their flexibility through its influence on vascular wall remodeling. These changes lead to an increase in blood pressure, strengthening the development of hypertension and target organ damage in patients with this disease. PMID:24491900

  4. A mechanism for trauma induced muscle wasting and immune dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madihally, S.; Toner, M.; Yarmush, M.; Mitchell, R.

    A diverse physiological conditions lead to a hypercatabolic state marked by the loss of proteins, primarily derived from skeletal muscle. The sustained loss of proteins results in loss of muscle mass and strength, poor healing, and long-term hospitalization. These problems are further compounded by the deterioration of immunity to infection which is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality of traumatic patients. In an attempt to understand the signal propagation mechanism(s), we tested the role of Interferon-? (IFN-? ) in an animal burn injury model; IFN-? is best conceptualized as a macrophage activating protein and known to modulate a variety of intracellular processes potentially relevant to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Mice congenitally -deficient in IFN-? , and IFN-? -Receptor, and wild type (WT) animals treated with IFN-? neutralizing antibody received either a 20% total body surface area burn or a control sham treatment. At days 1, 2, and 7 following treatment, skeletal muscle, peripheral blood, and spleen were harvested from both groups. Overall body weight, protein turnovers, changes in the lymphocyte subpopulations and alterations in the major histocompatibility complex I expression (MHC I) and proliferation capacity of lymphocytes was measured using mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). These results indicate that we can prevent both muscle wasting and immune dysfunction. Based on these observations and our previous other animal model results (using insulin therapy), a novel mechanism of interactions leading to muscle wasting and immune dysfunction will be discussed. Further, implications of these findings on future research and clinical therapies will be discussed in detail.

  5. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis: A critical review and practical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Bunchorntavakul, Chalermrat; Chamroonkul, Naichaya; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection is common and accounts for major morbidity and mortality in cirrhosis. Patients with cirrhosis are immunocompromised and increased susceptibility to develop spontaneous bacterial infections, hospital-acquired infections, and a variety of infections from uncommon pathogens. Once infection develops, the excessive response of pro-inflammatory cytokines on a pre-existing hemodynamic dysfunction in cirrhosis further predispose the development of serious complications such as shock, acute-on-chronic liver failure, renal failure, and death. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and bacteremia are common in patients with advanced cirrhosis, and are important prognostic landmarks in the natural history of cirrhosis. Notably, the incidence of infections from resistant bacteria has increased significantly in healthcare-associated settings. Serum biomarkers such as procalcitonin may help to improve the diagnosis of bacterial infection. Preventive measures (e.g., avoidance, antibiotic prophylaxis, and vaccination), early recognition, and proper management are required in order to minimize morbidity and mortality of infections in cirrhosis. PMID:26962397

  6. Nest Material Shapes Eggs Bacterial Environment

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Castellano, Cristina; Tomás, Gustavo; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Magdalena; Martín-Gálvez, David; Soler, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    environmental variation associated with risk of bacterial proliferation determining the strength of such effects. Because of costs associated to nest building, birds should adjust nest building effort to expected bacterial environments during incubation, a prediction that should be further explored. PMID:26871451

  7. Nest Material Shapes Eggs Bacterial Environment.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Castellano, Cristina; Tomás, Gustavo; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Magdalena; Martín-Gálvez, David; Soler, Juan José

    2016-01-01

    environmental variation associated with risk of bacterial proliferation determining the strength of such effects. Because of costs associated to nest building, birds should adjust nest building effort to expected bacterial environments during incubation, a prediction that should be further explored. PMID:26871451

  8. Biofilms’ Role in Planktonic Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bester, Elanna; Wolfaardt, Gideon M.; Aznaveh, Nahid B.; Greener, Jesse

    2013-01-01

    The detachment of single cells from biofilms is an intrinsic part of this surface-associated mode of bacterial existence. Pseudomonas sp. strain CT07gfp biofilms, cultivated in microfluidic channels under continuous flow conditions, were subjected to a range of liquid shear stresses (9.42 mPa to 320 mPa). The number of detached planktonic cells was quantified from the effluent at 24-h intervals, while average biofilm thickness and biofilm surface area were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis. Biofilm accumulation proceeded at the highest applied shear stress, while similar rates of planktonic cell detachment was maintained for biofilms of the same age subjected to the range of average shear rates. The conventional view of liquid-mediated shear leading to the passive erosion of single cells from the biofilm surface, disregards the active contribution of attached cell metabolism and growth to the observed detachment rates. As a complement to the conventional conceptual biofilm models, the existence of a biofilm surface-associated zone of planktonic cell proliferation is proposed to highlight the need to expand the traditional perception of biofilms as promoting microbial survival, to include the potential of biofilms to contribute to microbial proliferation. PMID:24201127

  9. Mitochondrial Regulation of Cell Cycle and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Antico Arciuch, Valeria Gabriela; Elguero, María Eugenia; Poderoso, Juan José

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Eukaryotic mitochondria resulted from symbiotic incorporation of α-proteobacteria into ancient archaea species. During evolution, mitochondria lost most of the prokaryotic bacterial genes and only conserved a small fraction including those encoding 13 proteins of the respiratory chain. In this process, many functions were transferred to the host cells, but mitochondria gained a central role in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis, and in the modulation of metabolism; accordingly, defective organelles contribute to cell transformation and cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. Most cell and transcriptional effects of mitochondria depend on the modulation of respiratory rate and on the production of hydrogen peroxide released into the cytosol. The mitochondrial oxidative rate has to remain depressed for cell proliferation; even in the presence of O2, energy is preferentially obtained from increased glycolysis (Warburg effect). In response to stress signals, traffic of pro- and antiapoptotic mitochondrial proteins in the intermembrane space (B-cell lymphoma-extra large, Bcl-2-associated death promoter, Bcl-2 associated X-protein and cytochrome c) is modulated by the redox condition determined by mitochondrial O2 utilization and mitochondrial nitric oxide metabolism. In this article, we highlight the traffic of the different canonical signaling pathways to mitochondria and the contributions of organelles to redox regulation of kinases. Finally, we analyze the dynamics of the mitochondrial population in cell cycle and apoptosis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1150–1180. PMID:21967640

  10. Cardiac dysfunction and prenatal exposure to venlafaxine.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ana R; Marçal, Mónica; Tuna, Madalena; Anjos, Rui

    2016-04-01

    Venlofaxine, a widely used antidepressant, is known to cause a withdrawal syndrome. We present a case of neonatal transient ventricular dysfunction in a neonate exposed to venlafaxine in utero. Other causes of ventricular dysfunction were excluded. Neonatal ventricular dysfunction can be a possible side effect of maternal use of this drug. PMID:27099733

  11. Adult Children of Dysfunctional Families: Childhood Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Stephen J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Used retrospective accounts to compare adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs), adults who experienced stressful events in childhood not involving parental alcoholism (A-D+), and adults with no reported dysfunction in family of origin (A-D-) with regard to dysfunctional roles adopted as children. Dysfunctional role adoption was more frequent in ACOA…

  12. Focally regulated endothelial proliferation and cell death in human synovium.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, D. A.; Wade, M.; Mapp, P. I.; Blake, D. R.

    1998-01-01

    Angiogenesis and vascular insufficiency each may support the chronic synovial inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis. We have shown by quantitative immunohistochemistry and terminal uridyl deoxynucleotide nick end labeling that endothelial proliferation and cell death indices were each increased in synovia from patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with osteoarthritic and noninflamed controls, whereas endothelial fractional areas did not differ significantly among disease groups. Markers of proliferation were associated with foci immunoreactive for vascular endothelial growth factor and integrin alpha(v)beta3, whereas cell death was observed in foci in which immunoreactivities for these factors were weak or absent. No association was found with thrombospondin immunoreactivity. The balance between angiogenesis and vascular regression in rheumatoid synovitis may be determined by the focal expression of angiogenic and endothelial survival factors. Increased endothelial cell turnover may contribute to microvascular dysfunction and thereby facilitate persistent synovitis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9502411

  13. Mitochondria: Redox Metabolism and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jia; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are the main intracellular location for fuel generation; however, they are not just power plants but involved in a range of other intracellular functions including regulation of redox homeostasis and cell fate. Dysfunction of mitochondria will result in oxidative stress which is one of the underlying causal factors for a variety of diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. In this paper, generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the mitochondria, redox regulatory roles of certain mitochondrial proteins, and the impact on cell fate will be discussed. The current state of our understanding in mitochondrial dysfunction in pathological states and how we could target them for therapeutic purpose will also be briefly reviewed. PMID:22593827

  14. [Sexual dysfunction among patients with psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Soldati, Lorenzo

    2016-03-16

    Scientific literature shows that sexual dysfunction is more common in patients suffering from psychiatric illness as opposed to the general population. It also shows that the prevalence of sexual dysfunction is underestimated by professionals, partly because patients rarely talk spontaneously about their dysfunctions. However, sexual dysfunction has an impact on patients' mental health. Furthermore, some psychotropic medication, antidepressants and antipsychotics in particular, can hinder sexual functioning and induce sexual dysfunction. These harmful effects can, in turn, reduce patients' compliance with their medical treatments. It is therefore important that practitioners take into account their patients' sexual experience. PMID:27149715

  15. Global proliferation of cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Doubleday, Zoë A; Prowse, Thomas A A; Arkhipkin, Alexander; Pierce, Graham J; Semmens, Jayson; Steer, Michael; Leporati, Stephen C; Lourenço, Sílvia; Quetglas, Antoni; Sauer, Warwick; Gillanders, Bronwyn M

    2016-05-23

    Human activities have substantially changed the world's oceans in recent decades, altering marine food webs, habitats and biogeochemical processes [1]. Cephalopods (squid, cuttlefish and octopuses) have a unique set of biological traits, including rapid growth, short lifespans and strong life-history plasticity, allowing them to adapt quickly to changing environmental conditions [2-4]. There has been growing speculation that cephalopod populations are proliferating in response to a changing environment, a perception fuelled by increasing trends in cephalopod fisheries catch [4,5]. To investigate long-term trends in cephalopod abundance, we assembled global time-series of cephalopod catch rates (catch per unit of fishing or sampling effort). We show that cephalopod populations have increased over the last six decades, a result that was remarkably consistent across a highly diverse set of cephalopod taxa. Positive trends were also evident for both fisheries-dependent and fisheries-independent time-series, suggesting that trends are not solely due to factors associated with developing fisheries. Our results suggest that large-scale, directional processes, common to a range of coastal and oceanic environments, are responsible. This study presents the first evidence that cephalopod populations have increased globally, indicating that these ecologically and commercially important invertebrates may have benefited from a changing ocean environment. PMID:27218844

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  17. Amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2015-05-01

    Amiodarone is an effective medication for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Originally developed for the treatment of angina, it is now the most frequently prescribed antiarrhythmia drug despite the fact that its use is limited because of potential serious side effects including adverse effects on the thyroid gland and thyroid hormones. Although the mechanisms of action of amiodarone on the thyroid gland and thyroid hormone metabolism are poorly understood, the structural similarity of amiodarone to thyroid hormones, including the presence of iodine moieties on the inner benzene ring, may play a role in causing thyroid dysfunction. Amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction includes amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) and amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism (AIH). The AIT develops more commonly in iodine-deficient areas and AIH in iodine-sufficient areas. The AIT type 1 usually occurs in patients with known or previously undiagnosed thyroid dysfunction or goiter. The AIT type 2 usually occurs in normal thyroid glands and results in destruction of thyroid tissue caused by thyroiditis. This is the result of an intrinsic drug effect from the amiodarone itself. Mixed types are not uncommon. Patients with cardiac disease receiving amiodarone treatment should be monitored for signs of thyroid dysfunction, which often manifest as a reappearance of the underlying cardiac disease state. When monitoring patients, initial tests should include the full battery of thyroid function tests, thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and antithyroid antibodies. Mixed types of AIT can be challenging both to diagnose and treat and therapy differs depending on the type of AIT. Treatment can include thionamides and/or glucocorticoids. The AIH responds favorably to thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Amiodarone is lipophilic and has a long half-life in the body. Therefore, stopping the amiodarone therapy usually has little short-term benefit. PMID:24067547

  18. Thyroid dysfunction from antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Hamnvik, Ole-Petter Riksfjord; Larsen, P Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-11-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%-50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient's quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  19. Insulin dysfunction and Tau pathology

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Noura B.; Gratuze, Maud; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Bretteville, Alexis; Planel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides (a cleavage product of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, or APP) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein assembled in paired helical filaments (PHF). NFT pathology is important since it correlates with the degree of cognitive impairment in AD. Only a small proportion of AD is due to genetic variants, whereas the large majority of cases (~99%) is late onset and sporadic in origin. The cause of sporadic AD is likely to be multifactorial, with external factors interacting with biological or genetic susceptibilities to accelerate the manifestation of the disease. Insulin dysfunction, manifested by diabetes mellitus (DM) might be such factor, as there is extensive data from epidemiological studies suggesting that DM is associated with an increased relative risk for AD. Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are known to affect multiple cognitive functions in patients. In this context, understanding the effects of diabetes on Tau pathogenesis is important since Tau pathology show a strong relationship to dementia in AD, and to memory loss in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. Here, we reviewed preclinical studies that link insulin dysfunction to Tau protein pathogenesis, one of the major pathological hallmarks of AD. We found more than 30 studies reporting Tau phosphorylation in a mouse or rat model of insulin dysfunction. We also payed attention to potential sources of artifacts, such as hypothermia and anesthesia, that were demonstrated to results in Tau hyperphosphorylation and could major confounding experimental factors. We found that very few studies reported the temperature of the animals, and only a handful did not use anesthesia. Overall, most published studies showed that insulin dysfunction can promote Tau hyperphosphorylation and pathology, both directly and indirectly, through hypothermia. PMID:24574966

  20. Facial bacterial infections: folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Laureano, Ana Cristina; Schwartz, Robert A; Cohen, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Facial bacterial infections are most commonly caused by infections of the hair follicles. Wherever pilosebaceous units are found folliculitis can occur, with the most frequent bacterial culprit being Staphylococcus aureus. We review different origins of facial folliculitis, distinguishing bacterial forms from other infectious and non-infectious mimickers. We distinguish folliculitis from pseudofolliculitis and perifolliculitis. Clinical features, etiology, pathology, and management options are also discussed. PMID:25441463

  1. Gut dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Adreesh; Biswas, Atanu; Das, Shyamal Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Early involvement of gut is observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) and symptoms such as constipation may precede motor symptoms. α-Synuclein pathology is extensively evident in the gut and appears to follow a rostrocaudal gradient. The gut may act as the starting point of PD pathology with spread toward the central nervous system. This spread of the synuclein pathology raises the possibility of prion-like propagation in PD pathogenesis. Recently, the role of gut microbiota in PD pathogenesis has received attention and some phenotypic correlation has also been shown. The extensive involvement of the gut in PD even in its early stages has led to the evaluation of enteric α-synuclein as a possible biomarker of early PD. The clinical manifestations of gastrointestinal dysfunction in PD include malnutrition, oral and dental disorders, sialorrhea, dysphagia, gastroparesis, constipation, and defecatory dysfunction. These conditions are quite distressing for the patients and require relevant investigations and adequate management. Treatment usually involves both pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures. One important aspect of gut dysfunction is its contribution to the clinical fluctuations in PD. Dysphagia and gastroparesis lead to inadequate absorption of oral anti-PD medications. These lead to response fluctuations, particularly delayed-on and no-on, and there is significant relationship between levodopa pharmacokinetics and gastric emptying in patients with PD. Therefore, in such cases, alternative routes of administration or drug delivery systems may be required. PMID:27433087

  2. Neuromuscular dysfunction in nonbacterial prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Hellstrom, W J; Schmidt, R A; Lue, T F; Tanagho, E A

    1987-08-01

    Although chronic nonbacterial prostatitis is common, the condition remains poorly understood and refractory to treatment. Another approach, i.e., a urodynamic explanation, seems warranted. The underlying cause of the symptoms may be an inappropriate spasm of of the distal urethra/external sphincteric unit, leading to increased pressure in the prostatic urethra with a resultant reflux of urine into the prostatic ducts. The presence of urine (sterile or infected) could induce ductal and periductal inflammation, which could further aggravate spasm of the involved pelvic musculature, exacerbating the voiding dysfunction. We present 3 patients in whom this sequence of events was documented radiographically and urodynamically. Consequently, treatment involved modulation of the dysfunction of the distal urethra/external sphincteric unit: (1) reeducation by reassurance and biofeedback was the initial line of therapy; (2) pharmacologic manipulation using alpha-blockers (to affect smooth and striated muscle irritability) and striated muscle relaxants was next tried; (3) finally, in unremitting symptoms, we used selective sacral-root electro-stimulation, successfully fatiguing the involved muscles and relieving the voiding dysfunction. PMID:3497475

  3. Gut dysfunction in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Adreesh; Biswas, Atanu; Das, Shyamal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Early involvement of gut is observed in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and symptoms such as constipation may precede motor symptoms. α-Synuclein pathology is extensively evident in the gut and appears to follow a rostrocaudal gradient. The gut may act as the starting point of PD pathology with spread toward the central nervous system. This spread of the synuclein pathology raises the possibility of prion-like propagation in PD pathogenesis. Recently, the role of gut microbiota in PD pathogenesis has received attention and some phenotypic correlation has also been shown. The extensive involvement of the gut in PD even in its early stages has led to the evaluation of enteric α-synuclein as a possible biomarker of early PD. The clinical manifestations of gastrointestinal dysfunction in PD include malnutrition, oral and dental disorders, sialorrhea, dysphagia, gastroparesis, constipation, and defecatory dysfunction. These conditions are quite distressing for the patients and require relevant investigations and adequate management. Treatment usually involves both pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures. One important aspect of gut dysfunction is its contribution to the clinical fluctuations in PD. Dysphagia and gastroparesis lead to inadequate absorption of oral anti-PD medications. These lead to response fluctuations, particularly delayed-on and no-on, and there is significant relationship between levodopa pharmacokinetics and gastric emptying in patients with PD. Therefore, in such cases, alternative routes of administration or drug delivery systems may be required. PMID:27433087

  4. Binge eating and menstrual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ålgars, Monica; Huang, Lu; Von Holle, Ann F.; Peat, Christine M.; Thornton, Laura; Lichtenstein, Paul; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The relation between eating disorders and menstrual function has been widely studied, but it is unknown whether the behavior of binge eating itself is related to menstrual dysfunction. Methods The 11,503 women included in this study were from the Swedish Twin study of Adults: Genes and Environment. The associations between menstrual dysfunction and binge eating were analyzed using logistic regression or multiple linear regression models with generalized estimation equations. Results Women who reported lifetime binge eating were more likely to report either amenorrhea or oligomenorrhea than women who reported no binge eating. These results persisted when controlling for compensatory behaviors including self-induced vomiting, laxative use, and diuretic use. No differences between women with and without a history of binge eating were observed for age at menarche. Conclusion Even when controlling for the effect of compensatory behaviors, the behavior of binge eating is associated with menstrual dysfunction. Metabolic and endocrinological factors could underlie this association. Careful evaluation of menstrual status is warranted for women with all eating disorders, not just anorexia nervosa. PMID:24360136

  5. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  6. From proliferation to proliferation: monocyte lineage comes full circle

    PubMed Central

    Swirski, Filip K.; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Robbins, Clinton S.

    2014-01-01

    Monocytes are mononuclear circulating phagocytes that originate in the bone marrow and give rise to macrophages in peripheral tissue. For decades, our understanding of monocyte lineage was bound to a stepwise model that favored an inverse relationship between cellular proliferation and differentiation. Sophisticated molecular and surgical cell tracking tools have transformed our thinking about monocyte topo-ontogeny and function. Here, we discuss how recent studies focusing on progenitor proliferation and differentiation, monocyte mobilization and recruitment, and macrophage differentiation and proliferation are reshaping knowledge of monocyte lineage in steady state and disease. PMID:24435095

  7. A western type of bacterial gill disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, F.F.

    1935-01-01

    The first reference to a pathological condition of the gill tissues of salmonid fishes was made by Osburn in 1910. This author in describing a progressive infolding of the opercula of trout, commonly known to hatcherymen as "short gill covers," mentioned a marked proliferation on the gill epithelium as accompanying this condition. Osburn assumed that the club-like appearance of the gill filaments due to the proliferated epithelium was the result of continual irritation of the delicate gill tissue in the absence of the usual protection offered by the normal opercula. Although such a conclusion seems quite logical, it is also possible that Osburn was dealing with "short gill covers" complicated by the unknown bacterial gill disease which was subsequently described by Davis.

  8. Perspectives of bacterial ACC deaminase in phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Muhammad; Saleem, Muhammad; Hussain, Sarfraz

    2007-08-01

    Phytoremediation of contaminated soil and water environments is regulated and coordinated by the plant root system, yet root growth is often inhibited by pollutant-induced stress. Prolific root growth could maximize rates of hyperaccumulation of inorganic contaminants or rhizodegradation of organic pollutants, and thus accelerate phytoremediation. Accelerated ethylene production in response to stress induced by contaminants is known to inhibit root growth and is considered as a major limitation in improving phytoremediation efficiency. Recent work shows that bacterial 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase regulates ethylene levels in plants by metabolizing its precursor ACC into alpha-ketobutyric acid and ammonia. Plants inoculated with ACC deaminase bacteria or transgenic plants that express bacterial ACC deaminase genes can regulate their ethylene levels and consequently contribute to a more extensive root system. Such proliferation of roots in contaminated soil can lead to enhanced uptake of heavy metals or rhizodegradation of xenobiotics. PMID:17573137

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inflammatory responses and cellular senescence: pathogenesis and pharmacological targets for chronic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Yue, Li; Yao, Hongwei

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, which couple the various cellular processes that regulate metabolism, cell proliferation and survival. Environmental stress can cause mitochondrial dysfunction and dynamic changes including reduced mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP production, as well as mitophagy impairment, which leads to increased ROS, inflammatory responses and cellular senescence. Oxidative stress, inflammation and cellular senescence all have important roles in the pathogenesis of chronic lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary fibrosis and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In this review, we discuss the current state on how mitochondrial dysfunction affects inflammatory responses and cellular senescence, the mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction underlying the pathogenesis of chronic lung diseases and the potential of mitochondrial transfer and replacement as treatments for these diseases. PMID:27189175

  10. Metabolic dysfunction in lymphocytes promotes postoperative morbidity.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Mark R; Sultan, Pervez; del Arroyo, Ana Gutierrez; Whittle, John; Karmali, Shamir N; Moonesinghe, S Ramani; Haddad, Fares S; Mythen, Michael G; Singer, Mervyn; Ackland, Gareth L

    2015-09-01

    Perioperative lymphopenia has been linked with an increased risk of postoperative infectious complications, but the mechanisms remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that bioenergetic dysfunction is an important mechanism underlying lymphopenia, impaired functionality and infectious complications. In two cohorts of patients (61-82 years old) undergoing orthopaedic joint replacement (n=417 and 328, respectively), we confirmed prospectively that preoperative lymphopenia (≤1.3 x 10(9)·l(-1); <20% white cell count; prevalence 15-18%) was associated with infectious complications (relative risk 1.5 (95% confidence interval 1.1-2.0); P=0.008) and prolonged hospital stay. Lymphocyte respirometry, mitochondrial bioenergetics and function were assessed (n=93 patients). Postoperative lymphocytes showed a median 43% fall (range: 26-65%; P=0.029; n=13 patients) in spare respiratory capacity, the extra capacity available to produce energy in response to stress. This was accompanied by reduced glycolytic capacity. A similar hypometabolic phenotype was observed in lymphocytes sampled preoperatively from chronically lymphopenic patients (n=21). This hypometabolic phenotype was associated with functional lymphocyte impairment including reduced T-cell proliferation, lower intracellular cytokine production and excess apoptosis induced by a range of common stressors. Glucocorticoids, which are ubiquitously elevated for a prolonged period postoperatively, generated increased levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, activated caspase-1 and mature interleukin (IL)-1β in human lymphocytes, suggesting inflammasome activation. mRNA transcription of the NLRP1 inflammasome was increased in lymphocytes postoperatively. Genetic ablation of the murine NLRP3 inflammasome failed to prevent glucocorticoid-induced lymphocyte apoptosis and caspase-1 activity, but increased NLRP1 protein expression. Our findings suggest that the hypometabolic phenotype observed in chronically lymphopenic

  11. Asthma: vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) and other dysfunctional breathing disorders.

    PubMed

    Balkissoon, Ron; Kenn, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) and dysfunctional breathing (DB) disorders may mimic or coexist with asthma, leading to overtreatment with corticosteroids with consequent morbidity. Iatrogenic complications can be averted by early and correct diagnosis. VCD, also termed paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder (PVFMD), is characterized by intermittent paradoxical adduction of the vocal cords, mainly during inspiration, leading to airflow obstruction and dyspnea. Patients with VCD may have repetitive emergency room visits due to acute dyspnea (mimicking exacerbations of asthma). In the seminal descriptions of VCD, young women (often with psychiatric issues) predominated; however, other groups at increased risk for developing VCD include elite athletes, military recruits, and individuals exposed to irritants (inhaled or aspirated). Chronic postnasal drip, laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) may lead to laryngeal hyperresponsiveness. The diagnosis of VCD may be difficult because physical exam and spirometry may be normal between episodes. During symptomatic episodes, spirometry typically reveals variable extrathoracic airway obstruction (truncated inspiratory flow volume loop). The gold standard for identifying VCD is flexible fiberoptic rhinolaryngoscopy. Management of VCD includes identification and treatment of underlying disorders (eg, chronic postnasal drip, LPR, GER, anxiety, depression) and a multidisciplinary approach (including highly trained speech therapists). Speech therapy and biofeedback play a critical role in teaching techniques to override various dysfunctional breathing habits. When postnasal drip, LPR, or GER coexist, these disorders should be aggressively treated. With successful therapy, corticosteroids can often be discontinued. During severe, acute episodes of VCD, therapeutic strategies include heliox (80% helium/20% oxygen), topical lidocaine, anxiolytics, and superior laryngeal blocks with Clostridium botulinum toxin

  12. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tim N.; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  13. Bacterial Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Compton, Emma L R; Mindell, Joseph A

    2010-09-01

    Bacterial ion channels were known, but only in special cases, such as outer membrane porins in Escherichia coli and bacterial toxins that form pores in their target (bacterial or mammalian) membranes. The exhaustive coverage provided by a decade of bacterial genome sequencing has revealed that ion channels are actually widespread in bacteria, with homologs of a broad range of mammalian channel proteins coded throughout the bacterial and archaeal kingdoms. This review discusses four groups of bacterial channels: porins, mechano-sensitive (MS) channels, channel-forming toxins, and bacterial homologs of mammalian channels. The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria blocks access of essential nutrients; to survive, the cell needs to provide a mechanism for nutrients to penetrate the OM. Porin channels provide this access by forming large, nonspecific aqueous pores in the OM that allow ions and vital nutrients to cross it and enter the periplasm. MS channels act as emergency release valves, allowing solutes to rapidly exit the cytoplasm and to dissipate the large osmotic disparity between the internal and external environments. MS channels are remarkable in that they do this by responding to forces exerted by the membrane itself. Some bacteria produce toxic proteins that form pores in trans, attacking and killing other organisms by virtue of their pore formation. The review focuses on those bacterial toxins that kill other bacteria, specifically the class of proteins called colicins. Colicins reveal the dangers of channel formation in the plasma membrane, since they kill their targets with exactly that approach. PMID:26443789

  14. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections.

    PubMed

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  15. Fungal and Bacterial Diseases.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal and bacterial diseases are important constraints to production. Recognition of diseases and information on their biology is important in disease management. This chapter is aimed at providing diagnostic information on fungal and bacterial diseases of sugar beet and their biology, epidemiolo...

  16. Pharmacotherapy of Sexual Dysfunctions : Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajith; Biswas, Parthasarathy

    2004-01-01

    The sexual dysfunctions are one of the most prevalent conditions. Sexual dysfunctions can have profound effect on the psychological well-being of an individual and the psychosexual relationship of a couple. Management of the sexual dysfunction should be preceded by an accurate diagnosis reached after a complete medical and sexual history and physical examination. Current focus of researchers has been on understanding the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation and other sexual dysfunctions that can help in developing newer pharmacological cures for these conditions. Recently, a number of clinical trials have studied the potential effectiveness of the phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 inhibitor sildenafil in the treatment of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) and Premature Ejaculation (PME). The introduction of PDE-5 inhibitors like sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil has revolutionized the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. This review focuses on the recent pharmacological advances in the treatment of common sexual dysfunctions like ED and PME with special focus on the role of PDE-5 inhibitors. Also discussed is the pharmacological treatment of other less prevalent and recognized disorders like female sexual dysfunction, drug induced sexual dysfunction etc. PMID:21224902

  17. Cerebrovascular Dysfunction in Preeclamptic Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Erica S.; Cipolla, Marilyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive, multi-system disorder of pregnancy that affects several organ systems, including the maternal brain. Cerebrovascular dysfunction during preeclampsia can lead to cerebral edema, seizures, stroke and potentially maternal mortality. This review will discuss the effects of preeclampsia on the cerebrovasculature that may adversely affect the maternal brain, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation and blood-brain barrier disruption, and the resultant clinical outcomes including posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and maternal stroke. Potential long-term cognitive outcomes of preeclampsia and the role of the cerebrovasculature are also reviewed. PMID:26126779

  18. Male sexual dysfunction in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Christopher CK; Singam, Praveen; Hong, Goh Eng; Zainuddin, Zulkifli Md

    2011-01-01

    Sex has always been a taboo subject in Asian society. However, over the past few years, awareness in the field of men's sexual health has improved, and interest in sexual health research has recently increased. The epidemiology and prevalence of erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism and premature ejaculation in Asia are similar in the West. However, several issues are specific to Asian males, including culture and beliefs, awareness, compliance and the availability of traditional/complementary medicine. In Asia, sexual medicine is still in its infancy, and a concerted effort from the government, relevant societies, physicians and the media is required to propel sexual medicine to the forefront of health care. PMID:21643001

  19. Nonpharmacologic Treatment of Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Drogo K

    2002-01-01

    Nonpharmacologic treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED) includes sex therapy, the use of vacuum erection devices, penile prosthesis implantation, and penile vascular surgery. Sex therapy is indicated for psychogenic ED and is at times a useful adjunct for other treatments in men with mixed psychogenic and organic ED. Vacuum erection devices produce usable erections in over 90% of patients; however, patient and partner acceptability is an issue. Three-piece inflatable penile prostheses create flaccidity and an erection that comes close to that which occurs naturally. Penile vascular surgery has shown greatest efficacy in young men with vasculogenic ED resulting from pelvic or perineal trauma. PMID:16986016

  20. Male sexual dysfunction in Asia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Christopher Ck; Singam, Praveen; Hong, Goh Eng; Zainuddin, Zulkifli Md

    2011-07-01

    Sex has always been a taboo subject in Asian society. However, over the past few years, awareness in the field of men's sexual health has improved, and interest in sexual health research has recently increased. The epidemiology and prevalence of erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism and premature ejaculation in Asia are similar in the West. However, several issues are specific to Asian males, including culture and beliefs, awareness, compliance and the availability of traditional/complementary medicine. In Asia, sexual medicine is still in its infancy, and a concerted effort from the government, relevant societies, physicians and the media is required to propel sexual medicine to the forefront of health care. PMID:21643001

  1. Medical treatment of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Burns-Cox, N.; Gingell, C.

    1998-01-01

    There has been a tremendous increase in demand for the treatment of erectile dysfunction in the last 10 years. This has occurred partly because of a greater understanding and awareness by both the general public and clinicians, and also because there now exists a range of effective treatments. The choice of treatments is increasing rapidly and novel delivery systems which may be more patient-friendly than intracavernosal injections are now becoming available. We review the published data on effectiveness and safety of the currently available treatments and discuss recent advances in oral therapy, as these drugs are likely to become available in the near future. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9799886

  2. [Cognitive dysfunction in cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Ladwig, Karl-Heinz

    2016-08-01

    A multitude of modifiable risk factors during the median phase of life are often causative for cognitive dysfunction (CD) in old age. High evidence exists for cigarette smoking, diabetes, physical inactivity and sleeping disorders. Single large scale population based studies proof it for hypertension, hypercholesterinemia and depression, conflicting evidence exists for obesity and work stress. Little attention is paid to the close association between cardiovascular disease conditions and CD, particularly for atrial fibrillation, heart failure and for older patients with coronary heart disease. Undetected CD may be responsible for non-adherence and failure of self-care programs in chronic heart patients. PMID:27557067

  3. Conservative management of voiding dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anita

    2007-01-01

    This review article discusses the efficacy of various conservative therapies in the management of voiding dysfunction with special reference to urinary incontinence. The article emphasizes the fact that conservative therapies have limited side effects and they do not jeopardize future treatment options. Behaviour therapy, pelvic floor therapy and biofeedback; electrical and magnetic stimulation are discussed here individually. Though there is unanimous agreement that these therapies improve quality of life, complete cure is rare. All therapies work better in conjunction with each other rather than in isolation. The review also highlights the need for randomized controlled trials of better methodology. PMID:19675794

  4. Nuclear Proliferation and Grand Challenges

    ScienceCinema

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2013-05-28

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy leads systems analysis. She talks about proliferation and the grand challenges of nuclear R&D. For more information about INL energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  5. Nuclear Proliferation and Grand Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy leads systems analysis. She talks about proliferation and the grand challenges of nuclear R&D. For more information about INL energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  6. The Impact of Infection on Chronic Allograft Dysfunction and Allograft Survival After Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Martin-Gandul, C; Mueller, N J; Pascual, M; Manuel, O

    2015-12-01

    Infectious diseases after solid organ transplantation (SOT) are a significant cause of morbidity and reduced allograft and patient survival; however, the influence of infection on the development of chronic allograft dysfunction has not been completely delineated. Some viral infections appear to affect allograft function by both inducing direct tissue damage and immunologically related injury, including acute rejection. In particular, this has been observed for cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in all SOT recipients and for BK virus infection in kidney transplant recipients, for community-acquired respiratory viruses in lung transplant recipients, and for hepatitis C virus in liver transplant recipients. The impact of bacterial and fungal infections is less clear, but bacterial urinary tract infections and respiratory tract colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aspergillus spp appear to be correlated with higher rates of chronic allograft dysfunction in kidney and lung transplant recipients, respectively. Evidence supports the beneficial effects of the use of antiviral prophylaxis for CMV in improving allograft function and survival in SOT recipients. Nevertheless, there is still a need for prospective interventional trials assessing the potential effects of preventive and therapeutic strategies against bacterial and fungal infection for reducing or delaying the development of chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:26474168

  7. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus, and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cylic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22948484

  9. Meibomian Gland Dysfunction: Endocrine Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ozlem G.; Kartal, Elçin; Taheri, Nusret

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the hormone levels of patients with seborrheic meibomian gland dysfunction with controls. Procedures. This is a retrospective case-control study involving 50 patients and 50 controls. Blood workup for hormones was studied in both groups by using macroELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Statistical evaluation was done by using SPSS 15.0 independent samples t-test. Results. There were statistically significant differences of serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels between patients and controls (P = 0.000). Female gender showed statistically significant differences of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin levels between patients and controls (P = 0.014 and P = 0.043), in addition to serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels (P = 0.000 and P = 0.001). However, male gender showed statistically significant differences of only serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels between patients and controls. (P = 0.003 and P = 0.003 resp.). Conclusions. Increased serum levels of testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate in both genders should be considered as diagnostic markers for seborrheic meibomian gland dysfunction. PMID:24533183

  10. Immune surveillance for ERAAP dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Niranjana A; Shastri, Nilabh

    2013-09-01

    The ER aminopeptidase associated with antigen processing, ERAAP (or ERAP1), is essential for trimming peptides that are presented by MHC class I molecules. ERAP1 is inhibited by human cytomegalovirus, and ERAP1 polymorphisms are associated with autoimmune diseases. How the immune system detects ERAAP dysfunction, however, is unknown. We have shown previously that ERAAP-deficient cells present an immunogenic pMHC I repertoire, that elicits CD8+ T cell response in WT mice. Additionally, we discovered that the WT CD8+ T cells recognized novel peptides presented by non-classical, or MHC class Ib, molecules on ERAAP-deficient cells. The MHC Ib restricted WT CD8 T cells eliminated ERAAP-deficient cells in vitro and in vivo. We identified the FL9 peptide, presented by Qa-1(b), a MHC class Ib molecule exclusively on ERAAP-deficient cells. Remarkably, T cells specific for the FL9-Qa-1(b) complex were frequent in naïve WT mice, and had an antigen-experienced phenotype. Thus, novel non-classical pQa-1(b) complexes direct cytotoxic T cells to target cells with defective peptide processing in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we discuss the implications of our findings, and the possible roles of pMHC Ib-specific T cells in immune surveillance for ERAAP dysfunction. PMID:23433779

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Giannattasio, Sergio; Moro, Loredana

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with cancer development and progression. Recent evidences suggest that pathogenic mutations or depletion of the mitochondrial genome can contribute to development of chemoresistance in malignant tumors. In this review we will describe the current knowledge on the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of chemoresistance in cancer. We will also discuss the significance of this research topic in the context of development of more effective, targeted therapeutic modalities and diagnostic strategies for cancer patients, with a particular focus on the potential use of PARP inhibitors in cancer patients displaying mitochondrial DNA mutations. We will discuss recent studies highlighting the importance of the cross-talk between the tumor microenvironment and mitochondrial functionality in determining selective response to certain chemotherapeutic drugs. Finally, owing to the similarities between cancer and yeast cell metabolism, we will point out the use of yeast as a model system to study cancer-related genes and for anti-cancer drugs screening. PMID:25107705

  12. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yong-ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-ping; Zhang, Hui-hong; Zhou, Yu-ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  13. Bacterial challenges in food

    PubMed Central

    Collee, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative aspects of bacterial challenges that might be encountered in food are discussed with reference to recognized and relatively unrecognized hazards. Mechanisms of pathogenicity are reviewed and the populations at risk are noted. The bacterial content of food as it is served at table merits more study. The challenge of prevention by education is discussed. Indirect bacterial challenges in our food are considered. The real challenge of diagnosis depends upon an awareness of a complex range of conditions; the importance of effective communication with efficient laboratory and epidemiological services is stressed. There is an increasing need for care in the preparation and distribution of food. PMID:4467860

  14. Inside the Spiral of Dysfunction: The Personal Consequences of Working for a Dysfunctional Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuck, Brad; Rose, Kevin; Bergman, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunctional leaders suffocate others with coercive power and ego, are unpredictable, and often lack self-awareness about their dysfunction. Dysfunctional leaders are incredibly difficult to work with and can cause a series of cascading personal consequences for employees who work with them. This Perspectives in Human Resource Development essay…

  15. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla Pareja, Maria Eugenia; Colombo, Maria I.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance. PMID:24137567

  16. Eldecalcitol prevents endothelial dysfunction in postmenopausal osteoporosis model rats.

    PubMed

    Serizawa, Kenichi; Yogo, Kenji; Tashiro, Yoshihito; Takeda, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Ryohei; Aizawa, Ken; Endo, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Postmenopausal women have high incidence of cardiovascular events as estrogen deficiency can cause endothelial dysfunction. Vitamin D is reported to be beneficial on endothelial function, but it remains controversial whether vitamin D is effective for endothelial dysfunction under the treatment for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the endothelial protective effect of eldecalcitol (ELD) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. ELD (20  ng/kg) was orally administrated five times a week for 4 weeks from 1 day after surgery. After that, flow-mediated dilation (FMD) as an indicator of endothelial function was measured by high-resolution ultrasound in the femoral artery of living rats. ELD ameliorated the reduction of FMD in OVX rats. ELD inhibited the increase in NOX4, nitrotyrosine, and p65 and the decrease in dimer/monomer ratio of nitric oxide synthase in OVX rat femoral arteries. ELD also prevented the decrease in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) in femoral arteries and cultured endothelial cells. Although PPARγ is known to inhibit osteoblastogenesis, ELD understandably increased bone mineral density of OVX rats without increase in PPARγ in bone marrow. These results suggest that ELD prevented the deterioration of endothelial function under condition of preventing bone loss in OVX rats. This endothelial protective effect of ELD might be exerted through improvement of endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling, which is mediated by an antioxidative effect through normalization of vascular PPARγ/NF-κB signaling. PMID:26537128

  17. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  18. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in people who work in the health care industry. Chronic paronychia is most common in adult women and those who work in places where their hands are kept moist, such as food handlers. Signs and Symptoms Bacterial nail infection most ...

