Science.gov

Sample records for dysfunction undergoing opcab

  1. The Importance of Intraoperative Selenium Blood Levels on Organ Dysfunction in Patients Undergoing Off-Pump Cardiac Surgery: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stevanovic, Ana; Coburn, Mark; Menon, Ares; Rossaint, Rolf; Heyland, Daren; Schälte, Gereon; Werker, Thilo; Wonisch, Willibald; Kiehntopf, Michael; Goetzenich, Andreas; Rex, Steffen; Stoppe, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac surgery is accompanied by an increase of oxidative stress, a significantly reduced antioxidant (AOX) capacity, postoperative inflammation, all of which may promote the development of organ dysfunction and an increase in mortality. Selenium is an essential co-factor of various antioxidant enzymes. We hypothesized a less pronounced decrease of circulating selenium levels in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery due to less intraoperative oxidative stress. Methods In this prospective randomised, interventional trial, 40 patients scheduled for elective coronary artery bypass grafting were randomly assigned to undergo either on-pump or OPCAB-surgery, if both techniques were feasible for the single patient. Clinical data, myocardial damage assessed by myocard specific creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-MB), circulating whole blood levels of selenium, oxidative stress assessed by asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels, antioxidant capacity determined by glutathionperoxidase (GPx) levels and perioperative inflammation represented by interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were measured at predefined perioperative time points. Results At end of surgery, both groups showed a comparable decrease of circulating selenium concentrations. Likewise, levels of oxidative stress and IL-6 were comparable in both groups. Selenium levels correlated with antioxidant capacity (GPx: r = 0.720; p<0.001) and showed a negative correlation to myocardial damage (CK-MB: r = −0.571, p<0.001). Low postoperative selenium levels had a high predictive value for the occurrence of any postoperative complication. Conclusions OPCAB surgery is not associated with less oxidative stress and a better preservation of the circulating selenium pool than on-pump surgery. Low postoperative selenium levels are predictive for the development of complications. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01409057 PMID:25118980

  2. Preoperative intra-aortic balloon pump improves the clinical outcomes of off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting in left ventricular dysfunction patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Wang, Jinhong; Hou, Dengbang; Xing, Jialin; Liu, Feng; Xing, Zhi Chen; Jiang, Chunjing; Hao, Xing; Du, Zhongtao; Yang, Xiaofang; Zhao, Yanyan; Miao, Na; Jiang, Yu; Dong, Ran; Gu, Chengxiong; Sun, Lizhong; Wang, Hong; Hou, Xiaotong

    2016-01-01

    Severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) are often associated with a higher mortality. The efficacy and safety of the preoperative prophylactic intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) insertion is not well established. 416 consecutive patients with severe LV dysfunction (ejection fraction ≤35%) undergoing isolated OPCAB were enrolled in a retrospective observational study. 191 patients was enrolled in the IABP group; the remaining 225 patients was in control group. A total of 129 pairs of patients were propensity-score matched. No significant differences in demographic and preoperative risk factors were found between the two groups. The postoperative 30-day mortality occurred more frequently in the control group compared with the IABP group (8.5% vs. 1.6%, p = 0.02). There was a significant reduction of low cardiac output syndrome in the IABP group compared with the control group (14% vs. 6.2%, p = 0.04). Prolonged mechanical ventilation (≥48 h) occurred more frequently in the control group (34.9% vs. 20.9%, p = 0.02). IABP also decreased the postoperative length of stay. Preoperative IABP was associated with a lower 30-day mortality, suggesting that it is effective in patients with severe LV dysfunction undergoing OPCAB. PMID:27279591

  3. Preoperative intra-aortic balloon pump improves the clinical outcomes of off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting in left ventricular dysfunction patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Wang, Jinhong; Hou, Dengbang; Xing, Jialin; Liu, Feng; Xing, Zhi chen; Jiang, Chunjing; Hao, Xing; Du, Zhongtao; Yang, Xiaofang; Zhao, Yanyan; Miao, Na; Jiang, Yu; Dong, Ran; Gu, Chengxiong; Sun, Lizhong; Wang, Hong; Hou, Xiaotong

    2016-01-01

    Severe left ventricular (LV) dysfunction patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) are often associated with a higher mortality. The efficacy and safety of the preoperative prophylactic intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) insertion is not well established. 416 consecutive patients with severe LV dysfunction (ejection fraction ≤35%) undergoing isolated OPCAB were enrolled in a retrospective observational study. 191 patients was enrolled in the IABP group; the remaining 225 patients was in control group. A total of 129 pairs of patients were propensity-score matched. No significant differences in demographic and preoperative risk factors were found between the two groups. The postoperative 30-day mortality occurred more frequently in the control group compared with the IABP group (8.5% vs. 1.6%, p = 0.02). There was a significant reduction of low cardiac output syndrome in the IABP group compared with the control group (14% vs. 6.2%, p = 0.04). Prolonged mechanical ventilation (≥48 h) occurred more frequently in the control group (34.9% vs. 20.9%, p = 0.02). IABP also decreased the postoperative length of stay. Preoperative IABP was associated with a lower 30-day mortality, suggesting that it is effective in patients with severe LV dysfunction undergoing OPCAB. PMID:27279591

  4. [Ultrafast-track Anesthesia (UFTA) in the Operating Room and the Anesthetic Management for Off-pump Coronary Artery Bypass (OPCAB)].

    PubMed

    Shimosaka, Mika; Inoue, Motoki; Takahashi, Hisato; Takahashi, Masao; Miyajima, Keisuke; Ishikawa, Toshihiro; Hatada, Kazuyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Currently, the immediate extubation in the operating room is necessary for the patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB). To achieve UFTA, anesthesiologists should control general anesthesia. We report the case series of UFTA for the patients undergone OPCAB at our hospital. Forty patients receiving OPCAB between April 2012 and April 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. We divided the patients into those extubated in the operating room (Extubation group) and those not (Intubation group). The extubation criteria included adequate revascularization, adequate hemostasis, ratio between Pa(O2) and FI(O2) more than 250, body temperature above 36 degrees C, stable hemodynamics without noradrenaline, without IABP, and normal postoperative chest X-ray. Twenty-three patients (70% of the scheduled and 20% of the emergency patients) were included in our criteria and could be extubated in the operating room. One patient was re-intubated due to asthma attack following extubation in the operating room. The sucess rate of immediate extubation was 95.7% by our criteria. There were no significant differences in age, sex, BMI, duration of anesthesia, and amount of hemorrhage between the 2 groups. We believe that UFTA for OPCAB patients may be possible under carefull decision by extubation criteria. PMID:27188100

  5. Respiratory muscle dysfunction: a multicausal entity in the critically ill patient undergoing mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Magda C; Ospina-Tascón, Gustavo A; Salazar C, Blanca C

    2014-02-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction, particularly of the diaphragm, may play a key role in the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to difficulty in weaning patients from mechanical ventilation. The limited mobility of critically ill patients, and of the diaphragm in particular when prolonged mechanical ventilation support is required, promotes the early onset of respiratory muscle dysfunction, but this can also be caused or exacerbated by other factors that are common in these patients, such as sepsis, malnutrition, advanced age, duration and type of ventilation, and use of certain medications, such as steroids and neuromuscular blocking agents. In this review we will study in depth this multicausal origin, in which a common mechanism is altered protein metabolism, according to the findings reported in various models. The understanding of this multicausality produced by the same pathophysiological mechanism could facilitate the management and monitoring of patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. PMID:23669061

  6. [Perioperative ocular surface evaluation and management in meibomian gland dysfunction patients undergoing cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Liang, Qingfeng; Dong, Zhe; Wang, Ningli

    2014-04-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is one of the most common conditions in the elderly. Most of MGD patients undergoing cataract surgery were found to have significant dry eye symptoms and ocular surface disease. The severe cases with ocular surface disease are also at higher risk of postoperative complications, namely infections and corneal ulcers. To improve the operation effect and achieve the best visual outcome and life quality in cataract patients, it is important to evaluate the ocular surface and meibomian glands in MGD patients preoperatively, pay attention to the intraoperative care and detect the postoperative complications carefully and use medicine properly. PMID:24931148

  7. Erectile Dysfunction Among HIV Patients Undergoing Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy: Dyslipidemia as a Main Risk Factor

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Velez, Gustavo; Lisker-Cervantes, Andrés; Villeda-Sandoval, Christian I; Sotomayor de Zavaleta, Mariano; Olvera-Posada, Daniel; Sierra-Madero, Juan Gerardo; Arreguin-Camacho, Lucrecia O; Castillejos-Molina, Ricardo A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence and risk factors of erectile dysfunction (ED) in HIV patients from the HIV clinic of a tertiary referral center in Mexico City. Design Prevalence was obtained from cross-sectional studies, and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), a standardized method, was used to assess ED. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in the HIV clinic. Participants completed the IIEF to allow ED assessment. Information on demographics, clinical and HIV-related variables was retrieved from their medical records. Results One hundred and nine patients were included, with a mean age of 39.9 ± 8.8 years. ED was present in 65.1% of the individuals. Patients had been diagnosed with HIV for a mean of 92.7 ± 70.3 months and had undergone a mean 56.4 ± 45.5 months of HAART. The only variable associated with ED in the univariate analysis was dyslipidemia, and this association was also found in the multivariate analysis (P = 0.01). Conclusions ED is highly prevalent in HIV patients. Dyslipidemia should be considered as a risk factor for ED in HIV patients. Romero-Velez G, Lisker-Cervantes A, Villeda-Sandoval CI, Sotomayor de Zavaleta M, Olvera-Posada D, Sierra-Madero JG, Arreguin-Camacho LO, and Castillejos-Molina RA. Erectile dysfunction among HIV patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy: Dyslipidemia as a main risk factor. Sex Med 2014;2:24–30. PMID:25356298

  8. Parecoxib prevents early postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yang-Zi; Yao, Rui; Zhang, Zhe; Xu, Hui; Wang, Li-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Trial design neuroinflammation and postoperative pain after surgery are increasingly reported in association with postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Parecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, is used for postoperative analgesia for its potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. This study aimed to evaluate parecoxib's effects on POCD in elderly patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. Methods: Around 134 elderly patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty were randomly divided into parecoxib (group P) and control (group C) groups, and treated with parecoxib sodium and saline, respectively, shortly after induction of general anesthesia and 12-h postsurgery, respectively. Perioperative plasma IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and C-reactive protein (CRP) 1evels were measured. Postoperative pain was assessed following surgery. Neuropsychological tests were performed before surgery, and 1 week and 3 months postoperation. Results: POCD incidence in group P was significantly lower compared with that of group C at 1 week after surgery (16.7% vs 33.9%; P < 0.05); no significant difference was found between groups C and P at 3-month follow-up (9.7% vs 6.7%). Compared with group C values, visual analog pain scale (VAS) scores at 3, 6, and 12 hours after surgery were significantly lower in group P(P < 0.05). Plasma IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α levels were lower in group P than in group C after the operation (P < 0.05). No significant difference in the plasma CRP level was found between groups P and C. Conclusions: Parecoxib sodium decreases POCD incidence after total knee arthroplasty in elderly patients and may explain how this drug suppresses inflammation and acute postoperative pain caused by surgical trauma. PMID:27428192

  9. Lipidomics comparing DCD and DBD liver allografts uncovers lysophospholipids elevated in recipients undergoing early allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Casas-Ferreira, Ana M; Ma, Yun; Sen, Arundhuti; Kim, Min; Proitsi, Petroula; Shkodra, Maltina; Tena, Maria; Srinivasan, Parthi; Heaton, Nigel; Jassem, Wayel; Legido-Quigley, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Finding specific biomarkers of liver damage in clinical evaluations could increase the pool of available organs for transplantation. Lipids are key regulators in cell necrosis and hence this study hypothesised that lipid levels could be altered in organs suffering severe ischemia. Matched pre- and post-transplant biopsies from donation after circulatory death (DCD, n = 36, mean warm ischemia time = 2 min) and donation after brain death (DBD, n = 76, warm ischemia time = none) were collected. Lipidomic discovery and multivariate analysis (MVA) were applied. Afterwards, univariate analysis and clinical associations were conducted for selected lipids differentiating between these two groups. MVA grouped DCD vs. DBD (p = 6.20 × 10(-12)) and 12 phospholipids were selected for intact lipid measurements. Two lysophosphatidylcholines, LysoPC (16:0) and LysoPC (18:0), showed higher levels in DCD at pre-transplantation (q < 0.01). Lysophosphatidylcholines were associated with aspartate aminotransferase (AST) 14-day post-transplantation (q < 0.05) and were more abundant in recipients undergoing early allograft dysfunction (EAD) (p < 0.05). A receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve combining both lipid levels predicted EAD with 82% accuracy. These findings suggest that LysoPC (16:0) and LysoPC (18:0) might have a role in signalling liver tissue damage due to warm ischemia before transplantation. PMID:26635289

  10. Sexual Dysfunction in Women Undergoing Fertility Treatment in Iran: Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Afsaneh; Basirat, Zahra; Nasiri-Amiri, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sexual dysfunctions are one of the most fundamental difficulties for infertile women, which can be as the cause of infertility. This study investigated the prevalence of this disorder and associated factors in order to improve infertility treatment process and the quality of life of women referring to infertility center. Methods: A cross sectional study was performed on 236 women who referred to Fatima Zahra infertility center of Babol, Iran. Data collection tool was a questionnaire contained two parts; demographic characteristics and infertility information. Also, data for sexual dysfunction was obtained through diagnostic interview based on the international classification DSM-IV. For data analysis, logistic and linear regression analysis were used. The p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Most of women (84.9%) suffered from primary infertility and the mean duration of infertility was 60.2±8.4 months. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was 55.5% (n=131); including dyspareunia in 28% (n=66), impaired sexual desire and lack of orgasm in 26.3% (n=62 patients), vaginismus in 15.2% (n=36) and lack of sexual stimulation in 13.6% (n=32). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that age, sexual satisfaction and history of mental illness had a significant effect on the probability of experiencing the sexual dysfunction. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of sexual dysfunction among infertile women. Considering the interaction between sexual dysfunction and infertility, professional health care centers should be sensitive to this effect. Also, more attention must be paid on marital relationships, economic and social situation and infertility characteristics in order to prevent sexual dysfunction development through early screening and psychological interference. PMID:26962480

  11. Postoperative Neurocognitive Dysfunction in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery after Remote Ischemic Preconditioning: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Meybohm, Patrick; Renner, Jochen; Broch, Ole; Caliebe, Dorothee; Albrecht, Martin; Cremer, Jochen; Haake, Nils; Scholz, Jens; Zacharowski, Kai; Bein, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Background Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) has been shown to enhance the tolerance of remote organs to cope with a subsequent ischemic event. We hypothesized that RIPC reduces postoperative neurocognitive dysfunction (POCD) in patients undergoing complex cardiac surgery. Methods We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial including 180 adult patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients were randomized either to RIPC or to control group. Primary endpoint was postoperative neurocognitive dysfunction 5–7 days after surgery assessed by a comprehensive test battery. Cognitive change was assumed if the preoperative to postoperative difference in 2 or more tasks assessing different cognitive domains exceeded more than one SD (1 SD criterion) or if the combined Z score was 1.96 or greater (Z score criterion). Results According to 1 SD criterion, 52% of control and 46% of RIPC patients had cognitive deterioration 5–7 days after surgery (p = 0.753). The summarized Z score showed a trend to more cognitive decline in the control group (2.16±5.30) compared to the RIPC group (1.14±4.02; p = 0.228). Three months after surgery, incidence and severity of neurocognitive dysfunction did not differ between control and RIPC. RIPC tended to decrease postoperative troponin T release at both 12 hours [0.60 (0.19–1.94) µg/L vs. 0.48 (0.07–1.84) µg/L] and 24 hours after surgery [0.36 (0.14–1.89) µg/L vs. 0.26 (0.07–0.90) µg/L]. Conclusions We failed to demonstrate efficacy of a RIPC protocol with respect to incidence and severity of POCD and secondary outcome variables in patients undergoing a wide range of cardiac surgery. Therefore, definitive large-scale multicenter trials are needed. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00877305 PMID:23741380

  12. Relation of Baseline Renal Dysfunction With Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Popliteal and Infrapopliteal Percutaneous Peripheral Arterial Interventions.

    PubMed

    Parvataneni, Kesav C; Piyaskulkaew, Chatchawan; Szpunar, Susan; Sharma, Tarun; Patel, Vishal; Patel, Saurabhkumar; Davis, Thomas; Lalonde, Thomas; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Rosman, Howard S; Mehta, Rajendra H

    2016-07-15

    Renal dysfunction is a major risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Infrapopliteal PAD is associated with more co-morbid conditions and worse prognosis than suprapopliteal PAD. Long-term outcomes of patients with renal dysfunction and popliteal or infrapopliteal PAD undergoing peripheral vascular intervention (PVI) are not well described. We retrospectively evaluated long-term outcomes in 726 patients undergoing infrapopliteal PVI categorized into 3 glomerular filtration rate (GFR)-based groups: GFR (≥60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)), GFR (<60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)), and those on dialysis. At mean follow-up of 36 ± 20 months, amputation rates were 3%, 5%, and 11% with mortality rates of 23%, 36%, and 56% in normal renal function, chronic kidney disease (adjusted odds ratio [OR] for amputation 1.75, 95% CI 0.73 to 4.21; adjusted OR for mortality 1.53, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.23, p = 0.028), and dialysis (adjusted OR for amputation 2.43, 95% CI 0.84 to 7.02, p = 0.100; adjusted OR for mortality 4.51, 95% CI 2.46 to 8.26, p <0.0001) groups, respectively. Repeat revascularization was similar in all 3 groups at roughly 25%. In conclusion, chronic kidney disease and dialysis were associated with increased major amputations and mortality in patients who received PVI for popliteal and infrapopliteal PAD. PMID:27236250

  13. Comparison of B-type natriuretic peptide and left ventricular dysfunction in patients with constrictive pericarditis undergoing pericardiectomy.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Aggarwal, Vikram; Chowdhury, Ujjwal; Choudhury, Minati; Singh, Sarvesh Pal; Kiran, Usha

    2010-01-01

    Chronic constrictive pericarditis (CCP) due to tuberculosis has high morbidity and mortality in the periopeartive period following pericardiectomy because of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is considered a marker for both LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction. We undertook this prospective study in 24 patients, to measure the BNP levels and to compare it with transmitral Doppler flow velocities, that is, the E/A ratio (E = initial peak velocity during early diastolic filling and A = late peak flow velocity during atrial systole), as a marker of diastolic function and systolic parameters, pre- and post-pericardiectomy, at the time of discharge. The latter parameters have been taken as a flow velocity across the mitral valve on a transthoracic echo. There was a significant decrease in the mean values of log BNP (6.19 +/- 0.33 to 4.65 +/- 0.14) (P = 0.001) and E/A ratio (1.81 +/- 0.21 to 1.01 +/- 0.14) (P = 0.001) post pericardiectomy, with a positive correlation, r = 0.896 and 0.837, respectively, between the two values at both the time periods. There was significant improvement in the systolic parameters of the LV function, that is, stroke volume index, cardiac index, systemic vascular resistance index, and delivered oxygen index. However, no correlation was observed between these values and the BNP levels. We believe that BNP can be used as a marker for LV diastolic dysfunction in place of the E/A ratio in patients with CCP, undergoing pericardiectomy. However, more studies have to be performed for validation of the same. PMID:20442542

  14. The Impact of Renal Dysfunction on the Long Term Clinical Outcomes of Diabetic Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in the Drug-Eluting Stent Era

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hwan; Song, Young Bin; Hahn, Joo-Yong; Choi, Jin-Ho; Gwon, Hyeon-Cheol; Lee, Sang Hoon; Choi, Seung-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Background Limited data are available regarding the association between renal dysfunction and clinical outcomes in diabetic patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in the drug-eluting stent (DES) era. Methods Between March 2003 and December 2010, 2,181 diabetic patients were enrolled in a single-center registry. We divided diabetic patients into a renal dysfunction group (n = 518) and a non-renal dysfunction group (n = 1,663) according to a baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Propensity score matching analysis was also performed. The primary outcome was cardiac death. Results The median follow-up duration was 48 months. The rate of cardiac death was higher in the renal dysfunction group than in the non-renal dysfunction group (14.3% vs. 3.0%, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 3.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.47 to 5.35, p<0.001). Similarly, the incidence of stent thrombosis was significantly higher in the renal dysfunction group than in the non-renal dysfunction group (4.1% vs. 1.4%, adjusted HR 1.90, 95% CI 1.02 to 3.56, p = 0.04). After 1:1 propensity score matching (502 pairs), patients with renal dysfunction still had a higher rate of cardiac death (13.3% vs. 4.8%, HR 2.58, 95% CI 1.52 to 4.38, p<0.001) although there was no significant difference in the rate of stent thrombosis (4.0% vs. 2.8%, HR 1.31, 95% CI 0.64 to 2.69, p = 0.47). Conclusions Renal dysfunction is associated with long-term mortality for diabetic patients undergoing PCI in the DES era. PMID:26731526

  15. Monitoring diastolic dysfunction using a simplified algorithm in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting surgery

    PubMed Central

    Borde, Deepak Prakash; Asegaonkar, Balaji; Apsingekar, Pramod; Khade, Sujeet; Futane, Savni; Khodve, Bapu; Kedar, Mahesh; Deodhar, Anand; Takalkar, Unmesh; George, Antony; Joshi, Shreedhar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Left ventricle diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) is gaining importance as useful marker of mortality and morbidity in cardiac surgical patients. Different algorithms have been proposed for the intraoperative grading of DD. Knowledge of the particular grade of DD has clinical implications with the potential to modify therapy, but there is a paucity of literature on the role of diastolic function evaluation during off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCABG) surgery. Aims: The aim of this study was to monitor changes in LVDD using simplified algorithm proposed by Swaminathan et al. in patients undergoing OPCABG. Settings and Design: The study was conducted in a tertiary care level hospital; this was a prospective, observational study. Subjects and Methods: Fifty consecutive patients undergoing OPCABG were enrolled. Hemodynamic and echocardiographic parameters were measured at 6 stages in every patient namely after anesthetic induction (baseline), during left internal mammary artery (LIMA) to left anterior descending (LAD) grafting (LIMA → LAD), saphenous vein graft (SVG) to obtuse marginal (OM) grafting (SVG → OM), SVG to posterior descending artery (PDA) grafting (SVG → PDA), during proximal anastomosis of SVG to aorta, and postprotamine. The patients were classified in grades of LVDD as per simplified algorithm proposed by Swaminathan et al. using only intraoperatively measured E and E’. Results: The success rate of measurement and classification of LVDD was 98.92% (277 out of 280 measurements). The grades of LVDD varied significantly as per surgical steps with maximum downgrading occurring during OM and LAD grafting. During OM grafting, none of the patients had normal diastolic function while 29% of patients exhibited restrictive pattern (Grade 3 LVDD). Patients with normal baseline LV diastolic function also exhibited downgrading during OM and LAD grafting. Postprotamine, 37% of patients with normal baseline diastolic function continued to

  16. Implication of Right Ventricular Dysfunction on Long-term Outcome in Patients with Ischemic Cardiomyopathy Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting with or without Surgical Ventricular Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kukulski, Tomasz; She, Lilin; Racine, Normand; Gradinac, Sinisa; Panza, Julio A.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Chan, Kwan; Petrie, Mark C.; Lee, Kerry L.; Pellikka, Patricia A.; Romanov, Alexander; Biernat, Jolanta; Rouleau, Jean L.; Batlle, Carmen; Rogowski, Jan; Ferrazzi, Paolo; Zembala, Marian; Oh, Jae K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Whether right ventricular (RV) dysfunction affects clinical outcome after CABG with or without SVR is still unknown. Thus, the aim of the study was to assess the impact of RV dysfunction on clinical outcome in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with or without surgical ventricular reconstruction (SVR). Methods and Results Of 1,000 STICH patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) ≤35% and anterior dysfunction randomized to undergo CABG or CABG + SVR, baseline RV function could be assessed by echocardiography in 866 patients. Patients were followed for a median of 48 months. All-cause mortality or cardiovascular hospitalization was the primary endpoint, and all-cause mortality alone was a secondary endpoint. RV dysfunction was mild in 102 (12%) patients and moderate or severe in 78 (9%) patients. Moderate to severe RV dysfunction was associated with larger LV, lower EF, more severe mitral regurgitation, higher filling pressure, and higher pulmonary artery systolic pressure (all p<0.0001) compared to normal or mildly reduced RV function. A significant interaction between RV dysfunction and treatment allocation was observed. Patients with moderate or severe RV dysfunction who received CABG + SVR had significantly worse outcomes compared to patients who received CABG alone on both the primary (HR=1.86; CI=1.06–3.26; p=0.028) and the secondary endpoint (HR=3.37; CI=1.36–8.37; p=0.005). After adjusting for all other prognostic clinical factors, the interaction remained significant with respect to all-cause mortality (p=0.022). Conclusion Adding SVR to CABG may worsen long-term survival in ischemic cardiomyopathy patients with moderate to severe RV dysfunction, which reflects advanced LV remodeling. PMID:25451487

  17. Effect of dexmedetomidine on early postoperative cognitive dysfunction and peri-operative inflammation in elderly patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    LI, YUHONG; HE, RUI; CHEN, SHUNFU; QU, YULIAN

    2015-01-01

    The use of intravenous dexmedetomidine during surgery has been shown to suppress inflammatory cytokines peri-operatively. It has also been demonstrated that dexmedetomidine may benefit cognitive function in elderly patients following surgery; however, it is not clear whether dexmedetomidine reduces postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) via the suppression of inflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of dexmedetomidine on early POCD and inflammatory cytokines in elderly patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). The study comprised 120 elderly patients undergoing selective LC, who were randomly allocated to receive either dexmedetomidine intravenously (DEX group, n=60) or the same volume of normal saline (control group, n=60). Cognitive function was assessed by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores 1 day prior to surgery, 6 h following surgery and postoperatively on days 1 and 2. Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were also measured at these time-points. On the basis of whether the patients had POCD on the first day after surgery, patients were divided into a POCD group and a non-POCD group. Blood cytokine levels were compared between the patients with and without POCD. A total of 100 patients completed both pre- and postoperative MMSE tests. At 1 day following surgery, POCD occurred in 10/50 (20%) patients in the DEX group and in 21/50 (42%) patients in the control group (P=0.017). At 6 h following surgery, IL-1β, IL-6 and CRP levels showed significant increases (P<0.01) compared with the baseline levels in the two groups. Furthermore, in the control group, CRP levels showed a significant increase on day 1 (P<0.001) and day 2 (P=0.017) postoperatively. In the DEX group compared with the control group, IL-1β, IL-6 and CRP levels were markedly decreased at 6 h and 1 day after surgery (P<0.01). Concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6 and CRP were significantly higher in patients who

  18. Renal Dysfunction on Admission Predicts No-Reflow Phenomenon in Patients Undergoing Manual Thrombus Aspiration during Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Sensoy, Baris; Uzunget, Sezen Baglan; Acikgoz, SadikKadri; Sensoy, Nur; Sen, Fatih; Acar, Burak; Canpolat, Uğur; Ozeke, Ozcan; Cay, Serkan; Maden, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Background No-reflow is a frequent complication during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Available data is limited regarding its impact on short-term outcomes in patients undergoing manual thrombus aspiration. Renal impairment is also associated with higher complication rates in STEMI. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the impact of baseline renal dysfunction on the no- reflow phenomenon and the association of no-reflow phenomenon with early clinical outcomes. Methods A total of 94 consecutive STEMI patients who underwent primary stent-based PCI and thrombus aspiration were enrolled. No-reflow was established by the use of angiographic and electrocardiographic reperfusion criteria, respectively. Additionally angiographic and clinical follow-up data were also recorded. Results In our study, the no-reflow phenomenon was observed in 10 patients (11%) angiographically and in 23 patients (24%) electrocardiographically. Whereas, the the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) [odds ratio (OR) 10.4], hypertension (OR 6.2), previous MI (OR 6.5), previous PCI history, (OR 4.2), predilatation (OR 7.2), final balloon pressure (OR 0.9) were found to be the significant predictors of angiographic no-reflow, only reperfusion time was the predictor of electrocardiographic no-reflow (OR 1.12) at univariate analysis. After adjustment, lower eGFR (OR 14.8) was found to be the independent predictor for angiographic no-reflow. In-hospital mortality was more common in patients with either no-reflow condition separately. Conclusions Longer ischemic time and lower initial eGFR values were associated with no-reflow phenomenon. Irrespective of poor reperfusion criteria, no-reflow phenomenon is associated with in-hospital outcome. Future efforts should be made to reduce the incidence of no-reflow especially in patients with lower initial eGFR values. PMID:27122949

  19. Prevalence and impact of incompetence of internal jugular valve on postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients undergoing robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Roh, Go Un; Kim, Won Oak; Rha, Koon Ho; Lee, Byung Ho; Jeong, Hae Won; Na, Sungwon

    2016-01-01

    Internal jugular vein (IJV) is the main pathway of cerebral venous drainage and its valves prevent regurgitation of blood to the brain. IJV valve incompetence (IJVVI) is known to be associated with cerebral dysfunctions. It occurs more often in male over 50 years old, conditions elevating intra-abdominal or intra-thoracic pressure. In robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP), elderly male undergoes surgery in Trendelenburg position with pneumoperitoneum applied. Therefore, we assessed the IJVVI during RALRP and its influence on postoperative cognitive function. 57 patients undergoing RALRP were enrolled. Neurocognitive tests including Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Digit Symbol Substitution Test, Color Word Stroop Test, digit span test, and grooved pegboard test were performed the day before and 2 days after surgery. During surgery, IJVVI was assessed with ultrasonography in supine position with and without pneumoperitoneum, and Trendelenburg position with pneumoperitoneum. 50 patients underwent sonographic assessment and 41 patients completed neurocognitive examination. A total of 27 patients presented IJVVI, 19 patients in supine position without pneumoperitoneum, 7 patients in supine position with pneumoperitoneum and 1 patient in Trendelenburg position with pneumoperitoneum. In neurocognitive tests, patients with IJVVI showed statistically significant decline of score in MMSE postoperatively (p<0.05). IJVVI occurred in 38% in supine position but the incidence was increased to 54% after Trendelenburg position and pneumoperitoneum. Patients with IJVVI did not show significant differences in cognitive function tests except MMSE. Clinical and neurological significance of physiologic changes associated RALRP should be studied further. PMID:26921505

  20. Right heart function and prediction of respiratory morbidity in patients undergoing pneumonectomy with moderately severe cardiopulmonary dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J W; Bastanfar, M; Gabriel, F; Mascha, E

    1994-07-01

    Detailed hemodynamic monitoring was performed in 20 patients undergoing pneumonectomy with moderately severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Flow-directed pulmonary artery catheters capable of determining thermal dilution right ventricular ejection fraction and other indexes of right ventricular performance were placed in each patient. The mean actual and percent values for forced expiratory volume in 1 second in this group were 1.8 +/- 0.5 L and 66% +/- 18%, respectively. Pulmonary hypertension was present in 76.5% of patients at the baseline nonintubated state. At pulmonary artery clamping, 53.8% of this subgroup had no change or a mean drop of 8 mm Hg in pressure. The remaining had a mean rise of 12 mm Hg. Mean systolic pulmonary artery pressures in this subset (41 mm Hg) did not change from the nonintubated state to pulmonary artery clamping. Patients with normal pulmonary artery pressures before intubation had an average rise of only 4 mm Hg at pulmonary artery clamping. In the immediate postoperative period, only 10.0% of the entire group had normal pulmonary artery pressures. Right ventricular ejection fraction and pulmonary vascular resistance were normal in 58.8% and 94.1%, respectively, at the baseline nonintubated state. Abnormal right ventricular ejection fraction values (< 45%) were present in 70.0% of patients at pulmonary artery clamping; 25.0% fell below 35%. Pulmonary vascular resistance increased above 200 dyne.sec.cm-5 in 30.0% at pulmonary artery clamping. No correlation was found between right ventricular ejection fraction and pulmonary vascular resistance or pulmonary artery pressure during operation. No pulmonary function test or hemodynamic variable measured in this study accurately predicted the days of hospital stay or early postoperative cardiopulmonary morbidity. At the baseline nonintubated state, no parameter consistently predicted late New York Heart Association class III/IV. At the time of pulmonary artery clamping, a right

