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Sample records for dysfunctional hdl cholesterol

  1. HDL Function, Dysfunction, and Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Edward A.; Feig, Jonathan E.; Hewing, Bernd; Hazen, Stanley L.; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Although high HDL-cholesterol levels are associated with decreased cardiovascular risk in epidemiological studies, recent genetic and pharmacological findings have raised doubts about the beneficial effects of HDL. Raising HDL levels in animal models by infusion or over expression of apolipoprotein A-I has shown clear vascular improvements, such as delayed atherosclerotic lesion progression and accelerated lesion regression, along with increased reverse cholesterol transport. Inflammation and other factors, such as myeloperoxidase mediated oxidation, can impair HDL production and HDL function, in regard to its reverse cholesterol transport, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. Thus, tests of HDL function, which have not yet been developed as routine diagnostic assays, may prove useful and be a better predictor of cardiovascular risk than HDL-cholesterol levels. PMID:23152494

  2. ABCG1 and HDL protect against endothelial dysfunction in mice fed a high-cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Terasaka, Naoki; Yu, Shuiqing; Yvan-Charvet, Laurent; Wang, Nan; Mzhavia, Nino; Langlois, Read; Pagler, Tamara; Li, Rong; Welch, Carrie L.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Tall, Alan R.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma HDL levels are inversely related to the incidence of atherosclerotic disease. Some of the atheroprotective effects of HDL are likely mediated via preservation of EC function. Whether the beneficial effects of HDL on ECs depend on its involvement in cholesterol efflux via the ATP-binding cassette transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1, which promote efflux of cholesterol and oxysterols from macrophages, has not been investigated. To address this, we assessed endothelial function in Abca1–/–, Abcg1–/–, and Abca1–/–Abcg1–/– mice fed either a high-cholesterol diet (HCD) or a Western diet (WTD). Non-atherosclerotic arteries from WTD-fed Abcg1–/– and Abca1–/–Abcg1–/– mice exhibited a marked decrease in endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, while Abca1–/– mice had a milder defect. In addition, eNOS activity was reduced in aortic homogenates generated from Abcg1–/– mice fed either a HCD or a WTD, and this correlated with decreased levels of the active dimeric form of eNOS. More detailed analysis indicated that ABCG1 was expressed primarily in ECs, and that these cells accumulated the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC) when Abcg1–/– mice were fed a WTD. Consistent with these data, ABCG1 had a major role in promoting efflux of cholesterol and 7-KC in cultured human aortic ECs (HAECs). Furthermore, HDL treatment of HAECs prevented 7-KC–induced ROS production and active eNOS dimer disruption in an ABCG1-dependent manner. Our data suggest that ABCG1 and HDL maintain EC function in HCD-fed mice by promoting efflux of cholesterol and 7-oxysterols and preserving active eNOS dimer levels. PMID:18924609

  3. Raising HDL cholesterol in women

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Danny J; Kalra, Girish L; Rifai, Luay; Eapen, Christina A; Merchant, Nadya; Khan, Bobby V

    2010-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration is essential in the determination of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk in women. This is especially true in the postmenopausal state, where lipid profiles and CHD risk mimic that of age-matched men. Thus, interventions designed to reduce CHD risk by raising HDL-C levels may have particular significance during the transition to menopause. This review discusses HDL-C-raising therapies and the role of HDL in the primary prevention of CHD in women. Lifestyle-based interventions such as dietary change, aerobic exercise regimens, and smoking cessation are initial steps that are effective in raising HDL-C, and available data suggest women respond similarly to men with these interventions. When combined with pharmacotherapy, the effects of these lifestyle alterations are further amplified. Though studies demonstrating gender-specific differences in therapy are limited, niacin continues to be the most effective agent in raising HDL-C levels, especially when used in combination with fibrate or statin therapy. Emerging treatments such as HDL mimetic therapy show much promise in further raising HDL-C levels and improving cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:21072287

  4. Dysfunctional HDL and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenson, Robert S; Brewer, H Bryan; Ansell, Benjamin J; Barter, Philip; Chapman, M John; Heinecke, Jay W; Kontush, Anatol; Tall, Alan R; Webb, Nancy R

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) protect against atherosclerosis by removing excess cholesterol from macrophages through the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) pathways involved in reverse cholesterol transport. Factors that impair the availability of functional apolipoproteins or the activities of ABCA1 and ABCG1 could, therefore, strongly influence atherogenesis. HDL also inhibits lipid oxidation, restores endothelial function, exerts anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic actions, and exerts anti-inflammatory actions in animal models. Such properties could contribute considerably to the capacity of HDL to inhibit atherosclerosis. Systemic and vascular inflammation has been proposed to convert HDL to a dysfunctional form that has impaired antiatherogenic effects. A loss of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative proteins, perhaps in combination with a gain of proinflammatory proteins, might be another important component in rendering HDL dysfunctional. The proinflammatory enzyme myeloperoxidase induces both oxidative modification and nitrosylation of specific residues on plasma and arterial apolipoprotein A-I to render HDL dysfunctional, which results in impaired ABCA1 macrophage transport, the activation of inflammatory pathways, and an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Understanding the features of dysfunctional HDL or apolipoprotein A-I in clinical practice might lead to new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to atherosclerosis. PMID:26323267

  5. HDL cholesterol: physiology, pathophysiology, and management.

    PubMed

    Link, Jeffrey J; Rohatgi, Anand; de Lemos, James A

    2007-05-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have identified high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) to be an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). HDL is an emerging therapeutic target that could rival the impact of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) on LDL and CHD risk reduction. HDL metabolism, HDL kinetics, the concentration of various HDL subclasses, and other genetic factors affecting HDL functionality may all contribute to the anti-atherogenic properties of HDL; thus, standard plasma measurement may not capture the full range of HDL effects. Algorithms have been suggested to treat low HDL levels in subgroups of patients; however, no formal HDL target goals or treatment guidelines have been implemented as there is a lack of strong clinical evidence to support effective pharmacologic therapy for primary risk reduction. Available therapies have a modest impact on serum HDL levels; however, emerging therapies could have a more significant influence. PMID:17481993

  6. Intestinal nuclear receptors in HDL cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Degirolamo, Chiara; Sabbà, Carlo; Moschetta, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The intestine plays a pivotal role in cholesterol homeostasis by functioning as an absorptive and secretory organ in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Enterocytes control cholesterol absorption, apoAI synthesis, HDL biogenesis, and nonbiliary cholesterol fecal disposal. Thus, intestine-based therapeutic interventions may hold promise in the management of diseases driven by cholesterol overload. Lipid-sensing nuclear receptors (NRs) are highly expressed in the intestinal epithelium and regulate transcriptionally the handling of cholesterol by the enterocytes. Here, we discuss the NR regulation of cholesterol fluxes across the enterocytes with special emphasis on NR exploitation as a bona fide novel HDL-raising strategy. PMID:25070952

  7. Intestinal nuclear receptors in HDL cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Degirolamo, Chiara; Sabbà, Carlo; Moschetta, Antonio

    2015-07-01

    The intestine plays a pivotal role in cholesterol homeostasis by functioning as an absorptive and secretory organ in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Enterocytes control cholesterol absorption, apoAI synthesis, HDL biogenesis, and nonbiliary cholesterol fecal disposal. Thus, intestine-based therapeutic interventions may hold promise in the management of diseases driven by cholesterol overload. Lipid-sensing nuclear receptors (NRs) are highly expressed in the intestinal epithelium and regulate transcriptionally the handling of cholesterol by the enterocytes. Here, we discuss the NR regulation of cholesterol fluxes across the enterocytes with special emphasis on NR exploitation as a bona fide novel HDL-raising strategy. PMID:25070952

  8. Subfractions of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and dysfunctional HDL in chronic kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Banach, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Chronic kidney disease is characterized by significant disturbances in lipoprotein metabolism, including differences in quantitative and qualitative content of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Recent studies have revealed that serum HDL cholesterol levels do not predict CVD in CKD patients; thus CKD-induced modifications in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may be responsible for the increase in CV risk in CKD patients. Various methods are available to separate several subclasses of HDL and confirm their atheroprotective properties. However, under pathological conditions associated with inflammation and oxidation, HDL can progressively lose normal biological activities and be converted into dysfunctional HDL. In this review, we highlight the current state of knowledge on subfractions of HDL and HDL dysfunction in CKD. PMID:27478466

  9. Subfractions of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and dysfunctional HDL in chronic kidney disease patients.

    PubMed

    Rysz-Górzyńska, Magdalena; Banach, Maciej

    2016-08-01

    A number of studies have shown that chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Chronic kidney disease is characterized by significant disturbances in lipoprotein metabolism, including differences in quantitative and qualitative content of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. Recent studies have revealed that serum HDL cholesterol levels do not predict CVD in CKD patients; thus CKD-induced modifications in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may be responsible for the increase in CV risk in CKD patients. Various methods are available to separate several subclasses of HDL and confirm their atheroprotective properties. However, under pathological conditions associated with inflammation and oxidation, HDL can progressively lose normal biological activities and be converted into dysfunctional HDL. In this review, we highlight the current state of knowledge on subfractions of HDL and HDL dysfunction in CKD. PMID:27478466

  10. HDL Cholesterol, Apolipoproteins, and Cardiovascular Risk in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Genser, Bernd; Drechsler, Christiane; Scharnagl, Hubert; Grammer, Tanja B.; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Krane, Vera; Ritz, Eberhard; Wanner, Christoph; März, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    High concentrations of HDL cholesterol are considered to indicate efficient reverse cholesterol transport and to protect from atherosclerosis. However, HDL has been suggested to be dysfunctional in ESRD. Hence, our main objective was to investigate the effect of HDL cholesterol on outcomes in maintenance hemodialysis patients with diabetes. Moreover, we investigated the associations between the major protein components of HDL (apoA1, apoA2, and apoC3) and end points. We performed an exploratory, post hoc analysis with 1255 participants (677 men and 578 women) of the German Diabetes Dialysis study. The mean age was 66.3 years and the mean body mass index was 28.0 kg/m2. The primary end point was a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and stroke. The secondary end point included all-cause mortality. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.9 years. A total of 31.3% of the study participants reached the primary end point and 49.1% died from any cause. HDL cholesterol and apoA1 and apoC3 quartiles were not related to end points. However, there was a trend toward an inverse association between apoA2 and all-cause mortality. The hazard ratio for death from any cause in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile of apoA2 was 0.63 (95% confidence interval, 0.40 to 0.89). The lack of an association between HDL cholesterol and cardiovascular risk may support the concept of dysfunctional HDL in hemodialysis. The possible beneficial effect of apoA2 on survival requires confirmation in future studies. PMID:25012163

  11. Impact of Mifepristone, a Glucocorticoid/Progesterone Antagonist, on HDL Cholesterol, HDL Particle Concentration, and HDL Function

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Ronald M.; Gross, Coleman; Ishida, Brian; Heinecke, Jay W.; Tang, Chongren; Amory, John K.; Schaefer, Peter M.; Cox, Cheryl J.; Kane, John; Purnell, Jonathan Q.; Weinstein, Richard L.; Vaisar, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Context: Mifepristone is a glucocorticoid and progestin antagonist under investigation for the treatment of Cushing's syndrome. Mifepristone decreases high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in treated patients, but the clinical significance of this is unclear because recent studies suggest that functional properties of HDL predict cardiovascular disease status better than does HDL-C concentration. Objective: The aim of the study was to characterize the impact of mifepristone administration on HDL particle concentration and function. Design and Setting: We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial at a single-site, clinical research center. Participants: Thirty healthy postmenopausal female volunteers participated in the study. Intervention: Individuals were randomized to receive daily oral mifepristone (600 mg) or placebo for 6 wk. Main Outcome Measures: We measured HDL-C, serum HDL particle concentration, and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux by treatment group. Results: As expected, ACTH, cortisol, estradiol, and testosterone levels increased in the mifepristone group. Mifepristone treatment decreased HDL-C and HDL particle concentration by 26 and 25%, respectively, but did not alter pre-β HDL concentration. In contrast, the serum HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux decreased with mifepristone treatment by only 12%, resulting in an effective increase of the efflux capacity per HDL particle. No changes were observed in cholesterol ester transfer protein or lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase activity. Conclusions: Treatment with mifepristone reduced HDL-C, HDL particle concentration, and serum HDL cholesterol efflux in postmenopausal women. However, on a per particle basis, the efflux capacity of serum HDL increased. These observations support the concept that a decrease in HDL-C may not represent proportional impairment of HDL function. PMID:22399518

  12. Inflammatory remodeling of the HDL proteome impairs cholesterol efflux capacity.

    PubMed

    Vaisar, Tomáš; Tang, Chongren; Babenko, Ilona; Hutchins, Patrick; Wimberger, Jake; Suffredini, Anthony F; Heinecke, Jay W

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that HDL's ability to promote cholesterol efflux from macrophages associates strongly with cardioprotection in humans independently of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apoA-I, HDL's major protein. However, the mechanisms that impair cholesterol efflux capacity during vascular disease are unclear. Inflammation, a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease, has been shown to impair HDL's cholesterol efflux capacity. We therefore tested the hypothesis that HDL's impaired efflux capacity is mediated by specific changes of its protein cargo. Humans with acute inflammation induced by low-level endotoxin had unchanged HDL-C levels, but their HDL-C efflux capacity was significantly impaired. Proteomic analyses demonstrated that HDL's cholesterol efflux capacity correlated inversely with HDL content of serum amyloid A (SAA)1 and SAA2. In mice, acute inflammation caused a marked impairment of HDL-C efflux capacity that correlated with a large increase in HDL SAA. In striking contrast, the efflux capacity of mouse inflammatory HDL was preserved with genetic ablation of SAA1 and SAA2. Our observations indicate that the inflammatory impairment of HDL-C efflux capacity is due in part to SAA-mediated remodeling of HDL's protein cargo. PMID:25995210

  13. [HDL cholesterol as a sensitive diagnostic parameter in malaria].

    PubMed

    Kittl, E M; Diridl, G; Lenhart, V; Neuwald, C; Tomasits, J; Pichler, H; Bauer, K

    1992-01-01

    In patients with malaria the lipid parameters triglycerides, cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol were determined routinely. At the time of admission hypertriglyceridemia, hypocholesterolemia, and an extreme decrease in HDL-cholesterol were found. This dyslipoproteinemia was present in cases of falciparum malaria, as well as in cases of benign tertian malaria. The extent of HDL-cholesterol decrease showed no correlation to the severity of the clinical course of disease. HDL-cholesterol has proven to be an independent diagnostic laboratory finding in cases of suspected malarial infection. This parameter displays high diagnostic sensitivity, but no specificity for malaria. PMID:1546481

  14. Emerging therapies for raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and augmenting HDL particle functionality.

    PubMed

    Barylski, Marcin; Toth, Peter P; Nikolic, Dragana; Banach, Maciej; Rizzo, Manfredi; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles are highly complex polymolecular aggregates capable of performing a remarkable range of atheroprotective functions. Considerable research is being performed throughout the world to develop novel pharmacologic approaches to: (1) promote apoprotein A-I and HDL particle biosynthesis; (2) augment capacity for reverse cholesterol transport so as to reduce risk for the development and progression of atherosclerotic disease; and (3) modulate the functionality of HDL particles in order to increase their capacity to antagonize oxidation, inflammation, thrombosis, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, and other processes that participate in arterial wall injury. HDL metabolism and the molecular constitution of HDL particles are highly complex and can change in response to both acute and chronic alterations in the metabolic milieu. To date, some of these interventions have been shown to positively impact rates of coronary artery disease progression. However, none of them have as yet been shown to significantly reduce risk for cardiovascular events. In the next 3-5 years a variety of pharmacologic interventions for modulating HDL metabolism and functionality will be tested in large, randomized, prospective outcomes trials. It is hoped that one or more of these therapeutic approaches will result in the ability to further reduce risk for cardiovascular events once low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol targets have been attained. PMID:24840270

  15. Niacin Therapy, HDL Cholesterol, and Cardiovascular Disease: Is the HDL Hypothesis Defunct?

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Preethi; Rohatgi, Anand

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) has been shown in epidemiologic studies to be associated with cardiovascular (CV) risk and thus significant efforts have been focused on HDL-C modulation. Multiple pharmaceutical agents have been developed with the goal of increasing HDL-C. Niacin, the most widely used medication to raise HDL-C, increases HDL-C by up to 25 % and was shown in multiple surrogate end point studies to reduce CV risk. However, two large randomized controlled trials of niacin, AIM-HIGH and HPS2-THRIVE, have shown that despite its effects on HDL-C, niacin does not decrease the incidence of CV events and may have significant adverse effects. Studies of other classes of agents such as cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors have also shown that even dramatic increases in HDL-C do not necessarily translate to reduction in clinical events. While these findings have cast doubt upon the importance of HDL-C modulation on CV risk, it is becoming increasingly clear that HDL function-related measures may be better targets for CV risk reduction. Increasing ApoA-I, the primary apolipoprotein associated with HDL, correlates with reduced risk of events, and HDL particle concentration (HDL-P) inversely associates with incident CV events adjusted for HDL-C and LDL particle measures. Cholesterol efflux, the mechanism by which macrophages in vessel walls secrete cholesterol outside cells, correlates with both surrogate end points and clinical events. The effects of niacin on these alternate measures of HDL have been conflicting. Further studies should determine if modulation of these HDL function markers translates to clinical benefits. Although the HDL cholesterol hypothesis may be defunct, the HDL function hypothesis is now poised to be rigorously tested. PMID:26048725

  16. [Raising HDL cholesterol: which is the best strategy?].

    PubMed

    Alfonso, John Edwin Feliciano; Ariza, Iván Darío Sierra

    2008-01-01

    After having reached the objective for the LDL cholesterol levels, it becomes imperative to reach the objective for HDL cholesterol, known for its anti-atherogenic properties, generally confirmed in many epidemiological studies. This review deals, in a clear and concise manner, with the different alternatives available in daily clinical practice to raise the HDL cholesterol levels of patients, to achieve better outcomes in terms of morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease. PMID:18719798

  17. High Pre-β1 HDL Concentrations and Low Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase Activities Are Strong Positive Risk Markers for Ischemic Heart Disease and Independent of HDL-Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Amar A.; Sampson, Maureen; Warnick, Russell; Muniz, Nehemias; Vaisman, Boris; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Remaley, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We hypothesized that patients with high HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and ischemic heart disease (IHD) may have dysfunctional HDL or unrecognized nonconventional risk factors. METHODS Individuals with IHD (Copenhagen University Hospital) and either high HDL-C (n = 53; women ≥735 mg/L; men ≥619 mg/L) or low HDL-C (n = 42; women ≤387 mg/L; men ≤341 mg/L) were compared with individuals without IHD (Copenhagen City Heart Study) matched by age, sex, and HDL-C concentrations (n = 110). All participants had concentrations within reference intervals for LDL-C (<1600 mg/L) and triglyceride (<1500 mg/L), and none were treated with lipid-lowering medications. Pre-β1 HDL and phospholipid transfer protein concentrations were measured by using commercial kits and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity by using a proteoliposome cholesterol esterification assay. RESULTS Pre-β1 HDL concentrations were 2-fold higher in individuals with IHD vs no IHD in both the high [63 (5.7) vs 35 (2.3) mg/L; P < 0.0001] and low HDL-C [49 (5.0) vs 27 (1.5) mg/L; P = 0.001] groups. Low LCAT activity was also associated with IHD in the high [95.2 (6.7) vs 123.0 (5.3) μmol · L−1 · h−1; P = 0.002] and low [93.4 (8.3) vs 113.5 (4.9) μmol · L−1 · h−1; P = 0.03] HDL-C groups. ROC curves for pre-β1 HDL in the high–HDL-C groups yielded an area under the curve of 0.71 (95% CI: 0.61–0.81) for predicting IHD, which increased to 0.92 (0.87–0.97) when LCAT was included. Similar results were obtained for low HDL-C groups. An inverse correlation between LCAT activity and pre-β1 HDL was observed (r2 = 0.30; P < 0.0001) in IHD participants, which was stronger in the low HDL-C group (r2 = 0.56; P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS IHD was associated with high pre-β1 HDL concentrations and low LCAT levels, yielding correct classification in more than 90% of the IHD cases for which both were measured, thus making pre-β1 HDL concentration and LCAT activity level potentially

  18. HDL in children with CKD promotes endothelial dysfunction and an abnormal vascular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Shroff, Rukshana; Speer, Thimoteus; Colin, Sophie; Charakida, Marietta; Zewinger, Stephen; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Hettrich, Inga; Rohrer, Lucia; O'Neill, Francis; McLoughlin, Eve; Long, David; Shanahan, Catherine M; Landmesser, Ulf; Fliser, Danilo; Deanfield, John E

    2014-11-01

    Endothelial dysfunction begins in early CKD and contributes to cardiovascular mortality. HDL is considered antiatherogenic, but may have adverse vascular effects in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and inflammatory conditions. The effect of renal failure on HDL properties is unknown. We studied the endothelial effects of HDL isolated from 82 children with CKD stages 2-5 (HDL(CKD)), who were free of underlying inflammatory diseases, diabetes, or active infections. Compared with HDL from healthy children, HDL(CKD) strongly inhibited nitric oxide production, promoted superoxide production, and increased vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human aortic endothelial cells, and reduced cholesterol efflux from macrophages. The effects on endothelial cells correlated with CKD grade, with the most profound changes induced by HDL from patients on dialysis, and partial recovery observed with HDL isolated after kidney transplantation. Furthermore, the in vitro effects on endothelial cells associated with increased aortic pulse wave velocity, carotid intima-media thickness, and circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction in patients. Symmetric dimethylarginine levels were increased in serum and fractions of HDL from children with CKD. In a longitudinal follow-up of eight children undergoing kidney transplantation, HDL-induced production of endothelial nitric oxide, superoxide, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 in vitro improved significantly at 3 months after transplantation, but did not reach normal levels. These results suggest that in children with CKD without concomitant disease affecting HDL function, HDL dysfunction begins in early CKD, progressing as renal function declines, and is partially reversed after kidney transplantation. PMID:24854267

  19. [Therapeutic targets in the treatment of dyslipidemia: HDL and non-HDL cholesterol].

    PubMed

    Brea Hernando, Ángel Julián

    2014-07-01

    Atherogenic dyslipidemia (AD) consists of the combination of an increase in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), which results in increased plasma triglyceride (TG) levels, with a reduction of levels of high-density lipoprotein bound cholesterol (HDL-C), also accompanied by a high proportion of small and dense LDL particles. AD is considered the main cause of the residual risk of experiencing cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is still presented by any patient on treatment with statins despite maintaining low-density lipoprotein bound cholesterol (LDL-C) levels below the values considered to be the objective. Non-HDL cholesterol (non-HDL-c) reflects the number of atherogenic particles present in the plasma. This includes VLDL, intermediate density lipoproteins (IDL) and LDL. Non-HDL-c provides a better estimate of cardiovascular risk than LDL-c, especially in the presence of hypertriglyceridemia or AD. The European guidelines for managing dyslipidemia recommend that non-HDL-c values be less than 100 and 130 mg/dL for individuals with very high and high cardiovascular risk, respectively. However, these guidelines state that there is insufficient evidence to suggest that raising HDL-c levels incontrovertibly results in a reduction in CVD. Therefore, the guidelines do not set recommended HDL-c levels as a therapeutic objective. The guidelines, however, state that individuals with AD on treatment with statins could benefit from an additional reduction in their risk by using fibrates. PMID:25043539

  20. HDL-Mediated Cellular Cholesterol Efflux Assay Method.

    PubMed

    Hafiane, Anouar; Genest, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function may provide mechanistic insights and better cardiovascular risk discrimination than HDL-cholesterol mass. The purpose of this work is to describe a simplified experimental protocol that can be used in the determination of cholesterol efflux from macrophages cultured cells and be brought to a medium throughput volume. The cellular cholesterol efflux assay is designed to quantify the rate of cholesterol efflux from cultured cells to an acceptor particle or to plasma. This assay is multi step, cell based assay. Various factors, if not carefully controlled may influence the accuracy and reproducibility of the assay. Attempts were made to address factors influencing this assay and to provide a standardized method that is relatively rapid and scalable. We demonstrate that further centrifugation of the HDL fraction is necessary to avoid apolipoprotein B contamination when using polyethylene glycol (PEG) method. We demonstrate also no effect on cholesterol efflux efficiency when using PEG with plasma or serum. This method has been previously applied in our laboratory in context of cardiovascular research, cardiovascular disease and pharmacologic therapies. PMID:26663796

  1. HDL phospholipid content and cholesterol efflux capacity are reduced in patients with very high HDL-C and coronary disease

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Anandita P.; Rodrigues, Amrith; Risman, Marjorie; McCoy, Mary; Trindade, Kevin; Qu, Liming; Cuchel, Marina; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Rader, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are strongly inversely associated with coronary artery disease (CAD), and high HDL-C is generally associated with reduced risk of CAD. Extremely high HDL-C with CAD is an unusual phenotype, and we hypothesized that the HDL in such individuals may have an altered composition and reduced function when compared to controls with similarly high HDL-C and no CAD. Approach 55 subjects with very high HDL-C (mean 86 mg/dL) and onset of CAD around age 60 with no known risk factors for CAD (‘cases’) were identified through systematic recruitment. 120 control subjects without CAD, matched for race, gender, and HDL-C level (‘controls’), were identified. In all subjects, HDL composition was analyzed and HDL cholesterol efflux capacity was assessed. Results HDL phospholipid composition was significantly lower in cases (92 ± 37 mg/dL) than in controls (109 ± 43 mg/dL, p= 0.0095). HDL cholesterol efflux capacity was significantly lower in cases (1.96 ± 0.39) compared with controls (2.11 ± 0.43, p= 0.04). Conclusions In persons with very high HDL-C, reduced HDL phospholipid content and cholesterol efflux capacity is associated with the paradoxical development of CAD. PMID:25838421

  2. In vivo effects of anacetrapib on preβ HDL: improvement in HDL remodeling without effects on cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Ping; Daniels, Erin; Chen, Ying; Castro-Perez, Jose; Zhou, Haihong; Akinsanya, Karen O; Previs, Stephen F; Roddy, Thomas P; Johns, Douglas G

    2013-10-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) transfers cholesteryl ester and triglyceride between HDL and apoB-containing lipoproteins. Anacetrapib (ANA), a reversible inhibitor of CETP, raises HDL cholesterol and lowers LDL cholesterol in dyslipidemic patients. We previously demonstrated that ANA increases macrophage-to-feces reverse cholesterol transport and fecal cholesterol excretion in hamsters, and increased preβ HDL-dependent cholesterol efflux via ABCA1 in vitro. However, the effects of ANA on in vivo preβ HDL have not been characterized. In vitro, ANA inhibited the formation of preβ, however in ANA-treated dyslipidemic hamsters, preβ HDL levels (measured by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis) were increased, in contrast to in vitro findings. Because changes in plasma preβ HDL have been proposed to potentially affect markers of cholesterol absorption with other CETP inhibitors, a dual stable isotope method was used to directly measure cholesterol absorption in hamsters. ANA treatment of hamsters (on either dyslipidemic or normal diet) had no effect on cholesterol absorption, while dalcetrapib-treated hamsters displayed an increase in cholesterol absorption. Taken together, these data support the notion that ANA promotes preβ HDL functionality in vivo, with no effects on cholesterol absorption. PMID:23898048

  3. Differing rates of cholesterol absorption among inbred mouse strains yield differing levels of HDL-cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Sontag, Timothy J; Chellan, Bijoy; Getz, Godfrey S; Reardon, Catherine A

    2013-09-01

    Inbred strains of mice with differing susceptibilities to atherosclerosis possess widely varying plasma HDL levels. Cholesterol absorption and lipoprotein formation were compared between atherosclerosis-susceptible, low-HDL C57BL6/J mice and atherosclerosis-resistant, high-HDL FVBN/J mice. [(3)H]cholesterol and triglyceride appeared in the plasma of FVB mice gavaged with cholesterol in olive oil at a much higher rate than in C57 mice. The plasma cholesterol was found almost entirely as HDL-cholesterol in both strains. Inhibition of lipoprotein catabolism with Tyloxapol revealed that the difference in the rate of [(3)H]cholesterol appearance in the plasma was due entirely to a greater rate of chylomicron secretion from the intestine of the FVB mice. Lipid absorption into the 2nd quarter of the small intestine is greater in the FVB mice and indicates that this region may contain the factors that give rise to the differences in absorption observed between the two mouse strains. Additionally, ad libitum feeding prior to cholesterol gavage accentuates the absorption rate differences compared with fasting. The resultant remodeling of the increased levels of chylomicron in the plasma may contribute to increased plasma HDL. Intestinal gene expression analysis reveals several genes that may play a role in these differences, including microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and ABCG8. PMID:23812556

  4. Selective delipidation of plasma HDL enhances reverse cholesterol transport in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Frank M.; Rudel, Lawrence L.; Conner, Adam; Akeefe, Hassibullah; Kostner, Gerhard; Baki, Talal; Rothblat, George; de la Llera-Moya, Margarita; Asztalos, Bela; Perlman, Timothy; Zheng, Chunyu; Alaupovic, Petar; Maltais, Jo-Ann B.; Brewer, H. Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Uptake of cholesterol from peripheral cells by nascent small HDL circulating in plasma is necessary to prevent atherosclerosis. This process, termed reverse cholesterol transport, produces larger cholesterol-rich HDL that transfers its cholesterol to the liver facilitating excretion. Most HDL in plasma is cholesterol-rich. We demonstrate that treating plasma with a novel selective delipidation procedure converts large to small HDL [HDL-selectively delipidated (HDL-sdl)]. HDL-sdl contains several cholesterol-depleted species resembling small α, preβ-1, and other preβ forms. Selective delipidation markedly increases efficacy of plasma to stimulate ABCA1-mediated cholesterol transfer from monocytic cells to HDL. Plasma from African Green monkeys underwent selective HDL delipidation. The delipidated plasma was reinfused into five monkeys. Preβ-1-like HDL had a plasma residence time of 8 ± 6 h and was converted entirely to large α-HDL having residence times of 13–14 h. Small α-HDL was converted entirely to large α-HDL. These findings suggest that selective HDL delipidation activates reverse cholesterol transport, in vivo and in vitro. Treatment with delipidated plasma tended to reduce diet-induced aortic atherosclerosis in monkeys measured by intravascular ultrasound. These findings link the conversion of small to large HDL, in vivo, to improvement in atherosclerosis. PMID:19144994

  5. Selective delipidation of plasma HDL enhances reverse cholesterol transport in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Frank M; Rudel, Lawrence L; Conner, Adam; Akeefe, Hassibullah; Kostner, Gerhard; Baki, Talal; Rothblat, George; de la Llera-Moya, Margarita; Asztalos, Bela; Perlman, Timothy; Zheng, Chunyu; Alaupovic, Petar; Maltais, Jo-Ann B; Brewer, H Bryan

    2009-05-01

    Uptake of cholesterol from peripheral cells by nascent small HDL circulating in plasma is necessary to prevent atherosclerosis. This process, termed reverse cholesterol transport, produces larger cholesterol-rich HDL that transfers its cholesterol to the liver facilitating excretion. Most HDL in plasma is cholesterol-rich. We demonstrate that treating plasma with a novel selective delipidation procedure converts large to small HDL [HDL-selectively delipidated (HDL-sdl)]. HDL-sdl contains several cholesterol-depleted species resembling small alpha, prebeta-1, and other prebeta forms. Selective delipidation markedly increases efficacy of plasma to stimulate ABCA1-mediated cholesterol transfer from monocytic cells to HDL. Plasma from African Green monkeys underwent selective HDL delipidation. The delipidated plasma was reinfused into five monkeys. Prebeta-1-like HDL had a plasma residence time of 8 +/- 6 h and was converted entirely to large alpha-HDL having residence times of 13-14 h. Small alpha-HDL was converted entirely to large alpha-HDL. These findings suggest that selective HDL delipidation activates reverse cholesterol transport, in vivo and in vitro. Treatment with delipidated plasma tended to reduce diet-induced aortic atherosclerosis in monkeys measured by intravascular ultrasound. These findings link the conversion of small to large HDL, in vivo, to improvement in atherosclerosis. PMID:19144994

  6. Mechanism of transfer of LDL-derived free cholesterol to HDL subfractions in human plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Miida, T.; Fielding, C.J.; Fielding, P.E. )

    1990-11-01

    The transfer of ({sup 3}H)cholesterol in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to different high-density lipoprotein (HDL) species in native human plasma was determined by using nondenaturing two-dimensional electrophoresis. Transfer from LDL had a t{sub 1/2} at 37{degree}C of 51 {plus minus} 8 min and an activation energy of 18.0 kCal mol{sup {minus}1}. There was unexpected specificity among HDL species as acceptors of LDL-derived labeled cholesterol. The largest fraction of the major {alpha}-migrating class (HDL{sub 2b}) was the major initial acceptor of LDL-derived cholesterol. Kinetic analysis indicated a rapid secondary transfer from HDL{sub 2b} to smaller {alpha}HDL (particularly HDL{sub 3}) driven enzymatically by the lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase reaction. Rates of transfer among {alpha}HDL were most rapid from the largest {alpha}HDL fraction (HDL{sub 2b}), suggesting possible protein-mediated facilitation. Simultaneous measurements of the transport of LDL-derived and cell-derived isotopic cholesterol indicated that the former preferably utilized the {alpha}HDL pathyway, with little label in pre-{beta}HDL. The same experiments confirmed earlier data that cell-derived cholesterol is preferentially channeled through pre-{beta}HDL. The authors suggest that the functional heterogeneity of HDL demonstrated here includes the ability to independently process cell- and LDL-derived free cholesterol.

  7. Hyperhomocysteinemia: a missing link to dysfunctional HDL via paraoxanase-1.

    PubMed

    Givvimani, Srikanth; Kundu, Sourav; Pushpakumar, Sathnur; Doyle, Vivian; Narayanan, Nithya; Winchester, Lee J; Veeranki, Sudhakar; Metreveli, Naira; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2015-09-01

    Paraoxanase-1 (PON1) is an HDL-associated enzyme that contributes to the antioxidant and antiatherosclerotic properties of HDL. Lack of PON1 results in dysfunctional HDL. HHcy is a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders, and instigates vascular dysfunction and ECM remodeling. Although studies have reported HHcy during atherosclerosis, the exact mechanism is unclear. Here, we hypothesize that dysfunctional HDL due to lack of PON1 contributes to endothelial impairment and atherogenesis through HHcy-induced ECM re-modeling. To verify this hypothesis, we used C57BL6/J and PON1 knockout mice (KO) and fed them an atherogenic diet. The expression of Akt, ADMA, and DDAH, as well as endothelial gap junction proteins such as Cx-37 and Cx-40 and eNOS was measured for vascular dysfunction and inflammation. We observed that cardiac function was decreased and plasma Hcy levels were increased in PON1 KO mice fed the atherogenic diet compared with the controls. Expression of Akt, eNOS, DDAH, Cx-37, and Cx-40 was decreased, and the expression of MMP-9 and ADMA was increased in PON1 KO mice fed an atherogenic diet compared with the controls. Our results suggest that HHcy plays an intricate role in dysfunctional HDL, owing to the lack of PON1. This contributes to vascular endothelial impairment and atherosclerosis through MMP-9-induced vascular remodeling. PMID:26176406

  8. Adiponectin and the mediation of HDL-cholesterol change with improved lifestyle: the Look AHEAD Study.

    PubMed

    Belalcazar, L Maria; Lang, Wei; Haffner, Steven M; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Pi-Sunyer, F Xavier; Schwenke, Dawn C; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Tracy, Russell P; Kriska, Andrea P; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2012-12-01

    Adipose tissue dysfunction plays a key role in the development of the metabolic abnormalities characteristic of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and participates actively in lipid metabolism. Adiponectin, found abundantly in circulation and a marker of adipose health, is decreased in obese persons with T2DM. We investigated whether the changes in adiponectin with an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss could potentially mediate the increase in low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) with ILI. Adiponectin and its fractions were determined using an ELISA with selective protease treatment in 1,397 participants from Look AHEAD, a trial examining whether ILI will reduce cardiovascular events in overweight/obese subjects with T2DM when compared with a control arm, diabetes support and education (DSE). Multivariable regression and mediational analyses were performed for adiponectin and its high-molecular-weight (HMW) and non-HMW fractions. ILI increased baseline HDL-C by 9.7% and adiponectin by 11.9%; changes with DSE were 1.3% and 0.2%, respectively (P < 0.0001). In a model including changes in weight, fitness, triglycerides, and glucose control and that adjusted for demographics and medical history, adiponectin changes remained significantly associated with HDL-C change. Data supported the contribution of changes in both HMW- and non-HMW-adiponectin to the improvement in HDL-C with ILI. PMID:22956782

  9. Serum Opacity Factor Enhances HDL-Mediated Cholesterol Efflux, Esterification and Anti Inflammatory Effects

    PubMed Central

    Tchoua, Urbain; Rosales, Corina; Tang, Daming; Gillard, Baiba K.; Vaughan, Ashley; Lin, Hu Yu; Courtney, Harry S.

    2011-01-01

    Serum opacity factor (SOF) is a streptococcal protein that disrupts the structure of human high density lipoproteins (HDL) releasing lipid-free apo A-I while forming a large cholesteryl ester-rich particle and a small neo HDL. Given its low cholesterol and high phospholipid contents, we tested the hypotheses that neo HDL is a better substrate for cholesterol esterification via lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), better than HDL as an acceptor of THP-1 macrophage cholesterol efflux, and improves reduction of oxidized LDL-induced production of inflammatory markers. We observed that both cholesterol efflux and esterification were improved by recombinant (r)SOF treatment of whole plasma and that the underlying cause of the improved cholesterol esterification in plasma and macrophage cholesterol efflux to rSOF-treated plasma was due to the rSOF-mediated conversion of HDL to neo HDL. Moreover, the reduction of secretion of TNF-α and IL-6 by THP-1 cells by neo HDL was twice that of HDL. Studies in BHK cells overexpressing cholesterol transporters showed that efflux to neo HDL occurred primarily via ABCA1 not ABCG1. Thus, rSOF improves two steps in reverse cholesterol transport with a concomitant reduction in the release of macrophage markers of inflammation. We conclude that rSOF catalyzes a novel reaction that might be developed as a new therapy that prevents or reverses atherosclerosis via improved reverse cholesterol transport. PMID:20972840

  10. Intracellular cholesterol transport proteins enhance hydrolysis of HDL-CEs and facilitate elimination of cholesterol into bile.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Bie, Jinghua; Ghosh, Shobha

    2016-09-01

    While HDL-associated unesterified or free cholesterol (FC) is thought to be rapidly secreted into the bile, the fate of HDL-associated cholesteryl esters (HDL-CEs) that represent >80% of HDL-cholesterol, is only beginning to be understood. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that intracellular cholesterol transport proteins [sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) and fatty acid binding protein-1 (FABP1)] not only facilitate CE hydrolase-mediated hydrolysis of HDL-CEs, but also enhance elimination of cholesterol into bile. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of FABP1 or SCP2 in primary hepatocytes significantly increased hydrolysis of HDL-[(3)H]CE, reduced resecretion of HDL-CE-derived FC as nascent HDL, and increased its secretion as bile acids. Consistently, the flux of [(3)H]cholesterol from HDL-[(3)H]CE to biliary bile acids was increased by overexpression of SCP2 or FABP1 in vivo and reduced in SCP2(-/-) mice. Increased flux of HDL-[(3)H]CE to biliary FC was noted with FABP1 overexpression and in SCP2(-/-) mice that have increased FABP1 expression. Lack of a significant decrease in the flux of HDL-[(3)H]CE to biliary FC or bile acids in FABP1(-/-) mice indicates the likely compensation of its function by an as yet unidentified mechanism. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that FABP1 and SCP2 facilitate the preferential movement of HDL-CEs to bile for final elimination. PMID:27381048

  11. HDL-apolipoprotein A-I exchange is independently associated with cholesterol efflux capacity.

    PubMed

    Borja, Mark S; Ng, Kit F; Irwin, Angela; Hong, Jaekyoung; Wu, Xing; Isquith, Daniel; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Prazen, Bryan; Gildengorin, Virginia; Oda, Michael N; Vaisar, Tomáš

    2015-10-01

    HDL is the primary mediator of cholesterol mobilization from the periphery to the liver via reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). A critical first step in this process is the uptake of cholesterol from lipid-loaded macrophages by HDL, a function of HDL inversely associated with prevalent and incident cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that the dynamic ability of HDL to undergo remodeling and exchange of apoA-I is an important and potentially rate-limiting aspect of RCT. In this study, we investigated the relationship between HDL-apoA-I exchange (HAE) and serum HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) efflux capacity. We compared HAE to the total and ABCA1-specific cholesterol efflux capacity of 77 subjects. We found that HAE was highly correlated with both total (r = 0.69, P < 0.0001) and ABCA1-specific (r = 0.47, P < 0.0001) efflux, and this relationship remained significant after adjustment for HDL-C or apoA-I. Multivariate models of sterol efflux capacity indicated that HAE accounted for approximately 25% of the model variance for both total and ABCA1-specific efflux. We conclude that the ability of HDL to exchange apoA-I and remodel, as measured by HAE, is a significant contributor to serum HDL efflux capacity, independent of HDL-C and apoA-I, indicating that HDL dynamics are an important factor in cholesterol efflux capacity and likely RCT. PMID:26254308

  12. Anthocyanin-rich black elderberry extract improves markers of HDL function and reduces aortic cholesterol in hyperlipidemic mice.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Nicholas; Norris, Gregory; Lee, Sang Gil; Chun, Ock K; Blesso, Christopher N

    2015-04-01

    Serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) is a risk factor considered to be protective of atherosclerosis. However, atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease and contributes to impairment in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function, including reductions in HDL-C, HDL antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Anthocyanins are polyphenols that have demonstrated antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The objective of this study was to determine whether an anthocyanin-rich black elderberry extract (Sambucus nigra) (BEE) (13% anthocyanins) would protect against inflammation-related impairments in HDL function and atherosclerosis in apoE(-/-) mice, a mouse model of hyperlipidemia and HDL dysfunction. We fed an AIN-93M diet supplemented with 1.25% (w/w) BEE or control diet to 10 week old male apoE(-/-) mice for 6 weeks. The BEE fed to mice was rich in cyanidin 3-sambubioside (∼ 9.8% w/w) and cyanidin 3-glucoside (∼ 3.8% w/w). After 6 weeks, serum lipids did not differ significantly between groups, while aspartate transaminase (AST) and fasting glucose were reduced in BEE-fed mice. Hepatic and intestinal mRNA changes with BEE-feeding were consistent with an improvement in HDL function (Apoa1, Pon1, Saa1, Lcat, Clu) and a reduction in hepatic cholesterol levels (increased Ldlr and Hmgcr, reduced Cyp7a1). In BEE-fed mice, serum paraoxonase-1 (PON1) arylesterase activity was significantly higher. In addition, mice fed BEE had significantly lower serum chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) compared to control-fed mice. Notably, we observed significant reductions in total cholesterol content of the aorta of BEE-fed mice, indicating less atherosclerosis progression. This study suggests that black elderberry may have the potential to influence HDL dysfunction associated with chronic inflammation by impacting hepatic gene expression. PMID:25758596

  13. Tailoring of Biomimetic High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Nanostructures Changes Cholesterol Binding and Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Luthi, Andrea J.; Zhang, Heng; Kim, Dongwoo; Giljohann, David A.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were employed as templates to synthesize spherical, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) biomimics (HDL Au NPs) of different sizes and surface chemistries. The effect of size and surface chemistry on the cholesterol binding properties and the ability of the HDL Au NPs to efflux cholesterol from macrophage cells were measured. Results demonstrate that Au NPs may be utilized as templates to generate nanostructures with different physical characteristics that mimic natural HDL. Furthermore, the properties of the HDL Au NPs may be tailored to modulate the ability to bind cholesterol in solution and efflux cholesterol from macrophages. From the conjugates tested, the optimum size and surface chemistry for preparing functional Au NP-templated HDL biomimics were identified. PMID:22117189

  14. LXR driven induction of HDL-cholesterol is independent of intestinal cholesterol absorption and ABCA1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kannisto, Kristina; Gåfvels, Mats; Jiang, Zhao-Yan; Slätis, Katharina; Hu, Xiaoli; Jorns, Carl; Steffensen, Knut R; Eggertsen, Gösta

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether: (1) liver X receptor (LXR)-driven induction of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and other LXR-mediated effects on cholesterol metabolism depend on intestinal cholesterol absorption; and (2) combined treatment with the LXR agonist GW3965 and the cholesterol absorption inhibitor ezetimibe results in synergistic effects on cholesterol metabolism that could be beneficial for treatment of atherosclerosis. Mice were fed 0.2 % cholesterol and treated with GW3965+ezetimibe, GW3965 or ezetimibe. GW3965+ezetimibe treatment elevated serum HDL-C and Apolipoprotein (Apo) AI, effectively reduced the intestinal cholesterol absorption and increased the excretion of faecal neutral sterols. No changes in intestinal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) A1 or ABCG5 protein expression were observed, despite increased mRNA expression, while hepatic ABCA1 was slightly reduced. The combined treatment caused a pronounced down-regulation of intestinal Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) and reduced hepatic and intestinal cholesterol levels. GW3965 did not affect the intestinal cholesterol absorption, but increased serum HDL-C and ApoAI levels. GW3965 also increased Apoa1 mRNA levels in primary mouse hepatocytes and HEPA1-6 cells. Ezetimibe reduced the intestinal cholesterol absorption, ABCA1 and ABCG5, but did not affect the serum HDL-C or ApoAI levels. Thus, the LXR-driven induction of HDL-C and ApoAI was independent of the intestinal cholesterol absorption and increased expression of intestinal or hepatic ABCA1 was not required. Inhibited influx of cholesterol via NPC1L1 and/or low levels of intracellular cholesterol prevented post-transcriptional expression of intestinal ABCA1 and ABCG5, despite increased mRNA levels. Combined LXR activation and blocked intestinal cholesterol absorption induced effective faecal elimination of cholesterol. PMID:24163219

  15. The macrophage and its related cholesterol efflux as a HDL function index in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Suguru; Narita, Ichiei; Kotani, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    The macrophage and its related cholesterol efflux are considered to be a key player in atherosclerotic formation in relation to the function of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The HDL function can be evaluated by the reaction between lipid-loaded macrophages and lipid-acceptors in the HDL fraction from the plasma, apolipoprotein B-depleted serum, and/or whole serum/plasma. Recent studies have reported that an impaired cholesterol efflux of HDL is observed in patients with cardiometabolic diseases, such as dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. A population-based cohort study has reported an inverse association between the cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL and the incidence of atherosclerotic disease, regardless of the serum HDL-cholesterol level. Moreover, in this paper, when we summarized several clinical interventional studies of statin treatment that examined cholesterol efflux, a potential increase in the efflux in patients treated with statins was implied. However, the effect was not fully defined in the current situation because of the small sample sizes, lack of a unified protocol for measuring the efflux, and short-term intervention periods without cardiovascular outcomes in available studies. Further investigation is necessary to determine the effect of drugs on cholesterol efflux. With additional advanced studies, cholesterol efflux is a promising laboratory index to understand the HDL function. PMID:27087419

  16. Hemorheological and Glycemic Parameters and HDL Cholesterol for the Prediction of Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Woo; Kim, Byung Gyu; Kim, Byung Ok; Byun, Young Sup; Goh, Choong Won; Rhee, Kun Joo; Kwon, Hyuck Moon; Lee, Byoung Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemorheological and glycemic parameters and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are used as biomarkers of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Objective To investigate the association and clinical relevance of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), fibrinogen, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and HDL cholesterol in the prediction of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and coronary heart disease (CHD) in an outpatient population. Methods 708 stable patients who visited the outpatient department were enrolled and followed for a mean period of 28.5 months. Patients were divided into two groups, patients without MACE and patients with MACE, which included cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction, newly diagnosed CHD, and cerebral vascular accident. We compared hemorheological and glycemic parameters and lipid profiles between the groups. Results Patients with MACE had significantly higher ESR, fibrinogen, fasting glucose, and HbA1c, while lower HDL cholesterol compared with patients without MACE. High ESR and fibrinogen and low HDL cholesterol significantly increased the risk of MACE in multivariate regression analysis. In patients with MACE, high fibrinogen and HbA1c levels increased the risk of multivessel CHD. Furthermore, ESR and fibrinogen were significantly positively correlated with HbA1c and negatively correlated with HDL cholesterol, however not correlated with fasting glucose. Conclusion Hemorheological abnormalities, poor glycemic control, and low HDL cholesterol are correlated with each other and could serve as simple and useful surrogate markers and predictors for MACE and CHD in outpatients. PMID:26690693

  17. Hepatobiliary cholesterol transport is not impaired in Abca1-null mice lacking HDL

    PubMed Central

    Groen, Albert K.; Bloks, Vincent W.; Bandsma, Robert H.J.; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Chimini, Giovanna; Kuipers, Folkert

    2001-01-01

    The ABC transporter ABCA1 regulates HDL levels and is considered to control the first step of reverse cholesterol transport from the periphery to the liver. To test this concept, we studied the effect of ABCA1 deficiency on hepatic metabolism and hepatobiliary flux of cholesterol in mice. Hepatic lipid contents and biliary secretion rates were determined in Abca1–/–, Abca1+/–, and Abca1+/+ mice with a DBA background that were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet. Hepatic cholesterol and phospholipid contents in Abca1–/– mice were indistinguishable from those in Abca1+/– and Abca1+/+ mice on both diets. In spite of the absence of HDL, biliary secretion rates of cholesterol, bile salts, and phospholipid were unimpaired in Abca1–/– mice. Neither the hepatic expression levels of genes controlling key steps in cholesterol metabolism nor the contribution of de novo synthesis to biliary cholesterol and bile salts were affected by Abca genotype. Finally, fecal excretion of neutral and acidic sterols was similar in all groups. We conclude that plasma HDL levels and ABCA1 activity do not control net cholesterol transport from the periphery via the liver into the bile, indicating that the importance of HDL in reverse cholesterol transport requires re-evaluation. PMID:11560953

  18. Rare variant in scavenger receptor BI raises HDL cholesterol and increases risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Paolo; Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Larach, Daniel B; Hancock-Cerutti, William F; Millar, John S; Cuchel, Marina; DerOhannessian, Stephanie; Kontush, Anatol; Surendran, Praveen; Saleheen, Danish; Trompet, Stella; Jukema, J Wouter; De Craen, Anton; Deloukas, Panos; Sattar, Naveed; Ford, Ian; Packard, Chris; Majumder, Abdullah al Shafi; Alam, Dewan S; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Abecasis, Goncalo; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Erdmann, Jeanette; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schmidt, Ruth Frikke; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Liu, Dajiang J; Perola, Markus; Blankenberg, Stefan; Salomaa, Veikko; Männistö, Satu; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Ferrieres, Jean; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ferrario, Marco; Kee, Frank; Willer, Cristen J; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Butterworth, Adam S; Howson, Joanna M M; Peloso, Gina M; Stitziel, Nathan O; Danesh, John; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J

    2016-03-11

    Scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) is the major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C). In humans, high amounts of HDL-C in plasma are associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Mice that have depleted Scarb1 (SR-BI knockout mice) have markedly elevated HDL-C levels but, paradoxically, increased atherosclerosis. The impact of SR-BI on HDL metabolism and CHD risk in humans remains unclear. Through targeted sequencing of coding regions of lipid-modifying genes in 328 individuals with extremely high plasma HDL-C levels, we identified a homozygote for a loss-of-function variant, in which leucine replaces proline 376 (P376L), in SCARB1, the gene encoding SR-BI. The P376L variant impairs posttranslational processing of SR-BI and abrogates selective HDL cholesterol uptake in transfected cells, in hepatocyte-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells from the homozygous subject, and in mice. Large population-based studies revealed that subjects who are heterozygous carriers of the P376L variant have significantly increased levels of plasma HDL-C. P376L carriers have a profound HDL-related phenotype and an increased risk of CHD (odds ratio = 1.79, which is statistically significant). PMID:26965621

  19. Higher HDL cholesterol is associated with better cognitive function: the Maine-Syracuse study.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Georgina E; Elias, Merrill F; Davey, Adam; Sullivan, Kevin J; Robbins, Michael A

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have examined associations between different subcategories of cholesterol and cognitive function. We examined relationships between total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), triglyceride levels and cognitive performance in the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study, a community-based study of cardiovascular risk factors. Cross-sectional analyses were undertaken on data from 540 participants, aged 60 to 98 years, free of dementia and stroke. TC, HDL, LDL, and triglyceride levels were obtained. Cognitive function was assessed using a thorough neuropsychological test battery, including domains of cognitive function indexed by multiple cognitive tests. The cognitive outcomes studied were as follows: Visual-Spatial Memory and Organization, Verbal and Working Memory, Scanning and Tracking, Abstract Reasoning, a Global Composite score, and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Significant positive associations were observed between HDL-cholesterol and the Global Composite score, Working Memory, and the MMSE after adjustment for demographic and cardiovascular risk factors. Participants with desirable levels of HDL (≥60 mg/dL) had the highest scores on all cognitive outcomes. There were no significant associations observed between TC, LDL, or triglyceride concentrations and cognition. In older individuals, HDL-cholesterol was related to a composite of Working Memory tests and for general measures of cognitive ability when adjusted for cardiovascular variables. We speculate that persons over 60 are survivors and thus less likely to show cognitive deficit in relation to TC, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides. Longitudinal studies are needed to examine relations between specific cognitive abilities and the different subcategories of cholesterol. PMID:25382185

  20. HDL Cholesterol and Cancer Risk Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenhui; Guan, Jing; Horswell, Ronald; Li, Weiqin; Wang, Yujie; Wu, Xiaocheng

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the relationship between HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and cancer risk among type 2 diabetic patients. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed a retrospective cohort study of 14,169 men and 23,176 women with type 2 diabetes. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the association of various levels of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) with cancer risk. RESULTS During a mean follow-up period of 6.4 years, 3,711 type 2 diabetic patients had a cancer diagnosis. A significant inverse association between HDL-C and the risk of cancer was found among men and women. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of cancer at various levels of HDL-C at baseline (<30, 30–39.9, 40–49.9, 50–59.9, 60–69.9, 70–79.9, and ≥80 mg/dL) were 1.00, 0.87, 0.95, 1.01, 0.61, 0.45, and 0.37, respectively, in men (Ptrend = 0.027) and 1.00, 0.98, 0.88, 0.85, 0.84, 0.86, and 0.84, respectively, in women (Ptrend = 0.025). When stratified by race, BMI, smoking status, or medication use, the inverse association was still present. With an updated mean of HDL-C used in the analysis, the inverse association of HDL-C with cancer risk did not change. The inverse association substantially attenuated after excluding patients who died of or were diagnosed with cancer during the first 2 years of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The study suggests an inverse association of HDL-C with cancer risk among men and women with type 2 diabetes, whereas the effect of HDL-C was partially mediated by reverse causation. PMID:25216507

  1. Adrenal steroidogenesis disruption caused by HDL/cholesterol suppression in diethylstilbestrol-treated adult male rat.

    PubMed

    Haeno, Satoko; Maeda, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Kousuke; Sato, Michiko; Uto, Aika; Yokota, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    The synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol is used to prevent miscarriages and as a therapeutic treatment for prostate cancer, but it has been reported to have adverse effects on endocrine homeostasis. However, the toxicity mechanism is poorly understood. Recently, we reported that diethylstilbestrol impairs adrenal steroidogenesis via cholesterol insufficiency in adult male rats. In the present study, we found that the adrenal cholesterol level was significantly reduced without of the decrease in other precursors in the adrenal steroidogenesis 24 h after a single dose of diethylstilbestrol (0.33 μg/g body mass). The serum HDL/cholesterol level was also reduced only 12 h after the diethylstilbestrol exposure. The level of Apo E, which is indispensable for HDL/cholesterol maturation, was decreased in both the HDL and VLDL/LDL fractions, whereas the level of Apo A1, which is an essential constituent of HDL, was not altered in the HDL fraction. Because the liver is a major source of Apo E and Apo A1, the secretion rates of these proteins were examined using a liver perfusion experiment. The secretion rate of Apo A1 from the liver was consistent between DES-treated and control rats, but that of Apo E was comparatively suppressed in the DES-treated rats. The disruption of adrenal steroidogenesis by diethylstilbestrol was caused by a decrease in serum HDL/cholesterol, which is the main source of adrenal steroidogenesis, due to the inhibition of Apo E secretion from the liver. PMID:26349937

  2. Associations of high HDL cholesterol level with all-cause mortality in patients with heart failure complicating coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Anping; Li, Xida; Zhong, Qi; Li, Minming; Wang, Rui; Liang, Yingcong; Chen, Wenzhong; Huang, Tehui; Li, Xiaohong; Zhou, Yingling; Li, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between HDL cholesterol level and all-cause mortality in patients with ejection fraction reduced heart failure (EFrHF) complicating coronary heart disease (CHD). A total of 323 patients were retrospectively recruited. Patients were divided into low and high HDL cholesterol groups. Between-group differences and associations between HDL cholesterol level and all-cause mortality were assessed. Patients in the high HDL cholesterol group had higher HDL cholesterol level and other lipid components (P <0.05 for all comparison). Lower levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (Hs-CRP), and higher albumin (ALB) level were observed in the high HDL cholesterol group (P <0.05 for all comparison). Although left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were comparable (28.8 ± 4.5% vs 28.4 ± 4.6%, P = 0.358), mean mortality rate in the high HDL cholesterol group was significantly lower (43.5% vs 59.1%, P = 0.007). HDL cholesterol level was positively correlated with ALB level, while inversely correlated with ALT, Hs-CRP, and NYHA classification. Logistic regression analysis revealed that after extensively adjusted for confounding variates, HDL cholesterol level remained significantly associated with all-cause mortality although the magnitude of association was gradually attenuated with odds ratio of 0.007 (95% confidence interval 0.001–0.327, P = 0.012). Higher HDL cholesterol level is associated with better survival in patients with EFrHF complicating CHD, and future studies are necessary to demonstrate whether increasing HDL cholesterol level will confer survival benefit in these populations of patients. PMID:27428188

  3. Proteomic analysis of HDL from inbred mouse strains implicates APOE associated with HDL in reduced cholesterol efflux capacity via the ABCA1 pathway[S

    PubMed Central

    Pamir, Nathalie; Hutchins, Patrick; Ronsein, Graziella; Vaisar, Tomas; Reardon, Catherine A.; Getz, Godfrey S.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Heinecke, Jay W.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol efflux capacity associates strongly and negatively with the incidence and prevalence of human CVD. We investigated the relationships of HDL’s size and protein cargo with its cholesterol efflux capacity using APOB-depleted serum and HDLs isolated from five inbred mouse strains with different susceptibilities to atherosclerosis. Like humans, mouse HDL carried >70 proteins linked to lipid metabolism, the acute-phase response, proteinase inhibition, and the immune system. HDL’s content of specific proteins strongly correlated with its size and cholesterol efflux capacity, suggesting that its protein cargo regulates its function. Cholesterol efflux capacity with macrophages strongly and positively correlated with retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) and PLTP, but not APOA1. In contrast, ABCA1-specific cholesterol efflux correlated strongly with HDL’s content of APOA1, APOC3, and APOD, but not RBP4 and PLTP. Unexpectedly, APOE had a strong negative correlation with ABCA1-specific cholesterol efflux capacity. Moreover, the ABCA1-specific cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL isolated from APOE-deficient mice was significantly greater than that of HDL from wild-type mice. Our observations demonstrate that the HDL-associated APOE regulates HDL’s ABCA1-specific cholesterol efflux capacity. These findings may be clinically relevant because HDL’s APOE content associates with CVD risk and ABCA1 deficiency promotes unregulated cholesterol accumulation in human macrophages. PMID:26673204

  4. HDL cholesterol and bone mineral density: Is there a genetic link?

    PubMed Central

    Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.