  19. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    Overgrowth - intestinal bacteria; Bacterial overgrowth - intestine ... Unlike the large intestine, the small intestine does not have a high number of bacteria. When there are too many bacteria in the ...

  20. Bacterial surface adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  1. Deciphering the bacterial glycocode: recent advances in bacterial glycoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Longwell, Scott A.; Dube, Danielle H.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial glycoproteins represent an attractive target for new antibacterial treatments, as they are frequently linked to pathogenesis and contain distinctive glycans that are absent in humans. Despite their potential therapeutic importance, many bacterial glycoproteins remain uncharacterized. This review focuses on recent advances in deciphering the bacterial glycocode, including metabolic glycan labeling to discover and characterize bacterial glycoproteins, lectin-based microarrays to monitor bacterial glycoprotein dynamics, crosslinking sugars to assess the roles of bacterial glycoproteins, and harnessing bacterial glycosylation systems for the efficient production of industrially important glycoproteins. PMID:23276734

  2. An Essential Role of the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain in Cell Proliferation Is to Enable Aspartate Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Birsoy, Kıvanç; Wang, Tim; Chen, Walter W; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Abu-Remaileh, Monther; Sabatini, David M

    2015-07-30

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) enables many metabolic processes, but why its inhibition suppresses cell proliferation is unclear. It is also not well understood why pyruvate supplementation allows cells lacking ETC function to proliferate. We used a CRISPR-based genetic screen to identify genes whose loss sensitizes human cells to phenformin, a complex I inhibitor. The screen yielded GOT1, the cytosolic aspartate aminotransferase, loss of which kills cells upon ETC inhibition. GOT1 normally consumes aspartate to transfer electrons into mitochondria, but, upon ETC inhibition, it reverses to generate aspartate in the cytosol, which partially compensates for the loss of mitochondrial aspartate synthesis. Pyruvate stimulates aspartate synthesis in a GOT1-dependent fashion, which is required for pyruvate to rescue proliferation of cells with ETC dysfunction. Aspartate supplementation or overexpression of an aspartate transporter allows cells without ETC activity to proliferate. Thus, enabling aspartate synthesis is an essential role of the ETC in cell proliferation. PMID:26232224

  3. Bistability and Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Malka, Roy; Shochat, Eliezer; Rom-Kedar, Vered

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial infections occur when the natural host defenses are overwhelmed by invading bacteria. The main component of the host defense is impaired when neutrophil count or function is too low, putting the host at great risk of developing an acute infection. In people with intact immune systems, neutrophil count increases during bacterial infection. However, there are two important clinical cases in which they remain constant: a) in patients with neutropenic-associated conditions, such as those undergoing chemotherapy at the nadir (the minimum clinically observable neutrophil level); b) in ex vivo examination of the patient's neutrophil bactericidal activity. Here we study bacterial population dynamics under fixed neutrophil levels by mathematical modelling. We show that under reasonable biological assumptions, there are only two possible scenarios: 1) Bacterial behavior is monostable: it always converges to a stable equilibrium of bacterial concentration which only depends, in a gradual manner, on the neutrophil level (and not on the initial bacterial level). We call such a behavior type I dynamics. 2) The bacterial dynamics is bistable for some range of neutrophil levels. We call such a behavior type II dynamics. In the bistable case (type II), one equilibrium corresponds to a healthy state whereas the other corresponds to a fulminant bacterial infection. We demonstrate that published data of in vitro Staphylococcus epidermidis bactericidal experiments are inconsistent with both the type I dynamics and the commonly used linear model and are consistent with type II dynamics. We argue that type II dynamics is a plausible mechanism for the development of a fulminant infection. PMID:20463954

  4. Novel factors modulating human β-cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, J; Kulkarni, R N

    2016-09-01

    β-Cell dysfunction in type 1 and type 2 diabetes is accompanied by a progressive loss of β-cells, and an understanding of the cellular mechanism(s) that regulate β-cell mass will enable approaches to enhance hormone secretion. It is becoming increasingly recognized that enhancement of human β-cell proliferation is one potential approach to restore β-cell mass to prevent and/or cure type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While several reports describe the factor(s) that enhance β-cell replication in animal models or cell lines, promoting effective human β-cell proliferation continues to be a challenge in the field. In this review, we discuss recent studies reporting successful human β-cell proliferation including WS6, an IkB kinase and EBP1 inhibitor; harmine and 5-IT, both DYRK1A inhibitors; GNF7156 and GNF4877, GSK-3β and DYRK1A inhibitors; osteoprotegrin and Denosmab, receptor activator of NF-kB (RANK) inhibitors; and SerpinB1, a protease inhibitor. These studies provide important examples of proteins and pathways that may prove useful for designing therapeutic strategies to counter the different forms of human diabetes. PMID:27615134

  5. Low Proliferation and Differentiation Capacities of Adult Hippocampal Stem Cells Correlate with Memory Dysfunction in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coras, Roland; Siebzehnrubl, Florian A.; Pauli, Elisabeth; Huttner, Hagen B.; Njunting, Marleisje; Kobow, Katja; Villmann, Carmen; Hahnen, Eric; Neuhuber, Winfried; Weigel, Daniel; Buchfelder, Michael; Stefan, Hermann; Beck, Heinz; Steindler, Dennis A.; Blumcke, Ingmar

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampal dentate gyrus maintains its capacity to generate new neurons throughout life. In animal models, hippocampal neurogenesis is increased by cognitive tasks, and experimental ablation of neurogenesis disrupts specific modalities of learning and memory. In humans, the impact of neurogenesis on cognition remains unclear. Here, we…

  6. Dysfunctional attention in autistic savants.

    PubMed

    Casey, B J; Gordon, C T; Mannheim, G B; Rumsey, J M

    1993-11-01

    A dysfunctional attention hypothesis of the basis of savant skills was tested with a series of computerized tasks that assessed the ability to divide, shift, direct, and sustain attention. Ten healthy men with pervasive developmental disorders and unusual calendar-calculating skill, and 10 age- and sex-matched controls were tested. There were four general findings. First, the savants and controls did not differ on a measure of visual sustained attention. Second, the savants failed to detect rare auditory targets significantly more than did the controls. Third, the savants were unable to efficiently divide their attention when required to detect both visual and auditory targets simultaneously. Finally, deficient orienting or a deficit in shifting selective attention from one stimulus location to another was evidenced in overall slower reaction times for the savants across tasks requiring shifts and redirecting of attention. This deficit was attributed to an inability to disengage attention as a result of deficient orienting and overselectivity. PMID:8120129

  7. Coronary microvascular dysfunction: an update

    PubMed Central

    Crea, Filippo; Camici, Paolo G.; Bairey Merz, Cathleen Noel

    2014-01-01

    Many patients undergoing coronary angiography because of chest pain syndromes, believed to be indicative of obstructive atherosclerosis of the epicardial coronary arteries, are found to have normal angiograms. In the past two decades, a number of studies have reported that abnormalities in the function and structure of the coronary microcirculation may occur in patients without obstructive atherosclerosis, but with risk factors or with myocardial diseases as well as in patients with obstructive atherosclerosis; furthermore, coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) can be iatrogenic. In some instances, CMD represents an epiphenomenon, whereas in others it is an important marker of risk or may even contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and myocardial diseases, thus becoming a therapeutic target. This review article provides an update on the clinical relevance of CMD in different clinical settings and also the implications for therapy. PMID:24366916

  8. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A.; Borum, Marie L.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27134599

  9. Neddylation dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuzhi; Neve, Rachael L; Liu, Helena

    2012-11-01

    Ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis is a major mechanism that downregulates misfolded proteins or those that have finished a programmed task. In the last two decades, neddylation has emerged as a major regulatory pathway for ubiquitination. Central to the neddylation pathway is the amyloid precursor protein (APP)-binding protein APP-BP1, which together with Uba3, plays an analogous role to the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 in nedd8 activation. Activated nedd8 covalently modifies and activates a major class of ubiquitin ligases called Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs). New evidence suggests that neddylation also modifies Type-1 transmembrane receptors such as APP. Here we review the functions of neddylation and summarize evidence suggesting that dysfunction of neddylation is involved in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22805479

  10. Balance Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rinalduzzi, Steno; Missori, Paolo; Fattapposta, Francesco; Currà, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stability and mobility in functional motor activities depend on a precise regulation of phasic and tonic muscular activity that is carried out automatically, without conscious awareness. The sensorimotor control of posture involves a complex integration of multisensory inputs that results in a final motor adjustment process. All or some of the components of this system may be dysfunctional in Parkinsonian patients, rendering postural instability one of the most disabling features of Parkinson's disease (PD). Balance control is critical for moving safely in and adapting to the environment. PD induces a multilevel impairment of this function, therefore worsening the patients' physical and psychosocial disability. In this review, we describe the complex ways in which PD impairs posture and balance, collecting and reviewing the available experimental evidence. PMID:25654100

  11. [Conservative therapy of erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Trottmann, M; Marcon, J; Pompe, S; Strobach, D; Becker, A J; Stief, C G

    2015-05-01

    The erectile dysfunction (ED) with a prevalence of 19.2% and a steep age-related increase up to 53.4% in men over 70 years is a common sexual disorder. Especially after market launch of the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors the possibility of an easy-to-use and well-tolerated therapy is available. In case of nonresponse, vasoactive substances can be applied in different forms. In case of an additional hypogonadism, testosterone substitution is indicated. Simultaneously the causes of ED should always be treated, including a change of lifestyle with elimination of exogenous noxa. The use of mechanic tools as single or combination therapy can lead to improved erection. This article provides a critical overview of the latest conservative therapy options, it explains previous unsuccessful therapeutic trials and gives an outlook into potential ED therapy concepts of the future. PMID:25987332

  12. Environmental Enteric Dysfunction in Children.

    PubMed

    Syed, Sana; Ali, Asad; Duggan, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    Diarrheal diseases are a major cause of childhood death in resource-poor countries, killing approximately 760,000 children younger than 5 years each year. Although deaths due to diarrhea have declined dramatically, high rates of stunting and malnutrition have persisted. Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) is a subclinical condition caused by constant fecal-oral contamination with resultant intestinal inflammation and villous blunting. These histological changes were first described in the 1960s, but the clinical effect of EED is only just being recognized in the context of failure of nutritional interventions and oral vaccines in resource-poor countries. We review the existing literature regarding the underlying causes of and potential interventions for EED in children, highlighting the epidemiology, clinical and histologic classification of the entity, and discussing novel biomarkers and possible therapies. Future research priorities are also discussed. PMID:26974416

  13. Hypoparathyroidism presenting as cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gunjan; Kaur, Darshpreet; Aggarwal, Puneet; Khurana, Tilak

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction in hypoparathyroidism is an important cause of intracranial calcifications, which cause cognitive impairment depending on the calcified areas leading to difficulties in executing activities of daily living. We report a case of a 25-year-old man who presented with gradually decreasing organisational skills, memory problems and difficulty in carrying out daily activities. CT imaging of the brain showed extensive calcification in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. Comprehensive health-related quality of life and cognitive assessment revealed significant affliction in his activities of daily living along with impairment in recall memory, executive functions and verbal fluency. Owing to late diagnosis, chronicity of cognitive problems could not prevent him from discontinuing his college education. PMID:23709145

  14. Psychopathy: cognitive and neural dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    R. Blair, R. James

    2013-01-01

    Psychopathy is a developmental disorder marked by emotional deficits and an increased risk for antisocial behavior. It is not equivalent to the diagnosis Antisocial Personality Disorder, which concentrates only on the increased risk for antisocial behavior and not a specific cause—ie, the reduced empathy and guilt that constitutes the emotional deficit. The current review considers data from adults with psychopathy with respect to the main cognitive accounts of the disorder that stress either a primary attention deficit or a primary emotion deficit. In addition, the current review considers data regarding the neurobiology of this disorder. Dysfunction within the amygdala's role in reinforcement learning and the role of ventromedial frontal cortex in the representation of reinforcement value is stressed. Data is also presented indicating potential difficulties within parts of temporal and posterior cingulate cortex. Suggestions are made with respect to why these deficits lead to the development of the disorder. PMID:24174892

  15. Noradrenergic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, Mary; Che, Pulin; Chen, Yunjia; Jiao, Kai; Roberson, Erik D.; Wang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    The brain noradrenergic system supplies the neurotransmitter norepinephrine throughout the brain via widespread efferent projections, and plays a pivotal role in modulating cognitive activities in the cortex. Profound noradrenergic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients has been observed for decades, with recent research suggesting that the locus coeruleus (where noradrenergic neurons are mainly located) is a predominant site where AD-related pathology begins. Mounting evidence indicates that the loss of noradrenergic innervation greatly exacerbates AD pathogenesis and progression, although the precise roles of noradrenergic components in AD pathogenesis remain unclear. The aim of this review is to summarize current findings on noradrenergic dysfunction in AD, as well as to point out deficiencies in our knowledge where more research is needed. PMID:26136654

  16. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A; Borum, Marie L; Doman, David B

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27134599

  17. [Topical therapy in erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Floth, A

    2000-01-01

    All forms of pharmacological therapy result in a relaxation of the corporeal smooth muscle. Intracorporeal injection of vasoactive drugs was introduced around 15 years ago and still is the most effective therapy in erectile dysfunction. Resulting in a consistent success rate of 70-80% this form of therapy will find numerous applications, even after the introduction of effective oral agents such as sildenafil. Prostaglandin E1 and--less frequently used--the combination of papaverine and phentolamine are the mainstay of intracorporeal injection therapy. Intraurethral prostaglandin (MUSE) has recently become available and is somewhat less effective than injection therapy. Externally applied drugs (nitroglycerin paste on the penile shaft and minoxidil solution on the glans penis) have not succeeded in the long run. Vacuum erection devices represent a form of physical topical therapy that is very versatile and also effective but rather infrequently applied. PMID:10746290

  18. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eui Seok; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR. PMID:25667739

  19. The neuropathy of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bleustein, C B; Arezzo, J C; Eckholdt, H; Melman, A

    2002-12-01

    These studies were intended to explore the relationship between autonomic neuropathy and erectile dysfunction (ED). Sensory thresholds reflecting the integrity of both large diameter, myelinated neurons (ie pressure, touch, vibration) and small diameter axons (ie hot and cold thermal sensation) were determined on the penis and finger. Data were compared across subjects with and without ED, controlling for age, hypertension and diabetes. The correlation of specific thresholds scores and IIEF values were also examined. Seventy-three patients who visited the academic urology clinics at Montefiore hospital were evaluated. All patients were required to complete the erectile function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire: 20 subjects had no complaints of ED and scored within the 'normal' range on the IIEF. Patients were subsequently tested on their index finger and glans penis for vibration (Biothesiometer), pressure (Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments), spatial perception (Tactile Circumferential Discriminator), and warm and cold thermal thresholds (Physitemp NTE-2). Sensation of the glans penis, as defined by the examined sensory thresholds, was significantly diminished in patients with ED and these differences remained significant when controlling for age, diabetes and hypertension. In contrast, thresholds on the index finger were equivalent in the ED and non-ED groups. Threshold and IIEF scores were highly correlated, consistent with an association between diminished sensation and decreasing IIEF score (worse erectile functioning). These relations also remained significant when controlling for age, diabetes and hypertension. The findings demonstrate dysfunction of large and small diameter nerve fibers in patients with ED of all etiologies. Further, the neurophysiologic measures validate the use of the IIEF as an index of ED, as objective findings of sensory neuropathy were highly correlated with worse IIEF scores. The sensory

  20. Towards an Analysis of Dysfunctional Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigaudeau-McKenna, B.

    2005-01-01

    This article applies Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL) to the study of language dysfunction. It demonstrates the potential that Systemic Functional analysis can offer to one aspect of the analysis of language dysfunction--the failure to realise complexes of clauses. For the purpose of analysis, new concepts and new measures have been created.…

  1. Male Pseudoheterosexuality and Minimal Sexual Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutstadt, Joseph P.

    1976-01-01

    There is often a correlation between "pseudoheterosexuality" and minor sexual dysfunction. Insight alone is not sufficient to provide relief, but when the patient can be helped to a comfortable acceptance of his homosexual feelings as a normal and healthy facet of his personality, very often the dysfunction is relieved. (Author)

  2. Bile acids regulate intestinal cell proliferation by modulating EGFR and FXR signaling.

    PubMed

    Dossa, Avafia Y; Escobar, Oswaldo; Golden, Jamie; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Gayer, Christopher P

    2016-01-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are synthesized in the liver and secreted into the intestine. In the lumen, enteric bacteria metabolize BAs from conjugated, primary forms into more toxic unconjugated, secondary metabolites. Secondary BAs can be injurious to the intestine and may contribute to disease. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are known to interact with BAs. In this study we examined the effects of BAs on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and investigated the possible roles for EGFR and FXR in these effects. We report that taurine-conjugated cholic acid (TCA) induced proliferation, while its unconjugated secondary counterpart deoxycholic acid (DCA) inhibited proliferation. TCA stimulated phosphorylation of Src, EGFR, and ERK 1/2. Pharmacological blockade of any of these pathways or genetic ablation of EGFR abrogated TCA-stimulated proliferation. Interestingly, Src or EGFR inhibitors eliminated TCA-induced phosphorylation of both molecules, suggesting that their activation is interdependent. In contrast to TCA, DCA exposure diminished EGFR phosphorylation, and pharmacological or siRNA blockade of FXR abolished DCA-induced inhibition of proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that TCA induces intestinal cell proliferation via Src, EGFR, and ERK activation. In contrast, DCA inhibits proliferation via an FXR-dependent mechanism that may include downstream inactivation of the EGFR/Src/ERK pathway. Since elevated secondary BA levels are the result of specific bacterial modification, this may provide a mechanism through which an altered microbiota contributes to normal or abnormal intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:26608185

  3. Nuclear proliferation: toward global restraint

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    A year-long study by the United Nations Association of the USA (UNA-USA) on the problem of proliferation analyzed the policy issues and developed recommendations for US and international policy. The consensus report concludes that old approaches are no longer sufficient. Renewed efforts must avoid the spread of nuclear weapons to additional countries. Efforts must focus on raising the costs of and decreasing the incentives for acquiring nuclear weapons. The report defines five categories of feasible policy initiatives: (1) strengthen the International Atomic Energy Agency's credibility as a nuclear watchdog, (2) reaffirm US and international support for the Non-Proliferation Treaty, (3) develop a comprehensive US non-proliferation policy, (4) renew efforts to develop nuclear-weapons-free zones, and (5) develop nonproliferation confidence-building measures.

  4. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review. PMID:26275497

  5. [The cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Akira

    2004-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a slowly progressive disorder which begins with motor symptoms. Several cognitive deficits can be observed in nondemented patients with PD during their history. The core symptom in the cognitive deficits in PD is the executive dysfunction. Neuropsychological tests such as Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Trail Making Test are used to measure the degree of this dysfunction. Executive dysfunction is thought related to abnormalities in the dorsolateral prefrontal circuit which largely passes through the caudate nucleus. The dysfunction emerges as the pathology spreads to the nigrocaudate project corresponding to Hoehn & Yahr stage II-III. Effective therapy for cognitive dysfunction in PD remains elusive, however donepezil, Attention Process Training, Music therapy and Transcranial magnetic stimulation have been reported to have partial efficacy. PMID:15462384

  6. Proliferation of mutators in A cell population.

    PubMed Central

    Mao, E F; Lane, L; Lee, J; Miller, J H

    1997-01-01

    A Lac- strain of Escherichia coli that reverts by the addition of a G to a G-G-G-G-G-G sequence was used to study the proliferation of mutators in a bacterial culture. Selection for the Lac+ phenotype, which is greatly stimulated in mismatch repair-deficient strains, results in an increase in the percentage of mutators in the selected population from less than 1 per 100,000 cells to 1 per 200 cells. All the mutators detected were deficient in the mismatch repair system. Mutagenesis results in a similar increase in the percentage of mutators. Mutagenesis combined with a single selection can result in a population of more than 50% mutators when a sample of several thousand cells is grown out and selected. Mutagenesis combined with two or more successive selections can generate a population that is 100% mutator. These experiments are discussed in relation to ideas that an early step in carcinogenesis is the creation of a mutator phenotype. PMID:8990293

  7. Bacterial interactions in pathogenic subgingival plaque.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hong Min; Kin, Lin Xin; Dashper, Stuart G; Slakeski, Nada; Butler, Catherine A; Reynolds, Eric C

    2016-05-01

    Chronic periodontitis has a polymicrobial biofilm aetiology. Polymicrobial biofilms are complex, dynamic microbial communities formed by two or more bacterial species that are important for the persistence and proliferation of participating microbes in the environment. Interspecies adherence, which often involves bacterial surface-associated molecules, and communications are essential in the spatial and temporal development of a polymicrobial biofilm, which in turn is necessary for the overall fitness of a well-organized multispecies biofilm community. In the oral cavity, interactions between key oral bacterial species, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia, are essential for the progression of chronic periodontitis. In vivo, P. gingivalis and T. denticola are frequently found to co-exist in deep periodontal pockets and have been co-localized to the superficial layers of subgingival plaque as microcolony blooms adjacent to the pocket epithelium, suggesting possible interbacterial interactions that contribute towards disease. The motility and chemotactic ability of T. denticola, although not considered as classic virulence factors, are likely to be important in the synergistic biofilm formation with P. gingivalis. In vitro, P. gingivalis and T. denticola display a symbiotic relationship in nutrient utilization and growth promotion. Together these data suggest there is an intimate relationship between these two species that has evolved to enhance their survival and virulence. PMID:26541672

  8. How bacterial pathogens colonize their hosts and invade deeper tissues.

    PubMed

    Ribet, David; Cossart, Pascale

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial pathogens have evolved a wide range of strategies to colonize and invade human organs, despite the presence of multiple host defense mechanisms. In this review, we will describe how pathogenic bacteria can adhere and multiply at the surface of host cells, how some bacteria can enter and proliferate inside these cells, and finally how pathogens may cross epithelial or endothelial host barriers and get access to internal tissues, leading to severe diseases in humans. PMID:25637951

  9. Bacterial start site prediction.

    PubMed

    Hannenhalli, S S; Hayes, W S; Hatzigeorgiou, A G; Fickett, J W

    1999-09-01

    With the growing number of completely sequenced bacterial genes, accurate gene prediction in bacterial genomes remains an important problem. Although the existing tools predict genes in bacterial genomes with high overall accuracy, their ability to pinpoint the translation start site remains unsatisfactory. In this paper, we present a novel approach to bacterial start site prediction that takes into account multiple features of a potential start site, viz., ribosome binding site (RBS) binding energy, distance of the RBS from the start codon, distance from the beginning of the maximal ORF to the start codon, the start codon itself and the coding/non-coding potential around the start site. Mixed integer programing was used to optimize the discriminatory system. The accuracy of this approach is up to 90%, compared to 70%, using the most common tools in fully automated mode (that is, without expert human post-processing of results). The approach is evaluated using Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Pyrococcus furiosus. These three genomes cover a broad spectrum of bacterial genomes, since B.subtilis is a Gram-positive bacterium, E.coli is a Gram-negative bacterium and P. furiosus is an archaebacterium. A significant problem is generating a set of 'true' start sites for algorithm training, in the absence of experimental work. We found that sequence conservation between P. furiosus and the related Pyrococcus horikoshii clearly delimited the gene start in many cases, providing a sufficient training set. PMID:10446249

  10. Nuclear Proliferation Technology Trends Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zentner, Michael D.; Coles, Garill A.; Talbert, Robert J.

    2005-10-04

    A process is underway to develop mature, integrated methodologies to address nonproliferation issues. A variety of methodologies (both qualitative and quantitative) are being considered. All have one thing in common, a need for a consistent set of proliferation related data that can be used as a basis for application. One approach to providing a basis for predicting and evaluating future proliferation events is to understand past proliferation events, that is, the different paths that have actually been taken to acquire or attempt to acquire special nuclear material. In order to provide this information, this report describing previous material acquisition activities (obtained from open source material) has been prepared. This report describes how, based on an evaluation of historical trends in nuclear technology development, conclusions can be reached concerning: (1) The length of time it takes to acquire a technology; (2) The length of time it takes for production of special nuclear material to begin; and (3) The type of approaches taken for acquiring the technology. In addition to examining time constants, the report is intended to provide information that could be used to support the use of the different non-proliferation analysis methodologies. Accordingly, each section includes: (1) Technology description; (2) Technology origin; (3) Basic theory; (4) Important components/materials; (5) Technology development; (6) Technological difficulties involved in use; (7) Changes/improvements in technology; (8) Countries that have used/attempted to use the technology; (9) Technology Information; (10) Acquisition approaches; (11) Time constants for technology development; and (12) Required Concurrent Technologies.

  11. Neurologic complications of thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kudrjavcev, T

    1978-01-01

    Until such time as results of more rigorous studies are available, the morbidity rates for thyroid dysfunction cited here must suffice. The 1955 to 1956 outpatient "incidence" for England and Wales was 1.1 per 1,000 for thyrotoxicosis and 1.7 per 1,000 for myxedema (18). United States in-patient "incidence" for 1971 was 0.16 per 1,000 for thyrotoxicosis and 0.13 per 1,000 for myxedema (25). The 1935 to 1967 average annual incidence of Graves' disease for females in Olmsted County, Minnesota, was 30.5 per 100,000 (10). Well over 50% of hyperthyroid patients have clinical evidence of mild or moderate muscle weakness. Usually this weakness is proximal, and electro-myography and muscle biopsy confirm the existence of myopathic process (Table 11). Severe muscular weakness of acute onset is relatively rare and is encountered in approximately 1% of hyperthyroid patients (11,17,40). Ophthalmoplegia and psychosis are reported 4% and 2% of patients, respectively (17). Myasthenia gravis, although well publicized, is estimated to occur in less than 1% of patients (3,30). TPP is virtually nonexistent in the West; in the Orient it is reported in 2 to 8% of hyperthyroid patients and is 20 to 60 times more frequent in the hyperthyroid male than in the hyperthyroid female (Table 12). The neurologic symptomatology of myxedema is more extensive, and agreement among the various series is poor. The only unselected series addressing itself to neuromuscular manifestations of myxedema that is suitable for citation is that of Scarpalezos et al. (36). This comprehensive study was done without apparent patient selection, and it reported 2% of patients with definite carpal tunnel syndrome, 6% with myopathy, and 18% with polyneuropathy (Table 13). Reported percentages of hypothyroid patients found to have neurologic manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction are extremely diverse: ataxic gait was reported in 5 to 32% (6,7,12,27) of patients and dysdiadochokinesia in 6 to 52% (7,12,27). Psychosis

  12. Erectile dysfunction in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Turan, Onur; Ure, Iyimser; Turan, Pakize Ayse

    2016-02-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common problem in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aimed to assess the presence of erectile dysfunction (ED) in COPD patients. Ninety-three outpatients who had been diagnosed as COPD and followed in Bolvadin State Hospital, Afyon, Turkey, were included in the study. All patients underwent pulmonary function tests and arterial blood gas analysis. They completed International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), Medical Research Council (MRC) Dyspnea Scale, Short Form 36-item Scale (SF-36), and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) Questionnaire. The mean age of 10 (10.8%) mild, 46 (49.5%) moderate, 28 (30.1%) severe, and 9 (9.7%) very severe COPD patients was 61.4 ± 9.8 years. Varying degrees of ED were detected in 67.7% of COPD patients. All patients with hypoxemia had ED. IPAQ score and all SF-36 parameters were low in patients with ED, while MRC score was high. Forced expiratory volume in one second, forced vital capacity, partial pressure of oxygen in blood, oxygen (O2) saturation, IPAQ score, and role-physical parameters were statistically low in ED patients (p = 0.04, 0.02, <0.01, <0.01, 0.02, and 0.04, respectively); MRC score was statistically higher in patients with ED (p = 0.02). Patients with moderate and severe ED had statistically lower score of mental health (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). There was a positive correlation between IIEF score and IPAQ scores (p < 0.01), MRC scores (p = 0.01), general health (p < 0.01), role-physical (p < 0.01), role-emotional (p < 0.01), physical functioning (p < 0.01), and mental health (p < 0.01) parameters in SF-36. ED is frequently seen in COPD patients. Hypoxemia, smoking, and limitation of physical activity are thought to be associated with ED in COPD as mechanisms. Quality of life and the functional capacity are negatively affected with the presence of ED. It is important for a physician to question the sexual functions in patients with COPD. The

  13. Psychogenic erectile dysfunction. Classification and management.

    PubMed

    Rosen, R C

    2001-05-01

    Psychogenic factors are involved alone or in combination with organic causes in a substantial number of cases of erectile dysfunction. Epidemiologic studies have implicated the role of depressed mood, loss of self-esteem, and other psychosocial stresses in the cause of erectile dysfunction. A new definition and classification of psychogenic erectile dysfunction has been proposed based on recent clinical and research findings. According to this new classification, psychogenic erectile dysfunction is categorized as generalized or situational type, with subcategories of each type proposed. Traditional treatment approaches for psychogenic erectile dysfunction have included anxiety reduction and desensitization procedures, cognitive-behavioral interventions, guided sexual stimulation techniques, and couples' or relationship counseling. Recently, these approaches increasingly have been combined with pharmacologic therapy such as sildenafil. Special situations have been identified in which combining psychosocial interventions with medical therapy is recommended. These situations include problems of sexual initiation, low sexual desire, other sexual dysfunctions, and significant couples' or relationship problems. More research is needed on the role of psychosocial interventions in the treatment of erectile dysfunction. PMID:11402580

  14. Myocardial Dysfunction and Shock after Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Jentzer, Jacob C.; Chonde, Meshe D.; Dezfulian, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Postarrest myocardial dysfunction includes the development of low cardiac output or ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction after cardiac arrest. Impaired left ventricular systolic function is reported in nearly two-thirds of patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Hypotension and shock requiring vasopressor support are similarly common after cardiac arrest. Whereas shock requiring vasopressor support is consistently associated with an adverse outcome after cardiac arrest, the association between myocardial dysfunction and outcomes is less clear. Myocardial dysfunction and shock after cardiac arrest develop as the result of preexisting cardiac pathology with multiple superimposed insults from resuscitation. The pathophysiology involves cardiovascular ischemia/reperfusion injury and cardiovascular toxicity from excessive levels of inflammatory cytokine activation and catecholamines, among other contributing factors. Similar mechanisms occur in myocardial dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass, in sepsis, and in stress-induced cardiomyopathy. Hemodynamic stabilization after resuscitation from cardiac arrest involves restoration of preload, vasopressors to support arterial pressure, and inotropic support if needed to reverse the effects of myocardial dysfunction and improve systemic perfusion. Further research is needed to define the role of postarrest myocardial dysfunction on cardiac arrest outcomes and identify therapeutic strategies. PMID:26421284

  15. Lipoproteins of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kovacs-Simon, A; Titball, R W; Michell, S L

    2011-02-01

    Bacterial lipoproteins are a set of membrane proteins with many different functions. Due to this broad-ranging functionality, these proteins have a considerable significance in many phenomena, from cellular physiology through cell division and virulence. Here we give a general overview of lipoprotein biogenesis and highlight examples of the roles of lipoproteins in bacterial disease caused by a selection of medically relevant Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Neisseria meningitidis. Lipoproteins have been shown to play key roles in adhesion to host cells, modulation of inflammatory processes, and translocation of virulence factors into host cells. As such, a number of lipoproteins have been shown to be potential vaccines. This review provides a summary of some of the reported roles of lipoproteins and of how this knowledge has been exploited in some cases for the generation of novel countermeasures to bacterial diseases. PMID:20974828

  16. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination. PMID:27349114

  17. Psychiatric disorders and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, Marcel D

    2015-01-01

    Sexual problems are highly prevalent among patients with psychiatric disorders. They may be caused by the psychopathology of the psychiatric disorder but also by its pharmacotherapy. Both positive symptoms (e.g., psychosis, hallucinations) as well as negative symptoms (e.g., anhedonia) of schizophrenia may negatively interfere with interpersonal and sexual relationships. Atypical antipsychotics have fewer sexual side-effects than the classic antipsychotics. Mood disorders may affect libido, sexual arousal, orgasm, and erectile function. With the exception of bupropion, agomelatine, mirtazapine, vortioxetine, amineptine, and moclobemide, all antidepressants cause sexual side-effects. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may particularly delay ejaculation and female orgasm, but also can cause decreased libido and erectile difficulties. SSRI-induced sexual side-effects are dose-dependent and reversible. Very rarely, their sexual side-effects persist after SSRI discontinuation. This is often preceded by genital anesthesia. Some personality characteristics are a risk factor for sexual dysfunction. Also patients with eating disorders may suffer from sexual difficulties. So far, research into psychotropic-induced sexual side-effects suffers from substantial methodologic limitations. Patients tend not to talk with their clinician about their sexual life. Psychiatrists and other doctors need to take the initiative to talk about the patient's sexual life in order to become informed about potential medication-induced sexual difficulties. PMID:26003261

  18. Tumor-induced immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, R; Wasserman, K; Horiguchi, S; Kono, K; Sjöberg, J; Pisa, P; Petersson, M

    1999-10-01

    Immune system-based approaches for the treatment of malignant disease over the past decades have often focused on cytolytic effector cells such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cells. It has also been demonstrated that tumor-bearing mice can be cured using a wide variety of approaches, some of which involve cytokine-mediated enhancement of CTL and NK cell activity. However, the apparent success in mice stands in contrast to the current situation in the clinic, wherein only a minority of patients have thus far benefited from CTL- or NK cell-based antitumor approaches. The underlying causes of tumor-associated immune suppression of CTL and NK cell activity are discussed, and features of interest shared with HIV infection, leprosy, and rheumatoid arthritis are also be mentioned. Remarkable and very recent observations have shed more light upon the causes of dysfunctional alterations in CTL and NK cells often associated with these diseases, that in turn have suggested new immunotherapeutic approaches for cancer and infectious disease. PMID:10501847

  19. Animal models of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Snehlata V.; Jadhav, Kshitij S.; Marathe, Padmaja A.; Pawar, Dattatray B.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models have contributed to a great extent to understanding and advancement in the field of sexual medicine. Many current medical and surgical therapies in sexual medicine have been tried based on these animal models. Extensive literature search revealed that the compiled information is limited. In this review, we describe various experimental models of erectile dysfunction (ED) encompassing their procedures, variables of assessment, advantages and disadvantages. The search strategy consisted of review of PubMed based articles. We included original research work and certain review articles available in PubMed database. The search terms used were “ED and experimental models,” “ED and nervous stimulation,” “ED and cavernous nerve stimulation,” “ED and central stimulation,” “ED and diabetes mellitus,” “ED and ageing,” “ED and hypercholesteremia,” “ED and Peyronie's disease,” “radiation induced ED,” “telemetric recording,” “ED and mating test” and “ED and non-contact erection test.” PMID:25624570

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Katsetos, Christos D; Koutzaki, Sirma; Melvin, Joseph J

    2013-09-01

    This review deciphers aspects of mitochondrial (mt) dysfunction among nosologically, pathologically, and genetically diverse diseases of the skeletal muscle, lower motor neuron, and peripheral nerve, which fall outside the traditional realm of mt cytopathies. Special emphasis is given to well-characterized mt abnormalities in collagen VI myopathies (Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy), megaconial congenital muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 (calpainopathy), centronuclear myopathies, core myopathies, inflammatory myopathies, spinal muscular atrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2, and drug-induced peripheral neuropathies. Among inflammatory myopathies, mt abnormalities are more prominent in inclusion body myositis and a subset of polymyositis with mt pathology, both of which are refractory to corticosteroid treatment. Awareness is raised about instances of phenotypic mimicry between cases harboring primary mtDNA depletion, in the context of mtDNA depletion syndrome, and established neuromuscular disorders such as spinal muscular atrophy. A substantial body of experimental work, derived from animal models, attests to a major role of mitochondria (mt) in the early process of muscle degeneration. Common mechanisms of mt-related cell injury include dysregulation of the mt permeability transition pore opening and defective autophagy. The therapeutic use of mt permeability transition pore modifiers holds promise in various neuromuscular disorders, including muscular dystrophies. PMID:24331362

  1. Nonobvious obstructive meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Blackie, Caroline A; Korb, Donald R; Knop, Eric; Bedi, Raman; Knop, Nadja; Holland, Edward J

    2010-12-01

    This review presents the rationale and supporting data for a recent paradigm shift in our understanding of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). The historical understanding of MGD has been that of an infectious hypersecretory disorder with obvious signs of inflammation, hypersecretion, and purulent excreta. The current understanding of MGD now includes the polar concept of a less obvious or nonobvious type of hyposecretory obstructive MGD, where inflammation and other signs of pathology may be absent unless special examination techniques are employed. A new term, nonobvious obstructive MGD (NOMGD), is used to describe what may be the most common form of obstructive MGD. Obstructive MGD is an area of growing importance because obstructive MGD is now recognized to be the most common cause of evaporative dry eye, and because NOMGD seems to be the precursor to obvious obstructive MGD, it is also an important area to understand. The prevalence of NOMGD seems to be very high but currently significantly underdiagnosed. This review presents the relevant anatomy and physiology, concepts of obstructive MGD, the usual absence of inflammation in obstructive MGD, nomenclature and classification of obstructive and NOMGD, clinical diagnosis of NOMGD emphasizing the necessity for diagnostic expression, the use of a new instrument for diagnostic expression providing a standardized method of assessing meibomian gland functionality, the complementary roles of the aqueous and lipid layers, and the specific treatment of NOMGD, emphasizing that the success of treatment of all forms of obstructive MGD is dependent on the relief of the obstruction. PMID:20847669

  2. The anatomy of group dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hayes, David F

    2014-04-01

    The dysfunction of the radiology group has 2 components: (1) the thinking component-the governance structure of the radiology group; how we manage the group; and (2) the structural component-the group's business model and its conflict with the partner's personal business model. Of the 2 components, governance is more important. Governance must be structured on classic, immutable business management principles. The structural component, the business model, is not immutable. In fact, it must continually change in response to the marketplace. Changes in the business model should occur only if demanded or permitted by the marketplace; instituting changes for other reasons, including personal interests or deficient knowledge of the deciders, is fundamentally contrary to the long-term interests of the group and its owners. First, we must learn basic business management concepts to appreciate the function and necessity of standard business models and standard business governance. Peter Drucker's The Effective Executive is an excellent primer on the subjects of standard business practices and the importance of a functional, authorized, and fully accountable chief executive officer. PMID:24503047

  3. Metabolic Dysfunction in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Isfort, Michael; Stevens, Sarah C.W.; Schaffer, Stephen; Jong, Chian Ju; Wold, Loren E.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is defined as cardiac disease independent of vascular complications during diabetes. The number of new cases of DCM is rising at epidemic rates in proportion to newly diagnosed cases of diabetes mellitus (DM) throughout the world. DCM is a heart failure syndrome found in diabetic patients that is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and reduced diastolic function, with or without concurrent systolic dysfunction, occurring in the absence of hypertension and coronary artery disease. DCM and other diabetic complications are caused in part by elevations in blood glucose and lipids, characteristic of DM. Although there are pathological consequences to hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, the combination of the two metabolic abnormalities potentiates the severity of diabetic complications. A natural competition exists between glucose and fatty acid metabolism in the heart that is regulated by allosteric and feedback control and transcriptional modulation of key limiting enzymes. Inhibition of these glycolytic enzymes not only controls flux of substrate through the glycolytic pathway, but also leads to the diversion of glycolytic intermediate substrate through pathological pathways, which mediate the onset of diabetic complications. The present review describes the limiting steps involved in the development of these pathological pathways and the factors involved in the regulation of these limiting steps. Additionally, therapeutic options with demonstrated or postulated effects on DCM are described. PMID:23443849

  4. Sexual dysfunction within an adult developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Fagan, P J; Meyer, J K; Schmidt, C W

    1986-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the adult who has adequately mastered the oedipal stage of psychosexual development and who presents with a sexual dysfunction. Drawing on the developmental sequence of Erik Erikson, the authors suggest that failure to address adequately an adult psychosocial crisis may result in sexual dysfunction. There may be both adult developmental deficits and regression to adolescent and adult stages previously negotiated. Both may be symptomatically represented by sexual dysfunction. The authors urge that the sexual and marital problems be evaluated within an adult developmental framework and that the therapy address the psychosocial issues which are appropriate to the developmental stage of the patient. PMID:3820320

  5. [Female sexual dysfunction: Drug treatment options].