  1. Implications of worse renal dysfunction and medical comorbidities in patients with NASH undergoing liver transplant evaluation: impact on MELD and more.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan W; Tsai, Naoky T; Wong, Linda L

    2011-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are referred for liver transplant (LT). Our objective was to characterize patients with NASH among referred LT candidates (from 1998 to 2008), and we compared demographics, etiology of liver disease, diabetes, hypertension, smoking, obesity, cardiac disease, cancer, laboratory data, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD), and outcomes between NASH and non-NASH patients. Patients with NASH (n = 71) were compared to other chronic liver disease (n = 472). Patients with NASH were older (58.7 vs. 52.5 yr, p < 0.0001), Asian (53.5% vs. 34.7%, p = 0.03) and women (50.7% vs. 32.1%, p = 0.003). Patients with NASH had more diabetes, hypertension, obesity, cardiac disease, and smoking history (p < 0.05). Patients with NASH were equally likely to have liver cancer, but more likely to have non-liver cancers (20.8% vs. 4.4%, p = 0.008). There was no difference in MELD, but patients with NASH had lower protime/international normalized ratio (1.14 vs. 1.27, p = 0.04) and higher creatinine (1.26 vs. 0.98 mg/dL, p = 0.0018). Patients with NASH were equally likely to undergo evaluation, listing, and transplantation compared to non-NASH patients. While all patients with chronic liver disease can have renal dysfunction because of hepatorenal syndrome, patients with NASH have more renal dysfunction, perhaps related to diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Transplant centers should consider this carefully in selection of candidates for LT. PMID:21958082

  2. Assessment of the effect of off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery on right ventricle function using strain and strain rate imaging

    PubMed Central

    Khani, Mohammad; Hosseintash, Mahsa; Foroughi, Mahnoosh; Naderian, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Background Right ventricle function significantly decreases after coronary artery bypass surgery; as one of the likely causes, such a condition is attributed to the use of cardiopulmonary pump (CPB). Because nowadays there is a tendency toward increasing use of off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery, this study was conducted to evaluate the right ventricle function after this type of surgery using strain and strain rate imaging (SRI) echocardiography. Methods This study was conducted on 30 patients, candidate for elective OPCAB surgery, between 2011 and 2012. Standard echocardiography was performed before the surgery and the right ventricle function was examined using strain and SRI echocardiography. Then patient underwent surgery, 6 days and 3 months after surgery they underwent echocardiography again and the results obtained from the three stages were compared with each other. Results Participants included 30 patients (23 males and 7 females) with a mean age of 66±11 years. Compared to the prior of the surgery, 6 days and 3 months after the surgery there was a significant decrease in tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) at the lateral annulus of tricuspid valve, and strain and SRI of right ventricle. However, the values obtained 3 months after surgery were significantly higher than those obtained after 6 days. In other words, the right ventricle function 6 days after the surgery had dropped, however some of the values recovered 3 months after the surgery. Conclusions The findings of this study are consistent with other studies in this field and showed that after coronary artery surgery a decline occurs in right ventricular function. However, more detailed quantitative strain and SRI parameters which were measured in our study showed that at the early days after the OPCAB surgery there is a decline in the right ventricle function which is relatively reversible at longer intervals (3 months after surgery). PMID

  3. Thymoglobulin prevents chronic graft-versus-host disease, chronic lung dysfunction, and late transplant-related mortality: long-term follow-up of a randomized trial in patients undergoing unrelated donor transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, Andrea; Lamparelli, Teresa; Barisione, Giovanni; Bruzzi, Paolo; Guidi, Stefano; Alessandrino, Paolo Emilio; di Bartolomeo, Paolo; Oneto, Rosi; Bruno, Barbara; Sacchi, Nicoletta; van Lint, Maria Teresa; Bosi, Alberto

    2006-05-01

    This is an update of a randomized study on antithymocyte globulin (ATG; Thymoglobulin) before transplantation in patients undergoing unmanipulated marrow transplantation from unrelated donors. The median follow-up for surviving patients is 5.7 years. At last follow-up, chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was scored in 60% of non-ATG and in 37% of ATG patients (P=.05), and extensive chronic GVHD was present in 41% and 15%, respectively (P=.01). Chronic lung dysfunction was diagnosed in 51% versus 19% of patients (P=.005). Forced vital capacity decreased significantly with time in non-ATG patients (P=.005), but not in patients who received ATG (P=.30). The proportion of patients with Karnofsky scores of >or=90% at 4 years was 57% versus 89% in non-ATG versus ATG patients (P=.03). The actuarial 6-year survival for all patients randomized was 31% versus 44% (non-ATG versus ATG; P=.80). The cumulative incidence of transplant-related mortality was 51% versus 41% (P=.70) and of relapse was 32% versus 40% (P=.90). For patients who survived 1 year, transplant-related mortality was 25% versus 3% (P=.03), and actuarial survival was 58% versus 85% (P=.09). In conclusion, the addition of ATG to cyclosporine/methotrexate provides significant protection against extensive chronic GVHD and chronic lung dysfunction, reduces late transplant mortality, and improves quality of life in patients undergoing unrelated donor transplantation. PMID:16635791

  4. Prevalence and predictors of mechanical dyssynchrony as defined by phase analysis in patients with left ventricular dysfunction undergoing gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Samad, Zainab; Atchley, Allen E.; Trimble, Mark A.; Sun, Jie-Lena; Shaw, Linda K.; Pagnanelli, Robert; Chen, Ji; Garcia, Ernest V.; Iskandrian, Ami E.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Borges-Neto, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Background A novel method to quantify dyssynchrony using phase analysis of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging has been developed. We sought to determine the prevalence of SPECT-derived mechanical dyssynchrony, and we report clinical variables which predict mechanical dyssynchrony in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. Methods We used a count-based Fourier analysis method to convert the regional myocardial counts from discrete frames per cardiac cycle into a continuous thickening function which allows resolution of the phase of the onset of myocardial contraction. The standard deviation of left ventricular phases (Phase SD) describes the regional phase dispersion as a measure of dyssynchrony. Significant dyssynchrony was defined as Phase SD ≥ 43°. 260 patients with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35% were examined. Results The prevalence of mechanical dyssynchrony in the entire cohort of patients studied was 52%. Univariate predictors of Phase SD were age (P = .03), black race (P = .0005), QRS duration, EF, EDV, summed stress score (SSS), and summed rest score (SRS) (all P = <.0001). Black race, male gender, QRS EF, and SRS were independent predictors of SPECT-based mechanical dyssynchrony. Conclusions Significant SPECT-based mechanical dyssynchrony is relatively common among patients with left ventricular dysfunction. In a population of patients with predominantly ischemic heart disease referred for SPECT, a reduced EF, increasing QRS duration, severity and extent of myocardial scar on SPECT imaging are independent predictors of mechanical dyssynchrony and may serve to identify patients for dyssynchrony screening. PMID:21082299

  5. Impact of trimetazidine on incidence of myocardial injury and contrast-induced nephropathy in diabetic patients with renal dysfunction undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Mohamed

    2014-08-01

    Trimetazidine is an anti-ischemic agent with antioxidant activity. This study evaluated the effect of periprocedural administration of trimetazidine on the incidence of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)-induced myocardial injury and contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) in diabetic patients with mild-to-moderate renal dysfunction. One hundred patients with a mean glomerular filtration rate of 48 ± 16 (ml/min/1.73 m(2)) were prospectively enrolled, then randomly assigned to receive (50 patients; trimetazidine group) or not receive (50 patients; control group) periprocedural trimetazidine (70 mg/day) for 72 hours. The serum creatinine level was measured pre-PCI, 72 hours, and 10 days thereafter. An increase in the serum creatinine level by >0.5 mg/dl or 0.25% of the baseline value is considered as CIN. Cardiac troponin I levels were measured before and 6, 12, and 24 hours after PCI. Mean age of the study cohort was 59 ± 6 years (men 68%). The serum creatinine level in the control group increased significantly 3 days after PCI and decreased on the tenth day. However, it showed no significant change in the trimetazidine group. Incidence of CIN was 12% in the trimetazidine group and 28% in the control group (p <0.05). Cardiac troponin I levels were significantly reduced in the trimetazidine group (6 hours: 8 ± 0.3 vs 16 ± 0.2 pg/ml, 12 hours: 13 ± 0.9 vs 24 ± 0.8 pg/ml, 24 hours: 7 ± 0.7 vs 14 ± 0.3 pg/ml, p <0.001). In conclusion, trimetazidine intake before elective PCI in diabetic patients with mild-to-moderate renal dysfunction is associated with decreased incidence of CIN and myocardial injury. PMID:24927970

  6. Cardiac, renal, and neurological benefits of preoperative levosimendan administration in patients with right ventricular dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension undergoing cardiac surgery: evaluation with two biomarkers neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and neuronal enolase

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Orriach, José Luis; Ariza-Villanueva, Daniel; Florez-Vela, Ana; Garrido-Sánchez, Lourdes; Moreno-Cortés, María Isabel; Galán-Ortega, Manuel; Ramírez-Fernández, Alicia; Alcaide Torres, Juan; Fernandez, Concepción Santiago; Navarro Arce, Isabel; Melero-Tejedor, José María; Rubio-Navarro, Manuel; Cruz-Mañas, José

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate if the preoperative administration of levosimendan in patients with right ventricular (RV) dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, and high perioperative risk would improve cardiac function and would also have a protective effect on renal and neurological functions, assessed using two biomarkers neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (N-GAL) and neuronal enolase. Methods This is an observational study. Twenty-seven high-risk cardiac patients with RV dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension, scheduled for cardiac valve surgery, were prospectively followed after preoperative administration of levosimendan. Levosimendan was administered preoperatively on the day before surgery. All patients were considered high risk of cardiac and perioperative renal complications. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography, renal function by urinary N-GAL levels, and the acute kidney injury scale. Neuronal damage was assessed by neuron-specific enolase levels. Results After surgery, no significant variations were found in mean and SE levels of N-GAL (14.31 [28.34] ng/mL vs 13.41 [38.24] ng/mL), neuron-specific enolase (5.40 [0.41] ng/mL vs 4.32 [0.61] ng/mL), or mean ± SD creatinine (1.06±0.24 mg/dL vs 1.25±0.37 mg/dL at 48 hours). RV dilatation decreased from 4.23±0.7 mm to 3.45±0.6 mm and pulmonary artery pressure from 58±18 mmHg to 42±19 mmHg at 48 hours. Conclusion Preoperative administration of levosimendan has shown a protective role against cardiac, renal, and neurological damage in patients with a high risk of multiple organ dysfunctions undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:27143905

  7. Circulating microRNAs indicate cardioprotection by sevoflurane inhalation in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XIAO; LIU, XIAOPENG; WANG, RUIKE; LUO, HUI; QIN, GANG; WANG, LU; YE, ZHI; GUO, QULIAN; WANG, E

    2016-01-01

    In patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB), it is important to attenuate myocardium injury during the surgery. The present study aimed to observe the cardioprotection induced by sevoflurane induction and maintenance compared with propofol intravenous anesthesia, and to detect its potential protection against acute myocardial injury with sensitive biomarkers. In total, 36 patients undergoing OPCAB were randomly assigned into two groups, receiving sevoflurane (n=18) or propofol (n=18) as the induction and maintenance anesthetic agent. The depth of anesthesia in the two groups was kept at a bispectral index value of 40–50. Physiological and hemodynamic parameters were recorded during the surgery. Cardiac troponin-I (cTnI), creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and two microRNAs (miR-499 and miR-208b) were also measured during and subsequent to surgery. Nno statistically significant differences were observed in the physiological and hemodynamic parameters between the two groups prior to surgery. Following surgery, the cardiac output and stroke volume improved significantly in the sevoflurane group (P<0.05). In addition, patients in the sevoflurane group had lower miR-499 (P<0.05) and miR-208b (P<0.01) levels at 12 h after surgery when compared with the propofol group. However, no significant differences in cTnI, CK-MB and LDH levels were observed following surgery between the two groups. In conclusion, volatile induction and maintenance with sevoflurane resulted in some extent of cardiac function improvement in patients undergoing OPCAB. Cardioprotection by sevoflurane is suggested by reduced cardiac injury compared with propofol, and indicated by the sensitive biomarkers, circulating miR-499 and miR-208b. PMID:27284310

  8. Plasma levels of growth differentiation factor-15 are associated with myocardial injury in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhize; Li, Haiqing; Qi, Quan; Gong, Wenhui; Qian, Cheng; Dong, Rong; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Zhou, Mi; Cai, Junfeng; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Anqing; Ye, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) has recently emerged as a risk predictor in patients with cardiovascular diseases. We therefore aimed to investigate the role of GDF-15 in the occurrence of cardiac injury during off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). 55 consecutive patients with coronary artery diseases were recruited in this prospective, observational study. All patients were operated for OPCAB surgery. Serial blood samples were collected preoperatively, 12 hours and 36 hours after surgery. GDF-15, together with C-reactive protein, cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase MB and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide levels in plasma were measured at each time-point. GDF-15 levels increased significantly at 12 hours after surgery, attaining nearly 2.5 times the baseline levels (p < 0.001). Postoperative GDF-15 levels correlated positively with cTnI (p = 0.003) and EuroSCORE II (p = 0.013). According to the ROC curves, postoperative plasma GDF-15 was found to be the best biomarker to predict perioperative cardiac injury, compared with cTnI, CK-MB and EuroSCORE II. Circulating GDF-15 is a promising novel biomarker for identifying perioperative myocardial injury in patients undergoing OPCAB. PMID:27311391

  9. Plasma levels of growth differentiation factor-15 are associated with myocardial injury in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhize; Li, Haiqing; Qi, Quan; Gong, Wenhui; Qian, Cheng; Dong, Rong; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Zhou, Mi; Cai, Junfeng; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Anqing; Ye, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) has recently emerged as a risk predictor in patients with cardiovascular diseases. We therefore aimed to investigate the role of GDF-15 in the occurrence of cardiac injury during off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). 55 consecutive patients with coronary artery diseases were recruited in this prospective, observational study. All patients were operated for OPCAB surgery. Serial blood samples were collected preoperatively, 12 hours and 36 hours after surgery. GDF-15, together with C-reactive protein, cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase MB and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide levels in plasma were measured at each time-point. GDF-15 levels increased significantly at 12 hours after surgery, attaining nearly 2.5 times the baseline levels (p < 0.001). Postoperative GDF-15 levels correlated positively with cTnI (p = 0.003) and EuroSCORE II (p = 0.013). According to the ROC curves, postoperative plasma GDF-15 was found to be the best biomarker to predict perioperative cardiac injury, compared with cTnI, CK-MB and EuroSCORE II. Circulating GDF-15 is a promising novel biomarker for identifying perioperative myocardial injury in patients undergoing OPCAB. PMID:27311391

  10. Preoperative levosimendan decreases mortality and the development of low cardiac output in high-risk patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Ricardo; Degrange, Marcela; Del Mazo, Carlos; Tanus, Eduardo; Porcile, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The calcium sensitizer levosimendan has been used in cardiac surgery for the treatment of postoperative low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) and difficult weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of preoperative treatment with levosimendan on 30-day mortality, the risk of developing LCOS and the requirement for inotropes, vasopressors and intra-aortic balloon pumps in patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction. METHODS: Patient with severe left ventricular dysfunction and an ejection fraction <25% undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with CPB were admitted 24 h before surgery and were randomly assigned to receive levosimendan (loading dose 10 μg/kg followed by a 23 h continuous infusion of 0.1μg/kg/min) or a placebo. RESULTS: From December 1, 2002 to June 1, 2008, a total of 252 patients were enrolled (127 in the levosimendan group and 125 in the control group). Individuals treated with levosimendan exhibited a lower incidence of complicated weaning from CPB (2.4% versus 9.6%; P<0.05), decreased mortality (3.9% versus 12.8%; P<0.05) and a lower incidence of LCOS (7.1% versus 20.8%; P<0.05) compared with the control group. The levosimendan group also had a lower requirement for inotropes (7.9% versus 58.4%; P<0.05), vasopressors (14.2% versus 45.6%; P<0.05) and intra-aortic balloon pumps (6.3% versus 30.4%; P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Patients with severe left ventricle dysfunction (ejection fraction <25%) undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with CPB who were pretreated with levosimendan exhibited lower mortality, a decreased risk for developing LCOS and a reduced requirement for inotropes, vasopressors and intra-aortic balloon pumps. Studies with a larger number of patients are required to confirm whether these findings represent a new strategy to reduce the operative risk in this high-risk patient population. PMID:23620700

  11. The role of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in predicting acute kidney injury in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vishal; Mehta, Yatin; Gupta, Abhinav; Sharma, Reetesh; Raizada, Arun; Trehan, Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a commonly encountered postoperative complication after cardiac surgery especially in high risk patients. AKI though seen more commonly after conventional on pump coronary artery bypass surgery (CCABG), is not uncommon after off pump coronary bypass surgery (OPCAB). Various biomarkers have shown promise over last one decade as an early marker for predicting AKI postoperatively. NGAL is one such biomarker whose concentration is increased in urine after any nephrotoxic and ischemic insult. The objective of this study was to assess the role of urine NGAL in predicting AKI after OPCAB in patients with increased risk of developing AKI. Design: A prospective cohort study. Setting: A clinical study in a multi specialty hospital. Participants: Eighty patients. Materials and Methods: study was approved by the hospital research ethics committee. 80 patients posted for OPCAB with an increased risk of developing AKI defined as having a Cleveland Clinic Foundation Acute renal failure scoring System score of ≥6 were included in the study. Patients with coronary angiography (CAG) within 48 hrs prior to surgery, pre-existing AKI, preoperative renal replacement therapy (RRT) and CKD stage 5 were excluded. Urine NGAL level before the start of surgery baseline and at 4 hrs post surgery were done. Renal function tests were assessed on the day of surgery (4 hrs post surgery) and on the next three days. Result: Seven patients developed AKI as defined by acute kidney infection network (AKIN) and risk injury failure loss end stage (RIFLE) criteria for AKI. NGAL value at 4 hrs in patients who developed AKI was significantly higher than in those patients who did not develop AKI (P < 0.05). Conclusion: urine NGAL is an early biomarker of acute kidney injury in patients undergoing OPCAB surgeries. However, large multicentre studies may be needed to confirm it. PMID:27052061

  12. Urinary Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Urinary Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... dysfunction is normal following initial therapy for localized prostate cancer. But it’s important to realize that not all ...

  13. Cystatin C as a predictive marker of renal dysfunction and mid-term outcomes following off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Youn, Young-Nam; Choo, Hyun Chel; Lee, Sak; Yoo, Kyung-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether plasma cystatin C and creatinine levels after isolated off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) are predictive of postoperative renal dysfunction and clinical outcomes. Methods Between January 2008 and December 2013, 1033 who underwent isolated OPCAB were recruited. The patients were divided into three groups according to the preoperative level of cystatin C: low (0.83 mg/L>), mid (0.83–1.13 mg/L) and high (1.13 mg/L<). The endpoints of all-cause mortality and major adverse cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events were compared among three groups using the Kaplan–Meier method. The predictive power of cystatin C was compared with creatinine using receiver operating curves. Results Follow-up was complete in all of the included patients at a mean of 2.9±1.5 years. Within the follow-up period, 9 early (30-day mortality) and 46 late deaths occurred. The 30-day mortality was zero, four (44%), and five (56%) cases in low, mid and high groups, respectively (p=0.03). The cut-off value of cystatin C for renal dysfunction prediction was approximately 1.04 (mg/L, p<0.001), and cystatin C showed greater predictive power than creatinine for renal dysfunction (area under the curve=0.73 vs 0.65; p=0.01). One-year and five-year overall survival in low, mid and high groups were 99.2%, 98.9% and 94.3%, and 97.9%, 97.3% and 86.3%, respectively (low vs high, p=0.01). Conclusions Cystatin C is a stronger predictor of postoperative renal dysfunction than serum creatinine, and its level is directly correlated with mid-term OPCAB adverse results. PMID:26215986

  14. Real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation by exhaled ethylene in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cristescu, Simona M.; Kiss, Rudolf; te Lintel Hekkert, Sacco; Dalby, Miles; Harren, Frans J. M.; Risby, Terence H.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary and systemic organ injury produced by oxidative stress including lipid peroxidation is a fundamental tenet of ischemia-reperfusion injury, inflammatory response to cardiac surgery, and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) but is not routinely measured in a surgically relevant time frame. To initiate a paradigm shift toward noninvasive and real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation, we have explored pulmonary excretion and dynamism of exhaled breath ethylene during cardiac surgery to test the hypothesis that surgical technique and ischemia-reperfusion triggers lipid peroxidation. We have employed laser photoacoustic spectroscopy to measure real-time trace concentrations of ethylene from the patient breath and from the CPB machine. Patients undergoing aortic or mitral valve surgery-requiring CPB (n = 15) or off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB) (n = 7) were studied. Skin and tissue incision by diathermy caused striking (>30-fold) increases in exhaled ethylene resulting in elevated levels until CPB. Gaseous ethylene in the CPB circuit was raised upon the establishment of CPB (>10-fold) and decreased over time. Reperfusion of myocardium and lungs did not appear to enhance ethylene levels significantly. During OPCAB surgery, we have observed increased ethylene in 16 of 30 documented reperfusion events associated with coronary and aortic anastomoses. Therefore, novel real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation in the intraoperative setting provides unparalleled detail of endogenous and surgery-triggered production of ethylene. Diathermy and unprotected regional myocardial ischemia and reperfusion are the most significant contributors to increased ethylene. PMID:25128523

  15. Real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation by exhaled ethylene in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Cristescu, Simona M; Kiss, Rudolf; Hekkert, Sacco te Lintel; Dalby, Miles; Harren, Frans J M; Risby, Terence H; Marczin, Nandor

    2014-10-01

    Pulmonary and systemic organ injury produced by oxidative stress including lipid peroxidation is a fundamental tenet of ischemia-reperfusion injury, inflammatory response to cardiac surgery, and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) but is not routinely measured in a surgically relevant time frame. To initiate a paradigm shift toward noninvasive and real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation, we have explored pulmonary excretion and dynamism of exhaled breath ethylene during cardiac surgery to test the hypothesis that surgical technique and ischemia-reperfusion triggers lipid peroxidation. We have employed laser photoacoustic spectroscopy to measure real-time trace concentrations of ethylene from the patient breath and from the CPB machine. Patients undergoing aortic or mitral valve surgery-requiring CPB (n = 15) or off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB) (n = 7) were studied. Skin and tissue incision by diathermy caused striking (> 30-fold) increases in exhaled ethylene resulting in elevated levels until CPB. Gaseous ethylene in the CPB circuit was raised upon the establishment of CPB (> 10-fold) and decreased over time. Reperfusion of myocardium and lungs did not appear to enhance ethylene levels significantly. During OPCAB surgery, we have observed increased ethylene in 16 of 30 documented reperfusion events associated with coronary and aortic anastomoses. Therefore, novel real-time monitoring of endogenous lipid peroxidation in the intraoperative setting provides unparalleled detail of endogenous and surgery-triggered production of ethylene. Diathermy and unprotected regional myocardial ischemia and reperfusion are the most significant contributors to increased ethylene. PMID:25128523

  16. Bowel Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Bowel Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... rectal worse. Back to Side Effects Print | Understanding Prostate Cancer Research Faces of Prostate Cancer About PCF Take ...

  17. Early outcomes of coronary artery bypass with and without cardiopulmonary bypass in octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, AD; Bhatnagar, G; Cutrara, CA; Ahmed, SM; McKenzie, N; Quantz, M; Kiaii, B; Menkis, A; Fox, S; Stitt, L; Novick, RJ

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery has been successfully used in diverse patient populations and has been postulated to be safer than conventional coronary artery bypass (CCAB) surgery in some high-risk patients, including the elderly. OBJECTIVE To compare the safety of OPCAB surgery versus CCAB surgery in the octogenarian population of two large southwestern Ontario cardiac surgical units. RESULTS Two hundred thirty-six consecutive octogenarians underwent primary isolated coronary artery bypass sugery from November 2000 to March 2005. Patients undergoing OPCAB surgery tended to have higher Parsonnet scores, while patients undergoing CCAB surgery had a greater number of emergent operations. The Canadian Cardiovascular Network predicted that mortality risk was similar in both groups. In-hospital mortality was similar between groups, as was postoperative myocardial infarction and new onset of renal dysfunction. However, in the OPCAB group, there was a decreased incidence of postoperative neurological dysfunction (2.3% in the OPCAB group versus 10.5% in the CCAB group, P=0.01), in particular cerebrovascular accidents (1.5% in the OPCAB group versus 7.6% in the CCAB group, P=0.05), and a decreased incidence of prolonged intubation (5.3% in the OPCAB group versus 13.3% in the CCAB group, P=0.04). Multivariable analysis found that cardiopulmonary bypass had no significant impact on mortality or length of stay. CONCLUSIONS In octogenarian patients, OPCAB surgery is as safe as CCAB surgery in terms of mortality and major morbidity. Furthermore, a significant reduction in neurological dysfunction and prolonged intubation was seen in the OPCAB group compared with the CCAB group. PMID:16957802

  18. Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Euy-Myoung; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing number of patients affected, the understanding of diastolic dysfunction and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is still poor. Clinical trials, largely based on successful treatments for systolic heart failure, have been disappointing, suggesting that HFpEF has a different pathology to that of systolic dysfunction. In this review, general concepts, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of diastolic dysfunction are summarized, with an emphasis on new experiments suggesting that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of at least some forms of the disease. This observation has lead to potential new diagnostics and therapeutics for diastolic dysfunction and heart failure caused by diastolic dysfunction. PMID:25746522

  19. Myocardial Viability and Impact of Surgical Ventricular Reconstruction on Outcomes of Patients with Severe Left Ventricular Dysfunction Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: Results of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Holly, Thomas A.; Bonow, Robert O.; Arnold, J. Malcolm O.; Oh, Jae K.; Varadarajan, Padmini; Pohost, Gerald M.; Haddad, Haissam; Jones, Robert H.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Birkenfeld, Bozena; Asch, Federico M.; Malinowski, Marcin; Barretto, Rodrigo; Kalil, Renato A.K.; Berman, Daniel S.; Sun, Jie-Lena; Lee, Kerry L.; Panza, Julio A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective In the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) trial, surgical ventricular reconstruction plus coronary artery bypass surgery was not associated with a reduction in the rate of death or cardiac hospitalization compared to bypass alone. We hypothesized that the absence of viable myocardium identifies patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction who have a greater benefit with coronary artery bypass graft surgery and surgical ventricular reconstruction compared to bypass alone. Methods Myocardial viability was assessed by single photon computed tomography in 267 of the 1,000 patients randomized to bypass or bypass plus surgical ventricular reconstruction in STICH. Myocardial viability was assessed on a per patient basis as well as regionally based on pre-specified criteria. Results At 3 years, there was no difference in mortality or the combined outcome of death or cardiac hospitalization between those with and those without viability, and there was no significant interaction between the type of surgery and global viability status with respect to mortality or death plus cardiac hospitalization. Furthermore, there was no difference in mortality or death plus cardiac hospitalization between those with and without anterior wall or apical scar, and no significant interaction between the presence of scar in these regions and the type of surgery with respect to mortality. Conclusion In patients with coronary artery disease and severe regional left ventricular dysfunction, assessment of myocardial viability does not identify patients who will derive a mortality benefit from adding surgical ventricular reconstruction to coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:25152476

  20. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yafi, Faysal A; Jenkins, Lawrence; Albersen, Maarten; Corona, Giovanni; Isidori, Andrea M; Goldfarb, Shari; Maggi, Mario; Nelson, Christian J; Parish, Sharon; Salonia, Andrea; Tan, Ronny; Mulhall, John P; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a multidimensional but common male sexual dysfunction that involves an alteration in any of the components of the erectile response, including organic, relational and psychological. Roles for nonendocrine (neurogenic, vasculogenic and iatrogenic) and endocrine pathways have been proposed. Owing to its strong association with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, cardiac assessment may be warranted in men with symptoms of erectile dysfunction. Minimally invasive interventions to relieve the symptoms of erectile dysfunction include lifestyle modifications, oral drugs, injected vasodilator agents and vacuum erection devices. Surgical therapies are reserved for the subset of patients who have contraindications to these nonsurgical interventions, those who experience adverse effects from (or are refractory to) medical therapy and those who also have penile fibrosis or penile vascular insufficiency. Erectile dysfunction can have deleterious effects on a man's quality of life; most patients have symptoms of depression and anxiety related to sexual performance. These symptoms, in turn, affect his partner's sexual experience and the couple's quality of life. This Primer highlights numerous aspects of erectile dysfunction, summarizes new treatment targets and ongoing preclinical studies that evaluate new pharmacotherapies, and covers the topic of regenerative medicine, which represents the future of sexual medicine. PMID:27188339

  1. Gustatory dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, T.; Abikshyeet, P.; Sitra, G.; Gokulanathan, S.; Vaithiyanadane, V.; Jeelani, S.

    2014-01-01

    Tastes in humans provide a vital tool for screening soluble chemicals for food evaluation, selection, and avoidance of potentially toxic substances. Taste or gustatory dysfunctions are implicated in loss of appetite, unintended weight loss, malnutrition, and reduced quality of life. Dental practitioners are often the first clinicians to be presented with complaints about taste dysfunction. This brief review provides a summary of the common causes of taste disorders, problems associated with assessing taste function in a clinical setting and management options available to the dental practitioner. PMID:25210380

  2. Ejaculatory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Elizabeth; Carpenter, Christina; Oates, Robert D

    2014-02-01

    Ejaculatory dysfunction may occur after many different disorders ranging from traumatic spinal cord injury to diabetes mellitus. With an understanding of the many facets and nuances of the ejaculatory apparatus, both anatomic and neurologic, the well-versed clinician can proceed along a safe, efficient, and appropriate treatment algorithm to help affected men and their partners achieve parenthood. PMID:24286771

  3. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... or vascular problems, will have a more difficult time returning to pre-treatment function. Management of Erectile Dysfunction When a man is sexually aroused, the erectile nerves running alongside the penis stimulate the ... blood to rush in. At the same time, tiny valves at the base of the penis ...

  4. Memory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Amici, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Memory is the cognitive ability that allows to acquire, store and recall information; its dysfunction is called amnesia and can be a presentation of unilateral ischemic stroke in the territory of the posterior cerebral and anterior choroidal artery as well as subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:22377863

  5. Sensory Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Web version Sensory Dysfunction Overview Why are smell and taste important? Your senses of smell and taste let you fully enjoy the scents ... bitter and sour. Flavor involves both taste and smell. For example, because a person is able to ...