    2011-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence has linked cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis, but the shared root cause of these two diseases of the elderly remains unknown. Low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and bone mineral density (BMD) are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis respectively. A number of correlation studies have attempted to determine if there is a relationship between serum HDL and BMD but these studies are confounded by a number of variables including age, diet, genetic background, gender and hormonal status. Collectively, these data suggest that there is a relationship between these two phenotypes, but that the nature of this relationship is context specific. Studies in mice plainly demonstrate that genetic loci for BMD and HDL co-map and transgenic mouse models have been used to show that a single gene can affect both serum HDL and BMD. Work completed to date has demonstrated that HDL can interact directly with both osteoblasts and osteoclasts, but no direct evidence links bone back to the regulation of HDL levels. Understanding the genetic relationship between BMD and HDL has huge implications for understanding the clinical relationship between CVD and osteoporosis and for the development of safe treatment options for both diseases. PMID:21810493

  5. Inhibition of ABCA1 protein degradation promotes HDL cholesterol efflux capacity and RCT and reduces atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, LinZhang; Fan, BaoYan; Ma, Ang; Shaul, Philip W; Zhu, HaiBo

    2015-05-01

    ABCA1 plays a key role in the initial lipidation of apoA-I, which generates circulating HDL cholesterol. Whereas it is known that the transcriptional upregulation of ABCA1 promotes HDL formation and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), it is not known how the inhibition of ABCA1 protein degradation impacts HDL function. Employing the small molecule triacetyl-3-hydroxyphenyladenosine (IMM-H007), we determined how the attenuation of ABCA1 protein degradation affects HDL cholesterol efflux capacity, RCT, and atherosclerotic lesion formation. Pulse-chase analysis revealed that IMM-H007 inhibits ABCA1 degradation and facilitates its cell-surface localization in macrophages, and additional studies in macrophages showed that IMM-H007 thereby promotes cholesterol efflux. IMM-H007 treatment of Paigen diet-fed mice caused an increase in circulating HDL level, it increased the cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL, and it enhanced in vivo RCT from macrophages to the plasma, liver, and feces. Furthermore, ABCA1 degradation suppression by IMM-H007 reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation in apoE(-/-) mice. Thus, via effects on both ABCA1-expressing cells and circulating HDL function, the inhibition of ABCA1 protein degradation by IMM-H007 promotes HDL cholesterol efflux capacity and RCT and attenuates atherogenesis. IMM-H007 potentially represents a lead compound for the development of agents to augment HDL function. PMID:25761370

  6. Plasma HDL cholesterol and risk of myocardial infarction: a mendelian randomisation study

    PubMed Central

    Voight, Benjamin F; Peloso, Gina M; Orho-Melander, Marju; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Barbalic, Maja; Jensen, Majken K; Hindy, George; Hólm, Hilma; Ding, Eric L; Johnson, Toby; Schunkert, Heribert; Samani, Nilesh J; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Thompson, John F; Li, Mingyao; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Musunuru, Kiran; Pirruccello, James P; Saleheen, Danish; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre FR; Schillert, Arne; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Anand, Sonia; Engert, James C; Morgan, Thomas; Spertus, John; Stoll, Monika; Berger, Klaus; Martinelli, Nicola; Girelli, Domenico; McKeown, Pascal P; Patterson, Christopher C; Epstein, Stephen E; Devaney, Joseph; Burnett, Mary-Susan; Mooser, Vincent; Ripatti, Samuli; Surakka, Ida; Nieminen, Markku S; Sinisalo, Juha; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Perola, Markus; Havulinna, Aki; de Faire, Ulf; Gigante, Bruna; Ingelsson, Erik; Zeller, Tanja; Wild, Philipp; de Bakker, Paul I W; Klungel, Olaf H; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Peters, Bas J M; de Boer, Anthonius; Grobbee, Diederick E; Kamphuisen, Pieter W; Deneer, Vera H M; Elbers, Clara C; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Hofker, Marten H; Wijmenga, Cisca; Verschuren, WM Monique; Boer, Jolanda MA; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Rasheed, Asif; Frossard, Philippe; Demissie, Serkalem; Willer, Cristen; Do, Ron; Ordovas, Jose M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L; Daly, Mark J; Guiducci, Candace; Burtt, Noël P; Surti, Aarti; Gonzalez, Elena; Purcell, Shaun; Gabriel, Stacey; Marrugat, Jaume; Peden, John; Erdmann, Jeanette; Diemert, Patrick; Willenborg, Christina; König, Inke R; Fischer, Marcus; Hengstenberg, Christian; Ziegler, Andreas; Buysschaert, Ian; Lambrechts, Diether; Van de Werf, Frans; Fox, Keith A; El Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Rubin, Diana; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Schreiber, Stefan; Schäfer, Arne; Danesh, John; Blankenberg, Stefan; Roberts, Robert; McPherson, Ruth; Watkins, Hugh; Hall, Alistair S; Overvad, Kim; Rimm, Eric; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Cupples, L Adrienne; Reilly, Muredach P; Melander, Olle; Mannucci, Pier M; Ardissino, Diego; Siscovick, David; Elosua, Roberto; Stefansson, Kari; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; Rader, Daniel J; Peltonen, Leena; Schwartz, Stephen M; Altshuler, David; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background High plasma HDL cholesterol is associated with reduced risk of myocardial infarction, but whether this association is causal is unclear. Exploiting the fact that genotypes are randomly assigned at meiosis, are independent of non-genetic confounding, and are unmodified by disease processes, mendelian randomisation can be used to test the hypothesis that the association of a plasma biomarker with disease is causal. Methods We performed two mendelian randomisation analyses. First, we used as an instrument a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the endothelial lipase gene (LIPG Asn396Ser) and tested this SNP in 20 studies (20 913 myocardial infarction cases, 95 407 controls). Second, we used as an instrument a genetic score consisting of 14 common SNPs that exclusively associate with HDL cholesterol and tested this score in up to 12 482 cases of myocardial infarction and 41 331 controls. As a positive control, we also tested a genetic score of 13 common SNPs exclusively associated with LDL cholesterol. Findings Carriers of the LIPG 396Ser allele (2·6% frequency) had higher HDL cholesterol (0·14 mmol/L higher, p=8×10−13) but similar levels of other lipid and non-lipid risk factors for myocardial infarction compared with non-carriers. This difference in HDL cholesterol is expected to decrease risk of myocardial infarction by 13% (odds ratio [OR] 0·87, 95% CI 0·84–0·91). However, we noted that the 396Ser allele was not associated with risk of myocardial infarction (OR 0·99, 95% CI 0·88–1·11, p=0·85). From observational epidemiology, an increase of 1 SD in HDL cholesterol was associated with reduced risk of myocardial infarction (OR 0·62, 95% CI 0·58–0·66). However, a 1 SD increase in HDL cholesterol due to genetic score was not associated with risk of myocardial infarction (OR 0·93, 95% CI 0·68–1·26, p=0·63). For LDL cholesterol, the estimate from observational epidemiology (a 1 SD increase in LDL cholesterol

  7. Impaired HDL cholesterol efflux in metabolic syndrome is unrelated to glucose tolerance status: the CODAM study

    PubMed Central

    Annema, Wijtske; Dikkers, Arne; de Boer, Jan Freark; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M. J.; van der Kallen, Carla J. H.; Schalkwijk, Casper G.; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.; Dullaart, Robin P. F.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) increase atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk. Cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) is a key metric of the anti-atherosclerotic functionality of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). The present study aimed to delineate if T2DM and MetS cross-sectionally associate with altered CEC in a large high cardiometabolic risk population. CEC was determined from THP-1 macrophage foam cells towards apolipoprotein B-depleted plasma from 552 subjects of the CODAM cohort (288 controls, 126 impaired glucose metabolism [IGM], 138 T2DM). MetS was present in 297 participants. CEC was not different between different glucose tolerance categories but was lower in MetS (P < 0.001), at least partly attributable to lower HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and apoA-I levels (P < 0.001 for each). Low grade inflammation was increased in IGM, T2DM and MetS as determined by a score comprising 8 different biomarkers (P < 0.05-< 0.001; n = 547). CEC inversely associated with low-grade inflammation taking account of HDL-C or apoA-I in MetS (P < 0.02), but not in subjects without MetS (interaction: P = 0.015). This study demonstrates that IGM and T2DM do not impact the HDL CEC function, while efflux is lower in MetS, partly dependent on plasma HDL-C levels. Enhanced low-grade inflammation in MetS may conceivably impair CEC even independent of HDL-C and apoA-I. PMID:27270665

  8. Impaired HDL cholesterol efflux in metabolic syndrome is unrelated to glucose tolerance status: the CODAM study.

    PubMed

    Annema, Wijtske; Dikkers, Arne; de Boer, Jan Freark; van Greevenbroek, Marleen M J; van der Kallen, Carla J H; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Dullaart, Robin P F; Tietge, Uwe J F

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) increase atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk. Cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) is a key metric of the anti-atherosclerotic functionality of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). The present study aimed to delineate if T2DM and MetS cross-sectionally associate with altered CEC in a large high cardiometabolic risk population. CEC was determined from THP-1 macrophage foam cells towards apolipoprotein B-depleted plasma from 552 subjects of the CODAM cohort (288 controls, 126 impaired glucose metabolism [IGM], 138 T2DM). MetS was present in 297 participants. CEC was not different between different glucose tolerance categories but was lower in MetS (P < 0.001), at least partly attributable to lower HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and apoA-I levels (P < 0.001 for each). Low grade inflammation was increased in IGM, T2DM and MetS as determined by a score comprising 8 different biomarkers (P < 0.05-< 0.001; n = 547). CEC inversely associated with low-grade inflammation taking account of HDL-C or apoA-I in MetS (P < 0.02), but not in subjects without MetS (interaction: P = 0.015). This study demonstrates that IGM and T2DM do not impact the HDL CEC function, while efflux is lower in MetS, partly dependent on plasma HDL-C levels. Enhanced low-grade inflammation in MetS may conceivably impair CEC even independent of HDL-C and apoA-I. PMID:27270665

  9. 9-cis β-Carotene Increased Cholesterol Efflux to HDL in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bechor, Sapir; Zolberg Relevy, Noa; Harari, Ayelet; Almog, Tal; Kamari, Yehuda; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Harats, Dror; Shaish, Aviv

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a key process in reverse cholesterol transport and, therefore, might inhibit atherogenesis. 9-cis-β-carotene (9-cis-βc) is a precursor for 9-cis-retinoic-acid (9-cis-RA), which regulates macrophage cholesterol efflux. Our objective was to assess whether 9-cis-βc increases macrophage cholesterol efflux and induces the expression of cholesterol transporters. Enrichment of a mouse diet with βc from the alga Dunaliella led to βc accumulation in peritoneal macrophages. 9-cis-βc increased the mRNA levels of CYP26B1, an enzyme that regulates RA cellular levels, indicating the formation of RA from βc in RAW264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, 9-cis-βc, as well as all-trans-βc, significantly increased cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) by 50% in RAW264.7 macrophages. Likewise, food fortification with 9-cis-βc augmented cholesterol efflux from macrophages ex vivo. 9-cis-βc increased both the mRNA and protein levels of ABCA1 and apolipoprotein E (APOE) and the mRNA level of ABCG1. Our study shows, for the first time, that 9-cis-βc from the diet accumulates in peritoneal macrophages and increases cholesterol efflux to HDL. These effects might be ascribed to transcriptional induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and APOE. These results highlight the beneficial effect of βc in inhibition of atherosclerosis by improving cholesterol efflux from macrophages. PMID:27447665

  10. 9-cis β-Carotene Increased Cholesterol Efflux to HDL in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bechor, Sapir; Zolberg Relevy, Noa; Harari, Ayelet; Almog, Tal; Kamari, Yehuda; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Harats, Dror; Shaish, Aviv

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a key process in reverse cholesterol transport and, therefore, might inhibit atherogenesis. 9-cis-β-carotene (9-cis-βc) is a precursor for 9-cis-retinoic-acid (9-cis-RA), which regulates macrophage cholesterol efflux. Our objective was to assess whether 9-cis-βc increases macrophage cholesterol efflux and induces the expression of cholesterol transporters. Enrichment of a mouse diet with βc from the alga Dunaliella led to βc accumulation in peritoneal macrophages. 9-cis-βc increased the mRNA levels of CYP26B1, an enzyme that regulates RA cellular levels, indicating the formation of RA from βc in RAW264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, 9-cis-βc, as well as all-trans-βc, significantly increased cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) by 50% in RAW264.7 macrophages. Likewise, food fortification with 9-cis-βc augmented cholesterol efflux from macrophages ex vivo. 9-cis-βc increased both the mRNA and protein levels of ABCA1 and apolipoprotein E (APOE) and the mRNA level of ABCG1. Our study shows, for the first time, that 9-cis-βc from the diet accumulates in peritoneal macrophages and increases cholesterol efflux to HDL. These effects might be ascribed to transcriptional induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and APOE. These results highlight the beneficial effect of βc in inhibition of atherosclerosis by improving cholesterol efflux from macrophages. PMID:27447665

  11. β-COP as a Component of Transport Vesicles for HDL Apolipoprotein-Mediated Cholesterol Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Weilie; Lin, Margarita; Ding, Hang; Lin, Guorong; Zhang, Zhizhen

    2016-01-01

    Objective HDL and its apolipoproteins protect against atherosclerotic disease partly by removing excess cholesterol from macrophage foam cells. But the underlying mechanisms of cholesterol clearance are still not well defined. We investigated roles of vesicle trafficking of coatomer β-COP in delivering cholesterol to the cell surface during apoA-1 and apoE-mediated lipid efflux from fibroblasts and THP-1 macrophages. Methods shRNA knockout, confocal and electron microscopy and biochemical analysis were used to investigate the roles of β-COP in apolipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux in fibroblasts and THP-1 macrophages. Results We showed that β-COP knockdown by lentiviral shRNA resulted in reduced apoA-1-mediated cholesterol efflux, while increased cholesterol accumulation and formation of larger vesicles were observed in THP-1 macrophages by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Immunogold electron microscopy showed that β-COP appeared on the membrane protrusion complexes and colocalized with apoA-1 or apoE during cholesterol efflux. This was associated with releasing heterogeneous sizes of small particles into the culture media of THP-1 macrophage. Western blotting also showed that apoA-1 promotes β-COP translocation to the cell membrane and secretion into culture media, in which a total of 17 proteins were identified by proteomics. Moreover, β-COP exclusively associated with human plasma HDL fractions. Conclusion ApoA-1 and apoE promoted transport vesicles consisting of β-COP and other candidate proteins to exocytose cholesterol, forming the protrusion complexes on cell surface, which were then released from the cell membrane as small particles to media. PMID:26986486

  12. Association of HDL cholesterol efflux capacity with incident coronary heart disease events: a prospective case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Saleheen, Danish; Scott, Robert; Javad, Sundas; Zhao, Wei; Rodrigues, Amrith; Picataggi, Antonino; Lukmanova, Daniya; Mucksavage, Megan L; Luben, Robert; Billheimer, Jeffery; Kastelein, John J P; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Rader, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Although HDL cholesterol concentrations are strongly and inversely associated with risk of coronary heart disease, interventions that raise HDL cholesterol do not reduce risk of coronary heart disease. HDL cholesterol efflux capacity—a prototypical measure of HDL function—has been associated with coronary heart disease after adjusting for HDL cholesterol, but its effect on incident coronary heart disease risk is uncertain. Methods We measured cholesterol efflux capacity and assessed its relation with vascular risk factors and incident coronary heart disease events in a nested case-control sample from the prospective EPIC-Norfolk study of 25 639 individuals aged 40–79 years, assessed in 1993–97 and followed up to 2009. We quantified cholesterol efflux capacity in 1745 patients with incident coronary heart disease and 1749 control participants free of any cardiovascular disorders by use of a validated ex-vivo radiotracer assay that involved incubation of cholesterol-labelled J774 macrophages with apoB-depleted serum from study participants. Findings Cholesterol efflux capacity was positively correlated with HDL cholesterol concentration (r=0·40; p<0·0001) and apoA-I concentration (r=0·22; p<0·0001). It was also inversely correlated with type 2 diabetes (r=–0·18; p<0·0001) and positively correlated with alcohol consumption (r=0·12; p<0·0001). In analyses comparing the top and bottom tertiles, cholesterol efflux capacity was significantly and inversely associated with incident coronary heart disease events, independent of age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, smoking and alcohol use, waist:hip ratio, BMI, LDL cholesterol concentration, log-triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol or apoA-I concentrations (odds ratio 0·64, 95% CI 0·51–0·80). After a similar multivariable adjustment the risk of incident coronary heart disease was 0·80 (95% CI 0·70–0·90) for a per-SD change in cholesterol efflux capacity. Interpretation HDL

  13. Monogenic causes of elevated HDL cholesterol and implications for development of new therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Larach, Daniel B; Cuchel, Marina; Rader, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    Identification of the CETP, LIPG (encoding endothelial lipase) and APOC3 genes, and ana lysis of rare genetic variants in them, have allowed researchers to increase understanding of HDL metabolism significantly. However, development of cardiovascular risk-reducing therapeutics targeting the proteins encoded by these genes has been less straightforward. The failure of two CETP inhibitors is complex but illustrates a possible over-reliance on HDL cholesterol as a marker of therapeutic efficacy. The case of endothelial lipase exemplifies the importance of utilizing population-wide genetic studies of rare variants in potential therapeutic targets to gain information on cardiovascular disease end points. Similar population-wide studies of cardiovascular end points make apoC-III a potentially attractive target for lipid-related drug discovery. These three cases illustrate the positives and negatives of single-gene studies relating to HDL-related cardiovascular drug discovery; such studies should focus not only on HDL cholesterol and other components of the lipid profile, but also on the effect genetic variants have on cardiovascular end points. PMID:25374625

  14. Transient increase in HDL-cholesterol during weight gain by hyperalimentation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Torbjörn; Kechagias, Stergios; Carlsson, Martin; Nystrom, Fredrik H

    2011-04-01

    Determination of lipid levels is fundamental in cardiovascular risk assessment. We studied the short-term effects of fast food-based hyperalimentation on lipid levels in healthy subjects. Twelve healthy men and six healthy women with a mean age of 26 ± 6.6 years and an aged-matched control group were recruited for this prospective interventional study. Subjects in the intervention group aimed for a body weight increase of 5-15% by doubling the baseline caloric intake by eating at least two fast food-based meals a day in combination with adoption of a sedentary lifestyle for 4 weeks. This protocol induced a weight gain from 67.6 ± 9.1 kg to 74.0 ± 11 kg (P < 0.001). A numerical increase in the levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol occurred in all subjects during the study and this was apparent already at the first week in 16/18 subjects (mean increase at week 1: +22.0 ± 16%, range from -7 to +50%), whereas the highest level of HDL during the study as compared with baseline values varied from +6% to +58% (mean +31.6 ± 15%). The intake of saturated fat in the early phase of the trial related positively with the HDL-cholesterol-increase in the second week (r = 0.53, P = 0.028). Although the levels of insulin doubled at week 2, the increase in low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol was only +12 ± 17%, and there was no statistically significant changes in fasting serum triglycerides. We conclude that hyperalimentation can induce a fast but transient increase in HDL-cholesterol that is of clinical interest when estimating cardiovascular risk based on serum lipid levels. PMID:20814413

  15. Truncal and abdominal fat as determinants of high triglycerides and low HDL-cholesterol in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tresaco, Beatriz; Moreno, Luis A; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Ortega, Francisco B; Bueno, Gloria; González-Gross, Marcela; Wärnberg, Julia; Gutiérrez, Angel; García-Fuentes, Miguel; Marcos, Ascensión; Castillo, Manuel J; Bueno, Manuel

    2009-05-01

    We examined whether abdominal and truncal adiposity, assessed with simple anthropometric indices, determines serum triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels independently of total adiposity amount in adolescents. A total of 547 Spanish adolescents (284 males and 263 females) aged 13-18.5 years were included in this study. Measures of truncal adiposity included subscapular to triceps ratio, and trunk-to-total skinfolds ratio (TTS%). Waist circumference was used as a surrogate of abdominal adiposity, and BMI was used as a measure of total adiposity. The results of the regression models indicated that levels of triglycerides were positively associated with waist circumference and TTS% after controlling for age and Tanner stage in both sexes. Once BMI was entered in the model, these associations remained significant for waist circumference in females. HDL-cholesterol levels were negatively associated with waist circumference in both sexes, and with subscapular to triceps ratio and TTS% in males, after controlling for age and Tanner stage. Once BMI was entered in the model, these associations remained significant for subscapular to triceps ratio and for TTS% in males. The results of this study suggest that in male adolescents, truncal adiposity is negatively associated with levels of HDL-cholesterol, whereas in females, abdominal adiposity is positively associated with levels of triglycerides independently of total adiposity. These findings highlight the deleterious effect of both truncal and abdominal fat depots on the lipid profile already from the first decades of life. PMID:19180070

  16. Using advanced intercross lines for high-resolution mapping of HDL cholesterol quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaosong; Le Roy, Isabelle; Nicodeme, Edwige; Li, Renhua; Wagner, Richard; Petros, Christina; Churchill, Gary A; Harris, Stephen; Darvasi, Ariel; Kirilovsky, Jorge; Roubertoux, Pierre L; Paigen, Beverly

    2003-07-01

    Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with high resolution facilitates identification and positional cloning of the underlying genes. The novel approach of advanced intercross lines (AILs) generates many more recombination events and thus can potentially narrow QTLs significantly more than do conventional backcrosses and F2 intercrosses. In this study, we carried out QTL analyses in (C57BL/6J x NZB/BlNJ) x C57BL/6J backcross progeny fed either chow or an atherogenic diet to detect QTLs that regulate high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL)concentrations, and in (C57BL/6J x NZB/BlNJ) F11 AIL progeny to confirm and narrow those QTLs. QTLs for HDL concentrations were found on chromosomes 1, 5, and 16. AIL not only narrowed the QTLs significantly more than did a conventional backcross but also resolved a chromosome 5 QTL identified in the backcross into two QTLs, the peaks of both being outside the backcross QTL region. We tested 27 candidate genes and found significant mRNA expression differences for 12 (Nr1i3, Apoa2, Sap, Tgfb2, Fgfbp1, Prom, Ppargc1, Tcf1, Ncor2, Srb1, App, and Ifnar). Some of these underlay the same QTL, indicating that expression differences are common and not sufficient to identify QTL genes. All the major HDL QTLs in our study had homologous counterparts in humans, implying that their underlying genes regulate HDL in humans. PMID:12805272

  17. Using Advanced Intercross Lines for High-Resolution Mapping of HDL Cholesterol Quantitative Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaosong; Le Roy, Isabelle; Nicodeme, Edwige; Li, Renhua; Wagner, Richard; Petros, Christina; Churchill, Gary A.; Harris, Stephen; Darvasi, Ariel; Kirilovsky, Jorge; Roubertoux, Pierre L.; Paige, Beverly

    2003-01-01

    Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs)with high resolution facilitates identification and positional cloning of the underlying genes. The novel approach of advanced intercross lines (AILs) generates many more recombination events and thus can potentially narrow QTLs significantly more than do conventional backcrosses and F2 intercrosses. In this study, we carried out QTL analyses in (C57BL/6J × NZB/BlNJ)× C57BL/6J backcross progeny fed either chow or an atherogenic diet to detect QTLs that regulate high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL)concentrations, and in (C57BL/6J × NZB/BlNJ)F11 AIL progeny to confirm and narrow those QTLs. QTLs for HDL concentrations were found on chromosomes 1, 5, and 16. AIL not only narrowed the QTLs significantly more than did a conventional backcross but also resolved a chromosome 5 QTL identified in the backcross into two QTLs, the peaks of both being outside the backcross QTL region. We tested 27 candidate genes and found significant mRNA expression differences for 12 (Nr1i3, Apoa2, Sap, Tgfb2, Fgfbp1, Prom, Ppargc1, Tcf1, Ncor2, Srb1, App, and Ifnar). Some of these underlay the same QTL, indicating that expression differences are common and not sufficient to identify QTL genes. All the major HDL QTLs in our study had homologous counterparts in humans, implying that their underlying genes regulate HDL in humans. PMID:12805272

  18. Reference Ranges for Serum Total Cholesterol, HDL-Cholesterol, LDL-Cholesterol, and VLDL-Cholesterol and Triglycerides in Healthy Iranian Ahvaz Population.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Mohammad Taha; Honomaror, Abdolhosain Mosavi; Rekabi, Abdolkarim; Latifi, Mahmod

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are recognized as major mortality causes and imposes tremendously heavy socio-economic burden worldwide. A vast variety of risk factors have been introduced in the literature known to enhance the incidence of CVD, such as hyperlipidemia. Therefore in order to make an accurate clinical decision it is essential to have appropriate reference ranges for lipids and lipoprotein particles in a particular population. Healthy female (n = 601) and male (n = 617) cases were randomly selected according to certain exclusion criteria from individuals visiting the major University hospital clinics situated in different part of Ahvaz city, Iran, from June 2010 to December 2010. Fasting blood samples (10 ml) were collected and analyzed for total cholesterol, total triglyceride and HDL-C employing enzymatic assays of CHOD-PAP, GPO-PAP and homogenous methods respectively. The samples were obtained such to include the ethnic populations of Persian, Arab. Lore leaving in this city. The data were analyzed statistically by SPSS-18 software. The obtained results were analyzed then age ethnic-wise and reference ranges (mean ± 1SD) were calculated. Remarkable differences between the obtained results for our population with other nations were seen. Also ethnic difference for HDL-C among our cases was noted. The observed significant differences among different nations and ethnicities emphasizes the need for nation-specific, local reference ranges for lipids and lipoproteins particles, to be established. PMID:24426224

  19. Loss-of-function variants in endothelial lipase are a cause of elevated HDL cholesterol in humans

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Andrew C.; Brown, Robert J.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Demissie, Serkalem; Manning, Alisa Knodle; Jensen, Majken K.; Rimm, Eric B.; Wang, Jian; Rodrigues, Amrith; Bamba, Vaneeta; Khetarpal, Sumeet A.; Wolfe, Megan L.; DerOhannessian, Stephanie; Li, Mingyao; Reilly, Muredach P.; Aberle, Jens; Evans, David; Hegele, Robert A.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) are associated with protection from atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Animal models indicate that decreased expression of endothelial lipase (LIPG) is inversely associated with HDL-C levels, and genome-wide association studies have identified LIPG variants as being associated with HDL-C levels in humans. We hypothesized that loss-of-function mutations in LIPG may result in elevated HDL-C and therefore performed deep resequencing of LIPG exons in cases with elevated HDL-C levels and controls with decreased HDL-C levels. We identified a significant excess of nonsynonymous LIPG variants unique to cases with elevated HDL-C. In vitro lipase activity assays demonstrated that these variants significantly decreased endothelial lipase activity. In addition, a meta-analysis across 5 cohorts demonstrated that the low-frequency Asn396Ser variant is significantly associated with increased HDL-C, while the common Thr111Ile variant is not. Functional analysis confirmed that the Asn396Ser variant has significantly decreased lipase activity both in vitro and in vivo, while the Thr111Ile variant has normal lipase activity. Our results establish that loss-of-function mutations in LIPG lead to increased HDL-C levels and support the idea that inhibition of endothelial lipase may be an effective mechanism to raise HDL-C. PMID:19287092

  20. HDL functionality in reverse cholesterol transport--Challenges in translating data emerging from mouse models to human disease.

    PubMed

    Lee-Rueckert, Miriam; Escola-Gil, Joan Carles; Kovanen, Petri T

    2016-07-01

    Whereas LDL-derived cholesterol accumulates in atherosclerotic lesions, HDL particles are thought to facilitate removal of cholesterol from the lesions back to the liver thereby promoting its fecal excretion from the body. Because generation of cholesterol-loaded macrophages is inherent to atherogenesis, studies on the mechanisms stimulating the release of cholesterol from these cells and its ultimate excretion into feces are crucial to learn how to prevent lesion development or even induce lesion regression. Modulation of this key anti-atherogenic pathway, known as the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport, has been extensively studied in several mouse models with the ultimate aim of applying the emerging knowledge to humans. The present review provides a detailed comparison and critical analysis of the various steps of reverse cholesterol transport in mouse and man. We attempt to translate this in vivo complex scenario into practical concepts, which could serve as valuable tools when developing novel HDL-targeted therapies. PMID:26968096

  1. HDL derived from the different phases of conjugated diene formation reduces membrane fluidity and contributes to a decrease in free cholesterol efflux from human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Girona, Josefa; LaVille, Agnes E; Solà, Rosa; Motta, Claude; Masana, Lluís

    2003-09-22

    Oxidized HDL (ox-HDL) has been reported to reduce free cholesterol efflux from cells. In this study we investigate the effect of different stages of ox-HDL on macrophage membrane fluidity and its effect on free cholesterol efflux from macrophages as a cell function influenced by ox-HDL. HDL was oxidized by means of conjugated diene production using copper as a prooxidant. Fluidity of HDL and human THP-1 macrophage membranes was evaluated by changes in fluorescence anisotropy (r) by DPH probe where lower (r) values give higher fluidity. We found that ox-HDL derived from the propagation phase (PP-HDL) and the decomposition phase (DP-HDL) became less fluid ((r): 0.263+/-0.001, 0.279+/-0.002, respectively) than HDL from the lag phase (LP-HDL) and native HDL (nat-HDL) ((r): 0.206+/-0.001) (P<0.05). Macrophages incubated with PP-HDL and DP-HDL had less fluid membranes ((r): 0.231+/-0.001, 0.243+/-0.002, respectively) than those incubated with LP-HDL and nat-HDL ((r): 0.223+/-0.001) (P<0.05). Consequently, fluidity was reduced not only in ox-HDL but also in the cell membranes exposed to ox-HDL. A significant negative correlation was observed between macrophage membrane fluorescence anisotropy (r) and free cholesterol efflux from these cells (-0.876; P<0.05). Thus, lower membrane fluidity was associated with lower free cholesterol efflux from cells. In conclusion, the increase in the HDL oxidation process leads to a lost of macrophage membrane fluidity that could contribute to an explanation of the reduction of free cholesterol efflux from cells by ox-HDL. PMID:14499733

  2. A nutrient-dense, high-fiber, fruit-based supplement bar increases HDL cholesterol, particularly large HDL, lowers homocysteine, and raises glutathione in a 2-wk trial

    PubMed Central

    Mietus-Snyder, Michele L.; Shigenaga, Mark K.; Suh, Jung H.; Shenvi, Swapna V.; Lal, Ashutosh; McHugh, Tara; Olson, Don; Lilienstein, Joshua; Krauss, Ronald M.; Gildengoren, Ginny; McCann, Joyce C.; Ames, Bruce N.

    2012-01-01

    Dietary intake modulates disease risk, but little is known how components within food mixtures affect pathophysiology. A low-calorie, high-fiber, fruit-based nutrient-dense bar of defined composition (e.g., vitamins and minerals, fruit polyphenolics, β-glucan, docosahexaenoic acid) appropriate for deconstruction and mechanistic studies is described and evaluated in a pilot trial. The bar was developed in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Changes in cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk biomarkers were measured after 2 wk twice-daily consumption of the bar, and compared against baseline controls in 25 healthy adults. Plasma HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) increased 6.2% (P=0.001), due primarily to a 28% increase in large HDL (HDL-L; P<0.0001). Total plasma homocysteine (Hcy) decreased 19% (P=0.017), and glutathione (GSH) increased 20% (P=0.011). The changes in HDL and Hcy are in the direction associated with decreased risk of cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline; increased GSH reflects improved antioxidant defense. Changes in biomarkers linked to insulin resistance and inflammation were not observed. A defined food-based supplement can, within 2 wk, positively impact metabolic biomarkers linked to disease risk. These results lay the groundwork for mechanistic/deconstruction experiments to identify critical bar components and putative synergistic combinations responsible for observed effects.—Mietus-Snyder, M. L., Shigenaga, M. K., Suh, J. H., Shenvi, S. V., Lal, A., McHugh, T., Olson, D., Lilienstein, J., Krauss, R. M., Gildengoren, G., McCann, J. C., Ames, B. N. A nutrient-dense, high-fiber, fruit-based supplement bar increases HDL cholesterol, particularly large HDL, lowers homocysteine, and raises glutathione in a 2-wk trial. PMID:22549511

  3. Enhanced vascular permeability facilitates entry of plasma HDL and promotes macrophage-reverse cholesterol transport from skin in mice.

    PubMed

    Kareinen, Ilona; Cedó, Lídia; Silvennoinen, Reija; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka; Jauhiainen, Matti; Julve, Josep; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escola-Gil, Joan Carles; Kovanen, Petri T; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam

    2015-02-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) pathway from macrophage foam cells initiates when HDL particles cross the endothelium, enter the interstitial fluid, and induce cholesterol efflux from these cells. We injected [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded J774 macrophages into the dorsal skin of mice and measured the transfer of macrophage-derived [(3)H]cholesterol to feces [macrophage-RCT (m-RCT)]. Injection of histamine to the macrophage injection site increased locally vascular permeability, enhanced influx of intravenously administered HDL, and stimulated m-RCT from the histamine-treated site. The stimulatory effect of histamine on m-RCT was abolished by prior administration of histamine H1 receptor (H1R) antagonist pyrilamine, indicating that the histamine effect was H1R-dependent. Subcutaneous administration of two other vasoactive mediators, serotonin or bradykinin, and activation of skin mast cells to secrete histamine and other vasoactive compounds also stimulated m-RCT. None of the studied vasoactive mediators affected serum HDL levels or the cholesterol-releasing ability of J774 macrophages in culture, indicating that acceleration of m-RCT was solely due to increased availability of cholesterol acceptors in skin. We conclude that disruption of the endothelial barrier by vasoactive compounds enhances the passage of HDL into interstitial fluid and increases the rate of RCT from peripheral macrophage foam cells, which reveals a novel tissue cholesterol-regulating function of these compounds. PMID:25473102

  4. Evidence for a role of CETP in HDL remodeling and cholesterol efflux: role of cysteine 13 of CETP.

    PubMed

    Maugeais, Cyrille; Perez, Anne; von der Mark, Elisabeth; Magg, Christine; Pflieger, Philippe; Niesor, Eric J

    2013-11-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), a key regulator of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism, induces HDL remodeling by transferring lipids between apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and HDL, and/or by promoting lipid transfer between HDL subparticles. In this study, we investigated the mechanism as to how CETP induces the generation of lipid-poor particles (pre-β-HDL) from HDL, which increases ATP-binding cassette transporter 1-mediated cholesterol efflux. This CETP-dependent HDL remodeling is enhanced by the CETP modulator dalcetrapib both in plasma and isolated HDL. The interaction of dalcetrapib with cysteine 13 of CETP is required, since this effect was abolished when using mutant CETP in which cysteine 13 was substituted for a serine residue. Other thiol-containing compounds were identified as CETP modulators interacting with cysteine 13 of CETP. In order to mimic dalcetrapib-bound CETP, mutant CETP proteins were prepared by replacing cysteine 13 with the bulky amino acid tyrosine or tryptophan. The resultant mutants showed virtually no CETP-dependent lipid transfer activity but demonstrated preserved CETP-dependent pre-β-HDL generation. Overall, these data demonstrate that the two functions of CETP i.e., cholesteryl ester transfer and HDL remodeling can be uncoupled by interaction of thiol-containing compounds with cysteine 13 of CETP or by introducing large amino acid residues in place of cysteine 13. PMID:23872476

  5. Reflex Testing for Carbohydrate-Deficient Transferrin (CDT) in Insurance Applicants with Elevated High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (HDL).

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurmukh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives .- Ascertain the utility of testing carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) levels in insurance applicants with elevated high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) levels. Background .- Chronic alcoholism is not uncommon and is a risk factor for health and longevity and thus of interest to providers of insurance. A number of tests serve as markers of alcohol use, eg, blood alcohol level, elevated liver enzymes, ethyl glucuronide in urine, whole blood associated aldehyde (WBAA), macrocytosis, elevated HDL, elevated CDT and others. WBAA and CDT are usually only done, if some other screening test suggests alcohol use. HDL testing is routinely done for assessing cardiac risk, however, chronic alcohol intake tends to raise HDL and some insurance providers reflex to CDT testing when HDL is elevated. Methods .- A number of the clients of Heritage Labs Inc. have rules in place to test for CDT levels in specimens showing elevated HDL levels. The commonest HDL level that serves as the trigger for reflex testing for CDT is 80mg/dL. The results of this practice were analyzed to assess the utility of reflex testing for CDT to identify chronic alcohol abusers among the applicants. Results .- In examining the results of CDT levels done as a reflex test due to elevated HDL levels, about 2% of the applicants, 0.7% of women and 3% of men, tested positive for elevated CDT levels. Conclusions .- The incidence of elevated CDT levels is high enough to warrant routinely testing for this analyte in applicants, especially men, with high HDL levels. PMID:27584808

  6. A nutrient-dense, high-fiber, fruit-based supplement bar increases HDL cholesterol, particularly large HDL, lowers homocysteine, and raises glutathione in a 2-wk trial.

    PubMed

    Mietus-Snyder, Michele L; Shigenaga, Mark K; Suh, Jung H; Shenvi, Swapna V; Lal, Ashutosh; McHugh, Tara; Olson, Don; Lilienstein, Joshua; Krauss, Ronald M; Gildengoren, Ginny; McCann, Joyce C; Ames, Bruce N

    2012-08-01

    Dietary intake modulates disease risk, but little is known how components within food mixtures affect pathophysiology. A low-calorie, high-fiber, fruit-based nutrient-dense bar of defined composition (e.g., vitamins and minerals, fruit polyphenolics, β-glucan, docosahexaenoic acid) appropriate for deconstruction and mechanistic studies is described and evaluated in a pilot trial. The bar was developed in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Changes in cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk biomarkers were measured after 2 wk twice-daily consumption of the bar, and compared against baseline controls in 25 healthy adults. Plasma HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) increased 6.2% (P=0.001), due primarily to a 28% increase in large HDL (HDL-L; P<0.0001). Total plasma homocysteine (Hcy) decreased 19% (P=0.017), and glutathione (GSH) increased 20% (P=0.011). The changes in HDL and Hcy are in the direction associated with decreased risk of cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline; increased GSH reflects improved antioxidant defense. Changes in biomarkers linked to insulin resistance and inflammation were not observed. A defined food-based supplement can, within 2 wk, positively impact metabolic biomarkers linked to disease risk. These results lay the groundwork for mechanistic/deconstruction experiments to identify critical bar components and putative synergistic combinations responsible for observed effects. PMID:22549511

  7. Marrubium vulgare extract inhibits human-LDL oxidation and enhances HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophage.

    PubMed

    Berrougui, Hicham; Isabelle, Maxim; Cherki, Mounia; Khalil, Abdelouahed

    2006-12-14

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the beneficial properties of aqueous extracts of Marrubium vulgare (AEM) towards cardiovascular disease by protecting human-LDL against lipid peroxidation and promoting HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux. Human-LDL were oxidised by incubation with CuSO(4) in the presence of increased concentrations of AEM (0-100 microg/ml). LDL lipid peroxidation was evaluated by conjugated diene formation, vitamin E disappearance as well as LDL-electrophoretic mobility. HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux assay was carried out in human THP-1 macrophages. Incubation of LDL with AEM significantly prolonged the lag phase (P=0.014), lowered the progression rate of lipid peroxidation (P=0.004), reduced the disappearance of vitamin E and the electrophoretic mobility in a dose-dependent manner. Also, incubation of HDL with AEM significantly increased HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from THP-1 macrophages implicating an independent ATP binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) pathways. Our findings suggest that M. vulgare provides a source of natural antioxidants, which inhibit LDL oxidation and enhance reverse cholesterol transport and thus can prevent cardiovascular diseases development. These antioxidant properties increase the anti-atherogenic potential of HDL. PMID:17045616

  8. Gene Therapy Targeting LDL Cholesterol but not HDL Cholesterol Induces Regression of Advanced Atherosclerosis in a Mouse Model of Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongying; Chao, Hsu; Ko, Kerry W.S.; Cormier, Shelley; Dieker, Carrie; Nour, Elie A.; Wang, Shining; Chan, Lawrence; Oka, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A reduction in low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol or an increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol can reduce the risk of development of atherosclerosis through overlapping or independent mechanisms. However, the clinical outcome of combined therapy remains in debate. In this study, we first characterized effects of various constructs of helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAd) expressing apolipoprotein E3 or LDL receptor (LDLR) in vivo on plasma cholesterol levels. Using this information, we designed experiments and compared the effects of long-term (28 weeks) LDL cholesterol lowering or raising HDL cholesterol, or a combination of both on advanced atherosclerosis in Ldlr−/− mice, a mouse model of familial hypercholesterolemia. Our major findings are: (i) various factors influence in vivo functional activity, which appear to be context dependent; (ii) apolipoprotein AI (APOAI) gene transfer, which raises HDL cholesterol, retards progression of atherosclerosis but does not induce regression; (iii) LDLR or LDLR and APOAI combination gene therapy induces lesion regression; however, LDLR gene transfer accounts for the majority of the effects of combined gene therapy; (iv) LDLR gene therapy reduces interleukin-7, which is a master regulator of T-cell homeostasis, but APOAI gene therapy does not. These results indicate that LDL cholesterol lowering is effective and sufficient in protection against atherosclerosis and induction of regression of pre-existing atherosclerosis. PMID:23106034

  9. Unacylated Ghrelin is associated with the isolated low HDL-cholesterol obese phenotype independently of insulin resistance and CRP level

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Low plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) level is commonly present in obesity and represents an independent cardiovascular risk factor. However, obese patients are a very heterogeneous population and the factors and mechanisms that contribute to low HDL-c remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between plasma HDL-c levels and plasma hormonal profiles (insulin, adiponectin, resistin, leptin and ghrelin) in subsets of class II and III obese patients. Methods Fasting plasma levels of glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-c, HDL-c, triglycerides, free fatty acids, apoproteins A-I, B-100, B-48, C-II, C-III, insulin, hs-CRP, adipocytokines (adiponectin, resistin, leptin), unacylated ghrelin, body composition (DXA) and resting energy expenditure were measured in three subsets of obese patients: 17 metabolically abnormal obese (MAO) with metabolic syndrome and the typical metabolic dyslipidaemia, 21 metabolically healthy obese (MHO) without metabolic syndrome and with a normal lipid profile, and 21 isolated low HDL-c obese patients (LHO) without metabolic syndrome, compared to 21 healthy lean control subjects. Results Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) increased gradually from MHO to LHO and from LHO to MAO patients (p < 0.05 between MHO and MAO and between LHO and MAO). In multiple regression analysis, serum unacylated ghrelin levels were only positively and independently associated with HDL-c levels in the LHO group (p = 0.032). Conclusions These results suggest that, in class II and III obese patients with an isolated low HDL-c phenotype, unacylated ghrelin is positively associated with HDL-c level independently of insulin resistance and CRP levels, and may contribute to the highly prevalent low HDL-c level seen in obesity. PMID:22413940

  10. Variation in the Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Gamma Gene Affects Plasma HDL-Cholesterol without Modification of Metabolic or Inflammatory Markers

    PubMed Central

    Kächele, Martin; Hennige, Anita M.; Machann, Jürgen; Hieronimus, Anja; Lamprinou, Apostolia; Machicao, Fausto; Schick, Fritz; Fritsche, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Nürnberg, Bernd; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Staiger, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Objective Phosphoinositide 3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ) is a G-protein-coupled receptor-activated lipid kinase mainly expressed in leukocytes and cells of the cardiovascular system. PI3Kγ plays an important signaling role in inflammatory processes. Since subclinical inflammation is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, obesity-related insulin resistance, and pancreatic β-cell failure, we asked whether common genetic variation in the PI3Kγ gene (PIK3CG) contributes to body fat content/distribution, serum adipokine/cytokine concentrations, alterations in plasma lipid profiles, insulin sensitivity, insulin release, and glucose homeostasis. Study Design Using a tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) approach, we analyzed genotype-phenotype associations in 2,068 German subjects genotyped for 10 PIK3CG SNPs and characterized by oral glucose tolerance tests. In subgroups, data from hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the liver, whole-body magnetic resonance imaging, and intravenous glucose tolerance tests were available, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used for gene expression analysis. Results After appropriate adjustment, none of the PIK3CG tagging SNPs was significantly associated with body fat content/distribution, adipokine/cytokine concentrations, insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, or blood glucose concentrations (p>0.0127, all; Bonferroni-corrected α-level: 0.0051). However, six non-linked SNPs displayed at least nominal associations with plasma HDL-cholesterol concentrations, two of them (rs4288294 and rs116697954) reaching the level of study-wide significance (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.0004, respectively). More precisely, rs4288294 and rs116697954 influenced HDL2-, but not HDL3-, cholesterol. With respect to the SNPs’ in vivo functionality, rs4288294 was significantly associated with PIK3CG mRNA expression in PBMCs. Conclusions We could demonstrate that common genetic variation in the PIK3CG locus, possibly

  11. Spontaneous remodeling of HDL particles at acidic pH enhances their capacity to induce cholesterol efflux from human macrophage foam cells[S

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Su Duy; Öörni, Katariina; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam; Pihlajamaa, Tero; Metso, Jari; Jauhiainen, Matti; Kovanen, Petri T.

    2012-01-01

    HDL particles may enter atherosclerotic lesions having an acidic intimal fluid. Therefore, we investigated whether acidic pH would affect their structural and functional properties. For this purpose, HDL2 and HDL3 subfractions were incubated for various periods of time at different pH values ranging from 5.5 to 7.5, after which their protein and lipid compositions, size, structure, and cholesterol efflux capacity were analyzed. Incubation of either subfraction at acidic pH induced unfolding of apolipoproteins, which was followed by release of lipid-poor apoA-I and ensuing fusion of the HDL particles. The acidic pH-modified HDL particles exhibited an enhanced ability to promote cholesterol efflux from cholesterol-laden primary human macrophages. Importantly, treatment of the acidic pH-modified HDL with the mast cell-derived protease chymase completely depleted the newly generated lipid-poor apoA-I, and prevented the acidic pH-dependent increase in cholesterol efflux. The above-found pH-dependent structural and functional changes were stronger in HDL3 than in HDL2. Spontaneous acidic pH-induced remodeling of mature spherical HDL particles increases HDL-induced cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells, and therefore may have atheroprotective effects. PMID:22855736

  12. Identification of four novel genes contributing to familial elevated plasma HDL cholesterol in humans.

    PubMed

    Singaraja, Roshni R; Tietjen, Ian; Hovingh, G Kees; Franchini, Patrick L; Radomski, Chris; Wong, Kenny; vanHeek, Margaret; Stylianou, Ioannis M; Lin, Linus; Wang, Liangsu; Mitnaul, Lyndon; Hubbard, Brian; Winther, Michael; Mattice, Maryanne; Legendre, Annick; Sherrington, Robin; Kastelein, John J; Akinsanya, Karen; Plump, Andrew; Hayden, Michael R

    2014-08-01

    While genetic determinants strongly influence HDL cholesterol (HDLc) levels, most genetic causes underlying variation in HDLc remain unknown. We aimed to identify novel rare mutations with large effects in candidate genes contributing to extreme HDLc in humans, utilizing family-based Mendelian genetics. We performed next-generation sequencing of 456 candidate HDLc-regulating genes in 200 unrelated probands with extremely low (≤10th percentile) or high (≥90th percentile) HDLc. Probands were excluded if known mutations existed in the established HDLc-regulating genes ABCA1, APOA1, LCAT, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), endothelial lipase (LIPG), and UDP-N-acetyl-α-D-galactosamine:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 2 (GALNT2). We identified 93 novel coding or splice-site variants in 72 candidate genes. Each variant was genotyped in the proband's family. Family-based association analyses were performed for variants with sufficient power to detect significance at P < 0.05 with a total of 627 family members being assessed. Mutations in the genes glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR), RNase L (RNASEL), leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor 3 (LILRA3), and dynein axonemal heavy chain 10 (DNAH10) segregated with elevated HDLc levels in families, while no mutations associated with low HDLc. Taken together, we have identified mutations in four novel genes that may play a role in regulating HDLc levels in humans. PMID:24891332

  13. Genetic-epidemiological evidence on genes associated with HDL cholesterol levels: A systematic in-depth review

    PubMed Central

    Boes, Eva; Coassin, Stefan; Kollerits, Barbara; Heid, Iris M.; Kronenberg, Florian

    2009-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles exhibit multiple antiatherogenic effects. They are key players in the reverse cholesterol transport which shuttles cholesterol from peripheral cells (e.g. macrophages) to the liver or other tissues. This complex process is thought to represent the basis for the antiatherogenic properties of HDL particles. The amount of cholesterol transported in HDL particles is measured as HDL cholesterol (HDLC) and is inversely correlated with the risk for coronary artery disease: an increase of 1 mg/dL of HDLC levels is associated with a 2% and 3% decrease of the risk for coronary artery disease in men and women, respectively. Genetically determined conditions with high HDLC levels (e.g. familial hyperalphalipoproteinemia) often coexist with longevity, and higher HDLC levels were found among healthy elderly individuals. HDLC levels are under considerable genetic control with heritability estimates of up to 80%. The identification and characterization of genetic variants associated with HDLC concentrations can provide new insights into the background of longevity. This review provides an extended overview on the current genetic-epidemiological evidence from association studies on genes involved in HDLC metabolism. It provides a path through the jungle of association studies which are sometimes confusing due to the varying and sometimes erroneous names of genetic variants, positions and directions of associations. Furthermore, it reviews the recent findings from genome-wide association studies which have identified new genes influencing HDLC levels. The yet identified genes together explain only a small amount of less than 10% of the HDLC variance, which leaves an enormous room for further yet to be identified genetic variants. This might be accomplished by large population-based genome-wide meta-analyses and by deep-sequencing approaches on the identified genes. The resulting findings will probably result in a re-drawing and extension of

  14. HDL cholesterol: all hope is not lost after the torcetrapib setback--emerging therapeutic strategies on the horizon.

    PubMed

    Verma, Nitin; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2014-01-01

    Lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) has been definitely shown to reduce cardiovascular events and improve clinical outcomes in the literature. As a result, LDL lowering has become the cornerstone of therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular disease prevention. Recently, there has been a focus on targeting other lipid fractions to improve the clinical risk profile of patients. Raising high-density lipoprotein (HDL) has received considerable attention. Low HDL levels are often seen in combination with elevated triglyceride levels. New therapeutic modalities are being developed to increase HDL levels. Recent failure of agents such as cholesteryl ester transferase protein inhibitor torcetrapib has highlighted the importance of measuring functionality of HDL particles and not just focus quantitatively on HDL-C levels. The heterogeneity of HDL within the systemic circulation results from constant remodeling of particles in response to several factors. Established dyslipidemia therapies such as stains, fibrates, and niacin have already been well known in the literature to have a substantial benefit. Lifestyle changes such as smoking cessation and moderate alcohol consumption have also shown to have some benefit. Several novel HDL therapies are currently being developed, but only the cholesteryl ester transferase protein inhibitors have received considerable attention. Although torcetrapib has received some negative attention due to adverse effects, this overall class of therapeutic agents still holds a lot of promise. Newer agents without the concerned toxicities are currently being developed. ApoA-1-related peptides, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists, endothelial lipase inhibitors, and liver X receptor agonists are some of the other novel agents currently in various stages of development. PMID:22967983

  15. Beneficial effects of artichoke leaf extract supplementation on increasing HDL-cholesterol in subjects with primary mild hypercholesterolaemia: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Rondanelli, Mariangela; Giacosa, Attilio; Opizzi, Annalisa; Faliva, Milena Anna; Sala, Patrizio; Perna, Simone; Riva, Antonella; Morazzoni, Paolo; Bombardelli, Ezio

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of artichoke leaf extract (ALE) supplementation (250 mg, 2 b.i.d.) on the lipid pattern. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed on 92 overweight subjects with primary mild hypercholesterolaemia for 8 weeks. Forty-six subjects were randomized to supplementation (age: 54.2 ± 6.6 years, body mass index (BMI): 25.8 ± 3.9 kg/m(2), male/female: 20/26) and 46 subjects to placebo (age: 53.8 ± 9.0 years, BMI: 24.8 ± 1.6 kg/m(2), male/female: 21/25). Verum supplementation was associated with a significant increase in mean high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (p < 0.001) and in mean change in HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) (p = 0.004). A significantly decreased difference was also found for the mean change in total cholesterol (p = 0.033), low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (p < 0.001), total cholesterol/HDL ratio (p < 0.001) and LDL/HDL ratio (p < 0.001), when verum and placebo treatment were compared. These results indicate that ALE could play a relevant role in the management of mild hypercholesterolaemia, favouring in particular the increase in HDL-C, besides decreasing total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol. PMID:22746542

  16. Effects of extended-release niacin/laropiprant, simvastatin, and the combination on correlations between apolipoprotein B, LDL cholesterol, and non-HDL cholesterol in patients with dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Farnier, Michel; Chen, Erluo; Johnson-Levonas, Amy O; McCrary Sisk, Christine; Mitchel, Yale B

    2014-01-01

    Background Statins modify correlations between apolipoprotein B (apoB) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and apoB and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C); however, it is not known whether niacin-based therapies have similar effects. Objective To evaluate the effects of extended-release niacin (ERN)/laropiprant (LRPT), simvastatin (SIMVA), and ERN/LRPT + SIMVA (pooled ERN/LRPT + SIMVA) on apoB:LDL-C and apoB:non-HDL-C correlations in dyslipidemic patients. Methods This post-hoc analysis of a 12-week study evaluated the apoB:LDL-C and apoB:non-HDL-C correlations in dyslipidemic patients randomized equally to double-blind ERN/LRPT 1 g/20 mg, SIMVA 10, 20, or 40 mg, or ERN/LRPT 1 g/20 mg + SIMVA (10, 20, or 40 mg) once daily for 4 weeks. At week 5, doses were doubled in all groups except SIMVA 40 mg (unchanged) and ERN/LRPT 1 g/20 mg + SIMVA 40 mg (switched to ERN/LRPT 2 g/40 mg + SIMVA 40 mg). Simple linear regression analyses were used to calculate LDL-C and non-HDL-C levels corresponding to known apoB baseline values (ie, in untreated patients) and following treatment. Results The apoB:LDL-C and apoB:non-HDL-C correlations were higher and the predicted LDL-C and non-HDL-C levels for a known apoB value were considerably lower following treatment with ERN/LRPT, SIMVA and ERN/LRPT + SIMVA compared with untreated patients at baseline. Conclusion Greater dissociation of apoB, LDL-C, and non-HDL-C targets occur following treatment with ERN/LRPT, SIMVA, and ERN/LRPT + SIMVA in patients with dyslipidemia. The achievement of more aggressive LDL-C and non-HDL-C goals in patients receiving lipid-modifying therapy may further reduce coronary risk by normalizing apoB-containing atherogenic lipoproteins. PMID:24855368

  17. Impairment of the ABCA1 and SR-BI-mediated cholesterol efflux pathways and HDL anti-inflammatory activity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Abdelouahed; Berrougui, Hicham; Pawelec, Graham; Fulop, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of Alzheimer's disease (AD) on the cholesterol efflux capacity and anti-inflammatory activity of HDL. HDL and apoA-I were isolated from 20 healthy subjects and from 39 AD patients. Our results showed that serum- and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux is significantly impaired in AD patients. This impairment of serum and HDL cholesterol efflux capacity was significantly inversely correlated to the AD severity as evaluated by MMSE scores. Results obtained from SR-BI-enriched Fu5AH and ABCA1-enriched J774 cells revealed that AD impaired the interaction of HDL and apoA-I with both the ABCA1 transporter and SR-BI receptor. Purified apoA-I from AD patients also failed to remove free excess cholesterol from ABCA1-enriched J774 macrophages. Interestingly, the decrease in plasma α-tocopherol content and the increase in MDA formation and HDL relative electrophoretic mobility indicated that AD patients had higher levels of oxidative stress. The anti-inflammatory activity of HDL was also significantly lower in AD patients as measured by the level of ICAM-1 expression. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for the first time that the functionality of HDL is impaired in AD and that this alteration might be caused by AD-associated oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:22178419

  18. Cholesterol stimulation of HDL binding to human endothelial cells EAhy 926 and skin fibroblasts: evidence for a mechanism independent of cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bernini, F; Bellosta, S; Corsini, A; Maggi, F M; Fumagalli, R; Catapano, A L

    1991-04-24

    The properties of the HDL binding site on the permanent human cell line EAhy 926 were studied. This cell line presents with highly differentiated functions of vascular endothelium. EAhy 926 cells possess HDL3 saturable binding sites with a Kd of about 20 micrograms/ml, which were up-regulated by cholesterol and were pronase- and EDTA-insensitive. Furthermore, HDL3 promoted cholesterol efflux from EAhy 926 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the HDL-binding site in EAhy 926 cells is similar to that present in fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. Up-regulation of HDL binding by cholesterol did not require de novo synthesis of HDL 'receptor' protein, as shown by the lack of effect of cycloheximide and alpha-amanitin and also occurred in fixed, non-living cells. Similar results were obtained using human skin fibroblasts. From these data we conclude that: (a) EAhy 926 cells are a good model for studying the HDL interaction with endothelial cells; (b) a mechanism independent of cellular metabolism is involved in the cholesterol-mediated up-regulation of HDL binding sites in EAhy 926 cells and human skin fibroblasts. PMID:1851638

  19. A thiocarbamate inhibitor of endothelial lipase raises HDL cholesterol levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Greco, M N; Connelly, M A; Leo, G C; Olson, M W; Powell, E; Huang, Z; Hawkins, M; Smith, C; Schalk-Hihi, C; Darrow, A L; Xin, H; Lang, W; Damiano, B P; Hlasta, D J

    2013-05-01

    By screening directed libraries of serine hydrolase inhibitors using the cell surface form of endothelial lipase (EL), we identified a series of carbamate-derived (EL) inhibitors. Compound 3 raised plasma HDL-C levels in the mouse, and a correlation was found between HDL-C and plasma compound levels. Spectroscopic and kinetic studies support a covalent mechanism of inhibition. Our findings represent the first report of EL inhibition as an effective means for increasing HDL-C in an in vivo model. PMID:23528297

  20. Cynanchum wilfordii ameliorates hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in rats fed with high fat/cholesterol diets.

    PubMed

    Choi, Deok Ho; Lee, Yun Jung; Kim, Jin Sook; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-02-01

    Hypercholesterolemia increases the incidence of atherosclerosis and its pathologic complications. This study was performed to test the effect of an ethanol extract of Cynanchum wilfordii (ECW) on vascular dysfunction in rats fed with high fat/cholesterol diets (HFCD). Male rats were fed a HFCD consisting of 7.5% cocoa butter and 1.25% cholesterol, with or without 100, 200 mg/day/kg ECW. Rats fed with HFCD increased body weight associated with an increase in plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level. Chronic ECW treatment in HFCD-fed rats lessened LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels as well as elevated high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Chronic ECW treatment recovered the HFCD-induced increase in systolic blood pressure, maintained smooth and soft intima endothelial layers by the decrease of intima-media thickness. ECW significantly recovered the diet-induced decrease in vasorelaxation to acetylcholine, high-dose ECW apparently increased vasorelaxation response to sodium nitroprusside in rats fed with HFCD. ECW clearly restored the HFCD-induced reduction in endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression and Akt expression levels in aortic tissue, leading to improve endothelial function through an increase in endothelium-derived NO production. Furthermore, treatment of ECW significantly recovered the HFCD-induced decrease in aortic cGMP levels in rats. These findings suggest that ECW ameliorates hypertension and endothelial dysfunction via improvement of NO/cGMP signaling pathway in aortic tissue of rats fed with HFCD, suggesting a vascular protective role for this herb in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:22176675

  1. Serum amyloid A impairs the antiinflammatory properties of HDL

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chang Yeop; Tang, Chongren; Guevara, Myriam E.; Wei, Hao; Wietecha, Tomasz; Shao, Baohai; Subramanian, Savitha; Omer, Mohamed; Wang, Shari; O’Brien, Kevin D.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Wight, Thomas N.; Vaisar, Tomas; de Beer, Maria C.; de Beer, Frederick C.; Osborne, William R.; Elkon, Keith B.; Chait, Alan

    2015-01-01

    HDL from healthy humans and lean mice inhibits palmitate-induced adipocyte inflammation; however, the effect of the inflammatory state on the functional properties of HDL on adipocytes is unknown. Here, we found that HDL from mice injected with AgNO3 fails to inhibit palmitate-induced inflammation and reduces cholesterol efflux from 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Moreover, HDL isolated from obese mice with moderate inflammation and humans with systemic lupus erythematosus had similar effects. Since serum amyloid A (SAA) concentrations in HDL increase with inflammation, we investigated whether elevated SAA is a causal factor in HDL dysfunction. HDL from AgNO3-injected mice lacking Saa1.1 and Saa2.1 exhibited a partial restoration of antiinflammatory and cholesterol efflux properties in adipocytes. Conversely, incorporation of SAA into HDL preparations reduced antiinflammatory properties but not to the same extent as HDL from AgNO3-injected mice. SAA-enriched HDL colocalized with cell surface–associated extracellular matrix (ECM) of adipocytes, suggesting impaired access to the plasma membrane. Enzymatic digestion of proteoglycans in the ECM restored the ability of SAA-containing HDL to inhibit palmitate-induced inflammation and cholesterol efflux. Collectively, these findings indicate that inflammation results in a loss of the antiinflammatory properties of HDL on adipocytes, which appears to partially result from the SAA component of HDL binding to cell-surface proteoglycans, thereby preventing access of HDL to the plasma membrane. PMID:26642365

  2. Serum amyloid A impairs the antiinflammatory properties of HDL.

    PubMed

    Han, Chang Yeop; Tang, Chongren; Guevara, Myriam E; Wei, Hao; Wietecha, Tomasz; Shao, Baohai; Subramanian, Savitha; Omer, Mohamed; Wang, Shari; O'Brien, Kevin D; Marcovina, Santica M; Wight, Thomas N; Vaisar, Tomas; de Beer, Maria C; de Beer, Frederick C; Osborne, William R; Elkon, Keith B; Chait, Alan

    2016-01-01

    HDL from healthy humans and lean mice inhibits palmitate-induced adipocyte inflammation; however, the effect of the inflammatory state on the functional properties of HDL on adipocytes is unknown. Here, we found that HDL from mice injected with AgNO3 fails to inhibit palmitate-induced inflammation and reduces cholesterol efflux from 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Moreover, HDL isolated from obese mice with moderate inflammation and humans with systemic lupus erythematosus had similar effects. Since serum amyloid A (SAA) concentrations in HDL increase with inflammation, we investigated whether elevated SAA is a causal factor in HDL dysfunction. HDL from AgNO3-injected mice lacking Saa1.1 and Saa2.1 exhibited a partial restoration of antiinflammatory and cholesterol efflux properties in adipocytes. Conversely, incorporation of SAA into HDL preparations reduced antiinflammatory properties but not to the same extent as HDL from AgNO3-injected mice. SAA-enriched HDL colocalized with cell surface-associated extracellular matrix (ECM) of adipocytes, suggesting impaired access to the plasma membrane. Enzymatic digestion of proteoglycans in the ECM restored the ability of SAA-containing HDL to inhibit palmitate-induced inflammation and cholesterol efflux. Collectively, these findings indicate that inflammation results in a loss of the antiinflammatory properties of HDL on adipocytes, which appears to partially result from the SAA component of HDL binding to cell-surface proteoglycans, thereby preventing access of HDL to the plasma membrane. PMID:26642365

  3. A Common CNR1 (Cannabinoid Receptor 1) Haplotype Attenuates the Decrease in HDL Cholesterol That Typically Accompanies Weight Gain

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qiping; Jiang, Lan; Berg, Richard L.; Antonik, Melissa; MacKinney, Erin; Gunnell-Santoro, Jennifer; McCarty, Catherine A.; Wilke, Russell A.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that genetic variability in CNR1 is associated with low HDL dyslipidemia in a multigenerational obesity study cohort of Northern European descent (209 families, median  = 10 individuals per pedigree). In order to assess the impact of CNR1 variability on the development of dyslipidemia in the community, we genotyped this locus in all subjects with class III obesity (body mass index >40 kg/m2) participating in a population-based biobank of similar ancestry. Twenty-two haplotype tagging SNPs, capturing the entire CNR1 gene locus plus 15 kb upstream and 5 kb downstream, were genotyped and tested for association with clinical lipid data. This biobank contains data from 645 morbidly obese study subjects. In these subjects, a common CNR1 haplotype (H3, frequency 21.1%) is associated with fasting TG and HDL cholesterol levels (p = 0.031 for logTG; p = 0.038 for HDL-C; p = 0.00376 for log[TG/HDL-C]). The strength of this relationship increases when the data are adjusted for age, gender, body mass index, diet and physical activity. Mean TG levels were 160±70, 155±70, and 120±60 mg/dL for subjects with 0, 1, and 2 copies of the H3 haplotype. Mean HDL-C levels were 45±10, 47±10, and 48±9 mg/dL, respectively. The H3 CNR1 haplotype appears to exert a protective effect against development of obesity-related dyslipidemia. PMID:21209828

  4. Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Genetic Polymorphisms, HDL Cholesterol, and Subclinical Cardiovascular Disease in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Michael Y.; Johnson, Craig; Kao, W.H. Linda; Sharrett, A. Richey; Arends, Valerie L.; Kronmal, Richard; Jenny, Nancy Swords; Jacobs, David R.; Arnett, Donna; O’Leary, Daniel; Post, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The cholesteryl ester transport protein (CETP) plays a key role in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. Genetic variants that alter CETP activity and concentration may cause significant alterations in HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration; however, controversies remain about whether these genetic variants are associated with atherosclerosis. We genotyped the CETP R451Q, A373P, -629C/A, Taq1B, and -2505C/A polymorphisms in a cohort of Caucasian, Chinese, African-American, and Hispanic individuals within the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Genotypes were examined in relationship to HDL-C, CETP activity, CETP concentration, and three measures of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD): coronary artery calcium (CAC) measured by fast CT scanning, and carotid intimal-medial thickness (IMT) and carotid artery plaque, measured by ultrasonography. Carriers of the 451Q and 373P alleles have significantly higher CETP concentration (22.4% and 19.5%, respectively; p<0.001) and activity (13.1% and 9.4%, respectively; p<0.01) and lower HDL-C (5.6% and 6.0%, respectively; p<0.05). The minor alleles of the R451Q and A373P polymorphisms are associated with the presence of CAC, even after adjusting for CVD risk factors and HDL-C (p=0.006 and p=0.01, respectively). The R451Q polymorphism is also associated with presence of carotid artery plaque (p=0.036). Neither polymorphism is associated with common or internal carotid IMT. We confirmed that the -629A, Taq1B B2, and -2505A alleles are significantly associated with lower CETP concentration (20.8%, 25.0%, and 23.7%, respectively; p<0.001) and activity (14.8%, 19.8%, and 18.4%, respectively; p<0.001) and higher HDL-C concentration (9.7%, 11.5%, and 10.4%, respectively; p<0.01). However, we did not find any associations between these non-coding polymorphisms and subclinical CVD. PMID:18243217

  5. The importance of low serum levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) as a cardiovascular risk factor.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Larrañaga, Francisco; Vejar-Jalaf, Margarita; Medina-Santillán, Roberto

    2005-10-01

    In order to discuss and establish a joint position on the treatment of low serum levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), a group of experts involved in the care of people with dyslipidaemia and at risk of cardiovascular disease met in Miami, Florida, U.S., on 5th and 6th March 2005. The experts came from the Latin American countries Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico and Venezuela and had at least five years of experience in the care of patients with dyslipidaemia and low HDL-C. The main objective of the meeting was to discuss and propose a treatment for low serum HDL-C levels as a cardiovascular risk factor in patients and to create a group of useful recommendations in this regard, applicable to the daily clinical practice of physicians dealing with patients with dyslipidaemia and cardiovascular disease. This document describes the methodology developed to obtain these recommendations and presents the results of this academic meeting. PMID:16342610

  6. The effect of quitting smoking on HDL-cholesterol - a review based on within-subject changes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A higher concentration of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in ex-smokers than smokers has consistently been observed. Better evidence of quitting effects comes from within-subject changes. We extend an earlier meta-analysis to quantify the reduction, and investigate variation by time quit and other factors. We conducted Medline and Cochrane searches for studies measuring HDL-C in subjects while still smoking and later having quit. Using unweighted and inverse-variance weighted regression analysis, we related changes (in mmol/l) to intra-measurement period, and estimated time quit, and to study type, location and start year, age, sex, product smoked, validation of quitting, baseline HDL-C, baseline and change in weight/BMI, and any study constraints on diet or exercise. Forty-five studies were identified (17 Europe, 16 North America, 11 Asia, 1 Australia). Thirteen were observational, giving changes over at least 12 months, with most involving >1000 subjects. Others were smoking cessation trials, 12 randomized and 20 non-randomized. These were often small (18 of <100 subjects) and short (14 of <10 weeks, the longest a year). Thirty studies provided results for only one time interval. From 94 estimates of HDL-C change, the unweighted mean was 0.107 (95% CI 0.085-0.128). The weighted mean 0.060 (0.044 to 0.075) was lower, due to smaller estimates in longer term studies. Weighted means varied by time quit (0.083, 0.112, 0.111, 0.072, 0.058 and 0.040 for <3, 3 to <6, 6 to <13, 13 to <27, 27 to <52 and 52+ weeks, p=0.006). After adjustment for time quit, estimates varied by study constraint on diet/exercise (p=0.003), being higher in studies requiring subjects to maintain their pre-quitting habits, but no other clear differences were seen, with significant (p<0.05) increases following quitting being evident in all subgroups studied, except where data were very limited. For both continuing and never smokers, the data are (except for two large studies

  7. Adverse effect of pregnancy on high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in young adult women. The CARDIA Study. Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Lewis, C E; Funkhouser, E; Raczynski, J M; Sidney, S; Bild, D E; Howard, B V

    1996-08-01

    The authors analyzed data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study in order to examine associations between parity and lipoproteins. Of 2,787 women recruited in 1985-1986, 2,534 (91%) returned in 1987-1988 and 2,393 (86%) returned in 1990-1991 for repeat evaluations. Two-year change (1987-1988 to 1985-1986) in high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was significantly different among the parity groups. HDL cholesterol decreased in women who had their first pregnancy of at least 28 weeks duration during follow-up (mean +/- standard error, -3.5 +/- 1.2 mg/dl), and this change was significantly different from the increase in women parous at baseline who had no further pregnancies (2.5 +/- 0.3 mg/dl) and in nullipara (2.4 +/- 0.3 mg/dl). There was a nonsignificant trend for a greater decrease in HDL2 cholesterol fraction in the primipara compared with the other groups. The HDL cholesterol decrease remained significant after controlling for race, age, education, oral contraceptive use, and changes in body mass index, waist-hip ratio, physical activity, smoking status, and alcohol intake. Change in HDL cholesterol was also significantly different among the parity groups in analyses of pregnancies that occurred during the subsequent 3 years of follow-up. There were no differences for change in LDL cholesterol or triglycerides. Potential mechanisms for a detrimental effect of pregnancy on HDL cholesterol include hormonal, body composition, or life-style/behavioral changes. PMID:8686693

  8. A Population Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Model Predicts Favorable HDL Cholesterol Changes Over the First 5 Years in Children Treated With Current Efavirenz-Based Regimens.