    PubMed

    Alcántara Montero, A; Sánchez Carnerero, C I

    2016-01-01

    Many women will likely experience a sexual problem in their lifetime. Female sexual dysfunction is a broad term used to describe 3 categories of disorders of a multifactorial nature. Effective, but limited pharmacotherapeutic options exist to address female sexual dysfunction. The FDA recently approved the first agent for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in pre-menopausal women. Off-label use of hormonal therapies, particularly oestrogen and testosterone, are the most widely employed for female sexual dysfunction, particularly in post-menopausal women. Other drugs currently under investigation include phosphodiesterase inhibitors and agents that modulate dopamine or melanocortin receptors. PMID:27041639

  6. Velo-pharyngeal dysfunction: Evaluation and management

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Separation of the nasal and oral cavities by dynamic closure of the velo-pharyngeal port is necessary for normal speech and swallowing. Velo-pharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) may either follow repair of a cleft palate or be independent of clefting. While the diagnosis of VPD is made by audiologic perceptual evaluation of speech, identification of the mechanism of the dysfunction requires instrumental visualization of the velo-pharyngeal port during specific speech tasks. Matching the specific intervention for management of VPD with the type of dysfunction, i.e. differential management for differential diagnosis, maximizes the result while minimizing the morbidity of the intervention. PMID:19884668

  7. Bacterial transfer RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer; Ibba, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Transfer RNA is an essential adapter molecule that is found across all three domains of life. The primary role of transfer RNA resides in its critical involvement in the accurate translation of messenger RNA codons during protein synthesis and, therefore, ultimately in the determination of cellular gene expression. This review aims to bring together the results of intensive investigations into the synthesis, maturation, modification, aminoacylation, editing and recycling of bacterial transfer RNAs. Codon recognition at the ribosome as well as the ever-increasing number of alternative roles for transfer RNA outside of translation will be discussed in the specific context of bacterial cells. PMID:25796611

  8. Sustainability of virulence in a phage-bacterial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Silja; Sneppen, Kim; Krishna, Sandeep

    2010-03-01

    Virulent phages and their bacterial hosts represent an unusual sort of predator-prey system where each time a prey is eaten, hundreds of new predators are born. It is puzzling how, despite the apparent effectiveness of the phage predators, they manage to avoid driving their bacterial prey to extinction. Here we consider a phage-bacterial ecosystem on a two-dimensional (2-d) surface and show that homogeneous space in itself enhances coexistence. We analyze different behavioral mechanisms that can facilitate coexistence in a spatial environment. For example, we find that when the latent times of the phage are allowed to evolve, selection favors "mediocre killers," since voracious phage rapidly deplete local resources and go extinct. Our model system thus emphasizes the differences between short-term proliferation and long-term ecosystem sustainability. PMID:20071588

  9. Recent advances in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Quagliarello, V J; Scheld, W M

    1986-11-01

    Bacterial meningitis continues to account for worldwide morbidity and mortality despite the advent of effective bactericidal antibiotic therapy. Recent advances over the past 10 years in the development of experimental animal models as well as basic investigation into critical bacterial surface virulence factors have begun to clarify a conceptual framework for understanding the mechanism of meningitis development in humans. Basic observations regarding competing host defenses and bacterial virulence factors have supported a pathogenetic sequence of mucosal colonization with a meningeal pathogen; systemic host invasion with intravascular replication; blood brain barrier penetration and unimpeded CSF proliferation amid the impaired host defenses in the CSF milieu; and pathophysiologic sequelae including vasogenic, cytotoxic, and interstitial brain edema (and other processes) accounting for irreversible neuronal injury and death. Only through continued basic investigation into each of these pathogenetic steps will significant reductions in morbidity and mortality ensue. PMID:3535498

  10. Sulfur Dioxide Contributes to the Cardiac and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Rats.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guohua; Wu, Meiqiong; Wang, Jiaoxia; Xu, Zhifang; Xia, Jin; Sang, Nan

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between sulfur dioxide (SO2) and an increase of morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemic heart disease, heart failure, and arrhythmia. Mitochondrion is the most sensitive organelle in myocardium of animals exposed to SO2 Here we study the molecular characterization of mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac muscles of rat after SO2 exposure. We found that the cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), ATP contents, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) contents, and mRNA expression of complexes IV and V subunits encoded by mtDNA were decreased after NaHSO3 treatment in vitro or SO2 inhalation in vivo The mitochondrial dysfunctions were accompanied by depressions of co-activator of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) mRNA and protein. We observed swollen mitochondria and lower amounts of cristae in hearts of rats after 3.5 mg/m(3) SO2 inhalation for 30 days. Interestingly, NaHSO3 induced mitochondrial dysfunctions marked by ΔΨm and ATP reduction could be inhibited by an antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NALC), accompanied by the restoration of transcriptional factors expressions. The cardiac mitochondrial dysfunctions could also be alleviated by overexpression of TFAM. SO2 induced abnormal left ventricular function was restored by NALC in vivo Our findings demonstrate that SO2 induces cardiac and mitochondrial dysfunction. And inhibition of reactive oxygen species and enhancing the transcriptional network controlling mitochondrial biogenesis can mitigate the SO2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26980303

  11. Role of long non-coding RNA-RNCR3 in atherosclerosis-related vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shan, K; Jiang, Q; Wang, X-Q; Wang, Y-N-Z; Yang, H; Yao, M-D; Liu, C; Li, X-M; Yao, J; Liu, B; Zhang, Y-Y; J, Yong; Yan, B

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the most common vascular disorders. Endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated in several biological processes and human diseases. Here we show that lncRNA-RNCR3 is expressed in ECs and VSMCs. RNCR3 expression is significantly upregulated in mouse and human aortic atherosclerotic lesions, and cultured ECs and VSMCs upon ox-LDL treatment in vitro. RNCR3 knockdown accelerates the development of atherosclerosis, aggravates hypercholesterolemia and inflammatory factor releases, and decreases EC and VSMC proliferation in vivo. RNCR3 knockdown also reduces the proliferation and migration, and accelerates apoptosis development of EC and VSMC in vitro. RNCR3 acts as a ceRNA, and forms a feedback loop with Kruppel-like factor 2 and miR-185-5p to regulate cell function. This study reveals that RNCR3 has an atheroprotective role in atherosclerosis, and its intervention is a promising strategy for treating atherosclerosis-related vascular dysfunction. PMID:27253412

  12. Soluble endoglin, hypercholesterolemia and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rathouska, Jana; Jezkova, Katerina; Nemeckova, Ivana; Nachtigal, Petr

    2015-12-01

    A soluble form of endoglin (sEng) is known to be an extracellular domain of the full-length membrane endoglin, which is elevated during various pathological conditions related to vascular endothelium. In the current review, we tried to summarize a possible role of soluble endoglin in cardiovascular pathologies, focusing on its relation to endothelial dysfunction and cholesterol levels. We discussed sEng as a proposed biomarker of cardiovascular disease progression, cardiovascular disease treatment and endothelial dysfunction. We also addressed a potential interaction of sEng with TGF-β/eNOS or BMP-9 signaling. We suggest soluble endoglin levels to be monitored, because they reflect the progression/treatment efficacy of cardiovascular diseases related to endothelial dysfunction and hypercholesterolemia. A possible role of soluble endoglin as an inducer of endothelial dysfunction however remains to be elucidated. PMID:26520890

  13. Endothelial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dhananjayan, R; Koundinya, K S Srivani; Malati, T; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an imbalance in the production of vasodilator factors and when this balance is disrupted, it predisposes the vasculature towards pro-thrombotic and pro-atherogenic effects. This results in vasoconstriction, leukocyte adherence, platelet activation, mitogenesis, pro-oxidation, impaired coagulation and nitric oxide production, vascular inflammation, atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Endothelial dysfunction is focussed as it is a potential contributor to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Under physiological conditions, there is a balanced release of endothelial-derived relaxing and contracting factors, but this delicate balance is altered in diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis, thereby contributing to further progression of vascular and end-organ damage. This review focuses on endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, oxidative stress associated with diabetes mellitus, markers and genetics that are implicated in endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27605734

  14. Evaluation and Treatment of Smell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Terence M.; Murphy, Claire; Jacobs, Robert D.; Jalowayski, Alfredo

    1987-01-01

    We gave 63 patients with symptoms of smell dysfunction a full evaluation by age-adjusted olfactory threshold and odor identification testing, rhinomanometry, nasal cytology, nasal endoscopy, computed tomographic (CT) scan and a trial of medical treatment. CT scans were valuable for identifying ethmoid sinus disease and nasal endoscopy for inspecting olfactory epithelium. A trial of prednisone served as a diagnostic modality to identify correctable causes of smell dysfunction. Given that there are 2 million people in the United States with a smell dysfunction, that the average physician knows little about its diagnosis and treatment and that the psychosocial impact to an afflicted person is great, we urge a greater awareness of smell dysfunction, its diagnosis and its treatment. PMID:3577134

  15. Modeling intraocular bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Astley, Roger A; Coburn, Phillip S; Parkunan, Salai Madhumathi; Callegan, Michelle C

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis is an infection and inflammation of the posterior segment of the eye which can result in significant loss of visual acuity. Even with prompt antibiotic, anti-inflammatory and surgical intervention, vision and even the eye itself may be lost. For the past century, experimental animal models have been used to examine various aspects of the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial endophthalmitis, to further the development of anti-inflammatory treatment strategies, and to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and efficacies of antibiotics. Experimental models allow independent control of many parameters of infection and facilitate systematic examination of infection outcomes. While no single animal model perfectly reproduces the human pathology of bacterial endophthalmitis, investigators have successfully used these models to understand the infectious process and the host response, and have provided new information regarding therapeutic options for the treatment of bacterial endophthalmitis. This review highlights experimental animal models of endophthalmitis and correlates this information with the clinical setting. The goal is to identify knowledge gaps that may be addressed in future experimental and clinical studies focused on improvements in the therapeutic preservation of vision during and after this disease. PMID:27154427

  16. Phagocytosis of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yoon-Suk Alexander; Kocks, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Phagocytosis is an evolutionarily ancient, receptor-driven process, by which phagocytic cells recognize invading microbes and destroy them after internalization. The phagocytosis receptor Eater is expressed exclusively on Drosophila phagocytes and is required for the survival of bacterial infections. In a recent study, we explored how Eater can defend fruit flies against different kinds of bacteria. We discovered that Eater bound to certain types of bacteria directly, while for others bacterial binding was dependent on prior disruption of the bacterial envelope. Similar to phagocytes, antimicrobial peptides and lysozymes are ancient components of animal immune systems. Our results suggest that cationic antimicrobial peptides, as well as lysozymes, can facilitate Eater binding to live Gram-negative bacteria. Both types of molecules promote surface-exposure of bacterial ligands that otherwise would remain buried and hidden under an outer membrane. We propose that unmasking ligands for phagocytic receptors may be a conserved mechanism operating in many animals, including humans. Thus, studying a Drosophila phagocytosis receptor may advance our understanding of innate immunity in general. PMID:22223092

  17. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  18. BACTERIAL WATERBORNE PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterial pathogens are examples of classical etiological agents of waterborne disease. While these agents no longer serve as major threats to U.S. water supplies, they are still important pathogens in areas with substandard sanitation and poor water treatment facilities. In th...

  19. Bacterial microflora of nectarines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microflora of fruit surfaces has been the best source of antagonists against fungi causing postharvest decays of fruit. However, there is little information on microflora colonizing surfaces of fruits other than grapes, apples, and citrus fruit. We characterized bacterial microflora on nectarine f...

  20. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  1. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  2. Proliferation Vulnerability Red Team report

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, J.P.; Barnard, R.W.; Bennett, D.E.

    1996-10-01

    This report is the product of a four-month independent technical assessment of potential proliferation vulnerabilities associated with the plutonium disposition alternatives currently under review by DOE/MD. The scope of this MD-chartered/Sandia-led study was limited to technical considerations that could reduce proliferation resistance during various stages of the disposition processes below the Stored Weapon/Spent Fuel standards. Both overt and covert threats from host nation and unauthorized parties were considered. The results of this study will be integrated with complementary work by others into an overall Nonproliferation and Arms Control Assessment in support of a Secretarial Record of Decision later this year for disposition of surplus U.S. weapons plutonium.

  3. [Thyroid dysfunction and the hemostatic system].

    PubMed

    Platonova, N M; Sviridonova, M A; Troshina, E A

    2014-01-01

    Whether there is a link between thyroid dysfunction and different impairments in the hemostatic system is discussed. The level of thyroid hormones is an essential factor that influences the coagulation system. Thyroid dysfunction affects the balance between coagulation and fibrinolysis, by increasing the risk of thrombosis and hemorrhage in hyperthyroidism. However, there is no consensus of opinion regarding the mechanisms of the described hemostatic changes in the literature. PMID:25509900

  4. Sinus node dysfunction complicating viper bite.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashish; Kumar, Tarun; Ravindranath, Khandenahally S; Bhat, Prabhavathi; Manjunath, Cholenahally N; Agarwal, Neena

    2015-02-01

    Viper venom toxicities comprise mainly bleeding disorders and nephrotoxicity. Cardiotoxicity is a rare manifestation of viper bite. We describe the case of a previously healthy 35-year-old man who developed coagulopathy and sinus node dysfunction following a viper bite. Electrocardiography showed sinus arrest and junctional escape rhythm. This is the first account of sinus node dysfunction caused by a viper bite. PMID:24887872

  5. Sexual dysfunction following proctocolectomy and abdominoperineal resection.

    PubMed

    Yeager, E S; Van Heerden, J A

    1980-02-01

    Sexual dysfunction after rectal excision was studied in 45 male patients who were less than 50 years of age. Of 25 patients having had proctocolectomy, one (4%) was impotent, while three (15%) of 20 patients having had abdominoperineal resection were impotent. Two patients in the abdominoperineal group reported no ejaculation with normal potency and sensation of orgasm. The age of the patient and the extent of dissection seemed to be the two main factors concerned with sexual dysfunction after rectal excision. PMID:7362286

  6. Synaptic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bagetta, Vincenza; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Sgobio, Carmelo; Calabresi, Paolo; Picconi, Barbara

    2010-04-01

    In neuronal circuits, memory storage depends on activity-dependent modifications in synaptic efficacy, such as LTD (long-term depression) and LTP (long-term potentiation), the two main forms of synaptic plasticity in the brain. In the nucleus striatum, LTD and LTP represent key cellular substrates for adaptive motor control and procedural memory. It has been suggested that their impairment could account for the onset and progression of motor symptoms of PD (Parkinson's disease), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the massive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons projecting to the striatum. In fact, a peculiar aspect of striatal plasticity is the modulation exerted by DA (dopamine) on LTP and LTD. Our understanding of these maladaptive forms of plasticity has mostly come from the electrophysiological, molecular and behavioural analyses of experimental animal models of PD. In PD, a host of cellular and synaptic changes occur in the striatum in response to the massive loss of DA innervation. Chronic L-dopa therapy restores physiological synaptic plasticity and behaviour in treated PD animals, but most of them, similarly to patients, exhibit a reduction in the efficacy of the drug and disabling AIMs (abnormal involuntary movements) defined, as a whole, as L-dopa-induced dyskinesia. In those animals experiencing AIMs, synaptic plasticity is altered and is paralleled by modifications in the postsynaptic compartment. In particular, dysfunctions in trafficking and subunit composition of NMDARs [NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors] on striatal efferent neurons result from chronic non-physiological dopaminergic stimulation and contribute to the pathogenesis of dyskinesias. According to these pathophysiological concepts, therapeutic strategies targeting signalling proteins coupled to NMDARs within striatal spiny neurons could represent new pharmaceutical interventions for PD and L-dopa-induced dyskinesia. PMID:20298209

  7. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies. PMID:26951056

  8. Cognitive dysfunction in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, J

    2012-07-01

    Among the various central nervous system (CNS) manifestations of mitochondrial disorders (MIDs), cognitive impairment is increasingly recognized and diagnosed (mitochondrial cognitive dysfunction). Aim of the review was to summarize recent findings concerning the aetiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of cognitive decline in MIDs. Among syndromic MIDs due to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, cognitive impairment occurs in patients with mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes syndrome, myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibres syndrome, mitochondrial chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, Kearns-Sayre syndrome, neuropathy, ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa syndrome and maternally inherited diabetes and deafness. Among syndromic MIDs due to nuclear DNA (nDNA) mutations, cognitive decline has been reported in myo-neuro-gastro-intestinal encephalopathy, mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome, spinocerebellar ataxia with encephalopathy, Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome, leuko-encephalopathy; brain and spinal cord involvement and lactic acidosis, CMT2, Wolfram syndrome, Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and Leigh syndrome. In addition to syndromic MIDs, a large number of non-syndromic MIDs due to mtDNA as well as nDNA mutations have been reported, which present with cognitive impairment as the sole or one among several other CNS manifestations of a MID. Delineation of mitochondrial cognitive impairment from other types of cognitive impairment is essential to guide the optimal management of these patients. Treatment of mitochondrial cognitive impairment is largely limited to symptomatic and supportive measures. Cognitive impairment may be a CNS manifestation of syndromic as well as non-syndromic MIDs. Correct diagnosis of mitochondrial cognitive impairment is a prerequisite for the optimal management of these patients. PMID:22335339

  9. Postprostatectomy Erectile Dysfunction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Salonia, Andrea; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In the current era of the early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) and the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques, erectile dysfunction (ED) represents an important issue, with up to 68% of patients who undergo radical prostatectomy (RP) complaining of postoperative erectile function (EF) impairment. In this context, it is crucial to comprehensively consider all factors possibly associated with the prevention of post-RP ED throughout the entire clinical management of PCa patients. A careful assessment of both oncological and functional baseline characteristics should be carried out for each patient preoperatively. Baseline EF, together with age and the overall burden of comorbidities, has been strongly associated with the chance of post-RP EF recovery. With this goal in mind, internationally validated psychometric instruments are preferable for ensuring proper baseline EF evaluations, and questionnaires should be administered at the proper time before surgery. Careful preoperative counselling is also required, both to respect the patient's wishes and to avoid false expectations regarding eventual recovery of baseline EF. The advent of robotic surgery has led to improvements in the knowledge of prostate surgical anatomy, as reflected by the formal redefinition of nerve-sparing techniques. Overall, comparative studies have shown significantly better EF outcomes for robotic RP than for open techniques, although data from prospective trials have not always been consistent. Preclinical data and several prospective randomized trials have demonstrated the value of treating patients with oral phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5is) after surgery, with the concomitant potential benefit of early re-oxygenation of the erectile tissue, which appears to be crucial for avoiding the eventual penile structural changes that are associated with postoperative neuropraxia and ultimately result in severe ED. For patients who do not properly respond to PDE5is, proper

  10. Postprostatectomy Erectile Dysfunction: A Review.

    PubMed

    Capogrosso, Paolo; Salonia, Andrea; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    In the current era of the early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) and the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques, erectile dysfunction (ED) represents an important issue, with up to 68% of patients who undergo radical prostatectomy (RP) complaining of postoperative erectile function (EF) impairment. In this context, it is crucial to comprehensively consider all factors possibly associated with the prevention of post-RP ED throughout the entire clinical management of PCa patients. A careful assessment of both oncological and functional baseline characteristics should be carried out for each patient preoperatively. Baseline EF, together with age and the overall burden of comorbidities, has been strongly associated with the chance of post-RP EF recovery. With this goal in mind, internationally validated psychometric instruments are preferable for ensuring proper baseline EF evaluations, and questionnaires should be administered at the proper time before surgery. Careful preoperative counselling is also required, both to respect the patient's wishes and to avoid false expectations regarding eventual recovery of baseline EF. The advent of robotic surgery has led to improvements in the knowledge of prostate surgical anatomy, as reflected by the formal redefinition of nerve-sparing techniques. Overall, comparative studies have shown significantly better EF outcomes for robotic RP than for open techniques, although data from prospective trials have not always been consistent. Preclinical data and several prospective randomized trials have demonstrated the value of treating patients with oral phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5is) after surgery, with the concomitant potential benefit of early re-oxygenation of the erectile tissue, which appears to be crucial for avoiding the eventual penile structural changes that are associated with postoperative neuropraxia and ultimately result in severe ED. For patients who do not properly respond to PDE5is, proper

  11. Corticosteroids for Bacterial Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Muthiah; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Rajaraman, Revathi; Ravindran, Meenakshi; Lalitha, Prajna; Glidden, David V.; Ray, Kathryn J.; Hong, Kevin C.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Lee, Salena M.; Zegans, Michael E.; McLeod, Stephen D.; Lietman, Thomas M.; Acharya, Nisha R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there is a benefit in clinical outcomes with the use of topical corticosteroids as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Methods Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked, multicenter clinical trial comparing prednisolone sodium phosphate, 1.0%, to placebo as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of bacterial corneal ulcers. Eligible patients had a culture-positive bacterial corneal ulcer and received topical moxifloxacin for at least 48 hours before randomization. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) at 3 months from enrollment. Secondary outcomes included infiltrate/scar size, reepithelialization, and corneal perforation. Results Between September 1, 2006, and February 22, 2010, 1769 patients were screened for the trial and 500 patients were enrolled. No significant difference was observed in the 3-month BSCVA (−0.009 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR]; 95% CI, −0.085 to 0.068; P = .82), infiltrate/scar size (P = .40), time to reepithelialization (P = .44), or corneal perforation (P > .99). A significant effect of corticosteroids was observed in subgroups of baseline BSCVA (P = .03) and ulcer location (P = .04). At 3 months, patients with vision of counting fingers or worse at baseline had 0.17 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (95% CI, −0.31 to −0.02; P = .03) compared with placebo, and patients with ulcers that were completely central at baseline had 0.20 logMAR better visual acuity with corticosteroids (−0.37 to −0.04; P = .02). Conclusions We found no overall difference in 3-month BSCVA and no safety concerns with adjunctive corticosteroid therapy for bacterial corneal ulcers. Application to Clinical Practice Adjunctive topical corticosteroid use does not improve 3-month vision in patients with bacterial corneal ulcers. PMID:21987582

  12. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  13. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-11-26

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  14. [Fluid management and care for multiple organ dysfunction syndrome in patients with extensive burns].

    PubMed

    Shinozawa, Yotaro

    2005-12-01

    Burn shock and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) are the main causes of death in patients with extensive burns, and thus fluid management and care for MODS are crucial in the treatment of these patients. Several fluid formulas have been developed, although there is still controversy over the best formula. The important point is to understand how to deal with the different side effects inevitable with each fluid therapy: fluid restriction and/or diuretic administration in the refilling phase in fluid therapy with crystalloid, care for hypernatremia and/or a hyperosmolar state in fluid therapy with hypertonic lactated solution (HLS), etc. Precise fluid management is needed for aged patients, patients with extensive inhalation injury, extensive electric injury, and myocardial dysfunction, or patients in whom the start of fluid treatment was delayed. MODS in extensively burned patients is attributed to overwhelming burn stress and complicated sepsis, including bacterial translocation (BT). A dysfunctioning organ impairs another organ (organ interrelationships), and therefore substitution and/or recovery of a dysfunctioning organ are crucial. Debridement of skin with third-degree burns, suppression of BT, sanitary airway management, avoidance of unnecessary stress, and mediator modulation to stop the mediator cascade inducing MODS are also crucial. PMID:16869126

  15. Bacterial flora as a cause or treatment of chronic diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Scaldaferri, Franco; Pizzoferrato, Marco; Pecere, Silvia; Forte, Fabrizio; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Intestinal microflora can be considered an organ of the body. It has several functions in the human gut, mostly metabolic and immunologic, and constantly interacts with the intestinal mucosa in a delicate equilibrium. Chronic diarrhea is associated with an alteration of gut microbiota when a pathogen invades the gut and also in several conditions associated with intestinal mucosal damage or bowel dysfunction, as in inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, or small bowel bacterial overgrowth. This article discusses the basis of gut microbiota modulation. Evidence for the efficacy of gut microbiota modulation in chronic conditions is also discussed. PMID:22917165

  16. 15 CFR 12.2 - Undue proliferation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Undue proliferation. 12.2 Section 12.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce FAIR PACKAGING AND LABELING § 12.2 Undue proliferation. (a) Information as to possible undue proliferation. Any person or group, including a State...

  17. 15 CFR 12.2 - Undue proliferation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Undue proliferation. 12.2 Section 12.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce FAIR PACKAGING AND LABELING § 12.2 Undue proliferation. (a) Information as to possible undue proliferation. Any person or group, including a State...

  18. 15 CFR 12.2 - Undue proliferation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Undue proliferation. 12.2 Section 12.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce FAIR PACKAGING AND LABELING § 12.2 Undue proliferation. (a) Information as to possible undue proliferation. Any person or group, including a State...

  19. 15 CFR 12.2 - Undue proliferation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Undue proliferation. 12.2 Section 12.2 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce FAIR PACKAGING AND LABELING § 12.2 Undue proliferation. (a) Information as to possible undue proliferation. Any person or group, including a State...

  20. Engineering microporosity in bacterial cellulose scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Bäckdahl, Henrik; Esguerra, Maricris; Delbro, Dick; Risberg, Bo; Gatenholm, Paul

    2008-08-01

    The scaffold is an essential component in tissue engineering. A novel method to prepare three-dimensional (3D) nanofibril network scaffolds with controlled microporosity has been developed. By placing paraffin wax and starch particles of various sizes in a growing culture of Acetobacter xylinum, bacterial cellulose scaffolds of different morphologies and interconnectivity were prepared. Paraffin particles were incorporated throughout the scaffold, while starch particles were found only in the outermost area of the resulting scaffold. The porogens were successfully removed after culture with bacteria and no residues were detected with electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) or Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR). Resulting scaffolds were seeded with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and investigated using histology and organ bath techniques. SMC were selected as the cell type since the main purpose of the resulting scaffolds is for tissue engineered blood vessels. SMCs attached to and proliferated on and partly into the scaffolds. PMID:18615821

  1. In situ evolutionary rate measurements show ecological success of recently emerged bacterial hybrids.

    PubMed

    Denef, Vincent J; Banfield, Jillian F

    2012-04-27

    Few data are available on how quickly free-living microorganisms evolve. We analyzed biofilms collected from a well-defined acid mine drainage system over 9 years to investigate the processes and determine rates of bacterial evolution directly in the environment. Population metagenomic analyses of the dominant primary producer yielded the nucleotide substitution rate, which we used to show that proliferation of a series of recombinant bacterial strains occurred over the past few decades. The ecological success of hybrid bacterial types highlights the role of evolutionary processes in rapid adaptation within natural microbial communities. PMID:22539719

  2. Synaptic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Picconi, Barbara; Piccoli, Giovanni; Calabresi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Activity-dependent modifications in synaptic efficacy, such as long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP), represent key cellular substrates for adaptive motor control and procedural memory. The impairment of these two forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus striatum could account for the onset and the progression of motor and cognitive symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), characterized by the massive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. In fact, both LTD and LTP are peculiarly controlled and modulated by dopaminergic transmission coming from nigrostriatal terminals. Changes in corticostriatal and nigrostriatal neuronal excitability may influence profoundly the threshold for the induction of synaptic plasticity, and changes in striatal synaptic transmission efficacy are supposed to play a role in the occurrence of PD symptoms. Understanding of these maladaptive forms of synaptic plasticity has mostly come from the analysis of experimental animal models of PD. A series of cellular and synaptic alterations occur in the striatum of experimental parkinsonism in response to the massive dopaminergic loss. In particular, dysfunctions in trafficking and subunit composition of glutamatergic NMDA receptors on striatal efferent neurons contribute to the clinical features of the experimental parkinsonism. Interestingly, it has become increasingly evident that in striatal spiny neurons, the correct assembly of NMDA receptor complex at the postsynaptic site is a major player in early phases of PD, and it is sensitive to distinct degrees of DA denervation. The molecular defects at the basis of PD progression may be not confined just at the postsynaptic neuron: accumulating evidences have recently shown that the genes linked to PD play a critical role at the presynaptic site. DA release into the synaptic cleft relies on a proper presynaptic vesicular transport; impairment of SV trafficking, modification of DA flow, and altered presynaptic plasticity have

  3. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in Female Reproduction and Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Gaspare; Artini, Paolo Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive functions may be altered by the exposure to a multitude of endogenous and exogenous agents, drug or environmental pollutants, which are known to affect gene transcription through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) activation. PPARs act as ligand activated transcription factors and regulate metabolic processes such as lipid and glucose metabolism, energy homeostasis, inflammation, and cell proliferation and differentiation. All PPARs isotypes are expressed along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and are strictly involved in reproductive functions. Since female fertility and energy metabolism are tightly interconnected, the research on female infertility points towards the exploration of potential PPARs activating/antagonizing compounds, mainly belonging to the class of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and fibrates, as useful agents for the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis in women with ovarian dysfunctions. In the present review, we discuss the recent evidence about PPARs expression in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and their involvement in female reproduction. Finally, the therapeutic potential of their manipulation through several drugs is also discussed. PMID:27559343

  4. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors in Female Reproduction and Fertility.

    PubMed

    Vitti, Maurizio; Di Emidio, Giovanna; Di Carlo, Michela; Carta, Gaspare; Antonosante, Andrea; Artini, Paolo Giovanni; Cimini, Annamaria; Tatone, Carla; Benedetti, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive functions may be altered by the exposure to a multitude of endogenous and exogenous agents, drug or environmental pollutants, which are known to affect gene transcription through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) activation. PPARs act as ligand activated transcription factors and regulate metabolic processes such as lipid and glucose metabolism, energy homeostasis, inflammation, and cell proliferation and differentiation. All PPARs isotypes are expressed along the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and are strictly involved in reproductive functions. Since female fertility and energy metabolism are tightly interconnected, the research on female infertility points towards the exploration of potential PPARs activating/antagonizing compounds, mainly belonging to the class of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and fibrates, as useful agents for the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis in women with ovarian dysfunctions. In the present review, we discuss the recent evidence about PPARs expression in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and their involvement in female reproduction. Finally, the therapeutic potential of their manipulation through several drugs is also discussed. PMID:27559343

  5. Serglycin in Quiescent and Proliferating Primary Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reine, Trine M.; Vuong, Tram T.; Rutkovskiy, Arkady; Meen, Astri J.; Vaage, Jarle; Jenssen, Trond G.; Kolset, Svein O.

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans are fundamental components of the endothelial barrier, but the functions of the proteoglycan serglycin in endothelium are less described. Our aim was to describe the roles of serglycin in processes relevant for endothelial dysfunction. Primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured in vitro and the expression of proteoglycans was investigated. Dense cell cultures representing the quiescent endothelium coating the vasculature was compared to sparse activated cell cultures, relevant for diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease. Secretion of 35S- proteoglycans increased in sparse cultures, and we showed that serglycin is a major component of the cell-density sensitive proteoglycan population. In contrast to the other proteoglycans, serglycin expression and secretion was higher in proliferating compared to quiescent HUVEC. RNAi silencing of serglycin inhibited proliferation and wound healing, and serglycin expression and secretion was augmented by hypoxia, mechanical strain and IL-1β induced inflammation. Notably, the secretion of the angiogenic chemokine CCL2 resulting from IL-1β activation, was increased in serglycin knockdown cells, while angiopoietin was not affected. Both serglycin and CCL2 were secreted predominantly to the apical side of polarized HUVEC, and serglycin and CCL2 co-localized both in perinuclear areas and in vesicles. These results suggest functions for serglycin in endothelial cells trough interactions with partner molecules, in biological processes with relevance for diabetic complications, cardiovascular disease and cancer development. PMID:26694746

  6. In utero origins of adult insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jennifer A; Regnault, Timothy R H

    2011-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome (or syndrome X) is a constellation of risk factors including insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and central obesity that predispose to the development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in adult life. Insulin resistance is believed to be a critical pathophysiological event early in the disease process, impacting both skeletal muscle metabolic function and vascular responses. Adverse changes in insulin sensitivity have been found to originate in utero; for instance, prenatal events such as placental insufficiency/oxidative stress leading to altered fetal growth trajectories are associated with increased rates of metabolic syndrome in adult life. Such intrauterine insults result in reduced skeletal muscle mass in conjunction with altered insulin signaling, decreased oxidative fibers, and impaired mitochondrial function. These developmental disturbances set the stage for development of muscle triglyceride accumulation and depressed insulin sensitivity in childhood. Abnormalities of vascular structure and function arising from deprived intrauterine conditions that are exacerbated by insulin resistance account for the progression of hypertension from childhood to adulthood. Arterial changes initiated in utero include reduced endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and inflammation, events leading to endothelial dysfunction, and atherosclerosis that are present in those destined for metabolic syndrome. In addition, the hypertensive phenotype that is a hallmark of metabolic syndrome may also be traced to blunted kidney development and renin-angiotensin system activation in growth-restricted offspring. The summative impact of these intrauterine programmed changes in terms of influencing adult health and disease encompasses dietary and lifestyle factors introduced postnatally. Establishing novel therapeutic interventions aimed at preventing and/or reducing in utero

  7. Mitochondrial loss, dysfunction and altered dynamics in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinho; Moody, Jennifer P.; Edgerly, Christina K.; Bordiuk, Olivia L.; Cormier, Kerry; Smith, Karen; Beal, M. Flint; Ferrante, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Although a direct causative pathway from the gene mutation to the selective neostriatal neurodegeneration remains unclear in Huntington's disease (HD), one putative pathological mechanism reported to play a prominent role in the pathogenesis of this neurological disorder is mitochondrial dysfunction. We examined mitochondria in preferentially vulnerable striatal calbindin-positive neurons in moderate-to-severe grade HD patients, using antisera against mitochondrial markers of COX2, SOD2 and cytochrome c. Combined calbindin and mitochondrial marker immunofluorescence showed a significant and progressive grade-dependent reduction in the number of mitochondria in spiny striatal neurons, with marked alteration in size. Consistent with mitochondrial loss, there was a reduction in COX2 protein levels using western analysis that corresponded with disease severity. In addition, both mitochondrial transcription factor A, a regulator of mtDNA, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-co-activator gamma-1 alpha, a key transcriptional regulator of energy metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis, were also significantly reduced with increasing disease severity. Abnormalities in mitochondrial dynamics were observed, showing a significant increase in the fission protein Drp1 and a reduction in the expression of the fusion protein mitofusin 1. Lastly, mitochondrial PCR array profiling in HD caudate nucleus specimens showed increased mRNA expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial localization, membrane translocation and polarization and transport that paralleled mitochondrial derangement. These findings reveal that there are both mitochondrial loss and altered mitochondrial morphogenesis with increased mitochondrial fission and reduced fusion in HD. These findings provide further evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of HD. PMID:20660112

  8. Apraxia and Motor Dysfunction in Corticobasal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burrell, James R.; Hornberger, Michael; Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C.; Hodges, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is characterized by multifaceted motor system dysfunction and cognitive disturbance; distinctive clinical features include limb apraxia and visuospatial dysfunction. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to study motor system dysfunction in CBS, but the relationship of TMS parameters to clinical features has not been studied. The present study explored several hypotheses; firstly, that limb apraxia may be partly due to visuospatial impairment in CBS. Secondly, that motor system dysfunction can be demonstrated in CBS, using threshold-tracking TMS, and is linked to limb apraxia. Finally, that atrophy of the primary motor cortex, studied using voxel-based morphometry analysis (VBM), is associated with motor system dysfunction and limb apraxia in CBS. Methods Imitation of meaningful and meaningless hand gestures was graded to assess limb apraxia, while cognitive performance was assessed using the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination – Revised (ACE-R), with particular emphasis placed on the visuospatial subtask. Patients underwent TMS, to assess cortical function, and VBM. Results In total, 17 patients with CBS (7 male, 10 female; mean age 64.4+/− 6.6 years) were studied and compared to 17 matched control subjects. Of the CBS patients, 23.5% had a relatively inexcitable motor cortex, with evidence of cortical dysfunction in the remaining 76.5% patients. Reduced resting motor threshold, and visuospatial performance, correlated with limb apraxia. Patients with a resting motor threshold <50% performed significantly worse on the visuospatial sub-task of the ACE-R than other CBS patients. Cortical function correlated with atrophy of the primary and pre-motor cortices, and the thalamus, while apraxia correlated with atrophy of the pre-motor and parietal cortices. Conclusions Cortical dysfunction appears to underlie the core clinical features of CBS, and is associated with atrophy of the primary motor and pre

  9. Bacterial Genome Instability

    PubMed Central

    Darmon, Elise

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial genomes are remarkably stable from one generation to the next but are plastic on an evolutionary time scale, substantially shaped by horizontal gene transfer, genome rearrangement, and the activities of mobile DNA elements. This implies the existence of a delicate balance between the maintenance of genome stability and the tolerance of genome instability. In this review, we describe the specialized genetic elements and the endogenous processes that contribute to genome instability. We then discuss the consequences of genome instability at the physiological level, where cells have harnessed instability to mediate phase and antigenic variation, and at the evolutionary level, where horizontal gene transfer has played an important role. Indeed, this ability to share DNA sequences has played a major part in the evolution of life on Earth. The evolutionary plasticity of bacterial genomes, coupled with the vast numbers of bacteria on the planet, substantially limits our ability to control disease. PMID:24600039

  10. Bacterial ratchet motors

    PubMed Central

    Di Leonardo, R.; Angelani, L.; Dell’Arciprete, D.; Ruocco, G.; Iebba, V.; Schippa, S.; Conte, M. P.; Mecarini, F.; De Angelis, F.; Di Fabrizio, E.