  6. Dysfunctional voiding.

    PubMed

    Chiozza, M L

    2002-01-01

    Wetting may be considered the Cinderella of paediatric medicine. Before discussing dysfunctional voiding, the milestones of the normal development of continence in the child and the definitions used to describe this topic are presented. Bladder storage requires (1): accommodation of increasing volumes of urine at low intravesical pressure and with appropriate sensation; (2): a bladder outlet that is closed and not modified during increase in intra-abdominal pressure; (3): absence of involuntary bladder contractions. Development of continence in the child involves three independent factors maturing concomitantly: (1) development of normal bladder capacity; (2) maturation of urethral sphincter function; (3) development of neural control over bladder-sphincter function. All these processes are discussed. Abnormalities of any of these maturational sequences, which run parallel and overlapping, may result in clinically evident abnormalities of bladder sphincter control. Although dysfunctional voiding (DV) in children is very common its prevalence has not been well studied and, to date, and its origin is not well known. In a correct evaluation of functional voiding we must take into account different elements: the bladder capacity (that increases during the first 8 years of life roughly 30 ml per year), the micturition frequency, post-void residual volumes, bladder dynamics, urinary flow rates. Thus the correct assessment of children with lower urinary tract dysfunction should include a detailed history. Signs of DV range from urge syndrome to complex incontinence patterns during the day and the night. In addition to incontinence problems, children may have frequency, urgency, straining to void, weak or interrupted urinary stream, urinary tract infections (UTIs) and chronic constipation with or without encopresis. DV are also referred in enuretic children who wet the bed more than one time per night and have a functional bladder capacity lower than attended for age

  7. Intraoperative conversion to on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting is independently associated with higher mortality in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting: A propensity-matched analysis

    PubMed Central

    Borde, Deepak Prakash; Asegaonkar, Balaji; Apsingekar, Pramod; Khade, Sujeet; Futane, Savni; Khodve, Bapu; Annachhatre, Ajita; Puranik, Manish; Sargar, Sayaji; Belapurkar, Yogesh; Deodhar, Anand; George, Antony; Joshi, Shreedhar

    2016-01-01

    Context: One of the main limitations of off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) is the occasional need for intraoperative conversion (IOC) to on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. IOC is associated with a significantly increased risk of mortality and postoperative morbidity. The impact of IOC on outcome cannot be assessed by a randomized control design. Aims: The objective of this study was to analyze the incidence, risk factors, and impact of IOC on the outcome in patients undergoing OPCAB. Settings and Design: Three tertiary care level hospitals; retrospective observational study. Subjects and Methods: This retrospective observational study included 1971 consecutive patients undergoing OPCAB from January 2012 to October 2015 at three tertiary care level hospitals by four surgeons. The incidence, patient characteristics, cause of IOC, and its impact on outcome were studied. Statistical Analysis Used: The cohort was divided into two groups according to IOC. Univariate logistic regression was performed to describe the predictors of IOC. Variables that were found to be significant in univariate analysis were introduced into multivariate model, and adjusted odds ratio (OR) was calculated. To further assess the independent effect of IOC on mortality, propensity score matching with a 5:1 ratio of non-IOC to IOC was performed. Results: The overall all-cause in-hospital mortality was 2.6%. IOC was needed in 128 (6.49%) patients. The mortality in the IOC group was significantly higher than non-IOC group (21 of 128 [16.4%] vs. 31 of 1843 [1.7%], P = 0.0001). The most common cause for IOC was hemodynamic disturbances during grafting to the obtuse marginal artery (51/128; 40%). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, left main disease, pulmonary hypertension, and mitral regurgitation independently predicted IOC. We obtained a propensity-matched sample of 692 patients (No IOC 570; IOC 122), and IOC had OR of 16.26 (confidence interval 6.3–41; P < 0

  8. Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Society for Reproductive Medicine Sexual dysfunction and infertility What is sexual dysfunction and how common is ... and 40% of women. For couples dealing with infertility, it is even more common. Often, people ignore ...

  9. All men with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction require a cardiovascular workup.

    PubMed

    Miner, Martin; Nehra, Ajay; Jackson, Graham; Bhasin, Shalender; Billups, Kevin; Burnett, Arthur L; Buvat, Jacques; Carson, Culley; Cunningham, Glenn; Ganz, Peter; Goldstein, Irwin; Guay, Andre; Hackett, Geoff; Kloner, Robert A; Kostis, John B; LaFlamme, K Elizabeth; Montorsi, Piero; Ramsey, Melinda; Rosen, Raymond; Sadovsky, Richard; Seftel, Allen; Shabsigh, Ridwan; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Wu, Frederick

    2014-03-01

    An association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease has long been recognized, and studies suggest that erectile dysfunction is an independent marker of cardiovascular disease risk. Therefore, assessment and management of erectile dysfunction may help identify and reduce the risk of future cardiovascular events, particularly in younger men. The initial erectile dysfunction evaluation should distinguish between predominantly vasculogenic erectile dysfunction and erectile dysfunction of other etiologies. For men believed to have predominantly vasculogenic erectile dysfunction, we recommend that initial cardiovascular risk stratification be based on the Framingham Risk Score. Management of men with erectile dysfunction who are at low risk for cardiovascular disease should focus on risk-factor control; men at high risk, including those with cardiovascular symptoms, should be referred to a cardiologist. Intermediate-risk men should undergo noninvasive evaluation for subclinical atherosclerosis. A growing body of evidence supports the use of emerging prognostic markers to further understand cardiovascular risk in men with erectile dysfunction, but few markers have been prospectively evaluated in this population. In conclusion, we support cardiovascular risk stratification and risk-factor management in all men with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. PMID:24423973

  10. Coronary microvascular dysfunction: an update

    PubMed Central

    Crea, Filippo; Camici, Paolo G.; Bairey Merz, Cathleen Noel

    2014-01-01

    Many patients undergoing coronary angiography because of chest pain syndromes, believed to be indicative of obstructive atherosclerosis of the epicardial coronary arteries, are found to have normal angiograms. In the past two decades, a number of studies have reported that abnormalities in the function and structure of the coronary microcirculation may occur in patients without obstructive atherosclerosis, but with risk factors or with myocardial diseases as well as in patients with obstructive atherosclerosis; furthermore, coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) can be iatrogenic. In some instances, CMD represents an epiphenomenon, whereas in others it is an important marker of risk or may even contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and myocardial diseases, thus becoming a therapeutic target. This review article provides an update on the clinical relevance of CMD in different clinical settings and also the implications for therapy. PMID:24366916

  11. Asexual metazoans undergo senescence.

    PubMed

    Martínez, D E; Levinton, J S

    1992-10-15

    August Weismann popularized the notion that metazoans have a potentially immortal germ line separated from a mortal soma, and evolutionary biologists regard senescence as an evolved characteristic of the soma. Many have claimed that metazoans that do not sequester their germ line have no clear distinction between germ line and soma, and consequently they should lack senescence. Here we present experimental evidence that senescence occurs in the asexually reproducing marine oligochaete Paranais litoralis. We also analyze data reported in Sonneborn's classical study and show that the rhabdocoel Stenostomum incaudatum undergoes senescence. We argue that the stability of commitment to somatic function and the fact that asexual metazoans form their germ cells from undifferentiated stem cells are sufficient to allow for senescence of the asexual metazoan's soma. Thus the evolution of somatic differentiation, and not germ-line sequestration, would be the necessary condition for the evolution of senescence. PMID:11607334

  12. [Neurogenic erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Ramos, Antonio Sánchez; Durán, Juan Antonio Godino; Oliviero, Antonio

    2010-10-01

    Neurogenic erectile dysfunction is a consequence of alterations in neural pathways, autonomic, somatic, the combination of both or brain components that induce erection. This review aims to explain the physiopathological mechanisms of the most frequent neurological alterations causing erectile dysfunction and sexual disorders. PMID:20978292

  13. [Pharmacotherapy of erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Kovalev, V A; Koroleva, S V; Kamalov, A A

    2000-01-01

    Among the drugs used to treat erectile dysfunction most common are prostaglandins El, viagra, iochimbin, vasodilators and desaggregants, vitamins, biogenic stimulators, etc. The comparative analysis of their efficacy was made in 360 patients with erectile dysfunction, primarily at subcompensated stage, aged 17-83 years. Organic and psychogenic erectile dysfunctions were diagnosed in 69 and 31% of the patients, respectively. Intracavernous injections of prostaglandin El (Caverject) were effective in 74%, transurethral alprostadil (MUSE) when adjusting the dose--in 38.7% of the patients. Iochimbin in patients with organic and psychogenic forms of erectile dysfunctions was effective in 25 and 40% of patients, respectively. In 26.3 and 19% of such patients the response was obtained after use of the combination including xantinol, nicotinate, trental, biogenic stimulators and adaptogens. Viagra was effective in 60 and 77.3% of patients with psychogenic and organic erectile dysfunctions, respectively. PMID:16856460

  14. Transesophageal echocardiography estimation of coronary sinus blood flow for the adequacy of revascularization in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, P. S.; Singh, Naveen G.; Patil, T. A.; Manjunath, V.; Prasad, S. R.; Jagadeesh, A. M.; Kumar, K. Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Physiologically coronary sinus (CS) drains the left coronary artery (LCA) territory. Stenosis of the branches of LCA may decrease the coronary sinus blood flow (CSBF). Any intervention that aims at restoring the flow of the stenosed vessel increases coronary artery flow that should consequently increase the CSBF. Hence, this study was undertaken to assess the CSBF before and after each branch of LCA to determine the adequacy of surgical revascularization in patients undergoing elective off pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). Materials and Methods: Thirty consecutive patients scheduled for elective OPCAB were enrolled. CSBF was assessed before and after each branch of LCA revascularization using TEE. Left internal mammary artery (LIMA) Doppler was also obtained post LIMA to left anterior descending (LAD) grafting. Results: Hemodynamic and echocardiographic variables were compared by means of Student's t-test for paired data before and after revascularization. The CSBF per beat (1.28 ± 0.71), CSBF per minute (92.59 ± 59.32) and total velocity time integral (VTI) (8.93 ± 4.29) before LAD grafting showed statistically significant increase to CSBF per beat (1.70 ± 0.89), CSBF per minute (130.72 ± 74.22) and total VTI (11.96 ± 5.68) after LAD revascularization. The CSBF per beat (1.67 ± 1.03), CSBF per minute (131.91 ± 86.59) and total VTI (11.00 ± 5.53) before obtuse marginal (OM) grafting showed statistically significant increase to CSBF per beat (1.91 ± 1.03), CSBF per min (155.20 ± 88.70) and total VTI (12.09 ± 5.43) after OM revascularization. In 9 patients, color flow Doppler of LIMA could be demonstrated which showed diastolic predominant blood flow after LIMA to LAD grafting. Conclusion: Demonstration of CSBF was simple and monitoring the trend of CSBF values before and after each graft of LCA territory will guide to determine the adequacy of surgical revascularization. PMID

  15. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions surfactant dysfunction surfactant dysfunction Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Surfactant dysfunction is a lung disorder that causes breathing ...

  16. NITROTYROSINATION OF A TUBULIN INDUCES EPITHELIAL BARRIER DYSFUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrotyrosination of a-Tubulin Induces Epithelial Transport Dysfunction. Yuh-Chin Huang, Lisa Dailey, Wen-Li Zhang and Ilona Jaspers. ORD, Environmental Protection Agency and CEMLB, University of North Carolina

    a-Tubulin undergoes a cyclic removal and readdition of tyrosin...

  17. Pain related sexual dysfunction after inguinal herniorrhaphy.

    PubMed

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Møhl, Bo; Bay-Nielsen, Morten; Kehlet, Henrik

    2006-06-01

    To determine the incidence of pain related sexual dysfunction 1 year after inguinal herniorrhaphy and to assess the impact pain has on sexual function. In contrast to the well-described about 10% risk of chronic wound related pain after inguinal herniorrhaphy, chronic genital pain, dysejaculation, and sexual dysfunction have only been described sporadically. The aim was therefore to describe these symptoms in a questionnaire study. A nationwide detailed questionnaire study in September 2004 of pain related sexual dysfunction in all men aged 18-40 years undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy between October 2002 and June 2003 (n=1015) based upon the nationwide Danish Hernia Database collaboration. The response rate was 68.4%. Combined frequent and moderate or severe pain from the previous hernia site during activity was reported by 187 patients (18.4%). Pain during sexual activity was reported by 224 patients (22.1%), of which 68 (6.7%) had moderate or severe pain occurring every third time or more. Genital or ejaculatory pain was found in 125 patients (12.3%), and 28 (2.8%) patients reported that the pain impaired their sexual activity to a moderate or severe degree. Pain during sexual activity and subsequent sexual dysfunction represent a clinically significant problem in about 3% of younger male patients with a previous inguinal herniorrhaphy. Intraoperative nerve damage and disposition to other chronic pain conditions are among the most likely pathogenic factors. PMID:16545910

  18. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  19. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management. PMID:25108498

  20. Eustachian Tube Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... flying (because of altitude changes). Riding in elevators, driving through mountains or diving may also make your symptoms worse. Causes & Risk Factors What causes eustachian tube dysfunction? The most common ...

  1. Tibial nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... a loss of movement or sensation in the foot from damage to the tibial nerve. ... Tibial nerve dysfunction is an unusual form of peripheral ... the calf and foot muscles. A problem in function with a single ...

  2. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  3. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Pamela

    1989-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction takes place in the context of women's lives and affects their sexuality and self-esteem. Awareness of these influences are vital to the management of the dysfunction and the promotion of positive sexuality. The family physician's contribution to both the prevention and management of sexual concerns includes an awareness of societal influences and facilitation of a woman's sense of her own power and control over her life. PMID:21248971

  4. Cellular dysfunction in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Singer, Mervyn

    2008-12-01

    Cellular dysfunction is a commonplace sequelum of sepsis and other systemic inflammatory conditions. Impaired energy production (related to mitochondrial inhibition, damage, and reduced protein turnover) appears to be a core mechanism underlying the development of organ dysfunction. The reduction in energy availability appears to trigger a metabolic shutdown that impairs normal functioning of the cell. This may well represent an adaptive mechanism analogous to hibernation that prevents a massive degree of cell death and thus enables eventual recovery in survivors. PMID:18954700

  5. Genitourinary dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamanishi, Tomonori; Kishi, Masahiko

    2010-01-15

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency) and sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction) are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, genitourinary autonomic dysfunctions are often nonresponsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine-basal ganglia circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. By contrast, hypothalamic dysfunction is mostly responsible for the sexual dysfunction (decrease in libido and erection) in PD, via altered dopamine-oxytocin pathways, which normally promote libido and erection. The pathophysiology of the genitourinary dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors are used to treat sexual dysfunction in PD. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life. PMID:20077468

  6. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Robert F.

    1983-01-01

    Dysfunctional uterine bleeding is most commonly associated with chronic anovulation. Early diagnosis of anovulation is important; the induction of regular withdrawal periods using a progestin such as Provera prevents the development of endometrial hyperplasia with the subsequent inevitable occurrence of a heavy, frightening vaginal bleed. The etiology of dysfunctional uterine bleeding occurring during ovulatory cycles is unknown and all medical therapies at present are necessarily experimental. Hysterectomy is probably the treatment of choice for women who have finished their childbearing career and in whom persisting menorrhagia during ovulatory cycles results in anemia. PMID:21283453

  7. Endothelin and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Tomoh; Sawamura, Tatsuya

    2006-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and endothelin (ET) produced in endothelial cells are leading molecules which regulate vascular function. Failure of the physiological balance between these two molecules is usually referred to as endothelial dysfunction. ET was initially identified as a potent vasoconstrictive peptide. Three ET isoforms and two ET receptors have been identified. One of the isoforms, ET-1, plays a significant role in many cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to induce endothelial dysfunction. The endothelial receptor for oxLDL was cloned, and named lectin-like oxidized receptor-1 (LOX-1). Activation of LOX-1 generates reactive oxygen species (ROS), and acivates a transcriptional factor, nuclear factor κB (NFκB), resulting in down-regulation of NO and up-regulation of ET-1. LOX-1 might be a key molecule in the generation of endothelial dysfunction. In endothelial dysfunction, ET-1 is an aggravating factor of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25792766

  8. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Michelle L.; Chourasia, Aparajita H.; Macleod, Kay F.

    2013-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell growth and tumorigenesis is emerging beyond Warburg as an area of research that is under-explored in terms of its significance for clinical management of cancer. Work discussed in this review focuses less on the Warburg effect and more on mitochondria and how dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cell cycle, gene expression, metabolism, cell viability, and other established aspects of cell growth and stress responses. There is increasing evidence that key oncogenes and tumor suppressors modulate mitochondrial dynamics through important signaling pathways and that mitochondrial mass and function vary between tumors and individuals but the significance of these events for cancer are not fully appreciated. We explore the interplay between key molecules involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion and in apoptosis, as well as in mitophagy, biogenesis, and spatial dynamics of mitochondria and consider how these distinct mechanisms are coordinated in response to physiological stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Importantly, we examine how deregulation of these processes in cancer has knock on effects for cell proliferation and growth. We define major forms of mitochondrial dysfunction and address the extent to which the functional consequences of such dysfunction can be determined and exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24350057

  9. Perceptual-Motor Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Jean L.

    Discussed are theoretical and treatment aspects of perceptual motor dysfunction and rehabilitation in 4- to 12-year-old academically failing children involved in a 3-year investigation at the University of Kansas. The program is said to stress increasing the amount of stimulation received by sensory receptors of the vestibular, reflex, and haptic…

  10. Shared Parenting Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkat, Ira Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Joint custody of children is the most prevalent court ordered arrangement for families of divorce. A growing body of literature indicates that many parents engage in behaviors that are incompatible with shared parenting. This article provides specific criteria for a definition of the Shared Parenting Dysfunction. Clinical aspects of the phenomenon…

  11. The combination of breast necrosis and chylothorax following the OPCAB

    PubMed Central

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Yaghoubi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Due to long term patency, the internal mammary artery is considered as a conduit of choice for revascularization of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The internal mammary artery and its accessory branches in addition to perfusing the chest wall structures also contributes to supplying, part of the female breast arteries. In addition, due to the accompaniment of thoracic duct branches with the left internal mammary artery, harvesting may be associated with injury to these branches and contribute to chylothorax. We report a rare case of chylothorax and the breast necrosis following the coronary artery bypass grafting. The chylothorax was started in the second postoperative day and ceased gradually in the 12th day of operation. The breast necrosis appeared in the 3th weeks of operation with pain, and tenderness and black skin color change. The patient underwent total mastectomy in the 4th weeks of operation. PMID:27493707

  12. Renal dysfunction after total body irradiation: Dose-effect relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Kal, Henk B. . E-mail: H.B.Kal@UMCUtrecht.nl; Kempen-Harteveld, M. Loes van

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: Late complications related to total body irradiation (TBI) as part of the conditioning regimen for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been increasingly noted. We reviewed and compared the results of treatments with various TBI regimens and tried to derive a dose-effect relationship for the endpoint of late renal dysfunction. The aim was to find the tolerance dose for the kidney when TBI is performed. Methods and Materials: A literature search was performed using PubMed for articles reporting late renal dysfunction. For intercomparison, the various TBI regimens were normalized using the linear-quadratic model, and biologically effective doses (BEDs) were calculated. Results: Eleven reports were found describing the frequency of renal dysfunction after TBI. The frequency of renal dysfunction as a function of the BED was obtained. For BED >16 Gy an increase in the frequency of dysfunction was observed. Conclusions: The tolerance BED for kidney tissue undergoing TBI is about 16 Gy. This BED can be realized with highly fractionated TBI (e.g., 6 x 1.7 Gy or 9 x 1.2 Gy at dose rates >5 cGy/min). To prevent late renal dysfunction, the TBI regimens with BED values >16 Gy (almost all found in published reports) should be applied with appropriate shielding of the kidneys.

  13. [Erectile and Ejaculatory Dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Gross, Oliver; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel

    2015-11-25

    The inability to achieve an erection of the penis sufficient for sexual activity is called erectile dysfunction (ED). In most cases, the diagnosis can be made by medical history. The prevalence of ED in men at the age of 65 has been reported to be up to 50%. Premature ejaculation has a prevalence, up to 20% and is the most frequent ejaculatory dysfunction. The etiology of ED can involve psychological, vascular, neurogenic, hormonal or urogenital pathologies. The main pathophysiological mechanisms of ED are vascular disorders such as diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Because of the common pathophysiology, patients diagnosed with ED should have a diagnostic work-up for systemic vascular pathologies to prevent concomitant cardiac events. Treatment options include invasive and non-invasive procedures. PMID:26602851

  14. Thyroid dysfunction and subfertility

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones act on nearly every cell in the body. Moreover, the thyroid gland continuously interacts with the ovaries, and the thyroid hormones are involved in almost all phases of reproduction. Thyroid dysfunctions are relatively common among women of reproductive age, and can affect fertility in various ways, resulting in anovulatory cycles, high prolactin levels, and sex hormone imbalances. Undiagnosed and untreated thyroid disease can be a cause of subfertility. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), also known as mild thyroid failure, is diagnosed when peripheral thyroid hormone levels are within the normal reference laboratory range, but serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels are mildly elevated. Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) is characterized by the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies, which include anti-thyroperoxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. SCH and TAI may remain latent, asymptomatic, or even undiagnosed for an extended period. It has also been demonstrated that controlled ovarian hyperstimulation has a significant impact on thyroid function, particularly in women with TAI. In the current review, we describe the interactions between thyroid dysfunctions and subfertility, as well as the proper work-up and management of thyroid dysfunctions in subfertile women. PMID:26816871

  15. Preclinical Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Siu-Hin; Vogel, Mark W.; Chen, Horng H

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical Diastolic Dysfunction (PDD) has been broadly defined as subjects with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, without the diagnosis of congestive heart failure (HF), and with normal systolic function. PDD is an entity which remains poorly understood, yet has definite clinical significance. Although few original studies have focused on PDD, it has been shown that PDD is prevalent, and that there is a clear progression from PDD to symptomatic heart failure including dyspnea, edema, and fatigue. In diabetic patients and patients with coronary artery disease or hypertension, it has been shown that patients with PDD have a significantly higher risk of progression to heart failure and death compared to patients without PDD. Because of these findings and the increasing prevalence of the heart failure epidemic, it is clear that an understanding of PDD is essential to decreasing patients’ morbidity and mortality. This review will focus on what is known concerning preclinical diastolic dysfunction, including definitions, staging, epidemiology, pathophysiology, and the natural history of the disease. In addition, given the paucity of trials focused on PDD treatment, studies targeting risk factors associated with the development of PDD and therapeutic trials for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction will be reviewed. PMID:24291270

  16. Obesity and Primary Graft Dysfunction after Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kawut, Steven M.; Wickersham, Nancy; Winterbottom, Christopher; Bhorade, Sangeeta; Palmer, Scott M.; Lee, James; Diamond, Joshua M.; Wille, Keith M.; Weinacker, Ann; Lama, Vibha N.; Crespo, Maria; Orens, Jonathan B.; Sonett, Joshua R.; Arcasoy, Selim M.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Christie, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Obesity has been linked to acute lung injury and is a risk factor for early mortality after lung transplantation. Objectives: To examine the associations of obesity and plasma adipokines with the risk of primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation. Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study of 512 adult lung transplant recipients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or interstitial lung disease enrolled in the Lung Transplant Outcomes Group Study. In a nested case-control study, we measured plasma leptin, adiponectin, and resistin before lung transplantation and 6 and 24 hours after lung transplantation in 40 cases of primary graft dysfunction and 80 control subjects. Generalized linear mixed models and logistic regression were used to estimate risk ratios and odds ratios. Measurements and Main Results: Grade 3 primary graft dysfunction developed within 72 hours of transplantation in 29% participants. Obesity was associated with a twofold increased risk of primary graft dysfunction (adjusted risk ratio 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.7–2.6). The risk of primary graft dysfunction increased by 40% (confidence interval, 30–50%) for each 5 kg/m2 increase in body mass index after accounting for center, diagnosis, cardiopulmonary bypass, and transplant procedure. Higher plasma leptin levels were associated with a greater risk of primary graft dysfunction (sex-adjusted P = 0.02). The associations of both obesity and leptin with primary graft dysfunction tended to be stronger among those who did not undergo cardiopulmonary bypass. Conclusions: Obesity is an independent risk factor for primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation. PMID:21799077

  17. Postprostatectomy Erectile Dysfunction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Salonia, Andrea; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In the current era of the early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) and the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques, erectile dysfunction (ED) represents an important issue, with up to 68% of patients who undergo radical prostatectomy (RP) complaining of postoperative erectile function (EF) impairment. In this context, it is crucial to comprehensively consider all factors possibly associated with the prevention of post-RP ED throughout the entire clinical management of PCa patients. A careful assessment of both oncological and functional baseline characteristics should be carried out for each patient preoperatively. Baseline EF, together with age and the overall burden of comorbidities, has been strongly associated with the chance of post-RP EF recovery. With this goal in mind, internationally validated psychometric instruments are preferable for ensuring proper baseline EF evaluations, and questionnaires should be administered at the proper time before surgery. Careful preoperative counselling is also required, both to respect the patient's wishes and to avoid false expectations regarding eventual recovery of baseline EF. The advent of robotic surgery has led to improvements in the knowledge of prostate surgical anatomy, as reflected by the formal redefinition of nerve-sparing techniques. Overall, comparative studies have shown significantly better EF outcomes for robotic RP than for open techniques, although data from prospective trials have not always been consistent. Preclinical data and several prospective randomized trials have demonstrated the value of treating patients with oral phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5is) after surgery, with the concomitant potential benefit of early re-oxygenation of the erectile tissue, which appears to be crucial for avoiding the eventual penile structural changes that are associated with postoperative neuropraxia and ultimately result in severe ED. For patients who do not properly respond to PDE5is, proper

  18. Postprostatectomy Erectile Dysfunction: A Review.

    PubMed

    Capogrosso, Paolo; Salonia, Andrea; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    In the current era of the early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) and the development of minimally invasive surgical techniques, erectile dysfunction (ED) represents an important issue, with up to 68% of patients who undergo radical prostatectomy (RP) complaining of postoperative erectile function (EF) impairment. In this context, it is crucial to comprehensively consider all factors possibly associated with the prevention of post-RP ED throughout the entire clinical management of PCa patients. A careful assessment of both oncological and functional baseline characteristics should be carried out for each patient preoperatively. Baseline EF, together with age and the overall burden of comorbidities, has been strongly associated with the chance of post-RP EF recovery. With this goal in mind, internationally validated psychometric instruments are preferable for ensuring proper baseline EF evaluations, and questionnaires should be administered at the proper time before surgery. Careful preoperative counselling is also required, both to respect the patient's wishes and to avoid false expectations regarding eventual recovery of baseline EF. The advent of robotic surgery has led to improvements in the knowledge of prostate surgical anatomy, as reflected by the formal redefinition of nerve-sparing techniques. Overall, comparative studies have shown significantly better EF outcomes for robotic RP than for open techniques, although data from prospective trials have not always been consistent. Preclinical data and several prospective randomized trials have demonstrated the value of treating patients with oral phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5is) after surgery, with the concomitant potential benefit of early re-oxygenation of the erectile tissue, which appears to be crucial for avoiding the eventual penile structural changes that are associated with postoperative neuropraxia and ultimately result in severe ED. For patients who do not properly respond to PDE5is, proper

  19. Managing the workforce reduction: hospital CEO perceptions of organizational dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rondeau, Kent V; Wagar, Terry H

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years many nations have undertaken activities aimed at restructuring and reengineering their health system as a means of achieving greater cost effectiveness and consumer responsiveness. Most efforts at reforming healthcare delivery have been accompanied by the downsizing of healthcare organizations. Organizations that are undergoing decline or significant workforce contractions are widely believed to experience a number of negative or dysfunctional attributes as a consequence of reductions in, or redeployments of, their labor force. For organizations undergoing planned workforce reductions, much speculation has been made in an attempt to identify a set of "best practices" that have the potential to mitigate the dysfunctional consequences associated with large permanent reductions in the workforce. This article explores the relationships among workforce-reduction practices and perceptions of organizational dysfunction in a large sample of Canadian hospitals. Results of the analysis suggest that the application of certain "progressive" workforce-reduction practices preceding, during, and subsequent to the downsizing process may play an important role in mitigating some of these dysfunctional organizational consequences. This research provides some evidence to suggest that how a workforce reduction is carried out may have a greater effect on organizational effectiveness than either the magnitude or severity of the overall workforce reduction. PMID:12055899

  20. Management of ejaculatory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    McMahon, C G

    2014-02-01

    Ejaculatory dysfunction is a common complaint and is often associated with a reduced quality of life for sufferer and partner. The spectrum of ejaculatory dysfunction extends from premature ejaculation (PE) to delayed ejaculation (DE) and anejaculation. Over the past 20-30 years, the PE treatment paradigm, previously limited to behavioural psychotherapy, has expanded to include drug treatment. Multiple well-controlled, evidence-based studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors in delaying ejaculation, confirming their role as first-line agents for the treatment of lifelong and acquired PE. More recently, there has been increased attention to the psychosocial consequences of PE, its epidemiology, its aetiology and its pathophysiology by both clinicians and the pharmaceutical industry. DE and anejaculation are probably the least common, least studied and least understood of the male sexual dysfunctions. However, their impact is significant as they may result in a lack of sexual fulfilment for both the man and his partner, an effect further compounded when procreation is among the couple's goals of sexual intercourse. The causes of DE, anejaculation and anorgasmia are manifold. Numerous psychotherapeutic treatments are described for the management of delayed or anejaculation. Although some appear to be effective, none has been properly evaluated in large-scale samples. Treatment of DE or anejaculation with pharmacotherapy has met with limited success. No drugs have been approved by regulatory agencies for this purpose, and most drugs that have been identified for potential use have limited efficacy, impart significant side-effects or are yet considered experimental in nature. PMID:24528812

  1. Posttraumatic olfactory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Daniel H; Costanzo, Richard M

    2016-04-01

    Impairment of smell may occur following injury to any portion of the olfactory tract, from nasal cavity to brain. A thorough understanding of the anatomy and pathophysiology combined with comprehensively obtained history, physical exam, olfactory testing, and neuroimaging may help to identify the mechanism of dysfunction and suggest possible treatments. Although most olfactory deficits are neuronal mediated and therefore currently unable to be corrected, promising technology may provide novel treatment options for those most affected. Until that day, patient counseling with compensatory strategies and reassurance is essential for the maintenance of safety and QoL in this unique and challenging patient population. PMID:26441369

  2. [Epilepsy with higher brain dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Azusa; Midorikawa, Akira; Koyama, Shinichi; Futamura, Akinori; Kuroda, Takeshi; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Itaya, Kazuhiro; Ishigaki, Seiichiro; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2013-02-01

    Acquired higher brain dysfunction is for the most part due to cerebral vascular disease, but epilepsy may also be a cause. In this study with five patients, we discuss the advantages of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) for persistent higher brain dysfunction. The patients showed chronic amnesia or acute aphasia, with associated symptoms like personality change. All five cases affected automatism or convulsive attack, though only after the emergence of higher brain dysfunction and administration of AEDs. There were underlying diseases like cerebral arteriovenous malformation in four cases, but the other patient had none. Electroencephalogram and single photon emission computed tomography revealed one case of aphasia epilepsy with higher brain dysfunction. These results suggest the potential therapeutic efficacy of AEDs for persistent higher brain dysfunction, and we must differentiate epilepsy with higher brain dysfunction from dementia or cerebral vascular disease. PMID:23399676

  3. Diastolic dysfunction in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Møller, Søren; Wiese, Signe; Halgreen, Hanne; Hove, Jens D

    2016-09-01

    Development of esophageal varices, ascites, and hepatic nephropathy is among the major complications of cirrhosis. The presence of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, which includes a left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (DD), seems to deteriorate the course of the disease and the prognosis. Increased stiffness of the cirrhotic heart may decrease the compliance and result in DD. The prevalence of DD in cirrhotic patients averages about 50 %. It can be evaluated by transmitral Doppler echocardiography, tissue Doppler echocardiography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. There seems to be a relation between DD and the severity of liver dysfunction and the presence of ascites. After liver transplantation, DD worsens the prognosis and increases the risk of graft rejection, but DD improves after few months. Insertion of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt increases left ventricular diastolic volumes, and DD is a predictor of poorer survival in these patients. Future studies should aim at disclosing pathophysiological mechanisms behind the developing of DD in cirrhosis in relation to patient characteristics, development of complications, treatment, and risk associated with interventional procedures. PMID:27075496

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction during sepsis.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Luciano Cesar Pontes

    2010-09-01

    Sepsis and multiple organ failure remain leading causes of death in intensive care patients. Recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of these syndromes include a likely prominent role for mitochondria. Patient studies have shown that the degree of mitochondrial dysfunction is related to the eventual outcome. Associated mechanisms include damage to mitochondria or inhibition of the electron transport chain enzymes by nitric oxide and other reactive oxygen species (the effects of which are amplified by co-existing tissue hypoxia), hormonal influences that decrease mitochondrial activity, and downregulation of mitochondrial protein expression. Notably, despite these findings, there is minimal cell death seen in most affected organs, and these organs generally regain reasonably normal function should the patient survive. It is thus plausible that multiple organ failure following sepsis may actually represent an adaptive state whereby the organs temporarily 'shut down' their normal metabolic functions in order to protect themselves from an overwhelming and prolonged insult. A decrease in energy supply due to mitochondrial inhibition or injury may trigger this hibernation/estivation-like state. Likewise, organ recovery may depend on restoration of normal mitochondrial respiration. Data from animal studies show histological recovery of mitochondria after a septic insult that precedes clinical improvement. Stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis could offer a new therapeutic approach for patients in multi-organ failure. This review will cover basic aspects of mitochondrial function, mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis, and approaches to prevent, mitigate or speed recovery from mitochondrial injury. PMID:20509844