    PubMed

    Homkham, Nontiya; Cressey, Tim R; Ingsrisawang, Lily; Bouazza, Naïm; Ngampiyaskul, Chaiwat; Hongsiriwon, Suchat; Srirojana, Sakulrat; Kanjanavanit, Suparat; Bhakeecheep, Sorakij; Coeur, Sophie Le; Salvadori, Nicolas; Treluyer, Jean Marc; Jourdain, Gonzague; Urien, Saik

    2016-09-01

    Efavirenz use is associated with changes in cholesterol concentrations, but it is unclear whether this effect is related to drug concentrations. Using efavirenz and cholesterol plasma concentrations measured in 87 antiretroviral-naive children in Thailand, we assessed indirect response models to describe the evolution of high- and low-density lipoprotein (HDL, LDL) cholesterol concentrations in relation to efavirenz plasma concentrations over time where efavirenz was assumed to either stimulate cholesterol production or inhibit its elimination. Simulations of cholesterol evolution for children with different average efavirenz concentrations (Cav ) according to their assumed status of "fast" or "slow" metabolizers of efavirenz were performed. At treatment initiation, children's median (interquartile range, IQR) age was 8 years (5 to 10), body mass index z-score 0.01 (-1.05 to 1.44), HDL 31 mg/dL (24 to 44), and LDL 83 mg/dL (69 to 100). Median (IQR) efavirenz Cav was 1.7 mg/L (1.3 to 2.1) during the period of observation. The best model describing the evolution of HDL and LDL cholesterol concentrations over time assumed that efavirenz inhibited their elimination. HDL concentrations increase over 5 years, whereas LDL concentrations increased only during the first 4 months and then returned to baseline levels afterward. Simulations predicted that, after 3 years, HDL would increase to 63 mg/dL in "fast" metabolizers and 97 mg/dL in "slow" metabolizers of efavirenz. The population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model shows that favorable HDL cholesterol changes can be expected in children with current efavirenz dosing guidelines over 5 years of treatment. PMID:26749102

  9. Correlation between high density lipoprotein-cholesterol and remodeling index in patients with coronary artery disease: IDEAS (IVUS diagnostic evaluation of atherosclerosis in Singapore)-HDL study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Hang; Tai, Bee-Choo; Lim, Gek-Hsiang; Chan, Mark Y; Low, Adrian F; Tan, Kathryn C; Chia, Boon-Lock; Tan, Huay-Cheem

    2012-01-01

    Serum level of high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol is associated with risk of coronary artery disease. We correlated the serum level of cholesterol with coronary artery remodeling index of patients with coronary artery disease. A total of 120 patients with de novo lesions located in native coronary artery were studied. Remodeling index was based on intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) interrogation of the lesions using the static approach, and was defined as external elastic membrane (EEM) area at lesion/average EEM area at proximal and distal reference segments. The average remodeling index was 0.9 (SD: 0.2). The remodeling index was not associated with any of the demographic and coronary risk factors. Stable angina was associated with a low remodeling index. Remodeling index correlated with white blood cell count and HDL-cholesterol, but not with total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglyceride. In the multiple linear regression analysis, HDL-cholesterol and procedure indication were the only 2 significant predictors of remodeling index. An increase of 1 mg/dL of HDL-cholesterol resulted in a decrease of 0.003 (95% CI: 0.0001, 0.007; P = 0.046) in remodeling index, after adjusting for procedural indications. When stratified according to diabetic status, the negative correlation persisted in non-diabetic (P = 0.023), but not in diabetic, patients (P = 0.707). We found a negative correlation between HDL-cholesterol level and remodeling index. Diabetic status may have an influence on the observed relationship. PMID:21197580

  10. Variation at the hepatic lipase and apolipoprotein AI/CIII/AIV loci is a major cause of genetically determined variation in plasma HDL cholesterol levels.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J C; Wang, Z; Grundy, S M; Stoesz, M R; Guerra, R

    1994-01-01

    Genetic factors have been shown to play an important role in determining interindividual variation in plasma HDL-C levels, but the specific genetic determinants of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels have not been elucidated. In this study, the effects of variation in the genomic regions encoding hepatic lipase, apolipoprotein AI/CIII/AIV, and the cholesteryl ester transfer protein on plasma HDL-C levels were examined in 73 normotriglyceridemic, Caucasian nuclear families. Genetic factors accounted for 56.5 +/- 13% of the interindividual variation in plasma HDL-C levels. For each candidate gene, adjusted plasma HDL-C levels of sibling pairs who shared zero, one, or two parental alleles identical-by-descent were compared using sibling-pair linkage analysis. Allelic variation in the genes encoding hepatic lipase and apolipoprotein AI/CIII/AIV accounted for 25 and 22%, respectively, of the total interindividual variation in plasma HDL-C levels. In contrast, none of the variation in plasma HDL-C levels could be accounted for by allelic variation in the cholesteryl ester transfer protein. These findings indicate that a major fraction of the genetically determined variation in plasma HDL-C levels is conferred by allelic variation at the hepatic lipase and the apolipoprotein AI/CIII/AIV gene loci. PMID:7989594

  11. Quantitative trait locus mapping of genes that regulate HDL cholesterol in SM/J and NZB/B1NJ inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Pitman, Wendy A; Korstanje, Ron; Churchill, Gary A; Nicodeme, Edwige; Albers, John J; Cheung, Marian C; Staton, Megan A; Sampson, Stephen S; Harris, Stephen; Paigen, Beverly

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the quantitative trait loci (QTL) regulating plasma cholesterol, the female progeny of an (SMxNZB/ B1NJ)xNZB/B1NJ backcross were fed an atherogenic diet. After 18 wk, plasma total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was measured. HDL-C concentrations were greater in NZB than in SM mice. For standard chow-fed mice, QTL were found near D5Mit370 and D18Mit34. For mice fed an atherogenic diet, a QTL was found near D5Mit239. The QTL for chow-fed and atherogenic-fed mice on chromosome 5 seem to be two different loci. We used a multitrait analysis to rule out pleiotropy in favor of a two-QTL hypothesis. Furthermore, the HDL-C in these strains was induced by the high-fat diet. For inducible HDL-C, one significant locus was found near D15Mit39. The gene for an HDL receptor, Srb1, maps close to the HDL-C QTL at D5Mit370, but the concentrations of Srb1 mRNA and SR-B1 protein and the gene sequence of NZB/B1NJ and SM/J did not support Srb1 as a candidate gene. With these QTL, we have identified chromosomal regions that affect lipoprotein profiles in these strains. PMID:12006675

  12. Extra Virgin Olive Oil Polyphenols Promote Cholesterol Efflux and Improve HDL Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Berrougui, Hicham; Ikhlef, Souad; Khalil, Abdelouahed

    2015-01-01

    Results of the present work give evidence from the beneficial role of extra virgin olive of oil (EVOO) consumption towards oxidative stress and cardiovascular diseases. Polyphenols contained in EVOO are responsible for inhibiting lipoproteins oxidative damages and promoting reverse cholesterol transport process via ABCA1 pathway. PMID:26495005

  13. Acute Decrease in HDL Cholesterol Associated With Exposure to Welding Fumes

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Mary Berlik; Cavallari, Jenn; Fang, Shona; Christiani, David

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate acute changes in circulating lipids after exposure to relatively high levels of particulate matter through welding. Methods Using a repeated measures panel study, lipid levels before and after welding and personal exposures to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were measured in 36 male welders over 63 exposure and/or control days. Results There was a trend toward decrease in HDL (−2.3 mg/dL, P = 0.08) 18 hours after welding. This effect became significant (−2.6 mg/dL, P = 0.05) after adjustment for possible confounders. The effect was strongest (−4.3 mg/dL, P = 0.02) among welders who did not weld the day before the study. There were no significant changes in other lipids associated with welding or PM2.5 exposure. Conclusion Welding exposure was associated with an acute decrease in circulating HDL, which may relate to the inflammatory and proatherosclerotic effects of fine particle exposure. PMID:21187793

  14. ATHENA: a tool for meta-dimensional analysis applied to genotypes and gene expression data to predict HDL cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Emily R; Dudek, Scott M; Frase, Alex T; Krauss, Ronald M; Medina, Marisa W; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2013-01-01

    Technology is driving the field of human genetics research with advances in techniques to generate high-throughput data that interrogate various levels of biological regulation. With this massive amount of data comes the important task of using powerful bioinformatics techniques to sift through the noise to find true signals that predict various human traits. A popular analytical method thus far has been the genome-wide association study (GWAS), which assesses the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with the trait of interest. Unfortunately, GWAS has not been able to explain a substantial proportion of the estimated heritability for most complex traits. Due to the inherently complex nature of biology, this phenomenon could be a factor of the simplistic study design. A more powerful analysis may be a systems biology approach that integrates different types of data, or a meta-dimensional analysis. For this study we used the Analysis Tool for Heritable and Environmental Network Associations (ATHENA) to integrate high-throughput SNPs and gene expression variables (EVs) to predict high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. We generated multivariable models that consisted of SNPs only, EVs only, and SNPs + EVs with testing r-squared values of 0.16, 0.11, and 0.18, respectively. Additionally, using just the SNPs and EVs from the best models, we generated a model with a testing r-squared of 0.32. A linear regression model with the same variables resulted in an adjusted r-squared of 0.23. With this systems biology approach, we were able to integrate different types of high-throughput data to generate meta-dimensional models that are predictive for the HDL-C in our data set. Additionally, our modeling method was able to capture more of the HDL-C variation than a linear regression model that included the same variables. PMID:23424143

  15. Betatrophin Acts as a Diagnostic Biomarker in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Is Negatively Associated with HDL-Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Min; Chen, Rong-ping; Yang, Rui; Guo, Xian-feng; Zhang, Jia-chun; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective. By assessing its circulating concentrations in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients, we aimed to explore the associations of betatrophin with various metabolic parameters and evaluate its diagnostic value in T2DM. Methods. A total of 58 non-diabetes-mellitus (NDM) subjects and 73 age- and sex-matched newly diagnosed T2DM patients were enrolled. Correlation analyses between circulating betatrophin levels and multiple metabolic parameters were performed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to assess the diagnostic value of betatrophin concentration in T2DM. Results. Circulating betatrophin levels were approximately 1.8 times higher in T2DM patients than in NDM individuals (median 747.12 versus 407.41 pg/mL, P < 0.001). Correlation analysis showed that betatrophin was negatively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in all subjects. ROC curve analysis identified betatrophin as a potent diagnostic biomarker for T2DM. The optimal cut-off point of betatrophin concentration for predicting T2DM was 501.23 pg/mL. Conclusions. Serum betatrophin levels were markedly increased in newly diagnosed T2DM patients and further elevated in obese T2DM subjects. Betatrophin was negatively correlated with HDL-C levels. Our findings indicate that betatrophin could be a potent diagnostic biomarker for T2DM. PMID:26819617

  16. Novel Apo E-Derived ABCA1 Agonist Peptide (CS-6253) Promotes Reverse Cholesterol Transport and Induces Formation of preβ-1 HDL In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hafiane, Anouar; Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan O.; Genest, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) mimetic peptides replicate some aspects of HDL function. We have previously reported the effects of compound ATI-5261 on its ability to replicate many functions of native apo A-I in the process of HDL biogenesis. ATI-5261 induced muscle toxicity in wild type C57Bl/6 mice, increased CPK, ALT and AST and increase in triglyceride (Tg) levels. Aromatic phenylalanine residues on the non-polar face of ATI-5261, together with positively charged arginine residues at the lipid-water interface were responsible for these effects. This information was used to create a novel analog (CS-6253) that was non-toxic. We evaluated this peptide designed from the carboxyl terminus of apo E, in its ability to mimic apo A-I functionality. Our data shows that the lipidated particles generated by incubating cells overexpressing ABCA1 with lipid free CS-6253 enhances the rate of ABCA1 lipid efflux with high affinity interactions with native ABCA1 oligomeric forms and plasma membrane micro-domains. Interaction between ABCA1 and lipid free CS-6253 resulted in formation of nascent HDL-CS-6253 particles that are actively remodeled in plasma. Mature HDL-CS-6253 particles deliver cholesterol to liver cells via SR-BI in-vitro. CS-6253 significantly increases cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages and in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells expressing ABCA1. Addition of CS-6253 to plasma dose-dependently displaced apo A-I from α-HDL particles and led to de novo formation of preβ-1 HDL that stimulates ABCA1 dependent cholesterol efflux efficiently. When incubated with human plasma CS-6253 was also found to bind with HDL and LDL and promoted the transfer of cholesterol from HDL to LDL predominantly. Our data shows that CS-6253 mimics apo A-I in its ability to promote ABCA1-mediated formation of nascent HDL particles, and enhances formation of preβ-1 HDL with increase in the cycling of apo A-I between the preβ and α-HDL particles in-vitro. These mechanisms are

  17. Novel apo E-derived ABCA1 agonist peptide (CS-6253) promotes reverse cholesterol transport and induces formation of preβ-1 HDL in vitro

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hafiane, Anouar; Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan O.; Genest, Jacques; Zhu, Xuewei

    2015-07-24

    Apolipoprotein (apo) mimetic peptides replicate some aspects of HDL function. We have previously reported the effects of compound ATI-5261 on its ability to replicate many functions of native apo A-I in the process of HDL biogenesis. ATI-5261 induced muscle toxicity in wild type C57Bl/6 mice, increased CPK, ALT and AST and increase in triglyceride (Tg) levels. Aromatic phenylalanine residues on the non-polar face of ATI-5261, together with positively charged arginine residues at the lipid-water interface were responsible for these effects. This information was used to create a novel analog (CS-6253) that was non-toxic. We evaluated this peptide designed from themore » carboxyl terminus of apo E, in its ability to mimic apo A-I functionality. Our data shows that the lipidated particles generated by incubating cells overexpressing ABCA1 with lipid free CS-6253 enhances the rate of ABCA1 lipid efflux with high affinity interactions with native ABCA1 oligomeric forms and plasma membrane micro-domains. Interaction between ABCA1 and lipid free CS-6253 resulted in formation of nascent HDL-CS-6253 particles that are actively remodeled in plasma. Mature HDL-CS-6253 particles deliver cholesterol to liver cells via SR-BI in-vitro. CS-6253 significantly increases cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages and in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells expressing ABCA1. Addition of CS-6253 to plasma dose-dependently displaced apo A-I from α-HDL particles and led to de novo formation of preβ-1 HDL that stimulates ABCA1 dependent cholesterol efflux efficiently. When incubated with human plasma CS-6253 was also found to bind with HDL and LDL and promoted the transfer of cholesterol from HDL to LDL predominantly. Our data shows that CS-6253 mimics apo A-I in its ability to promote ABCA1-mediated formation of nascent HDL particles, and enhances formation of preβ-1 HDL with increase in the cycling of apo A-I between the preβ and α-HDL particles in-vitro. These mechanisms are

  18. Circulating levels of linoleic acid and HDL-cholesterol are major determinants of 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts in patients with heart failure☆

    PubMed Central

    Asselin, Caroline; Ducharme, Anique; Ntimbane, Thierry; Ruiz, Matthieu; Fortier, Annik; Guertin, Marie-Claude; Lavoie, Joël; Diaz, Ariel; Levy, Émile; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Objective Measurements of oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with heart failure (HF) have yielded controversial results. This study aimed at testing the hypothesis that circulating levels of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal bound to thiol proteins (4HNE-P) are strongly associated with those of its potential precursors, namely n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Methods and results Circulating levels of 4HNE-P were evaluated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in 71 control subjects and 61 ambulatory symptomatic HF patients along with various other clinically- and biochemically-relevant parameters, including other oxidative stress markers, and total levels of fatty acids from all classes, which reflect both free and bound to cholesterol, phospholipids and triglycerides. All HF patients had severe systolic functional impairment despite receiving optimal evidence-based therapies. Compared to controls, HF patients displayed markedly lower circulating levels of HDL- and LDL-cholesterol, which are major PUFA carriers, as well as of PUFA of the n-6 series, specifically linoleic acid (LA; P=0.001). Circulating 4HNE-P in HF patients was similar to controls, albeit multiple regression analysis revealed that LA was the only factor that was significantly associated with circulating 4HNE-P in the entire population (R2=0.086; P=0.02). In HF patients only, 4HNE-P was even more strongly associated with LA (P=0.003) and HDL-cholesterol (p<0.0002). Our results demonstrate that 4HNE-P levels, expressed relative to HDL-cholesterol, increase as HDL-cholesterol plasma levels decrease in the HF group only. Conclusion Results from this study emphasize the importance of considering changes in lipids and lipoproteins in the interpretation of measurements of lipid peroxidation products. Further studies appear warranted to explore the possibility that HDL-cholesterol particles may be a carrier of 4HNE adducts. PMID:24494189

  19. Presence of unsedimented precipitate in visually non-turbid supernates in the heparin-manganese method for HDL-cholesterol quantitation.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Z; Simo, I E; Ooi, T C; Meuffels, M; Hindmarsh, J T

    1986-08-01

    An inherent problem with the heparin-manganese precipitation procedure for high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) quantitation is the inability to sediment all the precipitated lipoproteins, especially in hypertriglyceridemic samples. This results in overestimation of HDL-C. Thus ultrafiltration has been recommended for turbid supernates. We have investigated 47 non-turbid supernates for possible presence of unsedimented precipitate. Optical turbidity in these samples was found to correlate with the serum triglyceride level. With ultrafiltration of the supernates, there was a significant decrease in cholesterol, optical turbidity and apoprotein A-I. The percent change in turbidity correlated with the percent change in cholesterol. There was also correlation between percent change in cholesterol and the prefiltration supernate turbidity. These results indicate that visually clear supernates may show optical turbidity; the turbidity is likely due to triglyceride-rich particles, which contain cholesterol; the fall in cholesterol with ultrafiltration is due to removal of these floating particles and some adsorbance of HDL particles to the filters. PMID:3093118

  20. Adiponectin and the mediation of HDL cholesterol change with improved lifestyle: The Look AHEAD Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adipose tissue dysfunction plays a key role in the development of the metabolic abnormalities characteristic of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and participates actively in lipid metabolism. Adiponectin, found abundantly in circulation and a marker of adipose health, is decreased in obese persons with T2DM. ...

  1. The effects of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on plasma HDL cholesterol concentrations depend on smoking habit in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background-Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is associated with an increased risk for atherosclerosis and concentrations are modulated by genetic and environmental factors such as smoking. Objective- To assess whether the association of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs...

  2. Dialysis Modalities and HDL Composition and Function.

    PubMed

    Holzer, Michael; Schilcher, Gernot; Curcic, Sanja; Trieb, Markus; Ljubojevic, Senka; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Scharnagl, Hubert; Kopecky, Chantal M; Rosenkranz, Alexander R; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2015-09-01

    Lipid abnormalities may have an effect on clinical outcomes of patients on dialysis. Recent studies have indicated that HDL dysfunction is a hallmark of ESRD. In this study, we compared HDL composition and metrics of HDL functionality in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD) with those in healthy controls. We detected a marked suppression of several metrics of HDL functionality in patients on HD or PD. Compositional analysis revealed that HDL from both dialysis groups shifted toward a more proinflammatory phenotype with profound alterations in the lipid moiety and protein composition. With regard to function, cholesterol efflux and anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic functions seemed to be more severely suppressed in patients on HD, whereas HDL-associated paraoxonase activity was lowest in patients on PD. Quantification of enzyme activities involved in HDL metabolism suggested that HDL particle maturation and remodeling are altered in patients on HD or PD. In summary, our study provides mechanistic insights into the formation of dysfunctional HDL in patients with ESRD who are on HD or PD. PMID:25745027

  3. Dialysis Modalities and HDL Composition and Function

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Michael; Schilcher, Gernot; Curcic, Sanja; Trieb, Markus; Ljubojevic, Senka; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Scharnagl, Hubert; Kopecky, Chantal M.; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Heinemann, Akos

    2015-01-01

    Lipid abnormalities may have an effect on clinical outcomes of patients on dialysis. Recent studies have indicated that HDL dysfunction is a hallmark of ESRD. In this study, we compared HDL composition and metrics of HDL functionality in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD) with those in healthy controls. We detected a marked suppression of several metrics of HDL functionality in patients on HD or PD. Compositional analysis revealed that HDL from both dialysis groups shifted toward a more proinflammatory phenotype with profound alterations in the lipid moiety and protein composition. With regard to function, cholesterol efflux and anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic functions seemed to be more severely suppressed in patients on HD, whereas HDL-associated paraoxonase activity was lowest in patients on PD. Quantification of enzyme activities involved in HDL metabolism suggested that HDL particle maturation and remodeling are altered in patients on HD or PD. In summary, our study provides mechanistic insights into the formation of dysfunctional HDL in patients with ESRD who are on HD or PD. PMID:25745027

  4. The Ala54Thr Polymorphism of the Fatty Acid Binding Protein 2 Gene Modulates HDL Cholesterol in Mexican-Americans with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Salto, Lorena M.; Bu, Liming; Beeson, W. Lawrence; Firek, Anthony; Cordero-MacIntyre, Zaida; De Leon, Marino

    2015-01-01

    The alanine to threonine amino acid substitution at codon 54 (Ala54Thr) of the intestinal fatty acid binding protein (FABP2) has been associated with elevated levels of insulin and blood glucose as well as with dyslipidemia. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of this FABP2 polymorphism in Mexican-Americans with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the context of a three-month intervention to determine if the polymorphism differentially modulates selected clinical outcomes. For this study, we genotyped 43 participant samples and performed post-hoc outcome analysis of the profile changes in fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin, lipid panel and body composition, stratified by the Ala54Thr polymorphism. Our results show that the Thr54 allele carriers (those who were heterozygous or homozygous for the threonine-encoding allele) had lower HDL cholesterol and higher triglyceride levels at baseline compared to the Ala54 homozygotes (those who were homozygous for the alanine-encoding allele). Both groups made clinically important improvements in lipid profiles and glycemic control as a response to the intervention. Whereas the Ala54 homozygotes decreased HDL cholesterol in the context of an overall total cholesterol decrease, Thr54 allele carriers increased HDL cholesterol as part of an overall total cholesterol decrease. We conclude that the Ala54Thr polymorphism of FABP2 modulates HDL cholesterol in Mexican-Americans with T2D and that Thr54 allele carriers may be responsive in interventions that include dietary changes. PMID:26703680

  5. [The new atherogenic plasma index reflects the triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol ratio, the lipoprotein particle size and the cholesterol esterification rate: changes during lipanor therapy].

    PubMed

    Dobiásová, M; Frohlich, J

    2000-03-01

    The new atherogenic plasma index (AIP) is a logarithmic transformation of the ratio of the molar triglyceride (TG) concentration and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). AIP correlates closely with the size of LDL particles (r = 0.8) and esterification rate of plasma cholesterol devoid of apo B lipoproteins (FERHDL), r = 0.9 which are considered at present the most sensitive indicators of the atherogenic plasma profile. AIP was recommended by the authors, based on analysis of results of 11 previous studies (1156 subjects) where FERHDL and plasma lipid parameters were investigated in different groups of people who differed as to the atherogenic risk. The AIP index was moreover used for evaluation of a clinical study comprising 609 patients with hyperlipidaemia, who were treated for three months with ciprofibrate (Lipanor). The mean AIP values of non-risk groups (plasma from umbilical blood, children, healthy women etc.) equalled zero or were lower, while with an increasing atherogenic risk (men, women after the menopause) AIP reached positive values, incl. high positive values in risk groups (plasma of diabetic subjects, patients with HLP, patients with positive angiography, myocardial infarction etc.). In all groups women had lower AIP values as compared with males. In patients after Lipanor therapy the AIP declined (from 0.58 +/- 0.17 to 0.33_0.18 in men, from 0.50 +/- 0.18 to 0.21 +/- 0.19 in women). If we consider AIP values from negative ones to 0.15 as "safe" from the aspect of atherogenicity, before Lipanor treatment these "safe" levels were recorded in 1.5% men and in 5.2% women and after treatment in 32% men and 48% women. The results indicate, that AIP which reflects the plasma lipoprotein profile quantifies the relations between TG and HDL-C and thus can be an objective indicator of the atherogenic risk and effectiveness of treatment and it is useful because it can be assessed in any surgery. PMID:11048517

  6. Self-rated health showed a consistent association with serum HDL-cholesterol in the cross-sectional Oslo Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Tomten, Sissel E.; Høstmark, Arne T.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between serum HDL-cholesterol concentration (HDL-C) and self rated health (SRH) in several age groups of men and women. Study design and setting: The study had a cross-sectional design and included 18,770 men and women of the Oslo Health Study aged 30; 40 and 45; 69-60; 75-76 years. Results: In both sexes and all age groups, SRH (3 categories: poor, good, very good) was positively correlated with HDL-C. Logistic regression analysis on dichotomized values of SRH (i.e. poor vs. good health) in each age group of men and women showed that increasing HDL-C values were associated with increasing odds for reporting good health; the odds ratio (OR) was highest in young men, and was generally lower in women than in men. Odds ratios in the 4 age groups of men were 4.94 (2.63-9.29), 2.25 (1.63-3.09), 2.12 (1.58-2.86), 1.87 (1.37-2.54); and in women: 3.58 (2.46-5.21), 2.81 (2.23-3.53), 2.28 (1.84-2.82), 1.61 (1.31-1.99). In the whole material, 1 mmol/L increase in HDL-C increased the odds for reporting good health by 2.27 (2.06-2.50; p<0.001), when adjusting for sex, age group, time since food intake and use of cholesterol lowering drugs. Chronic diseases, pain, psychological distress, smoking, alcohol, length of education, and dietary items did not have any major influence on the pattern of the HDL-C vs. SRH association. Conclusion: There was a consistent positive association between HDL-C and SRH, in both men and women in four different age groups, with the strongest association in young people. PMID:18071582

  7. Ablating L-FABP in SCP-2/SCP-x null mice impairs bile acid metabolism and biliary HDL-cholesterol secretion

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Gregory G.; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M.; Howles, Philip N.; Kier, Ann B.

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of their abilities to bind bile acids and/or cholesterol, the physiological role(s) of liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) and sterol carrier protein (SCP) 2/SCP-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) gene products in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation was examined in gene-ablated male mice. L-FABP (LKO) or L-FABP/SCP-2/SCP-x [triple-knockout (TKO)] ablation markedly decreased hepatic bile acid concentration, while SCP-2/SCP-x [double-knockout (DKO)] ablation alone had no effect. In contrast, LKO increased biliary bile acid, while DKO and TKO had no effect on biliary bile acid levels. LKO and DKO also altered biliary bile acid composition to increase bile acid hydrophobicity. Furthermore, LKO and TKO decreased hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived 22-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol), while DKO alone had no effect. Finally, LKO and, to a lesser extent, DKO decreased most indexes contributing to cholesterol solubility in biliary bile. These results suggest different, but complementary, roles for L-FABP and SCP-2/SCP-x in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation. L-FABP appears to function more in hepatic retention of bile acids as well as hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, SCP-2/SCP-x may function more in formation and biliary secretion of bile acid, with less impact on hepatic uptake or biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. PMID:25277800

  8. Ablating L-FABP in SCP-2/SCP-x null mice impairs bile acid metabolism and biliary HDL-cholesterol secretion.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory G; Atshaves, Barbara P; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M; Howles, Philip N; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-12-01

    On the basis of their abilities to bind bile acids and/or cholesterol, the physiological role(s) of liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) and sterol carrier protein (SCP) 2/SCP-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) gene products in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation was examined in gene-ablated male mice. L-FABP (LKO) or L-FABP/SCP-2/SCP-x [triple-knockout (TKO)] ablation markedly decreased hepatic bile acid concentration, while SCP-2/SCP-x [double-knockout (DKO)] ablation alone had no effect. In contrast, LKO increased biliary bile acid, while DKO and TKO had no effect on biliary bile acid levels. LKO and DKO also altered biliary bile acid composition to increase bile acid hydrophobicity. Furthermore, LKO and TKO decreased hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived 22-(N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol), while DKO alone had no effect. Finally, LKO and, to a lesser extent, DKO decreased most indexes contributing to cholesterol solubility in biliary bile. These results suggest different, but complementary, roles for L-FABP and SCP-2/SCP-x in biliary bile acid and cholesterol formation. L-FABP appears to function more in hepatic retention of bile acids as well as hepatic uptake and biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, SCP-2/SCP-x may function more in formation and biliary secretion of bile acid, with less impact on hepatic uptake or biliary secretion of HDL-cholesterol. PMID:25277800

  9. THE CONSUMPTION OF RED PUPUNHA (BACTRIS GASIPAES KUNTH) INCREASES HDL CHOLESTEROL AND REDUCES WEIGHT GAIN OF LACTATING AND POST-LACTATING WISTAR RATS

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, R. Piccolotto; Lemos, J.R. Gonzaga; de Aquino Sales, R. Souza; Martins, M. Gassen; Nascimento, C.H.; Bayona, M.; Marcon, J.L.; Monteiro, J. Barros

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The lactating and post-lactating periods are marked by large metabolic change. Production of milk is 60% lipid dependent. We reported in a recent scientific meeting that Red pupunha palm tree fruit increases HDL cholesterol in lactating rats. This study evaluated if consumption of Red Pupunha by adult female rats has a beneficial impact on the lipid metabolism of lacting and post-lacting adult rats. Objective Evaluate if consumption of red pupunha has a beneficial effect in the lipid metabolism of lacting and post-lacting adult Wistar rats. Research Methods Four groups including two for control; (1) control adult lactating rats, (2) control adults post-lactating rats; and two experimental groups; (3) pupunha adults lactating rats and (4) pupunha adult post-lactating rats were evaluated and compared regarding: weight gain, food consumption, plasma total protein, glucose, total lipid, triglycerides, total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol levels. The mean difference and its 95% confidence intervals were used for group comparisons. Group comparisons were evaluated by using analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA). The statistical significance of the pairwise differences among groups was assessed by using the two-sided Tukey test. Results There were no important differences in food consumption, plasma glucose, total lipids and triglycerides among groups. The red pupunha lactating group gain less weight showing lower body mass index (BMI) than controls (p < 0.05). Total cholesterol was lower in red pupunha lactating than in controls but not in the red pupunha post-lactating group as compared to controls. Triglycerides were lower in the post-lactating red pupunha group as compared to the control group (p = 0.039) but not for the lactating groups. Red pupunha lactating and post-lactating groups had higher HDL-cholesterol than their corresponding control groups (p ≤ 0.01). Conclusion Original findings include the beneficial effect of red pupunha in post

  10. Changes in HDL-cholesterol and lipoprotein Lp(a) after 6-month treatment with finasteride in males affected by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    PubMed

    Denti, L; Pasolini, G; Cortellini, P; Sanfelici, L; Benedetti, R; Cecchetti, A; Ferretti, S; Bruschieri, L; Ablondi, F; Valenti, G

    2000-09-01

    Androgen effects on lipoproteins, mainly high density lipoprotein (HDL), could be exerted by a direct interaction of testosterone (T) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) with liver androgen receptors. To assess if T needs to be converted into DHT to affect lipid metabolism, 13 patients were studied, affected with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and treated with an inhibitor of 5 alpha-reductase (finasteride). They were compared with 15 untreated controls. At baseline and after 3 and 6 months of therapy, each patient was evaluated as for lipoprotein and hormone concentrations, as well as for nutritional status. Body composition was assessed by anthropometry and bio-impedance analysis (BIA). Treatment was associated with a significant increase of HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), mainly HDL3 subclass, and lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)), as well as a decline of DHT, whereas no significant changes were apparent for T, estradiol (E2), sex hormone binding hormone (SHBG) and body composition indexes. However, no significant associations between DHT and lipid relative changes were apparent at bivariate correlation analysis. This finding was confirmed by comparing patient subsets identified by cluster analysis, according to HDL subclass individual responses. Rather, a slight association with E2 for HDL2 (positive) and HDL3 (negative) was found. In conclusion, finasteride can modify HDL and Lp(a) concentrations. However, by the data, these effects cannot be definitively attributed to the changes in DHT synthesis induced by finasteride, since a direct and non-specific interference of the drug on liver metabolism cannot be excluded. PMID:10996351

  11. Arctium lappa ameliorates endothelial dysfunction in rats fed with high fat/cholesterol diets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae), burdock, is a medicinal plant that is popularly used for treating hypertension, gout, hepatitis, and other inflammatory disorders. This study was performed to test the effect of ethanol extract of Arctium lappa L. (EAL) seeds on vascular reactivity and inflammatory factors in rats fed a high fat/cholesterol diet (HFCD). Method EAL-I (100 mg·kg−1/day), EAL-II (200 mg·kg−1/day), and fluvastatin (3 mg·kg−1/day) groups initially received HFCD alone for 8 weeks, with EAL supplementation provided during the final 6 weeks. Results Treatment with low or high doses of EAL markedly attenuated plasma levels of triglycerides and augmented plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HFCD-fed rats. Chronic treatment with EAL markedly reduced impairments of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation of aortic rings. Furthermore, chronic treatment with EAL significantly lowered systolic blood pressure (SBP) and maintained smooth and flexible intimal endothelial layers in HFCD-fed rats. Chronic treatment with EAL suppressed upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, and E-selectin in the aorta. Chronic treatment with EAL also suppressed increases in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 expression. These results suggested that EAL can inhibit HFCD-induced vascular inflammation in the rat model. Conclusion The present study provides evidence that EAL ameliorates HFCD-induced vascular dysfunction through protection of vascular relaxation and suppression of vascular inflammation. PMID:22866890

  12. The Type 2 Diabetes and Insulin-Resistance Locus Near IRS1 Is A Determinant of HDL Cholesterol and Triglycerides Levels Among Diabetic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rajani; Prudente, Sabrina; Andreozzi, Francesco; Powers, Christine; Mannino, Gaia; Bacci, Simonetta; Gervino, Ernest V.; Hauser, Thomas H.; Succurro, Elena; Mercuri, Luana; Goheen, Elizabeth H.; Shah, Hetal; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Sesti, Giorgio; Doria, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE SNP rs2943641 near the insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) gene has been found to be associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and insulin-resistance in genome-wide association studies. We investigated whether this SNP is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and coronary artery disease (CAD) among diabetic individuals. METHODS SNP rs2943641 was typed in 2,133 White T2D subjects and tested for association with BMI, serum HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, hypertension history, and CAD risk. RESULTS HDL cholesterol decreased by 1 mg/dl (p=0.0045) and serum triglycerides increased by 6 mg/dl (p=0.018) for each copy of the insulin-resistance allele. Despite these effects, no association was found with increased CAD risk (OR=1.00, 95% CI 0.88–1.13). CONCLUSIONS The insulin-resistance and T2D locus near the IRS1 gene is a determinant of lower HDL cholesterol among T2D subjects. However, this effect is small and does not translate into a detectable increase in CAD risk in this population. PMID:21353221

  13. Relationship of Lifestyle Medical Advice and Non-HDL Cholesterol Control of a Nationally Representative US Sample with Hypercholesterolemia by Race/Ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    Vaccaro, Joan Anne; Huffman, Fatma G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the associations of lifestyle medical advice and non-HDL cholesterol control of a nationally representative US sample of adults with hypercholesterolemia by race/ethnicity. Methods. Data were collected by appending sociodemographic, anthropometric, and laboratory data from two cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Survey (2007-2008 and 2009-2010). This study acquired data from male and female adults aged ≥ 20 years (N = 11,577), classified as either Mexican American (MA), (n = 2173), other Hispanic (OH) (n = 1298), Black non-Hispanic (BNH) (n = 2349), or White non-Hispanic (WNH) (n = 5737). Results. Minorities were more likely to report having received dietary, weight management, and exercise recommendations by healthcare professionals than WNH, adjusting for confounders. Approximately 80% of those receiving medical advice followed the recommendation, regardless of race/ethnicity. Of those who received medical advice, reporting “currently controlling or losing weight” was associated with lower non-HDL cholesterol. BNH who reported “currently controlling or losing weight” had higher non-HDL cholesterol than WNH who reported following the advice. Conclusion. The results suggest that current methods of communicating lifestyle advice may not be adequate across race/ethnicity and that a change in perspective and delivery of medical recommendations for persons with hypercholesterolemia is needed. PMID:23119150

  14. HDL Cholesterol Test

    MedlinePlus

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization ... for trustworthy health information. Verify Compliance . Produced by Advertisement

  15. A functional ABCA1 gene variant is associated with low HDL-cholesterol levels and shows evidence of positive selection in Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Flores-Dorantes, Teresa; Kruit, Janine K; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Hünemeier, Tábita; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Ortiz-López, Ma Guadalupe; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; León-Mimila, Paola; Villalobos-Comparan, Marisela; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Sikora, Martin; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Pape, Terry D; Granados-Silvestre, Ma de Angeles; Montufar-Robles, Isela; Tito-Alvarez, Ana M; Zurita-Salinas, Camilo; Bustos-Arriaga, José; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Gómez-Trejo, Celta; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Vieira-Filho, Joao P; Granados, Julio; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Huertas-Vázquez, Adriana; González-Martín, Antonio; Gorostiza, Amaya; Bonatto, Sandro L; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Wang, Li; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Lisker, Ruben; Moises, Regina S; Menjivar, Marta; Salzano, Francisco M; Knowler, William C; Bortolini, M Cátira; Hayden, Michael R; Baier, Leslie J; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2010-07-15

    It has been suggested that the higher susceptibility of Hispanics to metabolic disease is related to their Native American heritage. A frequent cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) gene variant (R230C, rs9282541) apparently exclusive to Native American individuals was associated with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, obesity and type 2 diabetes in Mexican Mestizos. We performed a more extensive analysis of this variant in 4405 Native Americans and 863 individuals from other ethnic groups to investigate genetic evidence of positive selection, to assess its functional effect in vitro and to explore associations with HDL-C levels and other metabolic traits. The C230 allele was found in 29 of 36 Native American groups, but not in European, Asian or African individuals. C230 was observed on a single haplotype, and C230-bearing chromosomes showed longer relative haplotype extension compared with other haplotypes in the Americas. Additionally, single-nucleotide polymorphism data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel Native American populations were enriched in significant integrated haplotype score values in the region upstream of the ABCA1 gene. Cells expressing the C230 allele showed a 27% cholesterol efflux reduction (P< 0.001), confirming this variant has a functional effect in vitro. Moreover, the C230 allele was associated with lower HDL-C levels (P = 1.77 x 10(-11)) and with higher body mass index (P = 0.0001) in the combined analysis of Native American populations. This is the first report of a common functional variant exclusive to Native American and descent populations, which is a major determinant of HDL-C levels and may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of Native American populations. PMID:20418488

  16. A functional ABCA1 gene variant is associated with low HDL-cholesterol levels and shows evidence of positive selection in Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Flores-Dorantes, Teresa; Kruit, Janine K.; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Hünemeier, Tábita; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Ortiz-López, Ma Guadalupe; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; León-Mimila, Paola; Villalobos-Comparan, Marisela; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Sikora, Martin; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Pape, Terry D.; de Ángeles Granados-Silvestre, Ma; Montufar-Robles, Isela; Tito-Alvarez, Ana M.; Zurita-Salinas, Camilo; Bustos-Arriaga, José; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Gómez-Trejo, Celta; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Vieira-Filho, Joao P.; Granados, Julio; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Huertas-Vázquez, Adriana; González-Martín, Antonio; Gorostiza, Amaya; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Wang, Li; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Lisker, Ruben; Moises, Regina S.; Menjivar, Marta; Salzano, Francisco M.; Knowler, William C.; Bortolini, M. Cátira; Hayden, Michael R.; Baier, Leslie J.; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that the higher susceptibility of Hispanics to metabolic disease is related to their Native American heritage. A frequent cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) gene variant (R230C, rs9282541) apparently exclusive to Native American individuals was associated with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, obesity and type 2 diabetes in Mexican Mestizos. We performed a more extensive analysis of this variant in 4405 Native Americans and 863 individuals from other ethnic groups to investigate genetic evidence of positive selection, to assess its functional effect in vitro and to explore associations with HDL-C levels and other metabolic traits. The C230 allele was found in 29 of 36 Native American groups, but not in European, Asian or African individuals. C230 was observed on a single haplotype, and C230-bearing chromosomes showed longer relative haplotype extension compared with other haplotypes in the Americas. Additionally, single-nucleotide polymorphism data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel Native American populations were enriched in significant integrated haplotype score values in the region upstream of the ABCA1 gene. Cells expressing the C230 allele showed a 27% cholesterol efflux reduction (P< 0.001), confirming this variant has a functional effect in vitro. Moreover, the C230 allele was associated with lower HDL-C levels (P = 1.77 × 10−11) and with higher body mass index (P = 0.0001) in the combined analysis of Native American populations. This is the first report of a common functional variant exclusive to Native American and descent populations, which is a major determinant of HDL-C levels and may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of Native American populations. PMID:20418488

  17. Low HDL cholesterol as a cardiovascular risk factor in rural, urban, and rural-urban migrants: PERU MIGRANT cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Lazo-Porras, María; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Málaga, Germán; Gilman, Robert H.; Acuña-Villaorduña, Ana; Cardenas-Montero, Deborah; Smeeth, Liam; Miranda, J. Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Whilst the relationship between lipids and cardiovascular mortality has been well studied and appears to be controversial, very little has been explored in the context of rural-to-urban migration in low-resource settings. Objective Determine the profile and related factors for HDL-c patterns (isolated and non-isolated low HDL-c) in three population-based groups according to their migration status, and determine the effect of HDL-c patterns on the rates of cardiovascular outcomes (i.e. non-fatal stroke and non-fatal myocardial infarction) and mortality. Methods Cross-sectional and 5-year longitudinal data from the PERU MIGRANT study, designed to assess the effect of migration on cardiovascular risk profiles and mortality in Peru. Two different analyses were performed: first, we estimated prevalence and associated factors with isolated and non-isolated low HDL-c at baseline. Second, using longitudinal information, relative risk ratios (RRR) of composite outcomes of mortality, non-fatal stroke and non-fatal myocardial infarction were calculated according to HDL-c levels at baseline. Results Data from 988 participants, rural (n = 201), rural-to-urban migrants (n = 589), and urban (n = 199) groups, was analysed. Low HDL-c was present in 56.5% (95%CI: 53.4%–59.6%) without differences by study groups. Isolated low HDL-c was found in 36.5% (95%CI: 33.5–39.5%), with differences between study groups. In multivariable analysis, urban group (vs. rural), female gender, overweight and obesity were independently associated with isolated low HDL-c. Only female gender, overweight and obesity were associated with non-isolated low HDL-c. Longitudinal analyses showed that non-isolated low HDL-c increased the risk of negative cardiovascular outcomes (RRR = 3.46; 95%CI: 1.23–9.74). Conclusions Isolated low HDL-c was the most common dyslipidaemia in the study population and was more frequent in rural subjects. Non-isolated low HDL-c increased three-to fourfold

  18. Low Maternal Vitamin B12 Status Is Associated with Lower Cord Blood HDL Cholesterol in White Caucasians Living in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Adaikalakoteswari, Antonysunil; Vatish, Manu; Lawson, Alexander; Wood, Catherine; Sivakumar, Kavitha; McTernan, Philip G.; Webster, Craig; Anderson, Neil; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Tripathi, Gyanendra; Saravanan, Ponnusamy

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Studies in South Asian population show that low maternal vitamin B12 associates with insulin resistance and small for gestational age in the offspring. Low vitamin B12 status is attributed to vegetarianism in these populations. It is not known whether low B12 status is associated with metabolic risk of the offspring in whites, where the childhood metabolic disorders are increasing rapidly. Here, we studied whether maternal B12 levels associate with metabolic risk of the offspring at birth. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of 91 mother-infant pairs (n = 182), of white Caucasian origin living in the UK. Blood samples were collected from white pregnant women at delivery and their newborns (cord blood). Serum vitamin B12, folate, homocysteine as well as the relevant metabolic risk factors were measured. Results: The prevalence of low serum vitamin B12 (<191 ng/L) and folate (<4.6 μg/L) were 40% and 11%, respectively. Maternal B12 was inversely associated with offspring’s Homeostasis Model Assessment 2-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR), triglycerides, homocysteine and positively with HDL-cholesterol after adjusting for age and BMI. In regression analysis, after adjusting for likely confounders, maternal B12 is independently associated with neonatal HDL-cholesterol and homocysteine but not triglycerides or HOMA-IR. Conclusions: Our study shows that low B12 status is common in white women and is independently associated with adverse cord blood cholesterol. PMID:25849948

  19. Acrolein Impairs the Cholesterol Transport Functions of High Density Lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Alexandra C.; Holme, Rebecca L.; Chen, Yiliang; Thomas, Michael J.; Sorci-Thomas, Mary G.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Sahoo, Daisy

    2015-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are considered athero-protective, primarily due to their role in reverse cholesterol transport, where they transport cholesterol from peripheral tissues to the liver for excretion. The current study was designed to determine the impact of HDL modification by acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde found in high abundance in cigarette smoke, on the cholesterol transport functions of HDL. HDL was chemically-modified with acrolein and immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses confirmed apolipoprotein crosslinking, as well as acrolein adducts on apolipoproteins A-I and A-II. The ability of acrolein-modified HDL (acro-HDL) to serve as an acceptor of free cholesterol (FC) from COS-7 cells transiently expressing SR-BI was significantly decreased. Further, in contrast to native HDL, acro-HDL promotes higher neutral lipid accumulation in murine macrophages as judged by Oil Red O staining. The ability of acro-HDL to mediate efficient selective uptake of HDL-cholesteryl esters (CE) into SR-BI-expressing cells was reduced compared to native HDL. Together, the findings from our studies suggest that acrolein modification of HDL produces a dysfunctional particle that may ultimately promote atherogenesis by impairing functions that are critical in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway. PMID:25849485

  20. High intake of fatty fish, but not of lean fish, affects serum concentrations of TAG and HDL-cholesterol in healthy, normal-weight adults: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Ingrid V; Helland, Anita; Bratlie, Marianne; Brokstad, Karl A; Rosenlund, Grethe; Sveier, Harald; Mellgren, Gunnar; Gudbrandsen, Oddrun A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether high intake of lean or fatty fish (cod and farmed salmon, respectively) by healthy, normal-weight adults would affect risk factors of type 2 diabetes and CVD when compared with lean meat (chicken). More knowledge is needed concerning the potential health effects of high fish intake (>300 g/week) in normal-weight adults. In this randomised clinical trial, thirty-eight young, healthy, normal-weight participants consumed 750 g/week of lean or fatty fish or lean meat (as control) for 4 weeks at dinner according to provided recipes to ensure similar ways of preparations and choices of side dishes between the groups. Energy and macronutrient intakes at baseline and end point were similar in all groups, and there were no changes in energy and macronutrient intakes within any of the groups during the course of the study. High intake of fatty fish, but not lean fish, significantly reduced TAG and increased HDL-cholesterol concentrations in fasting serum when compared with lean meat intake. When compared with lean fish intake, fatty fish intake increased serum HDL-cholesterol. No differences were observed between lean fish, fatty fish and lean meat groups regarding fasting and postprandial glucose regulation. These findings suggest that high intake of fatty fish, but not of lean fish, could beneficially affect serum concentrations of TAG and HDL-cholesterol, which are CVD risk factors, in healthy, normal-weight adults, when compared with high intake of lean meat. PMID:27363518

  1. Brain Cholesterol Metabolism and Its Defects: Linkage to Neurodegenerative Diseases and Synaptic Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Petrov, A M; Kasimov, M R; Zefirov, A L

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important constituent of cell membranes and plays a crucial role in the compartmentalization of the plasma membrane and signaling. Brain cholesterol accounts for a large proportion of the body's total cholesterol, existing in two pools: the plasma membranes of neurons and glial cells and the myelin membranes . Cholesterol has been recently shown to be important for synaptic transmission, and a link between cholesterol metabolism defects and neurodegenerative disorders is now recognized. Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by impaired cholesterol turnover in the brain. However, at which stage the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is perturbed and how this contributes to pathogenesis remains unknown. Cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration may be associated with impaired synaptic transduction. Defects in cholesterol biosynthesis can trigger dysfunction of synaptic transmission. In this review, an overview of cholesterol turnover under physiological and pathological conditions is presented (Huntington's, Niemann-Pick type C diseases, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome). We will discuss possible mechanisms by which cholesterol content in the plasma membrane influences synaptic processes. Changes in cholesterol metabolism in Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and autistic disorders are beyond the scope of this review and will be summarized in our next paper. PMID:27099785

  2. Brain Cholesterol Metabolism and Its Defects: Linkage to Neurodegenerative Diseases and Synaptic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, A. M.; Kasimov, M. R.; Zefirov, A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is an important constituent of cell membranes and plays a crucial role in the compartmentalization of the plasma membrane and signaling. Brain cholesterol accounts for a large proportion of the body’s total cholesterol, existing in two pools: the plasma membranes of neurons and glial cells and the myelin membranes . Cholesterol has been recently shown to be important for synaptic transmission, and a link between cholesterol metabolism defects and neurodegenerative disorders is now recognized. Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by impaired cholesterol turnover in the brain. However, at which stage the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is perturbed and how this contributes to pathogenesis remains unknown. Cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration may be associated with impaired synaptic transduction. Defects in cholesterol biosynthesis can trigger dysfunction of synaptic transmission. In this review, an overview of cholesterol turnover under physiological and pathological conditions is presented (Huntington’s, Niemann-Pick type C diseases, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome). We will discuss possible mechanisms by which cholesterol content in the plasma membrane influences synaptic processes. Changes in cholesterol metabolism in Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and autistic disorders are beyond the scope of this review and will be summarized in our next paper. PMID:27099785

  3. Levels and changes of HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-I in relation to risk of cardiovascular events among statin-treated patients; a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Arsenault, Benoit J.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Mora, Samia; Pedersen, Terje R.; LaRosa, John C.; Welch, K.M.A.; Amarenco, Pierre; DeMicco, David A.; Tonkin, Andrew M.; Sullivan, David R.; Kirby, Adrienne; Colhoun, Helen M.; Hitman, Graham A.; Betteridge, D. John; Durrington, Paul N.; Clearfield, Michael B.; Downs, John R.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Ridker, Paul M.; Kastelein, John J.P.

    2013-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) or apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) remain inversely associated with cardiovascular risk among patients who achieve very low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) on statin therapy. It is also unknown whether a rise in HDL-C or apoA-I after initiation of statin therapy is associated with a reduced cardiovascular risk. Methods and results We performed a meta-analysis of 8 statin trials in which lipids and apolipoproteins were determined in all study participants at baseline and at 1-year follow-up. Individual patient data were obtained for 38,153 trial participants allocated to statin therapy, of whom 5387 suffered a major cardiovascular event. HDL-C levels were associated with a reduced risk of major cardiovascular events (adjusted hazard ratio 0.83, 95%CI 0.81–0.86 per 1 standard deviation increment), as were apoA-I levels (HR 0.79, 95%CI 0.72–0.82). This association was also observed among patients achieving on-statin LDL-C levels < 50 mg/dL. An increase of HDL-C was not associated with reduced cardiovascular risk (HR 0.98, 95%CI 0.94–1.01 per 1 standard deviation increment), whereas a rise in apoA-I was (HR 0.93, 95%CI 0.90–0.97). Conclusions Among patients treated with statin therapy, HDL-C and apoA-I levels were strongly associated with a reduced cardiovascular risk, even among those achieving very low LDL-C. An apoA-I increase was associated with a reduced risk of major cardiovascular events, whereas for HDL-C this was not the case. These findings suggest that therapies that increase apoA-I concentration require further exploration with regard to cardiovascular risk reduction. PMID:23965489

  4. Mining the LIPG allelic spectrum reveals the contribution of rare and common regulatory variants to HDL cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Khetarpal, Sumeet A; Edmondson, Andrew C; Raghavan, Avanthi; Neeli, Hemanth; Jin, Weijun; Badellino, Karen O; Demissie, Serkalem; Manning, Alisa K; DerOhannessian, Stephanie L; Wolfe, Megan L; Cupples, L Adrienne; Li, Mingyao; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J

    2011-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified loci associated with quantitative traits, such as blood lipids. Deep resequencing studies are being utilized to catalogue the allelic spectrum at GWAS loci. The goal of these studies is to identify causative variants and missing heritability, including heritability due to low frequency and rare alleles with large phenotypic impact. Whereas rare variant efforts have primarily focused on nonsynonymous coding variants, we hypothesized that noncoding variants in these loci are also functionally important. Using the HDL-C gene LIPG as an example, we explored the effect of regulatory variants identified through resequencing of subjects at HDL-C extremes on gene expression, protein levels, and phenotype. Resequencing a portion of the LIPG promoter and 5' UTR in human subjects with extreme HDL-C, we identified several rare variants in individuals from both extremes. Luciferase reporter assays were used to measure the effect of these rare variants on LIPG expression. Variants conferring opposing effects on gene expression were enriched in opposite extremes of the phenotypic distribution. Minor alleles of a common regulatory haplotype and noncoding GWAS SNPs were associated with reduced plasma levels of the LIPG gene product endothelial lipase (EL), consistent with its role in HDL-C catabolism. Additionally, we found that a common nonfunctional coding variant associated with HDL-C (rs2000813) is in linkage disequilibrium with a 5' UTR variant (rs34474737) that decreases LIPG promoter activity. We attribute the gene regulatory role of rs34474737 to the observed association of the coding variant with plasma EL levels and HDL-C. Taken together, the findings show that both rare and common noncoding regulatory variants are important contributors to the allelic spectrum in complex trait loci. PMID:22174694

  5. Mining the LIPG Allelic Spectrum Reveals the Contribution of Rare and Common Regulatory Variants to HDL Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Avanthi; Neeli, Hemanth; Jin, Weijun; Badellino, Karen O.; Demissie, Serkalem; Manning, Alisa K.; DerOhannessian, Stephanie L.; Wolfe, Megan L.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Li, Mingyao; Kathiresan, Sekar; Rader, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified loci associated with quantitative traits, such as blood lipids. Deep resequencing studies are being utilized to catalogue the allelic spectrum at GWAS loci. The goal of these studies is to identify causative variants and missing heritability, including heritability due to low frequency and rare alleles with large phenotypic impact. Whereas rare variant efforts have primarily focused on nonsynonymous coding variants, we hypothesized that noncoding variants in these loci are also functionally important. Using the HDL-C gene LIPG as an example, we explored the effect of regulatory variants identified through resequencing of subjects at HDL-C extremes on gene expression, protein levels, and phenotype. Resequencing a portion of the LIPG promoter and 5′ UTR in human subjects with extreme HDL-C, we identified several rare variants in individuals from both extremes. Luciferase reporter assays were used to measure the effect of these rare variants on LIPG expression. Variants conferring opposing effects on gene expression were enriched in opposite extremes of the phenotypic distribution. Minor alleles of a common regulatory haplotype and noncoding GWAS SNPs were associated with reduced plasma levels of the LIPG gene product endothelial lipase (EL), consistent with its role in HDL-C catabolism. Additionally, we found that a common nonfunctional coding variant associated with HDL-C (rs2000813) is in linkage disequilibrium with a 5′ UTR variant (rs34474737) that decreases LIPG promoter activity. We attribute the gene regulatory role of rs34474737 to the observed association of the coding variant with plasma EL levels and HDL-C. Taken together, the findings show that both rare and common noncoding regulatory variants are important contributors to the allelic spectrum in complex trait loci. PMID:22174694

  6. Discovery of XEN445: a potent and selective endothelial lipase inhibitor raises plasma HDL-cholesterol concentration in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaoyi; Dean, Richard; Jia, Qi; Zenova, Alla; Zhong, Jing; Grayson, Celene; Xie, Clark; Lindgren, Andrea; Samra, Pritpaul; Sojo, Luis; van Heek, Margaret; Lin, Linus; Percival, David; Fu, Jian-Min; Winther, Michael D; Zhang, Zaihui

    2013-12-15

    Endothelial lipase (EL) activity has been implicated in HDL metabolism and in atherosclerotic plaque development; inhibitors are proposed to be efficacious in the treatment of dyslipidemia related cardiovascular disease. We describe here the discovery of a novel class of anthranilic acids EL inhibitors. XEN445 (compound 13) was identified as a potent and selective EL inhibitor, that showed good ADME and PK properties, and demonstrated in vivo efficacy in raising plasma HDLc concentrations in mice. PMID:24211162

  7. Coffee intake can promote activity of antioxidant enzymes with increasing MDA level and decreasing HDL-cholesterol in physically trained rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eun-Young; Jang, Jin-Young

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of coffee intake and exercise on the antioxidative activity and plasma cholesterol profile of physically trained rats while they were exercising. Forty eight rats were under either the control diet with water (C) or control diet with coffee (CF) and at the same time they were given physical training for 4 weeks. In terms of physical training, the rats were exercised on a treadmill for 30 minutes everyday. At the end of 4 weeks, animals in each dietary group were subdivided into 3 groups: before-exercise (BE); during-exercise (DE); after-exercise (AE). Animals in the DE group were exercised on a treadmill for one hour, immediately before being sacrificed. Animals in the AE group were allowed to take a rest for one hour after exercise. TG levels were significantly high in coffee intake group than in control group. Also TG level of AE group was significantly higher than that of BE group. Exercise and coffee-exercise interaction effects were significant in total cholesterol (P = 0.0004, 0.0170). The AE of coffee intake group showed highest total cholesterol levels. HDL-cholesterol was significantly lower in coffee intake group than in control group. Coffee, exercise, and coffee-exercise interaction effects were significant in SOD (P = 0.0001, 0.0001, and 0.0001). The AE and BE of coffee intake group showed higher SOD levels than the other four groups. Catalase activities were significantly higher in coffee intake group than control group. No significant main effect was found in GSH/GSSG. Coffee, exercise, and coffee-exercise interaction effects were significant in MDA levels (P = 0.0464, 0.0016, and 0.0353). The DE and AE of coffee intake group and the DE of control group showed higher MDA levels than the BE of control group. Therefore, coffee intake can promote activities of antioxidant enzyme but it also increases MDA and decreases HDL-cholesterol in physically trained rats. PMID:20827343

  8. Novel apo E-derived ABCA1 agonist peptide (CS-6253) promotes reverse cholesterol transport and induces formation of preβ-1 HDL in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Hafiane, Anouar; Bielicki, John K.; Johansson, Jan O.; Genest, Jacques; Zhu, Xuewei

    2015-07-24

    Apolipoprotein (apo) mimetic peptides replicate some aspects of HDL function. We have previously reported the effects of compound ATI-5261 on its ability to replicate many functions of native apo A-I in the process of HDL biogenesis. ATI-5261 induced muscle toxicity in wild type C57Bl/6 mice, increased CPK, ALT and AST and increase in triglyceride (Tg) levels. Aromatic phenylalanine residues on the non-polar face of ATI-5261, together with positively charged arginine residues at the lipid-water interface were responsible for these effects. This information was used to create a novel analog (CS-6253) that was non-toxic. We evaluated this peptide designed from the carboxyl terminus of apo E, in its ability to mimic apo A-I functionality. Our data shows that the lipidated particles generated by incubating cells overexpressing ABCA1 with lipid free CS-6253 enhances the rate of ABCA1 lipid efflux with high affinity interactions with native ABCA1 oligomeric forms and plasma membrane micro-domains. Interaction between ABCA1 and lipid free CS-6253 resulted in formation of nascent HDL-CS-6253 particles that are actively remodeled in plasma. Mature HDL-CS-6253 particles deliver cholesterol to liver cells via SR-BI in-vitro. CS-6253 significantly increases cholesterol efflux in murine macrophages and in human THP-1 macrophage-derived foam cells expressing ABCA1. Addition of CS-6253 to plasma dose-dependently displaced apo A-I from α-HDL particles and led to de novo formation of preβ-1 HDL that stimulates ABCA1 dependent cholesterol efflux efficiently. When incubated with human plasma CS-6253 was also found to bind with HDL and LDL and promoted the transfer of cholesterol from HDL to LDL predominantly. Our data shows that CS-6253 mimics apo A-I in its ability to promote ABCA1-mediated formation of nascent HDL particles, and enhances formation of preβ-1 HDL with increase in the cycling of apo A-I between the preβ and α-HDL particles in-vitro. These

  9. Synbiotic food consumption reduces levels of triacylglycerols and VLDL, but not cholesterol, LDL, or HDL in plasma from pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Taghizadeh, Mohsen; Hashemi, Teibeh; Shakeri, Hossein; Abedi, Fatemeh; Sabihi, Sima-Sadat; Alizadeh, Sabihe-Alsadat; Asemi, Zatolla

    2014-02-01

    To our knowledge, no reports are available indicating the effects of synbiotic food consumption on blood lipid profiles and biomarkers of oxidative stress among pregnant women. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of daily consumption of a synbiotic food on blood lipid profiles and biomarkers of oxidative stress in pregnant women. This randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial was performed among 52 primigravida pregnant women, aged 18 to 35-year-old at their third trimester. After a 2-week run-in period, subjects were randomly assigned to consume either a synbiotic (n = 26) or control food (n = 26) for 9 weeks. The synbiotic food consisted of a probiotic viable and heat-resistant Lactobacillus sporogenes (1 × 10⁷ CFU) and 0.04 g inulin (HPX)/g as the prebiotic. Patients were asked to consume the synbiotic and control foods two times a day. Biochemical measurements including blood lipid profiles, plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total glutathione (GSH) were conducted before and after 9 weeks of intervention. Consumption of a synbiotic food for 9 weeks resulted in a significant reduction in serum TAG (P = 0.04), VLDL (P = 0.04) and a significant rise in plasma GSH levels (P = 0.004) compared to the control food. No significant effects of the synbiotic food consumption on serum TC, LDL, HDL and plasma TAC levels (P > 0.05) were observed. Trial registry code: http://www.irct.ir . IRCT201212105623N3. PMID:24271261

  10. The Role of Oxidized Cholesterol in Diabetes-Induced Lysosomal Dysfunction in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Bakeman, Anna; Rosko, Andrew; Glasser, Rebecca; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-05-01

    Abnormalities in lysosomal function have been reported in diabetes, aging, and age-related degenerative diseases. These lysosomal abnormalities are an early manifestation of neurodegenerative diseases and often precede the onset of clinical symptoms such as learning and memory deficits; however, the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction is not known. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction in the cortex and hippocampi, key structures involved in learning and memory, of a type 2 diabetes (T2D) mouse model, the leptin receptor deficient db/db mouse. We demonstrate for the first time that diabetes leads to destabilization of lysosomes as well as alterations in the protein expression, activity, and/or trafficking of two lysosomal enzymes, hexosaminidase A and cathepsin D, in the hippocampus of db/db mice. Pioglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD) commonly used in the treatment of diabetes due to its ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reverse hyperglycemia, was ineffective in reversing the diabetes-induced changes on lysosomal enzymes. Our previous work revealed that pioglitazone does not reverse hypercholesterolemia; thus, we investigated whether cholesterol plays a role in diabetes-induced lysosomal changes. In vitro, cholesterol promoted the destabilization of lysosomes, suggesting that lysosomal-related changes associated with diabetes are due to elevated levels of cholesterol. Since lysosome dysfunction precedes neurodegeneration, cognitive deficits, and Alzheimer's disease neuropathology, our results may provide a potential mechanism that links diabetes with complications of the central nervous system. PMID:25976368

  11. HDL, Atherosclerosis, and Emerging Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Genest, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to provide an overview on the properties of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) and their cardioprotective effects. Emergent HDL therapies will be presented in the context of the current understanding of HDL function, metabolism, and protective antiatherosclerotic properties. The epidemiological association between levels of HDL-C or its major apolipoprotein (apoA-I) is strong, graded, and coherent across populations. HDL particles mediate cellular cholesterol efflux, have antioxidant properties, and modulate vascular inflammation and vasomotor function and thrombosis. A link of causality has been cast into doubt with Mendelian randomization data suggesting that genes causing HDL-C deficiency are not associated with increased cardiovascular risk, nor are genes associated with increased HDL-C, with a protective effect. Despite encouraging data from small studies, drugs that increase HDL-C levels have not shown an effect on major cardiovascular end-points in large-scale clinical trials. It is likely that the cholesterol mass within HDL particles is a poor biomarker of therapeutic efficacy. In the present review, we will focus on novel therapeutic avenues and potential biomarkers of HDL function. A better understanding of HDL antiatherogenic functions including reverse cholesterol transport, vascular protective and antioxidation effects will allow novel insight on novel, emergent therapies for cardiovascular prevention. PMID:23781332

  12. Genetic determinants of HDL metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ossoli, A; Gomaraschi, M; Franceschini, G; Calabresi, L

    2014-01-01

    Plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL) comprise a highly heterogeneous family of lipoprotein particles, with subclasses that can be separated and identified according to density, size, surface charge as well as shape and protein composition. There is evidence that these subclasses may differ in their functional properties. The individual plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) level is generally taken as a snapshot of the steady-state concentration of all circulating HDL subclasses together, but this is insufficient to capture the structural and functional variation in HDL particles. HDL are continuously remodeled and metabolized in plasma and interstitial fluids, through the interaction with a large number of factors, including structural proteins, membrane transporters, enzymes, transfer proteins and receptors. Genetic variation in these factors can lead to essential changes in plasma HDL levels, and to remarkable changes in HDL particle density, size, surface charge, shape, and composition in lipids and apolipoproteins. This review discusses the impact of rare mutations and common variants in genes encoding factors involved in HDL remodeling and metabolism on plasma HDL-C levels and particle distribution. The study of the effects of human genetic variation in major players in HDL metabolism provides important clues on how individual factors modulate the formation, maturation, remodeling and catabolism of HDL. PMID:24606513

  13. Impact of HDL oxidation by the myeloperoxidase system on sterol efflux by the ABCA1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Shao, Baohai; Heinecke, Jay W

    2011-10-19

    Protein oxidation by phagocytic white blood cells is implicated in tissue injury during inflammation. One important target might be high-density lipoprotein (HDL), which protects against atherosclerosis by removing excess cholesterol from artery wall macrophages. In the human artery wall, cholesterol-laden macrophages are a rich source of myeloperoxidase (MPO), which uses hydrogen peroxide for oxidative reactions in the extracellular milieu. Levels of two characteristic products of MPO-chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine-are markedly elevated in HDL from human atherosclerotic lesions. Here, we describe how MPO-dependent chlorination impairs the ability of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), HDL's major protein, to transport cholesterol by the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) pathway. Faulty interactions between apoA-I and ABCA1 are involved. Tandem mass spectrometry and investigations of mutated forms of apoA-I demonstrate that tyrosine residues in apoA-I are chlorinated in a site-specific manner by chloramine intermediates on suitably juxtaposed lysine residues. Plasma HDL isolated from subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD) also contains higher levels of chlorinated and nitrated tyrosine residues than HDL from healthy subjects. Thus, the presence of chlorinated HDL might serve as a marker of CAD risk. Because HDL damaged by MPO in vitro becomes dysfunctional, inhibiting MPO in vivo might be cardioprotective. PMID:21501700

  14. Higher breakfast glycaemic load is associated with increased metabolic syndrome risk, including lower HDL-cholesterol concentrations and increased TAG concentrations, in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Nicholl, Analise; du Heaume, Mary; Mori, Trevor A; Beilin, Lawrence J; Oddy, Wendy H; Bremner, Alexandra P; O'Sullivan, Therese A

    2014-12-28

    Almost all previous studies examining the associations between glycaemic load (GL) and metabolic syndrome risk have used a daily GL value. The daily value does not distinguish between peaks of GL intake over the day, which may be more closely associated with the risk of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cross-sectional associations between daily and mealtime measures of GL and metabolic syndrome risk, including metabolic syndrome components, in adolescents. Adolescents participating in the 14-year follow-up of the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study completed 3 d food records and metabolic assessments. Breakfast GL, lunch GL, dinner GL and a score representing meal GL peaks over the day were determined in 516 adolescents. Logistic regression models were used to investigate whether GL variables were independent predictors of the metabolic syndrome in this population-based cohort (3.5% prevalence of the metabolic syndrome). Breakfast GL was found to be predictive of the metabolic syndrome in girls (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.04, 1.27; P <0.01), but not in boys. Other meal GL values and daily GL were found to be not significant predictors of the metabolic syndrome. When breakfast GL was examined in relation to each of the components of the metabolic syndrome in girls, it was found to be negatively associated with fasting HDL-cholesterol concentrations (P= 0.037; β = - 0.004; 95% CI - 0.008, - 0.002) and positively associated with fasting TAG concentrations (P= 0.008; exp(β) = 1.002; 95% CI 1.001, 1.004). he results of the present study suggest that there may be an association between breakfast composition and metabolic syndrome components in adolescent girls. These findings support further investigation into including lower-GL foods as part of a healthy breakfast in adolescence, particularly for girls. PMID:25327283

  15. Cholesterol testing and results

    MedlinePlus

    ... lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol) High density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol) Triglycerides (another type of fat in your blood) Very ... made of fat and protein. They carry cholesterol, triglycerides, and other fats, called lipids, in the blood ...