    2010-01-01

    Self-propelling bacteria are a nanotechnology dream. These unicellular organisms are not just capable of living and reproducing, but they can swim very efficiently, sense the environment, and look for food, all packaged in a body measuring a few microns. Before such perfect machines can be artificially assembled, researchers are beginning to explore new ways to harness bacteria as propelling units for microdevices. Proposed strategies require the careful task of aligning and binding bacterial cells on synthetic surfaces in order to have them work cooperatively. Here we show that asymmetric environments can produce a spontaneous and unidirectional rotation of nanofabricated objects immersed in an active bacterial bath. The propulsion mechanism is provided by the self-assembly of motile Escherichia coli cells along the rotor boundaries. Our results highlight the technological implications of active matter’s ability to overcome the restrictions imposed by the second law of thermodynamics on equilibrium passive fluids. PMID:20457936

  11. Bacterial multidrug efflux transporters.

    PubMed

    Delmar, Jared A; Su, Chih-Chia; Yu, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by bacteria are a leading cause of death worldwide. Although antibiotics remain a key clinical therapy, their effectiveness has been severely compromised by the development of drug resistance in bacterial pathogens. Multidrug efflux transporters--a common and powerful resistance mechanism--are capable of extruding a number of structurally unrelated antimicrobials from the bacterial cell, including antibiotics and toxic heavy metal ions, facilitating their survival in noxious environments. Transporters of the resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) superfamily typically assemble as tripartite efflux complexes spanning the inner and outer membranes of the cell envelope. In Escherichia coli, the CusCFBA complex, which mediates resistance to copper(I) and silver(I) ions, is the only known RND transporter specific to heavy metals. Here, we describe the current knowledge of individual pump components of the Cus system, a paradigm for efflux machinery, and speculate on how RND pumps assemble to fight diverse antimicrobials. PMID:24702006

  12. Physics of Bacterial Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sean X.; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Bacterial cells utilize three-dimensional (3D) protein assemblies to perform important cellular functions such as growth, division, chemoreception, and motility. These assemblies are composed of mechanoproteins that can mechanically deform and exert force. Sometimes, small-nucleotide hydrolysis is coupled to mechanical deformations. In this review, we describe the general principle for an understanding of the coupling of mechanics with chemistry in mechanochemical systems. We apply this principle to understand bacterial cell shape and morphogenesis and how mechanical forces can influence peptidoglycan cell wall growth. We review a model that can potentially reconcile the growth dynamics of the cell wall with the role of cytoskeletal proteins such as MreB and crescentin. We also review the application of mechanochemical principles to understand the assembly and constriction of the FtsZ ring. A number of potential mechanisms are proposed, and important questions are discussed. PMID:22126993

  13. Formation of bacterial nanocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Mikhail; Kudryashova, Ekaterina; Suzina, Natalia; Ariskina, Elena; Voronkov, Vadim

    1998-07-01

    Existence of nanobacteria received increasing attention both in environmental microbiology/geomicro-biology and in medical microbiology. In order to study a production of nanoforms by typical bacterial cells. Effects of different physical factors were investigated. Treatment of bacterial cultures with microwave radiation, or culturing in field of electric current resulted in formation a few types of nanocells. The number and type of nanoforms were determined with type and dose of the treatment. The produced nanoforms were: i) globules, ii) clusters of the globules--probably produced by liaison, iii) nanocells coated with membrane. The viability of the globules is an object opened for doubts. The nanocells discovered multiplication and growth on solidified nutrient media. The authors suggest that formation of nanocells is a common response of bacteria to stress-actions produced by different agents.

  14. Bacterial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Cynthia; Brown, Stephanie; Walker, Suzanne

    Bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides cells are surrounded by a variety of cell-surface structures that allow them to thrive in extreme environments. Components of the cell envelope and extracellular matrix are responsible for providing the cells with structural support, mediating intercellular communication, allowing the cells to move or to adhere to surfaces, protecting the cells from attack by antibiotics or the immune system, and facilitating the uptake of nutrients. Some of the most important cell wall components are polysaccharide structures. This review discusses the occurrence, structure, function, and biosynthesis of the most prevalent bacterial cell surface polysaccharides: peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, arabinogalactan, and lipoarabinomannan, and capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. The roles of these polysaccharides in medicine, both as drug targets and as therapeutic agents, are also described.

  15. [Bacterial diseases of rape].

    PubMed

    Zakharova, O M; Mel'nychuk, M D; Dankevych, L A; Patyka, V P

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial destruction of the culture was described and its agents identified in the spring and winter rape crops. Typical symptoms are the following: browning of stem tissue and its mucilagization, chlorosis of leaves, yellowing and beginning of soft rot in the place of leaf stalks affixion to stems, loss of pigmentation (violet). Pathogenic properties of the collection strains and morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties of the agents of rape's bacterial diseases isolated by the authors have been investigated. It was found that all the isolates selected by the authors are highly or moderately aggressive towards different varieties of rape. According to the complex of phenotypic properties 44% of the total number of isolates selected by the authors are related to representatives of the genus Pseudomonas, 37% - to Xanthomonas and 19% - to Pectobacterium. PMID:23293826

  16. Challenges and Management of Liver Cirrhosis: Pathophysiology of Renal Dysfunction in Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Solà, Elsa; Ginès, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Kidney dysfunction is a common complication of patients with advanced cirrhosis and is associated with poor prognosis. Patients with advanced cirrhosis show circulatory dysfunction characterized by reduced systemic vascular resistance due to splanchnic arterial vasodilation, which is caused by portal hypertension. The progressive reduction in systemic vascular resistance leads to effective arterial hypovolemia. In order to maintain arterial pressure within normal limits in this setting, there is activation of systemic vasoconstrictor systems, including the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic nervous system and, in late stages, nonosmotic hypersecretion of vasopressin. Although these systems have positive effects in maintaining arterial pressure, they have a negative influence on kidney function, leading to the retention of sodium and solute-free water, and in late stages of the disease an intense kidney vasoconstriction develops, leading to decrease of the glomerular filtration rate and the development of hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Moreover, bacterial translocation and the existence of a systemic inflammatory state in patients with advanced cirrhosis may play a role in the impairment of circulatory function. HRS is a unique cause of kidney failure of functional origin that develops in patients with cirrhosis. However, besides HRS, patients with cirrhosis may develop kidney failure due to other causes, including bacterial infections, prerenal kidney failure, shock, use of nephrotoxic drugs or intrinsic kidney diseases. Considering the existence of circulatory dysfunction and some degree of kidney vasoconstriction, patients with advanced cirrhosis have fragile kidney function and are susceptible to easily developing kidney failure associated with other complications of the disease, particularly bacterial infections and gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26159270

  17. EFFECTS OF CHRONIC ACTIVATION OF PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR-ALPHA OR HIGH-FAT FEEDING IN A RAT INFARCT MODEL OF HEART FAILURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intracardiac accumulation of lipid and related intermediates (e.g., ceramide) is associated with cardiac dysfunction and may contribute to the progression of heart failure (HF). Overexpression of nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-alpha) increases intramyocellula...

  18. The international nuclear non-proliferation system

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.; McGrew, T.

    1985-01-01

    This volume focuses upon the issues raised at this Conference, and attempts to address the international diplomatic, political and trading, rather than technical, questions which surround nuclear non-proliferation policies. It does so by bringing together chapters contributed by participants in non-proliferation diplomacy, those with experience in shaping International Atomic Energy Agency and national policies and academic observers of non-proliferation activities and the international nuclear industry. An analysis is provided of past non-proliferation policies and activities and current issues, and an attempt is made to offer ideas for new initiatives which may sustain the non-proliferation system in the future.

  19. Bacterial transformation of terpenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishko, V. V.; Nogovitsina, Y. M.; Ivshina, I. B.

    2014-04-01

    Data on the bacterial transformation of terpenoids published in the literature in the past decade are analyzed. Possible pathways for chemo-, regio- and stereoselective modifications of terpenoids are discussed. Considerable attention is given to new technological approaches to the synthesis of terpenoid derivatives suitable for the use in the perfume and food industry and promising as drugs and chiral intermediates for fine organic synthesis. The bibliography includes 246 references.

  20. Counter-proliferation and Non-proliferation: Both Needed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Michael

    2004-03-01

    Preventing further proliferation of nuclear weapon and nuclear weapons usable materials, and securing the weapons and materials that exist, have increased in importance with the increased urgency of the fight against international terrorism. This problem is likely to continue to increase in importance with the anticipated growth of nuclear civilian applications around the world. Recent experience in North Korea, Iraq and Iran tends to show that some combination of counterproliferation and better use of traditional, multilateral non-proliferation methods provides the best way to address this problem. Governments seeking nuclear civilian applications, particularly those that are suspicious of Western motives, must be offered in parallel an attractive way into the system should they follow its rules and an unacceptable alternative should they not. Such a combination should aim at implementing specific measures to (1) secure nuclear materials, (2) monitor dual-use facilities, (3) improve international governance of treaties and other agreements, and (4) reduce the demand for nuclear weapons. For some of the measures implementation has begun, although with less money and priority than is needed. Other measures would constitute a major departure from the way civilian nuclear activities are now carried out and remain controversial. The established nuclear powers must agree on implementation and funding of the measures suggested before there can be much progress elsewhere.

  1. Neglected Bacterial Zoonoses

    PubMed Central

    Chikeka, Ijeuru; Dumler, J. Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial zoonoses comprise a group of diseases in humans or animals acquired by direct contact with or by oral consumption of contaminated animal materials, or via arthropod vectors. Among neglected infections, bacterial zoonoses are among the most neglected given emerging data on incidence and prevalence as causes of acute febrile illness, even in areas where recognized neglected tropical diseases occur frequently. While many other bacterial infections could also be considered in this neglected category, five distinct infections stand out because they are globally distributed, are acute febrile diseases, have high rates of morbidity and case fatality, and are reported as commonly as malaria, typhoid or dengue virus infections in carefully designed studies in which a broad spectrum diagnoses are actively sought. Thus, this review will focus attention on leptospirosis, relapsing fever borreliosis, and rickettsioses, including scrub typhus, murine typhus and spotted fever group rickettsiosis. Of greatest interest is the lack of distinguishing clinical features among these infections when in humans, which confounds diagnosis where laboratory confirmation is lacking, and in regions where clinical diagnosis is often attributed to one of several perceived more common threats. As diseases such as malaria come under improved control, the real impact of these common and under-recognized infections will become evident, as will the requirement for the strategies and allocation of resources for their control. PMID:25964152

  2. Acute Bacterial Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Vincent; Lammert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute bacterial cholangitis for the most part owing to common bile duct stones is common in gastroenterology practice and represents a potentially life-threatening condition often characterized by fever, abdominal pain, and jaundice (Charcot's triad) as well as confusion and septic shock (Reynolds' pentad). Methods This review is based on a systematic literature review in PubMed with the search items ‘cholangitis’, ‘choledocholithiasis’, ‘gallstone disease’, ‘biliary infection’, and ‘biliary sepsis’. Results Although most patients respond to empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment, timely endoscopic biliary drainage depending on the severity of the disease is required to eliminate the underlying obstruction. Specific recommendations have been derived from the Tokyo guideline working group consensus 2006 and its update in 2013, albeit poorly evidence-based, providing a comprehensive overview of diagnosis, classification, risk stratification, and treatment algorithms in acute bacterial cholangitis. Conclusion Prompt clinical recognition and accurate diagnostic workup including adequate laboratory assessment and (aetiology-oriented) imaging are critical steps in the management of cholangitis. Treatment is directed at the two major interrelated pathophysiologic components, i.e. bacterial infection (immediate antimicrobial therapy) and bile duct obstruction (biliary drainage). As for the latter, transpapillary endoscopic drainage by stent or nasobiliary drain and/or same-session bile duct clearance, depending on individual disease severity, represent first-line treatment approaches. PMID:26468310

  3. Sputtered Gum metal thin films showing bacterial inactivation and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Achache, S; Alhussein, A; Lamri, S; François, M; Sanchette, F; Pulgarin, C; Kiwi, J; Rtimi, S

    2016-10-01

    Super-elastic Titanium based thin films Ti-23Nb-0.7Ta-2Zr-(O) (TNTZ-O) and Ti-24Nb-(N) (TN-N) (at.%) were deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) in different reactive atmospheres. The effects of oxygen doping (TNTZ-O) and/or nitrogen doping (TN-N) on the microstructure, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of the as-deposited coatings were investigated. Nano-indentation measurements show that, in both cases, 1sccm of reactive gas in the mixture is necessary to reach acceptable values of hardness and Young's modulus. Mechanical properties are considered in relation to the films compactness, the compressive stress and the changes in the grain size. Data on Bacterial inactivation and biocompatibility are reported in this study. The biocompatibility tests showed that O-containing samples led to higher cells proliferation. Bacterial inactivation was concomitant with the observed pH and surface potential changes under light and in the dark. The increased cell fluidity leading to bacterial lysis was followed during the bacterial inactivation time. The increasing cell wall fluidity was attributed to the damage of the bacterial outer cell which losing its capacity to regulate the ions exchange in and out of the bacteria. PMID:27434155

  4. Collective chemotaxis and segregation of active bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Ben Amar, M

    2016-01-01

    Still recently, bacterial fluid suspensions have motivated a lot of works, both experimental and theoretical, with the objective to understand their collective dynamics from universal and simple rules. Since some species are active, most of these works concern the strong interactions that these bacteria exert on a forced flow leading to instabilities, chaos and turbulence. Here, we investigate the self-organization of expanding bacterial colonies under chemotaxis, proliferation and eventually active-reaction. We propose a simple model to understand and quantify the physical properties of these living organisms which either give cohesion or on the contrary dispersion to the colony. Taking into account the diffusion and capture of morphogens complicates the model since it induces a bacterial density gradient coupled to bacterial density fluctuations and dynamics. Nevertheless under some specific conditions, it is possible to investigate the pattern formation as a usual viscous fingering instability. This explains the similarity and differences of patterns according to the physical bacterial suspension properties and explain the factors which favor compactness or branching. PMID:26888040

  5. Collective chemotaxis and segregation of active bacterial colonies

    PubMed Central

    Amar, M. Ben

    2016-01-01

    Still recently, bacterial fluid suspensions have motivated a lot of works, both experimental and theoretical, with the objective to understand their collective dynamics from universal and simple rules. Since some species are active, most of these works concern the strong interactions that these bacteria exert on a forced flow leading to instabilities, chaos and turbulence. Here, we investigate the self-organization of expanding bacterial colonies under chemotaxis, proliferation and eventually active-reaction. We propose a simple model to understand and quantify the physical properties of these living organisms which either give cohesion or on the contrary dispersion to the colony. Taking into account the diffusion and capture of morphogens complicates the model since it induces a bacterial density gradient coupled to bacterial density fluctuations and dynamics. Nevertheless under some specific conditions, it is possible to investigate the pattern formation as a usual viscous fingering instability. This explains the similarity and differences of patterns according to the physical bacterial suspension properties and explain the factors which favor compactness or branching. PMID:26888040

  6. Fissile material disposition and proliferation risk

    SciTech Connect

    Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.A.

    1996-05-01

    The proliferation risk of a facility is dependent on the material attractiveness, level of safeguards, and physical protection applied to the material in conjunction with an assessment of the impact of the socioeconomic circumstances and threat environment. Proliferation risk is a complementary extension of proliferation resistance. The authors believe a better determination of nuclear material proliferation can be achieved by establishing the proliferation risk for facilities that contain nuclear material. Developing a method that incorporates the socioeconomic circumstances and threat environment inherent to each country enables a global proliferation assessment. In order to effectively reduce the nuclear danger, a broadly based set of criteria is needed that provides the capability to relatively assess a wide range of disposition options/facilities in different countries and still ensure a global decrease in proliferation risk for plutonium.

  7. Unknown syndrome: ischiadic hypoplasia, renal dysfunction, immunodeficiency, and a pattern of minor congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Braegger, C; Bottani, A; Hallé, F; Giedion, A; Leumann, E; Seger, R; Willi, U; Schinzel, A

    1991-01-01

    We report a 6 year old male with a pattern of malformations and anomalies including intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, a pattern of craniofacial anomalies (flat face, hypertelorism, epicanthic folds, strabismus, short nose, low set ears), hypospadias and cryptorchidism, bilateral partial cutaneous syndactyly between fingers 2 to 5 and toes 2 to 4, postaxial polydactyly of the fingers and toes, severe conductive hearing loss, hypoplasia of the ischiadic bones, complex renal dysfunction, hypogammaglobulinaemia with proneness to bacterial infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract, and recurrent pseudomembranous enterocolitis. The parents are cousins of Turkish origin. Images PMID:1999836

  8. Sex therapy for female sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction About 45% of women suffer from some form of sexual dysfunction. Despite its high prevalence, there are few studies that have systematically evaluated sex therapy in comparison with other interventions. Objective Review randomized clinical trials that present psychotherapeutic interventions for female sexual dysfunctions. Method Through a search in three databases (Medline, Web of Science and PsycInfo), 1419 references were found. After an analysis of the abstracts, twenty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria and composed this review. Results Sex therapy, as proposed by Masters and Johnson and Heiman and LoPiccolo, is still the most commonly used form of therapy for sexual dysfunctions; although it has shown results, the results do not consistently support that this is the best alternative in the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. Conclusion There is a lack of systematic study of many female sexual dysfunctions. Orgasmic disorder and sexual pain (vaginismus and dyspaurenia) are the most extensively studied disorders and those in which sex therapy seems to have better outcomes. PMID:24066697

  9. Small Airway Dysfunction and Abnormal Exercise Responses

    PubMed Central

    Petsonk, Edward L.; Stansbury, Robert C.; Beeckman-Wagner, Lu-Ann; Long, Joshua L.; Wang, Mei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Coal mine dust exposure can cause symptoms and loss of lung function from multiple mechanisms, but the roles of each disease process are not fully understood. Objectives We investigated the implications of small airway dysfunction for exercise physiology among a group of workers exposed to coal mine dust. Methods Twenty coal miners performed spirometry, first breathing air and then helium-oxygen, single-breath diffusing capacity, and computerized chest tomography, and then completed cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Measurements and Main Results Six participants meeting criteria for small airway dysfunction were compared with 14 coal miners who did not. At submaximal workload, miners with small airway dysfunction used a higher proportion of their maximum voluntary ventilation and had higher ventilatory equivalents for both O2 and CO2. Regression modeling indicated that inefficient ventilation was significantly related to small airway dysfunction but not to FEV1 or diffusing capacity. At the end of exercise, miners with small airway dysfunction had 27% lower O2 consumption. Conclusions Small airway abnormalities may be associated with important inefficiency of exercise ventilation. In dust-exposed individuals with only mild abnormalities on resting lung function tests or chest radiographs, cardiopulmonary exercise testing may be important in defining causes of exercise intolerance. PMID:27073987

  10. Thyroid dysfunction in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2007-03-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is common, especially among women over the age of 50. In caring for peri- and post-menopausal women, it is important to recognize the changing clinical manifestations of thyroid disease with age. Postmenopausal women are at increased risk of both osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, and untreated thyroid disease may exacerbate these risks. Screening for thyroid dysfunction in asymptomatic individuals is controversial, but aggressive case-finding should be pursued, especially in older women. Women with overt thyroid dysfunction should be treated. Therapy for women with subclinical thyroid dysfunction is more controversial, although women with levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) > or =10 mU/L should be treated, and treatment may be considered in symptomatic women with subclinical hypothyroidism and TSH values <10 mU/L, and in women with subclinical hyperthyroidism who have TSH values consistently <0.1 mU/L. In women who are treated with thyroxine, careful dose titration and monitoring are required in order to prevent the adverse consequences of iatrogenic subclinical hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. Finally, caution is required in diagnosing and treating thyroid dysfunction in women who are taking oral estrogens or selective estrogen receptor modulators. PMID:17448261

  11. Expression of bacterial genes in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, R T; Rogers, S G; Horsch, R B; Sanders, P R; Flick, J S; Adams, S P; Bittner, M L; Brand, L A; Fink, C L; Fry, J S; Galluppi, G R; Goldberg, S B; Hoffmann, N L; Woo, S C

    1983-01-01

    Chimeric bacterial genes conferring resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics have been inserted into the Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid and introduced into plant cells by in vitro transformation techniques. The chimeric genes contain the nopaline synthase 5' and 3' regulatory regions joined to the genes for neomycin phosphotransferase type I or type II. The chimeric genes were cloned into an intermediate vector, pMON120, and inserted into pTiB6S3 by recombination and then introduced into petunia and tobacco cells by cocultivating A. tumefaciens cells with protoplast-derived cells. Southern hybridization was used to confirm the presence of the chimeric genes in the transformed plant tissues. Expression of the chimeric genes was determined by the ability of the transformed cells to proliferate on medium containing normally inhibitory levels of kanamycin (50 micrograms/ml) or other aminoglycoside antibiotics. Plant cells transformed by wild-type pTiB6S3 or derivatives carrying the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase genes with their own promoters failed to grow under these conditions. The significance of these results for plant genetic engineering is discussed. Images PMID:6308651

  12. Mesenteric Microcirculatory Dysfunctions and Translocation of Indigenous Bacteria in a Rat Model of Strangulated Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zanoni, Fernando Luiz; Benabou, Simon; Greco, Karin Vicente; Moreno, Ana Carolina Ramos; Cruz, José Walber Miranda Costa; Filgueira, Fernando Paranaiba; Martinez, Marina Baquerizo; de Figueiredo, Luiz Francisco Poli; Silva, Maurício Rocha e; Sannomiya, Paulina

    2009-01-01

    PRUPOSE Bacterial translocation has been shown to occur in critically ill patients after extensive trauma, shock, sepsis, or thermal injury. The present study investigates mesenteric microcirculatory dysfunctions, the bacterial translocation phenomenon, and hemodynamic/metabolic disturbances in a rat model of intestinal obstruction and ischemia. METHODS Anesthetized (pentobarbital 50 mg/kg, i.p.) male Wistar rats (250–350 g) were submitted to intestinal obstruction or laparotomy without intestinal obstruction (Sham) and were evaluated 24 hours later. Bacterial translocation was assessed by bacterial culture of the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, spleen, and blood. Leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the mesenteric microcirculation were assessed by intravital microscopy, and P-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 expressions were quantified by immunohistochemistry. Hematocrit, blood gases, lactate, glucose, white blood cells, serum urea, creatinine, bilirubin, and hepatic enzymes were measured. RESULTS About 86% of intestinal obstruction rats presented positive cultures for E. coli in samples of the mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, and spleen, and 57% had positive hemocultures. In comparison to the Sham rats, intestinal obstruction induced neutrophilia and increased the number of rolling (~2-fold), adherent (~5-fold), and migrated leukocytes (~11-fold); this increase was accompanied by an increased expression of P-selectin (~2-fold) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (~2-fold) in the mesenteric microcirculation. Intestinal obstruction rats exhibited decreased PaCO2, alkalosis, hyperlactatemia, and hyperglycemia, and increased blood potassium, hepatic enzyme activity, serum urea, creatinine, and bilirubin. A high mortality rate was observed after intestinal obstruction (83% at 72 h vs. 0% in Sham rats). CONCLUSION Intestinal obstruction and ischemia in rats is a relevant model for the in vivo study of mesenteric microcirculatory dysfunction

  13. Negative regulators of cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Cell proliferation is governed by the influence of both mitogens and inhibitors. Although cell contact has long been thought to play a fundamental role in cell cycling regulation, and negative regulators have long been suspected to exist, their isolation and purification has been complicated by a variety of technical difficulties. Nevertheless, over recent years an ever-expanding list of putative negative regulators have emerged. In many cases, their biological inhibitory activities are consistent with density-dependent growth inhibition. Most likely their interactions with mitogenic agents, at an intracellular level, are responsible for either mitotic arrest or continued cell cycling. A review of naturally occurring cell growth inhibitors is presented with an emphasis on those factors shown to be residents of the cell surface membrane. Particular attention is focused on a cell surface sialoglycopeptide, isolated from intact bovine cerebral cortex cells, which has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of an unusually wide range of target cells. The glycopeptide arrest cells obtained from diverse species, both fibroblasts and epithelial cells, and a broad variety of transformed cells. Signal transduction events and a limited spectrum of cells that are refractory to the sialoglycopeptide have provided insight into the molecular events mediated by this cell surface inhibitor.

  14. Gas Centrifuges and Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, David

    2004-09-15

    Gas centrifuges have been an ideal enrichment method for a wide variety of countries. Many countries have built gas centrifuges to make enriched uranium for peaceful nuclear purposes. Other countries have secretly sought centrifuges to make highly enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. In more recent times, several countries have secretly sought or built gas centrifuges in regions of tension. The main countries that have been of interest in the last two decades have been Pakistan, Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. Currently, most attention is focused on Iran, Pakistan, and North Korea. These states did not have the indigenous abilities to make gas centrifuges, focusing instead on illicit and questionable foreign procurement. The presentation covered the following main sections: Spread of centrifuges through illicit procurement; Role of export controls in stopping proliferation; Increasing the transparency of gas centrifuge programs in non-nuclear weapon states; and, Verified dismantlement of gas centrifuge programs. Gas centrifuges are important providers of low enriched uranium for civil nuclear power reactors. They also pose special nuclear proliferation risks. We all have special responsibilities to prevent the spread of gas centrifuges into regions of tension and to mitigate the consequences of their spread into the Middle East, South Asia, and North Asia.

  15. Progressive Telomere Dysfunction Causes Cytokinesis Failure and Leads to the Accumulation of Polyploid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pampalona, Judit; Frías, Cristina; Genescà, Anna; Tusell, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Most cancer cells accumulate genomic abnormalities at a remarkably rapid rate, as they are unable to maintain their chromosome structure and number. Excessively short telomeres, a known source of chromosome instability, are observed in early human-cancer lesions. Besides telomere dysfunction, it has been suggested that a transient phase of polyploidization, in most cases tetraploidization, has a causative role in cancer. Proliferation of tetraploids can gradually generate subtetraploid lineages of unstable cells that might fire the carcinogenic process by promoting further aneuploidy and genomic instability. Given the significance of telomere dysfunction and tetraploidy in the early stages of carcinogenesis, we investigated whether there is a connection between these two important promoters of chromosomal instability. We report that human mammary epithelial cells exhibiting progressive telomere dysfunction, in a pRb deficient and wild-type p53 background, fail to complete the cytoplasmatic cell division due to the persistence of chromatin bridges in the midzone. Flow cytometry together with fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated an accumulation of binucleated polyploid cells upon serial passaging cells. Restoration of telomere function through hTERT transduction, which lessens the formation of anaphase bridges by recapping the chromosome ends, rescued the polyploid phenotype. Live-cell imaging revealed that these polyploid cells emerged after abortive cytokinesis due to the persistence of anaphase bridges with large intervening chromatin in the cleavage plane. In agreement with a primary role of anaphase bridge intermediates in the polyploidization process, treatment of HMEC-hTERT cells with bleomycin, which produces chromatin bridges through illegimitate repair, resulted in tetraploid binucleated cells. Taken together, we demonstrate that human epithelial cells exhibiting physiological telomere dysfunction engender tetraploid cells through interference of

  16. AB271. Sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis/ chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), or NIH category III prostatitis, is a clinical syndrome characterized by genital/ pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms in the absence of urinary tract infection. CPPS is the most common prostatic disease in men younger than 50 years of age and the third most common in men older than 50 years of age. CP/CPPS is a complex entity with unclear etiology. Many articles reported that the high percentage of patients with CP/CPPS had sexual dysfunction. The most common symptoms of sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis patients are erectile dysfunction (ED), painful ejaculation and premature ejaculation. So we will discuss about ED and ejaculation problems in CP/CPPS patients.

  17. Chronic cerebrovascular dysfunction after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jullienne, Amandine; Obenaus, Andre; Ichkova, Aleksandra; Savona-Baron, Catherine; Pearce, William J; Badaut, Jerome

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) often involve vascular dysfunction that leads to long-term alterations in physiological and cognitive functions of the brain. Indeed, all the cells that form blood vessels and that are involved in maintaining their proper function can be altered by TBI. This Review focuses on the different types of cerebrovascular dysfunction that occur after TBI, including cerebral blood flow alterations, autoregulation impairments, subarachnoid hemorrhage, vasospasms, blood-brain barrier disruption, and edema formation. We also discuss the mechanisms that mediate these dysfunctions, focusing on the cellular components of cerebral blood vessels (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, astrocytes, pericytes, perivascular nerves) and their known and potential roles in the secondary injury cascade. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27117494

  18. Can thyroid dysfunction explicate severe menopausal symptoms?

    PubMed

    Badawy, A; State, O; Sherief, S

    2007-07-01

    Many of the menopausal manifestations look like those accredited to thyroid hyperfunction or hypofunction. Can thyroid dysfunction explicate severe menopausal symptoms? The study comprised 350 women with different menopausal symptoms. All women had serum TSH, T3 and free T4 estimated. Women with thyroid dysfunction were appropriately treated and other women were treated with ERT. The study showed that 21 women (6%) had hypothyroidism and 18 (5.1%) had hyperthyroidism. Marked improvement in the menopausal-like symptoms occurred after treatment of the thyroid dysfunction. Elderly women with severe or resistant menopausal symptoms can be offered TSH, T3 and T4 assays to rule out the thyroid disturbances before attempting hormone replacement therapy. PMID:17701801

  19. TWIST1 Integrates Endothelial Responses to Flow in Vascular Dysfunction and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Marwa M.; Kim, Hyejeong Rosemary; Xing, Rouyu; Hsiao, Sarah; Mammoto, Akiko; Chen, Jing; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Feng, Shuang; Bowden, Neil P.; Maguire, Richard; Ariaans, Markus; Francis, Sheila E.; Weinberg, Peter D.; van der Heiden, Kim; Jones, Elizabeth A.; Chico, Timothy J.A.; Ridger, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Blood flow–induced shear stress controls endothelial cell (EC) physiology during atherosclerosis via transcriptional mechanisms that are incompletely understood. The mechanosensitive transcription factor TWIST is expressed during embryogenesis, but its role in EC responses to shear stress and focal atherosclerosis is unknown. Objective: To investigate whether TWIST regulates endothelial responses to shear stress during vascular dysfunction and atherosclerosis and compare TWIST function in vascular development and disease. Methods and Results: The expression and function of TWIST1 was studied in EC in both developing vasculature and during the initiation of atherosclerosis. In zebrafish, twist was expressed in early embryonic vasculature where it promoted angiogenesis by inducing EC proliferation and migration. In adult porcine and murine arteries, TWIST1 was expressed preferentially at low shear stress regions as evidenced by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and en face staining. Moreover, studies of experimental murine carotid arteries and cultured EC revealed that TWIST1 was induced by low shear stress via a GATA4-dependent transcriptional mechanism. Gene silencing in cultured EC and EC-specific genetic deletion in mice demonstrated that TWIST1 promoted atherosclerosis by inducing inflammation and enhancing EC proliferation associated with vascular leakiness. Conclusions: TWIST expression promotes developmental angiogenesis by inducing EC proliferation and migration. In addition to its role in development, TWIST is expressed preferentially at low shear stress regions of adult arteries where it promotes atherosclerosis by inducing EC proliferation and inflammation. Thus, pleiotropic functions of TWIST control vascular disease and development. PMID:27245171

  20. Bladder, Bowel, and Sexual Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina; Tateno, Fuyuki; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yamanishi, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency), bowel dysfunction (constipation), and sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction) (also called “pelvic organ” dysfunctions) are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, pelvic organ autonomic dysfunctions are often nonresponsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine-basal ganglia circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. By contrast, peripheral myenteric pathology causing slowed colonic transit (loss of rectal contractions) and central pathology causing weak strain and paradoxical anal sphincter contraction on defecation (PSD, also called as anismus) are responsible for the bowel dysfunction. In addition, hypothalamic dysfunction is mostly responsible for the sexual dysfunction (decrease in libido and erection) in PD, via altered dopamine-oxytocin pathways, which normally promote libido and erection. The pathophysiology of the pelvic organ dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. Dietary fibers, laxatives, and “prokinetic” drugs such as serotonergic agonists are used to treat bowel dysfunction in PD. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors are used to treat sexual dysfunction in PD. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life. PMID:21918729

  1. Bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina; Tateno, Fuyuki; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yamanishi, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency), bowel dysfunction (constipation), and sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction) (also called "pelvic organ" dysfunctions) are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, pelvic organ autonomic dysfunctions are often nonresponsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine-basal ganglia circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. By contrast, peripheral myenteric pathology causing slowed colonic transit (loss of rectal contractions) and central pathology causing weak strain and paradoxical anal sphincter contraction on defecation (PSD, also called as anismus) are responsible for the bowel dysfunction. In addition, hypothalamic dysfunction is mostly responsible for the sexual dysfunction (decrease in libido and erection) in PD, via altered dopamine-oxytocin pathways, which normally promote libido and erection. The pathophysiology of the pelvic organ dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. Dietary fibers, laxatives, and "prokinetic" drugs such as serotonergic agonists are used to treat bowel dysfunction in PD. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors are used to treat sexual dysfunction in PD. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life. PMID:21918729

  2. An Endotoxin Tolerance Signature Predicts Sepsis and Organ Dysfunction at Initial Clinical Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Olga M.; Hancock, David G.; Lyle, Ngan H.; Linder, Adam; Russell, James A.; Xia, Jianguo; Fjell, Christopher D.; Boyd, John H.; Hancock, Robert E.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sepsis involves aberrant immune responses to infection, but the exact nature of this immune dysfunction remains poorly defined. Bacterial endotoxins like lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are potent inducers of inflammation, which has been associated with the pathophysiology of sepsis, but repeated exposure can also induce a suppressive effect known as endotoxin tolerance or cellular reprogramming. It has been proposed that endotoxin tolerance might be associated with the immunosuppressive state that was primarily observed during late-stage sepsis. However, this relationship remains poorly characterised. Here we clarify the underlying mechanisms and timing of immune dysfunction in sepsis. Methods We defined a gene expression signature characteristic of endotoxin tolerance. Gene-set test approaches were used to correlate this signature with early sepsis, both newly and retrospectively analysing microarrays from 593 patients in 11 cohorts. Then we recruited a unique cohort of possible sepsis patients at first clinical presentation in an independent blinded controlled observational study to determine whether this signature was associated with the development of confirmed sepsis and organ dysfunction. Findings All sepsis patients presented an expression profile strongly associated with the endotoxin tolerance signature (p < 0.01; AUC 96.1%). Importantly, this signature further differentiated between suspected sepsis patients who did, or did not, go on to develop confirmed sepsis, and predicted the development of organ dysfunction. Interpretation Our data support an updated model of sepsis pathogenesis in which endotoxin tolerance-mediated immune dysfunction (cellular reprogramming) is present throughout the clinical course of disease and related to disease severity. Thus endotoxin tolerance might offer new insights guiding the development of new therapies and diagnostics for early sepsis. PMID:25685830

  3. Synergy between bacterial infection and genetic predisposition in intestinal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Apidianakis, Yiorgos; Pitsouli, Chrysoula; Perrimon, Norbert; Rahme, Laurence

    2009-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that hyperproliferating intestinal stem cells (SCs) and progenitors drive cancer initiation, maintenance, and metastasis. In addition, chronic inflammation and infection have been increasingly recognized for their roles in cancer. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which bacterial infections can initiate SC-mediated tumorigenesis remain elusive. Using a Drosophila model of gut pathogenesis, we show that intestinal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human opportunistic bacterial pathogen, activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, a hallmark of the host stress response. This, in turn, causes apoptosis of enterocytes, the largest class of differentiated intestinal cells, and promotes a dramatic proliferation of SCs and progenitors that serves as a homeostatic compensatory mechanism to replenish the apoptotic enterocytes. However, we find that this homeostatic mechanism can lead to massive over-proliferation of intestinal cells when infection occurs in animals with a latent oncogenic form of the Ras1 oncogene. The affected intestines develop excess layers of cells with altered apicobasal polarity reminiscent of dysplasia, suggesting that infection can directly synergize with the genetic background in predisposed individuals to initiate SC-mediated tumorigenesis. Our results provide a framework for the study of intestinal bacterial infections and their effects on undifferentiated and mature enteric epithelial cells in the initial stages of intestinal cancer. Assessment of progenitor cell responses to pathogenic intestinal bacteria could provide a measure of predisposition for apoptotic enterocyte-assisted intestinal dysplasias in humans. PMID:19934041

  4. Stratum corneum dysfunction in dandruff

    PubMed Central

    Turner, G A; Hoptroff, M; Harding, C R

    2012-01-01

    Summary Synopsis Dandruff is characterized by a flaky, pruritic scalp and affects up to half the world’s population post-puberty. The aetiology of dandruff is multifactorial, influenced by Malassezia, sebum production and individual susceptibility. The commensal yeast Malassezia is a strong contributory factor to dandruff formation, but the presence of Malassezia on healthy scalps indicates that Malassezia alone is not a sufficient cause. A healthy stratum corneum (SC) forms a protective barrier to prevent water loss and maintain hydration of the scalp. It also protects against external insults such as microorganisms, including Malassezia, and toxic materials. Severe or chronic barrier damage can impair proper hydration, leading to atypical epidermal proliferation, keratinocyte differentiation and SC maturation, which may underlie some dandruff symptoms. The depleted and disorganized structural lipids of the dandruff SC are consistent with the weakened barrier indicated by elevated transepidermal water loss. Further evidence of a weakened barrier in dandruff includes subclinical inflammation and higher susceptibility to topical irritants. We are proposing that disruption of the SC of the scalp may facilitate dandruff generation, in part by affecting susceptibility to metabolites from Malassezia. Treatment of dandruff with cosmetic products to directly improve SC integrity while providing effective antifungal activity may thus be beneficial. Résumé Les pellicules se caractérisent par un cuir chevelu prurigineux, squameux, et affectent jusqu’à la moitié de la population post-pubertaire du monde. L’étiologie des pellicules est multifactorielle, influencée par Malassezia, par la production de sébum, et par la susceptibilité individuelle. La levure commensale Malassezia est un facteur fortement contributif à la formation de pellicules, mais la présence de Malassezia aussi sur les cuirs chevelus sains indique que Malassezia seule n’est pas une cause

  5. Endocrine Dysfunction in X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Burtman, Elizabeth; Regelmann, Molly O

    2016-06-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene and leads to an elevation of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). The accumulation of the VLCFA and the associated oxidative stress can present with a spectrum of significant neurologic disease, adrenal insufficiency, and testicular dysfunction in males with ABCD1 gene mutations. Much of the published literature for X-ALD has focused on the associated devastating progressive neurologic conditions. The purpose of this review is to summarize the concerns for endocrine dysfunction associated with X-ALD and provide guidance for monitoring and management of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27241966

  6. Diagnosis and Management of Velopharyngeal Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Glade, Robert S; Deal, Randolph

    2016-05-01

    Velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) describes any condition whereby the velopharyngeal valve does not properly close during the production of oral sounds. VPD contains multiple causes, including velopharyngeal mislearning (nasopharyngeal sound substitution for an oral sound), velopharyngeal incompetence (neurolophysiologic dysfunction causing poor pharyngeal movement), and velopharyngeal insufficiency (a structural or anatomic defect prevents velopharyngeal closure). Evaluation for VPD is best performed within the context of a multidisciplinary team and consists of history and physical examination, perceptual speech evaluation, and instrumental assessment of speech with either video nasoendoscopy or multiview speech fluoroscopy. PMID:27150305

  7. Transdermal clonidine in patients with swallowing dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Gregory; Bharathan, Thayyullathil; Shifrin, Inna

    2014-09-01

    Patients with swallowing dysfunction are usually very ill and have a constellation of challenging issues requiring palliation. Accumulation of oropharyngeal secretions leads to a substantial effort of medical teams including doctors, nurses, respiratory therapists, and ancillary staff. We present 10 patients successfully treated with application of transdermal clonidine film. It was well tolerated, provided quick control of secretions, and reduced staff labor. We suggest that transdermal clonidine can be used as antisialogogue in patients with swallowing dysfunction. Clonidine pharmacology is physiologic grounds for this clinical application. PMID:24813023