  5. Sexual dysfunction in uremia.

    PubMed

    Palmer, B F

    1999-06-01

    In summary, sexual dysfunction is a common finding in both men and women with chronic renal failure. Common disturbances include erectile dysfunction in men, menstrual abnormalities in women, and decreased libido and fertility in both sexes. These abnormalities are primarily organic in nature and are related to uremia as well as the other comorbid conditions that frequently accompany the chronic renal failure patient. Fatigue and psychosocial factors related to the presence of a chronic disease are also contributory factors. Disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis can be detected before the need for dialysis but continue to worsen once dialytic therapy is initiated. Impaired gonadal function is prominent in uremic men, whereas the disturbances in the hypothalamicpituitary axis are more subtle. By contrast, central disturbances are more prominent in uremic women. Therapy is initially directed toward optimizing the delivery of dialysis, correcting anemia with recombinant erythropoietin, and controlling the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism with vitamin D. For many practicing nephrologists, sildenafil has become the first-line therapy in the treatment of impotence. In the hypogonadal man whose only complaint is decreased libido, testosterone may be of benefit. Regular gynecologic follow-up is required in uremic women to guard against potential complications of unopposed estrogen effect. Uremic women should be advised against pregnancy while on dialysis. Successful transplantation is the most effective means of restoring normal sexual function in both men and women with chronic renal failure. PMID:10361878

  6. Client attributions for sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Fichten, C S; Spector, I; Libman, E

    1988-01-01

    This investigation examined attributions for sexual dysfunctions made by 63 individuals and 21 of their partners who presented at a sex therapy service for the following problems: erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation, and female orgasmic dysfunctions. All participants completed measures of marital adjustment, locus of control, depression and a questionnaire which assessed: attributions of responsibility for the sexual problem, perceived control over sexual functioning, distress, effort made to improve the sexual relationship, and expectations about the efficacy of sex therapy for the problem. Results indicate that both identified patients and their partners, regardless of the dysfunction, blamed the sexual problem on the "dysfunctional individual" rather than on the circumstances or the partner. With respect to the partners, husbands of women with orgasmic dysfunction were more likely to blame themselves than the circumstances, while the opposite was true for wives of males with erectile difficulties. Individuals experiencing the dysfunction perceived themselves and their partners as having little, but equal control over the identified patient's sexuality. Correlational analyses indicate that in identified patients, the better the quality of the marital relationship, the greater the self-blame and the lower the partner blame. Those with happy marriages also made greater efforts to improve their sexual relationship and had higher expectations of success with therapy. The implications of the results for research on the role of attributions in sexual dysfunction and for assessment of cognitive factors in sexually dysfunctional individuals and their partners is discussed. PMID:3172253

  7. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong-Ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hui-Hong; Zhou, Yu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Elizabeth A.; Mollen, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) represents a group of idiopathic disorders characterized by chronic or recurring inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. While the exact etiology of disease is unknown, IBD is recognized to be a complex, multifactorial disease that results from an intricate interplay of genetic predisposition, an altered immune response, changes in the intestinal microbiota, and environmental factors. Together, these contribute to a destruction of the intestinal epithelial barrier, increased gut permeability, and an influx of immune cells. Given that most cellular functions as well as maintenance of the epithelial barrier is energy-dependent, it is logical to assume that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a key role in both the onset and recurrence of disease. Indeed several studies have demonstrated evidence of mitochondrial stress and alterations in mitochondrial function within the intestinal epithelium of patients with IBD and mice undergoing experimental colitis. Although the hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, including oxidative stress and impaired ATP production are known to be evident in the intestines of patients with IBD, it is as yet unclear whether these processes occur as a cause of consequence of disease. We provide a current review of mitochondrial function in the setting of intestinal inflammation during IBD. PMID:26484345

  9. [Revisiting meibomian gland dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Baudouin, C

    2014-12-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunctions (MGD) are frequent affections, sometimes asymptomatic, more often responsible for disabling, potentially severe, manifestations. MGD is indeed the most frequent cause of dry eye, through the induction of tear film instability. However, eyelid inflammation, microbial proliferation that modifies melting temperature of meibum, frequent association with skin diseases, as well as potentially severe corneal complications make them complex multifactorial disorders. Complementary mechanisms combine to actually result in a vicious circle, or more accurately a double vicious cycle. The first one is self-stimulated by the microbiological changes, which create their own conditions for MGD development. The second one is related to tear film instability that results from MGD and is also self-stimulated through hyperosmolarity and inflammatory phenomena, which are both consequence and cause of dry eye. We herein propose a new pathophysiological schema on MGD, in order to better identify mechanisms and more efficiently target therapeutics. PMID:25455142

  10. Sexual dysfunctions and psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Levine, E M; Ross, N

    1977-06-01

    The authors examine the major factors involved in recent changes in the social standards and attitudes related to homosexuality. The principal influences investigated include the misconstrued emphasis given to the humanist ideology, which properly stresses the dignity of the individual; the social sciences' relativization of the cultural norms defining homosexuality; the influence of the mass media in disseminating these perspectives and thereby tending to create an acceptable image of homosexuality, and the tendency of all these changes to result in a substantial increase in public acceptance and tolerance of homosexuality. The authors suggest that this trend in public opinion has begun to isolate psychoanalytic knowledge, to reduce its status and acceptability among the public, and to replace it with popular views concerning the meaning of sexual dysfunctions. PMID:869030

  11. Endothelial dysfunction and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Duvall, W Lane

    2005-03-01

    The vascular endothelium plays a crucial role in the physiology of blood vessels and the pathological processes of atherosclerotic disease and acute coronary syndromes. Endothelial dysfunction is the core problem; it is an impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation caused by a loss of nitric oxide activity in the vessel wall, which results in impairment in the regulation of vascular homeostasis. Further understanding of its mechanisms of action and possible therapeutic targets will be of great importance. The group of antioxidant vitamins, A, C and E, would seem uniquely situated to reduce cardiovascular events by improving endothelial function by reducing the concentration of reactive oxygen species in the vessel wall and by preventing oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein. Unfortunately, despite extensive studies in both observational and randomized trials, the weight of evidence points to little or no benefit from antioxidant therapy. PMID:15770336

  12. [Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costa, R; Orriols, R

    2005-01-01

    Reactive airways dysfunction syndrome, better known as RADS, was described as a clinical entity consisting in the appearance of bronchial asthma due to massive toxic inhalation. The term was coined and recognised for the first time in 1985. Since then different publications have verified new cases as well as different causal agents. It usually arises from an accident at the work place and in closed or poorly ventilated spaces, where high concentrations of irritant products are inhaled in the form of gas, smoke or vapour. In the following minutes or hours symptoms of bronchial obstruction appear in an acute form, with bronchial hyperresponsiveness persisting for months or years. The affected patients do not show a recurrence of symptoms following exposure to non-toxic doses of the same agent that started the symptoms. This is why diagnosis is based on clinical manifestations as it is not reproducible through a provocation test. PMID:15915173

  13. Telomere dysfunction and chromothripsis.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Aurélie; Jones, David T W; Maass, Kendra K; Rode, Agata; Deeg, Katharina I; Jebaraj, Billy Michael Chelliah; Korshunov, Andrey; Hovestadt, Volker; Tainsky, Michael A; Pajtler, Kristian W; Bender, Sebastian; Brabetz, Sebastian; Gröbner, Susanne; Kool, Marcel; Devens, Frauke; Edelmann, Jennifer; Zhang, Cindy; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Tabori, Uri; Malkin, David; Rippe, Karsten; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Pfister, Stefan M; Zapatka, Marc; Lichter, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Chromothripsis is a recently discovered form of genomic instability, characterized by tens to hundreds of clustered DNA rearrangements resulting from a single dramatic event. Telomere dysfunction has been suggested to play a role in the initiation of this phenomenon, which occurs in a large number of tumor entities. Here, we show that telomere attrition can indeed lead to catastrophic genomic events, and that telomere patterns differ between cells analyzed before and after such genomic catastrophes. Telomere length and telomere stabilization mechanisms diverge between samples with and without chromothripsis in a given tumor subtype. Longitudinal analyses of the evolution of chromothriptic patterns identify either stable patterns between matched primary and relapsed tumors, or loss of the chromothriptic clone in the relapsed specimen. The absence of additional chromothriptic events occurring between the initial tumor and the relapsed tumor sample points to telomere stabilization after the initial chromothriptic event which prevents further shattering of the genome. PMID:26856307

  14. HIV and neurocognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Spudich, Serena

    2013-09-01

    The spectrum of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) has been dramatically altered in the setting of widely available effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). Once culminating in dementia in many individuals infected with HIV, HAND now typically manifests as more subtle, though still morbid, forms of cognitive impairment in persons surviving long-term with treated HIV infection. Despite the substantial improvement in severity of this disorder, the fact that neurologic injury persists despite ART remains a challenge to the community of patients, providers and investigators aiming to optimize quality of life for those living with HIV. Cognitive dysfunction in treated HIV may reflect early irreversible CNS injury accrued before ART is typically initiated, ongoing low-level CNS infection and progressive injury in the setting of ART, or comborbidities including effects of treatment which may confound the beneficial reduction in viral replication and immune activation effected by ART. PMID:23860944

  15. [Sexual dysfunction in torture victims].

    PubMed

    Theilade, Lotte D Arlø

    2002-10-01

    Sexual dysfunction is seen in up to 51% of torture victims. The torture victim seldom reports anything about having been tortured but often consults the health care system because of a somatic problem which may seem unrelated to torture. Therefore, it is important that doctors are aware of the possible correlation. Symptoms and findings may be both physical and psychical. The torture may be both sexual and non-sexual as well as physical and non-physical. Social, cultural and individual factors also influence the development of sexual dysfunction in a torture victim. The factors that cause sexual dysfunction and the identification of any direct causal relations are discussed. There are indications that sexual torture has a greater impact on the development of sexual dysfunction than other types of torture and it seems that sexual dysfunction is a result of many factors. PMID:12407879

  16. Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction in Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cho-Kai; Lee, Jen-Kuang; Wu, Yi-Fan; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Lin, Jiunn-Lee; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Lin, Jou-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) is common among patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). We examined the relationship between LVDD, major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), and mortality in PD patients. A total of 149 patients undergoing PD with preserved left ventricular systolic function were included and followed for 3.5 years. LVDD was diagnosed (according to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines) by conventional and tissue Doppler echocardiography. Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) was measured. The location and volume of adipose tissue were assessed by computed tomography (CT) at the level of the fourth lumbar vertebra. Subjects with LVDD had higher levels of hsCRP, and more visceral and peritoneal fat than controls. The relationship between adjusted visceral adipose tissue and LVDD became nonsignificant when hsCRP and baseline demographic data were introduced into the logistic regression model (odds ratio = 1.52, P = 0.07). Subsequent hierarchical multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that LVDD was one of the most powerful determinants of MACE and mortality after adjusting for all confounding factors (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.43–3.51, P = 0.02 and HR: 2.25, 95% CI: 1.45–2.91, P = 0.04, respectively). Systemic inflammation (hsCRP) was also significantly associated with MACE and mortality (HR: 2.03, P = 0.03 and HR: 2.16, P = 0.04, respectively). LVDD is associated with systemic inflammation and increased visceral fat in patients undergoing PD. LVDD is also a sensitive, independent indicator of future MACE and mortality in PD patients. PMID:25997054

  17. [Hormonal etiology in erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Jabaloyas, José María Martínez

    2010-10-01

    The proper function of erection mechanisms depend on correct interrelationship between psychological, vascular, neurological and hormonal factors. Endocrine diseases affect sexual function, and sexual dysfunction may be one of the symptoms of some hormonal anomalies. Diabetes mellitus is the endocrine disease most frequently causing erectile dysfunction due to the frequent vascular and neurological complications associated. It is important to determine blood glucose in the initial evaluation of a male with erectile dysfunction, as well as to try an adequate control of blood glucose levels to avoid worsening. Diabetic male erectile dysfunction is multifactorial, more severe and has worse response to oral treatment. Hyperprolactinemia causes disorders of the sexual sphere because it produces a descent of testosterone. In these cases, sexual symptoms are treated by correcting the levels of prolactin. Routine determination of prolactin is not clear and it seems it should be determined when testosterone levels are diminished. Thyroid hormone disorders (both hyper and hypotyroidism) are associated with erectile dysfunction, which will subside in half the patients with thyroid hormone normalization. The role of adrenal hormones in erectile function is not clear and their routine determination is not considered in the diagnostic evaluation of erectile dysfunction. The role of estradiol in the regulation of the erection mechanism is not well known either, although it is known that high levels may cause erectile dysfunction. Among endocrine-metabolic disorders we point out dyslipemias, with hypercholesterolemia as an important risk factor for erectile dysfunction and, though its correction may prevent vascular system deterioration, the role of statins in erectile dysfunction is not clear. PMID:20978293

  18. [Thyroid dysfunction during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan J; Iglesias, Pedro; Donnay, Sergio

    2015-10-21

    Recent clinical practice guidelines on thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy have changed health care provided to pregnant women, although their recommendations are under constant revision. Trimester- and area-specific reference ranges for serum thyroid-stimulating hormone are required for proper diagnosis of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. There is no doubt on the need of therapy for overt hypothyroidism, while therapy for subclinical hypothyroidism is controversial. Further research is needed to settle adverse effects of isolated hypothyroxinemia and thyroid autoimmunity. Differentiation between hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease and the usually self-limited gestational transient thyrotoxicosis is critical. It is also important to recognize risk factors for postpartum thyroiditis. Supplementation with iodine is recommended to maintain adequate iodine nutrition during pregnancy and avoid serious consequences in offspring. Controversy remains about universal screening for thyroid disease during pregnancy or case-finding in high-risk women. Opinions of some scientific societies and recent cost-benefit studies favour universal screening. Randomized controlled studies currently under development should reduce the uncertainties that still remain in this area. PMID:25433782

  19. Primary Graft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Jason D

    2014-01-01

    Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) is a syndrome encompassing a spectrum of mild to severe lung injury that occurs within the first 72 hours after lung transplantation. PGD is characterized by pulmonary edema with diffuse alveolar damage that manifests clinically as progressive hypoxemia with radiographic pulmonary infiltrates. In recent years, new knowledge has been generated on risks and mechanisms of PGD. Following ischemia and reperfusion, inflammatory and immunological injury-repair responses appear to be key controlling mechanisms. In addition, PGD has significant impact on short- and long-term outcomes; therefore, the choice of donor organ is impacted by this potential adverse consequence. Improved methods of reducing PGD risk and efforts to safely expand the pool are being developed. Ex-vivo lung perfusion is a strategy which may improve risk assessment and become a promising platform to implement treatment interventions to prevent PGD. This review will detail recent updates in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, molecular and genetic biomarkers and state-of-the-art technical developments affecting PGD. (158 words) PMID:23821506

  20. Late renal dysfunction in adult survivors of bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, C.A.; Cohen, E.P.; Barber-Derus, S.W.; Murray, K.J.; Ash, R.C.; Casper, J.T.; Moulder, J.E. )

    1991-06-01

    Until recently long-term renal toxicity has not been considered a major late complication of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Late renal dysfunction has been described in a pediatric population status post-BMT which was attributable to the radiation in the preparatory regimen. A thorough review of adults with this type of late renal dysfunction has not previously been described. Fourteen of 103 evaluable adult patients undergoing allogeneic (96) or autologous (7) bone marrow transplantation, predominantly for leukemia and lymphomas, at the Medical College of Wisconsin (Milwaukee, WI) have had a syndrome of renal insufficiency characterized by increased serum creatinine, decreased glomerular filtration rate, anemia, and hypertension. This syndrome developed at a median of 9 months (range, 4.5 to 26 months) posttransplantation in the absence of specific identifiable causes. The cumulative probability of having this renal dysfunction is 20% at 1 year. Renal biopsies performed on seven of these cases showed the endothelium widely separated from the basement membrane, extreme thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, and microthrombi. Previous chemotherapy, antibiotics, and antifungals as well as cyclosporin may add to and possibly potentiate a primary chemoradiation marrow transplant renal injury, but this clinical syndrome is most analogous to clinical and experimental models of radiation nephritis. This late marrow transplant-associated nephritis should be recognized as a potentially limiting factor in the use of some intensive chemoradiation conditioning regimens used for BMT. Some selective attenuation of the radiation to the kidneys may decrease the incidence of this renal dysfunction.

  1. Risk factors for transient dysfunction of gas exchange after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Cristiane Delgado Alves; Moreira, Marcos Mello; Lima, Núbia Maria Freire Vieira; de Figueirêdo, Luciana Castilho; Falcão, Antônio Luis Eiras; Petrucci, Orlando; Dragosavac, Desanka

    2015-01-01

    Objective A retrospective cohort study was preformed aiming to verify the presence of transient dysfunction of gas exchange in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery and determine if this disorder is linked to cardiorespiratory events. Methods We included 942 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery and cardiac procedures who were referred to the Intensive Care Unit between June 2007 and November 2011. Results Fifteen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome (2%), 199 (27.75%) had mild transient dysfunction of gas exchange, 402 (56.1%) had moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange, and 39 (5.4%) had severe transient dysfunction of gas exchange. Hypertension and cardiogenic shock were associated with the emergence of moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange postoperatively (P=0.02 and P=0.019, respectively) and were risk factors for this dysfunction (P=0.0023 and P=0.0017, respectively). Diabetes mellitus was also a risk factor for transient dysfunction of gas exchange (P=0.03). Pneumonia was present in 8.9% of cases and correlated with the presence of moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange (P=0.001). Severe transient dysfunction of gas exchange was associated with patients who had renal replacement therapy (P=0.0005), hemotherapy (P=0.0001), enteral nutrition (P=0.0012), or cardiac arrhythmia (P=0.0451). Conclusion Preoperative hypertension and cardiogenic shock were associated with the occurrence of postoperative transient dysfunction of gas exchange. The preoperative risk factors included hypertension, cardiogenic shock, and diabetes. Postoperatively, pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, renal replacement therapy, hemotherapy, and cardiac arrhythmia were associated with the appearance of some degree of transient dysfunction of gas exchange, which was a risk factor for reintubation, pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and renal replacement therapy in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery and cardiac

  2. Diagnostic evaluation of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Miller, T A

    2000-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction, the persistent inability to attain or maintain penile erection sufficient for sexual intercourse, affects millions of men to various degrees. The majority of cases have an organic etiology, most commonly vascular disease that decreases blood flow into the penis. Regardless of the primary cause, erectile dysfunction can have a negative impact on self-esteem, quality of life and interpersonal relationships. The initial step in evaluation is a detailed medical and social history, including a review of medication use. Discussion with the patient's sexual partner may clarify exacerbating issues. The physical examination focuses on the cardiovascular, neurologic and urogenital systems. Laboratory tests are useful to screen for common etiologic factors and, when indicated, to identify hypogonadal syndromes. Appropriate evaluation of erectile dysfunction leads to accurate advice, management and referral of patients with erectile dysfunction. PMID:10643952

  3. Emotional dysfunctions in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Leonie A K; Radke, Sina; Morawetz, Carmen; Derntl, Birgit

    2016-06-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are characterized primarily by motor signs but are also accompanied by emotional disturbances. Because of the limited knowledge about these dysfunctions, this Review provides an overview of emotional competencies in Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and multiple sclerosis (MS), with a focus on emotion recognition, emotion regulation, and depression. Most studies indicate facial emotion recognition deficits in HD and PD, whereas data for MS are inconsistent. On a neural level, dysfunctions of amygdala and striatum, among others, have been linked to these impairments. These dysfunctions also tap brain regions that are part of the emotion regulation network, suggesting problems in this competency, too. Research points to dysfunctional emotion regulation in MS, whereas findings for PD and HD are missing. The high prevalence of depression in all three disorders emphasizes the need for effective therapies. Research on emotional disturbances might improve treatment, thereby increasing patients' and caregivers' well-being. PMID:26011035

  4. Surgical Procedures for Vestibular Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rated Nonprofit! Volunteer. Donate. Review. Surgical Procedures for Vestibular Dysfunction When is surgery necessary? When medical treatment ... organ (cochlea) is also sacrificed with this procedure. Vestibular nerve section A vestibular nerve section is a ...

  5. The Dysfunctions of Bureaucratic Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duttweiler, Patricia Cloud

    1988-01-01

    Numerous dysfunctions result from bureaucratic school organization, including an overemphasis on specialized tasks, routine operating rules, and formal procedures for managing teaching and learning. Such schools are characterized by numerous regulations; formal communications; centralized decision making; and sharp distinctions among…

  6. Mechanisms of perivascular adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Alfonso, Maria S; Gil-Ortega, Marta; García-Prieto, Concha F; Aranguez, Isabel; Ruiz-Gayo, Mariano; Somoza, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Most blood vessels are surrounded by adipose tissue. Similarly to the adventitia, perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) was considered only as a passive structural support for the vasculature, and it was routinely removed for isolated blood vessel studies. In 1991, Soltis and Cassis demonstrated for the first time that PVAT reduced contractions to noradrenaline in rat aorta. Since then, an important number of adipocyte-derived factors with physiological and pathophysiological paracrine vasoactive effects have been identified. PVAT undergoes structural and functional changes in obesity. During early diet-induced obesity, an adaptative overproduction of vasodilator factors occurs in PVAT, probably aimed at protecting vascular function. However, in established obesity, PVAT loses its anticontractile properties by an increase of contractile, oxidative, and inflammatory factors, leading to endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. The aim of this review is to focus on PVAT dysfunction mechanisms in obesity. PMID:24307898

  7. Mechanisms of Perivascular Adipose Tissue Dysfunction in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Alfonso, Maria S.; García-Prieto, Concha F.; Aranguez, Isabel; Ruiz-Gayo, Mariano; Somoza, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Most blood vessels are surrounded by adipose tissue. Similarly to the adventitia, perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) was considered only as a passive structural support for the vasculature, and it was routinely removed for isolated blood vessel studies. In 1991, Soltis and Cassis demonstrated for the first time that PVAT reduced contractions to noradrenaline in rat aorta. Since then, an important number of adipocyte-derived factors with physiological and pathophysiological paracrine vasoactive effects have been identified. PVAT undergoes structural and functional changes in obesity. During early diet-induced obesity, an adaptative overproduction of vasodilator factors occurs in PVAT, probably aimed at protecting vascular function. However, in established obesity, PVAT loses its anticontractile properties by an increase of contractile, oxidative, and inflammatory factors, leading to endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. The aim of this review is to focus on PVAT dysfunction mechanisms in obesity. PMID:24307898

  8. Thyroid dysfunction and pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nazarpour, Sima; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Simbar, Masoumeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy has a huge impact on the thyroid function in both healthy women and those that have thyroid dysfunction. The prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in pregnant women is relatively high. Objective: The objective of this review was to increase awareness and to provide a review on adverse effect of thyroid dysfunction including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and thyroid autoimmune positivity on pregnancy outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this review, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched with appropriate keywords for relevant English manuscript. We used a variety of studies, including randomized clinical trials, cohort (prospective and retrospective), case-control and case reports. Those studies on thyroid disorders among non-pregnant women and articles without adequate quality were excluded. Results: Overt hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism has several adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes. Overt hyperthyroidism was associated with miscarriage, stillbirth, preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, preeclampsia and fetal thyroid dysfunction. Overt hypothyroidism was associated with abortion, anemia, pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, placental abruption, postpartum hemorrhage, premature birth, low birth weight, intrauterine fetal death, increased neonatal respiratory distress and infant neuro developmental dysfunction. However the adverse effect of subclinical hypothyroidism, and thyroid antibody positivity on pregnancy outcomes was not clear. While some studies demonstrated higher chance of placental abruption, preterm birth, miscarriage, gestational hypertension, fetal distress, severe preeclampsia and neonatal distress and diabetes in pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism or thyroid autoimmunity; the other ones have not reported these adverse effects. Conclusion: While the impacts of overt thyroid dysfunction on feto-maternal morbidities have been clearly identified and its long

  9. Nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Yoshino, Koji; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab (ONO-4538) is an anti-programmed death-1 specific monoclonal antibody, which has become a standard treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma. Nivolumab induces autoimmune adverse events, defined as immune-related adverse events. Herein, we report a case of nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction in the clinical setting. Fourteen patients were treated with nivolumab at our institute, of which three developed thyroid dysfunction, an incidence higher than previously reported in the initial clinical trials. Interestingly, one patient achieved complete remission; suggesting that in some patients, the occurrence of immune-related adverse events, including thyroid dysfunction, might reflect the drug's antitumour efficacy. No patient died or discontinued nivolumab treatment owing to thyroid dysfunction. Although thyroid dysfunction first appeared to be asymptomatic, two of the three patients developed symptoms related to hypothyroidism soon after, requiring hormone replacement therapy. Another patient developed hyperthyroidism that was initially asymptomatic; the patient subsequently developed myalgia with fever >39.5°C after two additional courses of nivolumab. Treatment with nivolumab was therefore discontinued, and treatment with prednisolone was initiated. Symptoms resolved within a few days, and thyroid function normalized. Thyroid dysfunction is sometimes difficult to diagnose because its symptoms similar to those of many other diseases. In addition, thyroid-related immune-related adverse events may present with unique symptoms such as myalgia with high fever, abruptly worsening patients' quality of life. Consequently, thyroid dysfunction should be considered as a possible immune-related adverse event. Thus, it is important to test for thyroid dysfunction at baseline and before the administration of each nivolumab dose if possible. PMID:27012985

  10. Management of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Heidelbaugh, Joel J

    2010-02-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common sexual problem in men. The incidence increases with age and affects up to one third of men throughout their lives. It causes a substantial negative impact on intimate relationships, quality of life, and self-esteem. History and physical examination are sufficient to make a diagnosis of ED in most cases, because there is no preferred, first-line diagnostic test. Initial diagnostic workup should usually be limited to a fasting serum glucose level and lipid panel, thyroid-stimulating hormone test, and morning total testosterone level. First-line therapy for ED consists of lifestyle changes, modifying drug therapy that may cause ED, and pharmacotherapy with phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. Obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and smoking greatly increase the risk of ED. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors are the most effective oral drugs for treatment of ED, including ED associated with diabetes mellitus, spinal cord injury, and antidepressants. Intraurethral and intracavernosal alprostadil, vacuum pump devices, and surgically implanted penile prostheses are alternative therapeutic options when phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors fail. Testosterone supplementation in men with hypogonadism improves ED and libido, but requires interval monitoring of hemoglobin, serum transaminase, and prostate-specific antigen levels because of an increased risk of prostate adenocarcinoma. Cognitive behavior therapy and therapy aimed at improving relationships may help to improve ED. Screening for cardiovascular risk factors should be considered in men with ED, because symptoms of ED present on average three years earlier than symptoms of coronary artery disease. Men with ED are at increased risk of coronary, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular diseases. PMID:20112889

  11. [QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING PROSTATE CRYOABLATION].

    PubMed

    Govorov, A V; Vasil'ev, A O; Pushkar, D Ju

    2015-01-01

    Not long ago, survival rates were the primary outcome measures of surgical management of prostate cancer. Currently, more attention is paid to the quality of life, because even minor changes in the quality of life can lead to serious alterations in the psycho-emotional status and significantly reduce patients' self-esteem. Most experts believe that the quality of life of patients treated for prostate cancer, is mostly affected by urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction, urethral stricture, and bowel dysfunction. Thanks to advances in the treatment of prostate cancer, the incidence of complications was reduced to a minimum. To some extent, this was due to the use of novel minimally invasive treatment for prostate cancer, such as cryoablation, interstitial brachytherapy and HIFU-therapy. The quality of life in 65 patients undergoing cryoablation of the prostate was evaluated using EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. Analyzing the findings of the survey enabled us to estimate the patients' quality of life, as well as to identify the various components of the postoperative health problems. PMID:26390559

  12. Performance of EuroSCORE in CABG and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting: single institution experience and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Parolari, Alessandro; Pesce, Lorenzo L.; Trezzi, Matteo; Loardi, Claudia; Kassem, Samer; Brambillasca, Claudio; Miguel, Bruno; Tremoli, Elena; Biglioli, Paolo; Alamanni, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Aims To assess EuroSCORE performance in predicting in-hospital mortality in on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB). Methods and results Additive and logistic EuroSCORE were computed for consecutive patients undergoing CABG (n = 3440, 75%) or OPCAB (n = 1140, 25%) at our hospital from 1999 to September 2007. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves (AUCs) were used to describe performance and accuracy. No difference in performance between CABG and OPCAB and between additive and logistic EuroSCORE (additive EuroSCORE AUCs of 0.808 and 0.779 for CABG and OPCAB, respectively; logistic EuroSCORE AUCs of 0.813 and of 0.773 for CABG and OPCAB, respectively) was found, although a marked tendency to overpredict mortality by both models was evident. A meta-analysis of previously published data was done, and a total of eight studies representing 19 212 and 5461 patients undergoing CABG and OPCAB, respectively, met inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis confirmed similar performance of EuroSCORE in CABG and OPCAB: estimated AUCs were 0.767 and 0.766 for CABG and OPCAB, respectively, with an estimated difference of 0.001 (95% CI −0.061 to 0.063). Conclusion Additive and logistic EuroSCORE algorithms performed similarly, and cumulative evidence suggests comparable performance in CABG and OPCAB procedures; both risk models, however, significantly overestimated mortality. PMID:19141560

  13. [Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamic and distribution in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Walczak, Jarosław; Szczepanowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a complex disease leading to degradation of motor neurons. One of the early symptoms of many neurodegenerative disorders are mitochondrial dysfunctions. Since few decades mitochondrial morphology changes have been observed in tissues of patients with ALS. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles which constantly undergo continuous process of fusion and fission and are actively transported within the cell. Proper functioning of mitochondrial dynamics and distribution is crucial for cell survival, especially neuronal cells that have long axons. This article summarizes the current knowledge about the role of mitochondrial dynamics and distribution in pathophysiology of familial and sporadic form of ALS. PMID:26689011

  14. Prostatic Disease and Sexual Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Prostatitis and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are common prostatic diseases. Furthermore, the incidence of prostate cancer has recently shown a rapid increase, even in Korea. Pain caused by prostatitis may induce sexual dysfunction, including erectile dysfunction and ejaculatory disturbance. And BPH itself, or treatments for BPH, may affect sexual function. In addition, with increased detection of localized prostate cancer, surgical treatments and radiation therapy have also increased, and the treatments may cause sexual dysfunction. Aging is also an important factor in the deterioration of the quality of life of men. Deterioration of quality of life caused by prostate diseases may be affected not only by the prostate diseases themselves but also by the sexual dysfunction caused by the prostate diseases secondarily. Thus, consideration of these points at the time of treatment of prostate disease is required. Therapies suitable to each condition should be selected with an understanding of the close association of prostate diseases and associated sexual dysfunction with the quality of life of males. PMID:21750746

  15. [Treatment Options for Executive Dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Müller, S V

    2016-09-01

    The concept of executive function is a so-called umbrella concept, so that it includes many different and in some cases mutually contradictory higher-level organizational abilities such as planning, monitoring, inhibition and control of action. Typically, the cause of an executive dysfunction is an underlying lesion in the prefrontal cortex or subcortical regions. Deficits in executive functions appear in the fields of cognition as well as behavior. Diagnosis requires the use of a wide-ranging repertoire of tests and questionnaires making it a time-consuming process. Different therapeutic approaches addressing the diverse symptoms of executive dysfunction, both positive and negative, are available. These include modification and manipulation of the environment and practice of cognitive repetitive procedures. The former are implemented particularly in cases of severely impaired persons. The latter are used in persons in whom cognitive dysfunctions are the dominating symptoms of the disorder.The operational area of therapeutic approaches using paper and pencil as well as computer programs limits them to treatment of cognitive dysfunction. If behavioral disturbances dominate the clinical picture, other procedures should be used.The effectiveness of cognitive therapy of executive dysfunction is well demonstrated according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine (EBM). PMID:27607068

  16. Prostatic disease and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae Woong

    2011-06-01

    Prostatitis and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are common prostatic diseases. Furthermore, the incidence of prostate cancer has recently shown a rapid increase, even in Korea. Pain caused by prostatitis may induce sexual dysfunction, including erectile dysfunction and ejaculatory disturbance. And BPH itself, or treatments for BPH, may affect sexual function. In addition, with increased detection of localized prostate cancer, surgical treatments and radiation therapy have also increased, and the treatments may cause sexual dysfunction. Aging is also an important factor in the deterioration of the quality of life of men. Deterioration of quality of life caused by prostate diseases may be affected not only by the prostate diseases themselves but also by the sexual dysfunction caused by the prostate diseases secondarily. Thus, consideration of these points at the time of treatment of prostate disease is required. Therapies suitable to each condition should be selected with an understanding of the close association of prostate diseases and associated sexual dysfunction with the quality of life of males. PMID:21750746