  16. The effects of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on HDL-cholesterol concentrations depend on ABCA1 genetic variants in the Boston Puerto Rican health study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and aims: ATP-binding cassette transporters G5/G8 (ABCG5/G8) are associated with HDL-C concentrations. To assess whether the effect of ABCG5/G8 genetic variants on HDL-C concentrations is dependent on ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 (ABCA1), we studied potential interactions between ...

  17. The effect of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on plasma HDL cholesterol levels depends on the ABCA1 gene variation in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: ATP-binding cassette transporters G5/G8 have shown an association with HDL-C. One of the most likely mechanisms to explain those associations is through ABCA1. Objective: To assess whether the effect of ABCG5/G8 polymorphisms on HDL-C is dependent on ABCA1, we studied potential interacti...

  18. A genetic variant of the CAPN10 gene in Mexican subjects with dyslipidemia is associated with increased HDL-cholesterol concentrations after the consumption of a soy protein and soluble fiber dietary portfolio.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Cruz, Martha; Torres, Nimbe; Tovar, Armando R; Tejero, M Elizabeth; Castellanos-Jankiewicz, Ashley; del Bosque-Plata, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is a major public health problem, and therefore, it is important to develop dietary strategies to diminish the prevalence of this disorder. It was recently reported that diet may play an important role in triggering insulin resistance by interacting with genetic variants at the CAPN10 gene locus in patients with metabolic syndrome. Nonetheless, it remains unknown whether genetic variants of genes involved in the development of type 2 diabetes are associated with variations in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). The study used a single-center, prospective, cohort design. Here, we assessed the effect of four variants of the CAPN10 gene on HDL-C levels in response to a soy protein and soluble fiber dietary portfolio in subjects with dyslipidemia. In 31 Mexican dyslipidemic individuals, we analyzed four CAPN10 gene variants (rs5030952, rs2975762, rs3792267, and rs2975760) associated with type 2 diabetes. Subjects with the GG genotype of the rs2975762 variant of the CAPN10 gene were better responders to dietary intervention, showing increased HDL-C concentrations from the first month of treatment. HDL-C concentrations in participants with the wild type genotype increased by 17.0%, whereas the HDL-C concentration in subjects with the variant genotypes increased by only 3.22% (p = 0.03); the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels of GG carriers tended to decrease (-12.6%). These results indicate that Mexican dyslipidemic carriers of the rs2975762-GG genotype are better responders to this dietary intervention. PMID:25238846

  19. Apolipoprotein A-II is a key regulatory factor of HDL metabolism as appears from studies with transgenic animals and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Maïga, Sira Fatoumata; Kalopissis, Athina-Despina; Chabert, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    The structure and metabolism of HDL are linked to their major apolipoproteins (apo) A-I and A-II. HDL metabolism is very dynamic and depends on the constant remodeling by lipases, lipid transfer proteins and receptors. HDL exert several cardioprotective effects, through their antioxidant and antiinflammatory capacities and through the stimulation of reverse cholesterol transport from extrahepatic tissues to the liver for excretion into bile. HDL also serve as plasma reservoir for C and E apolipoproteins, as transport vehicles for a great variety of proteins, and may have more physiological functions than previously recognized. In this review we will develop several aspects of HDL metabolism with emphasis on the structure/function of apo A-I and apo A-II. An important contribution to our understanding of the respective roles of apo A-I and apo A-II comes from studies using transgenic animal models that highlighted the stabilizatory role of apo A-II on HDL through inhibition of their remodeling by lipases. Clinical studies coupled with proteomic analyses revealed the presence of dysfunctional HDL in patients with cardiovascular disease. Beyond HDL cholesterol, a new notion is the functionality of HDL particles. In spite of abundant literature on HDL metabolic properties, a major question remains unanswered: which HDL particle(s) confer(s) protection against cardiovascular risk? PMID:24012775

  20. apo B gene knockout in mice results in embryonic lethality in homozygotes and neural tube defects, male infertility, and reduced HDL cholesterol ester and apo A-I transport rates in heterozygotes.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L S; Voyiaziakis, E; Markenson, D F; Sokol, K A; Hayek, T; Breslow, J L

    1995-01-01

    apo B is a structural constituent of several classes of lipoprotein particles, including chylomicrons, VLDL, and LDL. To better understand the role of apo B in the body, we have used gene targeting in embryonic stem cells to create a null apo B allele in the mouse. Homozygous apo B deficiency led to embryonic lethality, with resorption of all embryos by gestational day 9. Heterozygotes showed an increased tendency to intrauterine death with some fetuses having incomplete neural tube closure and some live-born heterozygotes developing hydrocephalus. The majority of male heterozygotes were sterile, although the genitourinary system and sperm were grossly normal. Viable heterozygotes had normal triglycerides, but total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol levels were decreased by 37, 37, and 39%, respectively. Hepatic and intestinal apo B mRNA levels were decreased in heterozygotes, presumably contributing to the decreased LDL levels through decreased synthesis of apo B-containing lipoproteins. Kinetic studies indicated that heterozygotes had decreased transport rates of HDL cholesterol ester and apo A-I. As liver and intestinal apo A-I mRNA levels were unchanged, the mechanism for decreased apo A-I transport must be posttranscriptional. Heterozygotes also had normal cholesterol absorption and a normal response of the plasma lipoprotein pattern to chronic consumption of a high fat, high cholesterol, Western-type diet. In summary, we report a mouse model for apo B deficiency with several phenotypic features that were unexpected based on clinical studies of apo B-deficient humans, such as embryonic lethality in homozygotes and neural tube closure defects, male infertility, and a major defect in HDL production in heterozygotes. This model presents an opportunity to study the mechanisms underlying these phenotypic changes. Images PMID:7593600

  1. Cholesterol Secosterol Aldehydes Induce Amyloidogenesis and Dysfunction of Wild Type Tumor Protein p53

    PubMed Central

    Nieva, Jorge; Song, Byeong-Doo; Rogel, Joseph K.; Kujawara, David; Altobel, Lawrence; Izharrudin, Alicia; Boldt, Grant E.; Grover, Rajesh K.; Wentworth, Anita D.; Wentworth, Paul

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Epidemiologic and clinical evidence points to an increased risk of cancer when coupled with chronic inflammation. However, the molecular mechanisms that underpin this interrelationship remain largely unresolved. Herein we show that the inflammation-derived cholesterol 5,6-secosterol aldehydes, atheronal-A (KA) and –B (ALD), but not the PUFA-derived aldehydes 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and 4-hydroxyhexenal (HHE), induce misfolding of wild-type p53 into an amyloidogenic form that binds thioflavin T and Congo Red dyes but cannot bind to a consensus DNA sequence. Treatment of lung carcinoma cells with KA and ALD leads to a loss of function of extracted p53, as determined by analysis of extracted nuclear protein and in activation of p21. Our results uncover a plausible chemical link between inflammation and cancer and expands the already pivotal role of p53 dysfunction and cancer risk. PMID:21802012

  2. HDL therapy for cardiovascular diseases: the road to HDL mimetics.

    PubMed

    White, C Roger; Datta, Geeta; Zhang, Zhenghao; Gupta, Himanshu; Garber, David W; Mishra, Vinod K; Palgunachari, Mayakonda N; Handattu, Shaila P; Chaddha, Manjula; Anantharamaiah, G M

    2008-10-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) are currently the drug of choice for the clinical management of elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Although statin treatment provides an overall improvement in outcomes, clinical trial data reveal a significant number of cardiac events despite reaching targeted LDL levels. A low serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level is an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. Accordingly, there has been interest in determining whether HDL elevation, in addition to LDL lowering, further reduces risk in patients with coronary artery disease. Several commonly prescribed lipid-lowering therapies modestly raise HDL, but their use may be limited by the development of adverse reactions. Emerging data suggest that HDL quality and function may also be significantly reduced by atherosclerosis and other inflammatory diseases. The goal of this review is to discuss the current status of HDL therapeutics, with emphasis on a novel class of agent, the apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptides, which improve the functional properties of HDL cholesterol. PMID:18706282

  3. Cholesterol and Statins

    MedlinePlus

    ... the liver makes ldl & hdl In the liver, triglycerides, cholesterol, and proteins form together to make LDL ... This is especially important for individuals with high triglyceride and/or low HDL levels who are overweight ...

  4. HDL biogenesis, remodeling, and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Zannis, Vassilis I; Fotakis, Panagiotis; Koukos, Georgios; Kardassis, Dimitris; Ehnholm, Christian; Jauhiainen, Matti; Chroni, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we review how HDL is generated, remodeled, and catabolized in plasma. We describe key features of the proteins that participate in these processes, emphasizing how mutations in apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and the other proteins affect HDL metabolism. The biogenesis of HDL initially requires functional interaction of apoA-I with the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and subsequently interactions of the lipidated apoA-I forms with lecithin/cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Mutations in these proteins either prevent or impair the formation and possibly the functionality of HDL. Remodeling and catabolism of HDL is the result of interactions of HDL with cell receptors and other membrane and plasma proteins including hepatic lipase (HL), endothelial lipase (EL), phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), apolipoprotein M (apoM), scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1), the F1 subunit of ATPase (Ecto F1-ATPase), and the cubulin/megalin receptor. Similarly to apoA-I, apolipoprotein E and apolipoprotein A-IV were shown to form discrete HDL particles containing these apolipoproteins which may have important but still unexplored functions. Furthermore, several plasma proteins were found associated with HDL and may modulate its biological functions. The effect of these proteins on the functionality of HDL is the topic of ongoing research. PMID:25522986

  5. Plasma cholesterol-lowering and transient liver dysfunction in mice lacking squalene synthase in the liver[S

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Shuichi; Yagyu, Hiroaki; Tozawa, Ryuichi; Tazoe, Fumiko; Takahashi, Manabu; Kitamine, Tetsuya; Yamamuro, Daisuke; Sakai, Kent; Sekiya, Motohiro; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Honda, Akira; Ishibashi, Shun

    2015-01-01

    Squalene synthase (SS) catalyzes the biosynthesis of squalene, the first specific intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. To test the feasibility of lowering plasma cholesterol by inhibiting hepatic SS, we generated mice in which SS is specifically knocked out in the liver (L-SSKO) using Cre-loxP technology. Hepatic SS activity of L-SSKO mice was reduced by >90%. In addition, cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver slices was almost eliminated. Although the hepatic squalene contents were markedly reduced in L-SSKO mice, the hepatic contents of cholesterol and its precursors distal to squalene were indistinguishable from those of control mice, indicating the presence of sufficient centripetal flow of cholesterol and/or its precursors from the extrahepatic tissues. L-SSKO mice showed a transient liver dysfunction with moderate hepatomegaly presumably secondary to increased farnesol production. In a fed state, the plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride were significantly reduced in L-SSKO mice, primarily owing to reduced hepatic VLDL secretion. In a fasted state, the hypolipidemic effect was lost. mRNA expression of liver X receptor α target genes was reduced, while that of sterol-regulatory element binding protein 2 target genes was increased. In conclusion, liver-specific ablation of SS inhibits hepatic cholesterol biosynthesis and induces hypolipidemia without increasing significant mortality. PMID:25755092

  6. Cholesterol efflux and reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Favari, Elda; Chroni, Angelika; Tietge, Uwe J F; Zanotti, Ilaria; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Bernini, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Both alterations of lipid/lipoprotein metabolism and inflammatory events contribute to the formation of the atherosclerotic plaque, characterized by the accumulation of abnormal amounts of cholesterol and macrophages in the artery wall. Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) may counteract the pathogenic events leading to the formation and development of atheroma, by promoting the high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-mediated removal of cholesterol from the artery wall. Recent in vivo studies established the inverse relationship between RCT efficiency and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD), thus suggesting that the promotion of this process may represent a novel strategy to reduce atherosclerotic plaque burden and subsequent cardiovascular events. HDL plays a primary role in all stages of RCT: (1) cholesterol efflux, where these lipoproteins remove excess cholesterol from cells; (2) lipoprotein remodeling, where HDL undergo structural modifications with possible impact on their function; and (3) hepatic lipid uptake, where HDL releases cholesterol to the liver, for the final excretion into bile and feces. Although the inverse association between HDL plasma levels and CVD risk has been postulated for years, recently this concept has been challenged by studies reporting that HDL antiatherogenic functions may be independent of their plasma levels. Therefore, assessment of HDL function, evaluated as the capacity to promote cell cholesterol efflux may offer a better prediction of CVD than HDL levels alone. Consistent with this idea, it has been recently demonstrated that the evaluation of serum cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) is a predictor of atherosclerosis extent in humans. PMID:25522988

  7. Enhanced HDL Functionality in Small HDL Species Produced Upon Remodeling of HDL by Reconstituted HDL, CSL112

    PubMed Central

    Didichenko, Svetlana A.; Navdaev, Alexei V.; Cukier, Alexandre M.O.; Gille, Andreas; Schuetz, Patrick; Spycher, Martin O.; Thérond, Patrice; Chapman, M. John; Kontush, Anatol

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: CSL112, human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) reconstituted with phosphatidylcholine, is known to cause a dramatic rise in small high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Objective: To explore the mechanisms by which the formation of small HDL particles is induced by CSL112. Methods and Results: Infusion of CSL112 into humans caused elevation of 2 small diameter HDL fractions and 1 large diameter fraction. Ex vivo studies showed that this remodeling does not depend on lipid transfer proteins or lipases. Rather, interaction of CSL112 with purified HDL spontaneously gave rise to 3 HDL species: a large, spherical species composed of apoA-I from native HDL and CSL112; a small, disc-shaped species composed of apoA-I from CSL112, but smaller because of the loss of phospholipids; and the smallest species, lipid-poor apoA-I composed of apoA-I from HDL and CSL112. Time-course studies suggest that remodeling occurs by an initial fusion of CSL112 with HDL and subsequent fission leading to the smaller forms. Functional studies showed that ATP-binding cassette transporter 1–dependent cholesterol efflux and anti-inflammatory effects in whole blood were carried by the 2 small species with little activity in the large species. In contrast, the ability to inactivate lipid hydroperoxides in oxidized low-density lipoprotein was carried predominantly by the 2 largest species and was low in lipid-poor apoA-I. Conclusions: We have described a mechanism for the formation of small, highly functional HDL species involving spontaneous fusion of discoidal HDL with spherical HDL and subsequent fission. Similar remodeling is likely to occur during the life cycle of apoA-I in vivo. PMID:27436846

  8. Data in support of a central role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 polymorphism in recurrent cardiovascular disease risk in the setting of high HDL cholesterol and C-reactive protein using Bayesian network modeling.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, James P; Salzman, Peter; Ryan, Dan; Moss, Arthur J; Zareba, Wojciech; Sparks, Charles E

    2016-09-01

    Data is presented that was utilized as the basis for Bayesian network modeling of influence pathways focusing on the central role of a polymorphism of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) on recurrent cardiovascular disease risk in patients with high levels of HDL cholesterol and C-reactive protein (CRP) as a marker of inflammation, "Influences on Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-2 Polymorphism-Associated Recurrent Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Patients with High HDL Cholesterol and Inflammation" (Corsetti et al., 2016; [1]). The data consist of occurrence of recurrent coronary events in 166 post myocardial infarction patients along with 1. clinical data on gender, race, age, and body mass index; 2. blood level data on 17 biomarkers; and 3. genotype data on 53 presumptive CVD-related single nucleotide polymorphisms. Additionally, a flow diagram of the Bayesian modeling procedure is presented along with Bayesian network subgraphs (root nodes to outcome events) utilized as the data from which PAI-2 associated influence pathways were derived (Corsetti et al., 2016; [1]). PMID:27284570

  9. HDL cholesterol levels and weight are the main determinants of subclinical atherosclerosis in the young with type 1 diabetes and suitable glycaemic control.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Camila S; Lana, Janaina M; Gabbay, Monica A L; de Sa, Joao R; Dib, Sergio A

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate subclinical atherosclerosis and related factors in young type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients and healthy peers. Carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and anthropometric/laboratorial data were obtained for 83 T1D patients (mean age 19.5 ± 4.0 years, disease duration 9.8 ± 4.8 years) and for 36 matched healthy subjects. Considering all the participants as one group, male sex (p = 0.008), weight (p = 0.016) and T1D (p < 0.001) were positively associated with a higher cIMT. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) (p = 0.036) was negatively associated with cIMT in T1D. In the male T1D patients, HDL ≤47.5 mg/dL had a sensitivity of 87.5% and specificity of 57% (p = 0.035) in detecting those belonging to a higher cIMT tercile. In conclusion, weight and T1D were associated with increased cIMT. HDL levels ≤47.5 mg/dL were related to a higher cIMT in male T1D patients. PMID:24553254

  10. Metabolic and functional relevance of HDL subspecies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Though the association of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) with cardiovascular disease (CVD) was described as early as 1950, HDL’s role in CVD still remains to be fully elucidated. There are numerous publications showing the inverse relationship between HDL-C and CVD risk; however, in t...

  11. Anion Exchange HPLC Isolation of High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) and On-Line Estimation of Proinflammatory HDL

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiang; Xu, Hao; Zhang, Hao; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Gao, Hai-qing; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.

    2014-01-01

    Proinflammatory high-density lipoprotein (p-HDL) is a biomarker of cardiovascular disease. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by chronic states of oxidative stress that many consider to play a role in forming p-HDL. To measure p-HDL, apolipoprotein (apo) B containing lipoproteins are precipitated. Supernatant HDL is incubated with an oxidant/LDL or an oxidant alone and rates of HDL oxidation monitored with dichlorofluorescein (DCFH). Although apoB precipitation is convenient for isolating HDL, the resulting supernatant matrix likely influences HDL oxidation. To determine effects of supernatants on p-HDL measurements we purified HDL from plasma from SCD subjects by anion exchange (AE) chromatography, determined its rate of oxidation relative to supernatant HDL. SCD decreased total cholesterol but not triglycerides or HDL and increased cell-free (cf) hemoglobin (Hb) and xanthine oxidase (XO). HDL isolated by AE-HPLC had lower p-HDL levels than HDL in supernatants after apoB precipitation. XO+xanthine (X) and cf Hb accelerated purified HDL oxidation. Although the plate and AE-HPLC assays both showed p-HDL directly correlated with cf-Hb in SCD plasma, the plate assay yielded p-HDL data that was influenced more by cf-Hb than AE-HPLC generated p-HDL data. The AE-HPLC p-HDL assay reduces the influence of the supernatants and shows that SCD increases p-HDL. PMID:24609013

  12. ABCA1 and nascent HDL biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhui; Smith, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    ABCA1 mediates the secretion of cellular free cholesterol and phospholipids to an extracellular acceptor, apolipoprotein AI, to form nascent high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Thus, ABCA1 is a key molecule in cholesterol homeostasis. Functional studies of certain Tangier disease mutations demonstrate that ABCA1 has multiple activities, including plasma membrane remodeling and apoAI binding to cell surface, which participate in nascent HDL biogenesis. Recent advances in our understanding of ABCA1 have demonstrated that ABCA1also mediates unfolding the N terminus of apoAI on the cell surface, followed by lipidation of apoAI and release of nascent HDL. Although ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux to apoAI can occur on the plasma membrane, the role of apoAI retroendocytosis during cholesterol efflux may play a role in macrophage foam cells that store cholesterol esters in cytoplasmic lipid droplets. PMID:25359426

  13. Restoration of renal function does not correct impairment of uremic HDL properties.

    PubMed

    Kopecky, Chantal; Haidinger, Michael; Birner-Grünberger, Ruth; Darnhofer, Barbara; Kaltenecker, Christopher C; Marsche, Gunther; Holzer, Michael; Weichhart, Thomas; Antlanger, Marlies; Kovarik, Johannes J; Werzowa, Johannes; Hecking, Manfred; Säemann, Marcus D

    2015-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in renal transplant recipients, but the underlying causative mechanisms for this important problem remain elusive. Recent work has indicated that qualitative alterations of HDL affect its functional and compositional properties in ESRD. Here, we systematically analyzed HDL from stable renal transplant recipients, according to graft function, and from patients with ESRD to determine whether structural and functional properties of HDL remain dysfunctional after renal transplantation. Cholesterol acceptor capacity and antioxidative activity, representing two key cardioprotective mechanisms of HDL, were profoundly suppressed in kidney transplant recipients independent of graft function and were comparable with levels in patients with ESRD. Using a mass spectroscopy approach, we identified specific remodeling of transplant HDL with highly enriched proteins, including α-1 microglobulin/bikunin precursor, pigment epithelium-derived factor, surfactant protein B, and serum amyloid A. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that HDL from kidney recipients is uniquely altered at the molecular and functional levels, indicating a direct pathologic role of HDL that could contribute to the substantial cardiovascular risk in the transplant population. PMID:25071090

  14. Restoration of Renal Function Does Not Correct Impairment of Uremic HDL Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kopecky, Chantal; Haidinger, Michael; Birner-Grünberger, Ruth; Darnhofer, Barbara; Kaltenecker, Christopher C.; Marsche, Gunther; Holzer, Michael; Weichhart, Thomas; Antlanger, Marlies; Kovarik, Johannes J.; Werzowa, Johannes; Hecking, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in renal transplant recipients, but the underlying causative mechanisms for this important problem remain elusive. Recent work has indicated that qualitative alterations of HDL affect its functional and compositional properties in ESRD. Here, we systematically analyzed HDL from stable renal transplant recipients, according to graft function, and from patients with ESRD to determine whether structural and functional properties of HDL remain dysfunctional after renal transplantation. Cholesterol acceptor capacity and antioxidative activity, representing two key cardioprotective mechanisms of HDL, were profoundly suppressed in kidney transplant recipients independent of graft function and were comparable with levels in patients with ESRD. Using a mass spectroscopy approach, we identified specific remodeling of transplant HDL with highly enriched proteins, including α-1 microglobulin/bikunin precursor, pigment epithelium-derived factor, surfactant protein B, and serum amyloid A. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that HDL from kidney recipients is uniquely altered at the molecular and functional levels, indicating a direct pathologic role of HDL that could contribute to the substantial cardiovascular risk in the transplant population. PMID:25071090

  15. A single infusion of MDCO-216 (ApoA-1 Milano/POPC) increases ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux and pre-beta 1 HDL in healthy volunteers and patients with stable coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Kallend, D.G.; Reijers, J.A.A.; Bellibas, S.E.; Bobillier, A.; Kempen, H.; Burggraaf, J.; Moerland, M.; Wijngaard, P.L.J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Apolipoprotein A-1 (ApoA-1), based on epidemiology, is inversely associated with cardiovascular (CV) events. Human carriers of the ApoA-1 Milano variant have a reduced incidence of CV disease. Regression of atherosclerotic plaque burden was previously observed on intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) with ETC-216, a predecessor of MDCO-216. MDCO-216, a complex of dimeric ApoA-1 Milano and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, is being developed to reduce atherosclerotic plaque burden and CV events. We investigated the efficacy and safety of a single infusion of MDCO-216 in healthy volunteers and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods and results Twenty-four healthy volunteers and 24 patients with documented CAD received a 2-h infusion of MDCO-216 in a randomized, placebo controlled, single ascending dose study. Five cohorts of healthy volunteers and four cohorts of CAD patients received ApoA-1 Milano doses ranging from 5 to 40 mg/kg. Subjects were followed for 30 days. Dose-dependent increases in ApoA-1, phospholipid, and pre-beta 1 HDL and decreases in ApoE were observed. Prominent and sustained increases in triglyceride, and decreases in HDL-C, endogenous ApoA-1 and ApoA-II occurred at doses >20 mg/kg and profound increases in ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux were observed. Other lipid and lipoprotein parameters were generally unchanged. MDCO-216 was well tolerated. Conclusions MDCO-216-modulated lipid parameters profoundly increased ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux and was well tolerated. These single-dose data support further development of this agent for reducing atherosclerotic disease and subsequent CV events. PMID:27418968

  16. HDL particle number and size as predictors of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Kontush, Anatol

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that reduced concentrations of circulating high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles can be superior to HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels as a predictor of cardiovascular disease. Measurements of HDL particle numbers, therefore, bear a potential for the improved assessment of cardiovascular risk. Furthermore, such measurement can be relevant for the evaluation of novel therapeutic approaches targeting HDL. Modern in-depth analyses of HDL particle profile may further improve evaluation of cardiovascular risk. Although clinical relevance of circulating concentrations of HDL subpopulations to cardiovascular disease remains controversial, the negative relationship between the number of large HDL particles and cardiovascular disease suggests that assessment of HDL particle profile can be clinically useful. Reduced mean HDL size is equally associated with cardiovascular disease in large-scale clinical studies. Since HDL-C is primarily carried in the circulation by large, lipid-rich HDL particles, the inverse relationship between HDL size and cardiovascular risk can be secondary to those established for plasma levels of HDL particles, HDL-C, and large HDL. The epidemiological data thereby suggest that HDL particle number may represent a more relevant therapeutic target as compared to HDL-C. PMID:26500551

  17. LDL-apheresis depletes apoE-HDL and pre-β1-HDL in familial hypercholesterolemia: relevance to atheroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Orsoni, Alexina; Saheb, Samir; Levels, Johannes H. M.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje; Atassi, Marielle; Bittar, Randa; Robillard, Paul; Bruckert, Eric; Kontush, Anatol; Carrié, Alain; Chapman, M. John

    2011-01-01

    Subnormal HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein (apo)AI levels are characteristic of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), reflecting perturbed intravascular metabolism with compositional anomalies in HDL particles, including apoE enrichment. Does LDL-apheresis, which reduces HDL-cholesterol, apoAI, and apoE by adsorption, induce selective changes in HDL subpopulations, with relevance to atheroprotection? Five HDL subpopulations were fractionated from pre- and post-LDL-apheresis plasmas of normotriglyceridemic FH subjects (n = 11) on regular LDL-apheresis (>2 years). Apheresis lowered both plasma apoE (−62%) and apoAI (−16%) levels, with preferential, genotype-independent reduction in apoE. The mass ratio of HDL2:HDL3 was lowered from ∼1:1 to 0.72:1 by apheresis, reflecting selective removal of HDL2 mass (80% of total HDL adsorbed). Pre-LDL-apheresis, HDL2 subpopulations were markedly enriched in apoE, consistent with ∼1 copy of apoE per 4 HDL particles. Large amounts (50-66%) of apoE-HDL were removed by apheresis, preferentially in the HDL2b subfraction (−50%); minor absolute amounts of apoE-HDL were removed from HDL3 subfractions. Furthermore, pre-β1-HDL particle levels were subnormal following removal (−53%) upon apheresis, suggesting that cellular cholesterol efflux may be defective in the immediate postapheresis period. In LDL-receptor (LDL-R) deficiency, LDL-apheresis may enhance flux through the reverse cholesterol transport pathway and equally attenuate potential biglycan-mediated deposition of apoE-HDL in the arterial matrix. PMID:21957200

  18. Cholesterol-mediated surfactant dysfunction is mitigated by surfactant protein A.

    PubMed

    Hiansen, Joshua Qua; Keating, Eleonora; Aspros, Alex; Yao, Li-Juan; Bosma, Karen J; Yamashita, Cory M; Lewis, James F; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2015-03-01

    The ability of pulmonary surfactant to reduce surface tension at the alveolar surface is impaired in various lung diseases. Recent animal studies indicate that elevated levels of cholesterol within surfactant may contribute to its inhibition. It was hypothesized that elevated cholesterol levels within surfactant inhibit human surfactant biophysical function and that these effects can be reversed by surfactant protein A (SP-A). The initial experiment examined the function of surfactant from mechanically ventilated trauma patients in the presence and absence of a cholesterol sequestering agent, methyl-β-cyclodextrin. The results demonstrated improved surface activity when cholesterol was sequestered in vitro using a captive bubble surfactometer (CBS). These results were explored further by reconstitution of surfactant with various concentrations of cholesterol with and without SP-A, and testing of the functionality of these samples in vitro with the CBS and in vivo using surfactant depleted rats. Overall, the results consistently demonstrated that surfactant function was inhibited by levels of cholesterol of 10% (w/w phospholipid) but this inhibition was mitigated by the presence of SP-A. It is concluded that cholesterol-induced surfactant inhibition can actively contribute to physiological impairment of the lungs in mechanically ventilated patients and that SP-A levels may be important to maintain surfactant function in the presence of high cholesterol within surfactant. PMID:25522687

  19. Divergent effects of alpha-tocopherol and vitamin C on the generation of dysfunctional HDL associated with diabetes and the Hp 2-2 genotype.

    PubMed

    Asleh, Rabea; Levy, Andrew P

    2010-02-01

    The haptoglobin (Hp) 2-2 genotype is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in diabetes (DM). We recently proposed this increased risk arises from the tethering of redox active hemoglobin (Hb) to high density lipoprotein (HDL), thereby resulting in oxidative modification of HDL. Clinical trials have demonstrated that vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) decreases while vitamin C increases CVD in Hp 2-2 DM individuals. We sought to test the hypothesis that the interaction of alpha-tocopherol or vitamin C on CVD in Hp 2-2 DM was due to their divergent effects on HDL oxidation and function. Vitamin C significantly increased while alpha-tocopherol completely blocked oxidation mediated by glycosylated Hb-Hp 2-2. Vitamin C had no benefit while alpha-tocopherol completely restored HDL function in Hp 2-2 DM mice. Co-administration of vitamin C mitigated the protective effects of alpha-tocopherol on HDL. There exists a pharmacogenomic interaction between vitamin C and alpha-tocopherol and the Hp 2-2 genotype on HDL function and structure. Choosing the correct antioxidant in the correct subset of patients may be critical in order to demonstrate benefit from antioxidant therapy. PMID:19769483

  20. Cholesterol Accumulation Is Associated with Lysosomal Dysfunction and Autophagic Stress in Npc1−/− Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Guanghong; Yao, Yueqin; Liu, Jihua; Yu, Zhang; Cheung, Simon; Xie, Ang; Liang, Xiaoli; Bi, Xiaoning

    2007-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of NPC1 and NPC2 genes. Progressive neurodegeneration that accompanies NPC is fatal, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. In the present study, we characterized the association of autophagic-lysosomal dysfunction with cholesterol accumulation in Npc1−/− mice during postnatal development. Brain levels of lysosomal cathepsin D were significantly higher in mutant than in wild-type mice. Increases in cathepsin D occurred first in neurons and later in astrocytes and microglia and were both spatially and temporally associated with intracellular cholesterol accumulation and neurodegeneration. Furthermore, levels of ubiquitinated proteins were higher in endosomal/lysosomal fractions of brains from Npc1−/− mice than from wild-type mice. Immunoblotting results showed that levels of LC3-II were significantly higher in brains of mutant than wild-type mice. Combined LC3 immunofluorescence and filipin staining showed that LC3 accumulated within filipin-labeled cholesterol clusters inside Purkinje cells. Electron microscopic examination revealed the existence of autophagic vacuole-like structures and multivesicles in brains from Npc1−/− mice. These results provide strong evidence that cholesterol accumulation-induced changes in autophagy-lysosome function are closely associated with neurodegeneration in NPC. PMID:17631520

  1. Usefulness of High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol to Predict Survival in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Carolyn M; McCully, Robert B; Murphy, Joseph G; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Frantz, Robert P; Kane, Garvan C

    2016-07-15

    It has been suggested that lipoprotein abnormalities may contribute to the pulmonary arteriolar dysfunction observed in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) has vasodilatory, anti-inflammatory, and endothelial protective properties. We hypothesized that a higher serum HDL level may be advantageous for survival in PAH and that the serum HDL level at diagnosis would be an independent predictor of survival in PAH and be additive to previously validated predictors of survival. This study included all patients with PAH seen at the Mayo Clinic Pulmonary Hypertension Clinic from January 1, 1995, to December 31, 2009, who had a baseline HDL measurement. Mortality was analyzed over 5 years using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards ratios were calculated to evaluate the relation between baseline HDL level and survival. HDL levels were available for 227 patients. Higher HDL levels were associated with significantly lower mortality. Patients with an HDL >54 mg/dl at diagnosis had a 5-year survival of 59%. By comparison those with an HDL <34 mg/dl had a 5-year survival of 30%. On multivariate analysis, higher HDL was associated with an age-adjusted risk ratio for death of 0.78 (CI 0.67 to 0.91; p <0.01) per 10 mg/dl increase. In conclusion, HDL was an independent predictor of survival in PAH. PMID:27291969

  2. Home-Use Tests - Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... this test does: This is a home-use test kit to measure total cholesterol. What cholesterol is: Cholesterol is a fat (lipid) in your blood. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) ("good" cholesterol) helps protect your heart, but low-density lipoprotein (LDL) ("bad" cholesterol) can clog the arteries of your ...

  3. Realistic intake of a flavanol-rich soluble cocoa product increases HDL-cholesterol without inducing anthropometric changes in healthy and moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Martínez-López, Sara; Sarriá, Beatriz; Sierra-Cinos, José Luis; Goya, Luis; Mateos, Raquel; Bravo, Laura

    2014-02-01

    To assess whether antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and other cardio-protective effects attributed to cocoa are achieved when regularly consuming moderate amounts of a flavanol-rich soluble cocoa product, a non-randomized, controlled, crossover, free-living study was carried out in healthy (n = 24; 25.9 ± 5.6 years) and moderately hypercholesterolemic (200-240 mg dL(-1); n = 20; 30.0 ± 10.3 years) volunteers. Participants consumed two servings per day (7.5 g per serving) of a soluble cocoa product (providing 45.3 mg flavanols per day) in milk, which was compared with consuming only milk during a 4 week period. The effects on systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were determined, as well as on serum lipid and lipoprotein profiles, interleukins (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), vascular (VCAM-1) and intercellular cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1), serum malondialdehyde (MDA), carbonyl groups (CG), ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), and free radical scavenging capacity (ABTS). During the study, the volunteers' diets and physical activity were also evaluated, as well as any changes in weight, skin folds, circumferences and related anthropometric parameters. Cocoa and certain polyphenol-rich fruits and vegetables and their derivatives were restricted. After consuming the cocoa product positive effects were observed such as an increase in serum HDL-C (p < 0.001) and dietary fiber intake (p = 0.050), whereas IL-10 decreased (p = 0.022). Other cardiovascular-related biomarkers and anthropometric parameters were unaffected. We have therefore concluded that regular consumption of this cocoa product in a Spanish-Mediterranean diet may protect against cardiovascular disease in healthy and hypercholesterolemic subjects without producing any weight gain or other anthropometric changes. PMID:24394704

  4. Innovative Target Therapies Are Able to Block the Inflammation Associated with Dysfunction of the Cholesterol Biosynthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Piscianz, Elisa; Loganes, Claudia; Vecchi Brumatti, Liza; Knowles, Alessandra; Bilel, Sabrine; Tommasini, Alberto; Bortul, Roberta; Zweyer, Marina

    2015-01-01

    The cholesterol pathway is an essential biochemical process aimed at the synthesis of bioactive molecules involved in multiple crucial cellular functions. The end products of this pathway are sterols, such as cholesterol, which are essential components of cell membranes, precursors of steroid hormones, bile acids and other molecules such as ubiquinone. Several diseases are caused by defects in this metabolic pathway: the most severe forms of which cause neurological involvement (psychomotor retardation and cerebellar ataxia) as a result of a variety of cellular impairments, including mitochondrial dysfunction. These pathologies are induced by convergent mechanisms in which the mitochondrial unit plays a pivotal role contributing to defective apoptosis, autophagy and mitophagy processes. Unraveling these mechanisms would contribute to the development of effective drug treatments for these disorders. In addition, the development of biochemical models could have a substantial impact on the understanding of the mechanism of action of drugs that act on this pathway in multifactor disorders. In this review we will focus in particular on inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis, mitochondria-targeted drugs and inhibitors of the inflammasome. PMID:26729102

  5. Improved endothelial dysfunction by Cynanchum wilfordii in apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice fed a high fat/cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Choi, Deok Ho; Lee, Yun Jung; Oh, Hyun Cheol; Cui, Ying Lan; Kim, Jin Sook; Kang, Dae Gill; Lee, Ho Sub

    2012-02-01

    Cynanchum wilfordii is used in traditional Chinese medicine with almost all parts of this plant considered beneficial for various vascular diseases. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of an ethanol extract of C. wilfordii (ECW) on vascular dysfunction in apolipoprotein E (apoE)(-/-) mice fed with high fat/cholesterol diets (HFCDs). The apoE(-/-) mice were fed HFCD consisting of 7.5% cocoa butter and 1.25% cholesterol, with or without 100 or 200 mg/day/kg ECW. Chronic ECW treatment significantly lessened the level of low-density lipoprotein (P<.05) and elevated that of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (P<.01). Chronic ECW treatment normalized the HFCD-induced increase in systolic blood pressure, maintained smooth and soft intimal endothelial layers, and decreased intima-media thickness in aortic sections of HFCD-fed apoE(-/-) mice. ECW significantly restored the diet-induced decrease in vasorelaxation response to acetylcholine; however, the response to sodium nitroprusside did not change. ECW clearly restored the HFCD-induced reduction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression levels in aortic tissue, leading to decreased vascular inflammation through an inhibition of cellular adhesion molecules such as E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 as well as endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression. In conclusion, ECW ameliorates endothelial dysfunction via improvement of the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP signaling pathway in a diet/genetic model of hyperlipidemia. ECW also substantially inhibited the development of atherosclerosis, possibly by inhibiting ET-1, cell adhesion molecules, and lesion formation, suggesting a vascular protective role for this herb in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:22082065

  6. Improved Endothelial Dysfunction by Cynanchum wilfordii in Apolipoprotein E−/− Mice Fed a High Fat/Cholesterol Diet

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Deok Ho; Lee, Yun Jung; Oh, Hyun Cheol; Cui, Ying Lan; Kim, Jin Sook

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cynanchum wilfordii is used in traditional Chinese medicine with almost all parts of this plant considered beneficial for various vascular diseases. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of an ethanol extract of C. wilfordii (ECW) on vascular dysfunction in apolipoprotein E (apoE)−/− mice fed with high fat/cholesterol diets (HFCDs). The apoE−/− mice were fed HFCD consisting of 7.5% cocoa butter and 1.25% cholesterol, with or without 100 or 200 mg/day/kg ECW. Chronic ECW treatment significantly lessened the level of low-density lipoprotein (P<.05) and elevated that of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (P<.01). Chronic ECW treatment normalized the HFCD-induced increase in systolic blood pressure, maintained smooth and soft intimal endothelial layers, and decreased intima-media thickness in aortic sections of HFCD-fed apoE−/− mice. ECW significantly restored the diet-induced decrease in vasorelaxation response to acetylcholine; however, the response to sodium nitroprusside did not change. ECW clearly restored the HFCD-induced reduction in endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression levels in aortic tissue, leading to decreased vascular inflammation through an inhibition of cellular adhesion molecules such as E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 as well as endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression. In conclusion, ECW ameliorates endothelial dysfunction via improvement of the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP signaling pathway in a diet/genetic model of hyperlipidemia. ECW also substantially inhibited the development of atherosclerosis, possibly by inhibiting ET-1, cell adhesion molecules, and lesion formation, suggesting a vascular protective role for this herb in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:22082065

  7. How to Get Your Cholesterol Tested

    MedlinePlus

    ... HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglycerides. A small sample of blood will be drawn ... the amount of LDL (bad) cholesterol level and triglycerides can be affected by what you've recently ...

  8. Structural modifications of HDL and functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Gianna; Bacchetti, Tiziana; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne; Salvayre, Robert; Dousset, Nicole; Curatola, Giovanna

    2006-01-01

    High density lipoproteins (HDL) are susceptible to structural modifications mediated by various mechanisms including oxidation, glycation, homocysteinylation or enzymatic degradation. Structural alterations of HDL may affect their functional and atheroprotective properties. Oxidants, such as hypochlorous acid, peroxyl radicals, metal ions, peroxynitrite, lipoxygenases and smoke extracts, can alter both surface and core components of HDL. The formation of lipid peroxidation derivatives, such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, conjugated dienes, lipid hydroperoxides and aldehydes, is associated with changes of physical properties (fluidity, molecular order) and of apoprotein conformation. Non-enzymatic glycation, generally associated with lipoxidation, leads to form irreversible complexes called advanced glycation end products. These HDL modifications are accompanied with altered biological activities of HDL and associated enzymes, including paraoxonase, CETP and LCAT. Homocysteine-induced modification of HDL is mediated by homocysteine-thiolactone, and can be prevented by a calcium-dependent thiolactonase/paraoxonase. Tyrosylation of HDL induces the formation of dimers and trimers of apo AI, and alters cholesterol efflux. Phospholipases and proteolytic enzymes can also modify HDL lipid and apoprotein structure. HDL modification induces generally the loss of their anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties. This could play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:16157342

  9. Simvastatin alleviates myocardial contractile dysfunction and lethal ischemic injury in rat heart independent of cholesterol-lowering effects.

    PubMed

    ADAMEOVA, A; HARCAROVA, A; MATEJIKOVA, J; PANCZA, D; KUZELOVA, M; CARNICKA, S; SVEC, P; BARTEKOVA, M; STYK, J; Ravingerová, T

    2009-01-01

    Statins, the inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, are most frequently used drugs in the prevention of coronary artery disease due to their cholesterol-lowering activity. However, it is not exactly known whether these effects of statins or those independent of cholesterol decrease account for the protection against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. In this study, we investigated the effect of 5-day treatment with simvastatin (10 mg/kg) in Langendorff-perfused hearts of healthy control (C) and diabetic-hypercholesterolemic (D-H; streptozotocin + high fat-cholesterol diet, 5 days) rats subjected to 30-min global ischemia followed by 40-min reperfusion for the examination of postischemic contractile dysfunction and reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias or to 30-min (left anterior descending) coronary artery occlusion and 2-h reperfusion for the infarct size determination (IS; tetrazolium staining). Postischemic recovery of left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) in animals with D-H was improved by simvastatin therapy (62.7+/-18.2 % of preischemic values vs. 30.3+/-5.7 % in the untreated D-H; P<0.05), similar to the values in the simvastatin-treated C group, which were 2.5-fold higher than those in the untreated C group. No ventricular fibrillation occurred in the simvastatin-treated C and D-H animals during reperfusion. Likewise, simvastatin shortened the duration of ventricular tachycardia (10.2+/-8.1 s and 57.8+/-29.3 s in C and D-H vs. 143.6+/-28.6 s and 159.3+/-44.3 s in untreated C and D-H, respectively, both P<0.05). The decreased arrhythmogenesis in the simvastatin-treated groups correlated with the limitation of IS (in % of risk area) by 66 % and 62 % in C and D-H groups, respectively. However, simvastatin treatment decreased plasma cholesterol levels neither in the D-H animals nor in C. The results indicate that other effects of statins (independent of cholesterol lowering) are involved in the

  10. HDL and Cognition in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hottman, David A.; Chernick, Dustin; Cheng, Shaowu; Wang, Zhe; Li, Ling

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are a heterogeneous group of lipoproteins composed of various lipids and proteins. HDL is formed both in the systemic circulation and in the brain. In addition to being a crucial player in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway, HDL possesses a wide range of other functions including anti-oxidation, anti-inflammation, pro-endothelial function, anti-thrombosis, and modulation of immune function. It has been firmly established that high plasma levels of HDL protect against cardiovascular disease. Accumulating evidence indicates that the beneficial role of HDL extends to many other systems including the central nervous system. Cognition is a complex brain function that includes all aspects of perception, thought, and memory. Cognitive function often declines during aging and this decline manifests as cognitive impairment/dementia in age-related and progressive neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A growing concern is that no effective therapy is currently available to prevent or treat these devastating diseases. Emerging evidence suggests that HDL may play a pivotal role in preserving cognitive function under normal and pathological conditions. This review attempts to summarize recent genetic, clinical and experimental evidence for the impact of HDL on cognition in aging and in neurodegenerative disorders as well as the potential of HDL-enhancing approaches to improve cognitive function. PMID:25131449

  11. Postmenopausal Women Have Higher HDL and Decreased Incidence of Low HDL than Premenopausal Women with Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Maria Luz; Murillo, Ana Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that plasma lipids, waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure (BP) increase following menopause. In addition, there is a perceived notion that plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations also decrease in postmenopausal women. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated plasma lipids, fasting glucose, anthropometrics and BP in 88 post and 100 pre-menopausal women diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. No differences were observed in plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting glucose or systolic and diastolic BP between groups. However, plasma HDL-C was higher (p < 0.01) in postmenopausal women and the percentage of women who had low HDL (<50 mg/dL) was higher (p < 0.01) among premenopausal women. In addition, negative correlations were found between WC and HDL-C (r = -0.148, p < 0.05) and BMI and HDL-C (r = -0.258, p < 0.01) for all subjects indicating that increases in weight and abdominal fat have a deleterious effect on plasma HDL-C. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation between age and plasma HDL-C (r = 0.237 p < 0.01). The results from this study suggest that although HDL is decreased by visceral fat and overall weight, low HDL is not a main characteristic of metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. Further, HDL appears to increase, not decrease, with age. PMID:27417608

  12. Postmenopausal Women Have Higher HDL and Decreased Incidence of Low HDL than Premenopausal Women with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Maria Luz; Murillo, Ana Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that plasma lipids, waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure (BP) increase following menopause. In addition, there is a perceived notion that plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations also decrease in postmenopausal women. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated plasma lipids, fasting glucose, anthropometrics and BP in 88 post and 100 pre-menopausal women diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. No differences were observed in plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting glucose or systolic and diastolic BP between groups. However, plasma HDL-C was higher (p < 0.01) in postmenopausal women and the percentage of women who had low HDL (<50 mg/dL) was higher (p < 0.01) among premenopausal women. In addition, negative correlations were found between WC and HDL-C (r = −0.148, p < 0.05) and BMI and HDL-C (r = −0.258, p < 0.01) for all subjects indicating that increases in weight and abdominal fat have a deleterious effect on plasma HDL-C. Interestingly, there was a positive correlation between age and plasma HDL-C (r = 0.237 p < 0.01). The results from this study suggest that although HDL is decreased by visceral fat and overall weight, low HDL is not a main characteristic of metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. Further, HDL appears to increase, not decrease, with age. PMID:27417608

  13. Antioxidant properties of HDL

    PubMed Central

    Soran, Handrean; Schofield, Jonathan D.; Durrington, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) provides a pathway for the passage of lipid peroxides and lysophospholipids to the liver via hepatic scavenger receptors. Perhaps more importantly, HDL actually metabolizes lipid hydroperoxides preventing their accumulation on low-density lipoprotein (LDL), thus impeding its atherogenic structural modification. A number of candidates have been suggested to be responsible for HDL's antioxidant function, with paraoxonase-1 (PON1) perhaps the most prominent. Here we review the evidence for HDL anti-oxidative function and the potential contributions of apolipoproteins, lipid transfer proteins, paraoxonases and other enzymes associated with HDL. PMID:26528181

  14. Inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein increases cholesteryl ester content of large HDL independently of HDL-to-HDL homotypic transfer: in vitro vs in vivo comparison using anacetrapib and dalcetrapib.

    PubMed

    Johns, Douglas G; Chen, Ying; Wang, Sheng-Ping; Castro-Perez, Jose; Previs, Stephen F; Roddy, Thomas P

    2015-09-01

    The increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol observed with cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibition is commonly attributed to blockade of cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer from HDL to low density lipoprotein particles. In vitro, it has been observed that CETP can mediate transfer of CE between HDL particles ("homotypic transfer"), and it is postulated that this contributes to HDL remodeling and generation of anti-atherogenic pre-beta HDL. Inhibition of CETP could limit this beneficial remodeling and reduce pre-beta HDL levels. We observed that anacetrapib does not reduce pre-beta HDL in vivo, but the role of HDL homotypic transfer was not examined. This study evaluated the effects of anacetrapib on homotypic transfer from HDL3 to HDL2 in vivo using deuterium-labeled HDL3, and compared this to in vitro settings, where homotypic transfer was previously described. In vitro, both anacetrapib and dalcetrapib inhibited transfer of CE from HDL3 to HDL2 particles. In CETP transgenic mice, anacetrapib did not inhibit the appearance of labeled CE derived from HDL3 in HDL2 particles, but rather promoted the appearance of labeled CE in HDL2. We concluded that inhibition of CETP by anacetrapib promoted HDL particle remodeling, and does not impair the flux of cholesterol ester into larger HDL particles when studied in vivo, which is not consistent with in vitro observations. We further conclude, therefore, that the in vitro conditions used to examine HDL-to-HDL homotypic transfer may not recapitulate the in vivo condition, where multiple mechanisms contribute to cholesteryl ester flux into and out of the HDL pool. PMID:26049012

  15. The Association of Pediatric LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol Dyslipidemia Classifications and Change in Dyslipidemia Status with Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Adulthood: Evidence from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study, the Bogalusa Heart Study, and the Childhood Determinants of Adult Health (CDAH) Study

    PubMed Central

    Magnussen, Costan G.; Venn, Alison; Thomson, Russell; Juonala, Markus; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Viikari, Jorma S.A.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Dwyer, Terence; Raitakari, Olli T.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives – To determine which of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) or National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol classifications of dyslipidemia status in adolescents is most effective at predicting high common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) in adulthood. Background – Two classifications of pediatric dyslipidemia status have been proposed. No study has assessed which of these is most effective for predicting adolescents who will develop preclinical atherosclerosis in adulthood. Methods – Three population-based, prospective cohort studies that collected lipoprotein measurements on 1711 adolescents aged 12–18 years who were re-measured as young adults aged 29–39 years. Lipoproteins in adolescence were classified according to NCEP and NHANES cut-points, while high IMT in adulthood was defined as those at or above the age, sex, race, and cohort specific 90th percentile of IMT. Results – Independent of the classification employed, adolescents with dyslipidemia were at significantly increased risk of having high IMT in adulthood (relative risks from 1.6 to 2.5). Differences in predictive capacity between both classifications were minimal. Overweight or obese adolescents with dyslipidemia had increased carotid IMT (males, 0.11mm; females, 0.08mm) in adulthood compared with those who did not have both risk factors. Adolescent dyslipidemia status was more strongly associated with high IMT in adulthood than change in dyslipidemia status. Conclusions – Pediatric dyslipidemia classifications perform equally in the prediction of adolescents who are at increased risk of high IMT in young adulthood. Our data suggest that dyslipidemia screening could be limited to overweight or obese adolescents. PMID:19264243

  16. Inflammation modulates human HDL composition and function in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation may directly impair HDL functions, in particular reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), but limited data support this concept in humans. Our study was designed to investigate this relationship. We employed low-dose human endotoxemia to assess the effects of inflammation on HDL and RCT-rel...

  17. A big role for small RNAs in HDL homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ouimet, Mireille; Moore, Kathryn J.

    2013-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins play a central role in systemic cholesterol homeostasis by stimulating the efflux of excess cellular cholesterol and transporting it to the liver for biliary excretion. HDL has long been touted as the “good cholesterol” because of the strong inverse correlation of plasma HDL cholesterol levels with coronary heart disease. However, the disappointing outcomes of recent clinical trials involving therapeutic elevations of HDL cholesterol have called this moniker into question and revealed our lack of understanding of this complex lipoprotein. At the same time, the discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) that regulate HDL biogenesis and function have led to a surge in our understanding of the posttranscriptional mechanisms regulating plasma levels of HDL. Furthermore, HDL has recently been shown to selectively transport miRNAs and thereby facilitate cellular communication by shuttling these potent gene regulators to distal tissues. Finally, that miRNA cargo carried by HDL may be altered during disease states further broadened our perspective of how this lipoprotein can have complex effects on target cells and tissues. The unraveling of how these tiny RNAs govern HDL metabolism and contribute to its actions promises to reveal new therapeutic strategies to optimize cardiovascular health. PMID:23509405

  18. Relationship between apolipoprotein concentrations and HDL subclasses distribution.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li; Fu, Mingde; Jia, Lianqun; Xu, Yanhua; Long, Shiyin; Tian, Haoming; Tian, Ying

    2007-05-01

    Alterations in plasma apolipoproteins levels can influence the composition, content, and distribution of plasma lipoproteins that affect the risk of atherosclerosis. This study assessed the relationship between plasma apolipoproteins levels, mainly apoAI, and HDL subclass distribution. The contents of plasma HDL subclasses were determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with immunodetection in 545 Chinese subjects. Compared with a low apoAI group, the contents of all HDL subclasses increased significantly both in middle and high apoAI group, and the contents of large-sized HDL(2b) increased more significantly relative to those of small-sized prebeta(1)-HDL in a high apoAI group. When apoAI and HDL-C levels increased simultaneously, in comparison to a low apoAI along with HDL-C concentration group, a significant increase (116%) was shown in HDL2b but only a slight increase (26%) in prebeta1-HDL. In addition, Pearson correlation analysis revealed that apoAI levels were positively and significantly correlated with all HDL subclasses. Multiple liner regression demonstrated that the apoAI concentrations were the most powerful predictor for HDL subclass distribution. With the elevation of apoAI concentrations, the contents of all HDL subclasses increased successively and significantly, especially, an increase in large-sized HDL(2b). Further, when apoAI and HDL-C concentrations increased simultaneously, the shift to larger HDL size was more obvious. Which, in turn, indicated that HDL maturation might be enhanced and, the reverse cholesterol transport might be strengthened along with apoAI levels which might be a more powerful factor influencing the distribution of HDL subclasses. PMID:17476546

  19. Dietary Lipid and Cholesterol Induce Ovarian Dysfunction and Abnormal LH Response to Stimulation in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Charlotte; Tarrade, Anne; Picone, Olivier; Larcher, Thibaut; Dahirel, Michèle; Poumerol, Elodie; Mandon-Pepin, Béatrice; Lévy, Rachel; Chavatte-Palmer, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim Excess of fat intake is dramatically increasing in women of childbearing age and results in numerous health complications, including reproductive disorders. Using rabbit does as a biomedical model, the aim of this study was to evaluate onset of puberty, endocrine responses to stimulation and ovarian follicular maturation in females fed a high fat high cholesterol diet (HH diet) from 10 weeks of age (i.e., 2 weeks before normal onset of puberty) or a control diet (C diet). Methodology/Principal Findings Three experiments were performed, each including 8 treated (HH group) and 8 control (C group) does. In experiment 1, the endocrine response to Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) was evaluated at 13, 18 and 22 weeks of age. In experiment 2, the follicular population was counted in ovaries of adult females (18 weeks of age). In experiment 3, the LH response to mating and steroid profiles throughout gestation were evaluated at 18 weeks of age. Fetal growth was monitored by ultrasound and offspring birth weight was recorded. Data showed a significantly higher Luteinizing hormone (LH) response after induction of ovulation at 13 weeks of age in the HH group. There was no difference at 18 weeks, but at 22 weeks, the LH response to GnRH was significantly reduced in the HH group. The number of atretic follicles was significantly increased and the number of antral follicles significantly reduced in HH does vs. controls. During gestation, the HH diet induced intra-uterine growth retardation (IUGR). Conclusion The HH diet administered from before puberty onwards affected onset of puberty, follicular growth, hormonal responses to breeding and GnRH stimulation in relation to age and lead to fetal IUGR. PMID:23690983

  20. Cholesterol and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... traveling together are called lipoproteins . Two kinds — low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) — are the ones that most of us have heard about. Low-density lipoproteins , or "bad cholesterol," are the primary cholesterol ...