  8. The female athlete triad and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lanser, Erica M; Zach, Karie N; Hoch, Anne Z

    2011-05-01

    A tremendous increase in the number of female athletes of all ages and abilities has occurred in the past 35 years. In general, sports and athletic competition produce healthier and happier women. However, explosion in participation has revealed clear gender-specific injuries and medical conditions unique to the female athlete. This article focuses on the latest advances in our knowledge of the female athlete triad and the relationship between athletic-associated amenorrhea and endothelial dysfunction. Treatment of vascular dysfunction with folic acid is also discussed. PMID:21570034

  9. Liver dysfunction and anti-thyroid therapy

    PubMed Central

    Papachristos, Danae A; Huynh, Jenny; Grossman, Mathis

    2015-01-01

    Thioamides have been used in the management of hyperthyroidism for over 50 years. Liver dysfunction is a rare but important side effect associated with their use. Recently, cases of liver failure associated with propylthiouracil have prompted the Federal Drug Administration to issue a Boxed Warning to the label of propylthiouracil regarding its risk of potentially fatal liver injury and acute liver failure in adults and children. Herein, we present a case to underline the importance of recognising the similar potential for severe hepatic dysfunction with the use of other thioamides. PMID:27489677

  10. Sexual Dysfunction Due to Psychotropic Medications.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Anita H; Alkis, Andrew R; Parikh, Nishant B; Votta, Jennifer G

    2016-09-01

    Sexual functioning is important to assess in patients with psychiatric illness as both the condition and associated treatment may contribute to sexual dysfunction (SD). Antidepressant medications, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and antianxiety agents may be associated with SD related to drug mechanism of action. Sexual adverse effects may be related to genetic risk factors, impact on neurotransmitters and hormones, and psychological elements. Effective strategies to manage medication-induced sexual dysfunction are initial choice of a drug unlikely to cause SD, switching to a different medication, and adding an antidote to reverse SD. Appropriate interventions should be determined on a clinical case-by-case basis. PMID:27514298

  11. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Botwin, Gregory J; Morgan, Timothy R

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial infections occur in 25-35 % of cirrhotics admitted to hospital. Health-care associated and hospital acquired (nosocomial) infections are the most common epidemiology, with community acquired infections less common (15-30 %). Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and urinary infections are the most common sites, with spontaneous bacteremia, pneumonia, cellulitis and other sites being less common. The risk of infection is increased among subjects with more severe liver disease and an infection in the past 6 months. Bacteria are isolated from approximately half of patients with a clinical diagnosis of infection. Gram-negative enterobacteriaceae are the most common organisms among community acquired infections; Gram-positive cocci are the most common organisms isolated among subjects with nosocomial infections. Up to 30 % of hospital associated infections are with multidrug resistant bacteria. Consequently, empiric antibiotic therapy that is recommended for community acquired infections is often inadequate for nosocomial infections. Infections worsen liver function. In-hospital and 1-year mortality of cirrhotics with infections is significantly higher than among cirrhotics without infection. In-hospital complications of infections, such as severe sepsis and septic shock, and mortality, are increased among subjects with multidrug-resistant infections as compared with cirrhotics with susceptible bacteria. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis of cirrhotics with upper gastrointestinal bleeding and long-term antibiotic prophylaxis of selected cirrhotics with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis reduces infections and improves survival. Albumin administration to cirrhotics with SBP and evidence of advanced liver disease improves survival. The benefit of albumin administration to cirrhotics with infections other than SBP is under investigation. PMID:26201326

  12. Diverse Bacterial Microcompartment Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Chiranjit; Sinha, Sharmistha; Chun, Sunny; Yeates, Todd O.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs) are sophisticated protein-based organelles used to optimize metabolic pathways. They consist of metabolic enzymes encapsulated within a protein shell, which creates an ideal environment for catalysis and facilitates the channeling of toxic/volatile intermediates to downstream enzymes. The metabolic processes that require MCPs are diverse and widely distributed and play important roles in global carbon fixation and bacterial pathogenesis. The protein shells of MCPs are thought to selectively control the movement of enzyme cofactors, substrates, and products (including toxic or volatile intermediates) between the MCP interior and the cytoplasm of the cell using both passive electrostatic/steric and dynamic gated mechanisms. Evidence suggests that specialized shell proteins conduct electrons between the cytoplasm and the lumen of the MCP and/or help rebuild damaged iron-sulfur centers in the encapsulated enzymes. The MCP shell is elaborated through a family of small proteins whose structural core is known as a bacterial microcompartment (BMC) domain. BMC domain proteins oligomerize into flat, hexagonally shaped tiles, which assemble into extended protein sheets that form the facets of the shell. Shape complementarity along the edges allows different types of BMC domain proteins to form mixed sheets, while sequence variation provides functional diversification. Recent studies have also revealed targeting sequences that mediate protein encapsulation within MCPs, scaffolding proteins that organize lumen enzymes and the use of private cofactor pools (NAD/H and coenzyme A [HS-CoA]) to facilitate cofactor homeostasis. Although much remains to be learned, our growing understanding of MCPs is providing a basis for bioengineering of protein-based containers for the production of chemicals/pharmaceuticals and for use as molecular delivery vehicles. PMID:25184561

  13. Bacterial Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fadi; Khan, Tariq; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-12-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections account for 0.5% of outpatient visits to primary care. Skin and soft tissue infections can usually be managed in an outpatient setting. However, there are certain circumstances as discussed in this article that require more urgent care or inpatient management. Primary care providers should be able to diagnose, manage, and provide appropriate follow-up care for these frequently seen skin infections. This article provides family physicians with a comprehensive review of the assessment and management of common bacterial skin infections. PMID:26612370

  14. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Dukowicz, Andrew C.; Levine, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), defined as excessive bacteria in the small intestine, remains a poorly understood disease. Initially thought to occur in only a small number of patients, it is now apparent that this disorder is more prevalent than previously thought. Patients with SIBO vary in presentation, from being only mildly symptomatic to suffering from chronic diarrhea, weight loss, and malabsorption. A number of diagnostic tests are currently available, although the optimal treatment regimen remains elusive. Recently there has been renewed interest in SIBO and its putative association with irritable bowel syndrome. In this comprehensive review, we will discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of SIBO. PMID:21960820

  15. Bacterial terpene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2016-01-01

    Covering: up to 2015. This review summarises the accumulated knowledge about characterised bacterial terpene cyclases. The structures of identified products and of crystallised enzymes are included, and the obtained insights into enzyme mechanisms are discussed. After a summary of mono-, sesqui- and diterpene cyclases the special cases of the geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases that are both particularly widespread in bacteria will be presented. A total number of 63 enzymes that have been characterised so far is presented, with 132 cited references. PMID:26563452

  16. Involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in nefazodone-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Marta; Barbosa, Inês A; Seabra, Cátia; Beltrão, Nuno; Santos, Raquel; Vega-Naredo, Ignacio; Oliveira, Paulo J; Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    Nefazodone (NEF) is an antidepressive agent that was widely used in the treatment of depression until its withdrawal from the market, due to reports of liver injury and failure. NEF hepatotoxicity has been associated with mitochondrial impairment due to interference with the OXPHOS enzymatic activities, increased ROS generation and decreased antioxidant defenses. However, the mechanisms by which NEF induces mitochondrial dysfunction in hepatocytes are not completely understood. Here, we investigated the mitochondrial mechanisms affected upon NEF exposure and whether these might be linked to drug hepatotoxicity, in order to infer liabilities of future drug candidates. Two moderately hepatotoxic NEF concentrations (20 and 50 μM) were selected from dose-response growth curves performed in HepG2 cells. Cell viability, caspase activity, nuclear morphology, mitochondrial transmembrane potential, mitochondrial superoxide levels, and the expression of genes associated with different cellular pathways were evaluated at different time points. NEF treatment led to an increase in the expression of genes associated with DNA-damage response, antioxidant defense and apoptosis and a decreased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, DNA repair, cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, which seem to constitute mechanisms underlying the observed mitochondrial and cell function impairment. PMID:27288927

  17. Hypoxia, mitochondrial dysfunction and synovial invasiveness in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fearon, Ursula; Canavan, Mary; Biniecka, Monika; Veale, Douglas J

    2016-07-01

    Synovial proliferation, neovascularization and leukocyte extravasation transform the normally acellular synovium into an invasive tumour-like 'pannus'. The highly dysregulated architecture of the microvasculature creates a poor oxygen supply to the synovium, which, along with the increased metabolic turnover of the expanding synovial pannus, creates a hypoxic microenvironment. Abnormal cellular metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction thus ensue and, in turn, through the increased production of reactive oxygen species, actively induce inflammation. When exposed to hypoxia in the inflamed joint, immune-inflammatory cells show adaptive survival reactions by activating key proinflammatory signalling pathways, including those mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) and Notch, which contribute to synovial invasiveness. The reprogramming of hypoxia-mediated pathways in synovial cells, such as fibroblasts, dendritic cells, macrophages and T cells, is implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions, and might therefore provide an opportunity for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27225300

  18. Hydrogen sulfide and endothelial dysfunction: relationship with nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Altaany, Zaid; Moccia, Francesco; Munaron, Luca; Mancardi, Daniele; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is a cellular monolayer that lines the inner surface of blood vessels and plays a central role in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis by controlling platelet aggregation, vascular tone, blood fluidity and fibrinolysis, adhesion and transmigration of inflammatory cells, and angiogenesis. Endothelial dysfunctions are associated with various cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular complications of diabetes. Numerous studies have established the anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and anti-oxidant effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the latest member to join the gasotransmitter family along with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, on vascular endothelium. In addition, H2S may prime endothelial cells (ECs) toward angiogenesis and contribute to wound healing, besides to its well-known ability to relax vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and thereby reducing blood pressure. Finally, H2S may inhibit VSMC proliferation and platelet aggregation. Consistently, a deficit in H2S homeostasis is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and of hyperglycaemic endothelial injury. Therefore, the application of H2S-releasing drugs or using gene therapy to increase endogenous H2S level may help restore endothelial function and antagonize the progression of cardiovascular diseases. The present article reviews recent studies on the role of H2S in endothelial homeostasis, under both physiological and pathological conditions, and its putative therapeutic applications. PMID:25005182

  19. Cell proliferation in normal epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, G.D.; McCullough, J.L.; Ross, P.

    1984-06-01

    A detailed examination of cell proliferation kinetics in normal human epidermis is presented. Using tritiated thymidine with autoradiographic techniques, proliferative and differentiated cell kinetics are defined and interrelated. The proliferative compartment of normal epidermis has a cell cycle duration (Tc) of 311 h derived from 3 components: the germinative labeling index (LI), the duration of DNA synthesis (ts), and the growth fraction (GF). The germinative LI is 2.7% +/- 1.2 and ts is 14 h, the latter obtained from a composite fraction of labeled mitoses curve obtained from 11 normal subjects. The GF obtained from the literature and from human skin xenografts to nude mice is estimated to be 60%. Normal-appearing epidermis from patients with psoriasis appears to have a higher proliferation rate. The mean LI is 4.2% +/- 0.9, approximately 50% greater than in normal epidermis. Absolute cell kinetic values for this tissue, however, cannot yet be calculated for lack of other information on ts and GF. A kinetic model for epidermal cell renewal in normal epidermis is described that interrelates the rate of birth/entry, transit, and/or loss of keratinocytes in the 3 epidermal compartments: proliferative, viable differentiated (stratum malpighii), and stratum corneum. Expected kinetic homeostasis in the epidermis is confirmed by the very similar ''turnover'' rates in each of the compartments that are, respectively, 1246, 1417, and 1490 cells/day/mm2 surface area. The mean epidermal turnover time of the entire tissue is 39 days. The Tc of 311 h in normal cells in 8-fold longer than the psoriatic Tc of 36 h and is necessary for understanding the hyperproliferative pathophysiologic process in psoriasis.

  20. Mucociliary dysfunction in HIV and smoked substance abuse

    PubMed Central

    Chinnapaiyan, Srinivasan; Unwalla, Hoshang J.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired mucociliary clearance (MCC) is a hallmark of acquired chronic airway diseases like chronic bronchitis associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. This manifests as microbial colonization of the lung consequently leading to recurrent respiratory infections. People living with HIV demonstrate increased incidence of these chronic airway diseases. Bacterial pneumonia continues to be an important comorbidity in people living with HIV even though anti-retroviral therapy has succeeded in restoring CD4+ cell counts. People living with HIV demonstrate increased microbial colonization of the lower airways. The microbial flora is similar to that observed in diseases like cystic fibrosis and COPD suggesting that mucociliary dysfunction could be a contributing factor to the increased incidence of chronic airway diseases in people living with HIV. The three principal components of the MCC apparatus are, a mucus layer, ciliary beating, and a periciliary airway surface liquid (ASL) layer that facilitates ciliary beating. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a pivotal role in regulating the periciliary ASL. HIV proteins can suppress all the components of the MCC apparatus by increasing mucus secretion and suppressing CFTR function. This can decrease ASL height leading to suppressed ciliary beating. The effects of HIV on MCC are exacerbated when combined with other aggravating factors like smoking or inhaled substance abuse, which by themselves can suppress one or more components of the MCC system. This review discusses the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to MCC suppression in people living with HIV who also smoke tobacco or abuse illicit drugs. PMID:26528246

  1. Digestive system dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: challenges for nutrition therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Somerset, Shawn

    2014-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis can affect food digestion and nutrient absorption. The underlying mutation of the cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator gene depletes functional cystic fibrosis trans-membrane regulator on the surface of epithelial cells lining the digestive tract and associated organs, where Cl(-) secretion and subsequently secretion of water and other ions are impaired. This alters pH and dehydrates secretions that precipitate and obstruct the lumen, causing inflammation and the eventual degradation of the pancreas, liver, gallbladder and intestine. Associated conditions include exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, impaired bicarbonate and bile acid secretion and aberrant mucus formation, commonly leading to maldigestion and malabsorption, particularly of fat and fat-soluble vitamins. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is used to address this insufficiency. The susceptibility of pancreatic lipase to acidic and enzymatic inactivation and decreased bile availability often impedes its efficacy. Brush border digestive enzyme activity and intestinal uptake of certain disaccharides and amino acids await clarification. Other complications that may contribute to maldigestion/malabsorption include small intestine bacterial overgrowth, enteric circular muscle dysfunction, abnormal intestinal mucus, and intestinal inflammation. However, there is some evidence that gastric digestive enzymes, colonic microflora, correction of fatty acid abnormalities using dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation and emerging intestinal biomarkers can complement nutrition management in cystic fibrosis. PMID:25053610

  2. Animal Models of Bacterial Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Marquart, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial keratitis is a disease of the cornea characterized by pain, redness, inflammation, and opacity. Common causes of this disease are Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Animal models of keratitis have been used to elucidate both the bacterial factors and the host inflammatory response involved in the disease. Reviewed herein are animal models of bacterial keratitis and some of the key findings in the last several decades. PMID:21274270

  3. Proliferation resistance: issues, initiatives and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    The vision of a nuclear renaissance has highlighted the issue of proliferation resistance. The prospects for a dramatic growth in nuclear power may depend on the effectiveness of, and the resources devoted to, plans to develop and implement technologies and approaches that strengthen proliferation resistance. The GenIV International Forum (GIF) and others have devoted attention and resources to proliferation resistance. However, the hope of finding a way to make the peaceful uses of nuclear energy resistant to proliferation has reappeared again and again in the history of nuclear power with little practical consequence. The concept of proliferation resistance has usually focused on intrinsic (technological) as opposed to extrinsic (institutional) factors. However, if there are benefits that may yet be realized from reactors and other facilities designed to minimize proliferation risks, it is their coupling with effective safeguards and other nonproliferation measures that likely will be critical. Proliferation resistance has also traditionally been applied only to state threats. Although there are no technologies that can wholly eliminate the risk of proliferation by a determined state, technology can play a limited role in reducing state threats and perhaps in eliminating many non-state threats. These and other issues are not academic. They affect efforts to evaluate proliferation resistance, including the methodology developed by GIF's Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP) Working Group as well as the proliferation resistance initiatives that are being pursued or may be developed in the future. This paper will offer a new framework for thinking about proliferation resistance issues, including the ways the output of the methodology could be developed to inform the decisions that states, the International Atomic Energy (IAEA) and others will have to make in order to fully realize the promise of a nuclear renaissance.

  4. Mechanism of Bacterial Oligosaccharyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Sabina; Lizak, Christian; Michaud, Gaëlle; Bucher, Monika; Darbre, Tamis; Aebi, Markus; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Locher, Kaspar P.

    2013-01-01

    N-Linked glycosylation is an essential post-translational protein modification in the eukaryotic cell. The initial transfer of an oligosaccharide from a lipid carrier onto asparagine residues within a consensus sequon is catalyzed by oligosaccharyltransferase (OST). The first X-ray structure of a complete bacterial OST enzyme, Campylobacter lari PglB, was recently determined. To understand the mechanism of PglB, we have quantified sequon binding and glycosylation turnover in vitro using purified enzyme and fluorescently labeled, synthetic peptide substrates. Using fluorescence anisotropy, we determined a dissociation constant of 1.0 μm and a strict requirement for divalent metal ions for consensus (DQNAT) sequon binding. Using in-gel fluorescence detection, we quantified exceedingly low glycosylation rates that remained undetected using in vivo assays. We found that an alanine in the −2 sequon position, converting the bacterial sequon to a eukaryotic one, resulted in strongly lowered sequon binding, with in vitro turnover reduced 50,000-fold. A threonine is preferred over serine in the +2 sequon position, reflected by a 4-fold higher affinity and a 1.2-fold higher glycosylation rate. The interaction of the +2 sequon position with PglB is modulated by isoleucine 572. Our study demonstrates an intricate interplay of peptide and metal binding as the first step of protein N-glycosylation. PMID:23382388

  5. The bacterial gliding machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Abhishek

    Cells of Flavobacterium johnsoniae, a rod-shaped bacterium, glide over surfaces with speeds reaching up to 2 micrometer's. Gliding is powered by a protonmotive force. The adhesin SprB forms filaments about 160 nm long that move on the cell-surface along a looped track. Interaction of SprB filaments with a surface produces gliding. We tethered F. johnsoniae cells to glass by adding anti-SprB antibody. Tethered cells spun about fixed points, rotating at speeds of about 1 Hz. The torques required to sustain such speeds were large, comparable to those generated by the flagellar rotary motor. Using a flow cell apparatus, we changed load on the gliding motor by adding the viscous agent Ficoll to tethered cells. We found that a gliding motor runs at constant speed rather than constant torque. We attached gold nanoparticles to the SprB filament and tracked its motion. We fluorescently tagged a bacterial Type IX secretion system (T9SS) protein and imaged its dynamics. Fluorescently tagged T9SS protein localized near the point of tether, indicating that T9SS localizes with the gliding motor. Based on our results, we propose a model to explain bacterial gliding.

  6. [Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis].

    PubMed

    Cornut, P-L; Chiquet, C

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis, also called metastatic bacterial endophthalmitis, remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. It is a rare and potentially sight-threatening ocular infection that occurs when bacteria reach the eye via the bloodstream, cross the blood-ocular barrier, and multiply within the eye. It usually affects immunocompromised patients and those suffering from diabetes mellitus, malignancy, or cardiac disease, but has also been reported after invasive procedures or in previously healthy people. In most cases, the ocular symptoms occur after the diagnosis of septicemia or systemic infection. Ocular symptoms include decreased vision, redness, discharge, pain, and floaters. The ocular inflammatory signs may be anterior and/or posterior. Bilateral involvement occurs in nearly 25% of cases. A wide range of microorganisms are involved, with differences in their frequency according to geography as well as the patient's age and past medical history, because of variations in the predisposing conditions and the source of the sepsis. The majority of patients are initially misdiagnosed, and ophthalmologists should be aware of this because prompt local and general management is required to save the eye and/or the patient's life. PMID:21145128

  7. Nanoparticle Approaches against Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weiwei; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the wide success of antibiotics, the treatment of bacterial infection still faces significant challenges, particularly the emergence of antibiotic resistance. As a result, nanoparticle drug delivery platforms including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, and various inorganic nanoparticles have been increasingly exploited to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of existing antibiotics. This review focuses on areas where nanoparticle approaches hold significant potential to advance the treatment of bacterial infection. These areas include targeted antibiotic delivery, environmentally responsive antibiotic delivery, combinatorial antibiotic delivery, nanoparticle-enabled antibacterial vaccination, and nanoparticle-based bacterial detection. In each area we highlight the innovative antimicrobial nanoparticle platforms and review their progress made against bacterial infections. PMID:25044325

  8. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Chi; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Lee, Hsin-Chen

    2016-06-01

    Deregulated cellular energetics was one of the cancer hallmarks. Several underlying mechanisms of deregulated cellular energetics are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations, mitochondrial enzyme defects, or altered oncogenes/tumor suppressors. In this review, we summarize the current understanding about the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer progression. Point mutations and copy number changes are the two most common mitochondrial DNA alterations in cancers, and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by chemical depletion of mitochondrial DNA or impairment of mitochondrial respiratory chain in cancer cells promotes cancer progression to a chemoresistance or invasive phenotype. Moreover, defects in mitochondrial enzymes, such as succinate dehydrogenase, fumarate hydratase, and isocitrate dehydrogenase, are associated with both familial and sporadic forms of cancer. Deregulated mitochondrial deacetylase sirtuin 3 might modulate cancer progression by regulating cellular metabolism and oxidative stress. These mitochondrial defects during oncogenesis and tumor progression activate cytosolic signaling pathways that ultimately alter nuclear gene expression, a process called retrograde signaling. Changes in the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species, Ca(2+), or oncometabolites are important in the mitochondrial retrograde signaling for neoplastic transformation and cancer progression. In addition, altered oncogenes/tumor suppressors including hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and tumor suppressor p53 regulate mitochondrial respiration and cellular metabolism by modulating the expression of their target genes. We thus suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in cancer progression and that targeting mitochondrial alterations and mitochondrial retrograde signaling might be a promising strategy for the development of selective anticancer therapy. PMID:27022139

  9. SOMATOSENSORY DYSFUNCTION FOLLOWING ACUTE TRIMETHYLTIN EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of trimethyltin (TMT) -produced sensory and behavioral dysfunctions have been reported. In this study the functional integrity of the somatosensory system was evaluated. Animals were tested using three different measures prior to (day 0) and 1,4, and 16 days following d...

  10. Chronic Inflammatory Diseases and Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Castellon, Xavier; Bogdanova, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with increases in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and subclinical atherosclerosis as well as early-stage endothelial dysfunction screening using the FMD method (Flow Mediated Dilation). This phenomenon, referred to as accelerated pathological remodeling of arterial wall, could be attributed to traditional risk factors associated with atherosclerosis. Several new non-invasive techniques have been used to study arterial wall’s structural and functional alterations. These techniques (based of Radio Frequency, RF) allow for an assessment of artery age through calculations of intima-media thickness (RF- QIMT), pulse wave rate (RF- QAS) and endothelial dysfunction degree (FMD). The inflammatory and autoimmune diseases should now be considered as new cardiovascular risk factors, result of the major consequences of oxidative stress and RAS (Renin Angiotensin System) imbalance associated with the deleterious effect of known risk factors that lead to the alteration of the arterial wall. Inflammation plays a key role in all stages of the formation of vascular lesions maintained and exacerbated by the risk factors. The consequence of chronic inflammation is endothelial dysfunction that sets in and we can define it as an integrated marker of the damage to arterial walls by classic risk factors. The atherosclerosis, which develops among these patients, is the main cause for cardiovascular morbi-mortality and uncontrolled chronic biological inflammation, which quickly favors endothelial dysfunction. These inflammatory and autoimmune diseases should now be considered as new cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26815098

  11. Salicylate-induced proximal tubular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tsimihodimos, Vasilis; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Kakaidi, Varvara; Bairaktari, Eleni; Elisaf, Moses

    2007-09-01

    We describe the case of a 17-year-old girl who was admitted to our clinic for drug poisoning. Twelve hours after the ingestion of 25 tablets of aspirin (12.5 g of acetylsalicylic acid), the patient had a generalized proximal tubular dysfunction characterized by glucosuria (in the face of normal serum glucose levels), proteinuria, and uric acid wasting. Further characterization of the tubular dysfunction using high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the urine showed a pattern consistent with proximal tubular injury. An important characteristic of the salicylate-induced proximal tubular dysfunction in our patient was its rapid reversibility. A trend toward normalization of fractional excretion values of electrolytes was observed 2 days after ingestion. Determination of serum and urine metabolites and spectroscopy of urine 15 days later showed no evidence of tubular dysfunction. The mechanisms potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of salicylate-induced Fanconi syndrome are discussed and a brief review of the relevant literature is provided. PMID:17720526

  12. Effect of Common Visual Dysfunctions on Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPartland, Brian P.

    1985-01-01

    Six common visual dysfunctions are briefly explained and their relationships to reading noted: (1) ametropia, refractive error; (2) inaccurate saccades, the small jumping eye movements used in reading; (3) inefficient binocularity/fusion; (4) insufficient convergence/divergence; (5) heterophoria, imbalance in extra-ocular muscles; and (6)…

  13. Cognitive dysfunction and hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Solinas, Antonio; Piras, Maria Rita; Deplano, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a distinct form of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). In fact, the majority of HCV-positive patients, irrespective of the grading of liver fibrosis, display alterations of verbal learning, attention, executive function, and memory when they are evaluated by suitable neuropsychological tests. Similarities between the cognitive dysfunction of HCV patients and MHE of patients with different etiologies are unclear. It is also unknown how the metabolic alterations of advanced liver diseases interact with the HCV-induced cognitive dysfunction, and whether these alterations are reversed by antiviral therapies. HCV replication in the brain may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation. HCV-related brain dysfunction may be associated with white matter neuronal loss, alterations of association tracts and perfusion. It is unclear to what extent, in patients with cirrhosis, HCV triggers an irreversible neurodegenerative brain damage. New insights on this issue will be provided by longitudinal studies using the protocols established by the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders fifth edition for cognitive disorders. The domains to be evaluated are complex attention; executive functions; learning and memory; perceptual motor functions; social cognition. These evaluations should be associated with fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols for major cognitive disorders including magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance perfusion, and functional MRI. Also, the characteristics of portal hypertension, including the extent of liver blood flow and the type of portal shunts, should be evaluated. PMID:25954475

  14. Adolescent Depression: Stress and Reward Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Randy P.; Admon, Roee; Pizzagalli, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescence is a peak period for the onset of depression, and it is also a time marked by substantial stress as well as neural development within the brain reward circuitry. In the current review, we provide a selective overview of current animal and human research investigating the relationship among reward processes, stress, and depression. Three separate, but related, etiological models examine the differential roles that stress may play with regard to reward dysfunction and adolescent depression. First, the reward mediation model suggests that acute and chronic stress contribute to reward deficits, which in turn, potentiate depressive symptoms and/or increase the risk for depression. Second, in line with the stress generation perspective, it is plausible that premorbid reward-related dysfunction generates stress, in particular interpersonal stress, which then leads to the manifestation of depressive symptoms. Last, consistent with a diathesis-stress model, the interaction between stress and premorbid reward dysfunction may contribute to the onset of depression. Given the equifinal nature of depression, these models could shed important light on different etiological pathways during adolescence, particularly as they may relate to understanding the heterogeneity of depression. To highlight the translational potential of these insights, a hypothetical case study is provided as means of demonstrating the importance of targeting reward dysfunction in both assessment and treatment of adolescent depression. PMID:24704785

  15. Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Steyers, Curtis M.; Miller, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). As the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory process, similarities between atherosclerosis and systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, lupus, psoriasis, spondyloarthritis and others have become a topic of interest. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key step in the initiation and maintenance of atherosclerosis and may serve as a marker for future risk of cardiovascular events. Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases manifest endothelial dysfunction, often early in the course of the disease. Therefore, mechanisms linking systemic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis may be best understood at the level of the endothelium. Multiple factors, including circulating inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α), reactive oxygen species, oxidized LDL (low density lipoprotein), autoantibodies and traditional risk factors directly and indirectly activate endothelial cells, leading to impaired vascular relaxation, increased leukocyte adhesion, increased endothelial permeability and generation of a pro-thrombotic state. Pharmacologic agents directed against TNF-α-mediated inflammation may decrease the risk of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in these patients. Understanding the precise mechanisms driving endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases may help elucidate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population. PMID:24968272

  16. Syllable Structure in Dysfunctional Portuguese Children's Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Candeias, Sara; Perdigao, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work is to investigate whether children with speech dysfunctions (SD) show a deficit in planning some Portuguese syllable structures (PSS) in continuous speech production. Knowledge of which aspects of speech production are affected by SD is necessary for efficient improvement in the therapy techniques. The case-study is focused…

  17. Pain related sexual dysfunction after inguinal herniorrhaphy.

    PubMed

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Møhl, Bo; Bay-Nielsen, Morten; Kehlet, Henrik

    2006-06-01

    To determine the incidence of pain related sexual dysfunction 1 year after inguinal herniorrhaphy and to assess the impact pain has on sexual function. In contrast to the well-described about 10% risk of chronic wound related pain after inguinal herniorrhaphy, chronic genital pain, dysejaculation, and sexual dysfunction have only been described sporadically. The aim was therefore to describe these symptoms in a questionnaire study. A nationwide detailed questionnaire study in September 2004 of pain related sexual dysfunction in all men aged 18-40 years undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy between October 2002 and June 2003 (n=1015) based upon the nationwide Danish Hernia Database collaboration. The response rate was 68.4%. Combined frequent and moderate or severe pain from the previous hernia site during activity was reported by 187 patients (18.4%). Pain during sexual activity was reported by 224 patients (22.1%), of which 68 (6.7%) had moderate or severe pain occurring every third time or more. Genital or ejaculatory pain was found in 125 patients (12.3%), and 28 (2.8%) patients reported that the pain impaired their sexual activity to a moderate or severe degree. Pain during sexual activity and subsequent sexual dysfunction represent a clinically significant problem in about 3% of younger male patients with a previous inguinal herniorrhaphy. Intraoperative nerve damage and disposition to other chronic pain conditions are among the most likely pathogenic factors. PMID:16545910

  18. Sexual dysfunction in female cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    DeSimone, Michael; Spriggs, Elizabeth; Gass, Jennifer S; Carson, Sandra A; Krychman, Michael L; Dizon, Don S

    2014-02-01

    Cancer survivors face a myriad of long-term effects of their disease, diagnosis, and treatment, and chief among many are problems associated with sexual dysfunction. Yet despite their frequency and the degree of distress they cause patients, sexual dysfunction is not effectively screened for or treated, and this is particularly true in female survivors. Inconsistently performed general sexual health screening at all facets of cancer care and survivorship ultimately translates into missed attempts to identify and treat dysfunction when it does arise. In this paper, we will review the current research and clinical practices addressing sexual dysfunction in female cancer survivors and propose questions in need of future research attention. This article will review the phases of sexual response and how each may be affected by the physical and emotional stress of cancer diagnosis and treatment. We will then discuss existing tools for assessment of sexual function and approaches to their treatment. Finally, we will conclude with advice to health care professionals based on current research and suggest questions for future study. PMID:22643563

  19. Feeding and Swallowing Dysfunction in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper-Brown, Linda; Copeland, Sara; Dailey, Scott; Downey, Debora; Petersen, Mario Cesar; Stimson, Cheryl; Van Dyke, Don C.

    2008-01-01

    Children with genetic syndromes frequently have feeding problems and swallowing dysfunction as a result of the complex interactions between anatomical, medical, physiological, and behavioral factors. Feeding problems associated with genetic disorders may also cause feeding to be unpleasant, negative, or even painful because of choking, coughing,…

  20. Management of sexual dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Gila; Vodušek, David B

    2011-11-01

    Nonmotor symptoms, among them sexual dysfunction, are common and underrecognized in patients with Parkinson disease; they play a major role in the deterioration of quality of life of patients and their partners. Loss of desire and dissatisfaction with their sexual life is encountered in both genders. Hypersexuality (HS), erectile dysfunction and problems with ejaculation are found in male patients, and loss of lubrication and involuntary urination during sex are found in female patients. Tremor, hypomimia, muscle rigidity, bradykinesia, 'clumsiness' in fine motor control, dyskinesias, hypersalivation and sweating may interfere with sexual function. Optimal dopaminergic treatment should facilitate sexual encounters of the couple. Appropriate counselling diminishes some of the problems (reluctance to engage in sex, problems with ejaculation, lubrication and urinary incontinence). Treatment of erectile dysfunction with sildenafil and apomorphine is evidence based. HS or compulsive sexual behaviour are side effects of dopaminergic therapy, particularly by dopaminergic agonists, and should be treated primarily by diminishing their dose. Neurologists should actively investigate sexual dysfunction in their Parkinsonian patients and offer treatment, optimally within a multidisciplinary team, where a dedicated professional would deal with sexual counselling. PMID:22164191

  1. Dysfunctional HDL and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenson, Robert S; Brewer, H Bryan; Ansell, Benjamin J; Barter, Philip; Chapman, M John; Heinecke, Jay W; Kontush, Anatol; Tall, Alan R; Webb, Nancy R

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) protect against atherosclerosis by removing excess cholesterol from macrophages through the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) pathways involved in reverse cholesterol transport. Factors that impair the availability of functional apolipoproteins or the activities of ABCA1 and ABCG1 could, therefore, strongly influence atherogenesis. HDL also inhibits lipid oxidation, restores endothelial function, exerts anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic actions, and exerts anti-inflammatory actions in animal models. Such properties could contribute considerably to the capacity of HDL to inhibit atherosclerosis. Systemic and vascular inflammation has been proposed to convert HDL to a dysfunctional form that has impaired antiatherogenic effects. A loss of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative proteins, perhaps in combination with a gain of proinflammatory proteins, might be another important component in rendering HDL dysfunctional. The proinflammatory enzyme myeloperoxidase induces both oxidative modification and nitrosylation of specific residues on plasma and arterial apolipoprotein A-I to render HDL dysfunctional, which results in impaired ABCA1 macrophage transport, the activation of inflammatory pathways, and an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Understanding the features of dysfunctional HDL or apolipoprotein A-I in clinical practice might lead to new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to atherosclerosis. PMID:26323267

  2. A humanized anti-DLL4 antibody promotes dysfunctional angiogenesis and inhibits breast tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xuelian; Wang, Wenyi; Xu, Zhuobin; Wang, Shijing; Wang, Tong; Wang, Min; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Blockage of Delta-like 4 (DLL4)-directed Notch signaling induces excessive tip cell formation and endothelial proliferation resulting in dysfunctional angiogenesis in tumors. MMGZ01, as a murine anti-human DLL4 monoclonal antibody, specifically binds to human DLL4 and blocks Notch pathway. Here, the structure of MMGZ01 variable fragment (Fv) was established and framework region (FR) residues which supported complementarily determining region (CDR) loop conformation were identified. Important residues interactions were also identified through docking MMGZ01 Fv with antigen epitope in DLL4. To humanize the murine antibody, we modified MMGZ01 Fv through CDR grafting and the reconstructed antibody (H3L2) maintained similar structure and binding affinity to parental MMGZ01 after back mutation of 12 canonical murine residues in the FRs. Meanwhile, H3L2 promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation through inhibiting DLL4-directed Notch pathway. Moreover, in MDA-MB-231-bearing nude mice, H3L2 induced dysfunctional angiogenesis and tumor cell apoptosis and showed superior anti-tumor activity. In conclusion, H3L2 is an ideal humanized antibody that inhibits tumor growth through targeting DLL4-Notch pathway and has attracting potentials for clinical applications. PMID:27301650

  3. Absence of ductal hyper-keratinization in Mouse age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD)

    PubMed Central

    Parfitt, Geraint J.; Xie, Yilu; Geyfman, Mikhail; Brown, Donald J.; Jester, James V.

    2013-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is frequent with aging and is the primary cause of dry eye disease, the most prevalent ocular complaint. We used a novel 3-D reconstruction technique, immunofluorescent computed tomography (ICT), to characterize meibomian gland keratinization and cell proliferation in a mouse model of age-related meibomian gland dysfunction (ARMGD). To visualize the changes associated with ARMGD, 5-month and 2-year old mouse eyelids were 3-D reconstructed by ICT using antibodies to cytokeratin (CK) 1, 5 and 6 and the proliferation marker Ki67. We quantified total gland, ductal and lipid volume from the reconstructions, observing a dramatic decrease in old glands. In young glands, proliferative ductules suggest a potential site of acinar progenitors that were found to be largely absent in aged, atrophic glands. In the aged mouse, we observed an anterior migration of the mucocutaneous junction (MCJ) and an absence of hyper-keratinization with meibomian gland atrophy. Thus, we propose that changes in the MCJ and glandular atrophy through a loss of meibocyte progenitors are most likely responsible for ARMGD and not ductal hyper-keratinization and gland obstruction. PMID:24259272

  4. A humanized anti-DLL4 antibody promotes dysfunctional angiogenesis and inhibits breast tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xuelian; Wang, Wenyi; Xu, Zhuobin; Wang, Shijing; Wang, Tong; Wang, Min; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Blockage of Delta-like 4 (DLL4)-directed Notch signaling induces excessive tip cell formation and endothelial proliferation resulting in dysfunctional angiogenesis in tumors. MMGZ01, as a murine anti-human DLL4 monoclonal antibody, specifically binds to human DLL4 and blocks Notch pathway. Here, the structure of MMGZ01 variable fragment (Fv) was established and framework region (FR) residues which supported complementarily determining region (CDR) loop conformation were identified. Important residues interactions were also identified through docking MMGZ01 Fv with antigen epitope in DLL4. To humanize the murine antibody, we modified MMGZ01 Fv through CDR grafting and the reconstructed antibody (H3L2) maintained similar structure and binding affinity to parental MMGZ01 after back mutation of 12 canonical murine residues in the FRs. Meanwhile, H3L2 promoted human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation through inhibiting DLL4-directed Notch pathway. Moreover, in MDA-MB-231-bearing nude mice, H3L2 induced dysfunctional angiogenesis and tumor cell apoptosis and showed superior anti-tumor activity. In conclusion, H3L2 is an ideal humanized antibody that inhibits tumor growth through targeting DLL4-Notch pathway and has attracting potentials for clinical applications. PMID:27301650

  5. Hippocampal neurogenesis dysfunction linked to depressive-like behaviors in a neuroinflammation induced model of depression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming-Ming; Lin, Wen-Juan; Pan, Yu-Qin; Guan, Xi-Ting; Li, Ying-Cong

    2016-07-01

    Our previous work found that triple central lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration could induce depressive-like behaviors and increased central pro-inflammatory cytokines mRNA, hippocampal cytokine mRNA in particular. Since several neuroinflammation-associated conditions have been reported to impair neurogenesis, in this study, we further investigated whether the neuroinflammation induced depression would be associated with hippocampal neurogenesis dysfunction. An animal model of depression induced by triple central lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration was used. In the hippocampus, the neuroinflammatory state evoked by LPS was marked by an increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α. It was found that rats in the neuroinflammatory state exhibited depressive-like behaviors, including reduced saccharin preference and locomotor activity as well as increased immobility time in the tail suspension test and latency to feed in the novelty suppressed feeding test. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis was concomitantly inhibited, including decreased cell proliferation and newborn cell survival. We also demonstrated that the decreased hippocampal neurogenesis in cell proliferation was significantly correlated with the depressive-like phenotypes of decreased saccharine preference and distance travelled, the core and characteristic symptoms of depression, under neuro inflammation state. These findings provide the first evidence that hippocampal neurogenesis dysfunction is correlated with neuroinflammation-induced depression, which suggests that hippocampal neurogenesis might be one of biological mechanisms underlying depression induced by neruoinflammation. PMID:27106565

  6. The bioactive composite film prepared from bacterial cellulose and modified by hydrolyzed gelatin peptide.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Bin; Chen, Chia-Che; Chen, Li-Chen; Chen, Hui-Huang

    2015-05-01

    The hydrolyzed gelatin peptides, obtained from the hydrolysis of Tilapia nilotica skin gelatin with alcalase and pronase E, were fractionated using an ultrafiltration system into hydrolyzed gelatin peptides-a (10 kDa membrane), hydrolyzed gelatin peptides-b1, and hydrolyzed gelatin peptides-b2 (5 kDa membrane) fractions. The highest oxygen radical absorbance capacity was observed in hydrolyzed gelatin peptides-b2, which contained more nonpolar amino acids than the other hydrolyzed gelatin peptides. Hydrolyzed gelatin peptides-b2 at a concentration of 12.5 mg/ml exhibited the highest proliferation ability and increased the expression of Type I procollagen mRNA, which indicated an enhanced collagen synthesis. Hydrolyzed gelatin peptides protected Detroit 551 cells from 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride-induced oxidative damage and increased cell viability. Hydroxylpropylmethyl cellulose-modified bacterial cellulose and dried fabricated biofilm were less eligible for Detroit 551 cell proliferation than bacterial cellulose. The release of hydrolyzed gelatin peptides in bacterial cellulose film was slower than that in hydroxylpropylmethyl cellulose-modified bacterial cellulose and dried fabricated biofilm; thus, bacterial cellulose film and hydroxylpropylmethyl cellulose-modified bacterial cellulose and dried fabricated biofilm are suitable candidates for applications in delayed release type and rapid release type biofilms, respectively. PMID:25614493

  7. Saliva promotes survival and even proliferation of Candida species in tap water.

    PubMed

    Barbot, Vanessa; Migeot, Virginie; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Deborde, Marie; Imbert, Christine

    2011-11-01

    Candida yeasts colonize the human oral cavity as commensals or opportunistic pathogens. They may be isolated from water circulating in dental unit waterlines mixed with traces of saliva mainly because of the dysfunction of antiretraction valves. This study deals with the growth ability of Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Candida parapsilosis in tap water with saliva (0-20% v/v). Results show that C. glabrata is the most susceptible species in tap water. Furthermore, saliva promotes both survival and proliferation of the three studied Candida species in tap water. PMID:22092759

  8. [Evaluation of autonomic dysfunction by novel methods].