  17. Cognitive Reactivity, Dysfunctional Attitudes, and Depressive Relapse and Recurrence in Cognitive Therapy Responders

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Robin B.; Minhajuddin, Abu; Borman, Patricia D.; Dunlap, Lauren; Segal, Zindel V.; Kidner, Cindy L.; Friedman, Edward S.; Thase, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunctional attitudes can foreshadow depressive relapse/recurrence. Priming mood, through induction paradigms, is hypothesized to activate dysfunctional attitudes. Cognitive reactivity (CR) refers to mood-linked increases in dysfunctional attitudes after priming. Here we explored the extent to which CR as well as residual, unprimed, dysfunctional attitudes predicted depressive relapse/recurrence among depressed patients who responded to acute phase cognitive therapy (CT). Consenting adults, aged 18–70, with recurrent major depressive disorder (n = 523) participated in a two-site randomized controlled trial examining the durability of continuation phase treatments. Patients received 16–20 sessions of CT. Among the 245 incompletely remitted responders, 213 agreed to undergo a mood induction paradigm. After 8 months of continuation phase treatments, participants were followed an additional 24 months. Although the mood induction significantly lowered mood in 80% of responders, the expected CR was not evident. By contrast, higher unprimed dysfunctional attitudes following CT did predict relapse/recurrence over 20 and 32 months post randomization. The findings of this large longitudinal study of incompletely remitted CT responders challenge the notion that it is necessary to prime mood in order to maximize dysfunctional attitudes’ prediction of relapse and/or recurrence. While findings cannot be generalized beyond CT responders, they emphasize the clinical importance of reducing dysfunctional attitudes in preventing depression. PMID:22445946

  18. Clinical neurology and executive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Filley, C M

    2000-01-01

    Executive function is a uniquely human ability that permits an individual to plan, carry out, and monitor a sequence of actions that is intended to accomplish a goal. This crucial neurobehavioral capacity depends on the integrity of the frontal lobes, most importantly the dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and their connections. Executive dysfunction is associated with a wide range of neurologic disorders that affect these regions. In this paper, executive dysfunction is considered from the perspective of behavioral neurology, and the lesion method is employed to illustrate this impairment in a diverse group of disorders. Frontal system damage leading to disturbed executive function is common and clinically significant. Recognition of this syndrome is critical for ensuring the correct diagnosis, accurate prognosis, and appropriate treatment of affected patients. Executive dysfunction also represents an intriguing aspect of brain-behavior relationships and offers important insights into one of the highest cerebral functions. PMID:10879543

  19. Cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Joana; Sá, Maria José

    2012-01-01

    In Multiple Sclerosis (MS) prevalence studies of community and clinical samples, indicate that 45-60% of patients are cognitively impaired. These cognitive dysfunctions have been traditionally described as heterogeneous, but more recent studies suggest that there is a specific pattern of MS-related cognitive dysfunctions. With the advent of disease-modifying medications for MS and emphasis on early intervention and treatment, detection of cognitive impairment at its earliest stage becomes particularly important. In this review the authors address: the cognitive domains most commonly impaired in MS (memory, attention, executive functions, speed of information processing, and visual-spatial abilities); the pathophysiological mechanism implied in MS cognitive dysfunction and correlated brain MRI features; the importance of neuropsychological assessment of MS patients in different stages of the disease and the influence of its course on cognitive performance; the most used tests and batteries for neuropsychological assessment; therapeutic strategies to improve cognitive abilities. PMID:22654782

  20. Developmental pathways of motor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kleven, Gale A; Bellinger, Seanceray A

    2015-05-01

    Recent evidence has revealed unique patterns of behavioral development after prenatal insult similar to those outlined in studies of adult metabolic dysfunction after prenatal malnutrition. The hallmark features of this Developmental Pathway include a prenatal insult to the nervous system (environmental or genetic) followed by a period of Silent Vulnerability, where no or few functional deficits are observed, and finally emergence of later dysfunction. Possible mechanisms leading to later dysfunction from prenatal insult may include secondary or cascade effects due to the timing of prenatal insults relative to later developing structures in the brain. Methods best employed to study the mechanisms of these pathways are microgenetic and longitudinal designs that include behavioral assessment during the prenatal period of development, and animal models such as the guinea pig. PMID:25864561

  1. Fibrosis and Adipose Tissue Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kai; Tordjman, Joan; Clément, Karine; Scherer, Philipp E.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is increasingly appreciated as a major player in adipose tissue dysfunction. In rapidly expanding adipose tissue, pervasive hypoxia leads to an induction of HIF1α that in turn leads to a potent pro-fibrotic transcriptional program. The pathophysiological impact of adipose tissue fibrosis is likely to play an equally important role on systemic metabolic alterations as fibrotic conditions play in the liver, heart and kidney. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the genesis, modulation and systemic impact of excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in adipose tissue of both rodents and humans and the ensuing impact on metabolic dysfunction. PMID:23954640

  2. Does stress induce bowel dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Ming; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Kao, John Y

    2014-08-01

    Psychological stress is known to induce somatic symptoms. Classically, many gut physiological responses to stress are mediated by the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. There is, however, a growing body of evidence of stress-induced corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) release causing bowel dysfunction through multiple pathways, either through the HPA axis, the autonomic nervous systems, or directly on the bowel itself. In addition, recent findings of CRF influencing the composition of gut microbiota lend support for the use of probiotics, antibiotics, and other microbiota-altering agents as potential therapeutic measures in stress-induced bowel dysfunction. PMID:24881644

  3. Sexual dysfunction in infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Zahra; Amirian, Malihe; Golmakani, Nahid; Mazlom, Reza; Laal Ahangar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sexual problems have different effects on the life of people by influencing their interpersonal and marital relationships and satisfaction. Relationship between sexual dysfunctions and infertility can be mutual. Sexual dysfunction may cause difficulty conceiving but also attempts to conceive, may cause sexual dysfunction. Objective: This paper compares sexual dysfunction in fertile and infertile women. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 110 infertile couples referring to Montasarieh Infertility Clinic and 110 fertile couples referring to five healthcare centers in Mashhad were selected by class cluster sampling method. Data collection tools included demographic questionnaire and Glombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction. Data were analyzed through descriptive and analytical statistical methods by SPSS. Results: There was no significant difference in total score of sexual problems and other dimensions of sexual problems (except infrequency) in fertile 28.9 (15.5) and infertile 29.0 (15.4) women. Fertile women had more infrequency than infertile women (p=0.002). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between fertile and infertile women in terms of sexual problems. Paying attention to sexual aspects of infertility and presence of programs for training of sexual skills seems necessary for couples. PMID:27200422

  4. Current Concepts in Ejaculatory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Jeffrey P; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G

    2006-01-01

    Although erectile dysfunction has recently become the most well-known aspect of male sexual dysfunction, the most prevalent male sexual disorders are ejaculatory dysfunctions. Ejaculatory disorders are divided into 4 categories: premature ejaculation (PE), delayed ejaculation, retrograde ejaculation, and anejaculation/anorgasmia. Pharmacologic treatment for certain ejaculatory disorders exists, for example the off-label use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for PE. Unfortunately, the other ejaculatory disorders are less studied and not as well understood. This review revisits the physiology of the normal ejaculatory response, specifically explores the mechanisms of anejaculation, and presents emerging data. The neurophysiology of the ejaculatory reflex is complex, making classification of the role of individual neurotransmitters extremely difficult. However, recent research has elucidated more about the role of serotonin and dopamine at the central level in the physiology of both arousal and orgasm. Other recent studies that look at differing pharmacokinetic profiles and binding affinities of the α1-antagonists serve as an indication of the centrally mediated role of ejaculation and orgasm. As our understanding of the interaction between central and peripheral modulations and regulation of the process of ejaculation increases, the probability of developing centrally acting pharmaceutical agents for the treatment of sexual dysfunction approaches reality. PMID:17215997

  5. [Cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Maruyama, T

    2000-10-01

    The neuropsychological impairments associated with Parkinson's disease(PD) have been often documented. However, the pathological mechanisms underlying cognitive dysfunction are hardly solved, as compared with motor dysfunction. Moreover, the precise relationships between the two dysfunctions have remained aloof. This paper attempts to clarify three specific domains of isolated cognitive impairments: dysexecutive syndrome, memory disturbance, and bradyphrenia, which are specifically observed in PD. It especially discusses the neuropsychological relationships between these impairments and the stages of illness. Several neuropsychological experiments to examine these three domains of cognitive impairments were conducted. Significant results were obtained in the following: set-shifting and divergent thinking were significantly impaired in both the early group and the advanced group; while set-maintaining, procedural learning, and cognitive speed, were only significantly disturbed in the advanced group. The failure to acquire procedural skills and the slowing of cognitive speed, were correlated with decreased attention of working memory in the advanced group. These results indicate that the shifting of cognitive sets maybe disturbed in the embryonic stage of the disease. The results also indicated that other cognitive dysfunctions might manifest themselves during the advanced stages due to attentional deficits. In conclusion, it is possible that other neurotransmitters maybe involved in the progressive degeneration of other systems in addition to the dopaminergic system. For example: serotoninergic, noradrenergic and cholinergic systems. Therefore, further research is required to establish which neurotransmitters are involved in their corresponding cognitive impairments in PD. PMID:11068439

  6. Photobiomodulation on alcohol induced dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Alcohol, which is ubiquitous today, is a major health concern. Its use was already relatively high among the youngest respondents, peaked among young adults, and declined in older age groups. Alcohol is causally related to more than 60 different medical conditions. Overall, 4% of the global burden of disease is attributable to alcohol, which accounts for about as much death and disability globally as tobacco and hypertension. Alcohol also promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or interferes with the body's normal defense mechanisms against these compounds through numerous processes, particularly in the liver. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a cell-specific effect of low intensity monochromatic light or low intensity laser irradiation (LIL) on biological systems. The cellular effects of both alcohol and LIL are ligand-independent so that PBM might rehabilitate alcohol induced dysfunction. The PBM on alcohol induced human neutrophil dysfunction and rat chronic atrophic gastritis, the laser acupuncture on alcohol addiction, and intravascular PBM on alcoholic coma of patients and rats have been observed. The endonasal PBM (EPBM) mediated by Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells is suggested to treat alcohol induced dysfunction in terms of EPBM phenomena, the mechanism of alcohol induced dysfunction and our biological information model of PBM. In our opinion, the therapeutic effects of PBM might also be achieved on alcoholic myopathy.

  7. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (PTTD) Text Size ... the arch, and an inward rolling of the ankle. As the condition progresses, the symptoms will change. ...

  8. Learning Disabilities: A Neurophysiological Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruickshank, William M.

    1983-01-01

    The author reviews the controversy over definitions of learning disabilities and posits two "givens" in any defintion of the condition: that all learning is neurological, and that learning is conditioning. He proposes a definition based on neuropsychological dysfunction which can be translated into an educational regimen. (CL)

  9. Cognitive Dysfunction and its Determinants in Patients with Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Vinod; Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Christopher, Rita; Rajeswaran, Jamuna; Prasad, Chandrajit; Subasree, R.; Issac, Thomas Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most common parasitic infection of man. In addition to a headache, seizures, and focal deficits, this is associated with significant cognitive dysfunction. Many studies revealed that the number and location of lesions are not always responsible for cognitive dysfunction. Cholinesterase and pseudocholinesterase are found in the walls of the cysticercus which could contribute to cholinergic depletion and thus cognitive dysfunction. Patients and Methods: A total of 43 patients who presented with NCC were evaluated for cognitive deficits, as well as cholinesterase levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with control CSF from patients undergoing spinal anesthesia. Blood levels of interleukin-10 and tumor necrosis factor alpha were also estimated and correlated with cognitive deficits. Results: There is a mild increase in the acetylcholinesterase in CSF of patients compared to controls, but it did not correlate with cognitive deficits. There is an increase in interleukins to a significant level which correlates with vesicular stage of the organism and cognitive impairment. The number of lesions also correlated with cognitive impairment even though the location did not. The domains of cognitive deficits seen are sustained attention, category fluency, verbal working memory, planning, set shifting, verbal learning, visual memory, and construction. Discussion and Conclusion: NCC is associated with multi-domain cognitive impairment correlates with vescicular stage, proinflammatory cytokines and number of lesions but not location, vesicular stage, and proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:27114627

  10. Sex Differences in the Prevalence of Diastolic Dysfunction in Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Renata G.; Worthington, Andrea; Huang, Chuan-Chin; Aranki, Sary F.; Muehlschlegel, Jochen D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The mortality from diastolic dysfunction is approximately 9% to 28%. In patients with ischemic heart disease, female sex and advanced age are associated with increases in ventricular diastolic stiffness. Clinical studies have found higher rates of diastolic dysfunction in women, despite higher ejection fractions, than in men post–myocardial infarction. Therefore, we hypothesized that female patients undergoing cardiac surgery have higher degrees of diastolic dysfunction and experience more adverse outcomes, such as prolonged hospitalization. Methods We prospectively enrolled 153 patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Diastolic function was assessed using early transmitral velocity (E) and early diastolic lateral mitral annular tissue velocity (e′). Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction was defined as binary and a continuous outcome (E/e′). Results Females were more likely than malesto present with higher E/e′ (11.5 vs. 7.9, p = 0.001) and higher left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (71% vs. 36%, p< 0.001). The addition of sex to the model for left ventricular diastolic dysfunction was significant. The relationship between sex and E/e′ ratio showed the biggest difference between males and females in the 56–72-year-old age brackets, where women were much more likely to have a higher E/e′ than males. Conclusions We identified a significantly higher prevalence of diastolic dysfunction among females presenting for elective cardiac surgery compared to males. This finding is more pronounced with age. Additionally, we found that female sex is at higher risk of prolonged ICU and hospital length of stay. PMID:25571945

  11. Adult Children of Dysfunctional Families: Childhood Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Stephen J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Used retrospective accounts to compare adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs), adults who experienced stressful events in childhood not involving parental alcoholism (A-D+), and adults with no reported dysfunction in family of origin (A-D-) with regard to dysfunctional roles adopted as children. Dysfunctional role adoption was more frequent in ACOA…

  12. Cardiac dysfunction and prenatal exposure to venlafaxine.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ana R; Marçal, Mónica; Tuna, Madalena; Anjos, Rui

    2016-04-01

    Venlofaxine, a widely used antidepressant, is known to cause a withdrawal syndrome. We present a case of neonatal transient ventricular dysfunction in a neonate exposed to venlafaxine in utero. Other causes of ventricular dysfunction were excluded. Neonatal ventricular dysfunction can be a possible side effect of maternal use of this drug. PMID:27099733

  13. Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Men with Vascular Erectile Dysfunction: The View of the Preventive Cardiologist.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nishant P; Cainzos-Achirica, Miguel; Feldman, David I; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram; Miner, Martin M; Billups, Kevin L; Blaha, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Vascular erectile dysfunction is a powerful marker of increased cardiovascular risk. However, current guidelines lack specific recommendations on the role that the evaluation of vascular erectile dysfunction should play in cardiovascular risk assessment, as well on the risk stratification strategy that men with vascular erectile dysfunction should undergo. In the last 3 years, erectile dysfunction experts have made a call for more specific guidance and have proposed the selective use of several prognostic tests for further cardiovascular risk assessment in these patients. Among them, stress testing has been prioritized, whereas other tests are considered second-line tools. In this review, we provide additional perspective from the viewpoint of the preventive cardiologist. We discuss the limitations of current risk scores and the potential interplay between erectile dysfunction assessment and the use of personalized prognostic tools, such as the coronary artery calcium score, in the cardiovascular risk stratification and management of men with vascular erectile dysfunction. Finally, we present an algorithm for primary care physicians, urologists, and cardiologists to aid clinical decision-making. PMID:26477950

  14. Evaluation of hand function in patients undergoing long term haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, V; Frankham, A; Disney, A; Pile, K

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Haemodialysis is associated with the deposition of β2 microglobulin in musculoskeletal structures, leading to the syndrome of dialysis related amyloidosis and impairment of hand function. This study aimed at assessing hand function using the Sollerman test in a cross section of patients undergoing haemodialysis.
METHODS—Recipients of haemodialysis underwent the Sollerman test of hand grip function, which assesses 20 activities of daily living using eight grip types, and the JAMAR grip strength test, visual analogue scales (VAS) for pain (VAS-P) and function (VAS-F), and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) were determined. Results—Thirty five subjects (26 male), with mean age 53.2 years, participated. The average duration of haemodialysis was 6.2 years (range one month to 25 years). The median Sollerman score was 77, with 19/35 (54%) patients receiving haemodialysis having a score below the lower normal value of 78-80. The log Sollerman score correlated poorly with age (rs=0.16, p=0.35), and significantly with the HAQ score (rs=−0.66, p<0.00005), duration of haemodialysis (rs=−0.39, p<0.05), VAS-F (rs=−0.41, p<0.05), VAS-P (rs=−0.34, p<0.05), and JAMAR score (rs=0.57, p<0.05). Sollerman scores were highly correlated between dominant and non-dominant hands (rs=0.69, p<000005).
CONCLUSIONS—Hand dysfunction is a common finding among patients undergoing long term haemodialysis. The Sollerman test accurately reflects patient function as measured by HAQ, VAS-F, and grip strength, but less so pain. Its use for the early detection of dialysis related amyloidosis and in the serial monitoring of the effects of hand treatment programmes is encouraged.

 PMID:11171692

  15. [USE OF SILDENAFIL CITRATE FOR TREATMENT OF ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION OF VARIOUS ETIOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Efremov, E A; Kasatonova, E V; Mel'nik, Ja I

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is closely linked to the general state of both physical and psychological wellness. Among the major risk factors are heart disease, arterial hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, as well as sedentary lifestyle, smoking and alcohol abuse. Also, the disease is more frequently found in men undergoing radiation therapy or surgery for prostate cancer. Psychological correlates include anxiety, depression and irritability. Despite a higher prevalence among older men, erectile dysfunction is not considered an inevitable part of aging. Due to polyetiology of the disease, sildenafil is regarded as the gold standard of treatment, and new high quality generic drugs are marketed. The article covers the use of sildenafil in patients with diseases of the cardiovascular system, diabetes, hypogonadism. Effectiveness of sildenafil in patients on chronic hemodialysis as well as in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy is discussed. The issue of addiction to sildenafil is outlined. PMID:26237819

  16. Mitochondria: Redox Metabolism and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jia; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are the main intracellular location for fuel generation; however, they are not just power plants but involved in a range of other intracellular functions including regulation of redox homeostasis and cell fate. Dysfunction of mitochondria will result in oxidative stress which is one of the underlying causal factors for a variety of diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. In this paper, generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the mitochondria, redox regulatory roles of certain mitochondrial proteins, and the impact on cell fate will be discussed. The current state of our understanding in mitochondrial dysfunction in pathological states and how we could target them for therapeutic purpose will also be briefly reviewed. PMID:22593827

  17. [Sexual dysfunction among patients with psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Soldati, Lorenzo

    2016-03-16

    Scientific literature shows that sexual dysfunction is more common in patients suffering from psychiatric illness as opposed to the general population. It also shows that the prevalence of sexual dysfunction is underestimated by professionals, partly because patients rarely talk spontaneously about their dysfunctions. However, sexual dysfunction has an impact on patients' mental health. Furthermore, some psychotropic medication, antidepressants and antipsychotics in particular, can hinder sexual functioning and induce sexual dysfunction. These harmful effects can, in turn, reduce patients' compliance with their medical treatments. It is therefore important that practitioners take into account their patients' sexual experience. PMID:27149715

  18. Thyroid dysfunction from antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Hamnvik, Ole-Petter Riksfjord; Larsen, P Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-11-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%-50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient's quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  19. Insulin dysfunction and Tau pathology

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Noura B.; Gratuze, Maud; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Bretteville, Alexis; Planel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides (a cleavage product of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, or APP) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein assembled in paired helical filaments (PHF). NFT pathology is important since it correlates with the degree of cognitive impairment in AD. Only a small proportion of AD is due to genetic variants, whereas the large majority of cases (~99%) is late onset and sporadic in origin. The cause of sporadic AD is likely to be multifactorial, with external factors interacting with biological or genetic susceptibilities to accelerate the manifestation of the disease. Insulin dysfunction, manifested by diabetes mellitus (DM) might be such factor, as there is extensive data from epidemiological studies suggesting that DM is associated with an increased relative risk for AD. Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are known to affect multiple cognitive functions in patients. In this context, understanding the effects of diabetes on Tau pathogenesis is important since Tau pathology show a strong relationship to dementia in AD, and to memory loss in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. Here, we reviewed preclinical studies that link insulin dysfunction to Tau protein pathogenesis, one of the major pathological hallmarks of AD. We found more than 30 studies reporting Tau phosphorylation in a mouse or rat model of insulin dysfunction. We also payed attention to potential sources of artifacts, such as hypothermia and anesthesia, that were demonstrated to results in Tau hyperphosphorylation and could major confounding experimental factors. We found that very few studies reported the temperature of the animals, and only a handful did not use anesthesia. Overall, most published studies showed that insulin dysfunction can promote Tau hyperphosphorylation and pathology, both directly and indirectly, through hypothermia. PMID:24574966

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction and organophosphorus compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Karami-Mohajeri, Somayyeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-07-01

    Organophosphorous (OPs) pesticides are the most widely used pesticides in the agriculture and home. However, many acute or chronic poisoning reports about OPs have been published in the recent years. Mitochondria as a site of cellular oxygen consumption and energy production can be a target for OPs poisoning as a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity of OPs. In the present review, we have reviewed and criticized all the evidences about the mitochondrial dysfunctions as a mechanism of toxicity of OPs. For this purpose, all biochemical, molecular, and morphological data were retrieved from various studies. Some toxicities of OPs are arisen from dysfunction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation through alteration of complexes I, II, III, IV and V activities and disruption of mitochondrial membrane. Reductions of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis or induction of its hydrolysis can impair the cellular energy. The OPs disrupt cellular and mitochondrial antioxidant defense, reactive oxygen species generation, and calcium uptake and promote oxidative and genotoxic damage triggering cell death via cytochrome C released from mitochondria and consequent activation of caspases. The mitochondrial dysfunction induced by OPs can be restored by use of antioxidants such as vitamin E and C, alpha-tocopherol, electron donors, and through increasing the cytosolic ATP level. However, to elucidate many aspect of mitochondrial toxicity of Ops, further studies should be performed. - Highlights: • As a non-cholinergic mechanism of toxicity, mitochondria is a target for OPs. • OPs affect action of complexes I, II, III, IV and V in the mitochondria. • OPs reduce mitochondrial ATP. • OPs promote oxidative and genotoxic damage via release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. • OP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction can be restored by increasing the cytosolic ATP.

  1. Amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Danzi, Sara; Klein, Irwin

    2015-05-01

    Amiodarone is an effective medication for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. Originally developed for the treatment of angina, it is now the most frequently prescribed antiarrhythmia drug despite the fact that its use is limited because of potential serious side effects including adverse effects on the thyroid gland and thyroid hormones. Although the mechanisms of action of amiodarone on the thyroid gland and thyroid hormone metabolism are poorly understood, the structural similarity of amiodarone to thyroid hormones, including the presence of iodine moieties on the inner benzene ring, may play a role in causing thyroid dysfunction. Amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction includes amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT) and amiodarone-induced hypothyroidism (AIH). The AIT develops more commonly in iodine-deficient areas and AIH in iodine-sufficient areas. The AIT type 1 usually occurs in patients with known or previously undiagnosed thyroid dysfunction or goiter. The AIT type 2 usually occurs in normal thyroid glands and results in destruction of thyroid tissue caused by thyroiditis. This is the result of an intrinsic drug effect from the amiodarone itself. Mixed types are not uncommon. Patients with cardiac disease receiving amiodarone treatment should be monitored for signs of thyroid dysfunction, which often manifest as a reappearance of the underlying cardiac disease state. When monitoring patients, initial tests should include the full battery of thyroid function tests, thyroid-stimulating hormone, thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and antithyroid antibodies. Mixed types of AIT can be challenging both to diagnose and treat and therapy differs depending on the type of AIT. Treatment can include thionamides and/or glucocorticoids. The AIH responds favorably to thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Amiodarone is lipophilic and has a long half-life in the body. Therefore, stopping the amiodarone therapy usually has little short-term benefit. PMID:24067547

  2. Neuromuscular dysfunction in nonbacterial prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Hellstrom, W J; Schmidt, R A; Lue, T F; Tanagho, E A

    1987-08-01

    Although chronic nonbacterial prostatitis is common, the condition remains poorly understood and refractory to treatment. Another approach, i.e., a urodynamic explanation, seems warranted. The underlying cause of the symptoms may be an inappropriate spasm of of the distal urethra/external sphincteric unit, leading to increased pressure in the prostatic urethra with a resultant reflux of urine into the prostatic ducts. The presence of urine (sterile or infected) could induce ductal and periductal inflammation, which could further aggravate spasm of the involved pelvic musculature, exacerbating the voiding dysfunction. We present 3 patients in whom this sequence of events was documented radiographically and urodynamically. Consequently, treatment involved modulation of the dysfunction of the distal urethra/external sphincteric unit: (1) reeducation by reassurance and biofeedback was the initial line of therapy; (2) pharmacologic manipulation using alpha-blockers (to affect smooth and striated muscle irritability) and striated muscle relaxants was next tried; (3) finally, in unremitting symptoms, we used selective sacral-root electro-stimulation, successfully fatiguing the involved muscles and relieving the voiding dysfunction. PMID:3497475

  3. Gut dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Adreesh; Biswas, Atanu; Das, Shyamal Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Early involvement of gut is observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) and symptoms such as constipation may precede motor symptoms. α-Synuclein pathology is extensively evident in the gut and appears to follow a rostrocaudal gradient. The gut may act as the starting point of PD pathology with spread toward the central nervous system. This spread of the synuclein pathology raises the possibility of prion-like propagation in PD pathogenesis. Recently, the role of gut microbiota in PD pathogenesis has received attention and some phenotypic correlation has also been shown. The extensive involvement of the gut in PD even in its early stages has led to the evaluation of enteric α-synuclein as a possible biomarker of early PD. The clinical manifestations of gastrointestinal dysfunction in PD include malnutrition, oral and dental disorders, sialorrhea, dysphagia, gastroparesis, constipation, and defecatory dysfunction. These conditions are quite distressing for the patients and require relevant investigations and adequate management. Treatment usually involves both pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures. One important aspect of gut dysfunction is its contribution to the clinical fluctuations in PD. Dysphagia and gastroparesis lead to inadequate absorption of oral anti-PD medications. These lead to response fluctuations, particularly delayed-on and no-on, and there is significant relationship between levodopa pharmacokinetics and gastric emptying in patients with PD. Therefore, in such cases, alternative routes of administration or drug delivery systems may be required. PMID:27433087

  4. Binge eating and menstrual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ålgars, Monica; Huang, Lu; Von Holle, Ann F.; Peat, Christine M.; Thornton, Laura; Lichtenstein, Paul; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The relation between eating disorders and menstrual function has been widely studied, but it is unknown whether the behavior of binge eating itself is related to menstrual dysfunction. Methods The 11,503 women included in this study were from the Swedish Twin study of Adults: Genes and Environment. The associations between menstrual dysfunction and binge eating were analyzed using logistic regression or multiple linear regression models with generalized estimation equations. Results Women who reported lifetime binge eating were more likely to report either amenorrhea or oligomenorrhea than women who reported no binge eating. These results persisted when controlling for compensatory behaviors including self-induced vomiting, laxative use, and diuretic use. No differences between women with and without a history of binge eating were observed for age at menarche. Conclusion Even when controlling for the effect of compensatory behaviors, the behavior of binge eating is associated with menstrual dysfunction. Metabolic and endocrinological factors could underlie this association. Careful evaluation of menstrual status is warranted for women with all eating disorders, not just anorexia nervosa. PMID:24360136

  5. Gut dysfunction in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Adreesh; Biswas, Atanu; Das, Shyamal Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Early involvement of gut is observed in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and symptoms such as constipation may precede motor symptoms. α-Synuclein pathology is extensively evident in the gut and appears to follow a rostrocaudal gradient. The gut may act as the starting point of PD pathology with spread toward the central nervous system. This spread of the synuclein pathology raises the possibility of prion-like propagation in PD pathogenesis. Recently, the role of gut microbiota in PD pathogenesis has received attention and some phenotypic correlation has also been shown. The extensive involvement of the gut in PD even in its early stages has led to the evaluation of enteric α-synuclein as a possible biomarker of early PD. The clinical manifestations of gastrointestinal dysfunction in PD include malnutrition, oral and dental disorders, sialorrhea, dysphagia, gastroparesis, constipation, and defecatory dysfunction. These conditions are quite distressing for the patients and require relevant investigations and adequate management. Treatment usually involves both pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures. One important aspect of gut dysfunction is its contribution to the clinical fluctuations in PD. Dysphagia and gastroparesis lead to inadequate absorption of oral anti-PD medications. These lead to response fluctuations, particularly delayed-on and no-on, and there is significant relationship between levodopa pharmacokinetics and gastric emptying in patients with PD. Therefore, in such cases, alternative routes of administration or drug delivery systems may be required. PMID:27433087

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction in liver failure requiring transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lane, Maria; Boczonadi, Veronika; Bachtari, Sahar; Gomez-Duran, Aurora; Langer, Thorsten; Griffiths, Alexandra; Kleinle, Stephanie; Dineiger, Christine; Abicht, Angela; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Schara, Ulrike; Gerner, Patrick; Horvath, Rita

    2016-05-01

    Liver failure is a heterogeneous condition which may be fatal and the primary cause is frequently unknown. We investigated mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in patients undergoing liver transplantation. We studied 45 patients who had liver transplantation due to a variety of clinical presentations. Blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with immunodetection of respiratory chain complexes I-V, biochemical activity of respiratory chain complexes II and IV and quantification of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number were investigated in liver tissue collected from the explanted liver during transplantation. Abnormal mitochondrial function was frequently present in this cohort: ten of 40 patients (25 %) had a defect of one or more respiratory chain enzyme complexes on blue native gels, 20 patients (44 %) had low activity of complex II and/or IV and ten (22 %) had a reduced mtDNA copy number. Combined respiratory chain deficiency and reduced numbers of mitochondria were detected in all three patients with acute liver failure. Low complex IV activity in biliary atresia and complex II defects in cirrhosis were common findings. All six patients diagnosed with liver tumours showed variable alterations in mitochondrial function, probably due to the heterogeneity of the presenting tumour. In conclusion, mitochondrial dysfunction is common in severe liver failure in non-mitochondrial conditions. Therefore, in contrast to the common practice detection of respiratory chain abnormalities in liver should not restrict the inclusion of patients for liver transplantation. Furthermore, improving mitochondrial function may be targeted as part of a complex therapy approach in different forms of liver diseases. PMID:27053192

  7. Metabolic dysfunction in lymphocytes promotes postoperative morbidity.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Mark R; Sultan, Pervez; del Arroyo, Ana Gutierrez; Whittle, John; Karmali, Shamir N; Moonesinghe, S Ramani; Haddad, Fares S; Mythen, Michael G; Singer, Mervyn; Ackland, Gareth L

    2015-09-01

    Perioperative lymphopenia has been linked with an increased risk of postoperative infectious complications, but the mechanisms remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that bioenergetic dysfunction is an important mechanism underlying lymphopenia, impaired functionality and infectious complications. In two cohorts of patients (61-82 years old) undergoing orthopaedic joint replacement (n=417 and 328, respectively), we confirmed prospectively that preoperative lymphopenia (≤1.3 x 10(9)·l(-1); <20% white cell count; prevalence 15-18%) was associated with infectious complications (relative risk 1.5 (95% confidence interval 1.1-2.0); P=0.008) and prolonged hospital stay. Lymphocyte respirometry, mitochondrial bioenergetics and function were assessed (n=93 patients). Postoperative lymphocytes showed a median 43% fall (range: 26-65%; P=0.029; n=13 patients) in spare respiratory capacity, the extra capacity available to produce energy in response to stress. This was accompanied by reduced glycolytic capacity. A similar hypometabolic phenotype was observed in lymphocytes sampled preoperatively from chronically lymphopenic patients (n=21). This hypometabolic phenotype was associated with functional lymphocyte impairment including reduced T-cell proliferation, lower intracellular cytokine production and excess apoptosis induced by a range of common stressors. Glucocorticoids, which are ubiquitously elevated for a prolonged period postoperatively, generated increased levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, activated caspase-1 and mature interleukin (IL)-1β in human lymphocytes, suggesting inflammasome activation. mRNA transcription of the NLRP1 inflammasome was increased in lymphocytes postoperatively. Genetic ablation of the murine NLRP3 inflammasome failed to prevent glucocorticoid-induced lymphocyte apoptosis and caspase-1 activity, but increased NLRP1 protein expression. Our findings suggest that the hypometabolic phenotype observed in chronically lymphopenic

  8. Asthma: vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) and other dysfunctional breathing disorders.

    PubMed

    Balkissoon, Ron; Kenn, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) and dysfunctional breathing (DB) disorders may mimic or coexist with asthma, leading to overtreatment with corticosteroids with consequent morbidity. Iatrogenic complications can be averted by early and correct diagnosis. VCD, also termed paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder (PVFMD), is characterized by intermittent paradoxical adduction of the vocal cords, mainly during inspiration, leading to airflow obstruction and dyspnea. Patients with VCD may have repetitive emergency room visits due to acute dyspnea (mimicking exacerbations of asthma). In the seminal descriptions of VCD, young women (often with psychiatric issues) predominated; however, other groups at increased risk for developing VCD include elite athletes, military recruits, and individuals exposed to irritants (inhaled or aspirated). Chronic postnasal drip, laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) may lead to laryngeal hyperresponsiveness. The diagnosis of VCD may be difficult because physical exam and spirometry may be normal between episodes. During symptomatic episodes, spirometry typically reveals variable extrathoracic airway obstruction (truncated inspiratory flow volume loop). The gold standard for identifying VCD is flexible fiberoptic rhinolaryngoscopy. Management of VCD includes identification and treatment of underlying disorders (eg, chronic postnasal drip, LPR, GER, anxiety, depression) and a multidisciplinary approach (including highly trained speech therapists). Speech therapy and biofeedback play a critical role in teaching techniques to override various dysfunctional breathing habits. When postnasal drip, LPR, or GER coexist, these disorders should be aggressively treated. With successful therapy, corticosteroids can often be discontinued. During severe, acute episodes of VCD, therapeutic strategies include heliox (80% helium/20% oxygen), topical lidocaine, anxiolytics, and superior laryngeal blocks with Clostridium botulinum toxin

  9. Pharmacotherapy of Sexual Dysfunctions : Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajith; Biswas, Parthasarathy

    2004-01-01

    The sexual dysfunctions are one of the most prevalent conditions. Sexual dysfunctions can have profound effect on the psychological well-being of an individual and the psychosexual relationship of a couple. Management of the sexual dysfunction should be preceded by an accurate diagnosis reached after a complete medical and sexual history and physical examination. Current focus of researchers has been on understanding the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation and other sexual dysfunctions that can help in developing newer pharmacological cures for these conditions. Recently, a number of clinical trials have studied the potential effectiveness of the phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 inhibitor sildenafil in the treatment of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) and Premature Ejaculation (PME). The introduction of PDE-5 inhibitors like sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil has revolutionized the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. This review focuses on the recent pharmacological advances in the treatment of common sexual dysfunctions like ED and PME with special focus on the role of PDE-5 inhibitors. Also discussed is the pharmacological treatment of other less prevalent and recognized disorders like female sexual dysfunction, drug induced sexual dysfunction etc. PMID:21224902

  10. Cognitive function in patients undergoing coronary angiography

    PubMed Central

    Devapalasundarum, A N; Silbert, B S; Evered, L A; Scott, D A; MacIsaac, A I; Maruff, P T

    2010-01-01

    Objective To measure cognition in patients before and after coronary angiography. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Setting University teaching hospital. Patients 56 patients presenting for elective coronary angiography. Main outcome measures Computerised cognitive test battery administered before coronary angiography, before discharge from hospital and 7 days after discharge. A matched healthy control group was used as a comparator. Results When analysed by group, coronary angiography patients performed worse than matched controls at each time point. When the cognitive change was examined for each individual, of the 48 patients tested at discharge, 19 (39.6%) were classified as having a new cognitive dysfunction, and of 49 patients tested at day 7, six (12.2%) were classified as having a new cognitive dysfunction. Conclusions The results confirm that cognitive function is decreased in patients who have cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, coronary angiography may exacerbate this impaired cognition in some patients.