  1. Where Are We With HDL Raising and Inhibition of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer for Heart Disease Risk Reduction?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: To review recent research in the area of high density lipoprotein (HDL) raising and coronary heart disease (CHD) risk reduction. Recent Findings: It is known that a decreased HDL cholesterol is an important CHD risk factor, and that raising HDL cholesterol has been associated with CHD risk...

  2. Regional variations in HDL metabolism in human fat cells: effect of cell size

    SciTech Connect

    Despres, J.; Fong, B.S.; Julien, P.; Jimenez, J.; Angel, A.

    1987-05-01

    Abdominal obesity is related to reduced plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and both are associated with cardiovascular disease risk. The authors have observed that plasma membranes from abdominal subcutaneous adipocytes have a greater HDL binding capacity than omental fat cell plasma membranes. The present study examined whether these binding characteristics could be due to differences in fat cell size or cholesterol concentration between the two adipose depots. Abdominal subcutaneous and deep omental fat were obtained from massively obese patients at surgery. Subcutaneous abdominal fat cells were significantly larger and their cellular cholesterol content greater than omental adipocytes. The uptake of HDL by collagenase-isolated fat cells was studied by incubating the cells for 2 h at 37/sup 0/C with 10 ..mu..g/ml /sup 125/I-HDL/sub 2/ or /sup 125/I-HDL/sub 3/. In both depots, the cellular uptake of /sup 125/I-HDL/sub 2/ and /sup 125/I-HDL/sub 3/ was specifically inhibited by addition of 25-fold excess unlabeled HDL and a close correlation was observed between the cellular uptake of /sup 125/I-HDL/sub 2/ and /sup 125/I-HDL/sub 3/. In obese patients, the uptake of /sup 125/I-HDL was higher in subcutaneous cells than in omental cells. The cellular /sup 125/I-HDL uptake was significantly correlated with adipocyte size and fat cell cholesterol content but not with adipocyte cholesterol concentration. These results suggest that the higher HDL uptake observed in subcutaneous cells compared with omental cells in obesity is the result of differences in adipocyte size rather than differences in the cholesterol concentration (cholesterol-to-triglyceride ratio). The increased interaction of HDL with hypertrophied abdominal adipocytes may play an important role in determining the lipid composition of HDL in obesity.

  3. The pleiotropic role of HDL in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Parra, Sandra; Castro, Antoni; Masana, Luis

    2015-01-01

    As is widely known, the classic function of HDL is reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), thus removing cholesterol from peripheral tissues. Early epidemiological studies, such as Framingham's, stated that increased HDL levels were associated with a significant decrease in relative risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality. However, those with heightened expectations in recent years for the development of therapeutic targets to increase HDL levels have been disappointed, because efforts have demonstrated the opposite effect on cardiovascular and global mortality. However, in contrast, studies have highlighted the complexity and the intriguing role of HDL in different pathological conditions, such as infections, neoplasms, and autoimmune diseases. In this review an attempt is made to summarize some biological pathways that link HDL function with the immune system, and its possible clinical repercussions in autoimmune diseases. PMID:25444650

  4. Synthetic High-Density Lipoprotein (sHDL) Inhibits Steroid Production in HAC15 Adrenal Cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Matthew J; Sanjanwala, Aalok R; Morin, Emily E; Rowland-Fisher, Elizabeth; Anderson, Kyle; Schwendeman, Anna; Rainey, William E

    2016-08-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) transported cholesterol represents one of the sources of substrate for adrenal steroid production. Synthetic HDL (sHDL) particles represent a new therapeutic option to reduce atherosclerotic plaque burden by increasing cholesterol efflux from macrophage cells. The effects of the sHDL particles on steroidogenic cells have not been explored. sHDL, specifically ETC-642, was studied in HAC15 adrenocortical cells. Cells were treated with sHDL, forskolin, 22R-hydroxycholesterol, or pregnenolone. Experiments included time and concentration response curves, followed by steroid assay. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to study mRNA of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, lanosterol 14-α-methylase, cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, and steroid acute regulatory protein. Cholesterol assay was performed using cell culture media and cell lipid extracts from a dose response experiment. sHDL significantly inhibited production of cortisol. Inhibition occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and in a concentration range of 3μM-50μM. Forskolin (10μM) stimulated cortisol production was also inhibited. Incubation with 22R-hydroxycholesterol (10μM) and pregnenolone (10μM) increased cortisol production, which was unaffected by sHDL treatment. sHDL increased transcript levels for the rate-limiting cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase. Extracellular cholesterol assayed in culture media showed a positive correlation with increasing concentration of sHDL, whereas intracellular cholesterol decreased after treatment with sHDL. The current study suggests that sHDL inhibits HAC15 adrenal cell steroid production by efflux of cholesterol, leading to an overall decrease in steroid production and an adaptive rise in adrenal cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:27253994

  5. Effects of oral niacin on endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary artery disease: results of the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled INEF study.

    PubMed

    Warnholtz, Ascan; Wild, Philipp; Ostad, Mir Abolfazl; Elsner, Veronika; Stieber, Fabian; Schinzel, Reinhard; Walter, Ulrich; Peetz, Dirk; Lackner, Karl; Blankenberg, Stefan; Munzel, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    High-density-lipoproteins-cholesterol (HDL-C) is invertedly related to the incidence of cardiovascular events. Recent studies suggest that HDL-C directly improves endothelial function. Nicotinic acid (niacin) effectively raises serum HDL-C. We therefore hypothesized that treatment with niacin improves endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). One hundred seven patients with CAD were randomly assigned to double-blinded treatment for 12 weeks with extended-release (ER)-niacin 1000 mg/day (N) or placebo (C), respectively. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, nitroglycerin-mediated endothelium-independent dilation (NMD) and serum lipid concentrations were measured before and after treatment. Triglycerides (P=0.013), low-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) (P=0.013) and HDL-C (P<0.0001) were altered by N compared to C. Niacin treatment was without effect on FMD or NMD, respectively, compared to placebo. However, post-hoc subgroup analysis revealed an improvement in FMD in patients with low HDL-C at baseline (absolute change in FMD (mean+/-S.D.) N: +3.25+/-3.88%, C: +1.03+/-2.71% in low tertile HDL-C dysfunction in patients with CAD and low HDL-C, but not with normal HDL-C. PMID:18822413

  6. HDL measures, particle heterogeneity, proposed nomenclature, and relation to atherosclerotic cardiovascular events

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A growing body of evidence from epidemiological data, animal studies, and clinical trials supports HDL as the next target to reduce residual cardiovascular risk in statin-treated, high-risk patients. For more than 3 decades, HDL cholesterol has been employed as the principal clinical measure of HDL ...

  7. The pathophysiological role of oxidized cholesterols in epicardial fat accumulation and cardiac dysfunction: a study in swine fed a high caloric diet with an inhibitor of intestinal cholesterol absorption, ezetimibe.

    PubMed

    Shimabukuro, Michio; Okawa, Chinami; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Yanagi, Shuhei; Uematsu, Etsuko; Sugasawa, Noriko; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Hirata, Yoichiro; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-Ri; Lei, Xiao-Feng; Takao, Shoichiro; Tanaka, Yasutake; Fukuda, Daiju; Yagi, Shusuke; Soeki, Takeshi; Kitagawa, Tetsuya; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Sato, Masao; Sata, Masataka

    2016-09-01

    Oxidized cholesterols (oxycholesterols) in food have been recognized as strong atherogenic components, but their tissue distributions and roles in cardiovascular diseases remain unclear. To investigate whether accumulation of oxycholesterols is linked to cardiac morphology and function, and whether reduction of oxycholesterols can improve cardiac performance, domestic male swine were randomized to a control diet (C), high caloric diet (HCD) or HCD+Ezetimibe, an inhibitor of intestinal cholesterol absorption, group (HCD+E) and evaluated for: (1) distribution of oxycholesterol components in serum and tissues, (2) levels of oxycholesterol-related enzymes, (3) paracardial and epicardial coronary fat thickness, and (4) cardiac performance. Ezetimibe treatment for 8weeks attenuated increases in oxycholesterols in the HCD group almost completely in liver, but reduced only levels of 4β-hydroxycholesterol in left ventricular (LV) myocardium. Ezetimibe treatment altered the expression of genes for cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism and decreased the expression of CYP3A46, which catabolizes cholesterol to 4β-hydroxycholesterol, strongly in liver. An increase in epicardial fat thickness and impaired cardiac performance in the HCD group were improved by ezetimibe treatment, and the improvement was closely related to the reduction in levels of 4β-hydroxycholesterol in LV myocardium. In conclusion, an increase in oxycholesterols in the HCD group was closely related to cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction, as well as an increase in epicardial fat thickness. Ezetimibe may directly reduce oxycholesterol in liver and LV myocardium, and improve cardiac morphology and function. PMID:27416363

  8. Atomistic MD simulation reveals the mechanism by which CETP penetrates into HDL enabling lipid transfer from HDL to CETP

    PubMed Central

    Cilpa-Karhu, Geraldine; Jauhiainen, Matti; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP), a protein mediating transfer of neutral lipids between lipoproteins, has been proposed as a means to elevate atheroprotective HDL subpopulations and thereby reduce atherosclerosis. However, off-target and adverse effects of the inhibition have raised doubts about the molecular mechanism of CETP-HDL interaction. Recent experimental findings have demonstrated the penetration of CETP into HDL. However, atomic level resolution of CETP penetration into HDL, a prerequisite for a better understanding of CETP functionality and HDL atheroprotection, is missing. We constructed an HDL particle that mimics the actual human HDL mass composition and investigated for the first time, by large-scale atomistic molecular dynamics, the interaction of an upright CETP with a human HDL-mimicking model. The results demonstrated how CETP can penetrate the HDL particle surface, with the formation of an opening in the N barrel domain end of CETP, put in evidence the major anchoring role of a tryptophan-rich region of this domain, and unveiled the presence of a phenylalanine barrier controlling further access of HDL-derived lipids to the tunnel of CETP. The findings reveal novel atomistic details of the CETP-HDL interaction mechanism and can provide new insight into therapeutic strategies. PMID:25424006

  9. Endothelial lipase is a major determinant of HDL level

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, Tatsuro; Choi, Sungshin; Kundu, Ramendra K.; Hirata, Ken-Ichi; Rubin, Edward M.; Cooper, Allen D.; Quertermous, Thomas

    2003-01-30

    For the past three decades, epidemiologic studies have consistently demonstrated an inverse relationship between plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and coronary heart disease (CHD). Population-based studies have provided compelling evidence that low HDL-C levels are a risk factor for CHD, and several clinical interventions that increased plasma levels of HDL-C were associated with a reduction in CHD risk. These findings have stimulated extensive investigation into the determinants of plasma HDL-C levels. Turnover studies using radiolabeled apolipoprotein A-I, the major protein component of HDL, suggest that plasma HDL-C concentrations are highly correlated with the rate of clearance of apolipoprotein AI. However, the metabolic mechanisms by which HDL are catabolized have not been fully defined. Previous studies in humans with genetic deficiency of cholesteryl ester transfer protein, and in mice lacking the scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), have demonstrated that these proteins participate in the removal of cholesterol from HDL, while observations in individuals with mutations in hepatic lipase indicate that this enzyme hydrolyzes HDL triglycerides. In this issue of the JCI, reports from laboratories of Tom Quertermous and Dan Rader now indicate that endothelial lipase (LIPG), a newly identified member of the lipase family, catalyzes the hydrolysis of HDL phospholipids and facilitates the clearance of HDL from the circulation. Endothelial lipase was initially cloned by both of these laboratories using entirely different strategies. Quertermous and his colleagues identified endothelial lipase as a transcript that was upregulated in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells undergoing tube formation, whereas the Rader group cloned endothelial lipase as a transcript that was upregulated in the human macrophage-like cell line THP-1 exposed to oxidized LDL. Database searches revealed that endothelial lipase shows strong sequence similarity to lipoprotein

  10. HDL and Atherosclerosis Regression: Evidence from Pre-clinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Feig, Jonathan E.; Hewing, Bernd; Smith, Jonathan D.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    High density lipoprotein particles (HDL) transport, among other molecules, cholesterol (HDL-C). In epidemiologic studies, plasma HDL-C levels have an inverse relationship to the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). It has been assumed that this reflects the protective functions of HDL, which include their ability to promote cholesterol efflux. Yet, a number of recent pharmacological and genetic studies have failed to demonstrate that increased plasma levels of HDL-C resulted in decreased CVD risk, giving rise to a controversy over whether plasma levels of HDL-C reflect HDL function, or that HDL is even as protective as assumed. On balance, the evidence from pre-clinical and (limited) clinical studies show that HDL can promote the regression of atherosclerosis when the levels of functional particles are increased from endogenous or exogenous sources. The data show that regression results from a combination of reduced plaque lipid and macrophage contents, as well as from a reduction in its inflammatory state. While more research will be needed on basic mechanisms and to establish that these changes translate clinically to reduced CVD events, that HDL can regress plaques suggests that the recent trial failures do not eliminate HDL from consideration as an atheroprotective agent, but emphasizes the important distinction between HDL function and plasma levels of HDL-C. PMID:24385513

  11. Volumetric determination of apolipoprotein stoichiometry of circulating HDL subspecies1[S

    PubMed Central

    Segrest, Jere P.; Cheung, Marian C.; Jones, Martin K.

    2013-01-01

    Although HDL is inversely correlated with coronary heart disease, elevated HDL-cholesterol is not always protective. Additionally, HDL has biological functions that transcend any antiatherogenic role: shotgun proteomics show that HDL particles contain 84 proteins (latest count), many correlating with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of HDL. ApoA-I has been suggested to serve as a platform for the assembly of these protein components on HDL with specific functions - the HDL proteome. However, the stoichiometry of apoA-I in HDL subspecies is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of immunoaffinity chromatography data and volumetric analysis to evaluate the size and stoichiometry of LpA-I and LpA-I,A-II particles. We conclude that there are three major LpA-I subspecies: two major particles, HDL[4] in the HDL3 size range (d = 85.0 ± 1.2 Å) and HDL[7] in the HDL2 size range (d = 108.5 ± 3.8 Å) with apoA-I stoichiometries of 3 and 4, respectively, and a small minor particle, HDL[1] (d = 73.8 ± 2.1Å) with an apoA-I stoichiometry of 2. Additionally, we conclude that the molar ratio of apolipoprotein to surface lipid is significantly higher in circulating HDL subspecies than in reconstituted spherical HDL particles, presumably reflecting a lack of phospholipid transfer protein in reconstitution protocols. PMID:23883582

  12. Nicotinic Acid Accelerates HDL Cholesteryl Ester Turnover in Obese Insulin-Resistant Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Le Bloc'h, Jérôme; Leray, Véronique; Nazih, Hassan; Gauthier, Olivier; Serisier, Samuel; Magot, Thierry; Krempf, Michel; Nguyen, Patrick; Ouguerram, Khadija

    2015-01-01

    Aim Nicotinic acid (NA) treatment decreases plasma triglycerides and increases HDL cholesterol, but the mechanisms involved in these change are not fully understood. A reduction in cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity has been advanced to explain most lipid-modulating effects of NA. However, due to the central role of CETP in reverse cholesterol transport in humans, other effects of NA may have been hidden. As dogs have no CETP activity, we conducted this study to examine the specific effects of extended-release niacin (NA) on lipids and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesteryl ester (CE) turnover in obese Insulin-Resistant dogs with increase plasma triglycerides. Methods HDL kinetics were assessed in fasting dogs before and four weeks after NA treatment through endogenous labeling of cholesterol and apolipoprotein AI by simultaneous infusion of [1,2 13C2] acetate and [5,5,5 2H3] leucine for 8 h. Kinetic data were analyzed by compartmental modeling. In vitro cell cholesterol efflux of serum from NA-treated dogs was also measured. Results NA reduced plasma total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), and very-low-density lipoprotein TG concentrations (p < 0.05). The kinetic study also showed a higher cholesterol esterification rate (p < 0.05). HDL-CE turnover was accelerated (p < 0.05) via HDL removal through endocytosis and selective CE uptake (p < 0.05). We measured an elevated in vitro cell cholesterol efflux (p < 0.05) with NA treatment in accordance with a higher cholesterol esterification. Conclusion NA decreased HDL cholesterol but promoted cholesterol efflux and esterification, leading to improved reverse cholesterol transport. These results highlight the CETP-independent effects of NA in changes of plasma lipid profile. PMID:26366727

  13. Why Targeting HDL Should Work as a Therapeutic Tool, but Hasn’t

    PubMed Central

    Sorci-Thomas, Mary G.; Thomas, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the most common causes of death and disability in US today despite the availability of statins which reduce hyperlipidemia, a risk factor that predisposes individuals to this disease. Epidemiology of human populations has overwhelmingly demonstrated an inverse correlation between the concentration of plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and the likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Decades of observations and mechanistic studies suggest that one protective function of HDL is its central role in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). In this pathway the ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCA1) releases intracellular cholesterol, which is packaged by apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) into nascent HDL (nHDL) particles and released from the plasma membrane. Further lipidation and maturation of HDL occurs in plasma with the eventual uptake by the liver where cholesterol is removed. It is generally accepted that CVD risk can be reduced if plasma HDL-C levels are elevated. Several different pharmacological approaches have been tried, the most popular approach targets the movement of cholesteryl ester from HDL to triglyceride rich particles by cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). Inhibition of CETP increases plasma HDL-C concentration, however, beneficial effects have yet to be demonstrated, likely the result of off-target effects. These revelations have led to a reevaluation of how elevating HDL concentration could decrease risk. A recent, landmark study showed that the inherent cholesterol efflux capacity of an individual’s plasma was a better predictor of CVD status than overall HDL-C concentration. Even more provocative are recent studies showing that apoA-I, the principle protein component of HDL, functions as a modulator of cellular inflammation and oxidation. The following will review all of these potential routes explaining how HDL apoA-I can reduce the risk of CVD. PMID:23743767

  14. The effects of apolipoprotein B depletion on HDL subspecies composition and function.

    PubMed

    Davidson, W Sean; Heink, Anna; Sexmith, Hannah; Melchior, John T; Gordon, Scott M; Kuklenyik, Zsuzsanna; Woollett, Laura; Barr, John R; Jones, Jeffrey I; Toth, Christopher A; Shah, Amy S

    2016-04-01

    HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) efflux function may be a more robust biomarker of coronary artery disease risk than HDL-C. To study HDL function, apoB-containing lipoproteins are precipitated from serum. Whether apoB precipitation affects HDL subspecies composition and function has not been thoroughly investigated. We studied the effects of four common apoB precipitation methods [polyethylene glycol (PEG), dextran sulfate/magnesium chloride (MgCl2), heparin sodium/manganese chloride (MnCl2), and LipoSep immunoprecipitation (IP)] on HDL subspecies composition, apolipoproteins, and function (cholesterol efflux and reduction of LDL oxidation). PEG dramatically shifted the size distribution of HDL and apolipoproteins (assessed by two independent methods), while leaving substantial amounts of reagent in the sample. PEG also changed the distribution of cholesterol efflux and LDL oxidation across size fractions, but not overall efflux across the HDL range. Dextran sulfate/MgCl2, heparin sodium/MnCl2, and LipoSep IP did not change the size distribution of HDL subspecies, but altered the quantity of a subset of apolipoproteins. Thus, each of the apoB precipitation methods affected HDL composition and/or size distribution. We conclude that careful evaluation is needed when selecting apoB depletion methods for existing and future bioassays of HDL function. PMID:26908829

  15. High-Density Lipoproteins (HDL) – Nature’s Multi-Functional Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kuai, Rui; Li, Dan; Chen, Y. Eugene; Moon, James J.; Schwendeman, Anna

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are endogenous nanoparticles involved in the transport and metabolism of cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides. HDL is well known as the ―good‖ cholesterol because it not only removes excess cholesterol from atherosclerotic plaques but also has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties, which protect the cardiovascular system. Circulating HDL also transports endogenous proteins, vitamins, hormones, and microRNA to various organs. Compared with other synthetic nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles, inorganic and polymeric nanoparticles, HDL has unique features that allow them to deliver cargo to specific targets more efficiently. These attributes include their ultra-small size (8-12 nm in diameter), high tolerability in humans (up to 8 g of protein per infusion), long circulating half-life (12-24 hours), and intrinsic targeting properties to different recipient cells. Various recombinant ApoA proteins and ApoA mimetic peptides have been recently developed for the preparation of reconstituted HDL that exhibits properties similar to endogenous HDL and has a potential for industrial scale-up. In this review, we will summarize: a) clinical pharmacokinetics and safety of reconstituted HDL products, b) comparison of HDL with inorganic and other organic nanoparticles, c) the rationale for using HDL as drug delivery vehicles for important therapeutic indications, d) the current state-of-the-art in HDL production, and e) HDL-based drug delivery strategies for small molecules, peptides/proteins, nucleic acids, and imaging agents targeted to various organs. PMID:26889958

  16. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Disappearing HDL Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Swetha; Joshi, Avni Y; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Kumar, Seema

    2016-01-01

    The term disappearing HDL syndrome refers to development of severe high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) deficiency in noncritically ill patients with previously normal HDL-C and triglyceride levels. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of the immune system due to an inability to regulate lymphocyte homeostasis resulting in lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. We describe a 17-year-old boy who was evaluated in the lipid clinic for history of undetectable or low HDL-C and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Past medical history was significant for ALPS IA diagnosed at 10 years of age when he presented with bilateral cervical adenopathy. He was known to have a missense mutation in one allele of the FAS protein extracellular domain consistent with ALPS type 1A. HDL-C and LDL-C levels had been undetectable on multiple occasions, though lipids had not been measured prior to the diagnosis of ALPS. He had been receiving sirolimus for immunosuppression. The HDL-C and LDL-C levels correlated with disease activity and improved to normal levels during times when the activity of ALPS was controlled. This case highlights the importance of considering ALPS as a cause of low HDL-C and LDL-C levels in a child with evidence of lymphoproliferation. PMID:27579193

  17. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome: A Rare Cause of Disappearing HDL Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Swetha; Joshi, Avni Y.; Rodriguez, Vilmarie

    2016-01-01

    The term disappearing HDL syndrome refers to development of severe high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) deficiency in noncritically ill patients with previously normal HDL-C and triglyceride levels. Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of the immune system due to an inability to regulate lymphocyte homeostasis resulting in lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. We describe a 17-year-old boy who was evaluated in the lipid clinic for history of undetectable or low HDL-C and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Past medical history was significant for ALPS IA diagnosed at 10 years of age when he presented with bilateral cervical adenopathy. He was known to have a missense mutation in one allele of the FAS protein extracellular domain consistent with ALPS type 1A. HDL-C and LDL-C levels had been undetectable on multiple occasions, though lipids had not been measured prior to the diagnosis of ALPS. He had been receiving sirolimus for immunosuppression. The HDL-C and LDL-C levels correlated with disease activity and improved to normal levels during times when the activity of ALPS was controlled. This case highlights the importance of considering ALPS as a cause of low HDL-C and LDL-C levels in a child with evidence of lymphoproliferation.

  18. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  19. Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction in Diet-Induced Obese Mice: Roles of AMP-Kinase, Protein Kinase Cε, Mitochondrial and Cholesterol Metabolism, and Alterations in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Émilie; Al-Mass, Anfal; Attané, Camille; Zhang, Kezhuo; Lamontagne, Julien; Lussier, Roxane; Madiraju, S. R. Murthy; Joly, Erik; Ruderman, Neil B.; Sladek, Robert; Prentki, Marc; Peyot, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Diet induced obese (DIO) mice can be stratified according to their weight gain in response to high fat diet as low responders (LDR) and high responders (HDR). This allows the study of β-cell failure and the transitions to prediabetes (LDR) and early diabetes (HDR). C57BL/6N mice were fed for 8 weeks with a normal chow diet (ND) or a high fat diet and stratified as LDR and HDR. Freshly isolated islets from ND, LDR and HDR mice were studied ex-vivo for mitochondrial metabolism, AMPK activity and signalling, the expression and activity of key enzymes of energy metabolism, cholesterol synthesis, and mRNA profiling. Severely compromised glucose-induced insulin secretion in HDR islets, as compared to ND and LDR islets, was associated with suppressed AMP-kinase activity. HDR islets also showed reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity and enhanced activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, which led respectively to elevated fatty acid oxidation and increased cholesterol biosynthesis. HDR islets also displayed mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization and reduced ATP turnover in the presence of elevated glucose. Expression of protein kinase Cε, which reduces both lipolysis and production of signals for insulin secretion, was elevated in DIO islets. Genes whose expression increased or decreased by more than 1.2-fold were minor between LDR and ND islets (17 differentially expressed), but were prominent between HDR and ND islets (1508 differentially expressed). In HDR islets, particularly affected genes were related to cell cycle and proliferation, AMPK signaling, mitochondrial metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. In conclusion, chronically reduced AMPK activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cholesterol biosynthesis in islets, and substantial alterations in gene expression accompany β-cell failure in HDR islets. The β-cell compensation process in the prediabetic state (LDR) is largely independent of transcriptional adaptive changes, whereas the transition

  20. Distinct composition of human fetal HDL attenuates its anti-oxidative capacity.

    PubMed

    Sreckovic, Ivana; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Obrist, Britta; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Scharnagl, Hubert; Holzer, Michael; Scholler, Monika; Philipose, Sonia; Marsche, Gunther; Lang, Uwe; Desoye, Gernot; Wadsack, Christian

    2013-04-01

    In human high-density lipoprotein (HDL) represents the major cholesterol carrying lipoprotein class in cord blood, while cholesterol is mainly carried by low-density lipoprotein in maternal serum. Additionally, to carrying cholesterol, HDL also associates with a range of proteins as cargo. We tested the hypothesis that fetal HDL carries proteins qualitatively and quantitatively different from maternal HDL. These differences then contribute to distinct HDL functionality in both circulations. Shotgun proteomics and biochemical analyses were used to assess composition/function of fetal and maternal HDL isolated from uncomplicated human pregnancies at term of gestation. The pattern of analyzed proteins that were statistically elevated in fetal HDL (apoE, proteins involved in coagulation, transport processes) suggests a particle characteristic for the light HDL2 sub-fraction. In contrast, proteins that were enriched in maternal HDL (apoL, apoF, PON1, apoD, apoCs) have been described almost exclusively in the dense HDL3 fraction and relevant to its anti-oxidative function and role in innate immunity. Strikingly, PON1 mass and activity were 5-fold lower (p<0.01) in the fetus, which was accompanied by attenuation of anti-oxidant capacity of fetal HDL. Despite almost equal quantity of CETP in maternal and fetal HDL, its enzymatic activity was 55% lower (p<0.001) in the fetal circulation, whereas LCAT activity was not altered. These findings indicate that maternally derived HDL differs from fetal HDL with respect to its proteome, size and function. Absence of apoA-1, apoL and PON1 on fetal HDL is associated with decreased anti-oxidative properties together with deficiency in innate immunity collectively indicating distinct HDLs in fetuses. PMID:23321267

  1. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL. PMID:25737239

  2. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; et al

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobicmore » environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.« less

  3. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-04

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

  4. HDL surface lipids mediate CETP binding as revealed by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Charles, River; Tong, Huimin; Zhang, Lei; Patel, Mili; Wang, Francis; Rames, Matthew J.; Ren, Amy; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Qiu, Xiayang; Johns, Douglas G.; Charles, M. Arthur; Ren, Gang

    2015-03-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the transfer of cholesterol esters (CE) from atheroprotective high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to atherogenic low-density lipoproteins (LDL). CETP inhibition has been regarded as a promising strategy for increasing HDL levels and subsequently reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the crystal structure of CETP is known, little is known regarding how CETP binds to HDL. Here, we investigated how various HDL-like particles interact with CETP by electron microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. Results showed that CETP binds to HDL via hydrophobic interactions rather than protein-protein interactions. The HDL surface lipid curvature generates a hydrophobic environment, leading to CETP hydrophobic distal end interaction. This interaction is independent of other HDL components, such as apolipoproteins, cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. Thus, disrupting these hydrophobic interactions could be a new therapeutic strategy for attenuating the interaction of CETP with HDL.

  5. HDL/ApoA-1 infusion and ApoA-1 gene therapy in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chyu, Kuang-Yuh; Shah, Prediman K.

    2015-01-01

    The HDL hypothesis stating that simply raising HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) may produce cardiovascular benefits has been questioned recently based on several randomized clinical trials using CETP inhibitors or niacin to raise HDL-C levels. However, extensive pre-clinical data support the vascular protective effects of administration of exogenous ApoA-1 containing preβ-HDL like particles. Several small proof-of-concept clinical trials using such HDL/ApoA-1 infusion therapy have shown encouraging results but definitive proof of efficacy must await large scale clinical trials. In addition to HDL infusion therapy an alternative way to exploit beneficial cardiovascular effects of HDL/ApoA-1 is to use gene transfer. Preclinical studies have shown evidence of benefit using this approach; however clinical validation is yet lacking. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the aforementioned strategies. PMID:26388776

  6. HDL-Mimetic PLGA Nanoparticle To Target Atherosclerosis Plaque Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Fay, Francois; Lobatto, Mark E.; Tang, Jun; Ouimet, Mireille; Kim, YongTae; van der Staay, Susanne E. M.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Zhang, Liangfang; Fisher, Edward A; Moore, Kathryn J.; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J M

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that exhibits an intrinsic affinity for atherosclerotic plaque macrophages. Its natural targeting capability as well as the option to incorporate lipophilic payloads, e.g., imaging or therapeutic components, in both the hydrophobic core and the phospholipid corona make the HDL platform an attractive nanocarrier. To realize controlled release properties, we developed a hybrid polymer/HDL nanoparticle composed of a lipid/apolipoprotein coating that encapsulates a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core. This novel HDL-like nanoparticle (PLGA–HDL) displayed natural HDL characteristics, including preferential uptake by macrophages and a good cholesterol efflux capacity, combined with a typical PLGA nanoparticle slow release profile. In vivo studies carried out with an ApoE knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis showed clear accumulation of PLGA–HDL nanoparticles in atherosclerotic plaques, which colocalized with plaque macrophages. This biomimetic platform integrates the targeting capacity of HDL biomimetic nanoparticles with the characteristic versatility of PLGA-based nanocarriers. PMID:25650634

  7. Regulation of HDL genes: transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational.

    PubMed

    Kardassis, Dimitris; Gafencu, Anca; Zannis, Vassilis I; Davalos, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    HDL regulation is exerted at multiple levels including regulation at the level of transcription initiation by transcription factors and signal transduction cascades; regulation at the posttranscriptional level by microRNAs and other noncoding RNAs which bind to the coding or noncoding regions of HDL genes regulating mRNA stability and translation; as well as regulation at the posttranslational level by protein modifications, intracellular trafficking, and degradation. The above mechanisms have drastic effects on several HDL-mediated processes including HDL biogenesis, remodeling, cholesterol efflux and uptake, as well as atheroprotective functions on the cells of the arterial wall. The emphasis is on mechanisms that operate in physiologically relevant tissues such as the liver (which accounts for 80% of the total HDL-C levels in the plasma), the macrophages, the adrenals, and the endothelium. Transcription factors that have a significant impact on HDL regulation such as hormone nuclear receptors and hepatocyte nuclear factors are extensively discussed both in terms of gene promoter recognition and regulation but also in terms of their impact on plasma HDL levels as was revealed by knockout studies. Understanding the different modes of regulation of this complex lipoprotein may provide useful insights for the development of novel HDL-raising therapies that could be used to fight against atherosclerosis which is the underlying cause of coronary heart disease. PMID:25522987

  8. Plasma levels of HDL and carotenoids are lower in dementia patients with vascular comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Dias, Irundika H K; Polidori, Maria Cristina; Li, Li; Weber, Daniela; Stahl, Wilhelm; Nelles, Gereon; Grune, Tilman; Griffiths, Helen R

    2014-01-01

    Elevated serum cholesterol concentrations in mid-life increase risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) in later life. However, lower concentrations of cholesterol-carrying high density lipoprotein (HDL) and its principal apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) correlate with increased risk for AD. As HDL transports oxocarotenoids, which are scavengers of peroxynitrite, we have investigated the hypothesis that lower HDL and oxocarotenoid concentrations during AD may render HDL susceptible to nitration and oxidation and in turn reduce the efficiency of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) from lipid-laden cells. Fasting blood samples were obtained from subjects with (1) AD without cardiovascular comorbidities and risk factors (AD); (2) AD with cardiovascular comorbidities and risk factors (AD Plus); (3) normal cognitive function; for carotenoid determination by HPLC, analysis of HDL nitration and oxidation by ELISA, and 3H-cholesterol export to isolated HDL. HDL concentration in the plasma from AD Plus patients was significantly lower compared to AD or control subject HDL levels. Similarly, lutein, lycopene, and zeaxanthin concentrations were significantly lower in AD Plus patients compared to those in control subjects or AD patients, and oxocarotenoid concentrations correlated with Mini-Mental State Examination scores. At equivalent concentrations of ApoA1, HDL isolated from all subjects irrespective of diagnosis was equally effective at mediating RCT. HDL concentration is lower in AD Plus patients' plasma and thus capacity for RCT is compromised. In contrast, HDL from patients with AD-only was not different in concentration, modifications, or function from HDL of healthy age-matched donors. The relative importance of elevating HDL alone compared with elevating carotenoids alone or elevating both to reduce risk for dementia should be investigated in patients with early signs of dementia. PMID:24448787

  9. Thyroid Dysfunction and Associated Risk Factors among Nepalese Diabetes Mellitus Patients.

    PubMed

    Khatiwada, Saroj; Kc, Rajendra; Sah, Santosh Kumar; Khan, Seraj Ahmed; Chaudhari, Rajendra Kumar; Baral, Nirmal; Lamsal, Madhab

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To assess thyroid function and associated risk factors in Nepalese diabetes mellitus patients. Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 419 diabetes mellitus patients at B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal. Information on demographic and anthropometric variables and risk factors for thyroid dysfunction was collected. Blood samples were analysed to measure thyroid hormones, blood sugar, and lipid profile. Results. Prevalence rate of thyroid dysfunction was 36.03%, with subclinical hypothyroidism (26.5%) as the most common thyroid dysfunction. Thyroid dysfunction was much common in females (42.85%) compared to males (30.04%) (p = 0.008) and in type 1 diabetes (50%) compared to type 2 diabetes mellitus (35.41%) (p = 0.218). Diabetic patients with thyroid dysfunction had higher total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol in comparison to patients without thyroid dysfunction. Significant risk factors for thyroid dysfunction, specifically hypothyroidism (overt and subclinical), were smoking (relative risk of 2.56 with 95% CI (1.99-3.29, p < 0.001)), family history of thyroid disease (relative risk of 2.57 with 95% CI (2.0-3.31, p < 0.001)), and female gender (relative risk of 1.44 with 95% CI (1.09-1.91, p = 0.01)). Conclusions. Thyroid dysfunction is common among Nepalese diabetic patients. Smoking, family history of thyroid disease, and female gender are significantly associated with thyroid dysfunction. PMID:26435714

  10. Dysfunctional High-Density Lipoprotein: An Innovative Target for Proteomics and Lipidomics

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Juan; Olivar, Luis Carlos; Ramos, Eduardo; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Rojas, Joselyn; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2015-01-01

    High-Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol (HDL-C) is regarded as an important protective factor against cardiovascular disease, with abundant evidence of an inverse relationship between its serum levels and risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as various antiatherogenic, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. Nevertheless, observations of hereditary syndromes featuring scant HDL-C concentration in absence of premature atherosclerotic disease suggest HDL-C levels may not be the best predictor of cardiovascular disease. Indeed, the beneficial effects of HDL may not depend solely on their concentration, but also on their quality. Distinct subfractions of this lipoprotein appear to be constituted by specific protein-lipid conglomerates necessary for different physiologic and pathophysiologic functions. However, in a chronic inflammatory microenvironment, diverse components of the HDL proteome and lipid core suffer alterations, which propel a shift towards a dysfunctional state, where HDL-C becomes proatherogenic, prooxidant, and proinflammatory. This heterogeneity highlights the need for further specialized molecular studies in this aspect, in order to achieve a better understanding of this dysfunctional state; with an emphasis on the potential role for proteomics and lipidomics as valuable methods in the search of novel therapeutic approaches for cardiovascular disease. PMID:26634153

  11. Atheroprotective role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P).

    PubMed

    Potì, Francesco; Simoni, Manuela; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2014-08-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies documented an inverse relationship between plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and the extent of atherosclerotic disease. However, clinical interventions targeting HDL cholesterol failed to show clinical benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk reduction, suggesting that HDL components distinct from cholesterol may account for anti-atherogenic effects attributed to this lipoprotein. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-a lysosphingolipid exerting its biological activity via binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors and regulating a wide array of biological responses in a variety of different organs and tissues including the cardiovascular system-has been identified as an integral constituent of HDL particles. In the present review, we discuss current evidence from epidemiological studies, experimental approaches in vitro, and animal models of atherosclerosis, suggesting that S1P contributes to atheroprotective effects exerted by HDL particles. PMID:24891400

  12. Pantethine, a derivative of vitamin B5, favorably alters total, LDL and non-HDL cholesterol in low to moderate cardiovascular risk subjects eligible for statin therapy: a triple-blinded placebo and diet-controlled investigation.

    PubMed

    Evans, Malkanthi; Rumberger, John A; Azumano, Isao; Napolitano, Joseph J; Citrolo, Danielle; Kamiya, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    High serum concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. The efficacy of pantethine treatment on cardiovascular risk markers was investigated in a randomized, triple-blinded, placebo-controlled study, in a low to moderate cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk North American population eligible for statin therapy, using the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) guidelines. A total of 32 subjects were randomized to pantethine (600 mg/day from weeks 1 to 8 and 900 mg/day from weeks 9 to 16) or placebo. Compared with placebo, the participants on pantethine showed a significant decrease in total cholesterol at 16 weeks (P=0.040) and LDL-C at 8 and 16 weeks (P=0.020 and P=0.006, respectively), and decreasing trends in non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at week 8 and week 12 (P=0.102 and P=0.145, respectively) that reached significance by week 16 (P=0.042). An 11% decrease in LDL-C from baseline was seen in participants on pantethine, at weeks 4, 8, 12, and 16, while participants on placebo showed a 3% increase at week 16. This decrease was significant between groups at weeks 8 (P=0.027) and 16 (P=0.010). The homocysteine levels for both groups did not change significantly from baseline to week 16. Coenzyme Q10 significantly increased from baseline to week 4 and remained elevated until week 16, in both the pantethine and placebo groups. After 16 weeks, the participants on placebo did not show significant improvement in any CVD risk end points. This study confirms that pantethine lowers cardiovascular risk markers in low to moderate CVD risk participants eligible for statins according to NCEP guidelines. PMID:24600231

  13. Pantethine, a derivative of vitamin B5, favorably alters total, LDL and non-HDL cholesterol in low to moderate cardiovascular risk subjects eligible for statin therapy: a triple-blinded placebo and diet-controlled investigation

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Malkanthi; Rumberger, John A; Azumano, Isao; Napolitano, Joseph J; Citrolo, Danielle; Kamiya, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    High serum concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. The efficacy of pantethine treatment on cardiovascular risk markers was investigated in a randomized, triple-blinded, placebo-controlled study, in a low to moderate cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk North American population eligible for statin therapy, using the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) guidelines. A total of 32 subjects were randomized to pantethine (600 mg/day from weeks 1 to 8 and 900 mg/day from weeks 9 to16) or placebo. Compared with placebo, the participants on pantethine showed a significant decrease in total cholesterol at 16 weeks (P=0.040) and LDL-C at 8 and 16 weeks (P=0.020 and P=0.006, respectively), and decreasing trends in non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at week 8 and week 12 (P=0.102 and P=0.145, respectively) that reached significance by week 16 (P=0.042). An 11% decrease in LDL-C from baseline was seen in participants on pantethine, at weeks 4, 8, 12, and 16, while participants on placebo showed a 3% increase at week 16. This decrease was significant between groups at weeks 8 (P=0.027) and 16 (P=0.010). The homocysteine levels for both groups did not change significantly from baseline to week 16. Coenzyme Q10 significantly increased from baseline to week 4 and remained elevated until week 16, in both the pantethine and placebo groups. After 16 weeks, the participants on placebo did not show significant improvement in any CVD risk end points. This study confirms that pantethine lowers cardiovascular risk markers in low to moderate CVD risk participants eligible for statins according to NCEP guidelines. PMID:24600231

  14. Bile acids reduce endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) transports lipids to hepatic cells and the majority of HDL-associated cholesterol is destined for biliary excretion. Cholesterol is excreted into the bile directly or after conversion to bile acids, which are also present in the plasma as they are effectively reabsorbed through the enterohepatic cycle. Here, we provide evidence that bile acids affect HDL endocytosis. Using fluorescent and radiolabeled HDL, we show that HDL endocytosis was reduced in the presence of high concentrations of taurocholate, a natural non-cell-permeable bile acid, in human hepatic HepG2 and HuH7 cells. In contrast, selective cholesteryl-ester (CE) uptake was increased. Taurocholate exerted these effects extracellularly and independently of HDL modification, cell membrane perturbation or blocking of endocytic trafficking. Instead, this reduction of endocytosis and increase in selective uptake was dependent on SR-BI. In addition, cell-permeable bile acids reduced HDL endocytosis by farnesoid X receptor (FXR) activation: chenodeoxycholate and the non-steroidal FXR agonist GW4064 reduced HDL endocytosis, whereas selective CE uptake was unaltered. Reduced HDL endocytosis by FXR activation was independent of SR-BI and was likely mediated by impaired expression of the scavenger receptor cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). Taken together we have shown that bile acids reduce HDL endocytosis by transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Further, we suggest that HDL endocytosis and selective lipid uptake are not necessarily tightly linked to each other. PMID:25010412

  15. HDL-S1P: cardiovascular functions, disease-associated alterations, and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Levkau, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid contained in High-density lipoproteins (HDL) and has drawn considerable attention in the lipoprotein field as numerous studies have demonstrated its contribution to several functions inherent to HDL. Some of them are partly and some entirely due to the S1P contained in HDL (HDL-S1P). Despite the presence of over 1000 different lipids in HDL, S1P stands out as it possesses its own cell surface receptors through which it exercises key physiological functions. Most of the S1P in human plasma is associated with HDL, and the amount of HDL-S1P influences the quality and quantity of HDL-dependent functions. The main binding partner of S1P in HDL is apolipoprotein M but others may also exist particularly under conditions of acute S1P elevations. HDL not only exercise functions through their S1P content but have also an impact on genuine S1P signaling by influencing S1P bioactivity and receptor presentation. HDL-S1P content is altered in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Low HDL-S1P has also been linked to impaired HDL functions associated with these disorders. Although the pathophysiological and molecular reasons for such disease-associated shifts in HDL-S1P are little understood, there have been successful approaches to circumvent their adverse implications by pharmacologically increasing HDL-S1P as means to improve HDL function. This mini-review will cover the current understanding of the contribution of HDL-S1P to physiological HDL function, its alteration in disease and ways for its restoration to correct HDL dysfunction. PMID:26539121

  16. Glycoxidized HDL, HDL enriched with oxidized phospholipids and HDL from diabetic patients inhibit platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Lê, Quang Huy; El Alaoui, Meddy; Véricel, Evelyne; Ségrestin, Bérénice; Soulère, Laurent; Guichardant, Michel; Lagarde, Michel; Moulin, Philippe; Calzada, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Context High-density lipoproteins (HDL) possess atheroprotective properties including anti-thrombotic and antioxidant effects. Very few studies relate to the functional effects of oxidized HDL on platelets in type 2 diabetes (T2D). Objective The objective of our study was to investigate the effects of in vitro glycoxidized HDL, and HDL from T2D patients on platelet aggregation and arachidonic acid signaling cascade. At the same time, the contents of hydroxylated fatty acids were assessed in HDL. Results Compared to control HDL, in vitro glycoxidized HDL had decreased proportions of linoleic (LA) and arachidonic (AA) acids in phospholipids and cholesteryl esters, and increased concentrations of hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids (9-HODE and 13-HODE) and 15-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE), derived from LA and AA respectively, especially hydroxy derivatives esterified in phospholipids. Glycoxidized HDL dose-dependently decreased collagen-induced platelet aggregation by binding to SR-BI. Glycoxidized HDL prevented collagen-induced increased phosphorylation of platelet p38 MAPK and cytosolic phospholipase A2, as well as intracellular calcium mobilization. HDL enriched with oxidized phospholipids, namely PC(16:0/13-HODE) dose-dependently inhibited platelet aggregation. Increased concentrations of 9-HODE, 13-HODE and 15-HETE in phospholipids (2.1, 2.1 and 2.4-fold increase respectively) were found in HDL from patients with T2D, and these HDL also inhibited platelet aggregation via SR-BI. Conclusions Altogether, our results indicate that in vitro glycoxidized HDL as well as HDL from T2D patients inhibit platelet aggregation, and suggest that oxidized LA-containing phospholipids may contribute to the anti-aggregatory effects of glycoxidized HDL and HDL from T2D patients. PMID:25794249

  17. Metabolism of low-density lipoprotein free cholesterol by human plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Fielding, P.E.; Miida, Takashi; Fielding, C.J. )

    1991-09-03

    The metabolism of cholesterol derived from ({sup 3}H) cholesterol-labeled low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was determined in human blood plasma. LDL-derived free cholesterol first appeared in large {alpha}-migrating HDL (HDL{sub 2}) and was then transferred to small {alpha}-HDL (HDL{sub 3}) for esterification. The major part of such esters was retained within HDL of increasing size in the course of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity; the balance was recovered in LDL. Transfer of preformed cholesteryl esters within HDL contributed little to the labeled cholesteryl ester accumulating HDL{sub 2}. When cholesterol for esterification was derived instead from cell membranes, a significantly smaller proportion of this cholesteryl ester was subsequently recovered in LDL. These data suggest compartmentation of cholesteryl esters within plasma that have been formed from cell membrane or LDL free cholesterol, and the role for HDL{sub 2} as a relatively unreactive sink for LCAT-derived cholesteryl esters.

  18. Protective Effects of HDL Against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gomaraschi, Monica; Calabresi, Laura; Franceschini, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that, besides being a strong independent predictor of the occurrence of primary coronary events, a low plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level is also associated with short- and long-term unfavorable prognosis in patients, who have recovered from a myocardial infarction, suggesting a direct detrimental effect of low HDL on post-ischemic myocardial function. Experiments performed in ex vivo and in vivo models of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury have clearly shown that HDL are able to preserve cardiac function when given before ischemia or at reperfusion; the protective effects of HDL against I/R injury have been also confirmed in other tissues and organs, as brain and hind limb. HDL were shown to act on coronary endothelial cells, by limiting the increase of endothelium permeability and promoting vasodilation and neoangiogenesis, on white blood cells, by reducing their infiltration into the ischemic tissue and the release of pro-inflammatory and matrix-degrading molecules, and on cardiomyocytes, by preventing the activation of the apoptotic cascade. Synthetic HDL retains the cardioprotective activity of plasma-derived HDL and may become a useful adjunctive therapy to improve clinical outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndromes or undergoing coronary procedures. PMID:26834639

  19. Hepatic lipase- and endothelial lipase-deficiency in mice promotes macrophage-to-feces RCT and HDL antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Chen, Xiangyu; Julve, Josep; Quesada, Helena; Santos, David; Metso, Jari; Tous, Monica; Jauhiainen, Matti; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-04-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) and endothelial lipase (EL) are negative regulators of plasma HDL cholesterol (HDLc) levels and presumably could affect two main HDL atheroprotective functions, macrophage-to-feces reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and HDL antioxidant properties. In this study, we assessed the effects of both HL and EL deficiency on macrophage-specific RCT process and HDL ability to protect against LDL oxidation. HL- and EL-deficient and wild-type mice were injected intraperitoneally with [(3)H]cholesterol-labeled mouse macrophages, after which the appearance of [(3)H]cholesterol in plasma, liver, and feces was determined. The degree of HDL oxidation and the protection of oxidative modification of LDL co-incubated with HDL were evaluated by measuring conjugated diene kinetics. Plasma levels of HDLc, HDL phospholipids, apoA-I, and platelet-activated factor acetyl-hydrolase were increased in both HL- and EL-deficient mice. These genetically modified mice displayed increased levels of radiolabeled, HDL-bound [(3)H]cholesterol 48h after the label injection. The magnitude of macrophage-derived [(3)H]cholesterol in feces was also increased in both the HL- and EL-deficient mice. HDL from the HL- and EL-deficient mice was less prone to oxidation and had a higher ability to protect LDL from oxidation, compared with the HDL derived from the wild-type mice. These changes were correlated with plasma apoA-I and apoA-I/HDL total protein levels. In conclusion, targeted inactivation of both HL and EL in mice promoted macrophage-to-feces RCT and enhanced HDL antioxidant properties. PMID:23328279

  20. New horizons for cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Gregory G

    2012-02-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels bear an inverse relationship to cardiovascular risk. To date, however, no intervention specifically targeting HDL has been demonstrated to reduce cardiovascular risk. Cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates transfer of cholesterol ester from HDL to apolipoprotein B-containing particles. Most, but not all observational cohort studies indicate that genetic polymorphisms of CETP associated with reduced activity and higher HDL cholesterol levels are also associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. Some, but not all studies indicate that CETP inhibition in rabbits retards atherosclerosis, whereas transgenic CETP expression in mice promotes atherosclerosis. Torcetrapib, the first CETP inhibitor to reach phase III clinical development, was abandoned due to excess mortality associated with increases in aldosterone and blood pressure. Two other CETP inhibitors have entered phase III clinical development. Anacetrapib is a potent inhibitor of CETP that produces very large increases in HDL cholesterol and large reductions in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, beyond those achieved with statins. Dalcetrapib is a less potent CETP inhibitor that produces smaller increases in HDL cholesterol with minimal effect on LDL cholesterol. Both agents appear to allow efflux of cholesterol from macrophages to HDL in vitro, and neither agent affects blood pressure or aldosterone in vivo. Two large cardiovascular outcomes trials, one with anacetrapib and one with dalcetrapib, should provide a conclusive test of the hypothesis that inhibition of CETP decreases cardiovascular risk. PMID:22083134

  1. Implication of Low HDL-c Levels in Patients with Average LDL-c Levels: A Focus on Oxidized LDL, Large HDL Subpopulation, and Adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas-Melo, Filipa; Sereno, José; Teixeira-Lemos, Edite; Marado, Daniela; Palavra, Filipe; Pinto, Rui; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Teixeira, Frederico; Reis, Flávio

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) on patients with LDL-c average levels, focusing on oxidative, lipidic, and inflammatory profiles. Patients with cardiovascular risk factors (n = 169) and control subjects (n = 73) were divided into 2 subgroups, one of normal HDL-c and the other of low HDL-c levels. The following data was analyzed: BP, BMI, waist circumference and serum glucose Total-c, TGs, LDL-c, oxidized LDL, total HDL-c and subpopulations (small, intermediate, and large), paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity, hsCRP, uric acid, TNF-α, adiponectin, VEGF, and iCAM1. In the control subgroup with low HDL-c levels, significantly higher values of BP and TGs and lower values of PON1 activity and adiponectin were found, versus control normal HDL-c subgroup. However, differences in patients' subgroups were clearly more pronounced. Indeed, low HDL-c subgroup presented increased HbA1c, TGs, non-HDL-c, Ox-LDL, hsCRP, VEGF, and small HDL-c and reduced adiponectin and large HDL. In addition, Ox-LDL, large-HDL-c, and adiponectin presented interesting correlations with classical and nonclassical markers, mainly in the normal HDL-c patients' subgroup. In conclusion, despite LDL-c average levels, low HDL-c concentrations seem to be associated with a poor cardiometabolic profile in a population with cardiovascular risk factors, which is better evidenced by traditional and nontraditional CV biomarkers, including Ox-LDL, large HDL-c, and adiponectin. PMID:24282340

  2. Paraoxonase 1 and HDL maturation.

    PubMed

    Gugliucci, Alejandro; Menini, Teresita

    2015-01-15

    Understanding the kinetics and function of paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is becoming an important issue in atherosclerosis. Low PON1 activity has been consistently linked with an increased risk of major cardiovascular events in the setting of secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. Recent studies have shown that there is a specific interaction of myeloperoxidase (MPO)-apoAI-PON1 on HDL surface that seems to be germane to atherogenesis. MPO specifically inhibits PON1 and PON1 mitigates MPO effects. Surprisingly, very little is known about the routes by which PON1 gets integrated into HDL or its fate during HDL remodeling in the intravascular space. We have developed a method that assesses PON1 activity in the individual HDL subclasses with the aid of which we have shown that PON1 is present across the HDL particle range and preferentially in HDL3, confirming data from ultracentrifugation (UC) studies. Upon HDL maturation ex vivo PON1 is activated and it shows a flux to both smaller and larger HDL particles as well as to VLDL and sdLDL. At the same time apoE, AI and AII are shifted across particle sizes. PON1 activation and flux across HDL particles are blocked by CETP and LCAT inhibitors. In a group of particles with such a complex biology as HDL, knowledge of the interaction between apo-lipoproteins, lipids and enzymes is key for an increased understanding of the yet multiple unknown features of its function. Solving the HDL paradox will necessitate the development of techniques to explore HDL function that are practical and well adapted to clinical studies and eventually become useful in patient monitoring. The confluence of proteomic, functional studies, HDL subclasses, PON1 assays and zymogram will yield data to draw a more elaborate and comprehensive picture of the function of HDL. It must be noted that all these studies are static and conducted in the fasting state. The crucial phase will be achieved when human kinetic studies (both in the fasting and post

  3. Hepatic ACAT2 Knock Down Increases ABCA1 and Modifies HDL Metabolism in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Degirolamo, Chiara; Gomaraschi, Monica; Graham, Mark; Ossoli, Alice; Larsson, Lilian; Calabresi, Laura; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Steffensen, Knut R.; Eriksson, Mats; Parini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives ACAT2 is the exclusive cholesterol-esterifying enzyme in hepatocytes and enterocytes. Hepatic ABCA1 transfers unesterified cholesterol (UC) to apoAI, thus generating HDL. By changing the hepatic UC pool available for ABCA1, ACAT2 may affect HDL metabolism. The aim of this study was to reveal whether hepatic ACAT2 influences HDL metabolism. Design WT and LXRα/β double knockout (DOKO) mice were fed a western-type diet for 8 weeks. Animals were i.p. injected with an antisense oligonucleotide targeted to hepatic ACAT2 (ASO6), or with an ASO control. Injections started 4 weeks after, or concomitantly with, the beginning of the diet. Results ASO6 reduced liver cholesteryl esters, while not inducing UC accumulation. ASO6 increased hepatic ABCA1 protein independently of the diet conditions. ASO6 affected HDL lipids (increased UC) only in DOKO, while it increased apoE-containing HDL in both genotypes. In WT mice ASO6 led to the appearance of large HDL enriched in apoAI and apoE. Conclusions The use of ASO6 revealed a new pathway by which the liver may contribute to HDL metabolism in mice. ACAT2 seems to be a hepatic player affecting the cholesterol fluxes fated to VLDL or to HDL, the latter via up-regulation of ABCA1. PMID:24695360

  4. Robust passive and active efflux of cellular cholesterol to a designer functional mimic of high density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Luthi, Andrea J.; Lyssenko, Nicholas N.; Quach, Duyen; McMahon, Kaylin M.; Millar, John S.; Vickers, Kasey C.; Rader, Daniel J.; Phillips, Michael C.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2015-01-01

    The ability of HDL to support macrophage cholesterol efflux is an integral part of its atheroprotective action. Augmenting this ability, especially when HDL cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophages is poor, represents a promising therapeutic strategy. One approach to enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux is infusing blood with HDL mimics. Previously, we reported the synthesis of a functional mimic of HDL (fmHDL) that consists of a gold nanoparticle template, a phospholipid bilayer, and apo A-I. In this work, we characterize the ability of fmHDL to support the well-established pathways of cellular cholesterol efflux from model cell lines and primary macrophages. fmHDL received cell cholesterol by unmediated (aqueous) and ABCG1- and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated diffusion. Furthermore, the fmHDL holoparticle accepted cholesterol and phospholipid by the ABCA1 pathway. These results demonstrate that fmHDL supports all the cholesterol efflux pathways available to native HDL and thus, represents a promising infusible therapeutic for enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux. fmHDL accepts cholesterol from cells by all known pathways of cholesterol efflux: unmediated, ABCG1- and SR-BI-mediated diffusion, and through ABCA1. PMID:25652088

  5. Robust passive and active efflux of cellular cholesterol to a designer functional mimic of high density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Luthi, Andrea J; Lyssenko, Nicholas N; Quach, Duyen; McMahon, Kaylin M; Millar, John S; Vickers, Kasey C; Rader, Daniel J; Phillips, Michael C; Mirkin, Chad A; Thaxton, C Shad

    2015-05-01

    The ability of HDL to support macrophage cholesterol efflux is an integral part of its atheroprotective action. Augmenting this ability, especially when HDL cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophages is poor, represents a promising therapeutic strategy. One approach to enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux is infusing blood with HDL mimics. Previously, we reported the synthesis of a functional mimic of HDL (fmHDL) that consists of a gold nanoparticle template, a phospholipid bilayer, and apo A-I. In this work, we characterize the ability of fmHDL to support the well-established pathways of cellular cholesterol efflux from model cell lines and primary macrophages. fmHDL received cell cholesterol by unmediated (aqueous) and ABCG1- and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated diffusion. Furthermore, the fmHDL holoparticle accepted cholesterol and phospholipid by the ABCA1 pathway. These results demonstrate that fmHDL supports all the cholesterol efflux pathways available to native HDL and thus, represents a promising infusible therapeutic for enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux. fmHDL accepts cholesterol from cells by all known pathways of cholesterol efflux: unmediated, ABCG1- and SR-BI-mediated diffusion, and through ABCA1. PMID:25652088

  6. Beneficial Effect of Higher Dietary Fiber Intake on Plasma HDL-C and TC/HDL-C Ratio among Chinese Rural-to-Urban Migrant Workers

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Quan; Wu, Jiang; Tang, Jie; Wang, Jia-Ji; Lu, Chu-Hong; Wang, Pei-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that high-dose supplemental dietary fiber intake has beneficial effects on cardiovascular risk factors. To clarify such a relationship, we examined the association between daily dietary fiber intake and plasma lipids using a cross-sectional design including 1034 (M 502, F 532) rural-to-urban workers in China. We found a dose-response relationship between increased dietary fiber intakes and increase of HDL cholesterol in male workers. There was also a dose-response relationship between increased dietary fiber intake and decreased total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol (TC/HDL-C) ratio in both male and female workers, after adjusting for potential confounders (p for trend, all p < 0.05). When the average dietary fiber intake increased from less than 18 g/day to over 30 g/day, the average HDL cholesterol level increased by 10.1%, and the TC/HDL-C ratio decreased by 14.4% for males (p = 0.020) and by 11.1% for females (p = 0.048). In conclusion, higher daily dietary fiber consumption is associated with beneficial effect on cholesterol for rural-to-urban workers in China, suggesting its potential beneficial effect on decreasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25938914

  7. Lipoprotein hydrophobic core lipids are partially extruded to surface in smaller HDL: “Herniated” HDL, a common feature in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Amigó, Núria; Mallol, Roger; Heras, Mercedes; Martínez-Hervás, Sergio; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Plana, Núria; Yanes, Óscar; Masana, Lluís; Correig, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that pharmacological increases in HDL cholesterol concentrations do not necessarily translate into clinical benefits for patients, raising concerns about its predictive value for cardiovascular events. Here we hypothesize that the size-modulated lipid distribution within HDL particles is compromised in metabolic disorders that have abnormal HDL particle sizes, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). By using NMR spectroscopy combined with a biochemical volumetric model we determined the size and spatial lipid distribution of HDL subclasses in a cohort of 26 controls and 29 DM2 patients before and after two drug treatments, one with niacin plus laropiprant and another with fenofibrate as an add-on to simvastatin. We further characterized the HDL surface properties using atomic force microscopy and fluorescent probes to show an abnormal lipid distribution within smaller HDL particles, a subclass particularly enriched in the DM2 patients. The reduction in the size, force cholesterol esters and triglycerides to emerge from the HDL core to the surface, making the outer surface of HDL more hydrophobic. Interestingly, pharmacological interventions had no effect on this undesired configuration, which may explain the lack of clinical benefits in DM2 subjects. PMID:26778677

  8. Origins and determinants of HDL populations and their subpopulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A.V.; Gong, E.L.

    1990-06-01

    This paper describes the origins and determinants of High Density Lipoproteins (HDL) populations and their subpopulations. Our survey of compositional properties of small HDL particles indicates considerable variation in core lipid content reflecting in large part the origins of such particles. Whether small HDL particles of different core content and apolipoprotein composition differ in their metabolic properties and function in reverse cholesterol transport remains to be established. Our studies demonstrate that lipolysis-derived products can facilitate formation in vitro of small Apolipoprotein (AI) particles with properties approximating those of plasma pre-{beta} HDL. Of particular interest is our observation that small AI particles are an exclusive reassembly product in mixtures containing POPE and FFA. This observation may be relevant to the physiologic origins of PE in lipoprotein structure and its role in metabolism and secretion of nascent HDL. Lastly our observations on the reactivity of small AI particles, containing FFA, with LCAT and LDL suggest further linkages between triglyceride and HDL metabolism. 19 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Effect of alcohol on hepatic receptor of high density lipoproteins (HDL)

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.C.; Miller, B.M. V.A. Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN )

    1991-03-11

    Moderate alcohol intake has been shown to increase HDL cholesterol and proteins. The seemingly protective effect' of moderate alcohol drinking against cardiovascular diseases has been attributed to an increase in serum HDL. In this study, the authors show that a receptor for HDL is present in rat liver. Rat liver membrane was prepared by stepwise ultracentrifugation. Apo Al was iodinated using {sup 125}I-NaI and IODO-beads. HDL was labeled by incubating with {sup 125}I-apo Al then refloated be centrifugation. Binding of {sup 125}I-HDL to rat liver membrane reached equilibrium by 2-3 h and was saturable at 37C. The binding was inhibited 80% by excess unlabeled HDL, but was inhibited only 25% by excess LDL. It could also be inhibited by preincubating HDL with anti-apo Al or anti-apo E antisera but not with anti-apo AIV or control sera. The binding affinity of HDL to the liver membrane of rats fed alcohol for 5 wk was 50% that of their pair-fed controls. Thus a decrease in the binding of HDL to liver membrane due to alcohol-drinking may result in a slower clearance of HDL by the liver and consequently a higher HDL concentration in the serum.