    PubMed

    Ando, Yukio; Obayashi, Konen

    2004-07-01

    The autonomic nervous system innervates every organ in the body. Since autonomic disturbances affect patient survival, an understanding and recognition of these disturbances are important. We adopted several new methods to evaluate autonomic function accurately. 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy can assess the cardiac autonomic function even in the presence of cardiac arrhythmia. Laser-Doppler flowmetry, ultrasonographic study in the vessels and near-infrared spectrophotoscopy techniques serve as useful markers for screening the dysfunction of vasomotor neurons and blood circulation. Electrogastrography and the circadian rhythms of protein C secretion could be markers of the visceromotor nerves in the abdomen. Electrogastrography is a particularly useful tool for reflecting on functional changes in gastrointestinal motility. The evaluation of anemia could be a marker of autonomic dysfunction in the kidney and bone marrow in patients with familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy, pandysautonomia, and multiple system atrophy. Normocytic and normochromic anemia correlated with the severity of autonomic dysfunction were shown in these patients. We also evaluated the dysfunction of the neuroendocrine system and sudomotor neuron using our new autonomic function tests. The glucose-tolerance test could become one of the most useful clinical tools for detecting autonomic dysfunction in the endocrine system. Microhydrography and thermography could be useful tools for diagnosing the lesion site of dyshidrosis. Moreover, it is clinically important to check the systemic circulation and autonomic function in patients treated with sildenafil citrate and organ transplantation to save their lives. Our new autonomic function tests, such as laser-Doppler flowmetry and 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy, are crucial tools in supplying the best symptomatic treatment for such patients. PMID:15344558

  9. Lysosomal Acid Phosphatase Biosynthesis and Dysfunction: A Mini Review Focused on Lysosomal Enzyme Dysfunction in Brain.

    PubMed

    Ashtari, N; Jiao, X; Rahimi-Balaei, M; Amiri, S; Mehr, S E; Yeganeh, B; Marzban, H

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles that are responsible for degrading and recycling macromolecules. Lysosomal dysfunction occurs in enzymatic and non-enzymatic deficiencies, which result in abnormal accumulation of materials. Although lysosomal storage disorders affect different organs, the central nervous system is the most vulnerable. Evidence shows the role of lysosomal dysfunction in different neurodegenerative diseases, such as Niemann-Pick Type C disease, juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Lysosomal enzymes such as lysosomal acid phosphatase 2 (Acp2) play a critical role in mannose-6-phosphate removal and Acp2 controls molecular and cellular functions in the brain during development and adulthood. Acp2 is essential in cerebellar development, and mutations in this gene cause severe cerebellar neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. In this mini-review, we highlight lysosomal dysfunctions in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental and/or neurodegenerative diseases with special attention to Acp2 dysfunction. PMID:27132795

  10. In Utero and Lactational TCDD Exposure Increases Susceptibility to Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Ricke, William A; Lee, Calvin W; Clapper, Tyler R; Schneider, Andrew J; Moore, Robert W; Keil, Kimberly P; Abler, Lisa L; Wynder, Jalissa L; López Alvarado, Arnaldo; Beaubrun, Isaac; Vo, Jenny; Bauman, Tyler M; Ricke, Emily A; Peterson, Richard E; Vezina, Chad M

    2016-04-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostate cancer, and changes in the ratio of circulating testosterone and estradiol often occur concurrently in aging men and can lead to lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction. To explore the possibility of a fetal basis for the development of LUT dysfunction in adulthood, Tg(CMV-cre);Nkx3-1(+/-);Pten(fl/+) mice, which are genetically predisposed to prostate neoplasia, were exposedin uteroand during lactation to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, 1 μg/kg po) or corn oil vehicle (5 ml/kg) after a single maternal dose on 13 days post coitus, and subsequently were aged without further manipulation, or at 8 weeks of age were exposed to exogenous 17 β-estradiol (2.5 mg) and testosterone (25 mg) (T+E2) via slow release subcutaneous implants.In uteroand lactational (IUL) TCDD exposure in the absence of exogenous hormone treatment reduced voiding pressure in adult mice, but otherwise had little effect on mouse LUT anatomy or function. By comparison, IUL TCDD exposure followed by exogenous hormone treatment increased relative kidney, bladder, dorsolateral prostate, and seminal vesicle weights, hydronephrosis incidence, and prostate epithelial cell proliferation, thickened prostate periductal smooth muscle, and altered prostate and bladder collagen fiber distribution. We propose a 2-hit model whereby IUL TCDD exposure sensitizes mice to exogenous-hormone-induced urinary tract dysfunction later in life. PMID:26865671

  11. Cardiomyocyte-specific perilipin 5 overexpression leads to myocardial steatosis and modest cardiac dysfunction1[S

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Sreenivasan, Urmila; Gong, Da-Wei; O'Connell, Kelly A.; Dabkowski, Erinne R.; Hecker, Peter A.; Ionica, Nicoleta; Konig, Manige; Mahurkar, Anup; Sun, Yezhou; Stanley, William C.; Sztalryd, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Presence of ectopic lipid droplets (LDs) in cardiac muscle is associated to lipotoxicity and tissue dysfunction. However, presence of LDs in heart is also observed in physiological conditions, such as when cellular energy needs and energy production from mitochondria fatty acid β-oxidation are high (fasting). This suggests that development of tissue lipotoxicity and dysfunction is not simply due to the presence of LDs in cardiac muscle but due at least in part to alterations in LD function. To examine the function of cardiac LDs, we obtained transgenic mice with heart-specific perilipin 5 (Plin5) overexpression (MHC-Plin5), a member of the perilipin protein family. Hearts from MHC-Plin5 mice expressed at least 4-fold higher levels of plin5 and exhibited a 3.5-fold increase in triglyceride content versus nontransgenic littermates. Chronic cardiac excess of LDs was found to result in mild heart dysfunction with decreased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α target genes, decreased mitochondria function, and left ventricular concentric hypertrophia. Lack of more severe heart function complications may have been prevented by a strong increased expression of oxidative-induced genes via NF-E2-related factor 2 antioxidative pathway. Perilipin 5 regulates the formation and stabilization of cardiac LDs, and it promotes cardiac steatosis without major heart function impairment. PMID:23345411

  12. TLR2 Activation Inhibits Embryonic Neural Progenitor Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Okun, Eitan; Griffioen, Kathleen J.; Gen-Son, Tae; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Roberts, Nicholas J.; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Hutchison, Emmette; Cheng, Aiwu; Arumugam, Thiruma V.; Lathia, Justin D.; van Praag, Henriette; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play essential roles in innate immunity, and increasing evidence indicates that these receptors are expressed in neurons, astrocytes and microglia in the brain, where they mediate responses to infection, stress and injury. To address the possibility that TLR2 heterodimer activation could affect progenitor cells in the developing brain, we analyzed the expression of TLR2 throughout the mouse cortical development, and assessed the role of TLR2 heterodimer activation in neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation. TLR2 mRNA and protein was expressed in the cortex in embryonic and early postnatal stages of development, and in cultured cortical NPC. While NPC from TLR2-deficient and wild type embryos had the same proliferative capacity, TLR2 activation by the synthetic bacterial lipopeptides Pam3CSK4 and FSL1, or low molecular weight hyaluronan, an endogenous ligand for TLR2, inhibited neurosphere formation in vitro. Intracerebral in utero administration of TLR2 ligands resulted in ventricular dysgenesis characterized by increased ventricle size, reduced proliferative area around the ventricles, increased cell density, an increase in PH3+ cells and a decrease in BrdU+ cells in the sub-ventricular zone. Our findings indicate that loss of TLR2 does not result in defects in cerebral development. However, TLR2 is expressed and functional in the developing telencephalon from early embryonic stages and infectious agent-related activation of TLR2 inhibits NPC proliferation. TLR2–mediated inhibition of NPC proliferation may therefore be a mechanism by which infection, ischemia and inflammation adversely affect brain development. PMID:20456021

  13. Identification of transcriptional networks involved in peroxisome proliferator chemical-induced hepatocyte proliferation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemical (PPC) exposure leads to increases in rodent liver tumors through a non-genotoxic mode of action (MOA). The PPC MOA includes increased oxidative stress, hepatocyte proliferation and decreased apoptosis. We investigated the putative genetic regulato...

  14. AB028. New drugs for sexual dysfunction complementary medicine for sexual dysfunction in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Earle, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective In Australia both oriental and western products are available as complementary medicines. Our aim was to review the current available over-the-counter (OTC) medications for sexual dysfunction and report on this market. Methods Following an earlier published review in 2010, 37 products were reviewed that were listed on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (ARTG) and registered with the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA). These products were manufactured in Australia and laid claim to provide treatment for sexual dysfunction. A review of these products and newer products was undertaken to establish the extent of complementary medicines in Australia for sexual dysfunction and the reported clinical experience. Results As at July 2015 there were 31 Australian manufactured OTC products registered with the TGA on the ARTG for sexual dysfunction. Twenty-four were for male sexual dysfunction, 3 for female sexual dysfunction and 4 for unisex sexual dysfunction. The main herbs used in sexual health products in Australia are tribulus terrestris, panax ginseng and horny goat weed. However, complementary medicine practitioners also promote the use of gingko Bilbo, avena sativa and damiana. Many of the ingredients found in men’s products are also in the women’s products. Although review articles for complementary medicine, sexual dysfunction and libido have been written in Australia, as far as can be investigated there are no published randomized clinical trials in the area of complementary medicine and sexual function. Conclusions Complementary medicine has reached a high degree of development in Australia. But, due to the lack of properly conducted placebo-controlled clinical trials there is not a body of supporting evidence of efficacy, certification of purity, guarantee of safety, or well-documented side effects. Even though most OTC medications for sexual health have mild side effects and some also promote general health, the lack of such evidence

  15. Nanoparticle-Stabilized Capsules for the Treatment of Bacterial Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Bradley; Li, Xiaoning; Landis, Ryan F; Kim, Sung Tae; Gupta, Akash; Wang, Li-Sheng; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Tang, Rui; Boerth, Jeffrey A; Rotello, Vincent M

    2015-08-25

    Bacterial biofilms are widely associated with persistent infections. High resistance to conventional antibiotics and prevalent virulence makes eliminating these bacterial communities challenging therapeutic targets. We describe here the fabrication of a nanoparticle-stabilized capsule with a multicomponent core for the treatment of biofilms. The peppermint oil and cinnamaldehyde combination that comprises the core of the capsules act as potent antimicrobial agents. An in situ reaction at the oil/water interface between the nanoparticles and cinnamaldehyde structurally augments the capsules to efficiently deliver the essential oil payloads, effectively eradicating biofilms of clinically isolated pathogenic bacteria strains. In contrast to their antimicrobial action, the capsules selectively promoted fibroblast proliferation in a mixed bacteria/mammalian cell system making them promising for wound healing applications. PMID:26083534

  16. Modulation of Host miRNAs by Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Das, Kishore; Garnica, Omar; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of protein coding genes of viruses and eukaryotes at the post-transcriptional level. The eukaryotic genes regulated by miRNAs include those whose products are critical for biological processes such as cell proliferation, metabolic pathways, immune response, and development. It is now increasingly recognized that modulation of miRNAs associated with biological processes is one of the strategies adopted by bacterial pathogens to survive inside host cells. In this review, we present an overview of the recent findings on alterations of miRNAs in the host cells by facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens. In addition, we discuss how the altered miRNAs help in the survival of these pathogens in the intracellular environment. PMID:27536558

  17. Modulation of Host miRNAs by Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Das, Kishore; Garnica, Omar; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of protein coding genes of viruses and eukaryotes at the post-transcriptional level. The eukaryotic genes regulated by miRNAs include those whose products are critical for biological processes such as cell proliferation, metabolic pathways, immune response, and development. It is now increasingly recognized that modulation of miRNAs associated with biological processes is one of the strategies adopted by bacterial pathogens to survive inside host cells. In this review, we present an overview of the recent findings on alterations of miRNAs in the host cells by facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens. In addition, we discuss how the altered miRNAs help in the survival of these pathogens in the intracellular environment. PMID:27536558

  18. Exploring bacterial lignin degradation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Margaret E; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2014-04-01

    Plant biomass represents a renewable carbon feedstock that could potentially be used to replace a significant level of petroleum-derived chemicals. One major challenge in its utilization is that the majority of this carbon is trapped in the recalcitrant structural polymers of the plant cell wall. Deconstruction of lignin is a key step in the processing of biomass to useful monomers but remains challenging. Microbial systems can provide molecular information on lignin depolymerization as they have evolved to break lignin down using metalloenzyme-dependent radical pathways. Both fungi and bacteria have been observed to metabolize lignin; however, their differential reactivity with this substrate indicates that they may utilize different chemical strategies for its breakdown. This review will discuss recent advances in studying bacterial lignin degradation as an approach to exploring greater diversity in the environment. PMID:24780273

  19. Ribonucleotides in Bacterial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Randall, Justin R.; Matthews, Lindsay A.; Simmons, Lyle A.

    2014-01-01

    In all living cells, DNA is the storage medium for genetic information. Being quite stable, DNA is well-suited for its role in storage and propagation of information, but RNA is also covalently included in DNA through various mechanisms. Recent studies also demonstrate useful aspects of including ribonucleotides in the genome during repair. Therefore, our understanding of the consequences of RNA inclusion into bacterial genomic DNA is just beginning, but with its high frequency of occurrence the consequences and potential benefits are likely to be numerous and diverse. In this review, we discuss the processes that cause ribonucleotide inclusion in genomic DNA, the pathways important for ribonucleotide removal and the consequences that arise should ribonucleotides remain nested in genomic DNA. PMID:25387798

  20. [Small intestine bacterial overgrowth].

    PubMed

    Leung Ki, E L; Roduit, J; Delarive, J; Guyot, J; Michetti, P; Dorta, G

    2010-01-27

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition characterised by nutrient malabsorption and excessive bacteria in the small intestine. It typically presents with diarrhea, flatulence and a syndrome of malabsorption (steatorrhea, macrocytic anemia). However, it may be asymptomatic in the eldery. A high index of suspicion is necessary in order to differentiate SIBO from other similar presenting disorders such as coeliac disease, lactose intolerance or the irritable bowel syndrome. A search for predisposing factor is thus necessary. These factors may be anatomical (stenosis, blind loop), or functional (intestinal hypomotility, achlorydria). The hydrogen breath test is the most frequently used diagnostic test although it lacks standardisation. The treatment of SIBO consists of eliminating predisposing factors and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. PMID:20214190

  1. Structure of bacterial respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Berrisford, John M; Baradaran, Rozbeh; Sazanov, Leonid A

    2016-07-01

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) plays a central role in cellular energy production, coupling electron transfer between NADH and quinone to proton translocation. It is the largest protein assembly of respiratory chains and one of the most elaborate redox membrane proteins known. Bacterial enzyme is about half the size of mitochondrial and thus provides its important "minimal" model. Dysfunction of mitochondrial complex I is implicated in many human neurodegenerative diseases. The L-shaped complex consists of a hydrophilic arm, where electron transfer occurs, and a membrane arm, where proton translocation takes place. We have solved the crystal structures of the hydrophilic domain of complex I from Thermus thermophilus, the membrane domain from Escherichia coli and recently of the intact, entire complex I from T. thermophilus (536 kDa, 16 subunits, 9 iron-sulphur clusters, 64 transmembrane helices). The 95Å long electron transfer pathway through the enzyme proceeds from the primary electron acceptor flavin mononucleotide through seven conserved Fe-S clusters to the unusual elongated quinone-binding site at the interface with the membrane domain. Four putative proton translocation channels are found in the membrane domain, all linked by the central flexible axis containing charged residues. The redox energy of electron transfer is coupled to proton translocation by the as yet undefined mechanism proposed to involve long-range conformational changes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26807915

  2. The bacterial proteogenomic pipeline

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proteogenomics combines the cutting-edge methods from genomics and proteomics. While it has become cheap to sequence whole genomes, the correct annotation of protein coding regions in the genome is still tedious and error prone. Mass spectrometry on the other hand relies on good characterizations of proteins derived from the genome, but can also be used to help improving the annotation of genomes or find species specific peptides. Additionally, proteomics is widely used to find evidence for differential expression of proteins under different conditions, e.g. growth conditions for bacteria. The concept of proteogenomics is not altogether new, in-house scripts are used by different labs and some special tools for eukaryotic and human analyses are available. Results The Bacterial Proteogenomic Pipeline, which is completely written in Java, alleviates the conducting of proteogenomic analyses of bacteria. From a given genome sequence, a naïve six frame translation is performed and, if desired, a decoy database generated. This database is used to identify MS/MS spectra by common peptide identification algorithms. After combination of the search results and optional flagging for different experimental conditions, the results can be browsed and further inspected. In particular, for each peptide the number of identifications for each condition and the positions in the corresponding protein sequences are shown. Intermediate and final results can be exported into GFF3 format for visualization in common genome browsers. Conclusions To facilitate proteogenomics analyses the Bacterial Proteogenomic Pipeline is a set of comprehensive tools running on common desktop computers, written in Java and thus platform independent. The pipeline allows integrating peptide identifications from various algorithms and emphasizes the visualization of spectral counts from different experimental conditions. PMID:25521444

  3. [Asthenic disorders and cognitive dysfunction in patients with tension headache].

    PubMed

    Chutko, L S; Surushkina, S Iu; Rozhkova, A V; Iakovenko, E A; Bykova, Iu L; Nikishina, I S

    2013-01-01

    The article is devoted to the study of cognitive dysfunction in patients suffering from tension headaches. Patients had attention and memory dysfunction, higher levels of anxiety, asthenia and subclinical symptoms of depression. The high efficacy of cerebrolysin in the restoration of cognitive dysfunction confirmed by the data of clinical, psychological and neuropsychological studies was shown. PMID:23739500

  4. [How Does Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Affekt Female Sexuality?].

    PubMed

    Anding, R; Kirschner-Hermanns, R; Rantell, A; Wiedemann, A

    2016-08-01

    With increasing age many women suffer from lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) and female sexual dysfunction. An increasing body of evidence supports an association between the 2 conditions. Especially women with urodynamically proved detrusor hyperactivity suffer from sexual dysfunction and there is some evidence that in patients with stress incontinence sexual health improves after successful surgery. PMID:27328304

  5. Uncovering common bacterial skin infections.

    PubMed

    Napierkowski, Daria

    2013-03-10

    The four most common bacterial skin infections are impetigo, erysipelas, cellulitis, and folliculitis. This article summarizes current information about the etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and implications for primary care practice needed to effectively diagnose and treat common bacterial skin infections. PMID:23361375

  6. Proliferation resistance of small modular reactors fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Polidoro, F.; Parozzi, F.; Fassnacht, F.; Kuett, M.; Englert, M.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the proliferation resistance of different types of Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) has been examined and classified with criteria available in the literature. In the first part of the study, the level of proliferation attractiveness of traditional low-enriched UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels to be used in SMRs based on pressurized water technology has been analyzed. On the basis of numerical simulations both cores show significant proliferation risks. Although the MOX core is less proliferation prone in comparison to the UO{sub 2} core, it still can be highly attractive for diversion or undeclared production of nuclear material. In the second part of the paper, calculations to assess the proliferation attractiveness of fuel in typical small sodium cooled fast reactor show that proliferation risks from spent fuel cannot be neglected. The core contains a highly attractive plutonium composition during the whole life cycle. Despite some aspects of the design like the sealed core that enables easy detection of unauthorized withdrawal of fissile material and enhances proliferation resistance, in case of open Non-Proliferation Treaty break-out, weapon-grade plutonium in sufficient quantities could be extracted from the reactor core.

  7. Teaching Activities on Horizontal Nuclear Proliferation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zola, John

    1990-01-01

    Provides learning activities concerning the horizontal proliferation of nuclear weapons. Includes step-by-step directions for four activities: (1) the life cycle of nuclear weapons; (2) nuclear nonproliferation: pros and cons; (3) the nuclear power/nuclear weapons connection; and (4) managing nuclear proliferation. (NL)

  8. Director`s series on proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, K.C.; Price, M.E.

    1995-11-17

    This is an occasional publication of essays on the topics of nuclear, chemical, biological, and missile proliferation. The views represented are those of the author`s. Essay topics include: Nuclear Proliferation: Myth and Reality; Problems of Enforcing Compliance with Arms Control Agreements; The Unreliability of the Russian Officer Corps: Reluctant Domestic Warriors; and Russia`s Nuclear Legacy.

  9. Rescue of dysfunctional autophagy attenuates hyperinflammatory responses from cystic fibrosis cells.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Matthew L; Blohmke, Christoph J; Falsafi, Reza; Fjell, Chris D; Madera, Laurence; Turvey, Stuart E; Hancock, Robert E W

    2013-02-01

    A hallmark feature of cystic fibrosis (CF) is progressive pulmonary obstruction arising from exaggerated host proinflammatory responses to chronic bacterial airway colonization. The mechanisms for these heightened inflammatory responses have been only partially characterized, hampering development of effective anti-inflammatory therapies. The aim of this study was to identify and validate novel dysfunctional processes or pathways driving the hyperinflammatory phenotype of CF cells using systems biology and network analysis to examine transcriptional changes induced by innate defense regulator (IDR)-1018, an anti-inflammatory peptide. IDR-1018 selectively attenuated hyperinflammatory cytokine production from CF airway cells and PBMCs stimulated with multiple bacterial ligands, including flagellin (FliC). Network analysis of CF cell transcriptional responses to FliC and IDR-1018 identified dysfunctional autophagy as the target of the peptide via modulation of upstream adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-Akt signaling. After treatment with FliC, CF cells were found to have elevated levels of the autophagosome marker LC3-II, and GFP-LC3-transfected CF airway cells showed abnormal perinuclear accumulation of GFP(+) structures. In both instances, treatment of CF cells with IDR-1018 abolished the accumulation of LC3 induced by FliC. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagosome-lysosome fusion with bafilomycinA1 attenuated the anti-inflammatory and autophagosome-clearing effects of IDR-1018, as did a chemical inhibitor of Akt and an activator of AMPK. These findings were consistent with hypotheses generated in silico, demonstrating the utility of systems biology and network analysis approaches for providing pathway-level insights into CF-associated inflammation. Collectively, these data suggest that dysfunctional autophagosome clearance contributes to heightened inflammatory responses from CF transmembrane receptor mutant cells and highlight autophagy and

  10. Phthalate esters as peroxisome proliferator carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, J R; Lalwani, N D; Reddy, J K

    1982-01-01

    The phthalate ester di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate is both a peroxisome proliferator and a hepatic carcinogen. Peroxisome proliferators as a class are hepatocarcinogenic in rodent species. However, none of the peroxisome proliferators tested to date including the phthalate esters and related alcohol and acid analogs have demonstrated mutagenic or DNA-damaging activity in the in vitro Salmonella typhimurium/microsomal or the lymphocyte 3H-thymidine assays. A working hypothesis is proposed that peroxisome proliferation itself initiates neoplastic transformation of hepatic parenchymal cells by increasing intracellular rates of DNA-damaging reactive oxygen production. Evidence which supports such a hypothesis includes increased fatty acid beta-oxidation, elevated H2O2 levels, accumulation of peroxidized lipofuscin, disproportionately small increase in catalase, and elevated peroxisomal uricase activity which accompany peroxisome proliferation in hepatocytes. Direct testing of this hypothesis will provide insight into mechanisms of phthalate ester carcinogenicity and cytotoxicity. Images FIGURE 1. PMID:6754363

  11. Tadalafil therapy for erectile dysfunction following prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kadıoğlu, Ateş; Ortaç, Mazhar; Dinçer, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a major complication affecting the quality of life of patients and partners after radical prostatectomy. Evolving evidence suggests that early penile rehabilitation may provide better erectile function after surgery. Phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors are routinely considered a first-line treatment option in most algorithms for penile rehabilitation owing to their efficacy, ease of use, wide availability and minimal morbidity. Tadalafil is a long-acting, potent PDE-5 inhibitor for erectile dysfunction, with demonstrated effect in animal studies at preserving penile smooth muscle content and prevention of fibrosis of cavernosal tissue. This article evaluates the existing literature on tadalafil and critically analyzes its impact on erectile function following radical prostatectomy. PMID:26161145

  12. Assessment of laryngeal dysfunctions of dysarthric speakers.

    PubMed

    Surabhi, V; Vijayalakshmi, P; Steffina, Lily; Jayanthan, Ra V

    2009-01-01

    Dysarthria is a neuromotor impairment of speech that affects one or more of the speech sub-systems. It is reflected in the acoustic characteristics of the phonemes as deviations from their healthy counterparts. In the current work, the deviations associated with laryngeal dysfunctions are analysed in order to assess and quantify parameters that will help evaluate dysarthria. Perturbation measures, pitch period statistics and Pitch Variation Index (PVI) are computed for the assessment of laryngeal dysfunctions of dysarthric speakers. The assessments were performed on the Nemours database of dysarthric speech and compared with normal speakers available in the TIMIT speech corpus. The results were correlated with Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment (FDA) scores. The analysis resulted in a technique to predict the degree of severity of dysarthria and illustrate the multi-causal nature of the disorder. PMID:19965223

  13. Antidepressant-Induced Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Tierney; Rullo, Jordan; Faubion, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    Because 1 in 6 women in the United States takes antidepressants and a substantial proportion of patients report some disturbance of sexual function while taking these medications, it is a near certainty that the practicing clinician will need to know how to assess and manage antidepressant-related female sexual dysfunction. Adverse sexual effects can be complex because there are several potentially overlapping etiologies, including sexual dysfunction associated with the underlying mood disorder. As such, careful assessment of sexual function at the premedication visit followed by monitoring at subsequent visits is critical. Treatment of adverse sexual effects can be pharmacological (dose reduction, drug discontinuation or switching, augmentation, or using medications with lower adverse effect profiles), behavioral (exercising before sexual activity, scheduling sexual activity, vibratory stimulation, psychotherapy), complementary and integrative (acupuncture, nutraceuticals), or some combination of these modalities. PMID:27594188

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance: an update

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Magdalene K; Turner, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance (IR); however, a large variety of association and intervention studies as well as genetic manipulations in rodents have reported contrasting results. Indeed, even 39 years after the first publication describing a relationship between IR and diminished mitochondrial function, it is still unclear whether a direct relationship exists, and more importantly if changes in mitochondrial capacity are a cause or consequence of IR. This review will take a journey through the past and summarise the debate about the occurrence of mitochondrial dysfunction and its possible role in causing decreased insulin action in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Evidence is presented from studies in various human populations, as well as rodents with genetic manipulations of pathways known to affect mitochondrial function and insulin action. Finally, we have discussed whether mitochondria are a potential target for the treatment of IR. PMID:25385852

  15. Renal Dysfunction in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seong Woo

    2011-01-01

    During treatment of acute heart failure (AHF), worsening renal function is often complicated and results in a complex clinical course. Furthermore, renal dysfunction is a strong independent predictor of long-term adverse outcomes in patients with AHF. Traditionally, the predominant cause of renal dysfunction has been attributed to impairment of cardiac output and relative underfilling of arterial perfusion. Recently, emerging data have led to the importance of venous congestion and elevated intra-abdominal pressure rather than confining it to impaired forward cardiac output as the primary driver of renal impairment. Relief of congestion is a major objective of AHF treatment but therapy is still based on the administration of loop diuretics. The results of the recently performed controlled studies for the assessment of new treatments to overcome resistance to diuretic treatment to protect kidneys from untoward effects have been mostly neutral. Better treatment of congestion in heart failure remains a major problem. PMID:22125554

  16. Baroreflex Dysfunction in Prader Willi Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Srivastav, Shival; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is a classical hypothalamic insufficiency disorder. This syndrome is often associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality - which could probably be attributed to autonomic dysfunction. A 21-year-old Prader Willi syndrome patient was referred for cardiovascular and autonomic function assessment. We performed a battery of tests assessing vascular structure (carotid intima thickness), vascular function (arterial stiffness indices), baroreflex sensitivity (overall integrator of short term regulation of blood pressure), blood pressure variability and autonomic tone (heart rate variability) along with autonomic reactivity tests. We observed impaired baroreflex sensitivity along with orthostatic tachycardia with normal vascular function tests. Prader- Willi syndrome patient have baroreflex dysfunction with probable afferent and/ central autonomic neural defects. PMID:27134867

  17. Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Chronic Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Todd M.; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Right ventricular dysfunction arises in chronic lung disease when chronic hypoxemia and disruption of pulmonary vascular beds contribute to increase ventricular afterload, and is generally defined by hypertrophy with preserved myocardial contractility and cardiac output. Although the exact prevalence is unknown, right ventricular hypertrophy appears to be a common complication of chronic lung disease, and more frequently complicates advanced lung disease. Right ventricular failure is rare, except during acute exacerbations of chronic lung disease or when multiple co-morbidities are present. Treatment is targeted at correcting hypoxia and improving pulmonary gas exchange and mechanics. There are presently no convincing data to support the use of pulmonary hypertension-specific therapies in patients with right ventricular dysfunction secondary to chronic lung disease. PMID:22548815

  18. The cholinergic hypothesis of geriatric memory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bartus, R T; Dean, R L; Beer, B; Lippa, A S

    1982-07-30

    Biochemical, electrophysiological, and pharmacological evidence supporting a role for cholinergic dysfunction in age-related memory disturbances is critically reviewed. An attempt has been made to identify pseudoissues, resolve certain controversies, and clarify misconceptions that have occurred in the literature. Significant cholinergic dysfunctions occur in the aged and demented central nervous system, relationships between these changes and loss of memory exist, similar memory deficits can be artificially induced by blocking cholinergic mechanisms in young subjects, and under certain tightly controlled conditions reliable memory improvements in aged subjects can be achieved after cholinergic stimulation. Conventional attempts to reduce memory impairments in clinical trials hav not been therapeutically successful, however. Possible explanations for these disappointments are given and directions for future laboratory and clinical studies are suggested. PMID:7046051

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Kimmy; Bourdette, Dennis; Forte, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has traditionally been considered an autoimmune inflammatory disorder leading to demyelination and clinical debilitation as evidenced by our current standard anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive treatment regimens. While these approaches do control the frequency of clinical relapses, they do not prevent the progressive functional decline that plagues many people with MS. Many avenues of research indicate that a neurodegenerative process may also play a significant role in MS from the early stages of disease, and one of the current hypotheses identifies mitochondrial dysfunction as a key contributing mechanism. We have hypothesized that pathological permeability transition pore (PTP) opening mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium dysregulation is central to mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in MS. This focused review highlights recent evidence supporting this hypothesis, with particular emphasis on our in vitro and in vivo work with the mitochondria-targeted redox enzyme p66ShcA. PMID:23898299

  20. Prefrontal system dysfunction and credit card debt.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Marcello; Yang, Bijou; Lester, David

    2004-10-01

    Credit card use often involves a disadvantageous allocation of finances because they allow for spending beyond means and buying on impulse. Accordingly they are associated with increased bankruptcy, anxiety, stress, and health problems. Mounting evidence from functional neuroimaging and clinical studies implicates prefrontal-subcortical systems in processing financial information. This study examined the relationship of credit card debt and executive functions using the Frontal System Behavior Scale (FRSBE). After removing the influences of demographic variables (age, sex, education, and income), credit card debt was associated with the Executive Dysfunction scale, but not the Apathy or Disinhibition scales. This suggests that processes of conceptualizing and organizing finances are most relevant to credit card debt, and implicates dorsolateral prefrontal dysfunction. PMID:15370189

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction and resuscitation in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Albert J; Levy, Richard J; Deutschman, Clifford S

    2010-07-01

    Sepsis is among the most common causes of death in patients in intensive care units in North America and Europe. In the United States, it accounts for upwards of 250,000 deaths each year. Investigations into the pathobiology of sepsis have most recently focused on common cellular and subcellular processes. One possibility would be a defect in the production of energy, which translates to an abnormality in the production of adenosine triphosphate and therefore in the function of mitochondria. This article presents a clear role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of sepsis. What is less clear is the teleology underlying this response. Prolonged mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired biogenesis clearly are detrimental. However, early inhibition of mitochondrial function may be adaptive. PMID:20643307

  2. High-voltage electrocution causing bulbar dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Parvathy, G.; Shaji, C. V.; Kabeer, K. A.; Prasanth, S. R.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical shock can result in neurological complications, involving both peripheral and central nervous systems, which may present immediately or later on. High-voltage electrical injuries are uncommonly reported and may predispose to both immediate and delayed neurologic complications. We report the case of a 68-year-old man who experienced a high-voltage electrocution injury, subsequently developed bulbar dysfunction and spontaneously recovered. We describe the development of bulbar palsy following a significant electrical injury, which showed no evidence of this on magnetic resonance imaging. High-voltage electrocution injuries are a serious problem with potential for both immediate and delayed neurologic sequelae. The existing literature has no reports on bulbar dysfunction following electrocution, apart from motor neuron disease. PMID:27365968

  3. Valvar prosthetic dysfunction. Localisation and evaluation of the dysfunction using the Doppler technique.

    PubMed Central

    Veyrat, C; Witchitz, S; Lessana, A; Ameur, A; Abitbol, G; Kalmanson, D

    1985-01-01

    Thirty patients with 33 mitral or aortic prostheses or both were examined using the pulsed Doppler technique combined with cross sectional echocardiography to study the applicability of the Doppler technique in the diagnosis and evaluation of the severity of prosthetic dysfunction and to assess the ability of the mapping procedure to estimate the site and the size of the prosthetic defect. The dysfunction was valvar regurgitation in 29 instances and stenoses in eight, all of which were confirmed by invasive procedures. The severity of the dysfunction was graded on a three point scale. A control group of 73 subjects with 88 normal prostheses also underwent pulsed Doppler and cross sectional echocardiography. The pulsed Doppler study followed the usual procedure for a valvar disease including two and three dimensional mapping for regurgitation. Eight patients also underwent a continuous wave Doppler examination. The diagnostic reliability of the pulsed Doppler technique was greater than or equal to 90%. The severity of the dysfunction was accurately assessed in 86% of cases. In the case of aortic regurgitation, mapping of the jets was performed as easily for prostheses as for native regurgitant valves. In the case of mitral regurgitation, the mapping patterns depended on the cause of the dysfunction. With valvar tears, a jet was detected at the centre of the annulus, and with paravalvar leaks eccentric atrial jets were seen opposite the site of the leak. The pulsed Doppler and the surgical findings correlated well for both the site of the dysfunction (16/20 (80%) patients) and the size of the leak (13/16 (81%) patients). Thus, despite some limitations, pulsed Doppler and particularly the mapping procedure provide sufficient information to give an accurate non-invasive assessment of prosthetic valve dysfunction. Images PMID:3899151

  4. Sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tran, Christine N; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2013-08-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), or NIH category III prostatitis, is a common clinical syndrome characterized by genital/pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms in the absence of urinary tract infection. There is also growing recognition of the association of sexual dysfunction with CP/CPPS including erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory pain, and premature ejaculation. In this review, we discuss the association between CP/CPPS and sexual dysfunction, potential mechanisms for sexual dysfunction, and treatment strategies for erectile dysfunction in CP/CPPS. PMID:23579441

  5. Attention bias for sexual words in female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Beard, Courtney; Amir, Nader

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive models suggest that attention processes maintain sexual dysfunction. However, few published studies have examined attention bias, and even fewer have studied female participants with sexual dysfunction. Using the Female Sexual Function Index, the authors classified undergraduates as experiencing sexual dysfunction (n = 28) or not (n = 28). The authors assessed whether participants showed attention bias for sexual words using a modified dot-probe task. As expected, female participants with sexual dysfunction showed an attention bias to sexual words, whereas control participants did not. The authors discuss implications for models of sexual dysfunction and clinical intervention. PMID:20432123

  6. Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Tabar, A I; Alvarez, M J; Acero, S; Olaguíbel, J M; García, B E; Quirce, S

    1998-01-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS) is a type of asthma that develops in subjects without prior pulmonary disease, following single or multiple exposure to high levels of nonimmunogenic irritants. The main difference from classic occupational asthma is the absence of a latency period. Non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness is characteristic of the disease and usually persists after cessation of exposure. We report the cases of two subjects in whom RADS developed after occupational exposure to irritants. PMID:9615307

  7. Lifestyle and testicular dysfunction: a brief update.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashok; Desai, Nisarg R; Ruffoli, Riccardo; Carpi, Angelo

    2008-10-01

    The incidence of testicular cancer, cryptorchidism and defective spermatogenesis is increasing probably due to environmental and lifestyle-related factors. The aim of this review is to briefly describe and comment on the principal lifestyle factors. The recent findings that the electromagnetic waves following the use of the cell phone and the prolonged exposure to the noise stress cause relevant testicular dysfunction in man or animals reinforce the hypothesis of the importance of lifestyle-related factors. PMID:18771892

  8. Neutrophil function and dysfunction in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, T E; Vaikuntam, J

    1994-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear leukocyte or neutrophil is an integral part of the acute inflammatory response. Its function as a protective cell in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease has been studied extensively. Abnormal neutrophil function has been associated (directly or indirectly) with the pathogenesis of early onset periodontal disease. This paper reviews the recent developments in neutrophil function and dysfunction as they relate to periodontal disease progression. PMID:8032460

  9. Renal dysfunction associated with liver transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, R. M.; Popescu, I.