  11. [Cognitive dysfunction in cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Ladwig, Karl-Heinz

    2016-08-01

    A multitude of modifiable risk factors during the median phase of life are often causative for cognitive dysfunction (CD) in old age. High evidence exists for cigarette smoking, diabetes, physical inactivity and sleeping disorders. Single large scale population based studies proof it for hypertension, hypercholesterinemia and depression, conflicting evidence exists for obesity and work stress. Little attention is paid to the close association between cardiovascular disease conditions and CD, particularly for atrial fibrillation, heart failure and for older patients with coronary heart disease. Undetected CD may be responsible for non-adherence and failure of self-care programs in chronic heart patients. PMID:27557067

  12. Nonpharmacologic Treatment of Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Drogo K

    2002-01-01

    Nonpharmacologic treatment for erectile dysfunction (ED) includes sex therapy, the use of vacuum erection devices, penile prosthesis implantation, and penile vascular surgery. Sex therapy is indicated for psychogenic ED and is at times a useful adjunct for other treatments in men with mixed psychogenic and organic ED. Vacuum erection devices produce usable erections in over 90% of patients; however, patient and partner acceptability is an issue. Three-piece inflatable penile prostheses create flaccidity and an erection that comes close to that which occurs naturally. Penile vascular surgery has shown greatest efficacy in young men with vasculogenic ED resulting from pelvic or perineal trauma. PMID:16986016

  13. Male sexual dysfunction in Asia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Christopher Ck; Singam, Praveen; Hong, Goh Eng; Zainuddin, Zulkifli Md

    2011-07-01

    Sex has always been a taboo subject in Asian society. However, over the past few years, awareness in the field of men's sexual health has improved, and interest in sexual health research has recently increased. The epidemiology and prevalence of erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism and premature ejaculation in Asia are similar in the West. However, several issues are specific to Asian males, including culture and beliefs, awareness, compliance and the availability of traditional/complementary medicine. In Asia, sexual medicine is still in its infancy, and a concerted effort from the government, relevant societies, physicians and the media is required to propel sexual medicine to the forefront of health care. PMID:21643001

  14. Cerebrovascular Dysfunction in Preeclamptic Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Erica S.; Cipolla, Marilyn J.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive, multi-system disorder of pregnancy that affects several organ systems, including the maternal brain. Cerebrovascular dysfunction during preeclampsia can lead to cerebral edema, seizures, stroke and potentially maternal mortality. This review will discuss the effects of preeclampsia on the cerebrovasculature that may adversely affect the maternal brain, including cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation and blood-brain barrier disruption, and the resultant clinical outcomes including posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and maternal stroke. Potential long-term cognitive outcomes of preeclampsia and the role of the cerebrovasculature are also reviewed. PMID:26126779

  15. Endothelial dysfunction: a comprehensive appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Esper, Ricardo J; Nordaby, Roberto A; Vilariño, Jorge O; Paragano, Antonio; Cacharrón, José L; Machado, Rogelio A

    2006-01-01

    The endothelium is a thin monocelular layer that covers all the inner surface of the blood vessels, separating the circulating blood from the tissues. It is not an inactive organ, quite the opposite. It works as a receptor-efector organ and responds to each physical or chemical stimulus with the release of the correct substance with which it may maintain vasomotor balance and vascular-tissue homeostasis. It has the property of producing, independently, both agonistic and antagonistic substances that help to keep homeostasis and its function is not only autocrine, but also paracrine and endocrine. In this way it modulates the vascular smooth muscle cells producing relaxation or contraction, and therefore vasodilatation or vasoconstriction. The endothelium regulating homeostasis by controlling the production of prothrombotic and antithrombotic components, and fibrynolitics and antifibrynolitics. Also intervenes in cell proliferation and migration, in leukocyte adhesion and activation and in immunological and inflammatory processes. Cardiovascular risk factors cause oxidative stress that alters the endothelial cells capacity and leads to the so called endothelial "dysfunction" reducing its capacity to maintain homeostasis and leads to the development of pathological inflammatory processes and vascular disease. There are different techniques to evaluate the endothelium functional capacity, that depend on the amount of NO produced and the vasodilatation effect. The percentage of vasodilatation with respect to the basal value represents the endothelial functional capacity. Taking into account that shear stress is one of the most important stimulants for the synthesis and release of NO, the non-invasive technique most often used is the transient flow-modulate "endothelium-dependent" post-ischemic vasodilatation, performed on conductance arteries such as the brachial, radial or femoral arteries. This vasodilatation is compared with the vasodilatation produced by drugs that

  16. Male sexual dysfunction in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Christopher CK; Singam, Praveen; Hong, Goh Eng; Zainuddin, Zulkifli Md

    2011-01-01

    Sex has always been a taboo subject in Asian society. However, over the past few years, awareness in the field of men's sexual health has improved, and interest in sexual health research has recently increased. The epidemiology and prevalence of erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism and premature ejaculation in Asia are similar in the West. However, several issues are specific to Asian males, including culture and beliefs, awareness, compliance and the availability of traditional/complementary medicine. In Asia, sexual medicine is still in its infancy, and a concerted effort from the government, relevant societies, physicians and the media is required to propel sexual medicine to the forefront of health care. PMID:21643001

  17. Medical treatment of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Burns-Cox, N.; Gingell, C.

    1998-01-01

    There has been a tremendous increase in demand for the treatment of erectile dysfunction in the last 10 years. This has occurred partly because of a greater understanding and awareness by both the general public and clinicians, and also because there now exists a range of effective treatments. The choice of treatments is increasing rapidly and novel delivery systems which may be more patient-friendly than intracavernosal injections are now becoming available. We review the published data on effectiveness and safety of the currently available treatments and discuss recent advances in oral therapy, as these drugs are likely to become available in the near future. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9799886

  18. Conservative management of voiding dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Anita

    2007-01-01

    This review article discusses the efficacy of various conservative therapies in the management of voiding dysfunction with special reference to urinary incontinence. The article emphasizes the fact that conservative therapies have limited side effects and they do not jeopardize future treatment options. Behaviour therapy, pelvic floor therapy and biofeedback; electrical and magnetic stimulation are discussed here individually. Though there is unanimous agreement that these therapies improve quality of life, complete cure is rare. All therapies work better in conjunction with each other rather than in isolation. The review also highlights the need for randomized controlled trials of better methodology. PMID:19675794

  19. Meibomian Gland Dysfunction: Endocrine Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Ozlem G.; Kartal, Elçin; Taheri, Nusret

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the hormone levels of patients with seborrheic meibomian gland dysfunction with controls. Procedures. This is a retrospective case-control study involving 50 patients and 50 controls. Blood workup for hormones was studied in both groups by using macroELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Statistical evaluation was done by using SPSS 15.0 independent samples t-test. Results. There were statistically significant differences of serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels between patients and controls (P = 0.000). Female gender showed statistically significant differences of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin levels between patients and controls (P = 0.014 and P = 0.043), in addition to serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels (P = 0.000 and P = 0.001). However, male gender showed statistically significant differences of only serum testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate levels between patients and controls. (P = 0.003 and P = 0.003 resp.). Conclusions. Increased serum levels of testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate in both genders should be considered as diagnostic markers for seborrheic meibomian gland dysfunction. PMID:24533183

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Mariana G.; Hoppel, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus, and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cylic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:22948484

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction in cancer chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Giannattasio, Sergio; Moro, Loredana

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with cancer development and progression. Recent evidences suggest that pathogenic mutations or depletion of the mitochondrial genome can contribute to development of chemoresistance in malignant tumors. In this review we will describe the current knowledge on the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the development of chemoresistance in cancer. We will also discuss the significance of this research topic in the context of development of more effective, targeted therapeutic modalities and diagnostic strategies for cancer patients, with a particular focus on the potential use of PARP inhibitors in cancer patients displaying mitochondrial DNA mutations. We will discuss recent studies highlighting the importance of the cross-talk between the tumor microenvironment and mitochondrial functionality in determining selective response to certain chemotherapeutic drugs. Finally, owing to the similarities between cancer and yeast cell metabolism, we will point out the use of yeast as a model system to study cancer-related genes and for anti-cancer drugs screening. PMID:25107705

  2. Immune surveillance for ERAAP dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Niranjana A; Shastri, Nilabh

    2013-09-01

    The ER aminopeptidase associated with antigen processing, ERAAP (or ERAP1), is essential for trimming peptides that are presented by MHC class I molecules. ERAP1 is inhibited by human cytomegalovirus, and ERAP1 polymorphisms are associated with autoimmune diseases. How the immune system detects ERAAP dysfunction, however, is unknown. We have shown previously that ERAAP-deficient cells present an immunogenic pMHC I repertoire, that elicits CD8+ T cell response in WT mice. Additionally, we discovered that the WT CD8+ T cells recognized novel peptides presented by non-classical, or MHC class Ib, molecules on ERAAP-deficient cells. The MHC Ib restricted WT CD8 T cells eliminated ERAAP-deficient cells in vitro and in vivo. We identified the FL9 peptide, presented by Qa-1(b), a MHC class Ib molecule exclusively on ERAAP-deficient cells. Remarkably, T cells specific for the FL9-Qa-1(b) complex were frequent in naïve WT mice, and had an antigen-experienced phenotype. Thus, novel non-classical pQa-1(b) complexes direct cytotoxic T cells to target cells with defective peptide processing in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, we discuss the implications of our findings, and the possible roles of pMHC Ib-specific T cells in immune surveillance for ERAAP dysfunction. PMID:23433779

  3. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yong-ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-ping; Zhang, Hui-hong; Zhou, Yu-ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  4. Management of erectile dysfunction post-radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Alan; Abboudi, Hamid; Ghazal-Aswad, MB; Mayer, Erik K; Vale, Justin A

    2015-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy is a commonly performed procedure for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. One of the long-term complications is erectile dysfunction. There is little consensus on the optimal management; however, it is agreed that treatment must be prompt to prevent fibrosis and increase oxygenation of penile tissue. It is vital that patient expectations are discussed, a realistic time frame of treatment provided, and treatment started as close to the prostatectomy as possible. Current treatment regimens rely on phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors as a first-line therapy, with vacuum erection devices and intraurethral suppositories of alprostadil as possible treatment combination options. With nonresponders to these therapies, intracavernosal injections are resorted to. As a final measure, patients undergo the highly invasive penile prosthesis implantation. There is no uniform, objective treatment program for erectile dysfunction post-radical prostatectomy. Management plans are based on poorly conducted and often underpowered studies in combination with physician and patient preferences. They involve the aforementioned drugs and treatment methods in different sequences and doses. Prospective treatments include dietary supplements and gene therapy, which have shown promise with there proposed mechanisms of improving erectile function but are yet to be applied successfully in human patients. PMID:25750901

  5. Chiropractic Treatment of Temporomandibular Dysfunction: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Pavia, Steven; Fischer, Rebecca; Roy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to describe chiropractic treatment of 14 patients who presented with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD). Methods This is a retrospective case series of 14 patients, including 13 adults and 1 child. The majority of these patients were undergoing chiropractic care for spine-related conditions when they presented with additional TMD signs and symptoms. They were evaluated and treated with Activator Methods International published protocols relative to the temporomandibular joint before the addition of treatment to the suprahyoid muscles. Results All pre- and postadjustment assessments were recorded using a numeric pain scale. The resulting average showed a reduction in the patients’ pain scores from the initial visit of 8.3 ± 1.6 to the last visit at 1.4 ± 1.1 with an 80.9% ± 15.4% improvement. The average number of visits was 13.6 ± 8.2. Conclusion All patients selected for this case series showed a reduction of temporomandibular dysfunction symptoms. PMID:26793040

  6. Differentiation Potential of Urothelium from Patients with Benign Bladder Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, Jennifer; Varley, Claire L; Garthwaite, Mary AE; Hinley, Jennifer; Marsh, Fiona; Stahlschmidt, Jens; Trejdosiewicz, Ludwik K; Eardley, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Objective Benign dysfunctional bladder diseases encompass a number of poorly understood clinically-defined conditions, including interstitial cystitis (IC), idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI). We developed a novel in vitro approach to test the hypothesis that failure of urothelial differentiation underlies the aetiopathology of IC, where there is evidence of compromised urinary barrier function. Materials and Methods Biopsy-derived urothelial cells from dysfunctional bladder biopsies were propagated as finite cell lines and examined for their capacity to undergo differentiation in vitro, as assessed by acquisition of a transitional cell morphology, a switch from a CK13lo/CK14hi to a CK13hi/CK14lo phenotype, expression of claudin 3, 4 and 5 proteins and induction of uroplakin gene transcription. Results 2/12 SUI cell lines showed early senescent changes in culture and were not characterised further; 1/7 IC, 1/5 IDO and a further 3 SUI cell lines displayed some evidence of senescence at passage 3. Of the IC-derived cell lines, 4/7 showed a near normal range of differentiation-associated responses, but the remainder of IC lines showed little or no response. A majority of IDO cell lines (4/5) showed a normal differentiation response, but at least 3/10 SUI cell lines showed some compromise of differentiation potential. Conclusion Our study supports the existence of a subset of IC patient in whom a failure of urothelial cytodifferentiation may contribute to the disease and provides a novel platform for investigating the cell biology of urothelium from SUI and other benign dysfunctional conditions. PMID:17537219

  7. Inside the Spiral of Dysfunction: The Personal Consequences of Working for a Dysfunctional Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuck, Brad; Rose, Kevin; Bergman, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunctional leaders suffocate others with coercive power and ego, are unpredictable, and often lack self-awareness about their dysfunction. Dysfunctional leaders are incredibly difficult to work with and can cause a series of cascading personal consequences for employees who work with them. This Perspectives in Human Resource Development essay…

  8. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with mirror-imaging dextrocardia.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xin; Sun, Hansong; Wang, Xianqiang

    2015-08-01

    Dextrocardia requires alterations in techniques during coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. We report two cases undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass graft (OPCAB) surgery and discuss techniques for the operative management of these patients. PMID:26059016

  9. Diabetes and Retinal Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eui Seok; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes predominantly affects the microvascular circulation of the retina resulting in a range of structural changes unique to this tissue. These changes ultimately lead to altered permeability, hyperproliferation of endothelial cells and edema, and abnormal vascularization of the retina with resulting loss of vision. Enhanced production of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress are primary insults with significant contribution to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR). We have determined the identity of the retinal vascular cells affected by hyperglycemia, and have delineated the cell autonomous impact of high glucose on function of these cells. We discuss some of the high glucose specific changes in retinal vascular cells and their contribution to retinal vascular dysfunction. This knowledge provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular defects contributing to the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy, and will aid in the development of innovative, as well as target specific therapeutic approaches for prevention and treatment of DR. PMID:25667739

  10. Environmental Enteric Dysfunction in Children.

    PubMed

    Syed, Sana; Ali, Asad; Duggan, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    Diarrheal diseases are a major cause of childhood death in resource-poor countries, killing approximately 760,000 children younger than 5 years each year. Although deaths due to diarrhea have declined dramatically, high rates of stunting and malnutrition have persisted. Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) is a subclinical condition caused by constant fecal-oral contamination with resultant intestinal inflammation and villous blunting. These histological changes were first described in the 1960s, but the clinical effect of EED is only just being recognized in the context of failure of nutritional interventions and oral vaccines in resource-poor countries. We review the existing literature regarding the underlying causes of and potential interventions for EED in children, highlighting the epidemiology, clinical and histologic classification of the entity, and discussing novel biomarkers and possible therapies. Future research priorities are also discussed. PMID:26974416

  11. Hypoparathyroidism presenting as cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gunjan; Kaur, Darshpreet; Aggarwal, Puneet; Khurana, Tilak

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction in hypoparathyroidism is an important cause of intracranial calcifications, which cause cognitive impairment depending on the calcified areas leading to difficulties in executing activities of daily living. We report a case of a 25-year-old man who presented with gradually decreasing organisational skills, memory problems and difficulty in carrying out daily activities. CT imaging of the brain showed extensive calcification in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. Comprehensive health-related quality of life and cognitive assessment revealed significant affliction in his activities of daily living along with impairment in recall memory, executive functions and verbal fluency. Owing to late diagnosis, chronicity of cognitive problems could not prevent him from discontinuing his college education. PMID:23709145

  12. Erectile Dysfunction in Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Veronika K; Walker, Ulrich A

    2016-08-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a major issue in systemic sclerosis (SSc) as it is observed in around 80 to 90 % of men with this connective tissue disease. ED greatly impacts the quality of life and should be actively addressed as a common complication. Whereas ED in the general population is usually associated with risk factors for atherosclerosis as well as cardiovascular disease, the main aetiology of ED in SSc is microangiopathic. In SSc, the blood flow is reduced in the small penile arteries due to corporal fibrosis and myointimal proliferation. There are no data on the prevention of ED in SSc. On-demand phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors have little effect in improving erectile function, but daily or alternate day regimens of long-acting phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors provide a measurable, although often limited, benefit. When intracavernous prostaglandin E1 injections are also ineffective, the implantation of a penile prosthesis should be considered as an option. PMID:27402106

  13. Psychopathy: cognitive and neural dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    R. Blair, R. James

    2013-01-01

    Psychopathy is a developmental disorder marked by emotional deficits and an increased risk for antisocial behavior. It is not equivalent to the diagnosis Antisocial Personality Disorder, which concentrates only on the increased risk for antisocial behavior and not a specific cause—ie, the reduced empathy and guilt that constitutes the emotional deficit. The current review considers data from adults with psychopathy with respect to the main cognitive accounts of the disorder that stress either a primary attention deficit or a primary emotion deficit. In addition, the current review considers data regarding the neurobiology of this disorder. Dysfunction within the amygdala's role in reinforcement learning and the role of ventromedial frontal cortex in the representation of reinforcement value is stressed. Data is also presented indicating potential difficulties within parts of temporal and posterior cingulate cortex. Suggestions are made with respect to why these deficits lead to the development of the disorder. PMID:24174892

  14. Dysfunctional attention in autistic savants.

    PubMed

    Casey, B J; Gordon, C T; Mannheim, G B; Rumsey, J M

    1993-11-01

    A dysfunctional attention hypothesis of the basis of savant skills was tested with a series of computerized tasks that assessed the ability to divide, shift, direct, and sustain attention. Ten healthy men with pervasive developmental disorders and unusual calendar-calculating skill, and 10 age- and sex-matched controls were tested. There were four general findings. First, the savants and controls did not differ on a measure of visual sustained attention. Second, the savants failed to detect rare auditory targets significantly more than did the controls. Third, the savants were unable to efficiently divide their attention when required to detect both visual and auditory targets simultaneously. Finally, deficient orienting or a deficit in shifting selective attention from one stimulus location to another was evidenced in overall slower reaction times for the savants across tasks requiring shifts and redirecting of attention. This deficit was attributed to an inability to disengage attention as a result of deficient orienting and overselectivity. PMID:8120129

  15. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A.; Borum, Marie L.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27134599

  16. Neddylation dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuzhi; Neve, Rachael L; Liu, Helena

    2012-11-01

    Ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis is a major mechanism that downregulates misfolded proteins or those that have finished a programmed task. In the last two decades, neddylation has emerged as a major regulatory pathway for ubiquitination. Central to the neddylation pathway is the amyloid precursor protein (APP)-binding protein APP-BP1, which together with Uba3, plays an analogous role to the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 in nedd8 activation. Activated nedd8 covalently modifies and activates a major class of ubiquitin ligases called Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs). New evidence suggests that neddylation also modifies Type-1 transmembrane receptors such as APP. Here we review the functions of neddylation and summarize evidence suggesting that dysfunction of neddylation is involved in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22805479

  17. Balance Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rinalduzzi, Steno; Missori, Paolo; Fattapposta, Francesco; Currà, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Stability and mobility in functional motor activities depend on a precise regulation of phasic and tonic muscular activity that is carried out automatically, without conscious awareness. The sensorimotor control of posture involves a complex integration of multisensory inputs that results in a final motor adjustment process. All or some of the components of this system may be dysfunctional in Parkinsonian patients, rendering postural instability one of the most disabling features of Parkinson's disease (PD). Balance control is critical for moving safely in and adapting to the environment. PD induces a multilevel impairment of this function, therefore worsening the patients' physical and psychosocial disability. In this review, we describe the complex ways in which PD impairs posture and balance, collecting and reviewing the available experimental evidence. PMID:25654100

  18. [Conservative therapy of erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Trottmann, M; Marcon, J; Pompe, S; Strobach, D; Becker, A J; Stief, C G

    2015-05-01

    The erectile dysfunction (ED) with a prevalence of 19.2% and a steep age-related increase up to 53.4% in men over 70 years is a common sexual disorder. Especially after market launch of the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors the possibility of an easy-to-use and well-tolerated therapy is available. In case of nonresponse, vasoactive substances can be applied in different forms. In case of an additional hypogonadism, testosterone substitution is indicated. Simultaneously the causes of ED should always be treated, including a change of lifestyle with elimination of exogenous noxa. The use of mechanic tools as single or combination therapy can lead to improved erection. This article provides a critical overview of the latest conservative therapy options, it explains previous unsuccessful therapeutic trials and gives an outlook into potential ED therapy concepts of the future. PMID:25987332

  19. [Topical therapy in erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Floth, A

    2000-01-01

    All forms of pharmacological therapy result in a relaxation of the corporeal smooth muscle. Intracorporeal injection of vasoactive drugs was introduced around 15 years ago and still is the most effective therapy in erectile dysfunction. Resulting in a consistent success rate of 70-80% this form of therapy will find numerous applications, even after the introduction of effective oral agents such as sildenafil. Prostaglandin E1 and--less frequently used--the combination of papaverine and phentolamine are the mainstay of intracorporeal injection therapy. Intraurethral prostaglandin (MUSE) has recently become available and is somewhat less effective than injection therapy. Externally applied drugs (nitroglycerin paste on the penile shaft and minoxidil solution on the glans penis) have not succeeded in the long run. Vacuum erection devices represent a form of physical topical therapy that is very versatile and also effective but rather infrequently applied. PMID:10746290

  20. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A; Borum, Marie L; Doman, David B

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27134599

  1. Noradrenergic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, Mary; Che, Pulin; Chen, Yunjia; Jiao, Kai; Roberson, Erik D.; Wang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    The brain noradrenergic system supplies the neurotransmitter norepinephrine throughout the brain via widespread efferent projections, and plays a pivotal role in modulating cognitive activities in the cortex. Profound noradrenergic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients has been observed for decades, with recent research suggesting that the locus coeruleus (where noradrenergic neurons are mainly located) is a predominant site where AD-related pathology begins. Mounting evidence indicates that the loss of noradrenergic innervation greatly exacerbates AD pathogenesis and progression, although the precise roles of noradrenergic components in AD pathogenesis remain unclear. The aim of this review is to summarize current findings on noradrenergic dysfunction in AD, as well as to point out deficiencies in our knowledge where more research is needed. PMID:26136654

  2. The neuropathy of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bleustein, C B; Arezzo, J C; Eckholdt, H; Melman, A

    2002-12-01

    These studies were intended to explore the relationship between autonomic neuropathy and erectile dysfunction (ED). Sensory thresholds reflecting the integrity of both large diameter, myelinated neurons (ie pressure, touch, vibration) and small diameter axons (ie hot and cold thermal sensation) were determined on the penis and finger. Data were compared across subjects with and without ED, controlling for age, hypertension and diabetes. The correlation of specific thresholds scores and IIEF values were also examined. Seventy-three patients who visited the academic urology clinics at Montefiore hospital were evaluated. All patients were required to complete the erectile function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire: 20 subjects had no complaints of ED and scored within the 'normal' range on the IIEF. Patients were subsequently tested on their index finger and glans penis for vibration (Biothesiometer), pressure (Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments), spatial perception (Tactile Circumferential Discriminator), and warm and cold thermal thresholds (Physitemp NTE-2). Sensation of the glans penis, as defined by the examined sensory thresholds, was significantly diminished in patients with ED and these differences remained significant when controlling for age, diabetes and hypertension. In contrast, thresholds on the index finger were equivalent in the ED and non-ED groups. Threshold and IIEF scores were highly correlated, consistent with an association between diminished sensation and decreasing IIEF score (worse erectile functioning). These relations also remained significant when controlling for age, diabetes and hypertension. The findings demonstrate dysfunction of large and small diameter nerve fibers in patients with ED of all etiologies. Further, the neurophysiologic measures validate the use of the IIEF as an index of ED, as objective findings of sensory neuropathy were highly correlated with worse IIEF scores. The sensory

  3. Male Pseudoheterosexuality and Minimal Sexual Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutstadt, Joseph P.

    1976-01-01

    There is often a correlation between "pseudoheterosexuality" and minor sexual dysfunction. Insight alone is not sufficient to provide relief, but when the patient can be helped to a comfortable acceptance of his homosexual feelings as a normal and healthy facet of his personality, very often the dysfunction is relieved. (Author)

  4. Towards an Analysis of Dysfunctional Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigaudeau-McKenna, B.

    2005-01-01

    This article applies Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL) to the study of language dysfunction. It demonstrates the potential that Systemic Functional analysis can offer to one aspect of the analysis of language dysfunction--the failure to realise complexes of clauses. For the purpose of analysis, new concepts and new measures have been created.…

  5. Update of Endocrine Dysfunction following Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Reifschneider, Kent; Auble, Bethany A.; Rose, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are common occurrences in childhood, often resulting in long term, life altering consequences. Research into endocrine sequelae following injury has gained attention; however, there are few studies in children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology and current literature documenting risk for endocrine dysfunction in children suffering from TBI. Primary injury following TBI often results in disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and antidiuretic hormone production and release, with implications for both acute management and survival. Secondary injuries, occurring hours to weeks after TBI, result in both temporary and permanent alterations in pituitary function. At five years after moderate to severe TBI, nearly 30% of children suffer from hypopituitarism. Growth hormone deficiency and disturbances in puberty are the most common; however, any part of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis can be affected. In addition, endocrine abnormalities can improve or worsen with time, having a significant impact on children’s quality of life both acutely and chronically. Since primary and secondary injuries from TBI commonly result in transient or permanent hypopituitarism, we conclude that survivors should undergo serial screening for possible endocrine disturbances. High indices of suspicion for life threatening endocrine deficiencies should be maintained during acute care. Additionally, survivors of TBI should undergo endocrine surveillance by 6–12 months after injury, and then yearly, to ensure early detection of deficiencies in hormonal production that can substantially influence growth, puberty and quality of life. PMID:26287247

  6. [The cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Akira

    2004-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a slowly progressive disorder which begins with motor symptoms. Several cognitive deficits can be observed in nondemented patients with PD during their history. The core symptom in the cognitive deficits in PD is the executive dysfunction. Neuropsychological tests such as Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Trail Making Test are used to measure the degree of this dysfunction. Executive dysfunction is thought related to abnormalities in the dorsolateral prefrontal circuit which largely passes through the caudate nucleus. The dysfunction emerges as the pathology spreads to the nigrocaudate project corresponding to Hoehn & Yahr stage II-III. Effective therapy for cognitive dysfunction in PD remains elusive, however donepezil, Attention Process Training, Music therapy and Transcranial magnetic stimulation have been reported to have partial efficacy. PMID:15462384

  7. Cardiometabolic risk profile of rural South Indians undergoing coronary interventions

    PubMed Central

    Sriharibabu, Manne; Himabindu, Yalamanchali; Kabir, Zubair

    2012-01-01

    Background According to projected estimates, India will bear 60% of the world's cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden by the year 2020. CVD mortality rates are high in South India compared with the rest of India. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of behavioural, biological and metabolic risk factors in different age groups of rural South Indians undergoing coronary interventions under a governmental health insurance scheme. Methods This study includes 1294 patients who underwent coronary interventions. Age, gender and anthropometric measurements were recorded. History of hypertension, diabetes, smoking and family history of ischaemic heart disease was obtained from every subject. Physical activity was assessed using a General Practise physical activity questionnaire. Investigations like haemogram, blood urea, serum creatinine, fasting and postprandial blood glucose, lipid profile and echocardiography were carried out for all patients. Results Hypertension was found in 65% patients, 32.38% had diabetes mellitus, 41.65% were smokers (current and former), 37.17% had dyslipidemia, 31.06% had body mass index more than 25 kg/m, 27.04% were physically active, 37% had left ventricular dysfunction, and 8.57% had renal impairment ( table 1). Statistically significant differences were seen in the prevalence rates of different risk factors in the compared age groups (p=<0.05) except for hypertension and dyslipidemia (p=0.596 and 0.306). Conclusions Risks to health, as an area of study, has recently begun to receive attention in developing countries including India. Population-based strategies aimed at bringing down risk factor levels in the community can translate into major public health benefits.