  10. Advances in the Study of the Antiatherogenic Function and Novel Therapies for HDL

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Peiqiu; Pan, Haitao; Xiao, Tiancun; Zhou, Ting; Guo, Jiao; Su, Zhengquan

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis that raising high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels could improve the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) is facing challenges. There is multitudinous clear clinical evidence that the latest failures of HDL-C-raising drugs show no clear association with risks for CVD. At the genetic level, recent research indicates that steady-state HDL-C concentrations may provide limited information regarding the potential antiatherogenic functions of HDL. It is evident that the newer strategies may replace therapeutic approaches to simply raise plasma HDL-C levels. There is an urgent need to identify an efficient biomarker that accurately predicts the increased risk of atherosclerosis (AS) in patients and that may be used for exploring newer therapeutic targets. Studies from recent decades show that the composition, structure and function of circulating HDL are closely associated with high cardiovascular risk. A vast amount of data demonstrates that the most important mechanism through which HDL antagonizes AS involves the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) process. Clinical trials of drugs that specifically target HDL have so far proven disappointing, so it is necessary to carry out review on the HDL therapeutics. PMID:26225968

  11. A review on lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Ramesh; Li, Min; Frohlich, Jiri

    2015-05-01

    Lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) is a plasma enzyme which esterifies cholesterol, and plays a key role in the metabolism of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Genetic disorders of LCAT are associated with lipoprotein abnormalities including low levels of HDL-C and presence of lipoprotein X, and clinical features mainly corneal opacities, changes in erythrocyte morphology and renal failure. Recombinant LCAT is being developed for the treatment of patients with LCAT deficiency. PMID:25172171

  12. What's Cholesterol?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Most cholesterol is LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol. LDL cholesterol is more likely to clog blood vessels because ... Here's a way to remember the difference: the LDL cholesterol is the bad kind, so call it "lousy" ...

  13. Expression of the human apolipoprotein A-I gene in transgenic mice alters high density lipoprotein (HDL) particle size distribution and diminishes selective uptake of HDL cholesteryl esters

    SciTech Connect

    Chajekshaul, T.; Hayek, T.; Walsh, A.; Breslow, J.L. )

    1991-08-01

    Transgenic mice carrying the human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I gene (HuAITg mice) were used to examine the effects of overexpression of the human gene on high density lipoprotein (HDL) particle size distribution and metabolism. On a chow diet, control mice had HDL cholesterol and apo A-I levels of 49 {plus minus} 2 and 137 {plus minus} 12 mg/dl of plasma, respectively. HuAITg mice had HDL cholesterol, human apo A-I, and mouse apo A-I levels of 88 {plus minus} 2, 255 {plus minus} 19, and 16 {plus minus} 2 mg/dl, respectively. Nondenaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed control mouse plasma HDL to be primarily monodisperse with a particle diameter of 10.2 nm, whereas HuAITg mouse plasma HDL was polydisperse with particles of diameter 11.4, 10.2, and 8.7 nm, which correspond in size to human HDL1, HDL2, and HDL3, respectively. In vivo turnover studies of HDL labeled with (3H)cholesteryl linoleyl ether and 125I-apo A-I were performed. In control animals, the fractional catabolic rate (FCR) for HDL cholesteryl ester was significantly more than the apo A-I FCR. In the HuAITg mice, the HDL cholesteryl ester FCR was the same as the apo A-I FCR. There were no significant differences between control and HuAITg animals in the sites of tissue removal of HDL cholesteryl ester, with the liver extracting most of the injected radioactivity. Control and HuAITg animals had comparable liver and intestinal cholesterol synthesis and LDL FCR. In conclusion, HuAITg mice have principally human and not mouse apo A-I in their plasma. This apparently causes a change in HDL particle size distribution in the transgenic mice to one resembling the human pattern. The replacement of mouse by human apo A-I also apparently causes the loss of the selective uptake pathway of HDL cholesteryl esters present in control mice.

  14. Association of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio and concentrations of plasma lipids with high-density lipoprotein subclass distribution in the Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To evaluate the relationship between the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio and HDL subclass distribution and to further examine and discuss the potential impact of LDL-C and HDL-C together with TG on HDL subclass metabolism. Results Small-sized preβ1-HDL, HDL3b and HDL3a increased significantly while large-sized HDL2a and HDL2b decreased significantly as the LDL-C/HDL-C ratio increased. The subjects in low HDL-C level (< 1.03 mmol/L) who had an elevation of the LDL-C/HDL-C ratio and a reduction of HDL2b/preβ1-HDL regardless of an undesirable or high LDL-C level. At desirable LDL-C levels (< 3.34 mmol/L), the HDL2b/preβ1-HDL ratio was 5.4 for the subjects with a high HDL-C concentration (≥ 1.55 mmol/L); however, at high LDL-C levels (≥ 3.36 mmol/L), the ratio of LDL-C/HDL-C was 2.8 in subjects, and an extremely low HDL2b/preβ1-HDL value although with high HDL-C concentration. Conclusion With increase of the LDL-C/HDL-C ratio, there was a general shift toward smaller-sized HDL particles, which implied that the maturation process of HDL was blocked. High HDL-C concentrations can regulate the HDL subclass distribution at desirable and borderline LDL-C levels but cannot counteract the influence of high LDL-C levels on HDL subclass distribution. PMID:20615262

  15. Remarkable quantitative and qualitative differences in HDL after niacin or fenofibrate therapy in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Masana, Luís; Cabré, Anna; Heras, Mercedes; Amigó, Núria; Correig, Xavier; Martínez-Hervás, Sergio; Real, José T; Ascaso, Juan F; Quesada, Helena; Julve, Josep; Palomer, Xavier; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel; Girona, Josefa; Plana, Núria; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2015-02-01

    HDL-increasing drugs such as fenofibrate and niacin have failed to decrease the cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. Drug-mediated quantitative and qualitative HDL modifications could be involved in these negative results. To evaluate the quantitative and qualitative effects of niacin and fenofibrate on HDL in patients with type 2 diabetes, a prospective, randomised controlled intervention trial was conducted. Thirty type 2 diabetic patients with low HDL were randomised to receive either fenofibrate (FFB) or niacin + laropiprant (ERN/LPR) as an add-on to simvastatin treatment for 12 weeks according to a crossover design. At the basal point and after each intervention period, physical examinations and comprehensive standard biochemical determinations and HDL metabolomics were performed. Thirty nondiabetic patients with normal HDL were used as a basal control group. ERN/LRP, but not FFB, significantly increased HDL cholesterol. Neither ERN/LRP nor FFB reversed the HDL particle size or particle number to normal. ERN/LRP increased apoA-I but not apoA-II, whereas FFB produced the opposite effect. FFB significantly increased Preβ1-HDL, whereas ERN/LRP tended to lower Preβ1-HDL. CETP and LCAT activities were significantly decreased only by ERN/LRP. PAF-AH activity in HDL and plasma decreased with the use of both agents. Despite their different actions on antioxidant parameters, none of the treatments induced detectable antioxidant improvements. ERN/LRP and FFB had strikingly different effects on HDL quantity and quality, as well as on HDL cholesterol concentrations. When prescribing HDL cholesterol increasing drugs, this differential action should be considered. PMID:25528430

  16. PLTP activity in premenopausal women. Relationship with lipoprotein lipase, HDL, LDL, body fat, and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, S J; Carr, M C; Hokanson, J E; Brunzell, J D; Albers, J J

    2000-02-01

    Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) is thought to play a major role in the facilitated transfer of phospholipids between lipoproteins and in the modulation of high density lipoprotein (HDL) particle size and composition. However, little has been reported concerning the relationships of PLTP with plasma lipoprotein parameters, lipolytic enzymes, body fat distribution, insulin, and glucose in normolipidemic individuals, particularly females. In the present study, 50 normolipidemic healthy premenopausal females were investigated. The relationships between the plasma PLTP activity and selected variables were assessed. PLTP activity was significantly and positively correlated with low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (r(s) = 0.53), apoB (r(s) = 0.44), glucose (r(s) = 0.40), HDL cholesterol (r(s) = 0.38), HDL(3) cholesterol (r(s) = 0.37), lipoprotein lipase activity (r(s) = 0.36), insulin (r(s) = 0.33), subcutaneous abdominal fat (r(s) = 0.36), intra-abdominal fat (r(s) = 0.29), and body mass index (r(s) = 0.29). HDL(2) cholesterol, triglyceride, and hepatic lipase were not significantly related to PLTP activity. As HDL(2) can be decreased by hepatic lipase and hepatic lipase is increased in obesity with increasing intra-abdominal fat, the participants were divided into sub-groups of non-obese (n = 35) and obese (n = 15) individuals and the correlation of PLTP with HDL(2) cholesterol was re-examined. In the non-obese subjects, HDL(2) cholesterol was found to be significantly and positively related to PLTP activity (r(s) = 0.44). Adjustment of the HDL(2) values for the effect of hepatic lipase activity resulted in a significant positive correlation between PLTP and HDL(2) (r(s) = 0.41), indicating that the strength of the relationship between PLTP activity and HDL(2) can be reduced by the opposing effect of hepatic lipase on HDL(2) concentrations. We conclude that PLTP-facilitated lipid transfer activity is related to HDL and LDL metabolism, as well as

  17. Quantification of HDL Proteins, Cardiac Events, and Mortality in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kopecky, Chantal; Genser, Bernd; Drechsler, Christiane; Krane, Vera; Kaltenecker, Christopher C.; Hengstschläger, Markus; März, Winfried; Wanner, Christoph; Säemann, Marcus D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Impairment of HDL function has been associated with cardiovascular events in patients with kidney failure. The protein composition of HDLs is altered in these patients, presumably compromising the cardioprotective effects of HDLs. This post hoc study assessed the relation of distinct HDL-bound proteins with cardiovascular outcomes in a dialysis population. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The concentrations of HDL-associated serum amyloid A (SAA) and surfactant protein B (SP-B) were measured in 1152 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on hemodialysis participating in The German Diabetes Dialysis Study who were randomly assigned to double-blind treatment of 20 mg atorvastatin daily or matching placebo. The association of SAA(HDL) and SP-B(HDL) with cardiovascular outcomes was assessed in multivariate regression models adjusted for known clinical risk factors. Results High concentrations of SAA(HDL) were significantly and positively associated with the risk of cardiac events (hazard ratio per 1 SD higher, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.01 to 1.19). High concentrations of SP-B(HDL) were significantly associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio per 1 SD higher, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.19). Adjustment for HDL cholesterol did not affect these associations. Conclusions In patients with diabetes on hemodialysis, SAA(HDL) and SP-B(HDL) were related to cardiac events and all-cause mortality, respectively, and they were independent of HDL cholesterol. These findings indicate that a remodeling of the HDL proteome was associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with ESRD. PMID:25424990

  18. Plasma cholesterol and other cardiac risk factors in adolescent girls.

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, M A; Jones, E; Steinbeck, K; Brock, K

    1995-01-01

    The aim was to examine the effects of smoking, physical activity, and body mass on total cholesterol and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in adolescent schoolgirls in Sydney, Australia. Body mass index (BMI) and waist to hip ratio (WHR) were determined in 144 girls aged 15 to 18 years. Total cholesterol (TC) and HDL-C were estimated on fingerprick blood and behavioural variables assessed by questionnaire. Prevalence of overweight (> 90th centile for BMI) was less in Australian adolescents than reported from the USA. Smokers had lower total cholesterol than non-smokers; this was partly explained by a lower HDL-C in the smokers. Physical activity was associated with a less atherogenic TC/HDL-C ratio. Girls with BMI > 90th centile had higher mean TC/HDL-C and apoprotein B than the group as a whole but those > 90th centile for WHR did not. PMID:8554353

  19. HDL abnormalities in nephrotic syndrome and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2016-01-01

    Normal HDL activity confers cardiovascular and overall protection by mediating reverse cholesterol transport and through its potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antithrombotic functions. Serum lipid profile, as well as various aspects of HDL metabolism, structure, and function can be profoundly altered in patients with nephrotic range proteinuria or chronic kidney disease (CKD). These abnormalities can, in turn, contribute to the progression of cardiovascular complications and various other comorbidities, such as foam cell formation, atherosclerosis, and/or glomerulosclerosis, in affected patients. The presence and severity of proteinuria and renal insufficiency, as well as dietary and drug regimens, pre-existing genetic disorders of lipid metabolism, and renal replacement therapies (including haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and renal transplantation) determine the natural history of lipid disorders in patients with kidney disease. Despite the adverse effects associated with dysregulated reverse cholesterol transport and advances in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms, safe and effective therapeutic interventions are currently lacking. This Review provides an overview of HDL metabolism under normal conditions, and discusses the features, mechanisms, and consequences of HDL abnormalities in patients with nephrotic syndrome or advanced CKD. PMID:26568191

  20. The mouse plasma PAF acetylhydrolase: II. It consists of two enzymes both associated with the HDL.

    PubMed

    Tsaoussis, V; Vakirtzi-Lemonias, C

    1994-05-01

    The PAF acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) of mouse plasma was characterised as to its lipoprotein subclass and apolipoprotein association. Association with plasma lipoproteins was established by cholesteryl-hemisuccinate agarose affinity chromatography while electrophoretic and electrofocusing studies demonstrated almost exclusive association with the HDL-VHDL. Fractionation of [4-14C]cholesterol-labelled plasma on a Bio-Gel A-5m column established that 1% of the enzymic activity was associated with the VLDL-LDL, 4.5% with the HDL1, 80% with the HDL2-HDL3 and 15% with the VHDL. Electrophoresis of the solubilised, HDL2-HDL3 bound enzyme gave two peaks of activity with mobilities of 0.29 and 0.49 and a distribution of the recovered activity of 78 and 22%, respectively. The VHDL associated activity on similar analysis gave a 25 and 75% distribution. These findings showed that two enzymes, both associated with the HDL and VHDL fractions, constitute the PAF-AH activity of mouse plasma. Further fractionation of the HDL2-HDL3 bound activity on heparin-agarose established that 70% of the recovered activity was bound to the apo-E containing HDL. PMID:7921790

  1. Quantification of In Vitro Macrophage Cholesterol Efflux and In Vivo Macrophage-Specific Reverse Cholesterol Transport.

    PubMed

    Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Lee-Rueckert, Miriam; Santos, David; Cedó, Lídia; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Julve, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Promotion of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is thought to be a major HDL-mediated mechanism for protecting against atherosclerosis. Preclinical studies support the concept that increasing cholesterol efflux from macrophages may confer atheroprotective benefits independently of the plasma HDL-cholesterol concentration. The application of the macrophage-to-feces RCT method in genetically engineered mice has provided evidence that this major HDL property correlates closely with changes in atherosclerosis susceptibility. This chapter provides details on the methodologies currently used to measure in vitro cholesterol efflux from macrophages or in vivo macrophage-specific RCT. The general principles and techniques described herein may be applied to measure the in vitro cholesterol efflux capacity of human serum in macrophage cultures and to evaluate the effect of different experimental pathophysiological conditions or the efficacy of different therapeutic strategies on the modulation of in vivo macrophage-RCT in mice. PMID:26445792

  2. Current guidelines for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in therapy and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Bishnu H; Joshi, Parag H; Jones, Steven R; Martin, Seth S; Blaha, Michael J; Michos, Erin D

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have suggested that a significant risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Therefore, increasing HDL-C with therapeutic agents has been considered an attractive strategy. In the prestatin era, fibrates and niacin monotherapy, which cause modest increases in HDL-C, reduced ASCVD events. Since their introduction, statins have become the cornerstone of lipoprotein therapy, the benefits of which are primarily attributed to decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Findings from several randomized trials involving niacin or cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors have challenged the concept that a quantitative elevation of plasma HDL-C will uniformly translate into ASCVD benefits. Consequently, the HDL, or more correctly, HDL-C hypothesis has become more controversial. There are no clear guidelines thus far for targeting HDL-C or HDL due to lack of solid outcomes data for HDL specific therapies. HDL-C levels are only one marker of HDL out of its several structural or functional properties. Novel approaches are ongoing in developing and assessing agents that closely mimic the structure of natural HDL or replicate its various functions, for example, reverse cholesterol transport, vasodilation, anti-inflammation, or inhibition of platelet aggregation. Potential new approaches like HDL infusions, delipidated HDL, liver X receptor agonists, Apo A-I upregulators, Apo A mimetics, and gene therapy are in early phase trials. This review will outline current therapies and describe future directions for HDL therapeutics. PMID:24748800

  3. The role of the lymphatic system in cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Li-Hao; Elvington, Andrew; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is the pathway for removal of peripheral tissue cholesterol and involves transport of cholesterol back to liver for excretion, starting from cellular cholesterol efflux facilitated by lipid-free apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) or other lipidated high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles within the interstitial space. Extracellular cholesterol then is picked up and transported through the lymphatic vasculature before entering into bloodstream. There is increasing evidence supporting a role for enhanced macrophage cholesterol efflux and RCT in ameliorating atherosclerosis, and recent data suggest that these processes may serve as better diagnostic biomarkers than plasma HDL levels. Hence, it is important to better understand the processes governing ApoA1 and HDL influx into peripheral tissues from the bloodstream, modification and facilitation of cellular cholesterol removal within the interstitial space, and transport through the lymphatic vasculature. New findings will complement therapeutic strategies for the treatment of atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:26388772

  4. An abundant dysfunctional apolipoprotein A1 in human atheroma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Levison, Bruce S.; Schmitt, Dave; Li, Lin; Wu, Yuping; Buffa, Jennifer; Kim, Timothy; Gerstenecker, Gary; Gu, Xiaodong; Kadiyala, Chandra; Wang, Zeneng; Culley, Miranda K.; Hazen, Jennie E.; DiDonato, Anthony J.; Fu, Xiaoming; Berisha, Stela; Peng, Daoquan; Nguyen, Truc; Liang, Shaohong; Chuang, Chia-Chi; Cho, Leslie; Plow, Edward F.; Fox, Paul L.; Gogonea, Valentin; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Parks, John S.; Fisher, Edward A.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate high density lipoproteins (HDL) and their major structural protein, apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), recovered from human atheroma, are dysfunctional and extensively oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO), while in vitro oxidation of apoA1/HDL by MPO impairs its cholesterol acceptor function. We developed a high affinity monoclonal antibody (mAb) that specifically recognizes apoA1/HDL modified by the MPO/H2O2/Cl-system using phage display affinity maturation. An oxindolyl alanine (2-OH-Trp) moiety at tryptophan 72 of apoA1 is the immunogenic epitope. Mutagenesis studies confirm a critical role for apoA1 Trp72 in MPO-mediated inhibition of ABCA1-dependent cholesterol acceptor activity of apoA1 in vitro and in vivo. ApoA1 containing a 2-OH-Trp72 group (oxTrp72-apoA1) is in low abundance within the circulation, but accounts for 20% of the apoA1 in atherosclerotic plaque. OxTrp72-apoA1 recovered from human atheroma or plasma was lipid-poor, virtually devoid of cholesterol acceptor activity, and demonstrated both potent pro-inflammatory activities on endothelial cells and impaired HDL biogenesis activity in vivo. Elevated oxTrp72-apoA1 levels in subjects presenting to a cardiology clinic (n=627) were associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Circulating oxTrp72-apoA1 levels may serve as a way to monitor a pro-atherogenic process in the artery wall. PMID:24464187

  5. Mechanism of the hepatic lipase induced accumulation of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol by cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, M.; Lund-Katz, S.; Phillips, M.C.; Rothblat, G.H.

    1985-07-02

    Hepatic lipase can enhance the delivery of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol to cells by a process which does not involve apoprotein catabolism. The incorporation of HDL-free (unesterified) cholesterol, phospholipid, and cholesteryl ester by cells has been compared to establish the mechanism of this delivery process. Human HDL was reconstituted with /sup 3/H-free cholesterol and (/sup 14/C)sphingomyelin, treated with hepatic lipase in the presence of albumin to remove the products of lipolysis, reisolated, and then incubated with cultured rat hepatoma cells. Relative to control HDL, modification of HDL with hepatic lipase stimulated both the amount of HDL-free cholesterol taken up by the cell and the esterification of HDL-free cholesterol but did not affect the delivery of sphingomyelin. Experiments utilizing HDL reconstituted with /sup 14/C-free cholesterol and (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl oleoyl ether suggest that hepatic lipase enhances the incorporation of HDL-esterified cholesterol. However, the amount of free cholesterol delivered as a result of treatment with hepatic lipase was 4-fold that of esterified cholesterol. On the basis of HDL composition, the cellular incorporation of free cholesterol was about 10 times that which would occur by the uptake and degradation of intact particles. The preferential incorporation of HDL-free cholesterol did not require the presence of lysophosphatidylcholine. To correlate the events observed at the cellular level with alterations in lipoprotein structure, high-resolution, proton-decoupled /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (90.55 MHz) was performed on HDL3 in which the cholesterol molecules were replaced with (4-/sup 13/C)cholesterol by particle reconstitution.

  6. Pleiotropy and genotype by diet interaction: A multivariate genetic analysis of HDL-C subfractions

    SciTech Connect

    Mahaney, M.C.; Blangero, J.; Comuzzie, A.G.

    1994-09-01

    Reduced high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in humans. Both major genes and major genotype by diet interaction have been reported for HDL-C, but the genetics of the HDL-C subfractions are less well known. In a baboon model for human atherosclerosis, we investigated the pleiotropic effects of genes on normal quantitative variation in three HDL-C subfractions (HDL{sub 1}-C, HDL{sub 2}-C, and HDL{sub 3}-C) in two dietary environments -- a basal diet and a 7 week high cholesterol, saturated fat (HCSF) diet. We analyzed data on serum HDL-C subfraction levels, quantified by gradient gel eletrophoresis, for 942 baboons (Papo hamadryas, sensu lato) from 17 pedigrees. We used multivariate maximum likelihood methods to simultaneously estimate phenotypic means, standard deviations, and heritabilities (h{sup 2}); effects of sex, age-by-sex, age{sup 2}-by-sex, percent subspecies admixture, and infant feeding modality; plus estimated significant h{sup 2} values for all three subfractions on both diets. When tested within dietary environments, we obtained significant genetic correlations between all three subfractions [i.e., P({rho}{sub G} = 0) < 0.001] and evidence of complete pleiotropy [i.e., P({vert_bar}{rho}{sub G}{vert_bar} = 1.0) > 0.1] between HDL{sub 1}-C and HDL{sub 3}-C ({rho}{sub G} = 0.81) on the basal diet. On the HCSF diet, only the genetic correlation between HDL{sub 1}-C and HDL{sub 3}-C ({rho}{sub g} = 0.61) was significant (p > 0.1). Complete pleiotropy was observed for each of the three subfractions between both diets. Given these results, we reject genotype by diet interaction for HDL{sub 1}-C, HDL{sub 2}-C or HDL{sub 3}-C; i.e., the same genes influence variation in each subfraction to the same degree on either diet. However, the apparent disruption of pleiotropy between HDL{sub 2}-C and the other two subfractions needs to be investigated further.

  7. Effects of dietary fucoxanthin on cholesterol metabolism in diabetic/obese KK-Ay mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fucoxanthin is a xanthophyll present in brown seaweeds and has several beneficial effects, including anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects. However, we and another group previously observed that fucoxanthin increases serum cholesterol levels in rodents. Cholesterol is an important component of cell membranes and biosynthesis of bile acids. Serum cholesterol levels are also closely associated with atherosclerosis. Therefore, we sought to identify the mechanism underlying the increase in serum cholesterol levels by fucoxanthin. Methods Diabetic/obese KK-Ay mice were fed a diet containing 0.2% fucoxanthin for 4 weeks. The mice were sacrificed, and total blood samples were collected for the measurement of serum total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol levels. Cholesterol content in tissues was also analyzed. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to determine hepatic mRNA and protein expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, respectively. Results Dietary fucoxanthin significantly increased serum HDL and non-HDL cholesterol levels, and reduced hepatic cholesterol content. In liver, the expression of SREBP1, SREBP2 and their target genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis significantly increased and tended to increase in the fucoxanthin-fed mice, respectively. In contrast, hepatic levels of LDLR and SR-B1 proteins which is important factors for LDL-cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol uptake in the liver from serum, decreased to 60% and 80% in the fucoxanthin-fed mice, respectively, compared with the control mice. Further, we found that dietary fucoxanthin significantly increased the mRNA expression of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), which enhances intracellular degradation of LDLR in lysosomes. Conclusions Fucoxanthin increased HDL-cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol levels in KK-Ay mice by inducing SREBP expression and reduced cholesterol uptake in the liver via down-regulation of LDLR and SR

  8. Nascent HDL formation by hepatocytes is reduced by the concerted action of serum amyloid A and endothelial lipase.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Joanne M; Jahangiri, Anisa; Ji, Ailing; de Beer, Frederick C; van der Westhuyzen, Deneys R; Webb, Nancy R

    2011-12-01

    Inflammation is associated with significant decreases in plasma HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and apoA-I levels. Endothelial lipase (EL) is known to be an important determinant of HDL-C in mice and in humans and is upregulated during inflammation. In this study, we investigated whether serum amyloid A (SAA), an HDL apolipoprotein highly induced during inflammation, alters the ability of EL to metabolize HDL. We determined that EL hydrolyzes SAA-enriched HDL in vitro without liberating lipid-free apoA-I. Coexpression of SAA and EL in mice by adenoviral vector produced a significantly greater reduction in HDL-C and apoA-I than a corresponding level of expression of either SAA or EL alone. The loss of HDL occurred without any evidence of HDL remodeling to smaller particles that would be expected to have more rapid turnover. Studies with primary hepatocytes demonstrated that coexpression of SAA and EL markedly impeded ABCA1-mediated lipidation of apoA-I to form nascent HDL. Our findings suggest that a reduction in nascent HDL formation may be partly responsible for reduced HDL-C during inflammation when both EL and SAA are known to be upregulated. PMID:21957202

  9. Effects of Carbohydrate and Dietary Fiber Intake, Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load on HDL Metabolism in Asian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, Hidekatsu; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Abe, Shinichi; Tada, Norio; Sako, Akahito

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a lipoprotein which has anti-atherogenic property by reverse cholesterol transport from the peripheral tissues to liver. Low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are associated with the development of coronary artery diseases (CADs). Various epidemiological studies have suggested that the development of CAD increase in individuals with less than 40 mg/dL of HDL-C. In spite of accumulation of evidences which suggest a significant association between low HDL-C and cardiovascular diseases, effects of dietary factors on HDL metabolism remained largely unknown. There may be interracial differences in effects of dietary factors on HDL metabolism. Here we reviewed published articles about effects of carbohydrate and dietary fiber intake, glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL), on HDL-C metabolism, regarding meta-analyses and clinical studies performed in Asian population as important articles. Low carbohydrate intake, GI and GL may be beneficially associated with HDL metabolism. Dietary fiber intake may be favorably associated with HDL metabolism in Asian populations. PMID:25110535

  10. About Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More About Cholesterol Updated:Aug 10,2016 It may surprise you ... our bodies to keep us healthy. What is cholesterol and where does it come from? Cholesterol is ...

  11. Curcumin retunes cholesterol transport homeostasis and inflammation response in M1 macrophage to prevent atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang-Yuan; Zhou, Juan; Guo, Ning; Ma, Wang-Ge; Huang, Xin; Wang, Huan; Yuan, Zu-Yi

    2015-11-27

    Lipoprotein cholesterol metabolism dysfunction in the arterial wall is a major contributor to atherosclerosis, and excessive lipid intake and failed cholesterol homeostasis may accelerate the atherogenic process. Curcumin exerts multiple effects by alleviating inflammation, hyperlipidemia, and atherosclerosis; however, its role in cholesterol transport homeostasis and its underlying impact on inflammatory M1 macrophages are poorly understood. This work aimed to investigate the effect of curcumin on cholesterol transport, the inflammatory response and cell apoptosis in M1 macrophages. RAW264.7 macrophages (M0) were induced with LPS plus IFN-γ for 12 h to develop a M1 subtype and were then incubated with curcumin at different concentrations (6.25 and 12.5 μmol/L) in the presence or absence of oxLDL. Then, cholesterol influx/efflux and foam cell formation as well as inflammation and apoptosis were evaluated. It was found that curcumin increased cholesterol uptake measured by the Dil-oxLDL binding assay, and simultaneously increased cholesterol efflux carried out by Apo-A1 and HDL in M1 cells. Curcumin further reinforced ox-LDL-induced cholesterol esterification and foam cell formation as determined by Oil Red O and BODIPY staining. Moreover, curcumin dramatically reduced ox-LDL-induced cytokine production such as IL-1β, IL-6 as well as TNF-α and M1 cell apoptosis. We also found that curcumin upregulated CD36 and ABCA1 in M1 macrophages. Curcumin increased PPARγ expression, which in turn promoted CD36 and ABCA1 expression. In conclusion, curcumin may increase the ability of M1 macrophages to handle harmful lipids, thus promoting lipid processing, disposal and removal, which may support cholesterol homeostasis and exert an anti-atherosclerotic effect. PMID:26471308

  12. Effects of human follicular fluid and high-density lipoproteins on early spermatozoa hyperactivation and cholesterol efflux

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Safouane M.; Vieitez, Gérard; Jaspard, Béatrice; Barbaras, Ronald; Perret, Bertrand; Mieusset, Roget; Parinaud, Jean; Collet, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    The preovulatory human follicular fluid contains only HDLs as a lipoprotein class with a typically high proportion of preβ HDL. We first examined the role of follicular fluid and HDL subfractions on human spermatozoa capacitation, a process characterized by a hyperactivation of the flagellar movement and a depletion of plasma membrane cholesterol. Whole follicular fluid and isolated HDL, used at constant free cholesterol concentration, were both able to promote an early flagellar hyperactivation. Moreover, incubation of [3H]cholesterol-labeled spermatozoa with follicular fluid induced a rapid cholesterol efflux from spermatozoa that was confirmed by mass measurements of cholesterol transfer. Using isolated HDL, the cholesterol efflux had a similar time course and represented 70% of that mediated by whole follicular fluid. We then analyzed the time course of radioactive labeling of HDL subfractions. In the first minute of incubation, we found that the preβ HDL fraction incorporated the main part of the radioactivity (60%), with the rest being found in α-HDL, but strikingly, the labeling of α-HDL increased with time at the expense of preβ HDL.Thus, our results indicate that HDLs are involved in both spermatozoa hyperactivation and cholesterol effl ux and suggest the role of preβ-HDL particles as fi rst cellular cholesterol acceptors. PMID:19965575

  13. Cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Cholesterol absorption is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol absorption and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol absorption is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol absorption when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of absorption physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296

  14. Relation between high density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary artery disease in asymptomatic men

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, G.S.; Troxler, R.G.; Hickman, J.R. Jr.; Clark, D.

    1981-11-01

    The well established inverse relation of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and the risk of coronary artery disease was tested in a cross-sectional group of 572 asymptomatic aircrew members who were being screened for risk of coronary artery disease. A battery of tests was performed, including determinations of fasting serum cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and triglycerides and performance of a maximal symptom-limited exercise tolerance test. Of the 572 patients, 132 also had an abnormal S-T segment response to exercise testing or were otherwise believed to have an increased risk of organic heart disease and subsequently underwent coronary angiography. Significant coronary artery disease was found in 16 men and minimal or subcritical coronary disease in 14; coronary angiograms were normal in the remaining 102 men. The remaining 440 men, who were believed to have a 1 percent chance of having coronary artery disease by sequential testing of risk factors and treadmill testing, had a mean cholesterol level of 213 mg/100 ml, a mean HDL cholesterol of 51 mg/100 ml and a mean cholesterol/HDL ratio of 4.4. The mean values of cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and cholesterol/HDL cholesterol did not differ significantly in men with normal angiographic finding and those with subcritical coronary disease. However, 14 of 16 men with coronary artery disease had a cholesterol/HDL ratio of 6.0 or more whereas only 4 men with normal coronary arteries had a ratio of 6.0 or more. Of the classical coronary risk factors evaluated, the cholesterol/HDL ratio of 6.0 or more had the highest odds ratio (172:1). It appears that determination of HDL cholesterol level helps to identify asymptomatic persons with a greater risk of having coronary artery disease.

  15. Role of HDL in cholesteryl ester metabolism of lipopolysaccharide-activated P388D1 macrophages[S

    PubMed Central

    Uda, Sabrina; Spolitu, Stefano; Angius, Fabrizio; Collu, Maria; Accossu, Simonetta; Banni, Sebastiano; Murru, Elisabetta; Sanna, Francesca; Batetta, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Infections share with atherosclerosis similar lipid alterations, with accumulation of cholesteryl esters (CEs) in activated macrophages and concomitant decrease of cholesterol-HDL (C-HDL). Yet the precise role of HDL during microbial infection has not been fully elucidated. Activation of P388D1 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggered an increase of CEs and neutral lipid contents, along with a remarkable enhancement in 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate-HDL uptake. Similar results were found in human monocyte-derived macrophages and monocytes cocultured with phytohemagglutinin-activated lymphocytes. Inhibition of cholesterol esterification with Sandoz-58035 resulted in 80% suppression of CE biosynthesis in P388D1. However, only a 35% decrease of CE content, together with increased scavenger receptor class B member 1 (SR-B1) protein expression, was found after 72 h and thereafter up to 16 passages of continuous ACAT suppression. Chronic inhibition blunted the effect of LPS treatment on cholesterol metabolism, increased the ratio of free cholesterol/CE content and enhanced interleukin 6 secretion.These results imply that, besides de novo biosynthesis and acquisition by LDL, HDL contributes probably through SR-B1 to the increased CE content in macrophages, partly explaining the low levels of C-HDL during their activation. Our data suggest that in those conditions where more CEs are required, HDL rather than removing, may supply CEs to the cells. PMID:23956443

  16. [The clinical evaluation of the hypocholesterolemic effects of an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis: mevalonic acid].

    PubMed

    Del Nero, E; Aloe, N; Augeri, C; Avola, F; Carta, G; Cavagnaro, A; De Grandi, R; Gianfreda, M; Magro, G P; Mazzarello, G P

    1992-07-01

    Twenty eight patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia were treated with mevalonic acid (an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis) for 45 days. Patients received a daily dose of 750 to 1500 mg mevalonic acid depending on plasma cholesterol levels. Results showed a significant reduction in cholesterol values whereas no significant difference was observed in HDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels. PMID:1505176

  17. Effect of HDL composition and particle size on the resistance of HDL to the oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To study the resistance of HDL particles to direct oxidation in respect to the distribution of HDL particles. Design and Methods We studied HDL composition, subclass distribution, and the kinetics of CuSO4-induced oxidation of total HDL and HDL3 in vitro in 36 low-HDL-C subjects and in 41 control subjects with normal HDL-C. Results The resistance of HDL3 to oxidation, as assessed from the propagation rate was significantly higher than that of total HDL. The propagation rate and diene formation during HDL oxidation in vitro was attenuated in HDL derived from low-HDL-C subjects. Propagation rate and maximal diene formation during total HDL oxidation correlated significantly with HDL mean particle size. The propagation rate of total HDL oxidation in vitro displayed a significant positive association with HDL2 particle mass and HDL mean particle size by multiple regression analyses. Conclusions These observations highlight that the distribution of HDL subpopulations has important implications for the potential of HDL as an anti-oxidant source. PMID:20863394

  18. The Role of Dietary Cholesterol in Lipoprotein Metabolism and Related Metabolic Abnormalities: A Mini-review.

    PubMed

    Kapourchali, Fatemeh Ramezani; Surendiran, Gangadaran; Goulet, Amy; Moghadasian, Mohammed H

    2016-10-25

    Cholesterol plays a vital role in cell biology. Dietary cholesterol or "exogenous" cholesterol accounts for approximately one-third of the pooled body cholesterol, and the remaining 70% is synthesized in the body (endogenous cholesterol). Increased dietary cholesterol intake may result in increased serum cholesterol in some individuals, while other subjects may not respond to dietary cholesterol. However, diet-increased serum cholesterol levels do not increase the low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein (LDL/HDL) cholesterol ratio, nor do they decrease the size of LDL particles or HDL cholesterol levels. Elevated levels of LDL cholesterol, reduced HDL cholesterol levels, and small, dense LDL particles are independent risk factors for coronary artery disease. Dietary cholesterol is the primary approach for treatment of conditions such as the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Recent studies have highlighted mechanisms for absorption of dietary cholesterol. These studies have help understand how dietary and/or pharmaceutical agents inhibit cholesterol absorption and thereby reduce LDL cholesterol concentrations. In this article, various aspects of cholesterol metabolism, including dietary sources, absorption, and abnormalities in cholesterol metabolism, have been summarized and discussed. PMID:26055276

  19. Effect of apolipoprotein E-free high density lipoproteins on cholesterol metabolism in cultured pig hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bachorik, P.S.; Virgil, D.G.; Kwiterovich, P.O. Jr.

    1987-10-05

    We studied cholesterol synthesis from (/sup 14/C)acetate, cholesterol esterification from (/sup 14/C)oleate, and cellular cholesterol and cholesteryl ester levels after incubating cells with apoE-free high density lipoproteins (HDL) or low density lipoproteins (LDL). LDL suppressed synthesis by up to 60%, stimulated esterification by up to 280%, and increased cell cholesteryl ester content about 4-fold. Esterification increased within 2 h, but synthesis was not suppressed until after 6 h. ApoE-free HDL suppressed esterification by about 50% within 2 h. Cholesterol synthesis was changed very little within 6 h, unless esterification was maximally suppressed; synthesis was then stimulated about 4-fold. HDL lowered cellular unesterified cholesterol by 13-20% within 2 h and promoted the removal of newly synthesized cholesterol and cholesteryl esters. These changes were transient; by 24 h, both esterification and cellular unesterified cholesterol returned to control levels, and cholesteryl esters increased 2-3-fold. HDL core lipid was taken up selectively from /sup 125/I-labeled (/sup 3/H)cholesteryl ester- and ether-labeled HDL. LDL core lipid uptake was proportional to LDL apoprotein uptake. The findings suggest that 1) the cells respond initially to HDL or LDL with changes in esterification, and 2) HDL mediates both the removal of free cholesterol from the cell and the delivery of HDL cholesteryl esters to the cell.

  20. HDL from apoA1 transgenic mice expressing the 4WF isoform is resistant to oxidative loss of function.

    PubMed

    Berisha, Stela Z; Brubaker, Greg; Kasumov, Takhar; Hung, Kimberly T; DiBello, Patricia M; Huang, Ying; Li, Ling; Willard, Belinda; Pollard, Katherine A; Nagy, Laura E; Hazen, Stanley L; Smith, Jonathan D

    2015-03-01

    HDL functions are impaired by myeloperoxidase (MPO), which selectively targets and oxidizes human apoA1. We previously found that the 4WF isoform of human apoA1, in which the four tryptophan residues are substituted with phenylalanine, is resistant to MPO-mediated loss of function. The purpose of this study was to generate 4WF apoA1 transgenic mice and compare functional properties of the 4WF and wild-type human apoA1 isoforms in vivo. Male mice had significantly higher plasma apoA1 levels than females for both isoforms of human apoA1, attributed to different production rates. With matched plasma apoA1 levels, 4WF transgenics had a trend for slightly less HDL-cholesterol versus human apoA1 transgenics. While 4WF transgenics had 31% less reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) to the plasma compartment, equivalent RCT to the liver and feces was observed. Plasma from both strains had similar ability to accept cholesterol and facilitate ex vivo cholesterol efflux from macrophages. Furthermore, we observed that 4WF transgenic HDL was partially (∼50%) protected from MPO-mediated loss of function while human apoA1 transgenic HDL lost all ABCA1-dependent cholesterol acceptor activity. In conclusion, the structure and function of HDL from 4WF transgenic mice was not different than HDL derived from human apoA1 transgenic mice. PMID:25561462

  1. Effect of Extended Release Niacin on Serum Lipids and on Endothelial Function in Adults with Sickle Cell Anemia and Low High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels

    PubMed Central

    Scoffone, Heather M.; Krajewski, Megan; Zorca, Suzana; Bereal-Williams, Candice; Littel, Patricia; Seamon, Catherine; Mendelsohn, Laurel; Footman, Eleni; Jaoudeh, Nadine Abi; Sachdev, Vandana; Machado, Roberto F.; Cuttica, Michael; Shamburek, Robert; Cannon, Richard O.; Remaley, Alan; Minniti, Caterina P.; Kato, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Through bound apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase, inducing vasodilation. Because patients with sickle cell disease (SCD)have low apoA-I andendothelial dysfunction,we conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to test whether extended-release niacin (niacin-ER) increases apoA-I-containing HDL-C, and improves vascular function in SCD. Twenty-seven SCD patientswith HDL-C <39 mg/dL or apoA-I <99 mg/dL were randomized to 12 weeks of niacin-ER, increased in 500mg increments to a maximum of 1500mg daily, or placebo. The primary outcome was the absolute change in HDL-C after 12 weeks, with endothelial function assessed before and at the end of treatment. Niacin-ER-treated patients trended to greater increase in HDL-C compared with placebo treatment at 12 weeks (5.1±7.7 vs. 0.9±3.8 mg/dL, one-tailed p=0.07), associated with significantly greater, improvements in the ratios of low-density lipoprotein to HDL-C (1.24 vs. 1.95, p = 0.003), and apolipoprotein B to apoA-I (0.46 vs. 0.58, p = 0.03) compared with placebo-treated patients. No improvements were detected in three independent vascular physiology assays of endothelial function. Thus, the relatively small changes in HDL-C achieved by the dose of niacin-ER used in our study are not associated with improved vascular function in patients with SCD with initially low levels of apoA-I or HDL-C. PMID:24035168

  2. High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Increasing Therapy: The Unmet Cardiovascular Need

    PubMed Central

    Cimmino, Giovanni; Ciccarelli, Giovanni; Morello, Alberto; Ciccarelli, Michele; Golino, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Despite aggressive strategies are now available to reduce LDL-cholesterol, the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease remains substantial. Several preclinical and clinical studies have shown that drug therapy ultimately leads to a regression of the angiographic lesions but also results in a reduction in cardiovascular events. The dramatic failure of clinical trials evaluating the cholesterol ester transfer protein (CEPT) inhibitors, torcetrapib and dalcetrapib, has led to considerable doubt about the value of the current strategy to raise high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) as a treatment for cardiovascular disease. These clinical results, as well as animal studies, have revealed the complexity of HDL metabolism, assessing a more important role of functional quality compared to circulating quantity of HDL. As a result, HDL-based therapeutic interventions that maintain or enhance HDL functionality, such as improving its main property, the reverse cholesterol transport, require closer investigation. In this review, we will discuss HDL metabolism and function, clinical-trial data available for HDL-raising agents, and potential strategies for future HDL-based therapies. PMID:26535185

  3. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  4. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara; Calabresi, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  5. [EFFICIENCY OF CONCOMITANT USE OF POLICOSANOL AND ROSUVASTATIN IN PATIENTS WITH STABLE CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE AND MODERATE HEPATIC DYSFUNCTION].

    PubMed

    Solomenchuk, T M; Vosukh, V; Bedzay, A; Koval, V G; Chepka, I M; Trotsko, V V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results for the study of lipid correction capacity and safety of concomitant use of policosanol and rosuvastatin compared with rosuvastatin monotherapy in patients with stable coronary artery disease and moderate hepatic dysfunction. Fifty-seven subjects aged 37 to 72 years (mean age 54.4 years +/- 6.5 years) have been enrolled into the study with the following inclusion criteria: therapy with statins for more than 8 weeks, failure to achieve target LDL cholesterol levels and moderately elevated liver enzymes. The following laboratory tests were performed at baseline and after 12 weeks of follow-up: blood lipid profile (total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides (TG), lipid peroxidation (ma- Ionic dialdehyde (MDA), glycosylated hemoglobin HbAlc (%) and liver function tests (gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase-gamma-GTP) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Concomitant use of policosanol with rosuvastatin was superior to rosuvastatin monotherapy in terms of reduction of pro-aterogenicity of lipid metabolism by decreasing serum TC, LDL-C and TG, increasing serum HDL-C and decreasing the pro-oxidative activity (MDA) with simultaneous substantial improvement of hepatic function. Concomitant use of policosanol at the dose of 20 mg/day and rosuvastatin at 10-20 mg/day was favorably tolerated. None of the subjects had any discontinuations of therapy due to adverse events. PMID:27491147

  6. Cholesterol loading re-programs the miR-143/145-myocardin axis to convert aortic smooth muscle cells to a dysfunctional macrophage-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Vengrenyuk, Yuliya; Nishi, Hitoo; Long, Xiaochun; Ouimet, Mireille; Savji, Nazir; Martinez, Fernando O.; Cassella, Courtney P.; Moore, Kathryn J.; Ramsey, Stephen A.; Miano, Joseph M.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We previously showed that cholesterol loading in vitro converts mouse aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from a contractile state to one resembling macrophages. In human and mouse atherosclerotic plaques it has become appreciated that ~40% of cells classified as macrophages by histological markers may be of VSMC origin. We therefore sought to gain insight into the molecular regulation of this clinically relevant process. Approach and Results VSMC of mouse (or human) origin were incubated with cyclodextrin-cholesterol complexes for 72 hours, at which time the expression at the protein and mRNA levels of contractile-related proteins were reduced and of macrophage markers increased. Concurrent was down regulation of miR-143/145, which positively regulate the master VSMC-differentiation transcription factor myocardin (MYOCD). Mechanisms were further probed in mouse VSMC. Maintaining the expression of MYOCD or miR-143/145 prevented and reversed phenotypic changes caused by cholesterol loading. Reversal was also seen when cholesterol efflux was stimulated after loading. Notably, despite expression of macrophage markers, bioinformatic analyses showed that cholesterol-loaded cells remained closer to the VSMC state, consistent with impairment in classical macrophage functions of phagocytosis and efferocytosis. In apoE-deficient atherosclerotic plaques, cells positive for VSMC and macrophage markers were found lining the cholesterol-rich necrotic core. Conclusions Cholesterol loading of VSMC converts them to a macrophage–appearing state by downregulating the miR-143/145-myocardin axis. Though these cells would be classified by immunohistochemistry as macrophages in human and mouse plaques, their transcriptome and functional properties imply that their contributions to atherogenesis would not be those of classical macrophages. PMID:25573853

  7. Is apolipoprotein-(a) an important indicator of vasculogenic erectile dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Atahan, O; Kayigil, O; Hizel, N; Metin, A

    1998-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether high peripheral and cavernosal plasma levels of apolipoprotein-(a) [Lp (a)] is an indicator for vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. We determined Lp (a), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels in peripheral and cavernosal blood in 39 patients with erectile dysfunction. Thirty-nine impotent patients have been divided into two groups: vasculogenic erectile dysfunction (VED) and nonvasculogenic erectile dysfunction (NVED), according to colour Doppler ultrasonic flowmetry, dynamic infusion cavernosometry, and the pressure difference between the brachial arterial systolic pressure and cavernosal arterial systolic pressure measurements. Biochemical values were compared in both groups. Lp (a) and TC levels were higher in both peripheral and cavernosal samples of VED group than in NVED group, with no differences between peripheral and cavernosal blood levels within the same groups. There were no significant changes in TG and HDL levels in either group. The detection of more than 31 mg/dl in Lp (a) level solely shows the vascular origin with a sensitivity and specificity of 95 and 82.3%, respectively. High Lp (a) levels can be considered an indicator of vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. PMID:9607890

  8. Population-Based Resequencing of LIPG and ZNF202 Genes in Subjects with Extreme HDL Levels.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi, Hamid; Santorico, Stephanie A; Kamboh, M Ilyas

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (LIPG) and zinc finger protein 202 (ZNF202) are two pivotal genes in high density lipoprotein (HDL metabolism). We sought to determine their genetic contribution to variation in HDL-cholesterol levels by comprehensive resequencing of both genes in 235 individuals with high or low HDL-C levels. The selected subjects were 141 Whites (High HDL Group: n = 68, [Formula: see text] Low HDL Group: n = 73, [Formula: see text]) and 94 Hispanics (High HDL Group: n = 46, [Formula: see text] Low HDL Group: n = 48, [Formula: see text]). We identified a total of 185 and 122 sequence variants in LIPG and ZNF202, respectively. We found only two missense variants in LIPG (T111I and N396S) and two in ZNF202 (A154V and K259E). In both genes, there were several variants unique to either the low or high HDL group. For LIPG, the proportion of unique variants differed between the high and low HDL groups in both Whites (p = 0.022) and Hispanics (p = 0.017), but for ZNF202 this difference was observed only in Hispanics (p = 0.021). We also identified a common haplotype in ZNF202 among Whites that was significantly associated with the high HDL group (p = 0.013). These findings provide insights into the genetics of LIPG and ZNF202, and suggest that sequence variants occurring with high frequency in non-exonic regions may play a prominent role in modulating HDL-C levels in the general population. PMID:22723803

  9. An abundant dysfunctional apolipoprotein A1 in human atheroma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; DiDonato, Joseph A; Levison, Bruce S; Schmitt, Dave; Li, Lin; Wu, Yuping; Buffa, Jennifer; Kim, Timothy; Gerstenecker, Gary S; Gu, Xiaodong; Kadiyala, Chandra S; Wang, Zeneng; Culley, Miranda K; Hazen, Jennie E; Didonato, Anthony J; Fu, Xiaoming; Berisha, Stela Z; Peng, Daoquan; Nguyen, Truc T; Liang, Shaohong; Chuang, Chia-Chi; Cho, Leslie; Plow, Edward F; Fox, Paul L; Gogonea, Valentin; Tang, W H Wilson; Parks, John S; Fisher, Edward A; Smith, Jonathan D; Hazen, Stanley L

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have indicated that high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) and their major structural protein, apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), recovered from human atheroma are dysfunctional and are extensively oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO). In vitro oxidation of either apoA1 or HDL particles by MPO impairs their cholesterol acceptor function. Here, using phage display affinity maturation, we developed a high-affinity monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes both apoA1 and HDL that have been modified by the MPO-H2O2-Cl(-) system. An oxindolyl alanine (2-OH-Trp) moiety at Trp72 of apoA1 is the immunogenic epitope. Mutagenesis studies confirmed a critical role for apoA1 Trp72 in MPO-mediated inhibition of the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)-dependent cholesterol acceptor activity of apoA1 in vitro and in vivo. ApoA1 containing a 2-OH-Trp72 group (oxTrp72-apoA1) is in low abundance within the circulation but accounts for 20% of the apoA1 in atherosclerosis-laden arteries. OxTrp72-apoA1 recovered from human atheroma or plasma is lipid poor, virtually devoid of cholesterol acceptor activity and demonstrated both a potent proinflammatory activity on endothelial cells and an impaired HDL biogenesis activity in vivo. Elevated oxTrp72-apoA1 levels in subjects presenting to a cardiology clinic (n = 627) were associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Circulating oxTrp72-apoA1 levels may serve as a way to monitor a proatherogenic process in the artery wall. PMID:24464187

  10. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Suárez, María E.; Escolà-Gil, Joan C.; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [3H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [3H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. PMID:27601313

  11. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, María E; Escolà-Gil, Joan C; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [(3)H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. PMID:27601313

  12. The improvement of large High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) particle levels, and presumably HDL metabolism, depend on effects of low-carbohydrate diet and weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Finelli, C.; Crispino, P.; Gioia, S.; La Sala, N.; D'amico, L.; La Grotta, M.; Miro, O.; Colarusso, D.

    2016-01-01

    Depressed levels of atheroprotective large HDL particles are common in obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Increases in large HDL particles are favourably associated with reduced CVD event risk and coronary plaque burden. The objective of the study is to compare the effectiveness of low-carbohydrate diets and weight loss for increasing blood levels of large HDL particles at 1 year. This study was performed by screening for body mass index (BMI) and metabolic syndrome in 160 consecutive subjects referred to our out-patient Metabolic Unit in South Italy. We administered dietary advice to four small groups rather than individually. A single team comprised of a dietitian and physician administered diet-specific advice to each group. Large HDL particles at baseline and 1 year were measured using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Dietary intake was assessed via 3-day diet records. Although 1-year weight loss did not differ between diet groups (mean 4.4 %), increases in large HDL particles paralleled the degree of carbohydrate restriction across the four diets (p<0.001 for trend). Regression analysis indicated that magnitude of carbohydrate restriction (percentage of calories as carbohydrate at 1 year) and weight loss were each independent predictors of 1-year increases in large HDL concentration. Changes in HDL cholesterol concentration were modestly correlated with changes in large HDL particle concentration (r=0.47, p=.001). In conclusion, reduction of excess dietary carbohydrate and body weight improved large HDL levels. Comparison trials with cardiovascular outcomes are needed to more fully evaluate these findings. PMID:27103896

  13. Increased HDL Size and Enhanced Apo A-I Catabolic Rates Are Associated With Doxorubicin-Induced Proteinuria in New Zealand White Rabbits.

    PubMed

    López-Olmos, Victoria; Carreón-Torres, Elizabeth; Luna-Luna, María; Flores-Castillo, Cristobal; Martínez-Ramírez, Miriam; Bautista-Pérez, Rocío; Franco, Martha; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Roldán, Francisco-Javier; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Soria-Castro, Elizabeth; Muñoz-Vega, Mónica; Fragoso, José-Manuel; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar

    2016-03-01

    The catabolism and structure of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) may be the determining factor of their atheroprotective properties. To better understand the role of the kidney in HDL catabolism, here we characterized HDL subclasses and the catabolic rates of apo A-I in a rabbit model of proteinuria. Proteinuria was induced by intravenous administration of doxorubicin in New Zealand white rabbits (n = 10). HDL size and HDL subclass lipids were assessed by electrophoresis of the isolated lipoproteins. The catabolic rate of HDL-apo A-I was evaluated by exogenous radiolabelling with iodine-131. Doxorubicin induced significant proteinuria after 4 weeks (4.47 ± 0.55 vs. 0.30 ± 0.02 g/L of protein in urine, P < 0.001) associated with increased uremia, creatininemia, and cardiotoxicity. Large HDL2b augmented significantly during proteinuria, whereas small HDL3b and HDL3c decreased compared to basal conditions. HDL2b, HDL2a, and HDL3a subclasses were enriched with triacylglycerols in proteinuric animals as determined by the triacylglycerol-to-phospholipid ratio; the cholesterol content in HDL subclasses remained unchanged. The fractional catabolic rate (FCR) of [(131)I]-apo A-I in the proteinuric rabbits was faster (FCR = 0.036 h(-1)) compared to control rabbits group (FCR = 0.026 h(-1), P < 0.05). Apo E increased and apo A-I decreased in HDL, whereas PON-1 activity increased in proteinuric rabbits. Proteinuria was associated with an increased number of large HDL2b particles and a decreased number of small HDL3b and 3c. Proteinuria was also connected to an alteration in HDL subclass lipids, apolipoprotein content of HDL, high paraoxonase-1 activity, and a rise in the fractional catabolic rate of the [(131)I]-apo A-I. PMID:26781765

  14. Human FABP1 T94A variant enhances cholesterol uptake.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; McIntosh, Avery L; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M; Martin, Gregory G; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2015-07-01

    Although expression of the human liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1) T94A variant alters serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels in human subjects, nothing is known whereby the variant elicits these effects. This issue was addressed by in vitro cholesterol binding assays using purified recombinant wild-type (WT) FABP1 T94T and T94A variant proteins and in cultured primary human hepatocytes expressing the FABP1 T94T (genotyped as TT) or T94A (genotyped as CC) proteins. The human FABP1 T94A variant protein had 3-fold higher cholesterol-binding affinity than the WT FABP1 T94T as shown by NBD-cholesterol fluorescence binding assays and by cholesterol isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) binding assays. CC variant hepatocytes also exhibited 30% higher total FABP1 protein. HDL- and LDL-mediated NBD-cholesterol uptake was faster in CC variant than TT WT human hepatocytes. VLDL-mediated uptake of NBD-cholesterol did not differ between CC and TT human hepatocytes. The increased HDL- and LDL-mediated NBD-cholesterol uptake was not associated with any significant change in mRNA levels of SCARB1, LDLR, CETP, and LCAT encoding the key proteins in lipoprotein cholesterol uptake. Thus, the increased HDL- and LDL-mediated NBD-cholesterol uptake by CC hepatocytes may be associated with higher affinity of T94A protein for cholesterol and/or increased total T94A protein level. PMID:25732850

  15. Intake of heat-expanded amaranth grain reverses endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Caselato-Sousa, Valeria Maria; Ozaki, Michiko Regina; de Almeida, Eros Antonio; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime

    2014-12-01

    This study reports the new functional property of amaranth grain against diet-induced endothelial dysfunction in rabbits. Twenty-seven New Zealand rabbits were fed either a standard diet (SD/G1) or a hypercholesterolemic diet (Hichol) for 28 days. On day 29, the Hichol group was subdivided into four groups and begun receiving the following diets for 21 days: G2: SD + amaranth, G3: Hichol + amaranth, G4: SD alone, and G5: Hichol alone, while G1 continued to receive SD for 21 days. Amaranth intake restored endothelial function (G2, G3) to nearly normal during the 21-day recovery besides substantially lowering total and LDL blood cholesterol levels. This effect was not seen by simply correcting the diet (G4). Upon continuance of Hichol, however, amaranth supplementation did show some contribution to the cholesterol-lowering effect (G4 vs. G3). On day 49, feeding Hichol without the help of amaranth, harm was further magnified by lowering HDL-cholesterol (G5). Fecal cholesterol was found increased in groups that ingested amaranth (G2, G3), but no significant impact from either supplementation or diet reversal was found in fecal bile acids. Amaranth supplementation granted some protection against tissue cholesterol (G5) and tissue peroxidation (G3). It is concluded that even in concurrence with a hypercholesterolemic diet, intake of heat-expanded amaranth can revert an associated endothelial dysfunction besides incrementing fecal cholesterol excretion and lowering blood and tissue cholesterol oxidation in dyslipidemic rabbits. These results supported the notion of a lipid peroxidation process occurring with high cholesterol intakes. PMID:25347416

  16. Cholesterol (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cholesterol is a soft, waxy substance that is present in all parts of the body including the ... and obtained from animal products in the diet. Cholesterol is manufactured in the liver and is needed ...

  17. A complete backbone spectral assignment of human apolipoprotein AI on a 38 kDa preβHDL (Lp1-AI) particle

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Xuefeng; Yang, Yunhuang; Neville, T.; Hoyt, David W.; Sparks, Daniel L.; Wang, Jianjun

    2007-06-12

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoAI, 243-residues) is the major protein component of the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) that has been a hot subject of interests because of its anti-atherogenic properties. This important property of apoAI is related to its roles in reverse cholesterol transport pathway. Upon lipid-binding, apoAI undergoes conformational changes from lipid-free to several different HDL-associated states (1). These different conformational states regulate HDL formation, maturation and transportation. Two initial conformational states of apoAI are lipid-free apoAI and apoAI/preβHDL that recruit phospholipids and cholesterol to form HDL particles. In particular, lipid-free apoAI specifically binds to phospholipids to form lipid-poor apoAI, including apoAI/preβ-HDL (~37 kDa). As a unique class of lipid poor HDL, both in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates that apoAI/preβ-HDLs are the most effective acceptors specifically for free cholesterol in human plasma and serves as the precursor of HDL particles (2). Here we report a complete backbone spectral assignment of human apoAI/preβHDL. Secondary structure prediction using backbone NMR parameters indicates that apoAI/preβHDL displays a two-domain structure: the N-terminal four helix-bundle domain (residues 1-186) and the C-terminal flexible domain (residues 187-243). A structure of apoAI/preβ-HDL is the first lipid-associated structure of apoAI and is critical for us to understand how apoAI recruits cholesterol to initialize HDL formation. BMRB deposit with accession number: 15093.

  18. Elevated High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Age-Related Macular Degeneration: The Alienor Study

    PubMed Central

    Cougnard-Grégoire, Audrey; Delyfer, Marie-Noëlle; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Rougier, Marie-Bénédicte; Le Goff, Mélanie; Dartigues, Jean-François; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; Delcourt, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid metabolism and particularly high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, conflicting results have been reported in the associations of AMD with plasma HDL and other lipids, which may be confounded by the recently reported associations of AMD with HDL-related genes. We explored the association of AMD with plasma lipid levels and lipid-lowering medication use, taking into account most of HDL-related genes associated with AMD. Methods The Alienor study is a population-based study on age-related eye diseases performed in 963 elderly residents of Bordeaux (France). AMD was graded from non mydriatic color retinal photographs in three exclusive stages: no AMD (n = 430 subjects, 938 eyes); large soft distinct drusen and/or large soft indistinct drusen and/or reticular drusen and/or pigmentary abnormalities (early AMD, n = 176, 247); late AMD (n = 40, 61). Associations of AMD with plasma lipids (HDL, total cholesterol (TC), Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglycerides (TG)) were estimated using Generalized Estimating Equation logistic regressions. Statistical analyses included 646 subjects with complete data. Results After multivariate adjustment for age, sex, educational level, smoking, BMI, lipid-lowering medication use, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, and for all relevant genetic polymorphisms (ApoE2, ApoE4, CFH Y402H, ARMS2 A69S, LIPC rs10468017, LIPC rs493258, LPL rs12678919, ABCA1 rs1883025 and CETP rs3764261), higher HDL was significantly associated with an increased risk of early (OR = 2.45, 95%CI: 1.54–3.90; P = 0.0002) and any AMD (OR = 2.29, 95%CI: 1.46–3.59; P = 0.0003). Association with late AMD was far from statistical significance (OR = 1.58, 95%CI: 0.48–5.17; p = 0.45). No associations were found for any stage of AMD with TC, LDL and TG levels, statin or fibrate drug use. Conclusions This study suggests that

  19. The Effect of Natural LCAT Mutations on the Biogenesis of HDL.

    PubMed

    Fotakis, Panagiotis; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert; Dafnis, Eugene; Kardassis, Dimitris; Zannis, Vassilis I

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated how the natural LCAT[T147I] and LCAT[P274S] mutations affect the pathway of biogenesis of HDL. Gene transfer of WT LCAT in LCAT(-/-) mice increased 11.8-fold the plasma cholesterol, whereas the LCAT[T147I] and LCAT[P274S] mutants caused a 5.2- and 2.9-fold increase, respectively. The LCAT[P274S] and the WT LCAT caused a monophasic distribution of cholesterol in the HDL region, whereas the LCAT[T147I] caused a biphasic distribution of cholesterol in the LDL and HDL region. Fractionation of plasma showed that the expression of WT LCAT increased plasma apoE and apoA-IV levels and shifted the distribution of apoA-I to lower densities. The LCAT[T147I] and LCAT[P274S] mutants restored partially apoA-I in the HDL3 fraction and LCAT[T147I] increased apoE in the VLD/IDL/LDL fractions. The in vivo functionality of LCAT was further assessed based on is its ability to correct the aberrant HDL phenotype that was caused by the apoA-I[L159R]FIN mutation. Co-infection of apoA-I(-/-) mice with this apoA-I mutant and either of the two mutant LCAT forms restored only partially the HDL biogenesis defect that was caused by the apoA-I[L159R]FIN and generated a distinct aberrant HDL phenotype. PMID:25948084

  20. Thyroid function modifies the association between ratio of triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and renal function: a multicenter cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhongshang; Zhao, Meng; Zhang, Bingchang; Zhang, Haiqing; Zhang, Xu; Guan, Qingbo; Ning, Guang; Gao, Ling; Xue, Fuzhong; Zhao, Jiajun

    2015-01-01

    Hypothyroidism was confirmed to be associated with both dyslipidemia and renal dysfunction. However, the impact of thyroid function on the relationship between serum lipid levels and renal function has never been given sufficient attention. In this large-scale multicenter cross-sectional study, the ratio of triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL) and the prevalence of hypothyroidism in CKD subjects were significantly higher than those in non-CKD ones (P < 0.001). After adjustment for potential confounding factors, TG/HDL was shown to be significantly associated with serum Cr levels (β = 0.551; 95%CI, 0.394–0.708), and eGFR (β = −0.481; 95%CI, −0.731–−0.230). The risk for CKD was significantly increased as TG/HDL ratio was elevated (adjusted odds ratio = 1.20; 95%CI, 1.11–1.27). These significant associations were found among subjects with euthyroidism and hypothyroidism rather than hyperthyroidism. Furthermore, the associations between TG/HDL and Cr or CKD status were significantly greater in hypothyroidism than those in euthyroidism (P < 0.05). These results suggested that elevated TG/HDL ratio was associated with renal dysfunction; it exhibited a significantly stronger association with Cr and CKD in hypothyroidism than in euthyroidism. Therefore, more attention should be paid on lipid profile to prevent or delay the occurrence and progression of renal dysfunction, especially for those with hypothyroidism. PMID:26179571

  1. Thyroid function modifies the association between ratio of triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and renal function: a multicenter cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhongshang; Zhao, Meng; Zhang, Bingchang; Zhang, Haiqing; Zhang, Xu; Guan, Qingbo; Ning, Guang; Gao, Ling; Xue, Fuzhong; Zhao, Jiajun

    2015-01-01

    Hypothyroidism was confirmed to be associated with both dyslipidemia and renal dysfunction. However, the impact of thyroid function on the relationship between serum lipid levels and renal function has never been given sufficient attention. In this large-scale multicenter cross-sectional study, the ratio of triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL) and the prevalence of hypothyroidism in CKD subjects were significantly higher than those in non-CKD ones (P < 0.001). After adjustment for potential confounding factors, TG/HDL was shown to be significantly associated with serum Cr levels (β = 0.551; 95%CI, 0.394-0.708), and eGFR (β = -0.481; 95%CI, -0.731--0.230). The risk for CKD was significantly increased as TG/HDL ratio was elevated (adjusted odds ratio = 1.20; 95%CI, 1.11-1.27). These significant associations were found among subjects with euthyroidism and hypothyroidism rather than hyperthyroidism. Furthermore, the associations between TG/HDL and Cr or CKD status were significantly greater in hypothyroidism than those in euthyroidism (P < 0.05). These results suggested that elevated TG/HDL ratio was associated with renal dysfunction; it exhibited a significantly stronger association with Cr and CKD in hypothyroidism than in euthyroidism. Therefore, more attention should be paid on lipid profile to prevent or delay the occurrence and progression of renal dysfunction, especially for those with hypothyroidism. PMID:26179571

  2. Physical inactivity interacts with an endothelial lipase polymorphism to modulate high density lipoprotein cholesterol in the GOLDN study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: Plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration is highly heritable but is also modifiable by environmental factors including physical activity. HDL-C response to exercise varies among individuals, and this variability may be associated with genetic polymorphism...