    1995-01-01

    It has been known for some time that a variety of liver diseases affect kidney function, but renal dysfunction associated with orthotopic liver transplantation has received scant attention. Although the mechanisms mediating these abnormalities are incompletely defined, advances in the understanding of renal pathophysiology after liver transplantation have made it possible to develop new treatment strategies. Aggressive and early intervention to diagnose and treat renal complications associated with liver transplantation should be the goal for transplant centres. PMID:7479462

  10. PROFILE OF LIVER DYSFUNCTION IN ALCHOHOL DEPENDENCE

    PubMed Central

    Desai, N.G.; Vaswani, M.; Chavan, B.S.; Tripathi, B.M.; Kaw, N.

    1996-01-01

    Ninety two patients of alcohol dependence were studied for liver function at a specialised drug dependence treatment centre. Biochemical laboratory evidence of liver dysfunction was found in a very large number of patients, including the patients who had no clinical signs or symptoms. The findings from this retrospective study are discussed in the context of the earlier studies from other settings in India. PMID:21584115

  11. Profile of liver dysfunction in alchohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Desai, N G; Vaswani, M; Chavan, B S; Tripathi, B M; Kaw, N

    1996-01-01

    Ninety two patients of alcohol dependence were studied for liver function at a specialised drug dependence treatment centre. Biochemical laboratory evidence of liver dysfunction was found in a very large number of patients, including the patients who had no clinical signs or symptoms. The findings from this retrospective study are discussed in the context of the earlier studies from other settings in India. PMID:21584115

  12. Minor Neurological Dysfunction in Children with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punt, Marja; de Jong, Marianne; de Groot, Erik; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To improve understanding of brain function in children with severe dyslexia in terms of minor neurological dysfunctions (MNDs). Method: One hundred and four children (81 males, 23 females; age range 7-12y; mean age 9y 7mo, SD 1y 2mo;) with severe dyslexia (the presence of a Full-scale IQ score of greater than or equal to 85, retardation in…

  13. Bloodstream-To-Eye Infections Are Facilitated by Outer Blood-Retinal Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Coburn, Phillip S.; Wiskur, Brandt J.; Miller, Frederick C.; LaGrow, Austin L.; Astley, Roger A.; Elliott, Michael H.; Callegan, Michelle C.

    2016-01-01

    The blood-retinal barrier (BRB) functions to maintain the immune privilege of the eye, which is necessary for normal vision. The outer BRB is formed by tightly-associated retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells which limit transport within the retinal environment, maintaining retinal function and viability. Retinal microvascular complications and RPE dysfunction resulting from diabetes and diabetic retinopathy cause permeability changes in the BRB that compromise barrier function. Diabetes is the major predisposing condition underlying endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis (EBE), a blinding intraocular infection resulting from bacterial invasion of the eye from the bloodstream. However, significant numbers of EBE cases occur in non-diabetics. In this work, we hypothesized that dysfunction of the outer BRB may be associated with EBE development. To disrupt the RPE component of the outer BRB in vivo, sodium iodate (NaIO3) was administered to C57BL/6J mice. NaIO3-treated and untreated mice were intravenously injected with 108 colony forming units (cfu) of Staphylococcus aureus or Klebsiella pneumoniae. At 4 and 6 days postinfection, EBE was observed in NaIO3-treated mice after infection with K. pneumoniae and S. aureus, although the incidence was higher following S. aureus infection. Invasion of the eye was observed in control mice following S. aureus infection, but not in control mice following K. pneumoniae infection. Immunohistochemistry and FITC-dextran conjugate transmigration assays of human RPE barriers after infection with an exoprotein-deficient agr/sar mutant of S. aureus suggested that S. aureus exoproteins may be required for the loss of the tight junction protein, ZO-1, and for permeability of this in vitro barrier. Our results support the clinical findings that for both pathogens, complications which result in BRB permeability increase the likelihood of bacterial transmigration from the bloodstream into the eye. For S. aureus, however, BRB permeability is

  14. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunctions and sleep disorders.

    PubMed

    Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Provini, Federica; Guaraldi, Pietro; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Cortelli, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Animal and human studies have shown that disorders of the autonomic nervous system may influence sleep physiology. Conversely, sleep disorders may be associated with autonomic dysfunctions. The current review describes the clinical presentation, supposed pathogenetic mechanisms and the diagnostic and prognostic implications of impaired cardiovascular autonomic control in sleep disorders. This dysfunction may result from a common pathogenetic mechanism affecting both autonomic cardiovascular control and sleep, as in fatal familial insomnia, or it may be mainly caused by the sleep disorder, as observed in obstructive sleep apnoea. For other sleep disorders, like primary insomnia, restless legs syndrome, narcolepsy type 1 and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, the causal link with the autonomic dysfunction and its possible impact on health remains unsettled. Given its clinical implications, most of the data available suggest that a systematic assessment of the association between sleep disorders and impaired autonomic control of the cardiovascular system is warranted. Understanding the mechanism of this association may also yield insights into the interaction between the autonomic nervous system and sleep. PMID:26146026

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with glucocerebrosidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gegg, Matthew E; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2016-06-01

    The lysosomal hydrolase glucocerebrosidase (GCase) is encoded for by the GBA gene. Homozygous GBA mutations cause Gaucher disease (GD), a lysosomal storage disorder. Furthermore, homozygous and heterozygous GBA mutations are numerically the greatest genetic risk factor for developing Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. The loss of GCase activity results in impairment of the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP), which is required for the degradation of macromolecules and damaged organelles. Aberrant protein handling of α-synuclein by the ALP occurs in both GD and PD. α-synuclein is the principle component of Lewy bodies, a defining hallmark of PD. Mitochondrial dysfunction is also observed in both GD and PD. In this review we will describe how mitochondria are affected following loss of GCase activity. The pathogenic mechanisms leading to mitochondria dysfunction will also be discussed, focusing on the likely inhibition of the degradation of mitochondria by the ALP, also termed mitophagy. Other pathogenic cellular processes associated with GBA mutations that might contribute, such as the unfolding of GCase in the endoplasmic reticulum, calcium dysregulation and neuroinflammation will also be described. Impairment of the ALP and mitochondria dysfunction are common pathogenic themes between GD and PD and probably explain why GBA mutations increase the risk of developing PD that is very similar to sporadic forms of the disease. PMID:26388395

  16. Profile of Gaze Dysfunction following Cerebrovascular Accident.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Fiona J; Wright, David; Brand, Darren; Jackson, Carole; Harrison, Shirley; Maan, Tallat; Scott, Claire; Vogwell, Linda; Peel, Sarah; Akerman, Nicola; Dodridge, Caroline; Howard, Claire; Shipman, Tracey; Sperring, Una; Macdiarmid, Sonia; Freeman, Cicely

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the profile of ocular gaze abnormalities occurring following stroke. Methods. Prospective multicentre cohort trial. Standardised referral and investigation protocol including assessment of visual acuity, ocular alignment and motility, visual field, and visual perception. Results. 915 patients recruited: mean age 69.18 years (SD 14.19). 498 patients (54%) were diagnosed with ocular motility abnormalities. 207 patients had gaze abnormalities including impaired gaze holding (46), complete gaze palsy (23), horizontal gaze palsy (16), vertical gaze palsy (17), Parinaud's syndrome (8), INO (20), one and half syndrome (3), saccadic palsy (28), and smooth pursuit palsy (46). These were isolated impairments in 50% of cases and in association with other ocular abnormalities in 50% including impaired convergence, nystagmus, and lid or pupil abnormalities. Areas of brain stroke were frequently the cerebellum, brainstem, and diencephalic areas. Strokes causing gaze dysfunction also involved cortical areas including occipital, parietal, and temporal lobes. Symptoms of diplopia and blurred vision were present in 35%. 37 patients were discharged, 29 referred, and 141 offered review appointments. 107 reviewed patients showed full recovery (4%), partial improvement (66%), and static gaze dysfunction (30%). Conclusions. Gaze dysfunction is common following stroke. Approximately one-third of patients complain of visual symptoms, two thirds show some improvement in ocular motility. PMID:24558601

  17. Understanding Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Gina; Manning, Philip; Newton, Julia L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a debilitating disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by severe disabling fatigue in the absence of alternative diagnosis. Historically, there has been a tendency to draw psychological explanations for the origin of fatigue; however, this model is at odds with findings that fatigue and accompanying symptoms may be explained by central and peripheral pathophysiological mechanisms, including effects of the immune, oxidative, mitochondrial, and neuronal pathways. For example, patient descriptions of their fatigue regularly cite difficulty in maintaining muscle activity due to perceived lack of energy. This narrative review examined the literature for evidence of biochemical dysfunction in CFS/ME at the skeletal muscle level. Methods. Literature was examined following searches of PUB MED, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, using key words such as CFS/ME, immune, autoimmune, mitochondria, muscle, and acidosis. Results. Studies show evidence for skeletal muscle biochemical abnormality in CFS/ME patients, particularly in relation to bioenergetic dysfunction. Discussion. Bioenergetic muscle dysfunction is evident in CFS/ME, with a tendency towards an overutilisation of the lactate dehydrogenase pathway following low-level exercise, in addition to slowed acid clearance after exercise. Potentially, these abnormalities may lead to the perception of severe fatigue in CFS/ME. PMID:26998359

  18. Insight Into Neurocognitive Dysfunction in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Medalia, Alice; Thysen, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Insight into psychotic symptoms is typically poor in schizophrenia; however, it is not known whether insight into neurocognitive impairment is similarly impaired. Most people with schizophrenia experience cognitive dysfunction, and the deficits in attention, memory, and critical thinking have been associated with poor functional outcome. As new treatments are developed for the cognitive impairments, it will be important to know whether patients will be receptive to yet another therapy. Insight is an important factor in treatment compliance and treatment outcome; however, it is not known if patients have insight into their cognitive dysfunction. In order to assess insight into neuro cognitive dysfunction, 75 subjects were administered the Measure of Insight into Cognition–Clinician Rated, a newly created measure based on the Scale to Access the Unawareness of Mental Disorder, that assesses insight into cognitive impairment. Subjects were also administered the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia and Independent Living Scale–Problem Solving to objectively assess neuropsychological status and problem-solving skills needed for independent living. Results demonstrated that virtually all subjects had cognitive impairment, yet insight into their neuro cognitive symptoms was limited. This finding has potential implications for treatment programs seeking to improve cognitive functioning in schizophrenia PMID:18199632

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction and risk of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lund, M; Melbye, M; Diaz, L J; Duno, M; Wohlfahrt, J; Vissing, J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial mutations are commonly reported in tumours, but it is unclear whether impaired mitochondrial function per se is a cause or consequence of cancer. To elucidate this, we examined the risk of cancer in a nationwide cohort of patients with mitochondrial dysfunction. Methods: We used nationwide results on genetic testing for mitochondrial disease and the Danish Civil Registration System, to construct a cohort of 311 patients with mitochondrial dysfunction. A total of 177 cohort members were identified from genetic testing and 134 genetically untested cohort members were matrilineal relatives to a cohort member with a genetically confirmed maternally inherited mDNA mutation. Information on cancer was obtained by linkage to the Danish Cancer Register. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to assess the relative risk of cancer. Results: During 7334 person-years of follow-up, 19 subjects developed a primary cancer. The corresponding SIR for any primary cancer was 1.06 (95% confidence interval 0.68–1.63). Subgroup analyses according to mutational subtype yielded similar results, for example, a SIR of 0.94 (95% CI 0.53 to 1.67) for the m.3243A>G maternally inherited mDNA mutation, cases=13. Conclusions: Patients with mitochondrial dysfunction do not appear to be at increased risk of cancer compared with the general population. PMID:25742477

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with glucocerebrosidase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gegg, Matthew E.; Schapira, Anthony H.V.

    2016-01-01

    The lysosomal hydrolase glucocerebrosidase (GCase) is encoded for by the GBA gene. Homozygous GBA mutations cause Gaucher disease (GD), a lysosomal storage disorder. Furthermore, homozygous and heterozygous GBA mutations are numerically the greatest genetic risk factor for developing Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. The loss of GCase activity results in impairment of the autophagy‐lysosome pathway (ALP), which is required for the degradation of macromolecules and damaged organelles. Aberrant protein handling of α-synuclein by the ALP occurs in both GD and PD. α-synuclein is the principle component of Lewy bodies, a defining hallmark of PD. Mitochondrial dysfunction is also observed in both GD and PD. In this review we will describe how mitochondria are affected following loss of GCase activity. The pathogenic mechanisms leading to mitochondria dysfunction will also be discussed, focusing on the likely inhibition of the degradation of mitochondria by the ALP, also termed mitophagy. Other pathogenic cellular processes associated with GBA mutations that might contribute, such as the unfolding of GCase in the endoplasmic reticulum, calcium dysregulation and neuroinflammation will also be described. Impairment of the ALP and mitochondria dysfunction are common pathogenic themes between GD and PD and probably explain why GBA mutations increase the risk of developing PD that is very similar to sporadic forms of the disease. PMID:26388395

  1. Episodic neurological dysfunction in hereditary peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Girish Baburao; Mailankody, Pooja; Isnwara, Pawanraj Palu; Prasad, Chandrajit; Mustare, Veerendrakumar

    2015-01-01

    Episodic transient neurological symptoms are an important set of problems presenting to a neurologist in his routine practice. Occasionally, detailed clinical history including past and family history supplemented with focused examination can bring out a rare cause for such symptoms. We describe in this report in a young male presenting with episodic focal neurological dysfunction, with family history of similar episodes in mother and brother. Examination showed features of pes cavus and peripheral neuropathy for which patient was asymptomatic. Mother and brother were established cases of hereditary neuropathy. Imaging on multiple occasions showed reversible white matter abnormalities. Clinical suspicion of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1X) was confirmed with detection of mutation in Gap Junction B1 (GJB1) gene, which codes for connexin 32 protein (c.425G>A; p.R142Q hemizygous mutation). Though this mutation has been already reported in CMTX patients, it has not been associated with transient neurological dysfunctions. This is probably the first reported case of CMTX patient with transient neurological dysfunction from India, whose family members had similar episodes. PMID:25745327

  2. Diaphragmatic dysfunction in Collagen VI myopathies.

    PubMed

    Quijano-Roy, S; Khirani, S; Colella, M; Ramirez, A; Aloui, S; Wehbi, S; de Becdelievre, A; Carlier, R Y; Allamand, V; Richard, P; Azzi, V; Estournet, B; Fauroux, B

    2014-02-01

    Collagen VI-related myopathies are hereditary disorders causing progressive restrictive respiratory insufficiency. Specific diaphragm involvement has been suggested by a drop in supine volumes. This pilot study aimed at characterizing the respiratory muscle phenotype in patients with COL6A1-3 genes mutations. Lung function, blood gases, muscle strength and respiratory mechanics were measured in 7 patients between 2002 and 2012. Patients were classified as Early-Severe (n = 3), Moderate-Progressive (n = 2) and Mild (n = 2) according to clinical disease presentation. Seven patients (aged 6-28) were evaluated. Forced vital capacity distinguished the Mild group (>60% predicted) from the two other groups (<50% predicted). This distinction was also possible using the motor function measure scale. Diaphragmatic dysfunction at rest was observed in all the Early-Severe and Moderate-Progressive patients. During a voluntary sniff maneuver diaphragmatic dysfunction was observed in all patients, as assessed by a negative gastric pressure. All patients had diaphragmatic fatigue assessed by a tension-time index over the threshold of 0.15. Diaphragmatic dysfunction during a maximal voluntary maneuver and diaphragmatic fatigue are constant features in Collagen VI myopathies. These observations can assist the diagnosis and should be taken in account for the clinical management, with the early detection of sleep-disordered breathing. PMID:24314752

  3. Hypothalamic dysfunction following whole-brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mechanick, J.I.; Hochberg, F.H.; LaRocque, A.

    1986-10-01

    The authors describe 15 cases with evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction 2 to 9 years following megavoltage whole-brain x-irradiation for primary glial neoplasm. The patients received 4000 to 5000 rads in 180- to 200-rad fractions. Dysfunction occurred in the absence of computerized tomography-delineated radiation necrosis or hypothalamic invasion by tumor, and antedated the onset of dementia. Fourteen patients displayed symptoms reflecting disturbances of personality, libido, thirst, appetite, or sleep. Hyperprolactinemia (with prolactin levels up to 70 ng/ml) was present in all of the nine patients so tested. Of seven patients tested with thyrotropin-releasing hormone, one demonstrated an abnormal pituitary gland response consistent with a hypothalamic disorder. Seven patients developed cognitive abnormalities. Computerized tomography scans performed a median of 4 years after tumor diagnosis revealed no hypothalamic tumor or diminished density of the hypothalamus. Cortical atrophy was present in 50% of cases and third ventricular dilatation in 58%. Hypothalamic dysfunction, heralded by endocrine, behavioral, and cognitive impairment, represents a common, subtle form of radiation damage.

  4. Understanding Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Gina; Manning, Philip; Newton, Julia L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a debilitating disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by severe disabling fatigue in the absence of alternative diagnosis. Historically, there has been a tendency to draw psychological explanations for the origin of fatigue; however, this model is at odds with findings that fatigue and accompanying symptoms may be explained by central and peripheral pathophysiological mechanisms, including effects of the immune, oxidative, mitochondrial, and neuronal pathways. For example, patient descriptions of their fatigue regularly cite difficulty in maintaining muscle activity due to perceived lack of energy. This narrative review examined the literature for evidence of biochemical dysfunction in CFS/ME at the skeletal muscle level. Methods. Literature was examined following searches of PUB MED, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, using key words such as CFS/ME, immune, autoimmune, mitochondria, muscle, and acidosis. Results. Studies show evidence for skeletal muscle biochemical abnormality in CFS/ME patients, particularly in relation to bioenergetic dysfunction. Discussion. Bioenergetic muscle dysfunction is evident in CFS/ME, with a tendency towards an overutilisation of the lactate dehydrogenase pathway following low-level exercise, in addition to slowed acid clearance after exercise. Potentially, these abnormalities may lead to the perception of severe fatigue in CFS/ME. PMID:26998359

  5. Endothelial dysfunction in adipose triglyceride lipase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schrammel, Astrid; Mussbacher, Marion; Wölkart, Gerald; Stessel, Heike; Pail, Karoline; Winkler, Sarah; Schweiger, Martina; Haemmerle, Guenter; Al Zoughbi, Wael; Höfler, Gerald; Lametschwandtner, Alois; Zechner, Rudolf; Mayer, Bernd

    2014-06-01

    Systemic knockout of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the pivotal enzyme of triglyceride lipolysis, results in a murine phenotype that is characterized by progredient cardiac steatosis and severe heart failure. Since cardiac and vascular dysfunction have been closely related in numerous studies we investigated endothelium-dependent and -independent vessel function of ATGL knockout mice. Aortic relaxation studies and Langendorff perfusion experiments of isolated hearts showed that ATGL knockout mice suffer from pronounced micro- and macrovascular endothelial dysfunction. Experiments with agonists directly targeting vascular smooth muscle cells revealed the functional integrity of the smooth muscle cell layer. Loss of vascular reactivity was restored ~50% upon treatment of ATGL knockout mice with the PPARα agonist Wy14,643, indicating that this phenomenon is partly a consequence of impaired cardiac contractility. Biochemical analysis revealed that aortic endothelial NO synthase expression and activity were significantly reduced in ATGL deficiency. Enzyme activity was fully restored in ATGL mice treated with the PPARα agonist. Biochemical analysis of perivascular adipose tissue demonstrated that ATGL knockout mice suffer from perivascular inflammatory oxidative stress which occurs independent of cardiac dysfunction and might contribute to vascular defects. Our results reveal a hitherto unrecognized link between disturbed lipid metabolism, obesity and cardiovascular disease. PMID:24657704

  6. Mitochondrial DNA, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cardiac manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ryul; Kim, Nari; Noh, Yeonhee; Xu, Zhelong; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouses of cells, have their own DNA (mtDNA). They regulate the transport of metabolites and ions, which determine cell physiology, survival, and death. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including impaired oxidative phosphorylation, preferentially affects heart function via imbalance of energy supply and demand. Recently, mitochondrial mutations and associated mitochondrial dysfunction were suggested as a causal factor of cardiac manifestations. Oxidative stress largely influences mtDNA stability due to oxidative modifications of mtDNA. Furthermore, the continuous replicative state of mtDNA and presence of minimal nucleoid structure render mitochondria vulnerable to oxidative damage and subsequent mutations, which impair mitochondrial functions. However, the occurrence of mtDNA heteroplasmy in the same mitochondrion or cell and presence of nuclear DNA-encoded mtDNA repair systems raise questions regarding whether oxidative stress-mediated mtDNA mutations are the major driving force in accumulation of mtDNA mutations. Here, we address the possible causes of mitochondrial DNA mutations and their involvement in cardiac manifestations. Current strategies for treatment related to mitochondrial mutations and/or dysfunction in cardiac manifestations are briefly discussed. PMID:27100514

  7. Microcirculatory dysfunction induced by cigarette smoking.

    PubMed

    Lehr, H A

    2000-12-01

    This review deals with the deleterious effects of cigarette smroking on the microcirculation, both in terms of morphological (i.e., vessel wall injury, capillary loss) and functional aspects. The latter concerns predominantly changes in tissue perfusion and its regullatory mechanisms (i.e., reactive hyperemia, sequestration of blood cells in the microcirculation). The mechanisms of action of cigarette smoking on the microcirculation include compromised endothelial-dependent voasorelaxation, platelet aggregation, emdothelial cell dysfunction and the activation of circulating leukocytes. Through these mechanisms, cigarette smoking elicits the aggregation and adhesion of leukocytes and/or platelets to the microvascular endothelium in venules and arterioles, as assessed by intravital fluorescence microscopy in the hamster skinfold chamber model. This model has allowed us to learn more about the participation of reactive oxygen species, inflammatory mediators, and adhesion molecules in the orchestration of microcirculatory dysfunction after cigarette smoking. In the final part of this review, the clinical consequences of microcirculatory dysfunction are discussed and an outlook is offered on potential prophylactic interventions (i.e., antioxidant vitamins) aimed at abrogating the deleterious action of cigarette smoking on the microcirculation. PMID:11142334

  8. Laboratory Diagnosis of Bacterial Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Romney M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial gastroenteritis is a disease that is pervasive in both the developing and developed worlds. While for the most part bacterial gastroenteritis is self-limiting, identification of an etiological agent by bacterial stool culture is required for the management of patients with severe or prolonged diarrhea, symptoms consistent with invasive disease, or a history that may predict a complicated course of disease. Importantly, characterization of bacterial enteropathogens from stool cultures in clinical laboratories is one of the primary means by which public health officials identify and track outbreaks of bacterial gastroenteritis. This article provides guidance for clinical microbiology laboratories that perform stool cultures. The general characteristics, epidemiology, and clinical manifestations of key bacterial enteropathogens are summarized. Information regarding optimal specimen collection, transport, and processing and current diagnostic tests and testing algorithms is provided. This article is an update of Cumitech 12A (P. H. Gilligan, J. M. Janda, M. A. Karmali, and J. M. Miller, Cumitech 12A, Laboratory diagnosis of bacterial diarrhea, 1992). PMID:25567220

  9. NATO and nuclear proliferation. Research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Necas, P.; Oliveira, L.; Alligood, M.J.; Frake, S.; Viloria-Villega, J.L.

    1996-04-01

    This research project explores the topic of nuclear proliferation in the current, post-Cold War environment. The intention is to provide the military planner with a basic primer on what has been and will continue to be a highly dynamic problem. The methodology for this research is primarily a literature review to illuminate the nuclear proliferation issue. These topics are critically assessed as they relate to NATO. This process will highlight tasks which NATO should consider accomplishing to confront the challenge of nuclear proliferation. Included in Chapter 1 is an examination of the nuclear environment - which states presently possess or are in pursuit of acquiring nuclear weapons, and what are the motives and disincentives of this pursuit. Methods of proliferation will be explored followed by an analysis of the factors which complicate decision-making on nuclear issues. Chapter 2 discusses the effectiveness of current treaties and international organizations in countering proliferation. Chapter 3 investigates current issues confronting NATO. An overview of the alliance`s new proliferation policy is included in Chapter 4. The paper`s fundamental theme is to provide the reader an understanding of the proliferation issue as well as an appreciation for today`s opportunities to confront the problem.

  10. The rare bacterial biosphere.

    PubMed

    Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    All communities are dominated by a few species that account for most of the biomass and carbon cycling. On the other hand, a large number of species are represented by only a few individuals. In the case of bacteria, these rare species were until recently invisible. Owing to their low numbers, conventional molecular techniques could not retrieve them. Isolation in pure culture was the only way to identify some of them, but current culturing techniques are unable to isolate most of the bacteria in nature. The recent development of fast and cheap high-throughput sequencing has begun to allow access to the rare species. In the case of bacteria, the exploration of this rare biosphere has several points of interest. First, it will eventually produce a reasonable estimate of the total number of bacterial taxa in the oceans; right now, we do not even know the right order of magnitude. Second, it will answer the question of whether "everything is everywhere." Third, it will require hypothesizing and testing the ecological mechanisms that allow subsistence of many species in low numbers. And fourth, it will open an avenue of research into the immense reserve of genes with potential applications hidden in the rare biosphere. PMID:22457983

  11. Bacterial Brain Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Significant advances in the diagnosis and management of bacterial brain abscess over the past several decades have improved the expected outcome of a disease once regarded as invariably fatal. Despite this, intraparenchymal abscess continues to present a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. Brain abscess may result from traumatic brain injury, prior neurosurgical procedure, contiguous spread from a local source, or hematogenous spread of a systemic infection. In a significant proportion of cases, an etiology cannot be identified. Clinical presentation is highly variable and routine laboratory testing lacks sensitivity. As such, a high degree of clinical suspicion is necessary for prompt diagnosis and intervention. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging offer a timely and sensitive method of assessing for abscess. Appearance of abscess on routine imaging lacks specificity and will not spare biopsy in cases where the clinical context does not unequivocally indicate infectious etiology. Current work with advanced imaging modalities may yield more accurate methods of differentiation of mass lesions in the brain. Management of abscess demands a multimodal approach. Surgical intervention and medical therapy are necessary in most cases. Prognosis of brain abscess has improved significantly in the recent decades although close follow-up is required, given the potential for long-term sequelae and a risk of recurrence. PMID:25360205

  12. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  13. Bacterial genotoxicity bioreporters

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Alva; Yagur‐Kroll, Sharon; Pedahzur, Rami; Buchinger, Sebastian; Reifferscheid, Georg; Ben‐Yoav, Hadar; Shacham‐Diamand, Yosi; Belkin, Shimshon

    2010-01-01

    Summary Ever since the introduction of the Salmonella typhimurium mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay (the ‘Ames test’) over three decades ago, there has been a constant development of additional genotoxicity assays based upon the use of genetically engineered microorganisms. Such assays rely either on reversion principles similar to those of the Ames test, or on promoter–reporter fusions that generate a quantifiable dose‐dependent signal in the presence of potential DNA damaging compounds and the induction of repair mechanisms; the latter group is the subject of the present review. Some of these assays were only briefly described in the scientific literature, whereas others have been developed all the way to commercial products. Out of these, only one, the umu‐test, has been fully validated and ISO‐ and OECD standardized. Here we review the main directions undertaken in the construction and testing of bacterial‐based genotoxicity bioassays, including the attempts to incorporate at least a partial metabolic activation capacity into the molecular design. We list the genetic modifications introduced into the tester strains, compare the performance of the different assays, and briefly describe the first attempts to incorporate such bacterial reporters into actual genotoxicity testing devices. PMID:21255340

  14. The bacterial nucleoid revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Robinow, C; Kellenberger, E

    1994-01-01

    This review compares the results of different methods of investigating the morphology of nucleoids of bacteria grown under conditions favoring short generation times. We consider the evidence from fixed and stained specimens, from phase-contrast and fluorescence microscopy of growing bacteria, and from electron microscopy of whole as well as thinly sectioned ones. It is concluded that the nucleoid of growing cells is in a dynamic state: part of the chromatin is "pulled out" of the bulk of the nucleoid in order to be transcribed. This activity is performed by excrescences which extend far into the cytoplasm so as to reach the maximum of available ribosomes. Different means of fixation provide markedly different views of the texture of the DNA-containing plasm of the bulk of the nucleoid. Conventional chemical fixatives stabilize the cytoplasm of bacteria but not their protein-low chromatin. Uranyl acetate does cross-link the latter well but only if the cytoplasm has first been fixed conventionally. In the interval between the two fixations, the DNA arranges itself in liquid-crystalline form, supposedly because of loss of supercoiling. In stark contrast, cryofixation preserves bacterial chromatin in a finely granular form, believed to reflect its native strongly negatively supercoiled state. In dinoflagellates the DNA of their permanently visible chromosomes (also low in histone-like protein) is natively present as a liquid crystal. The arrangement of chromatin in Epulocystis fishelsoni, one of the largest known prokaryotes, is briefly described. Images PMID:7521510

  15. Evolution of Bacterial Suicide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchernookov, Martin; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    While active, controlled cellular suicide (autolysis) in bacteria is commonly observed, it has been hard to argue that autolysis can be beneficial to an individual who commits it. We propose a theoretical model that predicts that bacterial autolysis is evolutionarily advantageous to an individualand would fixate in physically structured environments for stationary phase colonies. We perform spatially resolved agent-based simulations of the model, which predict that lower mixing in the environment results in fixation of a higher autolysis rate from a single mutated cell, regardless of the colony's genetic diversity. We argue that quorum sensing will fixate as well, even if initially rare, if it is coupled to controlling the autolysis rate. The model does not predict a strong additional competitive advantage for cells where autolysis is controlled by quorum sensing systems that distinguish self from nonself. These predictions are broadly supported by recent experimental results in B. subtilisand S. pneumoniae. Research partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No. 220020321 and by HFSP grant No. RGY0084/2011.

  16. Bacterial phospholipases C.

    PubMed Central

    Titball, R W

    1993-01-01

    A variety of pathogenic bacteria produce phospholipases C, and since the discovery in 1944 that a bacterial toxin (Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin) possessed an enzymatic activity, there has been considerable interest in this class of proteins. Initial speculation that all phospholipases C would have lethal properties has not been substantiated. Most of the characterized enzymes fall into one of four groups of structurally related proteins: the zinc-metallophospholipases C, the sphingomyelinases, the phosphatidylinositol-hydrolyzing enzymes, and the pseudomonad phospholipases C. The zinc-metallophospholipases C have been most intensively studied, and lethal toxins within this group possess an additional domain. The toxic phospholipases C can interact with eukaryotic cell membranes and hydrolyze phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin, leading to cell lysis. However, measurement of the cytolytic potential or lethality of phospholipases C may not accurately indicate their roles in the pathogenesis of disease. Subcytolytic concentrations of phospholipase C can perturb host cells by activating the arachidonic acid cascade or protein kinase C. Nonlethal phospholipases C, such as the Listeria monocytogenes PLC-A, appear to enhance the release of the organism from the host cell phagosome. Since some phospholipases C play important roles in the pathogenesis of disease, they could form components of vaccines. A greater understanding of the modes of action and structure-function relationships of phospholipases C will facilitate the interpretation of studies in which these enzymes are used as membrane probes and will enhance the use of these proteins as models for eukaryotic phospholipases C. PMID:8336671

  17. Uranium enrichment and nuclear-weapon proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Krass, Allan S.; Boskma, Peter; Elzen, Boeli; Smit, Wim A

    1983-01-01

    The authors review state-of-the-art enrichment technology, and evaluate the impact of this technology on the proliferation problem. They place the technological development into the context of the economic and institutional environment that has evolved around the enrichment industry, and suggest some measures which might be taken to reduce the proliferation dangers inherent in the industry. They specifically note the world excess of supply over demand which, coupled with the refusal of a number of countries with enrichment capability to sign the Non-Proliferation Treaty, intensifies the weapons risk. 336 references, 52 figures, 20 tables.

  18. Biocompatible, Free-Standing Film Composed of Bacterial Cellulose Nanofibers-Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lin; Zeng, Zhiping; Kuddannaya, Shreyas; Wu, Dingcai; Zhang, Yilei; Wang, Zhenling

    2016-01-13

    In recent years, graphene films have been used in a series of wide applications in the biomedical area, because of several advantageous characteristics. Currently, these films are derived from graphene oxide (GO) via chemical or physical reduction methods, which results in a significant decrease in surface hydrophilicity, although the electrical property could be greatly improved, because of the reduction process. Hence, the comprehensive performance of the graphene films showed practical limitations in the biomedical field, because of incompatibility of highly hydrophobic surfaces to support cell adhesion and growth. In this work, we present a novel fabrication of bacterial cellulose nanofibers/reduced graphene oxide (BC-RGO) film, using a bacterial reduction method. Thus-prepared BC-RGO films maintained excellent hydrophilicity, while electrical properties were improved by bacterial reduction of GO films in culture. Human marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on these surfaces showed improved cellular response with higher cell proliferation on the BC-RGO film, compared to free-standing reduced graphene oxide film without the nanoscale fibrous structure. Furthermore, the cellular adhesion and proliferation were even comparable to that on the tissue culture plate, indicating that the bacterial cellulose nanofibers play a critically contructive role in supporting cellular activities. The novel fabrication method greatly enhanced the biochemical activity of the cells on the surface, which could aid in realizing several potential applications of graphene film in biomedical area, such as tissue engineering, bacterial devices, etc. PMID:26670811

  19. Bacterial response to different surface chemistries fabricated by plasma polymerization on electrospun nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Abrigo, Martina; Kingshott, Peter; McArthur, Sally L

    2015-01-01

    Control over bacterial attachment and proliferation onto nanofibrous materials constitutes a major challenge for a variety of applications, including filtration membranes, protective clothing, wound dressings, and tissue engineering scaffolds. To develop effective devices, the interactions that occur between bacteria and nanofibers with different morphological and physicochemical properties need to be investigated. This paper explores the influence of fiber surface chemistry on bacterial behavior. Different chemical functionalities were generated on the surface of electrospun polystyrene nanofibers through plasma polymerization of four monomers (acrylic acid, allylamine, 1,7-octadiene, and 1,8-cineole). The interactions of Escherichia coli with the surface modified fibers were investigated through a combination of scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Fiber wettability, surface charge, and chemistry were found to affect the ability of bacterial cells to attach and proliferate throughout the nanofiber meshes. The highest proportion of viable cells attachment occurred on the hydrophilic amine rich coating, followed by the hydrophobic octadiene. The acrylic acid coating rich in carboxyl groups showed a significantly lower attraction of bacterial cells. The 1,8-cineole retained the antibacterial activity of the monomer, resulting with a high proportion of dead isolated cells attached onto the fibers. Results showed that the surface chemistry properties of nanofibrous membranes can be strategically tuned to control bacterial behavior. PMID:26251319

  20. Proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis in connexin43-null osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlan, F.; Lecanda, F.; Screen, J.; Civitelli, R.

    2001-01-01

    Osteoblasts are highly coupled by gap junctions formed primarily by connexin43 (Cx43). We have shown that interference with Cx43 expression or function disrupts transcriptional regulation of osteoblast genes, and that deletion of Cx43 in the mouse causes skeletal malformations, delayed mineralization, and osteoblast dysfunction. Here, we studied the mechanisms by which genetic deficiency of Cx43 alters osteoblast development. While cell proliferation rates were similar in osteoblastic cells derived from calvaria of Cx43-null and wild type mice, camptothecin-induced apoptosis was 3-fold higher in mutant compared to wild type osteoblasts. When grown in mineralizing medium, Cx43-null cells were able to produce mineralized matrix but it took one week longer to reach the same mineralization levels as in normal cells. Likewise, expression of alkaline phosphatase activity per cell--a marker of osteoblast differentiation--was maximal only 2 weeks later in Cx43-null relative to wild-type cells. These observations suggest that Cx43 is important for a normal and timely development of the osteoblastic phenotype. Delayed differentiation and increase programmed cell death may explain the skeletal phenotype of Cx43-null mice.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus α toxin potentiates opportunistic bacterial lung infections.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Taylor S; Hilliard, Jamese J; Jones-Nelson, Omari; Keller, Ashley E; O'Day, Terrence; Tkaczyk, Christine; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Hamilton, Melissa; Pelletier, Mark; Wang, Qun; Diep, Binh An; Le, Vien T M; Cheng, Lily; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C Kendall; Sellman, Bret R

    2016-03-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotic use may adversely affect a patient's beneficial microbiome and fuel cross-species spread of drug resistance. Although alternative pathogen-specific approaches are rationally justified, a major concern for this precision medicine strategy is that co-colonizing or co-infecting opportunistic bacteria may still cause serious disease. In a mixed-pathogen lung infection model, we find that the Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor α toxin potentiates Gram-negative bacterial proliferation, systemic spread, and lethality by preventing acidification of bacteria-containing macrophage phagosomes, thereby reducing effective killing of both S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria. Prophylaxis or early treatment with a single α toxin neutralizing monoclonal antibody prevented proliferation of co-infecting Gram-negative pathogens and lethality while also promoting S. aureus clearance. These studies suggest that some pathogen-specific, antibody-based approaches may also work to reduce infection risk in patients colonized or co-infected with S. aureus and disparate drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial opportunists. PMID:26962155

  2. Social Preference and Glutamatergic Dysfunction: Underappreciated Prerequisites for Social Dysfunction in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junghee; Green, Michael F

    2016-09-01

    Impaired social functioning is pervasive in schizophrenia. Unfortunately, existing treatments have limited efficacy, and possible psychological or neurobiological mechanisms underlying social dysfunction in this disorder remain obscure. Here, we evaluate whether social preference, one key aspect of social processing that has been largely overlooked in schizophrenia research, and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) dysfunction can provide insights into the mechanism underlying social dysfunction in schizophrenia. Based on evidence from developmental psychology, and behavioral and clinical neuroscience, we propose a heuristic model in which reduced NMDAR function may induce disrupted social preference that can subsequently lead to social cognitive impairment and social disability. We discuss its implications in terms of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, other disorders with marked social disability, and potential treatments. PMID:27477199

  3. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale.

    PubMed

    Stubbendieck, Reed M; Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Straight, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities. PMID:27551280

  4. Bacterial Communities: Interactions to Scale

    PubMed Central

    Stubbendieck, Reed M.; Vargas-Bautista, Carol; Straight, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    In the environment, bacteria live in complex multispecies communities. These communities span in scale from small, multicellular aggregates to billions or trillions of cells within the gastrointestinal tract of animals. The dynamics of bacterial communities are determined by pairwise interactions that occur between different species in the community. Though interactions occur between a few cells at a time, the outcomes of these interchanges have ramifications that ripple through many orders of magnitude, and ultimately affect the macroscopic world including the health of host organisms. In this review we cover how bacterial competition influences the structures of bacterial communities. We also emphasize methods and insights garnered from culture-dependent pairwise interaction studies, metagenomic analyses, and modeling experiments. Finally, we argue that the integration of multiple approaches will be instrumental to future understanding of the underlying dynamics of bacterial communities. PMID:27551280

  5. Inhibiting macrophage proliferation suppresses atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jun; Lobatto, Mark E.; Hassing, Laurien; van der Staay, Susanne; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Calcagno, Claudia; Braza, Mounia S.; Baxter, Samantha; Fay, Francois; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Sager, Hendrik B.; Astudillo, Yaritzy M.; Leong, Wei; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Storm, Gert; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Reiner, Thomas; Cormode, David P.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Swirski, Filip K.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation drives atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture, and is a compelling therapeutic target. Consequently, attenuating inflammation by reducing local macrophage accumulation is an appealing approach. This can potentially be accomplished by either blocking blood monocyte recruitment to the plaque or increasing macrophage apoptosis and emigration. Because macrophage proliferation was recently shown to dominate macrophage accumulation in advanced plaques, locally inhibiting macrophage proliferation may reduce plaque inflammation and produce long-term therapeutic benefits. To test this hypothesis, we used nanoparticle-based delivery of simvastatin to inhibit plaque macrophage proliferation in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice (Apoe−/−) with advanced atherosclerotic plaques. This resulted in the rapid reduction of plaque inflammation and favorable phenotype remodeling. We then combined this short-term nanoparticle intervention with an 8-week oral statin treatment, and this regimen rapidly reduced and continuously suppressed plaque inflammation. Our results demonstrate that pharmacologically inhibiting local macrophage proliferation can effectively treat inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:26295063

  6. Effects of weightlessness on tissue proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosby, W. H.; Tavassoli, M.