  8. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  9. Neurologic complications of thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kudrjavcev, T

    1978-01-01

    Until such time as results of more rigorous studies are available, the morbidity rates for thyroid dysfunction cited here must suffice. The 1955 to 1956 outpatient "incidence" for England and Wales was 1.1 per 1,000 for thyrotoxicosis and 1.7 per 1,000 for myxedema (18). United States in-patient "incidence" for 1971 was 0.16 per 1,000 for thyrotoxicosis and 0.13 per 1,000 for myxedema (25). The 1935 to 1967 average annual incidence of Graves' disease for females in Olmsted County, Minnesota, was 30.5 per 100,000 (10). Well over 50% of hyperthyroid patients have clinical evidence of mild or moderate muscle weakness. Usually this weakness is proximal, and electro-myography and muscle biopsy confirm the existence of myopathic process (Table 11). Severe muscular weakness of acute onset is relatively rare and is encountered in approximately 1% of hyperthyroid patients (11,17,40). Ophthalmoplegia and psychosis are reported 4% and 2% of patients, respectively (17). Myasthenia gravis, although well publicized, is estimated to occur in less than 1% of patients (3,30). TPP is virtually nonexistent in the West; in the Orient it is reported in 2 to 8% of hyperthyroid patients and is 20 to 60 times more frequent in the hyperthyroid male than in the hyperthyroid female (Table 12). The neurologic symptomatology of myxedema is more extensive, and agreement among the various series is poor. The only unselected series addressing itself to neuromuscular manifestations of myxedema that is suitable for citation is that of Scarpalezos et al. (36). This comprehensive study was done without apparent patient selection, and it reported 2% of patients with definite carpal tunnel syndrome, 6% with myopathy, and 18% with polyneuropathy (Table 13). Reported percentages of hypothyroid patients found to have neurologic manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction are extremely diverse: ataxic gait was reported in 5 to 32% (6,7,12,27) of patients and dysdiadochokinesia in 6 to 52% (7,12,27). Psychosis

  10. Erectile dysfunction in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Turan, Onur; Ure, Iyimser; Turan, Pakize Ayse

    2016-02-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common problem in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aimed to assess the presence of erectile dysfunction (ED) in COPD patients. Ninety-three outpatients who had been diagnosed as COPD and followed in Bolvadin State Hospital, Afyon, Turkey, were included in the study. All patients underwent pulmonary function tests and arterial blood gas analysis. They completed International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), Medical Research Council (MRC) Dyspnea Scale, Short Form 36-item Scale (SF-36), and International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) Questionnaire. The mean age of 10 (10.8%) mild, 46 (49.5%) moderate, 28 (30.1%) severe, and 9 (9.7%) very severe COPD patients was 61.4 ± 9.8 years. Varying degrees of ED were detected in 67.7% of COPD patients. All patients with hypoxemia had ED. IPAQ score and all SF-36 parameters were low in patients with ED, while MRC score was high. Forced expiratory volume in one second, forced vital capacity, partial pressure of oxygen in blood, oxygen (O2) saturation, IPAQ score, and role-physical parameters were statistically low in ED patients (p = 0.04, 0.02, <0.01, <0.01, 0.02, and 0.04, respectively); MRC score was statistically higher in patients with ED (p = 0.02). Patients with moderate and severe ED had statistically lower score of mental health (p < 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively). There was a positive correlation between IIEF score and IPAQ scores (p < 0.01), MRC scores (p = 0.01), general health (p < 0.01), role-physical (p < 0.01), role-emotional (p < 0.01), physical functioning (p < 0.01), and mental health (p < 0.01) parameters in SF-36. ED is frequently seen in COPD patients. Hypoxemia, smoking, and limitation of physical activity are thought to be associated with ED in COPD as mechanisms. Quality of life and the functional capacity are negatively affected with the presence of ED. It is important for a physician to question the sexual functions in patients with COPD. The

  11. Psychogenic erectile dysfunction. Classification and management.

    PubMed

    Rosen, R C

    2001-05-01

    Psychogenic factors are involved alone or in combination with organic causes in a substantial number of cases of erectile dysfunction. Epidemiologic studies have implicated the role of depressed mood, loss of self-esteem, and other psychosocial stresses in the cause of erectile dysfunction. A new definition and classification of psychogenic erectile dysfunction has been proposed based on recent clinical and research findings. According to this new classification, psychogenic erectile dysfunction is categorized as generalized or situational type, with subcategories of each type proposed. Traditional treatment approaches for psychogenic erectile dysfunction have included anxiety reduction and desensitization procedures, cognitive-behavioral interventions, guided sexual stimulation techniques, and couples' or relationship counseling. Recently, these approaches increasingly have been combined with pharmacologic therapy such as sildenafil. Special situations have been identified in which combining psychosocial interventions with medical therapy is recommended. These situations include problems of sexual initiation, low sexual desire, other sexual dysfunctions, and significant couples' or relationship problems. More research is needed on the role of psychosocial interventions in the treatment of erectile dysfunction. PMID:11402580

  12. Myocardial Dysfunction and Shock after Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Jentzer, Jacob C.; Chonde, Meshe D.; Dezfulian, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Postarrest myocardial dysfunction includes the development of low cardiac output or ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction after cardiac arrest. Impaired left ventricular systolic function is reported in nearly two-thirds of patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Hypotension and shock requiring vasopressor support are similarly common after cardiac arrest. Whereas shock requiring vasopressor support is consistently associated with an adverse outcome after cardiac arrest, the association between myocardial dysfunction and outcomes is less clear. Myocardial dysfunction and shock after cardiac arrest develop as the result of preexisting cardiac pathology with multiple superimposed insults from resuscitation. The pathophysiology involves cardiovascular ischemia/reperfusion injury and cardiovascular toxicity from excessive levels of inflammatory cytokine activation and catecholamines, among other contributing factors. Similar mechanisms occur in myocardial dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass, in sepsis, and in stress-induced cardiomyopathy. Hemodynamic stabilization after resuscitation from cardiac arrest involves restoration of preload, vasopressors to support arterial pressure, and inotropic support if needed to reverse the effects of myocardial dysfunction and improve systemic perfusion. Further research is needed to define the role of postarrest myocardial dysfunction on cardiac arrest outcomes and identify therapeutic strategies. PMID:26421284

  13. Oral surgery in patients undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Demian, Nagi M; Shum, Jonathan W; Kessel, Ivan L; Eid, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Oral health care in patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy can be complex. Care delivered by a multidisciplinary approach is timely and streamlines the allocation of resources to provide prompt care and to attain favorable outcomes. A hospital dentist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, and a maxillofacial prosthodontist must be involved early to prevent avoidable oral complications. Prevention and thorough preparation are vital before the start of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Oral complications must be addressed immediately and, even with the best management, can cause delays and interruption in treatment, with serious consequences for the outcome and prognosis. PMID:24794266

  14. Viscoelastic behavior of polymers undergoing crosslinking reactions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moacanin, J.; Aklonis, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Previously a method was developed for predicting the viscoelastic response of polymers undergoing scission reactions. These results are now extended to include crosslinking reactions. As for scission, at any given time the character of the network chains is determined by the instantaneous crosslink density. For scission all chains were assumed to carry the same stress; for crosslinking, however, the stress is distributed between the 'new' and 'old' chains. Equations for calculating the creep response of a system which experiences a step increase in crosslink density are derived.

  15. Granulocyte kinetics in donors undergoing filtration leukapheresis.

    PubMed

    Rubins, J M; MacPherson, J L; Nusbacher, J; Wiltbank, T

    1976-01-01

    Normal blood donors undergoing filtration leukapheresis (FL) have a profound transient neutropenia early in the procedure which is followed by a "rebound" neutrophilia. This phenomenon occurs in unstimulated donors as well as in donors pretreated with either prednisone or dexamethasone. The mechanism for development of the neutropenia was investigated in volunteers throug a nylon filter at 37 C, a significant but transient neutropenia was observed. Plasma rendered cell and stroma-free achieved the same result indicating that plasma alone, when exposed to nylon fibers, is capable of producing neutropenia. PMID:1251458

  16. Definition and application of neuropsychological test battery to evaluate postoperative cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Lívia Stocco Sanches; Pietrobon, Ricardo; de Aguiar, Wagner; Rios, Ruth Pinto Camarão; Stahlberg, Mariane Galzerano; de Menezes, Iolanda Valois Galvão; Osternack-Pinto, Kátia; Carmona, Maria José Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the adequacy of the neuropsychological test battery proposed by the International Study of Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction to evaluate this disorder in Brazilian elderly patients undergoing surgery under general anesthesia. Methods A neuropsychological assessment was made in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery under general anesthesia, aged over 65 years, literate, with no history of psychiatric or neurological problems and score on the Mini Mental State Examination at or above the cutoff point for the Brazilian population (>18 or >23) according to the schooling level of the subject. Eighty patients were evaluated by a trained team of neuropsychologists up to 24 hours before elective surgery. Results Among the patients evaluated, one was excluded due to score below the cutoff point in the Mini Mental State Examination and two did not complete the test battery, thus remaining 77 patients in the study. The mean age was 69±7.5 years, and 62.34% of the subjects had ±4 years of study. The subjects had significantly lower averages than expected (p<0.001) for normative tables on neuropsychological tests. Conclusion The study demonstrated the applicability of the instruments in the Brazilian elderly and low schooling level population, but suggested the need to determine cutoff points appropriate for these individuals, ensuring the correct interpretation of results. This battery is relevant to postoperative follow-up evaluations, favoring the diagnosis of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in patients undergoing different types of surgery and anesthetic techniques. PMID:25993064

  17. Animal models of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Snehlata V.; Jadhav, Kshitij S.; Marathe, Padmaja A.; Pawar, Dattatray B.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models have contributed to a great extent to understanding and advancement in the field of sexual medicine. Many current medical and surgical therapies in sexual medicine have been tried based on these animal models. Extensive literature search revealed that the compiled information is limited. In this review, we describe various experimental models of erectile dysfunction (ED) encompassing their procedures, variables of assessment, advantages and disadvantages. The search strategy consisted of review of PubMed based articles. We included original research work and certain review articles available in PubMed database. The search terms used were “ED and experimental models,” “ED and nervous stimulation,” “ED and cavernous nerve stimulation,” “ED and central stimulation,” “ED and diabetes mellitus,” “ED and ageing,” “ED and hypercholesteremia,” “ED and Peyronie's disease,” “radiation induced ED,” “telemetric recording,” “ED and mating test” and “ED and non-contact erection test.” PMID:25624570

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction in neuromuscular disorders.

    PubMed

    Katsetos, Christos D; Koutzaki, Sirma; Melvin, Joseph J

    2013-09-01

    This review deciphers aspects of mitochondrial (mt) dysfunction among nosologically, pathologically, and genetically diverse diseases of the skeletal muscle, lower motor neuron, and peripheral nerve, which fall outside the traditional realm of mt cytopathies. Special emphasis is given to well-characterized mt abnormalities in collagen VI myopathies (Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy and Bethlem myopathy), megaconial congenital muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2 (calpainopathy), centronuclear myopathies, core myopathies, inflammatory myopathies, spinal muscular atrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2, and drug-induced peripheral neuropathies. Among inflammatory myopathies, mt abnormalities are more prominent in inclusion body myositis and a subset of polymyositis with mt pathology, both of which are refractory to corticosteroid treatment. Awareness is raised about instances of phenotypic mimicry between cases harboring primary mtDNA depletion, in the context of mtDNA depletion syndrome, and established neuromuscular disorders such as spinal muscular atrophy. A substantial body of experimental work, derived from animal models, attests to a major role of mitochondria (mt) in the early process of muscle degeneration. Common mechanisms of mt-related cell injury include dysregulation of the mt permeability transition pore opening and defective autophagy. The therapeutic use of mt permeability transition pore modifiers holds promise in various neuromuscular disorders, including muscular dystrophies. PMID:24331362

  19. Nonobvious obstructive meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Blackie, Caroline A; Korb, Donald R; Knop, Eric; Bedi, Raman; Knop, Nadja; Holland, Edward J

    2010-12-01

    This review presents the rationale and supporting data for a recent paradigm shift in our understanding of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). The historical understanding of MGD has been that of an infectious hypersecretory disorder with obvious signs of inflammation, hypersecretion, and purulent excreta. The current understanding of MGD now includes the polar concept of a less obvious or nonobvious type of hyposecretory obstructive MGD, where inflammation and other signs of pathology may be absent unless special examination techniques are employed. A new term, nonobvious obstructive MGD (NOMGD), is used to describe what may be the most common form of obstructive MGD. Obstructive MGD is an area of growing importance because obstructive MGD is now recognized to be the most common cause of evaporative dry eye, and because NOMGD seems to be the precursor to obvious obstructive MGD, it is also an important area to understand. The prevalence of NOMGD seems to be very high but currently significantly underdiagnosed. This review presents the relevant anatomy and physiology, concepts of obstructive MGD, the usual absence of inflammation in obstructive MGD, nomenclature and classification of obstructive and NOMGD, clinical diagnosis of NOMGD emphasizing the necessity for diagnostic expression, the use of a new instrument for diagnostic expression providing a standardized method of assessing meibomian gland functionality, the complementary roles of the aqueous and lipid layers, and the specific treatment of NOMGD, emphasizing that the success of treatment of all forms of obstructive MGD is dependent on the relief of the obstruction. PMID:20847669

  20. The anatomy of group dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hayes, David F

    2014-04-01

    The dysfunction of the radiology group has 2 components: (1) the thinking component-the governance structure of the radiology group; how we manage the group; and (2) the structural component-the group's business model and its conflict with the partner's personal business model. Of the 2 components, governance is more important. Governance must be structured on classic, immutable business management principles. The structural component, the business model, is not immutable. In fact, it must continually change in response to the marketplace. Changes in the business model should occur only if demanded or permitted by the marketplace; instituting changes for other reasons, including personal interests or deficient knowledge of the deciders, is fundamentally contrary to the long-term interests of the group and its owners. First, we must learn basic business management concepts to appreciate the function and necessity of standard business models and standard business governance. Peter Drucker's The Effective Executive is an excellent primer on the subjects of standard business practices and the importance of a functional, authorized, and fully accountable chief executive officer. PMID:24503047

  1. Psychiatric disorders and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, Marcel D

    2015-01-01

    Sexual problems are highly prevalent among patients with psychiatric disorders. They may be caused by the psychopathology of the psychiatric disorder but also by its pharmacotherapy. Both positive symptoms (e.g., psychosis, hallucinations) as well as negative symptoms (e.g., anhedonia) of schizophrenia may negatively interfere with interpersonal and sexual relationships. Atypical antipsychotics have fewer sexual side-effects than the classic antipsychotics. Mood disorders may affect libido, sexual arousal, orgasm, and erectile function. With the exception of bupropion, agomelatine, mirtazapine, vortioxetine, amineptine, and moclobemide, all antidepressants cause sexual side-effects. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may particularly delay ejaculation and female orgasm, but also can cause decreased libido and erectile difficulties. SSRI-induced sexual side-effects are dose-dependent and reversible. Very rarely, their sexual side-effects persist after SSRI discontinuation. This is often preceded by genital anesthesia. Some personality characteristics are a risk factor for sexual dysfunction. Also patients with eating disorders may suffer from sexual difficulties. So far, research into psychotropic-induced sexual side-effects suffers from substantial methodologic limitations. Patients tend not to talk with their clinician about their sexual life. Psychiatrists and other doctors need to take the initiative to talk about the patient's sexual life in order to become informed about potential medication-induced sexual difficulties. PMID:26003261

  2. Tumor-induced immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, R; Wasserman, K; Horiguchi, S; Kono, K; Sjöberg, J; Pisa, P; Petersson, M

    1999-10-01

    Immune system-based approaches for the treatment of malignant disease over the past decades have often focused on cytolytic effector cells such as cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), and natural killer (NK) cells. It has also been demonstrated that tumor-bearing mice can be cured using a wide variety of approaches, some of which involve cytokine-mediated enhancement of CTL and NK cell activity. However, the apparent success in mice stands in contrast to the current situation in the clinic, wherein only a minority of patients have thus far benefited from CTL- or NK cell-based antitumor approaches. The underlying causes of tumor-associated immune suppression of CTL and NK cell activity are discussed, and features of interest shared with HIV infection, leprosy, and rheumatoid arthritis are also be mentioned. Remarkable and very recent observations have shed more light upon the causes of dysfunctional alterations in CTL and NK cells often associated with these diseases, that in turn have suggested new immunotherapeutic approaches for cancer and infectious disease. PMID:10501847

  3. Metabolic Dysfunction in Diabetic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Isfort, Michael; Stevens, Sarah C.W.; Schaffer, Stephen; Jong, Chian Ju; Wold, Loren E.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is defined as cardiac disease independent of vascular complications during diabetes. The number of new cases of DCM is rising at epidemic rates in proportion to newly diagnosed cases of diabetes mellitus (DM) throughout the world. DCM is a heart failure syndrome found in diabetic patients that is characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy and reduced diastolic function, with or without concurrent systolic dysfunction, occurring in the absence of hypertension and coronary artery disease. DCM and other diabetic complications are caused in part by elevations in blood glucose and lipids, characteristic of DM. Although there are pathological consequences to hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, the combination of the two metabolic abnormalities potentiates the severity of diabetic complications. A natural competition exists between glucose and fatty acid metabolism in the heart that is regulated by allosteric and feedback control and transcriptional modulation of key limiting enzymes. Inhibition of these glycolytic enzymes not only controls flux of substrate through the glycolytic pathway, but also leads to the diversion of glycolytic intermediate substrate through pathological pathways, which mediate the onset of diabetic complications. The present review describes the limiting steps involved in the development of these pathological pathways and the factors involved in the regulation of these limiting steps. Additionally, therapeutic options with demonstrated or postulated effects on DCM are described. PMID:23443849

  4. Sexual dysfunction within an adult developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Fagan, P J; Meyer, J K; Schmidt, C W

    1986-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the adult who has adequately mastered the oedipal stage of psychosexual development and who presents with a sexual dysfunction. Drawing on the developmental sequence of Erik Erikson, the authors suggest that failure to address adequately an adult psychosocial crisis may result in sexual dysfunction. There may be both adult developmental deficits and regression to adolescent and adult stages previously negotiated. Both may be symptomatically represented by sexual dysfunction. The authors urge that the sexual and marital problems be evaluated within an adult developmental framework and that the therapy address the psychosocial issues which are appropriate to the developmental stage of the patient. PMID:3820320

  5. [Female sexual dysfunction: Drug treatment options].

    PubMed

    Alcántara Montero, A; Sánchez Carnerero, C I

    2016-01-01

    Many women will likely experience a sexual problem in their lifetime. Female sexual dysfunction is a broad term used to describe 3 categories of disorders of a multifactorial nature. Effective, but limited pharmacotherapeutic options exist to address female sexual dysfunction. The FDA recently approved the first agent for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in pre-menopausal women. Off-label use of hormonal therapies, particularly oestrogen and testosterone, are the most widely employed for female sexual dysfunction, particularly in post-menopausal women. Other drugs currently under investigation include phosphodiesterase inhibitors and agents that modulate dopamine or melanocortin receptors. PMID:27041639

  6. Velo-pharyngeal dysfunction: Evaluation and management

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Separation of the nasal and oral cavities by dynamic closure of the velo-pharyngeal port is necessary for normal speech and swallowing. Velo-pharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) may either follow repair of a cleft palate or be independent of clefting. While the diagnosis of VPD is made by audiologic perceptual evaluation of speech, identification of the mechanism of the dysfunction requires instrumental visualization of the velo-pharyngeal port during specific speech tasks. Matching the specific intervention for management of VPD with the type of dysfunction, i.e. differential management for differential diagnosis, maximizes the result while minimizing the morbidity of the intervention. PMID:19884668

  7. Quantitative EEG and Low-Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) Imaging of Patients Undergoing Methadone Treatment for Opiate Addiction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Grace Y; Kydd, Robert R; Russell, Bruce R

    2016-07-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has been used as a treatment for opiate dependence since the mid-1960s. Evidence suggests that methadone binds to mu opiate receptors as do other opiates and induces changes in neurophysiological function. However, little is known, about how neural activity within the higher frequency gamma band (>30 Hz) while at rest changes in those stabilized on MMT despite its association with the excitation-inhibition balance within pyramidal-interneuron networks. Our study investigated differences in resting gamma power (37-41 Hz) between patients undergoing MMT for opiate dependence, illicit opiate users, and healthy controls subjects. Electroencephalographic data were recorded from 26 sites according to the international 10-20 system. Compared with the healthy controls subjects, people either undergoing MMT (mean difference [MD] = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.09-0.55, P < .01) or currently using illicit opiates (MD = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.06-0.56, P = .01) exhibited significant increased gamma power. The sLORETA (standardized low-resolution electromagnetic tomography) between-group comparison revealed dysfunctional neuronal activity in the occipital, parietal, and frontal lobes in the patients undergoing MMT. A more severe profile of dysfunction was observed in those using illicit opiates. Our findings suggest that long-term exposure to opioids is associated with disrupted resting state network, which may be reduced after MMT. PMID:26002855

  8. Spatial learning in men undergoing alcohol detoxification.

    PubMed

    Ceccanti, Mauro; Hamilton, Derek; Coriale, Giovanna; Carito, Valentina; Aloe, Luigi; Chaldakov, George; Romeo, Marina; Ceccanti, Marco; Iannitelli, Angela; Fiore, Marco

    2015-10-01

    Alcohol dependence is a major public health problem worldwide. Brain and behavioral disruptions including changes in cognitive abilities are common features of alcohol addiction. Thus, the present study was aimed to investigate spatial learning and memory in 29 alcoholic men undergoing alcohol detoxification by using a virtual Morris maze task. As age-matched controls we recruited 29 men among occasional drinkers without history of alcohol dependence and/or alcohol related diseases and with a negative blood alcohol level at the time of testing. We found that the responses to the virtual Morris maze are impaired in men undergoing alcohol detoxification. Notably they showed increased latencies in the first movement during the trials, increased latencies in retrieving the hidden platform and increased latencies in reaching the visible platform. These findings were associated with reduced swimming time in the target quadrant of the pool where the platform had been during the 4 hidden platform trials of the learning phase compared to controls. Such increasing latency responses may suggest motor control, attentional and motivational deficits due to alcohol detoxification. PMID:26143187

  9. Immune-Mediated Metabolic Kynurenine Pathways Are Involved in the Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction after Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    PubMed

    Yi, Shuang Qiang; Yang, Mi; Duan, Kai Ming

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) after cardiopulmonary bypass is a serious complication that can lead to personality changes, memory loss, reduction in the ability to learn, and other central nervous system dysfunctions. In recent years, there have been improvements in measures to protect the brain during surgery, although the incidence of cognitive dysfunction after cardiac surgery remains high (33 to 83% short-term and 20 to 60% long-term cognitive dysfunction). Despite the large amount of basic and clinical research on the incidence of POCD, its exact pathogenesis and complexity are not clear. Many studies have shown that the kynurenine pathway (KP) and cognitive function in humans are closely related. Some reports also show that the imbalance of some metabolites of the KP such as kynurenic acid and quinolinic acid (QUIN), which act in dynamic equilibrium under physiologic conditions, have effects on the central nervous system and can significantly affect cognitive function. Further studies have shown that inflammatory mediators may act on key enzymes of the KP causing KP-induced disorders. Severe inflammatory reaction occurs in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass, which triggers metabolic pathways that are closely related to changes in cognitive function. In this review, we summarize that inflammation-induced metabolic kynurenine (KYN) pathway disorders are likely to have an important role in incidence of POCD after CPB surgery. PMID:25893921

  10. Endothelial Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dhananjayan, R; Koundinya, K S Srivani; Malati, T; Kutala, Vijay Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is an imbalance in the production of vasodilator factors and when this balance is disrupted, it predisposes the vasculature towards pro-thrombotic and pro-atherogenic effects. This results in vasoconstriction, leukocyte adherence, platelet activation, mitogenesis, pro-oxidation, impaired coagulation and nitric oxide production, vascular inflammation, atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Endothelial dysfunction is focussed as it is a potential contributor to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus. Under physiological conditions, there is a balanced release of endothelial-derived relaxing and contracting factors, but this delicate balance is altered in diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis, thereby contributing to further progression of vascular and end-organ damage. This review focuses on endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, oxidative stress associated with diabetes mellitus, markers and genetics that are implicated in endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27605734

  11. Soluble endoglin, hypercholesterolemia and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rathouska, Jana; Jezkova, Katerina; Nemeckova, Ivana; Nachtigal, Petr

    2015-12-01

    A soluble form of endoglin (sEng) is known to be an extracellular domain of the full-length membrane endoglin, which is elevated during various pathological conditions related to vascular endothelium. In the current review, we tried to summarize a possible role of soluble endoglin in cardiovascular pathologies, focusing on its relation to endothelial dysfunction and cholesterol levels. We discussed sEng as a proposed biomarker of cardiovascular disease progression, cardiovascular disease treatment and endothelial dysfunction. We also addressed a potential interaction of sEng with TGF-β/eNOS or BMP-9 signaling. We suggest soluble endoglin levels to be monitored, because they reflect the progression/treatment efficacy of cardiovascular diseases related to endothelial dysfunction and hypercholesterolemia. A possible role of soluble endoglin as an inducer of endothelial dysfunction however remains to be elucidated. PMID:26520890

  12. Evaluation and Treatment of Smell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Terence M.; Murphy, Claire; Jacobs, Robert D.; Jalowayski, Alfredo

    1987-01-01

    We gave 63 patients with symptoms of smell dysfunction a full evaluation by age-adjusted olfactory threshold and odor identification testing, rhinomanometry, nasal cytology, nasal endoscopy, computed tomographic (CT) scan and a trial of medical treatment. CT scans were valuable for identifying ethmoid sinus disease and nasal endoscopy for inspecting olfactory epithelium. A trial of prednisone served as a diagnostic modality to identify correctable causes of smell dysfunction. Given that there are 2 million people in the United States with a smell dysfunction, that the average physician knows little about its diagnosis and treatment and that the psychosocial impact to an afflicted person is great, we urge a greater awareness of smell dysfunction, its diagnosis and its treatment. PMID:3577134

  13. Post-operative cognitive dysfunction after knee arthroplasty: a diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Kiryu K.; Joyner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is common in the elderly, and significantly impacts their recovery. We present an unusual diagnostic challenge where a 65-year-old male presented 4-week post-total knee arthroplasty with acute cognitive dysfunction lasting 19 days. Curiously, there were no findings uncovering a specific cause, but during investigation underlying predisposing factors such as depression, mild memory deficits and generalized brain volume loss were identified. The impression after psychogeriatric review was that of an organic brain syndrome with overlay of depression, with a complex presentation as POCD. After escalation of behavioural disturbance, he was commenced on anti-psychotic/depressant, with immediate response. We emphasize the importance of pre-operative evaluation of cognitive function and risk factors in all geriatric patients undergoing elective surgery, and the need for further characterization of POCD, as well as experimental research elucidating the underlying mechanisms to better identify and treat this important post-surgical phenomenon. PMID:25988029

  14. Post-operative cognitive dysfunction after knee arthroplasty: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Yap, Kiryu K; Joyner, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is common in the elderly, and significantly impacts their recovery. We present an unusual diagnostic challenge where a 65-year-old male presented 4-week post-total knee arthroplasty with acute cognitive dysfunction lasting 19 days. Curiously, there were no findings uncovering a specific cause, but during investigation underlying predisposing factors such as depression, mild memory deficits and generalized brain volume loss were identified. The impression after psychogeriatric review was that of an organic brain syndrome with overlay of depression, with a complex presentation as POCD. After escalation of behavioural disturbance, he was commenced on anti-psychotic/depressant, with immediate response. We emphasize the importance of pre-operative evaluation of cognitive function and risk factors in all geriatric patients undergoing elective surgery, and the need for further characterization of POCD, as well as experimental research elucidating the underlying mechanisms to better identify and treat this important post-surgical phenomenon. PMID:25988029

  15. Sexual dysfunction following proctocolectomy and abdominoperineal resection.

    PubMed

    Yeager, E S; Van Heerden, J A

    1980-02-01

    Sexual dysfunction after rectal excision was studied in 45 male patients who were less than 50 years of age. Of 25 patients having had proctocolectomy, one (4%) was impotent, while three (15%) of 20 patients having had abdominoperineal resection were impotent. Two patients in the abdominoperineal group reported no ejaculation with normal potency and sensation of orgasm. The age of the patient and the extent of dissection seemed to be the two main factors concerned with sexual dysfunction after rectal excision. PMID:7362286

  16. [Thyroid dysfunction and the hemostatic system].