  3. Sulforaphane attenuates the development of atherosclerosis and improves endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Shehatou, George S G; Suddek, Ghada M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to explore possible protective effects of sulforaphane (SFN) against atherosclerosis development and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Rabbits were assigned to three groups of five: group I fed normal chow diet for four weeks, group II fed 1% high cholesterol diet (HCD) and group III fed HCD + SFN (0.25 mg/kg/day). Blood samples were collected for measurement of serum triglycerides (TGs), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Aortic malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total nitrite/nitrate (NOx) were measured. Vascular reactivity and intima/media (I/M) ratio were analyzed. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in aortic endothelial cells was identified immunohistochemically. HCD induced significant increases in serum TGs, TC, LDL-C, LDH, and CRP, and aortic MDA and SOD. Moreover, HCD caused significant reductions in serum HDL-C, aortic GSH and NOx. SFN administration significantly decreased HCD-induced elevations in serum TC, LDL-C, CRP, and LDH. while significantly increased HDL-C and GSH levels and normalized aortic SOD and NOx. Additionally, SFN significantly improved rabbit aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine. Moreover, SFN significantly reduced the elevation in I/M ratio. This effect was confirmed by aortic histopathologic examination. The expression of NF-κB in aortic tissue showed a marked reduction upon treatment with SFN. In conclusion, this study reveals that SFN has the ability to ameliorate HCD-induced atherosclerotic lesions progression and vascular dysfunction, possibly via its lipid-lowering and antioxidant effects and suppression of NF-κB-mediated inflammation. PMID:26490346

  4. Characteristics of High-density Lipoprotein Subclasses Distribution for Subjects with Desirable Total Cholesterol Levels

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate alteration of high density lipoproteins (HDL) subclasses distribution in different total cholesterol (TC) levels, mainly the characteristics of HDL subclasses distribution in desirable TC levels and analyze the related mechanisms. Methods ApoA-I contents of plasma HDL subclasses were determined by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with immunodetection. 486 Chinese Adults subjects were assigned to different TC groups according to the third Report of NCEP (ATP- III) guidelines. Results The increase in contents of small preβ1-HDL, HDL3c, HDL3b, and HDL3a particles clustered and reduce in HDL2b with increased of TC. The distribution of HDL subclasses have shown abnormality characterized by the lower HDL2b (324.2 mg/L) contents and the higher preβ1-HDL (90.4 mg/L) contents for desirable TC Chinese subjects. Among 176 desirable TC subjects, 58.6% subjects with triglyceride (TG) < 2.26 mmol/L, 61.2% subjects with HDL-C ≥1.03 mmol/L and 88.6% subjects with low density lipoprotein cholesterol(LDL-C) < 3.34 mmol/L, and the profile of HDL subclasses distribution for above these subjects was reasonable. Conclusions The particles size of HDL subclasses shifted towards smaller with increased TC levels. The TC was liner with HDL2b contents and those can be reduced 17 mg/L for 0.5 mmol/L increment in TC levels. The HDL subclasses distribution phenotype was not expectation for Chinese Population with desirable TC levels. Thus, from the HDL subclasses distribution point, when assessing the coronary heart disease(CHD) risk not only rely on the TC levels, but also the concentrations of TG, HDL-C and LDL-C must considered in case the potential risk for desirable TC subjects with other plasma lipids metabolism disorders. PMID:21513524

  5. Impaired Cholesterol Efflux Capacity of High-Density Lipoprotein Isolated From Interstitial Fluid in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus—Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Tietge, Uwe J.F.; Dikkers, Arne; Parini, Paolo; Angelin, Bo; Rudling, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Objective— Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, the mechanism of which is incompletely understood. Their high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles in plasma have been reported to have impaired cholesterol efflux capacity. However, the efflux capacity of HDL from interstitial fluid (IF), the starting point for reverse cholesterol transport, has not been studied. We here investigated the cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL from IF and plasma from T2D patients and healthy controls. Approach and Results— HDL was isolated from IF and peripheral plasma from 35 T2D patients and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Cholesterol efflux to HDL was determined in vitro, normalized for HDL cholesterol, using cholesterol-loaded macrophages. Efflux capacity of plasma HDL was 10% lower in T2D patients than in healthy controls, in line with previous observations. This difference was much more pronounced for HDL from IF, where efflux capacity was reduced by 28% in T2D. Somewhat surprisingly, the efflux capacity of HDL from IF was lower than that of plasma HDL, by 15% and 32% in controls and T2D patients, respectively. Conclusion— These data demonstrate that (1) HDL from IF has a lower cholesterol efflux capacity than plasma HDL and (2) the efflux capacity of HDL from IF is severely impaired in T2D when compared with controls. Because IF comprises the compartment where reverse cholesterol transport is initiated, the marked reduction in cholesterol efflux capacity of IF-HDL from T2D patients may play an important role for their increased risk to develop atherosclerosis. PMID:27034474

  6. microRNAs and cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Kathryn J.; Rayner, Katey J.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated at the cellular level. In addition to classic transcriptional regulation of cholesterol metabolism (e.g., by SREBP and LXR), members of a class of non-coding RNAs termed microRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been identified to be potent post-transcriptional regulators of lipid metabolism genes, including cholesterol homeostasis. We and others have recently shown that miR-33 regulates cholesterol efflux and HDL biogenesis by downregulating the expression of the ABC transporters, ABCA1 and ABCG1. In addition to miR-33, miR-122 and miR-370 have been shown to play important roles in regulating cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism. These new data suggest important roles of microRNAs in the epigenetic regulation of cholesterol metabolism and have opened new avenues for the treatment of dyslipidemias. PMID:20880716

  7. Effect of the amyloidogenic L75P apolipoprotein A-I variant on HDL subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Gomaraschi, Monica; Obici, Laura; Simonelli, Sara; Gregorini, Gina; Negrinelli, Alessandro; Merlini, Giampaolo; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Background Hereditary amyloidosis due to mutations of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) is a rare disease characterized by the deposition of amyloid fibrils constituted by the N-terminal fragment of apoA-I in several organs. L75P is a variant of apoA-I associated with systemic amyloidosis predominantly involving the liver, kidneys, and testis, identified in a large number of unrelated subjects. Objective of the present paper was to evaluate the impact of the L75P apoA-I variant on HDL subpopulations and cholesterol esterification in carriers. Methods and results Plasma samples were collected from 30 carriers of the amyloidogenic L75P apoA-I (Carriers) and from 15 non affected relatives (Controls). Carriers displayed significantly reduced plasma levels of HDL-cholesterol, apoA-I, and apoA-II compared to Controls. Plasma levels of LpA-I, but not LpA-I:A-II, were significantly reduced in Carriers. HDL subclass distribution was not affected by the presence of the variant. The unesterified to total cholesterol ratio was higher, and cholesterol esterification rate and LCAT activity were lower in Carriers than in Controls. Conclusions The L75P apoA-I variant is associated with hypoalphalipoproteinemia, a selective reduction of LpA-I particles, and a partial defect in cholesterol esterification. PMID:21458433

  8. HDL function and subclinical atherosclerosis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Preethi; Uno, Kiyoko; Duong, MyNgan; Wolski, Kathy; Spalding, Steven; Husni, M. Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation adversely impacts the protective properties of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and progression of atherosclerosis. The impact of early chronic inflammatory conditions on HDL function and vascular risk has not been well investigated. Methods We compared measures of HDL particle distribution and functionality, in addition to measures of carotid intima-medial thickness (cIMT) in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and age matched controls. Results JIA patients demonstrated lower levels of HDL cholesterol [47.0 (40.0, 56.0) vs. 56.0 (53.0, 61.0) mg/dL, P=0.04], total HDL [29.5 (27.9, 32.3) vs. 32.9 (31.6, 36.3) mg/dL, P=0.05] and large HDL [5.1 (3.7, 7.3) vs. 8.0 (6.7, 9.7) mg/dL, P=0.04] particles. In association JIA patients demonstrated greater cholesterol efflux mediated via ATP binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) [17.3% (12.8, 19.7) vs. 10.0% (5.8, 16.0), P=0.05] and less efflux mediated via ATP binding cassette G-1 (ABCG1) [3.2% (2.0, 3.9) vs. 4.8% (3.5, 5.8), P=0.01] and SR-B1 [6.9% (6.0, 8.4) vs. 9.1% (8.6, 10.2), P=0.002] compared with controls. Exposure of macrophages to serum from JIA patients resulted in a smaller increase in mRNA expression of ABCA1 (2.0±0.95 vs. 7.1±5.7 fold increase, P=0.01) and greater increases in expression of ABCG1 [1.4 (0.9, 1.5) vs. 0.8 (0.7, 1.1) fold increase, P=0.04] and SR-B1 (1.3±0.47 vs. 0.7±0.3 fold increase, P=0.001) compared with controls. Arylesterase (128.9±27.6 vs. 152.0±45.2 umoles/min/mL, P=0.04) activity and endothelial cell migration (491.2±68.9 vs. 634.2±227.4 cells/field, P=0.01) were less in JIA patients. No differences in cIMT were observed between JIA patients and controls. Conclusions The presence of JIA was associated with alterations in HDL particle distribution, cholesterol efflux and non-lipid transporting activities. The ultimate implication of these findings for cardiovascular risk requires further investigation. PMID:26885490

  9. Mild endothelial dysfunction in Sirt3 knockout mice fed a high-cholesterol diet: protective role of a novel C/EBP-β-dependent feedback regulation of SOD2.

    PubMed

    Winnik, Stephan; Gaul, Daniel S; Siciliani, Giovanni; Lohmann, Christine; Pasterk, Lisa; Calatayud, Natacha; Weber, Julien; Eriksson, Urs; Auwerx, Johan; van Tits, Lambertus J; Lüscher, Thomas F; Matter, Christian M

    2016-05-01

    Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3) is an NAD(+)-dependent mitochondrial deacetylase associated with superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2)-mediated protection from oxidative stress. We have reported accelerated weight gain and impaired metabolic flexibility in atherosclerotic Sirt3 (-/-) mice. Oxidative stress is a hallmark of endothelial dysfunction. Yet, the role of Sirt3 in this context remains unknown. Thus, we aimed to unravel the effects of endogenous Sirt3 on endothelial function and oxidative stress. Knockdown of Sirt3 in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) increased intracellular mitochondrial superoxide accumulation, as assessed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of aortic rings from Sirt3 (-/-) mice exposed to a normal diet did not differ from wild-type controls. However, following 12 weeks of high-cholesterol diet and increasing oxidative stress, endothelial function of Sirt3 (-/-) mice was mildly impaired compared with wild-type controls. Relaxation was restored upon enhanced superoxide scavenging using pegylated superoxide dismutase. Knockdown of Sirt3 in cultured HAEC diminished SOD2 specific activity, which was compensated for by a CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBP-β)-dependent transcriptional induction of SOD2. Abrogation of this feedback regulation by simultaneous knockdown of C/EBP-β and Sirt3 exacerbated mitochondrial superoxide accumulation and culminated into endothelial cell death upon prolonged culture. Taken together, Sirt3 deficiency induces a mild, superoxide-dependent endothelial dysfunction in mice fed a high-cholesterol diet. In cultured endothelial cells, a novel C/EBP-β-dependent rescue mechanism maintains net SOD2 activity upon transient knockdown of Sirt3. PMID:27071400

  10. Macrophage ABCA5 deficiency influences cellular cholesterol efflux and increases susceptibility to atherosclerosis in female LDLr knockout mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Dan; Meurs, Illiana; Ohigashi, Megumi; Calpe-Berdiel, Laura; Habets, Kim L.L.; Zhao, Ying; Kubo, Yoshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Van Berkel, Theo J.C.; Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Van Eck, Miranda

    2010-05-07

    Objectives: To determine the role of macrophage ATP-binding cassette transporter A5 (ABCA5) in cellular cholesterol homeostasis and atherosclerotic lesion development. Methods and results: Chimeras with dysfunctional macrophage ABCA5 (ABCA5{sup -M/-M}) were generated by transplantation of bone marrow from ABCA5 knockout (ABCA5{sup -/-}) mice into irradiated LDLr{sup -/-} mice. In vitro, bone marrow-derived macrophages from ABCA5{sup -M/-M} chimeras exhibited a 29% (P < 0.001) decrease in cholesterol efflux to HDL, whereas a 21% (P = 0.07) increase in cholesterol efflux to apoA-I was observed. Interestingly, expression of ABCA1, but not ABCG1, was up-regulated in absence of functional ABCA5 in macrophages. To induce atherosclerosis, the transplanted LDLr{sup -/-} mice were fed a high-cholesterol Western-type diet (WTD) for 6, 10, or 18 weeks, allowing analysis of effects on initial as well as advanced lesion development. Atherosclerosis development was not affected in male ABCA5{sup -M/-M} chimeras after 6, 10, and 18 weeks WTD feeding. However, female ABCA5{sup -M/-M} chimeras did develop significantly (P < 0.05) larger aortic root lesions as compared with female controls after 6 and 10 weeks WTD feeding. Conclusions: ABCA5 influences macrophage cholesterol efflux, and selective disruption of ABCA5 in macrophages leads to increased atherosclerotic lesion development in female LDLr{sup -/-} mice.

  11. Protective effects of gypenosides against fatty liver disease induced by high fat and cholesterol diet and alcohol in rats.

    PubMed

    Qin, Renan; Zhang, Jianyu; Li, Chuyuan; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Xiong, Aihua; Huang, Feng; Yin, Zhen; Li, Kongyan; Qin, Wenyu; Chen, Mingzhen; Zhang, Shubing; Liang, Lingyi; Zhang, Huiye; Nie, Hong; Ye, Wencai

    2012-07-01

    In the present study, the protective effects of gypenosides from Gynostemma pentaphyllum on fatty liver disease (FLD) were examined in rats treated with high fat and cholesterol diet and alcohol. Male SD rats were divided into seven groups: control, model, lovastatin, silymarin, gypenosides high-, medium- and low-treatment groups. The latter 6 groups were fed high-fat and cholesterol diet and administered alcohol intragastricly once a day. Body weight was measured every week for 10 weeks, and the hepatic index was measured after 10 weeks. Compared with model group, levels of serum triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), free fatty acid (FFA), and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level, malondialdehyde (MDA), serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity, and hepatocyte apoptosis were significantly decreased in gypenosides groups; while serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in both serum and hepatic tissue and mRNA and protein level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α) were significantly increased. Moreover, hepatic steatosis and mitochondrial damage were improved. These results suggested that gypenosides could prevent liver fatty degeneration in fatty liver disease through modulating lipid metabolism, ameliorating liver dysfunction and reducing oxidative stress. PMID:22864747

  12. PROTEOMICS INVESTIGATIONS OF HDL. CHALLENGES AND PROMISE

    PubMed Central

    Vaisar, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) is recognized as the major negative risk factor of cardiovascular disease and number of anti-atherogenic functions has been ascribed to HDL. HDL is an assembly of a neutral lipid core and an outer shell consisting of polar lipids and proteins. It has been defined many different way based on various distinct properties including density flotation, protein composition, molecular size, and electrophoretic migration. Overall the studies characterizing HDL clearly demonstrate that it is a complex heterogeneous mixture of particles. Furthermore several studies convincingly demonstrated that certain populations of HDL particles have a distinct functionality suggesting that HDL may serve as a platform for assembly of protein complexes with very specific biological functions. Indeed recent proteomics studies described over 100 proteins associated with HDL. Here we review approaches to isolation and proteomic analysis of HDL and discuss potential problems associated with isolation methods which may confound our understanding of the relation of the HDL composition and its biological function. PMID:22339300

  13. Effects of simvastatin on liver and plasma levels of cholesterol, dolichol and ubiquinol in hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Marinari, U M; Pronzato, M A; Dapino, D; Gazzo, P; Traverso, N; Cottalasso, D; Odetti, P

    1995-01-01

    Increased levels of blood cholesterol are considered as a major factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Simvastatin, a drug which blocks hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCoAR), reduces plasma cholesterol and increases HDL-cholesterol in rats fed a hypercholesterolemic diet. Moreover, simvastatin produces a significant decrease of ubiquinol and dolichol in plasma and in liver. PMID:7797420

  14. Myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants modify apolipoprotein A-I and generate dysfunctional high-density lipoproteins: comparison of hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN) with hypochlorous acid (HOCl).

    PubMed

    Hadfield, Katrina A; Pattison, David I; Brown, Bronwyn E; Hou, Liming; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L

    2013-01-15

    Oxidative modification of HDLs (high-density lipoproteins) by MPO (myeloperoxidase) compromises its anti-atherogenic properties, which may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. Although it has been established that HOCl (hypochlorous acid) produced by MPO targets apoA-I (apolipoprotein A-I), the major apolipoprotein of HDLs, the role of the other major oxidant generated by MPO, HOSCN (hypothiocyanous acid), in the generation of dysfunctional HDLs has not been examined. In the present study, we characterize the structural and functional modifications of lipid-free apoA-I and rHDL (reconstituted discoidal HDL) containing apoA-I complexed with phospholipid, induced by HOSCN and its decomposition product, OCN- (cyanate). Treatment of apoA-I with HOSCN resulted in the oxidation of tryptophan residues, whereas OCN- induced carbamylation of lysine residues to yield homocitrulline. Tryptophan residues were more readily oxidized on apoA-I contained in rHDLs. Exposure of lipid-free apoA-I to HOSCN and OCN- significantly reduced the extent of cholesterol efflux from cholesterol-loaded macrophages when compared with unmodified apoA-I. In contrast, HOSCN did not affect the anti-inflammatory properties of rHDL. The ability of HOSCN to impair apoA-I-mediated cholesterol efflux may contribute to the development of atherosclerosis, particularly in smokers who have high plasma levels of SCN- (thiocyanate). PMID:23088652

  15. Effect of melatonin on cholesterol absorption in rats.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Saad Abdul-Rehman

    2007-04-01

    This study evaluated the influence of melatonin on cholesterol absorption in rats fed on high cholesterol diet (HCD). HCD induced a remarkable increase in hepatic and plasma total cholesterol, plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, a decrease in high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and an elevation in triacylglyceride (TG) levels in plasma and in the liver. Melatonin suspension (10 mg/kg), specially prepared for this purpose, cholestyramine (230 mg/kg) and ezetimibe (145 microg/kg) were administered orally to the rats fed HCD for 30 days. Melatonin significantly reduced cholesterol absorption in rats fed on HCD and caused significant decreases in total cholesterol, TG, VLDL- and LDL-cholesterol in the plasma and contents of cholesterol and TG in the liver. The level of HDL cholesterol was significantly increased after melatonin. These results suggested that inhibition of cholesterol absorption caused by melatonin could be a mechanism contributing to the positive changes in plasma cholesterol, lipoprotein profile and the lipid contents in the liver. PMID:17349025

  16. Ethanol enhances de novo synthesis of high density lipoprotein cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Cluette, J.E.; Mulligan, J.J.; Noring, R.; Doyle, K.; Hojnacki, J.

    1984-05-01

    Male squirrel monkeys fed ethanol at variable doses were used to assess whether alcohol enhances de novo synthesis of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in vivo. Monkeys were divided into three groups: 1) controls fed isocaloric liquid diet; 2) low ethanol monkeys fed liquid diet with vodka substituted isocalorically for carbohydrate at 12% of calories; and 3) High Ethanol animals fed diet plus vodka at 24% of calories. High Ethanol primates had significantly higher levels of HDL nonesterified cholesterol than Control and Low Ethanol animals while serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase was similar for the three treatments. There were no significant differences between the groups in HDL cholesteryl ester mass or specific activity following intravenous injection of labeled mevalonolactone. By contrast, High Ethanol monkeys had significantly greater HDL nonesterified cholesterol specific activity with approximately 60% of the radioactivity distributed in the HDL/sub 3/ subfraction. This report provides the first experimental evidence that ethanol at 24% of calories induces elevations in HDL cholesterol in primates through enhanced de novo synthesis without adverse effects on liver function.

  17. Lipoprotein products of lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase and cholesteryl ester transfer.

    PubMed

    Rose, H G; Ellerbe, P

    1982-09-14

    High-density lipoprotein substrates and products of human plasma lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase have been labelled with radioisotopic cholesteryl esters in order to facilitate identification. [3H]Cholesteryl esters were formed by endogenous HDL3/VHDL enzyme (d greater than 1.125 g/ml) following incubation with mixed vesicles of phosphatidylcholine, unesterified cholesterol and 3H-labelled unesterified cholesterol. Transfer of labelled esters to acceptor lipoproteins (VLDL+LDL, d less than 1.063 g/ml) was employed to distinguish a hypothetical transfer complex. Separation of labelled HDL3/VHDL was by gel-permeation chromatography. The results indicate that a subpopulation of labelled HDL3/VHDL cholesteryl esters (43-61% of total) were removed by VLDL/LDL during a 3 h transfer period and these derive from the smaller lipoproteins of the spectrum. HDL carrying non-transferable [3H]cholesteryl esters localize to the larger HDL3. Transfer rates were proportional to ratios of acceptor to donor lipoproteins. Net transfer of cholesteryl esters from the smaller HDL3 also occurred, but was smaller in magnitude (about 10.5% of total). Acyltransferase assays indicated that enzyme distribution is skewed to larger-sized HDL3, suggesting that the non-transferable components might be lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase-containing parent complexes, while the smaller transfer products contain little acyltransferase. The results fit the hypothesis that a parent HDL3-lecithin: cholesterol acyltransferase complex generates a smaller-sized lipoprotein product which is active in cholesteryl ester transport. PMID:7126623

  18. HDL from apoA1 transgenic mice expressing the 4WF isoform is resistant to oxidative loss of function[S

    PubMed Central

    Berisha, Stela Z.; Brubaker, Greg; Kasumov, Takhar; Hung, Kimberly T.; DiBello, Patricia M.; Huang, Ying; Li, Ling; Willard, Belinda; Pollard, Katherine A.; Nagy, Laura E.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    HDL functions are impaired by myeloperoxidase (MPO), which selectively targets and oxidizes human apoA1. We previously found that the 4WF isoform of human apoA1, in which the four tryptophan residues are substituted with phenylalanine, is resistant to MPO-mediated loss of function. The purpose of this study was to generate 4WF apoA1 transgenic mice and compare functional properties of the 4WF and wild-type human apoA1 isoforms in vivo. Male mice had significantly higher plasma apoA1 levels than females for both isoforms of human apoA1, attributed to different production rates. With matched plasma apoA1 levels, 4WF transgenics had a trend for slightly less HDL-cholesterol versus human apoA1 transgenics. While 4WF transgenics had 31% less reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) to the plasma compartment, equivalent RCT to the liver and feces was observed. Plasma from both strains had similar ability to accept cholesterol and facilitate ex vivo cholesterol efflux from macrophages. Furthermore, we observed that 4WF transgenic HDL was partially (∼50%) protected from MPO-mediated loss of function while human apoA1 transgenic HDL lost all ABCA1-dependent cholesterol acceptor activity. In conclusion, the structure and function of HDL from 4WF transgenic mice was not different than HDL derived from human apoA1 transgenic mice. PMID:25561462

  19. Regulation of high density lipoprotein receptors in cultured macrophages: role of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, G; Niemann, R; Brennhausen, B; Krause, R; Assmann, G

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of human serum high density lipoproteins (HDL) with mouse peritoneal macrophages and human blood monocytes was studied. Saturation curves for binding of apolipoprotein E-free [125I]HDL3 showed at least two components: non-specific binding and specific binding that saturated at approximately 40 micrograms HDL protein/ml. Scatchard analysis of specific binding of apo E-free [125I]-HDL3 to cultured macrophages yielded linear plots indicative of a single class of specific binding sites. Pretreatment of [125I]HDL3 with various apolipoprotein antibodies (anti apo A-I, anti apo A-II, anti apo C-II, anti apo C-III and anti apo E) and preincubation of the cells with anti-idiotype antibodies against apo A-I and apo A-II prior to the HDL binding studies revealed apolipoprotein A-I as the ligand involved in specific binding of HDL. Cellular cholesterol accumulation via incubation with acetylated LDL led to an increase in HDL binding sites as well as an increase in the activity of the cytoplasmic cholesterol esterifying enzyme acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT). Incubation of the cholesterol-loaded cells in the presence of various ACAT inhibitors (Sandoz 58.035, Octimibate-Nattermann, progesterone) revealed a time- and dose-dependent amplification in HDL binding and HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux. It is concluded that the homeostasis of cellular cholesterol in macrophages is regulated in part by the number of HDL binding sites and that ACAT inhibitors enhance HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from peripheral cells. Images Fig. 4. PMID:2998754

  20. Effects of high density lipoprotein subfractions on cholesterol homeostasis in human fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Oram, J F

    1983-01-01

    Ultracentrifugally isolated high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles of d greater than 1.125 g/ml promote net transport of cholesterol from cultured cells. Consequently, when cultured human fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells were incubated with HDL3 (d = 1.125-1.21 g/ml) and "very high" density lipoprotein (VHDL, d = 1.21-1.25 g/ml), low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor activity was induced and the rate of LDL degradation by the cells was increased. Enhancement of LDL degradation by HDL3 and VHDL was sustained over incubation periods of 5 days at medium LDL concentrations greater than needed to saturate the LDL receptors. Even during these long-term incubations with LDL, HDL3 and VHDL caused marked reductions in cellular cholesterol content. Thus, an increase in the rate of cholesterol transport from cells may lead to a steady-state decrease in cellular cholesterol content and a sustained increase in the rate of clearance of LDL from the extracellular fluid. In contrast to the effects of HDL3 and VHDL, the major subclasses of HDL2 (HDL2b, d = 1.063-1.100 g/ml; HDL2a, d = 1.100-1.125 g/ml) did not promote net cholesterol transport from cells. Moreover, by apparent direct blockage of the effects that HDL3 and VHDL had on cholesterol transport, HDL2 reversed the increased rate of LDL degradation induced by HDL3 and VHDL. These results suggest that the relative proportion of HDL subfractions in the extracellular fluid may be an important determinant of both the rate of cholesterol transport from cells and the rate of receptor-mediated catabolism of LDL. PMID:6312947

  1. Effect of cigarette smoke and dietary cholesterol on plasma lipoprotein composition

    SciTech Connect

    Hojnacki, J.L.; Mulligan, J.J.; Cluette, J.E.; Kew, R.R.; Stack, D.J.; Huber, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Pigeons were assigned to four treatment groups: 1) Controls fed a chow diet ad libitum and retained in their cages; 2) Sham pigeons fed a cholesterol-saturated fat diet and exposed to fresh air by the Lorillard smoking machine; 3) Low nicotine-low carbon monoxide (LoLo) animals also fed the cholesterol diet and exposed to low concentrations of cigarette smoke; and 4) High nicotine-high carbon monoxide (HiHi) birds fed the cholesterol diet and subjected to high concentrations of inhalants. Plasma very low density (VLDL), low density (LDL), and high density (HDL) lipoproteins were isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Smoke-related differences appeared in HiHi HDL which contained relatively more free and esterified cholesterol and total lipid, but less total protein than HDL from Sham-smoked pigeons. VLDL from birds exposed to cigarette smoke (LoLo and HiHi) contained relatively more total lipid, but less total protein than VLDL from Sham pigeons. Inhalation smoke produced a marked depression in the HDL2/HDL3 ratio resulting from an increased proportion of the HDL3 subfraction relative to HDL2. Pigeons fed the cholesterol-saturated fat diet circulated HDL with greater free and esterified cholesterol mass than Controls. Diet also altered the type of cholesteryl ester present in HDL with cholesteryl linoleate representing the predominant form in Control pigeons and cholesteryl oleate in cholesterol-fed birds. These results demonstrate that cigarette smoking can mediate alterations in lipoprotein composition independent of changes induced by dietary cholesterol and saturated fat.

  2. Dyslipidemia and its association with meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Braich, Puneet S; Howard, Mary K; Singh, Jorawer S

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal serum lipid levels significantly increase the risk for cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, abnormal compositions of cholesterol in glandular secretions have been hypothesized as an etiology for meibomian gland dysfunction, yet this relationship has not been well studied in clinical settings. The primary purpose of this study was to determine if there is an association between dyslipidemia and meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). The secondary purpose was to identify the factors, if any, that play a role in this association. A case-control study was performed between October 2013 and February 2015 which recruited 109 patients with MGD and 115 control patients without MGD. All participants were of Indian descent and had no history of dyslipidemia. Basic demographic information was collected as well as fasting levels of serum glucose, creatinine, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). To calculate differences between groups, Z test or Student t test were used. A stepwise logistic regression model was used to calculate the estimates of odds ratios (ORs), where MGD was the dependent variable, making the independent variables consist of sex, age, body mass index (BMI), triglycerides ≥150 mg/dL, total cholesterol ≥200 mg/dL, LDL ≥130 mg/dL, or HDL ≤40 mg/dL, serum glucose, and serum creatinine. Dyslipidemia, defined by either a fasting total cholesterol level of ≥ 200 mg/dL, triglycerides ≥150 mg/dL, LDL ≥130 mg/dL, or HDL ≤40 mg/dL, was detected in 70 cases (64 %) and 21 controls (18 %), P < 0.001. Mean levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL, and HDL were 98.5 ± 42.1, 203.1 ± 13.2, 126.1 ± 10.2, and 53.3 ± 4.2 mg/dL, respectively, in cases and 82.3 ± 36.5, 156.6 ± 14.5, 92.2 ± 12.4, 45.8 ± 2.6 mg/dL, respectively, in controls. All differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05). MGD was significantly associated with age >65

  3. HDL to verification logic translator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambles, J. W.; Windley, P. J.

    The increasingly higher number of transistors possible in VLSI circuits compounds the difficulty in insuring correct designs. As the number of possible test cases required to exhaustively simulate a circuit design explodes, a better method is required to confirm the absence of design faults. Formal verification methods provide a way to prove, using logic, that a circuit structure correctly implements its specification. Before verification is accepted by VLSI design engineers, the stand alone verification tools that are in use in the research community must be integrated with the CAD tools used by the designers. One problem facing the acceptance of formal verification into circuit design methodology is that the structural circuit descriptions used by the designers are not appropriate for verification work and those required for verification lack some of the features needed for design. We offer a solution to this dilemma: an automatic translation from the designers' HDL models into definitions for the higher-ordered logic (HOL) verification system. The translated definitions become the low level basis of circuit verification which in turn increases the designer's confidence in the correctness of higher level behavioral models.

  4. HDL to verification logic translator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambles, J. W.; Windley, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    The increasingly higher number of transistors possible in VLSI circuits compounds the difficulty in insuring correct designs. As the number of possible test cases required to exhaustively simulate a circuit design explodes, a better method is required to confirm the absence of design faults. Formal verification methods provide a way to prove, using logic, that a circuit structure correctly implements its specification. Before verification is accepted by VLSI design engineers, the stand alone verification tools that are in use in the research community must be integrated with the CAD tools used by the designers. One problem facing the acceptance of formal verification into circuit design methodology is that the structural circuit descriptions used by the designers are not appropriate for verification work and those required for verification lack some of the features needed for design. We offer a solution to this dilemma: an automatic translation from the designers' HDL models into definitions for the higher-ordered logic (HOL) verification system. The translated definitions become the low level basis of circuit verification which in turn increases the designer's confidence in the correctness of higher level behavioral models.

  5. Serum reserve cholesterol binding capacity (SRCBC): the relative importance of different lipoprotein classes.

    PubMed

    Børresen, A L; Berg, K

    1981-01-01

    Findings by several authors have motivated studies in our laboratory on the relationship between HDL and "serum reserve cholesterol binding capacity" (SRCBC). We found that incubation for 25 hours at 37 degrees C provided optimal conditions for uptake and saturation when 14 mg sonicated and pulverized cholesterol was added to 1 ml serum. Upon separation of serum to which 14C labelled cholesterol had been added, into lipoprotein classes, a higher cpm:protein ratio than expected (from the free cholesterol:protein ratio, assuming isotope exchange exclusively) was found in LDL and the HDL fraction. In a second series of experiments, the different lipoprotein classes were separated prior to addition of 14C-cholesterol. The highest capacity for uptake of labelled cholesterol was found in the HDL fraction. The major part of the 14C-cholesterol appeared in the LDL density area when this HDL fraction was subjected to repeated ultracentrifugation. This suggested that the uptake of added cholesterol by HDL had led to the formation of an altered particle with density characteristics similar to those of LDL particles. This was confirmed by the demonstration of a "new" particle which contained apoA-I, apoA-II, and apoE, but no apoB or Lp(a) antigen. Its electrophoretic mobility was similar to that of HDL. Electron microscopy revealed that this particle is larger than normal HDL. The findings suggest that a sub-population of HDL molecules may be responsible for serum binding of added excess cholesterol. PMID:6794547

  6. Nanoparticle Targeting and Cholesterol Flux Through Scavenger Receptor Type B-1 Inhibits Cellular Exosome Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Plebanek, Michael P.; Mutharasan, R. Kannan; Volpert, Olga; Matov, Alexandre; Gatlin, Jesse C.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are nanoscale vesicles that mediate intercellular communication. Cellular exosome uptake mechanisms are not well defined partly due to the lack of specific inhibitors of this complex cellular process. Exosome uptake depends on cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains called lipid rafts, and can be blocked by non-specific depletion of plasma membrane cholesterol. Scavenger receptor type B-1 (SR-B1), found in lipid rafts, is a receptor for cholesterol-rich high-density lipoproteins (HDL). We hypothesized that a synthetic nanoparticle mimic of HDL (HDL NP) that binds SR-B1 and removes cholesterol through this receptor would inhibit cellular exosome uptake. In cell models, our data show that HDL NPs bind SR-B1, activate cholesterol efflux, and attenuate the influx of esterified cholesterol. As a result, HDL NP treatment results in decreased dynamics and clustering of SR-B1 contained in lipid rafts and potently inhibits cellular exosome uptake. Thus, SR-B1 and targeted HDL NPs provide a fundamental advance in studying cholesterol-dependent cellular uptake mechanisms. PMID:26511855

  7. Coincubation of PON1, APO A1, and LCAT increases the time HDL is able to prevent LDL oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hine, David; Mackness, Bharti; Mackness, Mike

    2012-02-01

    The inhibition of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by high-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a major antiatherogenic property of this lipoprotein. This activity is due, in part, to HDL associated proteins. However, whether these proteins interact in the antioxidant activity of HDL is unknown. LDL was incubated with apolipoprotein A1 (apo A1), lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), and paraoxonase-1 (PON1) alone or in combination, in the presence or absence of HDL under oxidizing conditions. LDL lipid peroxide concentrations were determined. Apo A1, LCAT, and PON1 all inhibit LDL oxidation in the absence of HDL and enhance the ability of HDL to inhibit LDL oxidation. Their effect was additive rather than synergistic; the combination of these proteins significantly enhanced the length of time LDL was protected from oxidation. This seemed to be due to the ability of PON1 to prevent the oxidative inactivation of LCAT. Apo A1, LCAT, and PON1 can all contribute to the antioxidant activity of HDL in vitro. The combination of apo A1, LCAT, and PON1 prolongs the time that HDL can prevent LDL oxidation, due, at least in part, to the prevention LCAT inactivation. PMID:22184096

  8. From Evolution to Revolution: miRNAs as Pharmacological Targets for Modulating Cholesterol Efflux and Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Dávalos, Alberto; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    There has been strong evolutionary pressure to ensure that an animal cell maintain levels of cholesterol within tight limits for normal function. Imbalances in cellular cholesterol levels are a major player in the development of different pathologies associated to dietary excess. Although epidemiological studies indicate that elevated levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, recent genetic evidence and pharmacological therapies to raise HDL levels do not support their beneficial effects. Cholesterol efflux as the first and probably the most important step in reverse cholesterol transport is an important biological process relevant to HDL function. Small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs), post-transcriptional control different aspects of cellular cholesterol homeostasis including cholesterol efflux. miRNA families miR-33, miR-758, miR-10b, miR-26 and miR-106b directly modulates cholesterol efflux by targeting the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1). Pre-clinical studies with anti-miR therapies to inhibit some of these miRNAs have increased cellular cholesterol efflux, reverse cholesterol transport and reduce pathologies associated to dyslipidemia. Although miRNAs as therapy have benefits from existing antisense technology, different obstacles need to be solved before we incorporate such research into clinical care. Here we focus on the clinical potential of miRNAs as therapeutic target to increase cholesterol efflux and reverse cholesterol transport as a new alternative to ameliorate cholesterol-related pathologies. PMID:23435093

  9. Overexpression of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase in transgenic rabbits prevents diet-induced atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hoeg, J M; Santamarina-Fojo, S; Bérard, A M; Cornhill, J F; Herderick, E E; Feldman, S H; Haudenschild, C C; Vaisman, B L; Hoyt, R F; Demosky, S J; Kauffman, R D; Hazel, C M; Marcovina, S M; Brewer, H B

    1996-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is a key plasma enzyme in cholesterol and high density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. Transgenic rabbits overexpressing human LCAT had 15-fold greater plasma LCAT activity that nontransgenic control rabbits. This degree of overexpression was associated with a 6.7-fold increase in the plasma HDL cholesterol concentration in LCAT transgenic rabbits. On a 0.3% cholesterol diet, the HDL cholesterol concentrations increased from 24 +/- 1 to 39 +/- 3 mg/dl in nontransgenic control rabbits (n = 10; P < 0.05) and increased from 161 +/- 5 to 200 +/- 21 mg/dl (P < 0.001) in the LCAT transgenic rabbits (n = 9). Although the baseline non-HDL concentrations of control (4 +/- 3 mg/dl) and transgenic rabbits (18 +/- 4 mg/dl) were similar, the cholesterol-rich diet raised the non-HDL cholesterol concentrations, reflecting the atherogenic very low density, intermediate density, and low density lipoprotein particles observed by gel filtration chromatography. The non-HDL cholesterol rose to 509 +/- 57 mg/dl in controls compared with only 196 +/- 14 mg/dl in the LCAT transgenic rabbits (P < 0.005). The differences in the plasma lipoprotein response to a cholesterol-rich diet observed in the transgenic rabbits paralleled the susceptibility to developing aortic atherosclerosis. Compared with nontransgenic controls, LCAT transgenic rabbits were protected from diet-induced atherosclerosis with significant reductions determined by both quantitative planimetry (-86%; P < 0.003) and quantitative immunohistochemistry (-93%; P < 0.009). Our results establish the importance of LCAT in the metabolism of both HDL and apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein particles with cholesterol feeding and the response to diet-induced atherosclerosis. In addition, these findings identify LCAT as a new target for therapy to prevent atherosclerosis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8876155

  10. High-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and types of alcoholic beverages consumed among men and women.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, D R; McPhillips, J B; Derby, C A; Gans, K M; Lasater, T M; Carleton, R A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Differences by sex in the relationship between high-density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and consumption of alcoholic beverages were examined in 1516 individuals. METHODS. Questionnaires and blood-sample data from cross-sectional surveys were analyzed. RESULTS. Both beer and liquor were independently associated with increased HDL cholesterol in the total group, in men, and in women after covariates were controlled for. Wine was associated with a significant increase in HDL cholesterol in women only. CONCLUSIONS. Among women and men, amount may be more important than type of alcoholic beverage consumed. The independent effect of wine on HDL cholesterol among men remains unclear since few men in this population consumed wine exclusively or in large quantities. PMID:8669505

  11. High-density lipoprotein-mediated transcellular cholesterol transport in mouse aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Miao, LiXia; Okoro, Emmanuel U; Cao, ZhiJan; Yang, Hong; Motley-Johnson, Evangeline; Guo, Zhongmao

    2015-09-18

    Accumulation of unesterified cholesterol-rich lipid vesicles in the subendothelial space contributes to atherogenesis. Transport of cholesterol from the subendothelial intima back to the circulating blood inhibits atherosclerosis development; however, the mechanism for this process has not been fully defined. Using cultured mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs), we observed that unesterified cholesterol can be transported across the endothelial cell monolayer from the basolateral to the apical compartment. Administration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or apolipoprotein AI (apoAI) to the apical compartment enhanced transendothelial cholesterol transport in a concentration-dependent manner. Knockdown of ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) or scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1), or inhibition of SR-B1 diminished HDL-induced transendothelial cholesterol transport; while knockdown of ABCA1 reduced apoAI-mediated cholesterol transport. HDL enhanced phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt in MAECs. However, inhibition of PI3K or Akt did not reduce HDL-induced transendothelial cholesterol transport. These results suggest that HDL enhances transendothelial cholesterol transport by activation of a mechanism involving ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-B1 but not involving PI3K and Akt. PMID:26255968

  12. Red Blood Cells Play a Role in Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Kimberly T.; Berisha, Stela Z.; Ritchey, Brian M.; Santore, Jennifer; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) involves the removal of cholesterol from peripheral tissue for excretion in the feces. Here, we determined whether red blood cells (RBCs) can contribute to RCT. Methods and Results We performed a series of studies in apoAI-deficient mice where the HDL-mediated pathway of RCT is greatly diminished. RBCs carried a higher fraction of whole blood cholesterol than plasma in apoAI-deficient mice, and as least as much of the labeled cholesterol derived from injected foam cells appeared in RBCs compared to plasma. To determine if RBCs mediate RCT to the fecal compartment, we measured RCT in anemic and control apoAI-deficient mice and found that anemia decreased RCT to the feces by over 35% after correcting for fecal mass. Transfusion of [3H]cholesterol labeled RBCs led to robust delivery of the labeled cholesterol to the feces in apoAI-deficient hosts. In wild type mice, the majority of the blood cholesterol mass, as well as [3H]cholesterol derived from the injected foam cells, was found in plasma, and anemia did not significantly alter RCT to the feces after correction for fecal mass. Conclusion The RBC cholesterol pool is dynamic and facilitates RCT of peripheral cholesterol to the feces, particularly in the low HDL state. PMID:22499994

  13. Origin and heterogeneity of HDL subspecies

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A.V.; Gong, E.L.; Blanche, P.J.; Forte, T.M.; Shore, V.G.

    1987-09-01

    A major determinant of mature HDL particle size and apolar core content, in the absence of remodeling factors, is most likely the size and apolipoprotein content of the precursor particle. Depending on the number of apoA-I molecules per analog particle, the LCAT-induced transformation follows either a fusion pathway (for precursors with 2 apoA-I per particle) or a pathway (for precursors with more than 2 apoA-I per particle) that conserves the apolipoprotein number. According to our analog results, small nascent HDL probably serve as precursors to the major (apoA-I without apoA-II)-subpopulation in the size interval. Our studies with the large discoidal analog suggest that HDL/sub 2/ (apoA-I without apoA-II)-subpopulations probably originate from the large discoidal nascent HDL that contain a higher number of apolipoprotein molecules per particle than the small nascent HDL. Intermediate transformation products of the large discoidal analog, described in the present study, resemble deformable species found in human lymph and are characterized by a relatively high surface-to-core lipid ratio. Whether large discoidal precursors containing apoE transform in comparable manner but with eventual interchange of apoA-I for apoE (10,15) is under investigation in our laboratory. Likewise, detailed delineation of pathways whereby the (apoA-I with apoA-II)-HDL subpopulations are formed is yet to be accomplished. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Gender Difference in the Epidemiological Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Olfactory Dysfunction: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Se-Hwan; Kang, Jun-Myung; Seo, Jae-Hyun; Han, Kyung-do; Joo, Young-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a higher risk of morbidity and/or mortality for various chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships of MetS and its components with olfactory dysfunction in a representative Korean population. We analyzed the data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008–2010). A total of 11,609 adults who underwent otolaryngological examination were evaluated. The olfactory function was classified as normosmia or hyposmia by a self-report questionnaire according to the sense problems of smell during the past 3 months. MetS was diagnosed if a participant had at least three of the following: (1) WC ≥90 cm in men and ≥80 cm in women; (2) fasting blood sugar ≥ 100 mg/dL or medication use for elevated glucose; (3) fasting triglyceride ≥ 150 mg/dL or cholesterol-lowering medication use; (4) HDL-cholesterol <40 mg/dL in men and <50 mg/dL in women or cholesterol-lowering medication use; and (5) SBP ≥ 130 mmHg and/or DBP ≥ 85 mmHg or antihypertensive drug use for patients with a history of hypertension. The prevalence of olfactory dysfunction in the study population was 6.3%. The prevalence of olfactory dysfunction was significantly higher in older people with MetS than in those without MetS in both sexes (male, 42.0 ± 3.4% vs. 34.7 ± 0.9%, p = 0.0354; female, 46.2 ± 2.8% vs. 37.8 ± 0.8%, p = 0.0026). However, elevated waist circumference, elevated fasting glucose, elevated triglycerides, reduced HDL cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, severe stress, depressed mood, and suicidal ideation were significantly associated with olfactory dysfunction only in women. After controlling for confounders, olfactory dysfunction was significantly associated with MetS (odds ratio, 1.352; 95% confidence interval, 1.005–1.820) only in women. MetS are associated with olfactory dysfunction only in Korean women. PMID:26859830

  15. Beneficial effects of raloxifene and atorvastatin on serum lipids and HDL phospholipids levels of postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Piperi, Christina; Kalofoutis, C; Skenderi, Katerina; Economidou, Olga; Kalofoutis, A

    2004-06-01

    Selective oestrogen receptor modulators (raloxifene) and statins (atorvastatin) have been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease associated with the postmenopausal status. Their beneficial effects may be mediated partly by favourable changes in serum lipids and particular on HDL phospholipid composition. In the present study, individual administration of either raloxifene (Group A) or atorvastatin (Group B) or both (Group C) was compared for a period of 3 months and their effects on total lipids and HDL phospholipids were evaluated. The combined treatment of raloxifene and atorvastatin resulted in profound changes in the majority of serum lipids, including a significant reduction in total cholesterol and triglycerides (P<0.001), a rise in total phospholipids (P<0.01) and a reduction in LDL-C and Apo B levels (P<0.001). Furthermore, Apo A-I was elevated (P<0.001) whereas total HDL phospholipids were significantly increased (P<0.05). Specifically, HDL phosphatidylcholine levels were markedly increased (P<0.001) and HDL lysophosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin and phosphatidylinositol levels were reduced (P<0.05). A further attempt to evaluate each treatment group was performed and the significance of these results is discussed. PMID:15203583

  16. [Cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Historical considerations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Arturo; Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; Basurto, Lourdes; De la Chesnaye, Elsa; Saldívar, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is a precursor of steroid hormones and an essential component of the cell membrane, however, altered regulation of the synthesis, absorption and excretion of cholesterol predispose to cardiovascular diseases of atherosclerotic origin. Despite, the recognition of historical events for 200 years, starting with Michel Chevreul naming «cholesterol»; later on, Lobstein coining the term atherosclerosis and Marchand introducing it, Anichkov identifying cholesterol in atheromatous plaque, and Brown and Goldstein discovering LDL receptor; as well as the emerging of different drugs, such as fibrates, statins and cetrapibs this decade, promising to increase HDL and the most recent ezetimibe and anti-PCSK9 to inhibit the degradation of LDL receptor, however morbidity has not been reduced in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26774359

  17. Cholesterol, Triglycerides, and the Five-Factor Model of Personality

    PubMed Central

    Sutin, Angelina R.; Terracciano, Antonio; Deiana, Barbara; Uda, Manuela; Schlessinger, David; Lakatta, Edward G.; Costa, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    Unhealthy lipid levels are among the leading controllable risk factors for coronary heart disease. To identify the psychological factors associated with dyslipidemia, this study investigates the personality correlates of cholesterol (total, LDL, and HDL) and triglycerides. A community-based sample (N=5,532) from Sardinia, Italy, had their cholesterol and triglyceride levels assessed and completed a comprehensive personality questionnaire, the NEO-PI-R. All analyses controlled for age, sex, BMI, smoking, drinking, hypertension, and diabetes. Low Conscientiousness and traits related to impulsivity were associated with lower HDL cholesterol and higher triglycerides. Compared to the lowest 10%, those who scored in top 10% on Impulsivity had a 2.5 times greater risk of exceeding the clinical threshold for elevated triglycerides (OR=2.51, CI=1.56–4.07). In addition, sex moderated the association between trait depression (a component of Neuroticism) and HDL cholesterol, such that trait depression was associated with lower levels of HDL cholesterol in women but not men. When considering the connection between personality and health, unhealthy lipid profiles may be one intermediate biomarker between personality and morbidity and mortality. PMID:20109519

  18. Effect of honey on serum cholesterol and lipid values.

    PubMed

    Münstedt, Karsten; Hoffmann, Sven; Hauenschild, Annette; Bülte, Michael; von Georgi, Richard; Hackethal, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    Small studies have suggested that honey benefits patients with high cholesterol concentrations. The present study aimed to confirm this finding in a larger group of subjects. Sixty volunteers with high cholesterol, stratified according to gender and hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin) treatment (yes/no), were randomized to receive 75 g of honey solution or a honey-comparable sugar solution once daily over a period of 14 days. Baseline measurements, including body mass index (BMI) and lipid profile, were obtained, and subjects also completed dietary questionnaires and the Inventory for the Assessment of Negative Bodily Affect-Trait form (INKA-h) questionnaire. Measurements were repeated 2 weeks later. BMI and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol values were significantly correlated (r = -0.487; P < .001) as were BMI and a lower ratio of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol to HDL cholesterol (r = 0.420; P < .001), meaning that subjects with a high BMI had a lower HDL cholesterol value. INKA-h scores and LDL cholesterol values were also significantly correlated (r = 0.273, P = .042). Neither solution influenced significantly cholesterol or triglyceride values in the total group; in women, however, the LDL cholesterol value increased in the sugar solution subgroup but not in the women taking honey. Although ingesting honey did not reduce LDL cholesterol values in general, women may benefit from substituting honey for sugar in their diet. Reducing the BMI lowers the LDL cholesterol value, and psychological interventions also seem important and merit further investigation. PMID:19627212

  19. ApoA-IV promotes the biogenesis of apoA-IV-containing HDL particles with the participation of ABCA1 and LCAT[S

    PubMed Central

    Duka, Adelina; Fotakis, Panagiotis; Georgiadou, Dimitra; Kateifides, Andreas; Tzavlaki, Kalliopi; von Eckardstein, Leonard; Stratikos, Efstratios; Kardassis, Dimitris; Zannis, Vassilis I.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the role of apoA-IV, ABCA1, and LCAT in the biogenesis of apoA-IV-containing HDL (HDL-A-IV) using different mouse models. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of apoA-IV in apoA-I−/− mice did not change plasma lipid levels. ApoA-IV floated in the HDL2/HDL3 region, promoted the formation of spherical HDL particles as determined by electron microscopy, and generated mostly α- and a few pre-β-like HDL subpopulations. Gene transfer of apoA-IV in apoA-I−/− × apoE−/− mice increased plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and 80% of the protein was distributed in the VLDL/IDL/LDL region. This treatment likewise generated α- and pre-β-like HDL subpopulations. Spherical and α-migrating HDL particles were not detectable following gene transfer of apoA-IV in ABCA1−/− or LCAT−/− mice. Coexpression of apoA-IV and LCAT in apoA-I−/− mice restored the formation of HDL-A-IV. Lipid-free apoA-IV and reconstituted HDL-A-IV promoted ABCA1 and scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI)-mediated cholesterol efflux, respectively, as efficiently as apoA-I and apoE. Our findings are consistent with a novel function of apoA-IV in the biogenesis of discrete HDL-A-IV particles with the participation of ABCA1 and LCAT, and may explain previously reported anti-inflammatory and atheroprotective properties of apoA-IV. PMID:23132909

  20. Increased serum triglyceride clearance and elevated high-density lipoprotein 2 and 3 cholesterol during treatment of primary hypertriglyceridemia with bezafibrate☆

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Nagahiko; Ikeuchi, Reiko; Hibino, Takeshi; Yoshida, Takayuki; Mukai, Seiji; Akita, Sachie; Yajima, Kazuhiro; Miyabe, Hiromichi; Goto, Toshihiko; Takada, Norio; Ohte, Nobuyuki; Kunimatu, Mitoshi; Kimura, Genjiro

    2003-01-01

    Background Hypertriglyceridemia accompanied by low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is a risk factor for coronary artery disease. High-density lipoprotein 2 (HDL2) and 3 (HDL3) are believed to suppress the progress of atherosclerosis through reverse cholesterol transport. As a result, peripheral tissues can be protected against excessive accumulation of cholesterol. Although bezafibrate is known to accelerate the increase of HDL-C, results are not standardized regarding increases of HDL3 and HDL2 subfractions. Objective This study assessed the effects of bezafibrate on serum triglyceride (TG) fractional clearance rate (K2) and HDL2 and HDL3 cholesterol (HDL2-C and HDL3-C, respectively) levels in patients with primary hypertriglyceridemia (serum TG ≥150 mg/dL). Methods Outpatients with primary hypertriglyceridemia were enrolled in this 8-week study conducted at the Third Department of Internal Medicine, Nagoya City University Hospital (Nagoya, Japan). Oral bezafibrate was administered at a dose of 400 mg/d (200-mg tablet BID, morning and evening) for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, serum levels of total cholesterol (TC), TG, HDL-C, HDL2-C, and HDL3-C were measured. A fat emulsion tolerance test to assess K2 and measurements of plasma lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mass, LPL activity, and hepatic triglyceride lipase (HTGL) activity in postheparin plasma were performed before bezafibrate administration and after the course of treatment. Results Sixteen patients (10 men, 6 women; mean [SD] age, 54 [12] years [range, 30–69 years]; mean [SD] body mass index, 23 [2] kg/m2) entered the study. The following findings were observed in male and female patients after 8 weeks of treatment. A statistically significant reduction was observed in mean serum TG level (P<0.01). Significant increases were seen in HDL-C, HDL2-C, and HDL3-C (all P<0.01), K2 (P<0.01), and in plasma LPL mass (P<0.01) and LPL activity (P<0.05). TC level and HTGL activity did not change

  1. Reconstituted high-density lipoprotein can elevate plasma alanine aminotransferase by transient depletion of hepatic cholesterol: role of the phospholipid component.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Eva; Pragst, Ingo; Waelchli, Marcel; Gille, Andreas; Schenk, Sabrina; Mueller-Cohrs, Jochen; Diditchenko, Svetlana; Zanoni, Paolo; Cuchel, Marina; Seubert, Andreas; Rader, Daniel J; Wright, Samuel D

    2016-08-01

    Human apolipoprotein A-I preparations reconstituted with phospholipids (reconstituted high-density lipoprotein [HDL]) have been used in a large number of animal and human studies to investigate the physiological role of apolipoprotein A-I. Several of these studies observed that intravenous infusion of reconstituted HDL might cause transient elevations in plasma levels of hepatic enzymes. Here we describe the mechanism of this enzyme release. Observations from several animal models and in vitro studies suggest that the extent of hepatic transaminase release (alanine aminotransferase [ALT]) correlates with the movement of hepatic cholesterol into the blood after infusion. Both the amount of ALT release and cholesterol movement were dependent on the amount and type of phospholipid present in the reconstituted HDL. As cholesterol is known to dissolve readily in phospholipid, an HDL preparation was loaded with cholesterol before infusion into rats to assess the role of diffusion of cholesterol out of the liver and into the reconstituted HDL. Cholesterol-loaded HDL failed to withdraw cholesterol from tissues and subsequently failed to cause ALT release. To investigate further the role of cholesterol diffusion, we employed mice deficient in SR-BI, a transporter that facilitates spontaneous movement of cholesterol between cell membranes and HDL. These mice showed substantially lower movement of cholesterol into the blood and markedly lower ALT release. We conclude that initial depletion of hepatic cholesterol initiates transient ALT release in response to infusion of reconstituted HDL. This effect may be controlled by appropriate choice of the type and amount of phospholipid in reconstituted HDL. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26651060

  2. Cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoproteins and apolipoprotein A-I phosphatidylcholine complexes is inhibited by ethanol: role of apolipoprotein structure and cooperative interaction of phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Avdulov, N A; Chochina, S V; Igbavboa, U; Wood, W G

    2000-08-29

    There is a substantial body of evidence showing that moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. One of the factors thought to contribute to this reduction in risk is an increase in the level of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) correlated with alcohol consumption. However, HDL levels are elevated in heavy drinkers, but their risk of vascular disease is greater compared with that of moderate drinkers. Ethanol at concentrations observed in heavy drinkers and alcoholics may directly act on HDL and apolipoproteins and in turn modify cholesterol efflux. In this paper, we show that ethanol significantly inhibited cholesterol efflux from fibroblasts to HDL and to apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) complexed with phosphatidylcholine (PC). Ethanol significantly inhibited binding of PC to apoA-I, inhibited incorporation of cholesterol only when apoA-I contained PC, and did not alter incorporation of cholesterol into HDL. ApoA-I structure was altered by ethanol as monitored by steady-state fluorescence polarization of tryptophan residues. The absence of ethanol effects on incorporation of cholesterol into HDL versus inhibition of cholesterol incorporation into the apoA-I-PC complex suggests that the effects of ethanol on cholesterol efflux mediated by HDL involve interaction with the cell surface and that efflux mediated by the apoA-I-PC complex is a combination of aqueous diffusion and contact with the cell surface. In addition, effects of ethanol on apoA-I suggest that pre-beta-HDL or lipid-free apoA-I may be more perturbed by ethanol than mature HDL, and such effects may be pathophysiological with respect to the process of reverse cholesterol transport in heavy drinkers and alcoholics. PMID:10956052

  3. ABCA1 overexpression leads to hyperalphalipoproteinemia and increased biliary cholesterol excretion in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Vaisman, Boris L.; Lambert, Gilles; Amar, Marcelo; Joyce, Charles; Ito, Toshimitsu; Shamburek, Robert D.; Cain, William J.; Fruchart-Najib, Jamila; Neufeld, Edward D.; Remaley, Alan T.; Brewer, H. Bryan; Santamarina-Fojo, Silvia

    2001-01-01

    The discovery of the ABCA1 lipid transporter has generated interest in modulating human plasma HDL levels and atherogenic risk by enhancing ABCA1 gene expression. To determine if increased ABCA1 expression modulates HDL metabolism in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress human ABCA1 (hABCA1-Tg). Hepatic and macrophage expression of hABCA1 enhanced macrophage cholesterol efflux to apoA-I; increased plasma cholesterol, cholesteryl esters (CEs), free cholesterol, phospholipids, HDL cholesterol, and apoA-I and apoB levels; and led to the accumulation of apoE-rich HDL1. ABCA1 transgene expression delayed 125I-apoA-I catabolism in both liver and kidney, leading to increased plasma apoA-I levels, but had no effect on apoB secretion after infusion of Triton WR1339. Although the plasma clearance of HDL-CE was not significantly altered in hABCA1-Tg mice, the net hepatic delivery of exogenous 3H-CEt-HDL, which is dependent on the HDL pool size, was increased 1.5-fold. In addition, the cholesterol and phospholipid concentrations in hABCA1-Tg bile were increased 1.8-fold. These studies show that steady-state overexpression of ABCA1 in vivo (a) raises plasma apoB levels without altering apoB secretion and (b) raises plasma HDL-C and apoA-I levels, facilitating hepatic reverse cholesterol transport and biliary cholesterol excretion. Similar metabolic changes may modify atherogenic risk in humans. PMID:11457883

  4. Electrical activity of corpus cavernosum in vasculogenic and non-vasculogenic erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Atahan, O; Kayigil, O; Metin, A

    1997-12-01

    We aimed to compare the electrical activity of corpus cavernosum before and after intracavernous papaverine injection and to determine the blood lipid profile in vascular and non-vascular erectile dysfunction, and also to assess whether vascular pathology and abnormal blood lipid levels impair cavernosal smooth-muscle relaxation. We determined total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels in peripheral and cavernosal blood in 39 patients with erectile dysfunction. Electromyography of the corpus cavernosum was performed before and after an intracavernous injection with 60 mg of papaverine in all patients. Thirty-nine impotent patients have been divided into two groups: vasculogenic erectile dysfunction (VED) and non-vasculogenic erectile dysfunction (NVED), according to colour Doppler ultrasonic flowmetry, dynamic infusion cavernosometry and the pressure difference between the brachial arterial systolic pressure and cavernosal arterial systolic pressure measurements. Biochemical values and amplitude changes were compared in both groups. The TC level was higher in both peripheral and cavernosal samples of the VED group than in the NVED group (p = 0.000), with no differences between peripheral and cavernosal blood levels within the same groups (p > 0.05). There were no significant changes in TG and HDL levels in any of the groups (p > 0.05). The mean amplitude differences before and after papaverine injection (delta A) were found to be 2.05 +/- 0.78 microV in the VED group and 4.68 +/- 2.53 microV in the NVED group, showing that the relaxation response to papaverine was more significant in the NVED than in the VED group (p = 0.003). The moderate decreases in the amplitude of electrical activity of corpus cavernosum and the higher TC levels found in the VED group can be accepted as the parameters of impairment in the relaxation of corpus cavernosum, showing the role of hypercholesterolaemia and vascular pathologies in erectile

  5. Women and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Women and Cholesterol Updated:Apr 1,2016 The female sex hormone ... Glossary Related Sites Nutrition Center My Life Check Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol • Why Cholesterol Matters • Understand Your ...

  6. Cholesterol IQ Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cholesterol IQ Quiz Updated:Feb 2,2015 Begin the quiz Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol Introduction Good vs. Bad Cholesterol ...