    1975-01-01

    The repair of bone marrow stroma following mechanical injury was studied to obtain baseline data for a proposed space experiment regarding the effect of weightlessness on marrow stroma and other proliferating cell systems.

  7. Bacterial tracheitis in children.

    PubMed Central

    Kasian, G F; Bingham, W T; Steinberg, J; Ninan, A; Sankaran, K; Oman-Ganes, L; Houston, C S

    1989-01-01

    We examined the records of 14 patients aged 7 months to 10 1/4 years who were treated for bacterial tracheitis from May 1982 to December 1987; the management protocol for 13 of the patients included the use of nasotracheal intubation. The infection was caused by Staphylococcus aureus in seven, Haemophilus influenzae in three, Branhamella catarrhalis in one and Streptococcus pneumoniae in one. Both H. influenzae and B. catarrhalis were isolated in another patient, and no organism was found in the remaining patient. In addition to the bacteria, viruses were cultured from the tracheal secretions of two patients. The mean duration of intubation was 7.6 days and of hospital stay 9.2 days. Twelve of the cases occurred during the cold months of the year (October to March). Of the three deaths only one occurred in the pediatric intensive care unit and was due to severe bronchospasm and an air leak that caused bilateral pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum. In one patient subglottic stenosis developed that necessitated tracheostomy. Healing began 5 to 9 days after the onset of symptoms, as demonstrated with the use of repeated fibreoptic bronchoscopy. We found that the airway could be safely managed with the use of a nasotracheal tube. Bronchoscopy helped to confirm the diagnosis, to remove adherent secretions and to monitor the course of the disease. The ventilation tube can be removed after the patient's temperature returns to normal, if there is an air leak around the tube, if the quantity and viscosity of the secretions decrease and if healing is observed at bronchoscopy. PMID:2642395

  8. Bacterial computing with engineered populations.

    PubMed

    Amos, Martyn; Axmann, Ilka Maria; Blüthgen, Nils; de la Cruz, Fernando; Jaramillo, Alfonso; Rodriguez-Paton, Alfonso; Simmel, Friedrich

    2015-07-28

    We describe strategies for the construction of bacterial computing platforms by describing a number of results from the recently completed bacterial computing with engineered populations project. In general, the implementation of such systems requires a framework containing various components such as intracellular circuits, single cell input/output and cell-cell interfacing, as well as extensive analysis. In this overview paper, we describe our approach to each of these, and suggest possible areas for future research. PMID:26078340

  9. Bacterial Alkaloids Prevent Amoebal Predation.

    PubMed

    Klapper, Martin; Götze, Sebastian; Barnett, Robert; Willing, Karsten; Stallforth, Pierre

    2016-07-25

    Bacterial defense mechanisms have evolved to protect bacteria against predation by nematodes, predatory bacteria, or amoebae. We identified novel bacterial alkaloids (pyreudiones A-D) that protect the producer, Pseudomonas fluorescens HKI0770, against amoebal predation. Isolation, structure elucidation, total synthesis, and a proposed biosynthetic pathway for these structures are presented. The generation of P. fluorescens gene-deletion mutants unable to produce pyreudiones rendered the bacterium edible to a variety of soil-dwelling amoebae. PMID:27294402

  10. All men with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction require a cardiovascular workup.

    PubMed

    Miner, Martin; Nehra, Ajay; Jackson, Graham; Bhasin, Shalender; Billups, Kevin; Burnett, Arthur L; Buvat, Jacques; Carson, Culley; Cunningham, Glenn; Ganz, Peter; Goldstein, Irwin; Guay, Andre; Hackett, Geoff; Kloner, Robert A; Kostis, John B; LaFlamme, K Elizabeth; Montorsi, Piero; Ramsey, Melinda; Rosen, Raymond; Sadovsky, Richard; Seftel, Allen; Shabsigh, Ridwan; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Wu, Frederick

    2014-03-01

    An association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease has long been recognized, and studies suggest that erectile dysfunction is an independent marker of cardiovascular disease risk. Therefore, assessment and management of erectile dysfunction may help identify and reduce the risk of future cardiovascular events, particularly in younger men. The initial erectile dysfunction evaluation should distinguish between predominantly vasculogenic erectile dysfunction and erectile dysfunction of other etiologies. For men believed to have predominantly vasculogenic erectile dysfunction, we recommend that initial cardiovascular risk stratification be based on the Framingham Risk Score. Management of men with erectile dysfunction who are at low risk for cardiovascular disease should focus on risk-factor control; men at high risk, including those with cardiovascular symptoms, should be referred to a cardiologist. Intermediate-risk men should undergo noninvasive evaluation for subclinical atherosclerosis. A growing body of evidence supports the use of emerging prognostic markers to further understand cardiovascular risk in men with erectile dysfunction, but few markers have been prospectively evaluated in this population. In conclusion, we support cardiovascular risk stratification and risk-factor management in all men with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. PMID:24423973

  11. Loss of the DNA Damage Repair Kinase ATM Impairs Inflammasome-Dependent Anti-Bacterial Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Erttmann, Saskia F; Härtlova, Anetta; Sloniecka, Marta; Raffi, Faizal A M; Hosseinzadeh, Ava; Edgren, Tomas; Rofougaran, Reza; Resch, Ulrike; Fällman, Maria; Ek, Torben; Gekara, Nelson O

    2016-07-19

    The ATM kinase is a central component of the DNA damage repair machinery and redox balance. ATM dysfunction results in the multisystem disease ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). A major cause of mortality in AT is respiratory bacterial infections. Whether ATM deficiency causes innate immune defects that might contribute to bacterial infections is not known. Here we have shown that loss of ATM impairs inflammasome-dependent anti-bacterial innate immunity. Cells from AT patients or Atm(-/-) mice exhibited diminished interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in response to bacteria. In vivo, Atm(-/-) mice were more susceptible to pulmonary S. pneumoniae infection in a manner consistent with inflammasome defects. Our data indicate that such defects were due to oxidative inhibition of inflammasome complex assembly. This study reveals an unanticipated function of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in negative regulation of inflammasomes and proposes a theory for the notable susceptibility of AT patients to pulmonary bacterial infection. PMID:27421701

  12. Shigella Effector OspB Activates mTORC1 in a Manner That Depends on IQGAP1 and Promotes Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Eshleman, Heather D.; Fu, Yang; Bloom, Alexander; Li, Zhigang; Sacks, David B.; Goldberg, Marcia B.

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Shigella infects and spreads through the human intestinal epithelium. Effector proteins delivered by Shigella into cells promote infection by modulating diverse host functions. We demonstrate that the effector protein OspB interacts directly with the scaffolding protein IQGAP1, and that the absence of either OspB or IQGAP1 during infection leads to larger areas of S. flexneri spread through cell monolayers. We show that the effect on the area of bacterial spread is due to OspB triggering increased cell proliferation at the periphery of infected foci, thereby replacing some of the cells that die within infected foci and restricting the area of bacterial spread. We demonstrate that OspB enhancement of cell proliferation results from activation of mTORC1, a master regulator of cell growth, and is blocked by the mTORC1-specific inhibitor rapamycin. OspB activation of mTORC1, and its effects on cell proliferation and bacterial spread, depends on IQGAP1. Our results identify OspB as a regulator of mTORC1 and mTORC1-dependent cell proliferation early during S. flexneri infection and establish a role for IQGAP1 in mTORC1 signaling. They also raise the possibility that IQGAP1 serves as a scaffold for the assembly of an OspB-mTORC1 signaling complex. PMID:26473364

  13. Incidence and risk factors for early renal dysfunction after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wiesen, Patricia; Massion, Paul B; Joris, Jean; Detry, Olivier; Damas, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine renal dysfunction post liver transplantation, its incidence and risk factors in patients from a Belgian University Hospital. METHODS: Orthotopic liver transplantations performed from January 2006 until September 2012 were retrospectively reviewed (n = 187). Patients with no renal replacement therapy (RRT) before transplantation were classified into four groups according to their highest creatinine plasma level during the first postoperative week. The first group had a peak creatinine level below 12 mg/L, the second group between 12 and 20 mg/L, the third group between 20 and 35 mg/L, and the fourth above 35 mg/L. In addition, patients who needed RRT during the first week after transplantation were also classified into the fourth group. Perioperative parameters were recorded as risk factors, namely age, sex, body mass index (BMI), length of preoperative hospital stay, prior bacterial infection within one month, preoperative ascites, preoperative treatment with β-blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, preoperative creatinine and bilirubin levels, donor status (cardiac death or brain death), postoperative lactate level, need for intraoperative vasopressive drugs, surgical revision, mechanical ventilation for more than 24 h, postoperative bilirubin and transaminase peak levels, postoperative hemoglobin level, amount of perioperative blood transfusions and type of immunosuppression. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using logistic ordinal regression method. Post hoc analysis of the hemostatic agent used was also done. RESULTS: There were 78 patients in group 1 (41.7%), 46 in group 2 (24.6%), 38 in group 3 (20.3%) and 25 in group 4 (13.4%). Twenty patients required RRT: 13 (7%) during the first week after transplantation. Using univariate analysis, the severity of renal dysfunction was correlated with presence of ascites and prior bacterial infection, preoperative bilirubin, urea and

  14. Reshaping the gut microbiome with bacterial transplantation and antibiotic intake

    PubMed Central

    Manichanh, Chaysavanh; Reeder, Jens; Gibert, Prudence; Varela, Encarna; Llopis, Marta; Antolin, Maria; Guigo, Roderic; Knight, Rob; Guarner, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota consists of over 1000 species, which play key roles in gut physiology and homeostasis. Imbalances in the composition of this bacterial community can lead to transient intestinal dysfunctions and chronic disease states. Understanding how to manipulate this ecosystem is thus essential for treating many disorders. In this study, we took advantage of recently developed tools for deep sequencing and phylogenetic clustering to examine the long-term effects of exogenous microbiota transplantation combined with and without an antibiotic pretreatment. In our rat model, deep sequencing revealed an intestinal bacterial diversity exceeding that of the human gut by a factor of two to three. The transplantation produced a marked increase in the microbial diversity of the recipients, which stemmed from both capture of new phylotypes and increase in abundance of others. However, when transplantation was performed after antibiotic intake, the resulting state simply combined the reshaping effects of the individual treatments (including the reduced diversity from antibiotic treatment alone). Therefore, lowering the recipient bacterial load by antibiotic intake prior to transplantation did not increase establishment of the donor phylotypes, although some dominant lineages still transferred successfully. Remarkably, all of these effects were observed after 1 mo of treatment and persisted after 3 mo. Overall, our results indicate that the indigenous gut microbial composition is more plastic that previously anticipated. However, since antibiotic pretreatment counterintuitively interferes with the establishment of an exogenous community, such plasticity is likely conditioned more by the altered microbiome gut homeostasis caused by antibiotics than by the primary bacterial loss. PMID:20736229

  15. Fighting proliferation new concerns for the nineties

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolski, H.

    1996-09-01

    Iraq`s threatened chemical missile strikes against US forces, combined with its efforts to build nuclear weapons, have quite literally put issues about the proliferation of strategic weapons on the map. Indeed, after Operation Desert Shield, both the Bush and Clinton administrations focused considerable attention on the need to dismantle Iraq`s strategic weapons capabilities and to assure that the strategic weapons complex in the former Soviet Union doesn`t end up helping future Iraqs. Since Operation Desert Storm, though, additional proliferation concern devising an effective strategy against proliferation, coping with the spread of space technology, and curbing Iran`s and North Korea`s strategic programs have emerged. Fighting Proliferation examines these challenges and their implications for US policy. The first of these concern how best to reform existing non- proliferation efforts-is examined in part 1. With the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) indefinitely extended, just exactly how the treaty will be implemented remains unclear. The Clinton administration is on record arguing that the NPT is a model for how the US will curb the proliferation of not only nuclear but all other kinds of strategic weapons. But what does the NPT and its obligations actually mean. Its key proscriptions in Articles 1, 2, and 3 are ambiguous. The treaty also lacks any clear enforcement measures and is nearly impossible to amend.

  16. Defenses and disincentives to proliferation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Snipes, F.S.; Scesney, P.E.

    1992-03-02

    The proliferation of ballistic missiles and their associated technologies through the Third World has become a chief security concern for the United States and its allies. To meet this threat, the U.S. and other industrial nations have attempted to impose export controls on critical missile technologies in order to prohibit certain regimes from acquiring ballistic missile systems. Unfortunately, the controls have largely been ineffective as not only have ballistic missiles been acquired by dangerous Third World regimes, but often the technology and engineering expertise to indigenously produce these weapons have been obtained as well. Two major instances of ballistic missile use in the Third World--the Iran-Iraq War of the Cities and Desert Storm--have brought home the realization that arms control measures alone are not going to be successful in stopping proliferation of these weapons. Other responses to these systems are needed to enhance current arms control efforts. One of these responses is active ballistic missile defense. Desert Storm demonstrated the utility of defense as a response to the products of proliferation. Less obvious, but of great interest to SDI and U.S. foreign policy is how this demonstration of defensive prowess and subsequent development in defensive technologies will affect ballistic missile proliferation. The presence of defenses reduces the value of ballistic missiles that is determined by a potential proliferator. By doing so, defenses provide disincentives for regional countries to proliferate. Examining these disincentives is an integral part of determining the net value of defensive deployments.

  17. Managing Proliferation Issues with Iran

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C. Richard; Saltiel, David H.

    2002-02-15

    particular, will continue to play a vital role in determining the extent to which Iran is able to pursue WMD options. Without a fundamental change in the regional security environment, however, there is little reason to expect changes in Iranian WMD and missile policies, and the United States, acting alone and short of war, cannot prevent Iran from ultimately developing WMD and delivery systems. Furthermore, U.S. policies that take a tougher line with Russia, China and North Korea are not likely to lead to more restraint among these potential sources of WMD and missile technology. In the absence of engagement with Iran, unilateral U.S. economic sanctions will remain the principal, if flawed, U.S. policy tool for seeking to prevent Iran from acquiring WMD. The rationale is that by discouraging trade and investment, particularly in Iran's energy sector, the government of Iran will have less revenue to pursue proliferation. Without broad international support for economic isolation, however, such an effort may hinder Iran's WMD programs, though it cannot block them. Finally, options are needed to deal with major failures in nonproliferation efforts. These options include measures to deter Iranian use of WMD, to defend against their use if deterrence fails, and to destroy Iranian WMD capabilities should the need arise.

  18. Swallowing dysfunction following endotracheal intubation: Age matters.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Min-Hsuan; Ku, Shih-Chi; Wang, Tyng-Guey; Hsiao, Tzu-Yu; Lee, Jang-Jaer; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Huang, Guan-Hua; Chen, Cheryl Chia-Hui

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate postextubation swallowing dysfunction (PSD) 21 days after endotracheal extubation and to examine whether PSD is time-limited and whether age matters.For this prospective cohort study, we evaluated 151 adult critical care patients (≥20 years) who were intubated for at least 48 hours and had no pre-existing neuromuscular disease or swallowing dysfunction. Participants were assessed for time (days) to pass bedside swallow evaluations (swallow 50 mL of water without difficulty) and to resume total oral intake. Outcomes were compared between younger (20-64 years) and older participants (≥65 years).PSD, defined as inability to swallow 50 mL of water within 48 hours after extubation, affected 92 participants (61.7% of our sample). At 21 days postextubation, 17 participants (15.5%) still failed to resume total oral intake and were feeding-tube dependent. We found that older participants had higher PSD rates at 7, 14, and 21 days postextubation, and took significantly longer to pass the bedside swallow evaluations (5.0 vs 3.0 days; P = 0.006) and to resume total oral intake (5.0 vs 3.0 days; P = 0.003) than their younger counterparts. Older participants also had significantly higher rates of subsequent feeding-tube dependence than younger patients (24.1 vs 5.8%; P = 0.008).Excluding patients with pre-existing neuromuscular dysfunction, PSD is common and prolonged. Age matters in the time needed to recover. Swallowing and oral intake should be monitored and interventions made, if needed, in the first 7 to 14 days postextubation, particularly for older patients. PMID:27310972

  19. Endocrine dysfunction in patients of leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rohit Kumar; Bhasin, Rohit; Bisht, Y. S.; Kumar, K. V. S. Hari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leprosy is a chronic granulomatous disease and affects many internal organs in addition to the skin and peripheral nerves. Endocrine dysfunction is often silent and is often missed in patients of leprosy leading to significant morbidity. We studied the presence of occult endocrine disorders in leprosy patients and compared the same with disease parameters. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 40 patients of leprosy (aged 18–70 years, any duration) in this cross-sectional, observational study. All subjects were assessed for pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, gonadal function, and dynamic testing was done when deemed necessary. The participants were divided into two groups: Group 1 (Leprosy, n = 40) and Group 2 (Controls, n = 20) and the data were analyzed with appropriate statistical tests. Results: The study participants (35 males, 5 females) had a mean age of 36.4 ± 11.3 years, and duration of the disease was 2.5 ± 5.5 years. Eleven out of 40 patients showed results consistent with an endocrine disorder, including subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 4), sick euthyroid syndrome (n = 3), growth hormone (GH) deficiency (n = 2), primary hypogonadism (n = 2) and secondary hypogonadism in one patient. One patient had partial hypopituitarism (GH deficiency and secondary hypogonadism) and none of the controls showed any hormonal dysfunction. Testosterone levels showed inverse correlation with the number of skin patches (P = 0.0006). Conclusion: Occult endocrine dysfunction is seen in a quarter of patients with leprosy. Thyroid and gonadal axes abnormalities are common, and the severity is more in lepromatous forms of the disease. Further large studies are required to confirm the findings observed in our study. PMID:25932392

  20. Function and dysfunction of human sinoatrial node.

    PubMed

    Joung, Boyoung; Chen, Peng-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    Sinoatrial node (SAN) automaticity is jointly regulated by a voltage (cyclic activation and deactivation of membrane ion channels) and Ca(2+) clocks (rhythmic spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release). Using optical mapping in Langendorff-perfused canine right atrium, we previously demonstrated that the β-adrenergic stimulation pushes the leading pacemaker to the superior SAN, which has the fastest activation rate and the most robust late diastolic intracellular calcium (Cai) elevation. Dysfunction of the superior SAN is commonly observed in animal models of heart failure and atrial fibrillation (AF), which are known to be associated with abnormal SAN automaticity. Using the 3D electroanatomic mapping techniques, we demonstrated that superior SAN served as the earliest atrial activation site (EAS) during sympathetic stimulation in healthy humans. In contrast, unresponsiveness of superior SAN to sympathetic stimulation was a characteristic finding in patients with AF and SAN dysfunction, and the 3D electroanatomic mapping technique had better diagnostic sensitivity than corrected SAN recovery time testing. However, both tests have significant limitations in detecting patients with symptomatic sick sinus syndrome. Recently, we reported that the location of the EAS can be predicted by the amplitudes of P-wave in the inferior leads. The inferior P-wave amplitudes can also be used to assess the superior SAN responsiveness to sympathetic stimulation. Inverted or isoelectric P-waves at baseline that fail to normalize during isoproterenol infusion suggest SAN dysfunction. P-wave morphology analyses may be helpful in determining the SAN function in patients at risk of symptomatic sick sinus syndrome. PMID:26023305

  1. Dysfunctional stress responses in chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Woda, Alain; Picard, Pascale; Dutheil, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Many dysfunctional and chronic pain conditions overlap. This review describes the different modes of chronic deregulation of the adaptive response to stress which may be a common factor for these conditions. Several types of dysfunction can be identified within the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis: basal hypercortisolism, hyper-reactivity, basal hypocortisolism and hypo-reactivity. Neuroactive steroid synthesis is another component of the adaptive response to stress. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfated form DHEA-S, and progesterone and its derivatives are synthetized in cutaneous, nervous, and adipose cells. They are neuroactive factors that act locally. They may have a role in the localization of the symptoms and their levels can vary both in the central nervous system and in the periphery. Persistent changes in neuroactive steroid levels or precursors can induce localized neurodegeneration. The autonomic nervous system is another component of the stress response. Its dysfunction in chronic stress responses can be expressed by decreased basal parasympathethic activity, increased basal sympathetic activity or sympathetic hyporeactivity to a stressful stimulus. The immune and genetic systems also participate. The helper-T cells Th1 secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1-β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, whereas Th2 secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines: IL-4, IL-10, IGF-10, IL-13. Chronic deregulation of the Th1/Th2 balance can occur in favor of anti- or pro-inflammatory direction, locally or systemically. Individual vulnerability to stress can be due to environmental factors but can also be genetically influenced. Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetics are the main keys to understanding the influence of genetics on the response of individuals to constraints. PMID:27262345

  2. 7 CFR 58.135 - Bacterial estimate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bacterial estimate. 58.135 Section 58.135 Agriculture... Milk § 58.135 Bacterial estimate. (a) Methods of Testing. Milk shall be tested for bacterial estimate... of Testing. A laboratory examination to determine the bacterial estimate shall be made on...

  3. Emerging Neural Stimulation Technologies for Bladder Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Woong; Kim, Daejeong; Yoo, Sangjin; Lee, Hyungsup; Lee, Gu-Haeng; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-01-01

    In the neural engineering field, physiological dysfunctions are approached by identifying the target nerves and providing artificial stimulation to restore the function. Neural stimulation and recording technologies play a central role in this approach, and various engineering devices and stimulation techniques have become available to the medical community. For bladder control problems, electrical stimulation has been used as one of the treatments, while only a few emerging neurotechnologies have been used to tackle these problems. In this review, we introduce some recent developments in neural stimulation technologies including microelectrode array, closed-loop neural stimulation, optical stimulation, and ultrasound stimulation. PMID:25833475

  4. Autobiographical memory dysfunctions in depressive disorders.

    PubMed

    Talarowska, Monika; Berk, Michael; Maes, Michael; Gałecki, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    Autobiographical memory (AM) is a ubiquitous human experience that belongs to long-term declarative memory. It plays interpersonal and intrapsychic functions. The main aim of this study is to present results of contemporary research on AM in recurrent depressive disorders. The available research literature suggests that AM dysfunctions are a precursor and risk factor for recurrent depressive disorders and that they also appear to be a consequence of depressive symptoms in a bidirectional and interacting manner. These data suggest that AM might be a viable therapeutic target for cognitive remediation strategies, given the impact of cognition on diverse clinical outcomes. PMID:26522618

  5. Auditory dysfunction in Ramsay Hunt syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iragui, V J

    1986-07-01

    A 48-year-old woman with a Ramsay Hunt syndrome due to herpes zoster had a hearing deficit. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs) localised the site of dysfunction to the ipsilateral eighth nerve. Clinical improvement was associated with improvement of the BAEP. Conventional audiological studies and BAEPs provided no evidence of involvement of the cochlea or the brainstem. In Ramsay Hunt syndrome, BAEPs may help to localise the site of involvement within the auditory pathway and follow the course of the disease. PMID:3746312

  6. Mechanisms of transplant right ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Van Trigt, P; Bittner, H B; Kendall, S W; Milano, C A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction remains the leading cause of early mortality after cardiac transplantation. The effect of brain death and subsequent hypothermic cardioplegic arrest and storage on subsequent post-transplant right ventricular function was examined. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Right ventricular dysfunction in the donor heart usually is attributed to failure of the donor right ventricle to adapt to the sudden increase in afterload (pulmonary vascular resistance) in the recipient. Strategies to improve ventricular mechanics in the postoperative period are aimed at reducing pulmonary vascular resistance with vasodilators or augmenting right ventricular contractility with inotropic agents. Events occurring in the donor heart (brain death, hypothermic cardioplegic arrest, and storage) also may be directly related to post-transplant RV dysfunction. METHODS: A canine model of brain death and orthotopic cardiac transplantation was used. A dynamic pressure-volume analysis of RV mechanics was performed using micromanometers and sonomicrometric dimension transducers. Systolic function was assessed by measurement of preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW). Brain death was induced in 17 dogs by inflation of an intracranial balloon. Right ventricular function then was assessed serially to 6 hours (PRSW). Right ventricular adrenergic beta receptor density and function was sampled at control and after 6 hours of brain death. The effect of cardioplegic arrest and hypothermic storage was assessed in a second group of 17 dogs, using the same instrumentation and method of RV analysis. RESULTS: A significant decrease in right ventricular PRSW occurred after brain death, with the average decrease being 37% +/- 10.4% from the control. The RV myocardial beta adrenergic receptor density did not significantly change (253 +/- 34 fmol/ng control vs. 336 +/- 54 fmol/ng after brain death). The adenylyl cyclase activity of the RV beta receptor was assessed and was not

  7. Surgical Management of Male Voiding Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, Jessica; Mourtzinos, Arthur

    2016-06-01

    Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) is a common cause of voiding dysfunction. BPH may lead to bladder outlet obstruction and resultant troublesome lower urinary tract symptoms. Initial management of BPH and bladder outlet obstruction is typically conservative. However, when symptoms are severe or refractory to medical therapy or when urinary retention, bladder stone formation, recurrent urinary tract infections, or upper urinary tract deterioration occur, surgical intervention is often necessary. Numerous options are available for surgical management of BPH ranging from simple office-based procedures to transurethral operative procedures and even open and robotic surgeries. This article reviews the current, most commonly used techniques available for surgical management of BPH. PMID:27261790

  8. [Thyroid dysfunction in primary care medicine].

    PubMed

    Wuerzner, Kaisa; Pasche, Olivier; Rodondi, Nicolas; Portmann, Luc

    2010-12-01

    Thyroid function tests include the measuring of the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (T4) in the case of abnormal TSH. These tests are frequently performed in primary care medicine since many clinical situations can be suggestive of dysthyroidism, as for example fatigue, depressive states or cardiac arthmia. In the case of subclinical thyroid dysfunction, the indications for treatment are controversial there being a lack of significant randomised studies. For primary care physicians faced with abnormal thyroid function tests we propose a diagnostic approach, clinical recommendations, and indications for referral to the specialist. PMID:21207724

  9. Spironolactone improves endothelial dysfunction in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Syngle, Ashit; Vohra, Kanchan; Khichi, Dinesh; Garg, Nidhi; Verma, Inderjeet; Kaur, Ladbans

    2013-07-01

    Chronic inflammation in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction which leads to accelerated atherosclerosis. Accelerated atherosclerosis contributes to premature cardiovascular disease and increased cardiovascular mortality in AS. Spironolactone inhibits the production of proinflammatory cytokines and improves endothelial dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis. This study aimed to determine the effect of spironolactone in antitumor necrosis factor (TNF)-naive AS patients. Twenty anti-TNF-naive AS patients (M/F = 15/5) with high disease activity (Bath ankylosing spondylitis disease activity index, BASDAI >4) despite treatment with stable doses of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were investigated. Inflammatory disease activity (BASDAI and Bath ankylosing spondylitis functional index (BASFI) scores, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels), serum nitrite concentration, and endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilatation of the brachial artery were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of therapy with oral spironolactone 2 mg/kg/day. Ten healthy subjects matched for age and sex acted as the control. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in AS patients at baseline was significantly impaired compared with healthy control group (p < 0.001). After treatment, FMD improved from 11.3 ± 1.70 to 24.69 ± 2.34% (p < 0.001); nitrite concentration reduced from 7.9 ± 0.28 to 4.79 ± 0.19 μmol/L (p < 0.001); ESR from 33.8 ± 4.38 to 15.13 ± 1.30 mm in the first hour, (p < 0.001); and CRP level from 22.39 ± 3.80 to 6.3 ± 1.29 mg/dL, (p < 0.001). BASDAI and BASFI also reduced significantly (p < 0.001). The study suggests that in AS endothelial dysfunction is a part of the disease process. This is the first study to show that treatment with spironolactone improves both endothelial dysfunction and inflammatory disease activity in AS. PMID:23504211

  10. Pericytes, microvasular dysfunction and chronic rejection

    PubMed Central

    Kloc, Malgorzata; Kubiak, Jacek Z.; Li, Xian C.; Ghobrial, Rafik M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic rejection of transplanted organs remains the main obstacle in the long-term success of organ transplantation. Thus, there is a persistent quest for development of anti-chronic rejection therapies and identification of novel molecular and cellular targets. One of the potential targets is the pericytes, the mural cells of microvessels, which regulate microvascular permeability, development and maturation by controlling endothelial cell functions and regulating tissue fibrosis and inflammatory response. In this review we discuss the potential of targeting pericytes in development of microvasular dysfunction and the molecular pathways involved in regulation of pericyte activities for anti-chronic rejection intervention. PMID:25793439

  11. Erectile Dysfunction in the Older Adult Male.

    PubMed

    Mola, Joanna R

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) in the older adult male is a significant problem affecting more than 75% of men over 70 years of age in the United States. Older men have an increased likelihood of developing ED due to chronic disease, comorbid conditions, and age-related changes. Research has demonstrated that while the prevalence and severity of ED increases with age, sexual desire often remains unchanged. This article discusses the clinical picture of ED, including relevant pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and evaluation and treatment options. PMID:26197627

  12. Baroreflex dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manpreet; Chandran, Dinu S; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Bhowmik, Dipankar; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Deepak, Kishore Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The presence of traditional and CKD related risk factors results in exaggerated vascular calcification in these patients. Vascular calcification is associated with reduced large arterial compliance and thus impaired baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) resulting in augmented blood pressure (BP) variability and hampered BP regulation. Baroreflex plays a vital role in short term regulation of BP. This review discusses the normal baroreflex physiology, methods to assess baroreflex function, its determinants along with the prognostic significance of assessing BRS in CKD patients, available literature on BRS in CKD patients and the probable patho-physiology of baroreflex dysfunction in CKD. PMID:26788464

  13. Evidence for reversible motoneurone dysfunction in thyrotoxicosis

    PubMed Central

    McComas, A. J.; Sica, R. E. P.; McNabb, A. R.; Goldberg, W. M.; Upton, A. R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Motor unit estimating techniques have been employed as part of a comprehensive electrophysiological survey of peripheral nerve and muscle in 20 patients with thyrotoxicosis. In all patients there was evidence of a loss of operational motor units; the selective nature of this involvement suggested that the motoneurone soma was the site of the primary lesion. The reversible nature of the postulated motoneurone dysfunction was demonstrated by the increased motor unit counts in six patients who were studied again after treatment of their thyrotoxicosis. PMID:4836749

  14. Repeated treatment with oxytocin promotes hippocampal cell proliferation, dendritic maturation and affects socio-emotional behavior.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vidaña, Dalinda Isabel; Chan, Ngai-Man Jackie; Chan, Alan H L; Hui, Katy K Y; Lee, Sylvia; Chan, Hoi-Yi; Law, Yuen Shan; Sze, Mei Yi; Tsui, Wai-Ching Sarah; Fung, Timothy K H; Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Lai, Cynthia Y Y

    2016-10-01

    Rewarding social behaviors including positive social interactions and sexual behaviors are shown to regulate adult neurogenesis, but the underlying biological mechanisms remain elusive. Oxytocin, a neurohypophysial hormone secreted after exposure to social interaction or sexual behaviors, has a profound role in the formation of social bonding and regulation of emotional distress. While the acute effect of oxytocin was usually studied, relatively scarce evidence showed the behavioral consequence of repeated oxytocin treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of repeated oxytocin treatment on hippocampal cell proliferation, dendritic maturation of new born neurons and social/emotional behaviors. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received treatment with either vehicle or oxytocin (1mg/kg) daily for two weeks. Behavioral tests revealed that oxytocin increased social behaviors and reduced the anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. Cell proliferation, differentiation and the dendritic complexity of new born neurons in the hippocampus were promoted by oxytocin treatment. Depression- and anxiety-like behaviors were induced by repeated treatment of corticosterone (40mg/kg) for two weeks while oxytocin treatment reversed the behavioral disturbances. Suppression of cell proliferation caused by corticosterone was reverted by oxytocin treatment in which cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and dendritic complexity increased. The present findings reveal that oxytocin not only enhances cell proliferation, but also promotes the development of the new neurons which is associated with the induction of positive emotional and social behaviors. The results also suggest that oxytocin may be a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of emotional and social dysfunction. PMID:27418343

  15. Leptin augments coronary vasoconstriction and smooth muscle proliferation via a Rho-kinase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Noblet, Jillian N; Goodwill, Adam G; Sassoon, Daniel J; Kiel, Alexander M; Tune, Johnathan D

    2016-05-01

    Leptin has been implicated as a key upstream mediator of pathways associated with coronary vascular dysfunction and disease. The purpose of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that leptin modifies the coronary artery proteome and promotes increases in coronary smooth muscle contraction and proliferation via influences on Rho kinase signaling. Global proteomic assessment of coronary arteries from lean swine cultured with obese concentrations of leptin (30 ng/mL) for 3 days revealed significant alterations in the coronary artery proteome (68 proteins) and identified an association between leptin treatment and calcium signaling/contraction (four proteins) and cellular growth and proliferation (35 proteins). Isometric tension studies demonstrated that both acute (30 min) and chronic (3 days, serum-free media) exposure to obese concentrations of leptin potentiated depolarization-induced contraction of coronary arteries. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced leptin-mediated increases in coronary artery contractions. The effects of leptin on the functional expression of Rho kinase were time-dependent, as acute treatment increased Rho kinase activity while chronic (3 day) exposure was associated with increases in Rho kinase protein abundance. Proliferation assays following chronic leptin administration (8 day, serum-containing media) demonstrated that leptin augmented coronary vascular smooth muscle proliferation and increased Rho kinase activity. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced these effects of leptin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that leptin promotes increases in coronary vasoconstriction and smooth muscle proliferation and indicate that these phenotypic effects are associated with alterations in the coronary artery proteome and dynamic effects on the Rho kinase pathway. PMID:26975316

  16. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  17. Muscle-derived stem/progenitor cell dysfunction limits healthspan and lifespan in a murine progeria model

    PubMed Central

    Lavasani, Mitra; Robinson, Andria R.; Lu, Aiping; Song, Minjung; Feduska, Joseph M.; Ahani, Bahar; Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Feldman, Chelsea H.; Robbins, Paul D.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Huard, Johnny

    2012-01-01

    With ageing, there is a loss of adult stem cell function. However, there is no direct evidence that this has a causal role in ageing-related decline. We tested this using muscle-derived stem/progenitor cells (MDSPCs) in a murine progeria model. Here we show that MDSPCs from old and progeroid mice are defective in proliferation and multilineage differentiation. Intraperitoneal administration of MDSPCs, isolated from young wild-type mice, to progeroid mice confer significant lifespan and healthspan extension. The transplanted MDSPCs improve degenerative changes and vascularization in tissues where donor cells are not detected, suggesting that their therapeutic effect may be mediated by secreted factor(s). Indeed, young wild-type-MDSPCs rescue proliferation and differentiation defects of aged MDSPCs when co-cultured. These results establish that adult stem/progenitor cell dysfunction contributes to ageing-related degeneration and suggests a therapeutic potential of post-natal stem cells to extend health. PMID:22215083

  18. The association of age of toilet training and dysfunctional voiding

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Steve J; Richards, Kyle A; Gorbachinsky, Ilya; Krane, L Spencer

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether age of toilet training is associated with dysfunctional voiding in children. Materials and methods We compared patients referred to the urologic clinics for voiding dysfunction with age-matched controls without urinary complaints. Characteristics including age and reason for toilet training, method of training, and encopresis or constipation were compared between both groups. Results Initiation of toilet training prior to 24 months and later than 36 months of age were associated with dysfunctional voiding. However, dysfunctional voiding due to late toilet training was also associated with constipation. Conclusion Dysfunctional voiding may be due to delayed emptying of the bowel and bladder by children. The symptoms of dysfunctional voiding are more common when toilet training early, as immature children may be less likely to empty in a timely manner, or when training late due to (or in association with) constipation. PMID:25328866

  19. Symbiotic lactobacilli stimulate gut epithelial proliferation via Nox-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rheinallt M; Luo, Liping; Ardita, Courtney S; Richardson, Arena N; Kwon, Young Man; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Alam, Ashfaqul; Gates, Cymone L; Wu, Huixia; Swanson, Phillip A; Lambeth, J David; Denning, Patricia W; Neish, Andrew S

    2013-01-01

    The resident prokaryotic microbiota of the metazoan gut elicits profound effects on the growth and development of the intestine. However, the molecular mechanisms of symbiotic prokaryotic–eukaryotic cross-talk in the gut are largely unknown. It is increasingly recognized that physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as signalling secondary messengers that influence cellular proliferation and differentiation in a variety of biological systems. Here, we report that commensal bacteria, particularly members of the genus Lactobacillus, can stimulate NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1)-dependent ROS generation and consequent cellular proliferation in intestinal stem cells upon initial ingestion into the murine or Drosophila intestine. Our data identify and highlight a highly conserved mechanism that symbiotic microorganisms utilize in eukaryotic growth and development. Additionally, the work suggests that specific redox-mediated functions may be assigned to specific bacterial taxa and may contribute to the identification of microbes with probiotic potential. PMID:24141879

  20. Myocardial steatosis as a possible mechanistic link between diastolic dysfunction and coronary microvascular dysfunction in women.

    PubMed

    Wei, Janet; Nelson, Michael D; Szczepaniak, Edward W; Smith, Laura; Mehta, Puja K; Thomson, Louise E J; Berman, Daniel S; Li, Debiao; Bairey Merz, C Noel; Szczepaniak, Lidia S

    2016-01-01

    Women with coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) and no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) have increased rates of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The mechanisms of HFpEF are not well understood. Ectopic fat deposition in the myocardium, termed myocardial steatosis, is frequently associated with diastolic dysfunction in other metabolic diseases. We investigated the prevalence of myocardial steatosis and diastolic dysfunction in women with CMD and subclinical HFpEF. In 13 women, including eight reference controls and five women with CMD and evidence of subclinical HFpEF (left ventricular end-diastolic pressure >12 mmHg), we measured myocardial triglyceride content (TG) and diastolic function, by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and magnetic resonance tissue tagging, respectively. When compared with reference controls, women with CMD had higher myocardial TG content (0.83 ± 0.12% vs. 0.43 ± 0.06%; P = 0.025) and lower diastolic circumferential strain rate (168 ± 12 vs. 217 ± 15%/s; P = 0.012), with myocardial TG content correlating inversely with diastolic circumferential strain rate (r = -0.779; P = 0.002). This study provides proof-of-concept that myocardial steatosis may play an important mechanistic role in the development of diastolic dysfunction in women with CMD and no obstructive CAD. Detailed longitudinal studies are warranted to explore specific treatment strategies targeting myocardial steatosis and its effect on diastolic function. PMID:26519031