    PubMed

    Platonova, N M; Sviridonova, M A; Troshina, E A

    2014-01-01

    Whether there is a link between thyroid dysfunction and different impairments in the hemostatic system is discussed. The level of thyroid hormones is an essential factor that influences the coagulation system. Thyroid dysfunction affects the balance between coagulation and fibrinolysis, by increasing the risk of thrombosis and hemorrhage in hyperthyroidism. However, there is no consensus of opinion regarding the mechanisms of the described hemostatic changes in the literature. PMID:25509900

  17. Sinus node dysfunction complicating viper bite.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashish; Kumar, Tarun; Ravindranath, Khandenahally S; Bhat, Prabhavathi; Manjunath, Cholenahally N; Agarwal, Neena

    2015-02-01

    Viper venom toxicities comprise mainly bleeding disorders and nephrotoxicity. Cardiotoxicity is a rare manifestation of viper bite. We describe the case of a previously healthy 35-year-old man who developed coagulopathy and sinus node dysfunction following a viper bite. Electrocardiography showed sinus arrest and junctional escape rhythm. This is the first account of sinus node dysfunction caused by a viper bite. PMID:24887872

  18. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies. PMID:26951056

  19. Cognitive dysfunction in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, J

    2012-07-01

    Among the various central nervous system (CNS) manifestations of mitochondrial disorders (MIDs), cognitive impairment is increasingly recognized and diagnosed (mitochondrial cognitive dysfunction). Aim of the review was to summarize recent findings concerning the aetiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of cognitive decline in MIDs. Among syndromic MIDs due to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, cognitive impairment occurs in patients with mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes syndrome, myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibres syndrome, mitochondrial chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, Kearns-Sayre syndrome, neuropathy, ataxia and retinitis pigmentosa syndrome and maternally inherited diabetes and deafness. Among syndromic MIDs due to nuclear DNA (nDNA) mutations, cognitive decline has been reported in myo-neuro-gastro-intestinal encephalopathy, mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome, spinocerebellar ataxia with encephalopathy, Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome, leuko-encephalopathy; brain and spinal cord involvement and lactic acidosis, CMT2, Wolfram syndrome, Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome and Leigh syndrome. In addition to syndromic MIDs, a large number of non-syndromic MIDs due to mtDNA as well as nDNA mutations have been reported, which present with cognitive impairment as the sole or one among several other CNS manifestations of a MID. Delineation of mitochondrial cognitive impairment from other types of cognitive impairment is essential to guide the optimal management of these patients. Treatment of mitochondrial cognitive impairment is largely limited to symptomatic and supportive measures. Cognitive impairment may be a CNS manifestation of syndromic as well as non-syndromic MIDs. Correct diagnosis of mitochondrial cognitive impairment is a prerequisite for the optimal management of these patients. PMID:22335339

  20. Synaptic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bagetta, Vincenza; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Sgobio, Carmelo; Calabresi, Paolo; Picconi, Barbara

    2010-04-01

    In neuronal circuits, memory storage depends on activity-dependent modifications in synaptic efficacy, such as LTD (long-term depression) and LTP (long-term potentiation), the two main forms of synaptic plasticity in the brain. In the nucleus striatum, LTD and LTP represent key cellular substrates for adaptive motor control and procedural memory. It has been suggested that their impairment could account for the onset and progression of motor symptoms of PD (Parkinson's disease), a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the massive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons projecting to the striatum. In fact, a peculiar aspect of striatal plasticity is the modulation exerted by DA (dopamine) on LTP and LTD. Our understanding of these maladaptive forms of plasticity has mostly come from the electrophysiological, molecular and behavioural analyses of experimental animal models of PD. In PD, a host of cellular and synaptic changes occur in the striatum in response to the massive loss of DA innervation. Chronic L-dopa therapy restores physiological synaptic plasticity and behaviour in treated PD animals, but most of them, similarly to patients, exhibit a reduction in the efficacy of the drug and disabling AIMs (abnormal involuntary movements) defined, as a whole, as L-dopa-induced dyskinesia. In those animals experiencing AIMs, synaptic plasticity is altered and is paralleled by modifications in the postsynaptic compartment. In particular, dysfunctions in trafficking and subunit composition of NMDARs [NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors] on striatal efferent neurons result from chronic non-physiological dopaminergic stimulation and contribute to the pathogenesis of dyskinesias. According to these pathophysiological concepts, therapeutic strategies targeting signalling proteins coupled to NMDARs within striatal spiny neurons could represent new pharmaceutical interventions for PD and L-dopa-induced dyskinesia. PMID:20298209

  1. Environmental enteric dysfunction: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Rosie J.; Jones, Kelsey D. J.; Berkley, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) refers to an incompletely defined syndrome of inflammation, reduced absorptive capacity, and reduced barrier function in the small intestine. It is widespread among children and adults in low- and middle-income countries. Understanding of EED and its possible consequences for health is currently limited. Objective A narrative review of the current understanding of EED: epidemiology, pathogenesis, therapies, and relevance to child health. Methods Searches for key papers and ongoing trials were conducted using PUBMED 1966–June 2014; ClinicalTrials.gov; the WHO Clinical Trials Registry; the Cochrane Library; hand searches of the references of retrieved literature; discussions with experts; and personal experience from the field. Results EED is established during infancy and is associated with poor sanitation, certain gut infections, and micronutrient deficiencies. Helicobacter pylori infection, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), abnormal gut microbiota, undernutrition, and toxins may all play a role. EED is usually asymptomatic, but it is important due to its association with stunting. Diagnosis is frequently by the dual sugar absorption test, although other biomarkers are emerging. EED may partly explain the reduced efficacy of oral vaccines in low- and middle-income countries and the increased risk of serious infection seen in children with undernutrition. Conclusions Despite its potentially significant impacts, it is currently unclear exactly what causes EED and how it can be treated or prevented. Ongoing trials involve nutritional supplements, water and sanitation interventions, and immunomodulators. Further research is needed to better understand this condition, which is of likely crucial importance for child health and development in low- and middle-income settings. PMID:25902619

  2. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  3. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin Bo

    2015-11-26

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smoking, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease. PMID:26635921

  4. Impact of Corneal Endothelial Dysfunctions on Intraocular Oxygen Levels in Human Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Andrew J. W.; Shui, Ying-Bo; Han, Yu-Ping; Bai, Fang; Siegfried, Carla J.; Beebe, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We studied the implications of corneal endothelial dysfunctions on oxidative stress in the anterior segment via in vivo measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in the anterior chamber (AC) of human eyes. Methods We recruited 51 patients undergoing cataract surgery and/or endothelial keratoplasty (EK). Endothelial cell density (ECD; n = 33) and central corneal thickness (CCT; n = 41) were measured on patients with relatively clear corneas. Before surgery, an oxygen sensor was introduced into the AC via a peripheral corneal paracentesis. In all patients, seven measurements of pO2 were obtained by positioning the flexible tip near the endothelium at the central cornea, at four cardinal subendothelial locations near the midperipheral cornea, and in the mid-AC and AC angle. In patients with pseudophakia or eyes undergoing cataract surgery, pO2 also was measured near the lens surface and in the posterior chamber. Results Consistent with our previous reports, a steep oxygen gradient was noted in the anterior segment of normal controls (n = 24). In patients with endothelial dysfunctions (n = 27), there was a significant increase of pO2 at all five subendothelial locations without a significant increase of pO2 in the AC angle. By regression analyses, subendothelial pO2 correlated inversely with ECD and positively with CCT in patients with endothelial dysfunctions. Conclusions This study demonstrates an even steeper intraocular oxygen gradient in eyes with corneal endothelial dysfunctions. It suggests that the reduced oxygen consumption in corneal endothelial cells may increase oxidative stress in the AC and the existence of an alternative aqueous inflow pathway that maintains a relatively low and constant pO2 at the AC angle. PMID:26447982

  5. Reducing psychological distress in patients undergoing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Milanti, Ariesta; Metsälä, Eija; Hannula, Leena

    Psychological distress is a common problem among patients with cancer, yet it mostly goes unreported and untreated. This study examined the association of a psycho-educational intervention with the psychological distress levels of breast cancer and cervical cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The design of the study was quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design with a comparison group. One hundred patients at a cancer hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, completed Distress Thermometer screening before and after chemotherapy. Fifty patients in the intervention group were given a psycho-educational video with positive reappraisal, education and relaxation contents, while receiving chemotherapy. Patients who received the psycho-educational intervention had significantly lower distress levels compared with those in the control group. Routine distress screening, followed by distress management and outcome assessment, is needed to improve the wellbeing of cancer patients. PMID:26911178

  6. Impact of severe left ventricular dysfunction on mid-term mortality in elderly patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Giuseppe; Presbitero, Patrizia; Pagnotta, Paolo; Sonia Petronio, Anna; Brambilla, Nedy; De Marco, Federico; Fiorina, Claudia; Giannini, Cristina; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Klugmann, Silvio; Rossi, Marco L; Ettori, Federica; Bedogni, Francesco; Testa, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Background Whether patients with reduced left ventricular function present worse outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of baseline severe impairment of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) on mortality after TAVI. Methods Six-hundred-forty-nine patients with aortic stenosis underwent TAVI with the CoreValve system (92.8%) or the Edwards SAPIEN valve system (7.2%). Baseline LVEF was measured by the echocardiographic Simpson method. The impact of LVEF ≤ 30% on mortality was assessed by Cox regression. Results Patients with LVEF ≤ 30% (n = 63), as compared to those with LVEF > 30% (n = 586), had a higher prevalence of NHYA class > 2 (P < 0.001) and presented with a higher Euroscore (P < 0.001). Procedural success was similar in both groups (98.4% vs. 97.2%, P = 1). After a median follow-up of 436 days (25th–75th percentile, 357–737 days), all-cause mortality [23.8% vs. 23.7%, P = 0.87, hazard ratios (HR): 0.96, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.56–1.63] and cardiac mortality (19.1% vs. 17.6%, P = 0.89, HR: 1.04, 95% CI: 0.57–1.90) were similar in patients with LVEF ≤ 30% as compared to those with LVEF > 30%. Thirty-day all-cause mortality was not significantly different between the two groups (11.1% vs. 6.3%, P = 0.14, HR: 1.81, 95% CI: 0.81–4.06). Patients with LVEF ≤ 30% had a trend toward higher risk of 30-day cardiac mortality (11.1% vs. 5.3%; P = 0.06, HR: 2.16, 95% CI: 0.95–4.90), which disappeared after multivariable adjustment (P = 0.22). Conclusions Baseline severe impairment of LVEF is not a predictor of increased short-term and mid-term mortality after TAVI. Selected patients with severe impairment of left ventricular function should not be denied TAVI. PMID:27403137

  7. Synaptic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Picconi, Barbara; Piccoli, Giovanni; Calabresi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Activity-dependent modifications in synaptic efficacy, such as long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP), represent key cellular substrates for adaptive motor control and procedural memory. The impairment of these two forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus striatum could account for the onset and the progression of motor and cognitive symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), characterized by the massive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. In fact, both LTD and LTP are peculiarly controlled and modulated by dopaminergic transmission coming from nigrostriatal terminals. Changes in corticostriatal and nigrostriatal neuronal excitability may influence profoundly the threshold for the induction of synaptic plasticity, and changes in striatal synaptic transmission efficacy are supposed to play a role in the occurrence of PD symptoms. Understanding of these maladaptive forms of synaptic plasticity has mostly come from the analysis of experimental animal models of PD. A series of cellular and synaptic alterations occur in the striatum of experimental parkinsonism in response to the massive dopaminergic loss. In particular, dysfunctions in trafficking and subunit composition of glutamatergic NMDA receptors on striatal efferent neurons contribute to the clinical features of the experimental parkinsonism. Interestingly, it has become increasingly evident that in striatal spiny neurons, the correct assembly of NMDA receptor complex at the postsynaptic site is a major player in early phases of PD, and it is sensitive to distinct degrees of DA denervation. The molecular defects at the basis of PD progression may be not confined just at the postsynaptic neuron: accumulating evidences have recently shown that the genes linked to PD play a critical role at the presynaptic site. DA release into the synaptic cleft relies on a proper presynaptic vesicular transport; impairment of SV trafficking, modification of DA flow, and altered presynaptic plasticity have

  8. Intractable metabolic acidosis in a child with propionic acidemia undergoing liver transplantation -a case report-

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jiyoung; Shin, Young Hee; Gwak, Mi Sook; Kim, Gaab-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of metabolism caused by deficient activity of the mitochondrial enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase. The clinical manifestations are metabolic acidosis, poor feeding, lethargy, vomiting, osteoporosis, neurological dysfunction, pancytopenia, developmental retardation and cardiomyopathy. Liver transplantation has recently been considered as one of the treatment options for patients with PA. This case report describes several anesthetic considerations for patients with PA undergoing liver transplantation. Understanding the patient's status and avoiding events that may precipitate metabolic acidosis are important for anesthetic management of patients with PA. In conclusion, anesthesia should be focused on minimizing the severity of metabolic acidosis with following considerations: (1) maintaining optimal tissue perfusion by avoiding hypotension, (2) preventing hypoglycemia, and (3) providing bicarbonate to compensate for the acidosis. PMID:24101962

  9. Intractable metabolic acidosis in a child with propionic acidemia undergoing liver transplantation -a case report-.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jiyoung; Shin, Young Hee; Ko, Justin Sangwook; Gwak, Mi Sook; Kim, Gaab-Soo

    2013-09-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of metabolism caused by deficient activity of the mitochondrial enzyme propionyl-CoA carboxylase. The clinical manifestations are metabolic acidosis, poor feeding, lethargy, vomiting, osteoporosis, neurological dysfunction, pancytopenia, developmental retardation and cardiomyopathy. Liver transplantation has recently been considered as one of the treatment options for patients with PA. This case report describes several anesthetic considerations for patients with PA undergoing liver transplantation. Understanding the patient's status and avoiding events that may precipitate metabolic acidosis are important for anesthetic management of patients with PA. In conclusion, anesthesia should be focused on minimizing the severity of metabolic acidosis with following considerations: (1) maintaining optimal tissue perfusion by avoiding hypotension, (2) preventing hypoglycemia, and (3) providing bicarbonate to compensate for the acidosis. PMID:24101962

  10. Apraxia and Motor Dysfunction in Corticobasal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burrell, James R.; Hornberger, Michael; Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C.; Hodges, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is characterized by multifaceted motor system dysfunction and cognitive disturbance; distinctive clinical features include limb apraxia and visuospatial dysfunction. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been used to study motor system dysfunction in CBS, but the relationship of TMS parameters to clinical features has not been studied. The present study explored several hypotheses; firstly, that limb apraxia may be partly due to visuospatial impairment in CBS. Secondly, that motor system dysfunction can be demonstrated in CBS, using threshold-tracking TMS, and is linked to limb apraxia. Finally, that atrophy of the primary motor cortex, studied using voxel-based morphometry analysis (VBM), is associated with motor system dysfunction and limb apraxia in CBS. Methods Imitation of meaningful and meaningless hand gestures was graded to assess limb apraxia, while cognitive performance was assessed using the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination – Revised (ACE-R), with particular emphasis placed on the visuospatial subtask. Patients underwent TMS, to assess cortical function, and VBM. Results In total, 17 patients with CBS (7 male, 10 female; mean age 64.4+/− 6.6 years) were studied and compared to 17 matched control subjects. Of the CBS patients, 23.5% had a relatively inexcitable motor cortex, with evidence of cortical dysfunction in the remaining 76.5% patients. Reduced resting motor threshold, and visuospatial performance, correlated with limb apraxia. Patients with a resting motor threshold <50% performed significantly worse on the visuospatial sub-task of the ACE-R than other CBS patients. Cortical function correlated with atrophy of the primary and pre-motor cortices, and the thalamus, while apraxia correlated with atrophy of the pre-motor and parietal cortices. Conclusions Cortical dysfunction appears to underlie the core clinical features of CBS, and is associated with atrophy of the primary motor and pre

  11. Sex therapy for female sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction About 45% of women suffer from some form of sexual dysfunction. Despite its high prevalence, there are few studies that have systematically evaluated sex therapy in comparison with other interventions. Objective Review randomized clinical trials that present psychotherapeutic interventions for female sexual dysfunctions. Method Through a search in three databases (Medline, Web of Science and PsycInfo), 1419 references were found. After an analysis of the abstracts, twenty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria and composed this review. Results Sex therapy, as proposed by Masters and Johnson and Heiman and LoPiccolo, is still the most commonly used form of therapy for sexual dysfunctions; although it has shown results, the results do not consistently support that this is the best alternative in the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. Conclusion There is a lack of systematic study of many female sexual dysfunctions. Orgasmic disorder and sexual pain (vaginismus and dyspaurenia) are the most extensively studied disorders and those in which sex therapy seems to have better outcomes. PMID:24066697

  12. Thyroid dysfunction in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2007-03-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is common, especially among women over the age of 50. In caring for peri- and post-menopausal women, it is important to recognize the changing clinical manifestations of thyroid disease with age. Postmenopausal women are at increased risk of both osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, and untreated thyroid disease may exacerbate these risks. Screening for thyroid dysfunction in asymptomatic individuals is controversial, but aggressive case-finding should be pursued, especially in older women. Women with overt thyroid dysfunction should be treated. Therapy for women with subclinical thyroid dysfunction is more controversial, although women with levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) > or =10 mU/L should be treated, and treatment may be considered in symptomatic women with subclinical hypothyroidism and TSH values <10 mU/L, and in women with subclinical hyperthyroidism who have TSH values consistently <0.1 mU/L. In women who are treated with thyroxine, careful dose titration and monitoring are required in order to prevent the adverse consequences of iatrogenic subclinical hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. Finally, caution is required in diagnosing and treating thyroid dysfunction in women who are taking oral estrogens or selective estrogen receptor modulators. PMID:17448261

  13. Small Airway Dysfunction and Abnormal Exercise Responses

    PubMed Central

    Petsonk, Edward L.; Stansbury, Robert C.; Beeckman-Wagner, Lu-Ann; Long, Joshua L.; Wang, Mei Lin

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Coal mine dust exposure can cause symptoms and loss of lung function from multiple mechanisms, but the roles of each disease process are not fully understood. Objectives We investigated the implications of small airway dysfunction for exercise physiology among a group of workers exposed to coal mine dust. Methods Twenty coal miners performed spirometry, first breathing air and then helium-oxygen, single-breath diffusing capacity, and computerized chest tomography, and then completed cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Measurements and Main Results Six participants meeting criteria for small airway dysfunction were compared with 14 coal miners who did not. At submaximal workload, miners with small airway dysfunction used a higher proportion of their maximum voluntary ventilation and had higher ventilatory equivalents for both O2 and CO2. Regression modeling indicated that inefficient ventilation was significantly related to small airway dysfunction but not to FEV1 or diffusing capacity. At the end of exercise, miners with small airway dysfunction had 27% lower O2 consumption. Conclusions Small airway abnormalities may be associated with important inefficiency of exercise ventilation. In dust-exposed individuals with only mild abnormalities on resting lung function tests or chest radiographs, cardiopulmonary exercise testing may be important in defining causes of exercise intolerance. PMID:27073987

  14. Protein Changes Contributing to Right Ventricular Cardiomyocyte Diastolic Dysfunction in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rain, Silvia; Bos, Denielli da Silva Goncalves; Handoko, M. Louis; Westerhof, Nico; Stienen, Ger; Ottenheijm, Coen; Goebel, Max; Dorfmüller, Peter; Guignabert, Christophe; Humbert, Marc; Bogaard, Harm‐Jan; dos Remedios, Cris; Saripalli, Chandra; Hidalgo, Carlos G.; Granzier, Henk L.; Vonk‐Noordegraaf, Anton; van der Velden, Jolanda; de Man, Frances S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Right ventricular (RV) diastolic function is impaired in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Our previous study showed that elevated cardiomyocyte stiffness and myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity underlie diastolic dysfunction in PAH. This study investigates protein modifications contributing to cellular diastolic dysfunction in PAH. Methods and Results RV samples from PAH patients undergoing heart‐lung transplantation were compared to non‐failing donors (Don). Titin stiffness contribution to RV diastolic dysfunction was determined by Western‐blot analyses using antibodies to protein‐kinase‐A (PKA), Cα (PKCα) and Ca2+/calmoduling‐dependent‐kinase (CamKIIδ) titin and phospholamban (PLN) phosphorylation sites: N2B (Ser469), PEVK (Ser170 and Ser26), and PLN (Thr17), respectively. PKA and PKCα sites were significantly less phosphorylated in PAH compared with donors (P<0.0001). To test the functional relevance of PKA‐, PKCα‐, and CamKIIδ‐mediated titin phosphorylation, we measured the stiffness of single RV cardiomyocytes before and after kinase incubation. PKA significantly decreased PAH RV cardiomyocyte diastolic stiffness, PKCα further increased stiffness while CamKIIδ had no major effect. CamKIIδ activation was determined indirectly by measuring PLN Thr17phosphorylation level. No significant changes were found between the groups. Myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity is mediated by sarcomeric troponin I (cTnI) phosphorylation. We observed increased unphosphorylated cTnI in PAH compared with donors (P<0.05) and reduced PKA‐mediated cTnI phosphorylation (Ser22/23) (P<0.001). Finally, alterations in Ca2+‐handling proteins contribute to RV diastolic dysfunction due to insufficient diastolic Ca2+ clearance. PAH SERCA2a levels and PLN phosphorylation were significantly reduced compared with donors (P<0.05). Conclusions Increased titin stiffness, reduced cTnI phosphorylation, and altered levels of phosphorylation of Ca2

  15. Casimir invariants for systems undergoing collective motion

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, C. Allen; Byrd, Mark S.; Wu Lianao

    2011-06-15

    Dicke states are an important class of states which exhibit collective behavior in many-body systems. They are interesting because (1) the decay rates of these states can be quite different from a set of independently evolving particles and (2) a particular class of these states are decoherence-free or noiseless with respect to a set of errors. These noiseless states, or more generally subsystems, avoid certain types of errors in quantum-information-processing devices. Here we provide a method for determining a set of transformations of these states which leave the states in their subsystems but still enable them to evolve in particular ways. For subsystems of particles undergoing collective motions, these transformations can be calculated by using essentially the same construction which is used to determine the famous Casimir invariants for quantum systems. Such invariants can be used to determine a complete set of commuting observables for a class of Dicke states as well as to identify possible logical operations for decoherence-free-noiseless subsystems. Our method is quite general and provides results for cases where the constituent particles have more than two internal states.

  16. Analyses of viscoelastic solid polymers undergoing degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, Bentolhoda; Muliana, Anastasia; Tscharnuter, Daniel; Pinter, Gerald

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we study the three-dimensional response of isotropic viscoelastic solid-like polymers undergoing degradation due to mechanical stimuli. A single integral model is used to describe the time-dependent behaviors of polymers under general loading histories. The degradation is associated to excessive deformations in the polymers as strains continuously increase when the mechanical stimuli are prescribed, and therefore we consider a degradation threshold in terms of strains. The degradation part of the deformations is unrecoverable, and upon removal of the prescribed external stimuli, the accumulation of the degradation strains lead to residual strains. We also systematically present material parameter characterization from available experimental data under various loading histories, i.e., ramp loading with different constant rates, creep-recovery under different stresses, and relaxation under several strains. We analyze viscoelastic-degradation response of two polymers, namely polyethylene and polyoxymethylene under uniaxial tensile tests. Longer duration of loading can lead to increase in the degradation of materials due to the substantial increase in the deformations. The single integral model is capable in predicting the time-dependent responses of the polymers under various loading histories and capturing the recovery and residual strains at different stages of degradations.

  17. Inducing Tropical Cyclones to Undergo Brownian Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodyss, D.; McLay, J.; Moskaitis, J.; Serra, E.

    2014-12-01

    Stochastic parameterization has become commonplace in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models used for probabilistic prediction. Here, a specific stochastic parameterization will be related to the theory of stochastic differential equations and shown to be affected strongly by the choice of stochastic calculus. From an NWP perspective our focus will be on ameliorating a common trait of the ensemble distributions of tropical cyclone (TC) tracks (or position), namely that they generally contain a bias and an underestimate of the variance. With this trait in mind we present a stochastic track variance inflation parameterization. This parameterization makes use of a properly constructed stochastic advection term that follows a TC and induces its position to undergo Brownian motion. A central characteristic of Brownian motion is that its variance increases with time, which allows for an effective inflation of an ensemble's TC track variance. Using this stochastic parameterization we present a comparison of the behavior of TCs from the perspective of the stochastic calculi of Itô and Stratonovich within an operational NWP model. The central difference between these two perspectives as pertains to TCs is shown to be properly predicted by the stochastic calculus and the Itô correction. In the cases presented here these differences will manifest as overly intense TCs, which, depending on the strength of the forcing, could lead to problems with numerical stability and physical realism.

  18. Chronic cerebrovascular dysfunction after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Jullienne, Amandine; Obenaus, Andre; Ichkova, Aleksandra; Savona-Baron, Catherine; Pearce, William J; Badaut, Jerome

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) often involve vascular dysfunction that leads to long-term alterations in physiological and cognitive functions of the brain. Indeed, all the cells that form blood vessels and that are involved in maintaining their proper function can be altered by TBI. This Review focuses on the different types of cerebrovascular dysfunction that occur after TBI, including cerebral blood flow alterations, autoregulation impairments, subarachnoid hemorrhage, vasospasms, blood-brain barrier disruption, and edema formation. We also discuss the mechanisms that mediate these dysfunctions, focusing on the cellular components of cerebral blood vessels (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, astrocytes, pericytes, perivascular nerves) and their known and potential roles in the secondary injury cascade. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27117494

  19. AB271. Sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis/ chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), or NIH category III prostatitis, is a clinical syndrome characterized by genital/ pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms in the absence of urinary tract infection. CPPS is the most common prostatic disease in men younger than 50 years of age and the third most common in men older than 50 years of age. CP/CPPS is a complex entity with unclear etiology. Many articles reported that the high percentage of patients with CP/CPPS had sexual dysfunction. The most common symptoms of sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis patients are erectile dysfunction (ED), painful ejaculation and premature ejaculation. So we will discuss about ED and ejaculation problems in CP/CPPS patients.

  20. Can thyroid dysfunction explicate severe menopausal symptoms?

    PubMed

    Badawy, A; State, O; Sherief, S

    2007-07-01

    Many of the menopausal manifestations look like those accredited to thyroid hyperfunction or hypofunction. Can thyroid dysfunction explicate severe menopausal symptoms? The study comprised 350 women with different menopausal symptoms. All women had serum TSH, T3 and free T4 estimated. Women with thyroid dysfunction were appropriately treated and other women were treated with ERT. The study showed that 21 women (6%) had hypothyroidism and 18 (5.1%) had hyperthyroidism. Marked improvement in the menopausal-like symptoms occurred after treatment of the thyroid dysfunction. Elderly women with severe or resistant menopausal symptoms can be offered TSH, T3 and T4 assays to rule out the thyroid disturbances before attempting hormone replacement therapy. PMID:17701801

  1. Bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina; Tateno, Fuyuki; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yamanishi, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency), bowel dysfunction (constipation), and sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction) (also called "pelvic organ" dysfunctions) are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, pelvic organ autonomic dysfunctions are often nonresponsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine-basal ganglia circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. By contrast, peripheral myenteric pathology causing slowed colonic transit (loss of rectal contractions) and central pathology causing weak strain and paradoxical anal sphincter contraction on defecation (PSD, also called as anismus) are responsible for the bowel dysfunction. In addition, hypothalamic dysfunction is mostly responsible for the sexual dysfunction (decrease in libido and erection) in PD, via altered dopamine-oxytocin pathways, which normally promote libido and erection. The pathophysiology of the pelvic organ dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. Dietary fibers, laxatives, and "prokinetic" drugs such as serotonergic agonists are used to treat bowel dysfunction in PD. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors are used to treat sexual dysfunction in PD. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life. PMID:21918729

  2. Bladder, Bowel, and Sexual Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina; Tateno, Fuyuki; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yamanishi, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency), bowel dysfunction (constipation), and sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction) (also called “pelvic organ” dysfunctions) are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, pelvic organ autonomic dysfunctions are often nonresponsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine-basal ganglia circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. By contrast, peripheral myenteric pathology causing slowed colonic transit (loss of rectal contractions) and central pathology causing weak strain and paradoxical anal sphincter contraction on defecation (PSD, also called as anismus) are responsible for the bowel dysfunction. In addition, hypothalamic dysfunction is mostly responsible for the sexual dysfunction (decrease in libido and erection) in PD, via altered dopamine-oxytocin pathways, which normally promote libido and erection. The pathophysiology of the pelvic organ dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. Dietary fibers, laxatives, and “prokinetic” drugs such as serotonergic agonists are used to treat bowel dysfunction in PD. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors are used to treat sexual dysfunction in PD. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life. PMID:21918729

  3. The adaptation problems of patients undergoing hemodialysis: socio-economic and clinical aspects1

    PubMed Central

    Frazão, Cecília Maria Farias de Queiroz; de Sá, Jéssica Dantas; Medeiros, Ana Beatriz de Almeida; Fernandes, Maria Isabel da Conceição Dias; Lira, Ana Luisa Brandão de Carvalho; Lopes, Marcos Venícios de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to identify adaptation problems under Roy's Model in patients undergoing hemodialysis and to correlate them with the socioeconomic and clinical aspects. METHOD: a transversal study, undertaken using a questionnaire. The sample was made up of 178 individuals. The Chi-squared and Mann-Whitney U tests were undertaken. RESULTS: the adaptation problems and the socioeconomic and clinical aspects which presented statistical associations were: Hyperkalemia and age; Edema and income; Impairment of a primary sense: touch and income; Role failure and age; Sexual dysfunction and marital status and sex; Impairment of a primary sense: vision and years of education; Intolerance to activity and years of education; Chronic pain and sex and years of education; Impaired skin integrity and age: Hypocalcemia and access; Potential for injury and age and years of education; Nutrition below the organism's requirements and age; Impairment of a primary sense: hearing and sex and kinetic evaluation of urea; Mobility in gait and/or coordination restricted, and months of hemodialysis; and, Loss of ability for self-care, and months of hemodialysis and months of illness. CONCLUSION: adaptation problems in the clientele undergoing hemodialysis can be influenced by socioeconomic/clinical data. These findings contribute to the development of the profession, fostering the nurse's reflection regarding the care. PMID:25591091

  4. Glycated Albumin Predicts Long-term Survival in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chien-Lin; Ma, Wen-Ya; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Shyu, Jia-Fwu; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Liu, Yueh-Min; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lu, Kuo-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients with advanced renal dysfunction undergoing maintenance hemodialysis, glycated albumin (GA) levels may be more representative of blood glucose levels than hemoglobin A1C levels. The aim of this study was to determine the predictive power of GA levels on long-term survival in hemodialysis patients. Methods: A total of 176 patients with a mean age of 68.2 years were enrolled. The median duration of follow-up was 51.0 months. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was utilized to determine the optimal cutoff value. We examined the cumulative survival rate by Kaplan-Meier estimates and the influence of known survival factors with the multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression model. Results: In the whole patient group, cumulative survival in the low GA group was better than in the high GA group (p=0.030), with more prominence in those aged <70 years (p=0.029). In subgroup analysis, both diabetic (DM) and non-DM patients with low GA had a better cumulative survival compared with those with high GA. The risk of mortality increased by 3.0% for each 1% increase in serum GA level in all patients undergoing hemodialysis. Conclusions: In addition to serving as a glycemic control marker, GA levels may be useful for evaluating the risk of death in both DM and non-DM patients on hemodialysis. PMID:27226780

  5. Diagnosis and Management of Velopharyngeal Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Glade, Robert S; Deal, Randolph

    2016-05-01

    Velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) describes any condition whereby the velopharyngeal valve does not properly close during the production of oral sounds. VPD contains multiple causes, including velopharyngeal mislearning (nasopharyngeal sound substitution for an oral sound), velopharyngeal incompetence (neurolophysiologic dysfunction causing poor pharyngeal movement), and velopharyngeal insufficiency (a structural or anatomic defect prevents velopharyngeal closure). Evaluation for VPD is best performed within the context of a multidisciplinary team and consists of history and physical examination, perceptual speech evaluation, and instrumental assessment of speech with either video nasoendoscopy or multiview speech fluoroscopy. PMID:27150305

  6. Transdermal clonidine in patients with swallowing dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Gregory; Bharathan, Thayyullathil; Shifrin, Inna

    2014-09-01

    Patients with swallowing dysfunction are usually very ill and have a constellation of challenging issues requiring palliation. Accumulation of oropharyngeal secretions leads to a substantial effort of medical teams including doctors, nurses, respiratory therapists, and ancillary staff. We present 10 patients successfully treated with application of transdermal clonidine film. It was well tolerated, provided quick control of secretions, and reduced staff labor. We suggest that transdermal clonidine can be used as antisialogogue in patients with swallowing dysfunction. Clonidine pharmacology is physiologic grounds for this clinical application. PMID:24813023

  7. The female athlete triad and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lanser, Erica M; Zach, Karie N; Hoch, Anne Z

    2011-05-01

    A tremendous increase in the number of female athletes of all ages and abilities has occurred in the past 35 years. In general, sports and athletic competition produce healthier and happier women. However, explosion in participation has revealed clear gender-specific injuries and medical conditions unique to the female athlete. This article focuses on the latest advances in our knowledge of the female athlete triad and the relationship between athletic-associated amenorrhea and endothelial dysfunction. Treatment of vascular dysfunction with folic acid is also discussed. PMID:21570034

  8. Endocrine Dysfunction in X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Burtman, Elizabeth; Regelmann, Molly O

    2016-06-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene and leads to an elevation of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). The accumulation of the VLCFA and the associated oxidative stress can present with a spectrum of significant neurologic disease, adrenal insufficiency, and testicular dysfunction in males with ABCD1 gene mutations. Much of the published literature for X-ALD has focused on the associated devastating progressive neurologic conditions. The purpose of this review is to summarize the concerns for endocrine dysfunction associated with X-ALD and provide guidance for monitoring and management of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27241966

  9. Liver dysfunction and anti-thyroid therapy

    PubMed Central

    Papachristos, Danae A; Huynh, Jenny; Grossman, Mathis

    2015-01-01

    Thioamides have been used in the management of hyperthyroidism for over 50 years. Liver dysfunction is a rare but important side effect associated with their use. Recently, cases of liver failure associated with propylthiouracil have prompted the Federal Drug Administration to issue a Boxed Warning to the label of propylthiouracil regarding its risk of potentially fatal liver injury and acute liver failure in adults and children. Herein, we present a case to underline the importance of recognising the similar potential for severe hepatic dysfunction with the use of other thioamides. PMID:27489677

  10. Sexual Dysfunction Due to Psychotropic Medications.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Anita H; Alkis, Andrew R; Parikh, Nishant B; Votta, Jennifer G

    2016-09-01

    Sexual functioning is important to assess in patients with psychiatric illness as both the condition and associated treatment may contribute to sexual dysfunction (SD). Antidepressant medications, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and antianxiety agents may be associated with SD related to drug mechanism of action. Sexual adverse effects may be related to genetic risk factors, impact on neurotransmitters and hormones, and psychological elements. Effective strategies to manage medication-induced sexual dysfunction are initial choice of a drug unlikely to cause SD, switching to a different medication, and adding an antidote to reverse SD. Appropriate interventions should be determined on a clinical case-by-case basis. PMID:27514298