  7. Effects of zinc and cholesterol/choleate on serum lipoproteins and the liver in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, C.H.; Chen, S.M.; Ogle, C.W.; Young, T.K.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of short-term treatment with orally-administered zinc sulfate and/or a mixture of cholesterol/choleate on serum lipoprotein and hepatic enzyme levels were studied. Administration of graded doses of zinc sulfate for 5 days, dose-dependently increased serum and hepatic zinc levels but depressed the serum high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration and liver cytochrome P-450 activity. However, it did not affect hepatic concentrations of malondialdehyde and free {beta}-glucuronidase. Cholesterol/choleate treatment for 5 days markedly damaged the liver, as reflected by elevations of hepatic concentrations of malondialdehyde (both in the mitochondrial and microsomal fractions) and of free {beta}-glucuronidase; total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in the blood were increased, whereas HDL-C was decreased significantly. Concomitant administration of zinc sulfate with cholesterol/choleate further lowered HDL-C levels, but reversed the high hepatic concentrations of both malondialdehyde and free {beta}-glucuronidase. The present study indicates that both zinc ions and cholesterol can decrease circulatory HDL-C levels and that zinc protects against cholesterol-induced hepatic damage by reducing lysosomal enzyme release and preventing lipid peroxidation in the liver.

  8. Cholesterol efflux is LXRα isoform-dependent in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The nuclear receptor liver X receptor (LXR) has two isoforms: LXRα and LXRβ. LXR activation promotes cholesterol efflux in macrophages, but the relative importance of each LXR isoform in mediating cholesterol efflux remains elusive. Methods We evaluated the ability of different doses of LXRs agonist T0901317 to affect cholesterol efflux in human macrophages and its relationship with mRNA and protein levels of several well-characterized proteins involved in cholesterol efflux, including ABCA1, ABCG1, SR-BI, LXRβ and LXRα, using quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, and siRNA techniques. Results Here we show that LXRα rather than LXRβ sustains baseline cholesterol efflux in human blood-derived macrophages. Treatment of human macrophages with a non-isoform-specific LXR agonist T0901317 substantially increased HDL- and apoA-I-mediated cholesterol efflux, which was associated with increased mRNA and protein expression levels of ABCA1, ABCG1, SR-BI, LXRα and LXRβ. The siRNA- mediated silencing of LXRα, but not LXRβ significantly reduced the protein levels of ABCA1,ABCG1, and SR-BI as wellas HDL- and ApoA1-mediated cholesterol in human macrophages. Conclusions These findings imply that LXRα- rather than LXRβ- specific agonists may promote reverse cholesterol transport in humans. PMID:24996838

  9. Hyodeoxycholic acid improves HDL function and inhibits atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDLR-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Diana M.; Shaposhnik, Zory; Meng, Yonghong; Rosales, Melenie; Wang, Xuping; Wu, Judy; Ratiner, Boris; Zadini, Filiberto; Zadini, Giorgio; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a natural secondary bile acid, hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA), on lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-null (LDLRKO) mice. Female LDLRKO mice were maintained on a Western diet for 8 wk and then divided into 2 groups that received chow, or chow + 1.25% HDCA, diets for 15 wk. We observed that mice fed the HDCA diet were leaner and exhibited a 37% (P<0.05) decrease in fasting plasma glucose level. HDCA supplementation significantly decreased atherosclerotic lesion size at the aortic root region, the entire aorta, and the innominate artery by 44% (P<0.0001), 48% (P<0.01), and 94% (P<0.01), respectively, as compared with the chow group. Plasma VLDL/IDL/LDL cholesterol levels were significantly decreased, by 61% (P<0.05), in the HDCA group as compared with the chow diet group. HDCA supplementation decreased intestinal cholesterol absorption by 76% (P<0.0001) as compared with the chow group. Furthermore, HDL isolated from the HDCA group exhibited significantly increased ability to mediate cholesterol efflux ex vivo as compared with HDL of the chow diet group. In addition, HDCA significantly increased the expression of genes involved in cholesterol efflux, such as Abca1, Abcg1, and Apoe, in a macrophage cell line. Thus, HDCA is a candidate for antiatherosclerotic drug therapy.—Shih, D. M., Shaposhnik, Z., Meng, Y., Rosales, M., Wang, X., Wu, J., Ratiner, B., Zadini, F., Zadini, G., Lusis, A. J. Hyodeoxycholic acid improves HDL function and inhibits atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDLR-knockout mice. PMID:23752203

  10. Effect of Extended-Release Niacin on High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Functionality, Lipoprotein Metabolism, and Mediators of Vascular Inflammation in Statin-Treated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Rahul; Liu, Yifen; Kwok, See; Hama, Salam; France, Michael; Eatough, Ruth; Pemberton, Phil; Schofield, Jonathan; Siahmansur, Tarza J; Malik, Rayaz; Ammori, Basil A; Issa, Basil; Younis, Naveed; Donn, Rachelle; Stevens, Adam; Durrington, Paul; Soran, Handrean

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the influence of extended-release niacin/laropiprant (ERN/LRP) versus placebo on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) antioxidant function, cholesterol efflux, apolipoprotein B100 (apoB)-containing lipoproteins, and mediators of vascular inflammation associated with 15% increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Study patients had persistent dyslipidemia despite receiving high-dose statin treatment. Methods and Results In a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial, we compared the effect of ERN/LRP with placebo in 27 statin-treated dyslipidemic patients who had not achieved National Cholesterol Education Program-ATP III targets for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). We measured fasting lipid profile, apolipoproteins, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) activity, paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity, small dense LDL apoB (sdLDL-apoB), oxidized LDL (oxLDL), glycated apoB (glyc-apoB), lipoprotein phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), lysophosphatidyl choline (lyso-PC), macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP1), serum amyloid A (SAA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). We also examined the capacity of HDL to protect LDL from in vitro oxidation and the percentage cholesterol efflux mediated by apoB depleted serum. ERN/LRP was associated with an 18% increase in HDL-C levels compared to placebo (1.55 versus 1.31 mmol/L, P<0.0001). There were significant reductions in total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, total serum apoB, lipoprotein (a), CETP activity, oxLDL, Lp-PLA2, lyso-PC, MCP1, and SAA, but no significant changes in glyc-apoB or sdLDL-apoB concentration. There was a modest increase in cholesterol efflux function of HDL (19.5%, P=0.045), but no change in the antioxidant capacity of HDL in vitro or PON1 activity. Conclusions ERN/LRP reduces LDL-associated mediators of vascular inflammation, but has varied effects on HDL functionality and LDL quality, which may counter its HDL

  11. Impact of Dietary Fat Type Within the Context of Altered Cholesterol Homeostasis on Cholesterol and Lipoprotein Metabolism in the F1B Hamster

    PubMed Central

    Lecker, Jaime L.; Matthan, Nirupa R.; Billheimer, Jeffrey T.; Rader, Daniel J.; Lichtenstein, Alice H.

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol status and dietary fat alter several metabolic pathways reflected in lipoprotein profiles. To assess plasma lipoprotein response and mechanisms by which cholesterol and dietary fat type regulate expression of genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism we developed an experimental model system using F1B hamsters fed diets (12 weeks) enriched in 10% (w/w) coconut, olive or safflower oil with either high cholesterol (0.1%; cholesterol-supplemented) or low cholesterol coupled with cholesterol lowering drugs 10-days prior to killing (0.01% cholesterol, 0.15% lovastatin, 2% cholestyramine; cholesterol-depleted). Irrespective of dietary fat, cholesterol-depletion, relative to supplementation, resulted in lower plasma non-high density lipoprotein (HDL) and HDL cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations (all P<0.05). In the liver, these differences were associated with higher sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-2, low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and 7-α hydroxylase mRNA levels; higher scavenger receptor B1 and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I mRNA and protein levels; and lower apo E protein levels and in intestine modestly lower sterol transporters ATP binding cassette (ABC) A1, ABCG5 and ABCG8 mRNA levels. Irrespective of cholesterol status, coconut oil, relative to olive and safflower oils, resulted in higher non-HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations (both P<0.05) and modestly higher SREBP-2 mRNA levels. These data suggest that in F1B hamsters, differences in plasma lipoprotein profiles in response to cholesterol depletion are associated with changes in the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, whereas the effect of dietary fat type on gene expression was modest which limits the usefulness of the experimental animal model. PMID:20197195

  12. Impact of dietary fat type within the context of altered cholesterol homeostasis on cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism in the F1B hamster.

    PubMed

    Lecker, Jaime L; Matthan, Nirupa R; Billheimer, Jeffrey T; Rader, Daniel J; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2010-10-01

    Cholesterol status and dietary fat alter several metabolic pathways reflected in lipoprotein profiles. To assess plasma lipoprotein response and mechanisms by which cholesterol and dietary fat type regulate expression of genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism, we developed an experimental model system using F1B hamsters fed diets (12 weeks) enriched in 10% (wt/wt) coconut, olive, or safflower oil with either high cholesterol (0.1%; cholesterol supplemented) or low cholesterol coupled with cholesterol-lowering drugs 10 days before killing (0.01% cholesterol, 0.15% lovastatin, 2% cholestyramine; cholesterol depleted). Irrespective of dietary fat, cholesterol depletion, relative to supplementation, resulted in lower plasma non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL) and HDL cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations (all Ps < .05). In the liver, these differences were associated with higher sterol regulatory element binding protein-2, low-density lipoprotein receptor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and 7α-hydroxylase messenger RNA (mRNA) levels; higher scavenger receptor B1 and apolipoprotein A-I mRNA and protein levels; lower apolipoprotein E protein levels; and in intestine, modestly lower sterol transporters adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) A1, ABCG5, and ABCG8 mRNA levels. Irrespective of cholesterol status, coconut oil, relative to olive and safflower oils, resulted in higher non-HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations (both Ps < .05) and modestly higher sterol regulatory element binding protein-2 mRNA levels. These data suggest that, in F1B hamsters, differences in plasma lipoprotein profiles in response to cholesterol depletion are associated with changes in the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, whereas the effect of dietary fat type on gene expression was modest, which limits the usefulness of the experimental animal model. PMID:20197195

  13. Adding monounsaturated fatty acids to a dietary portfolio of cholesterol-lowering foods in hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, David J.A.; Chiavaroli, Laura; Wong, Julia M.W.; Kendall, Cyril; Lewis, Gary F.; Vidgen, Edward; Connelly, Philip W.; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Josse, Robert G.; Lamarche, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Background Higher intake of monounsaturated fat may raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol without raising low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. We tested whether increasing the monounsaturated fat content of a diet proven effective for lowering LDL cholesterol (dietary portfolio) also modified other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, specifically by increasing HDL cholesterol, lowering serum triglyceride and further reducing the ratio of total to HDL cholesterol. Methods Twenty-four patients with hyperlipidemia consumed a therapeutic diet very low in saturated fat for one month and were then randomly assigned to a dietary portfolio low or high in monounsaturated fatty acid for another month. We supplied participants’ food for the two-month period. Calorie intake was based on Harris–Benedict estimates for energy requirements. Results For patients who consumed the dietary portfolio high in monounsaturated fat, HDL cholesterol rose, whereas for those consuming the dietary portfolio low in monounsaturated fat, HDL cholesterol did not change. The 12.5% treatment difference was significant (0.12 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.05 to 0.21, p = 0.003). The ratio of total to HDL cholesterol was reduced by 6.5% with the diet high in monounsaturated fat relative to the diet low in monounsaturated fat (−0.28, 95% CI −0.59 to −0.04, p = 0.025). Patients consuming the diet high in monounsaturated fat also had significantly higher concentrations of apolipoprotein AI, and their C-reactive protein was significantly lower. No treatment differences were seen for triglycerides, other lipids or body weight, and mean weight loss was similar for the diets high in monounsaturated fat (−0.8 kg) and low in monounsaturated fat (−1.2 kg). Interpretation Monounsaturated fat increased the effectiveness of a cholesterol-lowering dietary portfolio, despite statin-like reductions in LDL cholesterol. The potential benefits for cardiovascular risk were

  14. Variants with large effects on blood lipids and the role of cholesterol and triglycerides in coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Helgadottir, Anna; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hjartarson, Eirikur; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Magnusdottir, Audur; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Kristjansson, Helgi; Sulem, Patrick; Oddsson, Asmundur; Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Rafnar, Thorunn; Masson, Gisli; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Olafsson, Isleifur; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Daneshpour, Maryam S; Khalili, Davood; Azizi, Fereidoun; Swinkels, Dorine W; Kiemeney, Lambertus; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Levey, Allan I; Patel, Riyaz S; Hayek, Salim S; Gudmundsdottir, Ingibjorg J; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-06-01

    Sequence variants affecting blood lipids and coronary artery disease (CAD) may enhance understanding of the atherogenicity of lipid fractions. Using a large resource of whole-genome sequence data, we examined rare and low-frequency variants for association with non-HDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides in up to 119,146 Icelanders. We discovered 13 variants with large effects (within ANGPTL3, APOB, ABCA1, NR1H3, APOA1, LIPC, CETP, LDLR, and APOC1) and replicated 14 variants. Five variants within PCSK9, APOA1, ANGPTL4, and LDLR associate with CAD (33,090 cases and 236,254 controls). We used genetic risk scores for the lipid fractions to examine their causal relationship with CAD. The non-HDL cholesterol genetic risk score associates most strongly with CAD (P = 2.7 × 10(-28)), and no other genetic risk score associates with CAD after accounting for non-HDL cholesterol. The genetic risk score for non-HDL cholesterol confers CAD risk beyond that of LDL cholesterol (P = 5.5 × 10(-8)), suggesting that targeting atherogenic remnant cholesterol may reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:27135400

  15. Gender differences in 7 years trends in cholesterol lipoproteins and lipids in India: Insights from a hospital database

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rajeev; Sharma, Madhawi; Goyal, Neeraj Krishna; Bansal, Preeti; Lodha, Sailesh; Sharma, Krishna Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine gender differences and secular trends in total, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high DL (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides using a large hospital database in India. Methods: All blood lipid tests evaluated from July 2007 to December 2014 were analyzed. Details of gender and age were available. Statin therapy was obtained at two separate periods. Trends were calculated using linear regression and Mantel-Haenszel X2. Results: Data of 67395 subjects (men 49,904, women 17,491) aged 51 ± 12 years were analyzed. Mean levels (mg/dl) were total cholesterol 174.7 ± 45, LDL cholesterol 110.7 ± 38, non-HDL cholesterol 132.1 ± 44.8, HDL cholesterol 44.1 ± 10, triglycerides 140.8 ± 99, and total: HDL cholesterol 4.44 ± 1.5. Various dyslipidemias in men/women were total cholesterol ≥200 mg/dl 25.4/36.4%, LDL cholesterol ≥130 mg/dl 28.1/35.0% and ≥100 mg/dl 54.4/66.4%, non-HDL cholesterol ≥160 mg/dl 25.5/29.6%, HDL cholesterol <40/50 mg/dl 54.4/64.4%, and triglycerides ≥150 mg/dl 34.0/26.8%. Cholesterol lipoproteins declined over 7 years with greater decline in men versus women for cholesterol (Blinearregression = −0.82 vs. −0.33, LDL cholesterol (−1.01 vs. −0.65), non-HDL cholesterol (−0.88 vs. −0.52), and total: HDL cholesterol (−0.02 vs. −0.01). In men versus women there was greater decline in prevalence of hypercholesterolemia (X2trend 74.5 vs. 1.60), LDL cholesterol ≥130 mg/dl (X2trend 415.5 vs. 25.0) and ≥100 mg/dl (X2trend 501.5 vs. 237.4), non-HDL cholesterol (X2trend 77.4 vs. 6.85), total: HDL cholesterol (X2trend 212.7 vs. 10.5) and high triglycerides (X2trend 10.8 vs. 6.15) (P < 0.01). Use of statins was in 2.6% (36/1405) in 2008 and 9.0% (228/2527) in 2014 (P < 0.01). Statin use was significantly lower in women (5.8%) than men (10.3%). Conclusions: In a large hospital - database we observed greater hypercholesterolemia and low HDL cholesterol in women. Mean levels and prevalence of high total, LDL, non-HDL

  16. The clinical significance of preoperative serum cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shan-Shan; Weng, De-Sheng; Jiang, Long; Zhang, Yao-Jun; Pan, Ke; Pan, Qiu-Zhong; Chen, Chang-Long; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Tang, Yan; Zhou, Zi-Qi; Chen, Min-Shan; Xia, Jian-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic role of the preoperative plasma lipid profile, including low-density lipoprotein -cholesterol [LDL-C], high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol [HDL-C], cholesterol, and triglycerides, in hepatocellular carcinoma patients undergoing radical resection. Methods: Clinical data, including the preoperative plasma profile levels, were retrospectively collected and reviewed in 1411 hepatocellular carcinoma patients, who underwent operation between 2001 and 2010. Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards regression model were used in analyzing the DFS and OS. Results: We found that HDL-C ≤ 0.88 mmol/L and cholesterol ≤ 4.420 mmol/L were preoperative risk factors of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). A decreased CHO level was significantly associated with decreased OS (HR, 0.800; 95% CI, (0.691-0.926), P =0.003) and decreased DFS (HR, 0.844; 95% CI, 0.737-0.966, P=0.012). Additionally, an increased HDL-C level was shown significant association with increased OS (HR, 0.679; 95% CI, 0.570-0.808, P<0.01) and DFS (HR, 2.085; 95% CI, 1.271- 3.422, P = 0.002). In the univariate and multivariate analyses involving OS and DFS, no significant relativity were observed between the LDL-C and TG groups. Conclusions: Decreased levels of CHO and HDL might predict worse outcomes both DFS and OS for hepatocellular carcinoma patients. PMID:27076843

  17. Six new loci associated with blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglycerides in humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and blood triglycerides reflect key metabolic processes including sensitivity to insulin. Blood lipoprotein and lipid concentrations are heritable. To date, the identification o...

  18. AIBP: A Novel Molecule at the Interface of Cholesterol Transport, Angiogenesis, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Laurence; Fang, Longhou

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, which is often driven by hypercholesterolemia and subsequent coronary atherosclerosis, is the number-one cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Based on long-term epidemiological studies, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are inversely correlated with risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). HDL-mediated reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is responsible for cholesterol removal from the peripheral tissues and return to the liver for final elimination.1 In atherosclerosis, intraplaque angiogenesis promotes plaque growth and increases plaque vulnerability. Conceivably, the acceleration of RCT and disruption of intraplaque angiogenesis would inhibit atherosclerosis and reduce CAD. We have identified a protein called apoA-I binding protein (AIBP) that augments HDL functionality by accelerating cholesterol efflux. Furthermore, AIBP inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 activation in endothelial cells and limits angiogenesis.2 The following discusses the prospect of using AIBP as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of CAD. PMID:26634023

  19. A naturally occurring variant of endothelial lipase associated with elevated HDL exhibits impaired synthesis[S

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert J.; Edmondson, Andrew C.; Griffon, Nathalie; Hill, Theophelus B.; Fuki, Ilia V.; Badellino, Karen O.; Li, Mingyao; Wolfe, Megan L.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Rader, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    Human endothelial lipase (EL) is a member of a family of lipases and phospholipases that are involved in the metabolism of plasma lipoproteins. EL displays a preference to hydrolyze lipids in HDL. We report here that a naturally occurring low frequency coding variant in the EL gene (LIPG), glycine-26 to serine (G26S), is significantly more common in African-American individuals with elevated HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. To test the hypothesis that this variant results in reduced EL function, we extensively characterized and compared the catalytic and noncatalytic functions of the G26S variant and wild-type (WT) EL. While the catalytic-specific activity of G26S EL is similar to WT EL, its secretion is markedly reduced. Consistent with this observation, we found that carriers of the G26S variant had significantly reduced plasma levels of EL protein. Thus, this N-terminal variant results in reduced secretion of EL protein, plausibly leading to increased HDL-C levels. PMID:19411705

  20. Association between lipids, lipoproteins composition of HDL particles and triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, and LCAT and CETP activity in post-renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Kimak, Elżbieta; Bylina, Jerzy; Solski, Janusz; Hałabiś, Magdalena; Baranowicz-Gąszczyk, Iwona; Książek, Andrzej

    2013-11-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) remodeling within the plasma compartment and the association between lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) activity, and lipid, lipoprotein concentrations and composition were investigated. The aim was to examine the high sensitivity of C-reactive protein (hsCRP), lipid, apolipoprotein B (apoB), apoAI, total apoAII, apoAIInonB, apoB-containing apoAII (apoB:AII), total apoCIII, apoCIIInonB, apoB-containing apoCIII (apoB:CIII) concentration and LCAT and CETP activity to gain an insight into the association between them and LCAT and CETP, 57 post-renal transplant (Tx) patients with and without statin therapy and in 15 healthy subjects. Tx patients had moderate hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and dyslipoproteinemia, disturbed triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) and HDL composition, decreased LCAT, and slightly increased hsCRP but no CETP activity. Spearman's correlation test showed the association between lipids and lipoproteins and LCAT or CETP, and multiple ridge stepwise forward regression showed that immunosuppressive therapy in Tx patients can disturb HDL and TRLs composition. The results suggest that inhibition or activation of LCAT is due, in part, to HDL-associated lipoprotein. Lipoprotein composition of apoAI, apoAIInonB, and apoCIIInonB in HDL particle and apoB:AII TRLs can contribute to decrease LCAT mass in Tx patients. Tx patients without statin and with lower triglycerides but higher HDL cholesterol concentration and disturbed lipoprotein composition of ApoAI and apoAII in HDL particle can decrease LCAT, increase LDL cholesterol, aggravate renal graft, and accelerate atherosclerosis and chronic heart diseases. PMID:23479335

  1. Comparison of once-daily, niacin extended-release/lovastatin with standard doses of atorvastatin and simvastatin (the ADvicor Versus Other Cholesterol-Modulating Agents Trial Evaluation [ADVOCATE]).

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E; Dujovne, Carlos A; McGovern, Mark E; White, T Eric; Kashyap, Moti L; Hutcheson, A Gene; Crouse, John R

    2003-03-15

    This study compared the relative efficacy of a once-daily niacin extended-release (ER)/lovastatin fixed-dose combination with standard doses of atorvastatin or simvastatin, with a special emphasis on relative starting doses. Subjects (n = 315) with elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol blood levels (defined as LDL cholesterol blood levels > or =160 mg/dl without coronary artery disease, or > or =130 mg/dl if coronary artery disease was present, and HDL cholesterol <45 mg/dl in men and <50 mg/dl in women) were randomized to atorvastatin, simvastatin, or niacin ER/lovastatin for 16 weeks. The primary efficacy variables were the mean percent change in LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol levels from baseline. After 8 weeks, the starting dose niacin ER/lovastatin 1,000/40 mg and the 10-mg starting dose atorvastatin both lowered mean LDL cholesterol by 38%. After 12 weeks, niacin ER/lovastatin 1,000/40 mg lowered LDL cholesterol by 42% versus 34% with the 20-mg starting dose of simvastatin (p <0.001). Niacin ER/lovastatin increased HDL cholesterol significantly more than atorvastatin or simvastatin at all compared doses (p <0.001). Niacin ER/lovastatin also provided significant improvements in triglycerides, lipoprotein(a), apolipoprotein A-1, apolipoprotein B, and HDL subfractions. A total of 6% of study subjects receiving niacin ER/lovastatin withdrew because of flushing. No significant differences were seen among study groups in discontinuance due to elevated liver enzymes. No drug-induced myopathy was observed. Niacin ER/lovastatin was comparable to atorvastatin 10 mg and more effective than simvastatin 20 mg in reducing LDL cholesterol, was more effective in increasing HDL cholesterol than either atorvastatin or simvastatin, and provided greater global improvements in non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and lipoprotein(a). PMID:12633795

  2. Increased hepatic cholesterol esterification with essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD): relationship to plasma lipoprotein (LP) cholesterol content

    SciTech Connect

    Ney, D.M.; Ziboh, V.A.; Schneeman, B.O.

    1986-03-01

    EFAD in the rat is associated with hepatic accumulation of esterified cholesterol and altered distribution of cholesterol between plasma and hepatic tissue. Little is known regarding the impact of EFAD on LP composition. To determine the relationship between hepatic cholesterol esterification and plasma lP composition in control (C) and EFAD male Wistar rats, the authors induced EFAD with continuous intragastric (IG) infusion of EFA-free solutions containing 3.5% of calories as triolein for 7 and 14 days. C animals received IG infusion of solutions containing 3.5% of calories as linoleic acid. Data in the EFAD groups reveal: (i) marked decreases in hepatic EFAs and increases in monoenoic acids; (ii) progressive increases in hepatic content of triglyceride and esterified cholesterol with 7 and 14 days of feeding; (iii) assay of acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase activity in hepatic tissue using /sup 14/C-cholesterol demonstrates an increase in hepatic cholesterol esterification when compared to C animals. Increased hepatic cholesterol esterification correlates with elevated levels of esterified cholesterol in plasma VLDL and HDL particles. These data indicate that the elevated levels of cholesterol esters in LP particles is due, at least in part, to increased hepatic cholesterol esterification with EFAD.

  3. Folded Functional Lipid-Poor Apolipoprotein A-I Obtained by Heating of High-Density Lipoproteins: Relevance to HDL Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Shobini; Cavigiolio, Giorgio; Gursky, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis High-density lipoproteins (HDL) remove cell cholesterol and protect from atherosclerosis. The major HDL protein is apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I). Most plasma apoA-I circulates in lipoproteins, yet ~5% forms monomeric lipid-poor/free species. This metabolically active species is a primary cholesterol acceptor and is central to HDL biogenesis. Structural properties of lipid-poor apoA-I are unclear due to difficulties in isolating this transient species. We used thermal denaturation of human HDL to produce lipid-poor apoA-I. Analysis of the isolated lipid-poor fraction showed protein:lipid weight ratio 3:1, with apoA-I, phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol ester at approximate molar ratios of 1:8:1. Compared to lipid-free apoA-I, lipid-poor apoA-I showed slightly altered secondary structure and aromatic packing, reduced thermodynamic stability, lower self-associating propensity, increased adsorption to phospholipid surface, and comparable ability to remodel phospholipids and form reconstituted HDL. Lipid-poor apoA-I can be formed by heating of either plasma or reconstituted HDL. We propose the first structural model of lipid-poor apoA-I which corroborates its distinct biophysical properties and postulates the lipid-induced ordering of the labile C-terminal region. In summary, HDL heating produces folded functional monomolecular lipid-poor apoA-I that is distinct from lipid-free apoA-I. Increased adsorption to phospholipid surface and reduced C-terminal disorder may help direct lipid-poor apoA-I towards HDL biogenesis. PMID:22150513

  4. Separation of the principal HDL subclasses by iodixanol ultracentrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Harman, Nicola L.; Griffin, Bruce A.; Davies, Ian G.

    2013-01-01

    HDL subclasses detection, in cardiovascular risk, has been limited due to the time-consuming nature of current techniques. We have developed a time-saving and reliable separation of the principal HDL subclasses employing iodixanol density gradient ultracentrifugation (IxDGUC) combined with digital photography. HDL subclasses were separated in 2.5 h from prestained plasma on a three-step iodixanol gradient. HDL subclass profiles were generated by digital photography and gel scan software. Plasma samples (n = 46) were used to optimize the gradient for the resolution of HDL heterogeneity and to compare profiles generated by IxDGUC with gradient gel electrophoresis (GGE); further characterization from participants (n = 548) with a range of lipid profiles was also performed. HDL subclass profiles generated by IxDGUC were comparable to those separated by GGE as indicated by a significant association between areas under the curve for both HDL2 and HDL3 (HDL2, r = 0.896, P < 0.01; HDL3, r = 0.894, P < 0.01). The method was highly reproducible, with intra- and interassay coefficient of variation percentage < 5 for percentage area under the curve HDL2 and HDL3, and < 1% for peak Rf and peak density. The method provides time-saving and cost-effective detection and preparation of the principal HDL subclasses. PMID:23690506

  5. Plasma cholesterol efflux capacity from human THP-1 macrophages is reduced in HIV-infected patients: impact of HAART[S

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Petra; Ghislain, Mathilde; Villard, Elise F.; Le Goff, Wilfried; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Yeni, Patrick; Meyer, Laurence; Vigouroux, Corinne; Goujard, Cécile; Guerin, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of HDL to remove cholesterol from macrophages is inversely associated with the severity of angiographic coronary artery disease. The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or its treatment on the ability of HDL particles to stimulate cholesterol efflux from human macrophages has never been studied. We evaluated the capacity of whole plasma and isolated HDL particles from HIV-infected subjects (n = 231) and uninfected controls (n = 200), as well as in a subset of 41 HIV subjects receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) to mediate cholesterol efflux from human macrophages. Plasma cholesterol efflux capacity was reduced (−12%; P = 0.001) in HIV patients as compared with controls. HIV infection reduced by 27% (P < 0.05) the capacity of HDL subfractions to promote cholesterol efflux from macrophages. We observed a reduced ABCA1-dependent efflux capacity of plasma (−27%; P < 0.0001) from HIV-infected subjects as a result of a reduction in the efflux capacity of HDL3 particles. HAART administration restored the capacity of plasma from HIV patients to stimulate cholesterol efflux from human macrophages (9.4%; P = 0.04). During HIV infection, the capacity of whole plasma to remove cholesterol from macrophages is reduced, thus potentially contributing to the increased coronary heart disease in the HIV population. HAART administration restored the removal of cholesterol from macrophages by increasing HDL functionality. PMID:25573889

  6. Inhibition of intestinal absorption of cholesterol by ezetimibe or bile acids by SC-435 alters lipoprotein metabolism and extends the lifespan of SR-BI/apoE double knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Braun, Anne; Yesilaltay, Ayce; Acton, Susan; Broschat, Kay O; Krul, Elaine S; Napawan, Nida; Stagliano, Nancy; Krieger, Monty

    2008-05-01

    SR-BI/apoE double knockout (dKO) mice exhibit many features of human coronary heart disease (CHD), including hypercholesterolemia, occlusive coronary atherosclerosis, cardiac hypertrophy, myocardial infarctions, cardiac dysfunction and premature death. Ezetimibe is a FDA-approved, intestinal cholesterol absorption inhibitor that lowers plasma LDL cholesterol in humans and animals and inhibits aortic root atherosclerosis in apoE KO mice, but has not been proven to reduce CHD. Three-week-ezetimibe treatment of dKO mice (0.005% (w/w) in standard chow administered from weaning) resulted in a 35% decrease in cholesterol in IDL/LDL-size lipoproteins, but not in VLDL- and HDL-size lipoproteins. Ezetimibe treatment significantly reduced aortic root (57%) and coronary arterial (68%) atherosclerosis, cardiomegaly (24%) and cardiac fibrosis (57%), and prolonged the lives of the mice (27%). This represents the first demonstration of beneficial effects of ezetimibe treatment on CHD. The dKO mice were similarly treated with SC-435 (0.01% (w/w)), an apical sodium codependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) inhibitor, that blocks intestinal absorption of bile acids, lowers plasma cholesterol in animals, and reduces aortic root atherosclerosis in apoE KO mice. The effects of SC-435 treatment were similar to those of ezetimibe: 37% decrease in ILD/LDL-size lipoprotein cholesterol and 57% prolongation in median lifespan. Thus, inhibition of intestinal absorption of either cholesterol (ezetimibe) or bile acids (SC-435) significantly reduced plasma IDL/LDL-size lipoprotein cholesterol levels and improved survival of SR-BI/apoE dKO mice. The SR-BI/apoE dKO murine model of atherosclerotic occlusive, arterial CHD appears to provide a useful system to evaluate compounds that modulate cholesterol homeostasis and atherosclerosis. PMID:18054357

  7. Urinary Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Urinary Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... dysfunction is normal following initial therapy for localized prostate cancer. But it’s important to realize that not all ...

  8. Anti-inflammatory and cholesterol-reducing properties of apolipoprotein mimetics: a review.

    PubMed

    White, C Roger; Garber, David W; Anantharamaiah, G M

    2014-10-01

    Reduced levels of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) are a strong independent predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. The major anti-atherogenic function of HDL is to mediate reverse cholesterol transport. This response is highly dependent on apoA-I and apoE, protein components of HDL. Randomized clinical trials have assessed effects of several classes of drugs on plasma cholesterol levels in CAD patients. Agents including cholestyramine, fibrates, niacin, and statins significantly lower LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and induce modest increases in HDL-C, but tolerance issues and undesirable side effects are common. Additionally, residual risk may be present in patients with persistently low HDL-C and other complications despite a reduction in LDL-C. These observations have fueled interest in the development of new pharmacotherapies that positively impact circulating lipoproteins. The goal of this review is to discuss the therapeutic potential of synthetic apolipoprotein mimetic peptides. These include apoA-I mimetic peptides that have undergone initial clinical assessment. We also discuss newer apoE mimetics that mediate the clearance of atherogenic lipids from the circulation and possess anti-inflammatory properties. One of these (AEM-28) has recently been given orphan drug status and is undergoing clinical trials. PMID:25157031

  9. Anti-inflammatory and cholesterol-reducing properties of apolipoprotein mimetics: a review

    PubMed Central

    White, C. Roger; Garber, David W.; Anantharamaiah, G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced levels of HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) are a strong independent predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. The major anti-atherogenic function of HDL is to mediate reverse cholesterol transport. This response is highly dependent on apoA-I and apoE, protein components of HDL. Randomized clinical trials have assessed effects of several classes of drugs on plasma cholesterol levels in CAD patients. Agents including cholestyramine, fibrates, niacin, and statins significantly lower LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and induce modest increases in HDL-C, but tolerance issues and undesirable side effects are common. Additionally, residual risk may be present in patients with persistently low HDL-C and other complications despite a reduction in LDL-C. These observations have fueled interest in the development of new pharmacotherapies that positively impact circulating lipoproteins. The goal of this review is to discuss the therapeutic potential of synthetic apolipoprotein mimetic peptides. These include apoA-I mimetic peptides that have undergone initial clinical assessment. We also discuss newer apoE mimetics that mediate the clearance of atherogenic lipids from the circulation and possess anti-inflammatory properties. One of these (AEM-28) has recently been given orphan drug status and is undergoing clinical trials. PMID:25157031

  10. Absorption and transport of cholesterol autoxidation derivatives in rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, S.K.; Morin, R.J.; Phillips, G.A.; Xia, G.Z.

    1986-03-01

    Spontaneously autoxidized products of cholesterol have been demonstrated to be angiotoxic and possibly atherogenic. This study investigates the absorption and transport of these cholesterol oxidation derivatives (COD's) as compared to cholesterol. /sup 14/C-labeled cholesterol autoxidized by incubation in a 60/sup 0/C water bath for 5 weeks, then suspended in gelatin and given to New Zealand white rabbits by gastric gavage. Rabbits were sacrificed 24 hours after treatment. COD's were separated by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and radioactivities of each COD and cholesterol were measured. Percentages of each COD and cholesterol in the original mixture before administration and in the rabbits' serum after administration are almost identical, suggesting that the rates of absorption of COD's are not significantly different from that of cholesterol. Lipoproteins were fractionated by ultracentrifugation into VLDL, LDL and HDL. Radioactivities of each COD separated by TLC in each lipoprotein fraction showed that cholestane-3..beta..,5..cap alpha..,6..beta..-triol, 7..cap alpha..- and 7..beta..-hydroxycholesterol and 7-ketocholesterol were predominantly present in VLDL (3 x serum concentration) and 25-hydroxycholesterol was predominantly in LDL (2.5 x serum concentration). HDL contained only minute amounts of COD's. The increased levels of COD's in VLDL and LDL may contribute to the atherogenicity of these lipoprotein.

  11. HDL in sepsis – risk factor and therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Emily E.; Guo, Ling; Schwendeman, Anna; Li, Xiang-An

    2015-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a key component of circulating blood and plays essential roles in regulation of vascular endothelial function and immunity. Clinical data demonstrate that HDL levels drop by 40–70% in septic patients, which is associated with a poor prognosis. Experimental studies using Apolipoprotein A-I (ApoAI) null mice showed that HDL deficient mice are susceptible to septic death, and overexpressing ApoAI in mice to increase HDL levels protects against septic death. These clinical and animal studies support our hypothesis that a decrease in HDL level is a risk factor for sepsis, and raising circulating HDL levels may provide an efficient therapy for sepsis. In this review, we discuss the roles of HDL in sepsis and summarize the efforts of using synthetic HDL as a potential therapy for sepsis. PMID:26557091

  12. Kidney Function as a Determinant of HDL and Triglyceride Concentrations in the Australian Population

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Michael; Ray, Udayan; Yu, Richard; Hudspeth, Andrew; Smillie, Michael; Jordan, Neville; Bartle, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a potent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD risk increases in a stepwise manner with increasing kidney impairment and is significantly reduced by kidney transplantation, suggesting a causal relationship. Dyslipidemia, a well recognised CVD risk factor, is highly prevalent in CKD. While dyslipidemia is a risk factor for CKD, kidney impairment can also induce a dyslipidemic state that may contribute to the excess burden of CVD in CKD. We utilised a multipronged approach to determine whether a causal relationship exists. Materials and Methods: Retrospective case-control analysis of 816 patients admitted to the Royal Hobart Hospital in 2008–2009 with different degrees of kidney impairment and retrospective before-after cohort analysis of 60 patients who received a transplanted kidney between 1999 and 2009. Results: Decreased estimated GFR (eGFR) was independently associated with decreased high density lipoprotein (HDL, p < 0.0001) and increased triglyceride concentrations (p < 0.01) in multivariate analysis. There was no significant relationship between eGFR and low density lipoprotein (LDL) or total cholesterol in multivariate analysis. Kidney transplantation increased HDL (p < 0.0001) and decreased triglyceride (p = 0.007) concentration, whereas there was no significant change in LDL and total cholesterol. These effects were dependent on maintenance of graft function, statin therapy (those who were on) if graft failure occurred then HDL again decreased and triglycerides increased. Conclusions: Kidney transplantation ameliorated alterations in plasma lipoprotein profile associated with kidney impairment, an effect that was dependent on the maintenance of graft function. These data suggest that kidney function is a determinant of HDL and triglyceride concentrations in patients with CKD. PMID:27005668

  13. Association between cholesterol efflux capacity and coronary restenosis after successful stent implantation.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Satoshi; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Takata, Kohei; Takamiya, Yosuke; Kuwano, Takashi; Sugihara, Makoto; Ike, Amane; Iwata, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-08-01

    The measurement of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) functionality could be useful for identifying patients who have an increased risk of coronary restenosis after stent implantation. In the present study, we elucidates whether HDL functionality can predict restenosis. The participants included 48 consecutive patients who had stable angina and were successfully implanted with a drug-eluting stent (DES) or bare-metal stent. Follow-up coronary angiography was performed after 6-8 months of stenting. Cholesterol efflux and the anti-inflammatory capacity of HDL were measured before stenting (at baseline) and at follow-up. The mean age was 64 ± 11 years and the body mass index was 24 ± 3 kg/m(2). While HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) significantly increased from baseline to follow-up, there was no significant association between HDL-C level at baseline and in-stent late loss. Cholesterol efflux capacity was significantly increased from baseline to follow-up. The efflux capacity at baseline was negatively correlated with in-stent late loss, whereas the anti-oxidative activity of HDL at baseline was not associated with in-stent late loss. We analyzed the predictors of in-stent late loss using independent variables (efflux capacity and anti-oxidative capacity at baseline in addition to age, gender, HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol at baseline, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, lesion length and DES implantation, history of myocardial infarction and prior percutaneous coronary intervention) by a multiple regression analysis. The efflux capacity at baseline was only independently associated with in-stent late loss. In conclusion, cholesterol efflux capacity at baseline could predict coronary restenosis in patients with successful stent implantation. PMID:26337618

  14. Printed Circuit Board Design with HDL Designer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkert, Thomas K.; LaFourcade, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Staying up to date with the latest CAD tools both from a cost and time perspective is difficult. Within a given organization there may be experts in Printed Circuit Board Design tools and experts in FPGA/VHDL tools. Wouldn't it be great to have someone familiar with HDL Designer be able to design PCBs without having to learn another tool? This paper describes a limited experiment to do this.

  15. Plasma lipoprotein composition in alcoholic hepatitis: accumulation of apolipoprotein E-rich high density lipoprotein and preferential reappearance of "light'-HDL during partial recovery.

    PubMed

    Weidman, S W; Ragland, J B; Sabesin, S M

    1982-05-01

    Abnormal lipoproteins accumulate in the plasma of alcoholic hepatitis patients in association with a deficiency of the cholesterol esterifying enzyme, lecithin:cholesterol acyl-transferase. Most of these abnormal lipoproteins are found in the d > 1.006 g/ml density fraction. To investigate the composition and morphology of the lipoproteins at various times during the illness in four patients, we have employed density gradient ultracentrifugation combined with analyses of gradient fractions by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, electroimmunoassay, and electron microscopy. At the onset of the illness, plasma cholesteryl esters ranged from 19-34% of total cholesterol; high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and apoA-I, the major HDL apoprotein, were <10% of normal; and most of the d > 1.006 g/ml triglycerides and phospholipids were found in the LDL density region. A linear correlation (r = 0.964, P < 0.001) was found between the d > 1.006 g/ml apoB concentration and the summation of the triglyceride and esterified cholesterol for that fraction, indicating a constant ratio of apoB to the summation of these two "core lipids". ApoA-I was primarily found in the fraction d > 1.18 g/ml (HDL(3) and VHDL) but not at all in the HDL(2) density range of the gradient. No cholesteryl esters were present in the apoA-I containing fractions. In contrast to normal, large amounts of apoE accumulated in lipoproteins isolated at d 1.055-1.114 g/ml. The apoE-rich fractions contained primarily phospholipids and unesterified cholesterol; they appeared by electron microscopy to be mixtures of spherical particles, vesicular particles, and chains of bilamellar discs. Analyses of the density gradient fractions by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions indicated that apoA-II levels and distribution paralleled apoA-I, not apoE, providing evidence against appreciable concentrations of apoE-apoA-II complexes. During partial recovery from alcoholic hepatitis in three

  16. Innovative pharmaceutical interventions in cardiovascular disease: Focusing on the contribution of non-HDL-C/LDL-C-lowering versus HDL-C-raising: A systematic review and meta-analysis of relevant preclinical studies and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kühnast, Susan; Fiocco, Marta; van der Hoorn, José W A; Princen, Hans M G; Jukema, J Wouter

    2015-09-15

    Non-HDL-cholesterol is well recognised as a primary causal risk factor in cardiovascular disease. However, despite consistent epidemiological evidence for an inverse association between HDL-C and coronary heart disease, clinical trials aimed at raising HDL-C (AIM-HIGH, HPS2-THRIVE, dal-OUTCOMES) failed to meet their primary goals. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated the effects of established and novel treatment strategies, specifically targeting HDL, on inhibition of atherosclerosis in cholesteryl ester transfer protein-expressing animals, and the prevention of clinical events in randomised controlled trials. Linear regression analyses using data from preclinical studies revealed associations for TC and non-HDL-C and lesion area (R(2)=0.258, P=0.045; R(2)=0.760, P<0.001), but not for HDL-C (R(2)=0.030, P=0.556). In clinical trials, non-fatal myocardial infarction risk was significantly less in the treatment group with pooled odd ratios of 0.87 [0.81; 0.94] for all trials and 0.85 [0.78; 0.93] after excluding some trials due to off-target adverse events, whereas all-cause mortality was not affected (OR 1.05 [0.99-1.10]). Meta-regression analyses revealed a trend towards an association between between-group differences in absolute change from baseline in LDL-C and non-fatal myocardial infarction (P=0.066), whereas no correlation was found for HDL-C (P=0.955). We conclude that the protective role of lowering LDL-C and non-HDL-C is well-established. The contribution of raising HDL-C on inhibition of atherosclerosis and the prevention of cardiovascular disease remains undefined and may be dependent on the mode of action of HDL-C-modification. Nonetheless, treatment strategies aimed at improving HDL function and raising apolipoprotein A-I may be worth exploring. PMID:25989133

  17. Serum Cholesterol and Variant in Cholesterol-Related Gene CETP Predict White Matter Microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Warstadt, Nicholus M.; Dennis, Emily L.; Jahanshad, Neda; Kohannim, Omid; Nir, Talia M.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Henders, Anjali K.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Whitfield, John B.; Jack, Clifford R.; Bernstein, Matt A.; Weiner, Michael W.; Toga, Arthur W.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Several common genetic variants influence cholesterol levels, which play a key role in overall health. Myelin synthesis and maintenance are highly sensitive to cholesterol concentrations, and abnormal cholesterol levels increase the risk for various brain diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). We report significant associations between higher serum cholesterol (CHOL) levels and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and higher fractional anisotropy in 403 young adults (23.8±2.4 years) scanned with diffusion imaging and anatomical MRI at 4 Tesla. By fitting a multi-locus genetic model within white matter areas associated with CHOL, we found that a set of 18 cholesterol-related SNPs implicated in AD risk predicted FA. We focused on the SNP with the largest individual effects - CETP (rs5882) – and found that increased G-allele dosage was associated with higher FA and lower radial and mean diffusivities in voxel-wise analyses of the whole brain. A follow-up analysis detected WM associations with rs5882 in the opposite direction in 78 older individuals (74.3±7.3 years). Cholesterol levels may influence WM integrity, and cholesterol-related genes may exert age-dependent effects. PMID:24997672

  18. Streptococcal serum opacity factor promotes cholesterol ester metabolism and bile acid secretion in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Baiba K; Rodriguez, Perla J; Fields, David W; Raya, Joe L; Lagor, William R; Rosales, Corina; Courtney, Harry S; Gotto, Antonio M; Pownall, Henry J

    2016-03-01

    Plasma high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations negatively correlate with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. HDL is thought to have several atheroprotective functions, which are likely distinct from the epidemiological inverse relationship between HDL-C levels and risk. Specifically, strategies that reduce HDL-C while promoting reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) may have therapeutic value. The major product of the serum opacity factor (SOF) reaction versus HDL is a cholesteryl ester (CE)-rich microemulsion (CERM), which contains apo E and the CE of ~400,000 HDL particles. Huh7 hepatocytes take up CE faster when delivered as CERM than as HDL, in part via the LDL-receptor (LDLR). Here we compared the final RCT step, hepatic uptake and subsequent intracellular processing to cholesterol and bile salts for radiolabeled HDL-, CERM- and LDL-CE by Huh7 cells and in vivo in C57BL/6J mice. In Huh7 cells, uptake from LDL was greater than from CERM (2-4X) and HDL (5-10X). Halftimes for [(14)C]CE hydrolysis were 3.0±0.2, 4.4±0.6 and 5.4±0.7h respectively for HDL, CERM and LDL-CE. The fraction of sterols secreted as bile acids was ~50% by 8h for all three particles. HDL, CERM and LDL-CE metabolism in mice showed efficient plasma clearance of CERM-CE, liver uptake and metabolism, and secretion as bile acids into the gall bladder. This work supports the therapeutic potential of the SOF reaction, which diverts HDL-CE to the LDLR, thereby increasing hepatic CE uptake, and sterol disposal as bile acids. PMID:26709142

  19. Antihyperlipidemic effect of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) protein isolate in rats fed a normal and high cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Arundhati; Dhar, Pubali; Ghosh, Santinath

    2010-01-01

    The dietary influence of sesame protein isolate (protein content 91.5%), produced from dehulled, defatted sesame meal, on blood and tissue lipid profile and lipid peroxidation has been assessed in normal and hypercholesterolemic rats. To evaluate their hypocholesterolemic and antioxidative activity in vivo, we fed 18% sesame protein isolate with or without 2% cholesterol in comparison with casein to rats for 28 d. We determined plasma total protein, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, triacylglycerol as well as susceptibility of plasma and erythrocyte membrane lipid to oxidation ex vivo. Liver tissue lipid, cholesterol, phospholipids, and lipid peroxidations were also determined. The total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were significantly reduced in the sesame protein isolate and isolate containing cholesterol group than the corresponding control casein groups. HDL-cholesterol level was also increased in sesame protein isolate (41%) and protein isolate containing cholesterol group (38%) than the corresponding control casein and casein containing cholesterol groups. There was 49% and 64% lowering of plasma lipid peroxidation as well as 36% and 56% lowering of lipoprotein oxidation susceptibility (LOS) in the 2 experimental groups (sesame protein isolate and isolate containing cholesterol group) than the corresponding control (casein and casein containing cholesterol) groups. There was significant lowering of erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation (68% and 63% lowering in sesame protein isolate and isolate containing cholesterol groups) and liver lipid peroxidation (61% and 76% lowering in the 2 experimental groups than the corresponding control casein groups). Therefore, our results indicate that sesame protein isolate decreases cholesterol concentration in plasma, increases HDL-cholesterol, and also decreases plasma and erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation with or

  20. All about Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... are several kinds of fats in your blood. • LDL cholesterol is sometimes called “bad” cholesterol. It can narrow ... medicine to manage blood fats. They help lower LDL cholesterol. They also help lower your risk for a ...

  1. High blood cholesterol levels

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000403.htm High blood cholesterol levels To use the sharing features on this page, ... called "bad" cholesterol For many people, abnormal cholesterol levels are partly due to an unhealthy lifestyle. This ...

  2. Competitive inhibition of LDL binding and uptake by HDL in aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.J.; Miguel, R.; Graham, D. )

    1990-09-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) may inhibit the binding and cellular uptake of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as one means of regulating the delivery of exogenous cholesterol to nonhepatic tissues. This may play an important role in atherogenesis, by altering lipid metabolism in cells of the arterial wall. To verify and better characterize this effect, endothelial cells were harvested from bovine aorta and maintained in tissue culture. Following initial preincubation in lipid-deficient culture media, these cells were incubated for 2 hr at 4 degrees C in media containing 125I-LDL (10 micrograms protein/ml) and varying concentrations of either HDL (0-400 micrograms protein/ml) or comparable amounts of Apoprotein A (Apo A), the major protein component of HDL. Intracellular and trypsin-released counts were assayed separately, as a measurement of cellular uptake and membrane bound LDL, respectively. Results of this study indicated an inhibition of LDL binding and uptake by HDL (P less than 0.005, ANOVA). A similar inhibition was found with Apo A alone (P less than 0.005). When identical studies were performed using 125I-Apoprotein B, the protein component of LDL, and Apo A, the latter was found to inhibit the binding of Apo B to the same extent (P less than 0.0006). These results indicate that HDL does inhibit LDL binding and uptake by bovine aortic endothelial cells and that, because this effect is seen equally with only the protein component of these lipoprotein particles, it is most likely due to competitive binding at the receptor level rather than to stearic hindrance or an alteration of the cell membrane.

  3. High-Density Lipoprotein Function Measurement in Human Studies: Focus on Cholesterol Efflux Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Rohatgi, Anand

    2015-01-01

    A low plasma level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) is a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). However, several observations have highlighted the shortcomings of using cholesterol content as the sole reflection of HDL metabolism. In particular, several large randomized controlled trials of extended release niacin and cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors on background statin therapy have failed to show improvement in ASCVD outcomes despite significant increases in HDL-C. Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is the principal HDL function that impacts macrophage foam cell formation and other functions such as endothelial activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, monocyte adhesion, and platelet aggregation. Cholesterol efflux from macrophages to plasma/serum reflects the first critical step of RCT and is considered a key anti-atherosclerotic function of HDL. Whether this function is operative in humans remains to be seen, but recent studies assessing cholesterol efflux in humans suggest that the cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) of human plasma or serum is a potent marker of ASCVD risk. This review describes the methodology of measuring CEC ex vivo from human samples and the findings to date linking CEC to human disease. Studies to date confirm that CEC can be reliably measured using stored human blood samples as cholesterol acceptors and suggest that CEC may be a promising new biomarker for atherosclerotic and metabolic diseases. Further studies are needed to standardize measurements and clarify the role CEC may play in predicting risk of developing disease and response to therapies. PMID:25968932

  4. High-Density Lipoprotein Function Measurement in Human Studies: Focus on Cholesterol Efflux Capacity.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, Anand

    2015-01-01

    A low plasma level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) is a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). However, several observations have highlighted the shortcomings of using cholesterol content as the sole reflection of HDL metabolism. In particular, several large randomized controlled trials of extended release niacin and cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors on background statin therapy have failed to show improvement in ASCVD outcomes despite significant increases in HDL-C. Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is the principal HDL function that impacts macrophage foam cell formation and other functions such as endothelial activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, monocyte adhesion, and platelet aggregation. Cholesterol efflux from macrophages to plasma/serum reflects the first critical step of RCT and is considered a key anti-atherosclerotic function of HDL. Whether this function is operative in humans remains to be seen, but recent studies assessing cholesterol efflux in humans suggest that the cholesterol efflux capacity (CEC) of human plasma or serum is a potent marker of ASCVD risk. This review describes the methodology of measuring CEC ex vivo from human samples and the findings to date linking CEC to human disease. Studies to date confirm that CEC can be reliably measured using stored human blood samples as cholesterol acceptors and suggest that CEC may be a promising new biomarker for atherosclerotic and metabolic diseases. Further studies are needed to standardize measurements and clarify the role CEC may play in predicting risk of developing disease and response to therapies. PMID:25968932

  5. Resveratrol Protects Rabbits Against Cholesterol Diet-Induced Hyperlipidaemia.

    PubMed

    Tanko, Y; Jimoh, A; Ahmed, A; Mohammed, A; Ayo, J O

    2016-01-01

    The excessive consumption of high cholesterol diet has been associated with an increased incidence oflipidaemia. Lipidaemia is enhanced by formation of oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation and hyperglycaemia. The aim ofthese experiments was to investigate the protective effect of resveratrol co-administered with cholesterol diet inducedhyperlipidaemia in rabbits. Thirty rabbits divided into six groups of five animal (group= 5) each: group 1 = normal control,group 2 = cholesterol diet/high fat diet group only (HFD), group 3 = resveratrol 200 mg/kg (R200), group 4 = resveratrol400 mg/kg (R400), group 5 = HFD + R200 and group 6 = HFD + R400. The normal group was fed with standard animalfeeds only; while the HFD groups were fed with standard animal feeds + cholesterol diet (10% Groundnut oil, 20%Groundnut mill and 2% cholesterol). Resveratrol-treated rabbits received resveratrol suspended in 10 g/Lcarboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and the control group received the vehicle only, CMC. The preparations were administeredfor 8 weeks of experimental protocol. At the end of the study period, the animals were sacrificed. Blood and plasma sampleswere collected. Serum evaluation of lipid profile such as total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerol (Tg), low density lipoproteincholesterol (LDP-c) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) were also assessed. The results obtained showsignificant (P < 0.05) decrease in total cholesterol (TC), Low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDP-c), total triacylglyceroland an increase in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) in resveratrol treated groups compared to HFD group only.In conclusion, the findings indicated that Resveratrol may contain polar products able to lower plasma lipid concentrationsand might be beneficial in treatment of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:27574767

  6. Prognostic Usefulness of Serum Cholesterol Efflux Capacity in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Xu, Jia; Wang, Jingfeng; Wu, Changhao; Xu, Yan; Wang, Yueguo; Deng, Fengfeng; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Xuhua; Wu, Mengzuo; Chen, Yangxin

    2016-02-15

    Cholesterol efflux capacity has been shown to have an inverse relation with coronary artery disease (CAD) and may overcome the limitations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels as a predictor for CAD risks. We investigated the predictive value of cholesterol efflux capacity for the prognosis of CAD. Serum cholesterol efflux capacity in 313 patients newly diagnosed with CAD by coronary angiography was measured, and all patients completed a 3-year follow-up. The primary clinical end points were nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, and cardiovascular mortality. The secondary clinical end points were class IV heart failure requiring hospitalization and coronary artery revascularization. Cholesterol efflux capacity was lower in patients with CAD compared with control group, and decreased cholesterol efflux capacity was associated with an increased risk of acute coronary syndrome (odds ratios, 0.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.14 to 0.46; p <0.01). There was no association between cholesterol efflux capacity and serum HDL cholesterol levels. Follow-up data showed that patients with CAD with lower cholesterol efflux capacity had higher primary clinical end point events (26 of 158 vs 8 of 155, p <0.01). Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analysis further showed that a decreased cholesterol efflux capacity was associated with an increased risk of the primary end point events regardless of adjustment. There was no association between cholesterol efflux capacity and the secondary end point events. In conclusion, the results provide the important clinical evidence that cholesterol efflux capacity is a predictive index for plaque stability and the prognosis of CAD, independent of HDL cholesterol levels. PMID:26718234

  7. In vivo efficacy of HDL-like nanolipid particles containing multivalent peptide mimetics of apolipoprotein A-I.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yannan; Black, Audrey S; Bonnet, David J; Maryanoff, Bruce E; Curtiss, Linda K; Leman, Luke J; Ghadiri, M Reza

    2014-10-01

    We have observed that molecular constructs based on multiple apoA-I mimetic peptides attached to a branched scaffold display promising anti-atherosclerosis functions in vitro. Building on these promising results, we now describe chronic in vivo studies to assess anti-atherosclerotic efficacy of HDL-like nanoparticles assembled from a trimeric construct, administered over 10 weeks either ip or orally to LDL receptor-null mice. When dosed ip, the trimer-based nanolipids markedly reduced plasma LDL-cholesterol levels by 40%, unlike many other apoA-I mimetic peptides, and were substantially atheroprotective. Surprisingly, these nanoparticles were also effective when administered orally at a dose of 75 mg/kg, despite the peptide construct being composed of l-amino acids and being undetectable in the plasma. The orally administered nanoparticles reduced whole aorta lesion areas by 55% and aortic sinus lesion volumes by 71%. Reductions in plasma cholesterol were due to the loss of non-HDL lipoproteins, while plasma HDL-cholesterol levels were increased. At a 10-fold lower oral dose, the nanoparticles were marginally effective in reducing atherosclerotic lesions. Intriguingly, analogous results were obtained with nanolipids of the corresponding monomeric peptide. These nanolipid formulations provide an avenue for developing orally efficacious therapeutic agents to manage atherosclerosis. PMID:24975585

  8. Reduction in Postoperative High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels in Children Undergoing the Fontan Operation

    PubMed Central

    Argraves, W. Scott; Graham, Eric M.; Slate, Elizabeth H.; Atz, Andrew M.; Bradley, Scott M.; McQuinn, Tim C.; Wilkerson, Brent A.; Wing, Shane B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the emerging relevance of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in the inflammatory cascade and vascular barrier integrity, HDL levels in children undergoing cardiac surgery are unexplored. As a measure of HDL levels, the HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) in single-ventricle patients was quantified before and after the Fontan operation, and it was determined whether relationships existed between the duration and the type of postoperative pleural effusions. The study prospectively enrolled 12 children undergoing the Fontan operation. Plasma HDL-C levels were measured before and after cardiopulmonary bypass. The outcome variables of interest were the duration and type of chest tube drainage (chylous vs. nonchylous). The Kendall rank correlation coefficient and the Wilcoxon rank sum test were used. There were 11 complete observations. The median preoperative HDL-C level for all the subjects was 30 mg/dl (range, 24–53 mg/dl), and the median postcardiopulmonary bypass level was 21 mg/dl (range, 14–46 mg/dl) (p = 0.004). There was a tendency toward a moderate inverse correlation (–0.42) between the postcardiopulmonary bypass HDL-C level and the duration of chest tube drainage, but the result was not statistically significant (p = 0.07). In the chylous effusion group, the median postcardiopulmonary bypass HDL-C tended to be lower (16 vs. 23 mg/dl; p = 0.09). After the Fontan operation, the plasma HDL-C levels in children are significantly reduced. It is reasonable to conclude that the reduction in HDL-C reflects reduced plasma levels of HDL particles, which may have pertinent implications in postoperative pleural effusions given the antiinflammatory and endothelial barrier functions of HDL. PMID:22411716

  9. [Cholesterol bound to high density lipoproteins: critical review of the methods of analysis and personal data].

    PubMed

    Orso Giacone, G

    1982-01-01

    It is widely known that atherosclerosis through its complication, i.e. heart and brain infarction, is at the present the main cause of death. The atherosclerotic process has been shown in correlation with hyperlipemia especially as far as the plasma lipoprotein cholesterol level is concerned. A preminent role in removing cholesterol from tissues and arterial walls then in preventing atherosclerosis is played by a specific class of plasma lipoproteins, the high density lipoproteins (HDL). Since the HDL-colesterol level seems to have an inverse correlation with the atherosclerotic disease it is of primary importance to define a reliable and reproducible technique to measure it. One of the aims of this paper was to examine the different methods now available for such a determination. This analysis has underlined the discrepancy among the reference values reported in the literature. However, all the authors agree that only the simultaneous measurement of total and HDL-colesterol levels is of prognostic value. Personal studies are here reported on the relationship between total and HDL-colesterol levels and risk factor of cardiovascular diseases. The two mentioned laboratory analyses have been performed on blood samples from 250 between male and female human subjects of different age. The obtained results show that the highest HDL-colesterol concentrations determined by a lipoprotein precipitation procedure with dextran sulphate, are typical in the first ten years of life both in male and in female, while the lowest levels of plasma HDL-cholesterol have been evintiated during the fifth decade of life, when the total cholesterol and the risk of cardiovascular complications rich the highest values. In a following set of investigations, the already examined blood parameters together with the risk factor values have been examined in two groups of subjects, the first one represented by adult healthy persons the second one by patients of similar age from a cardiovascular

  10. Xanthohumol Prevents Atherosclerosis by Reducing Arterial Cholesterol Content via CETP and Apolipoprotein E in CETP-Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Segawa, Shuichi; Ozaki, Moeko; Kobayashi, Naoyuki; Shigyo, Tatsuro; Chiba, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Background Xanthohumol is expected to be a potent anti-atherosclerotic agent due to its inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). In this study, we hypothesized that xanthohumol prevents atherosclerosis in vivo and used CETP-transgenic mice (CETP-Tg mice) to evaluate xanthohumol as a functional agent. Methodology/Principal Findings Two strains of mice, CETP-Tg and C57BL/6N (wild-type), were fed a high cholesterol diet with or without 0.05% (w/w) xanthohumol ad libitum for 18 weeks. In CETP-Tg mice, xanthohumol significantly decreased accumulated cholesterol in the aortic arch and increased HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) when compared to the control group (without xanthohumol). Xanthohumol had no significant effect in wild-type mice. CETP activity was significantly decreased after xanthohumol addition in CETP-Tg mice compared with the control group and it inversely correlated with HDL-C (%) (P<0.05). Furthermore, apolipoprotein E (apoE) was enriched in serum and the HDL-fraction in CETP-Tg mice after xanthohumol addition, suggesting that xanthohumol ameliorates reverse cholesterol transport via apoE-rich HDL resulting from CETP inhibition. Conclusions Our results suggest xanthohumol prevents cholesterol accumulation in atherogenic regions by HDL-C metabolism via CETP inhibition leading to apoE enhancement. PMID:23166663

  11. The very-high-density lipoprotein fraction of rabbit plasma is rich in tissue-derived cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Nanjee, M N; Miller, N E

    1991-11-01

    When plasma from rabbits, which several weeks earlier had been infused with [3H]cholesterol, was subjected to equilibrium density gradient ultracentrifugation, the specific radioactivity of cholesterol in the very-high-density lipoprotein (VHDL) fraction (d 1.22-1.32 g/ml) was three to 8-fold greater (mean, 5.5-fold; P less than 0.001) than that in high-density lipoproteins (HDL; d 1.06-1.21 g/ml). On size exclusion chromatography of plasma, no increase in specific radioactivity was seen in particles smaller than HDL. These findings suggest that those apolipoprotein-lipid complexes that dissociate from HDL during ultracentrifugation to form the VHDL fraction contain proportionately more tissue-derived cholesterol than do those that are more tightly bound to HDL. PMID:1932106

  12. Nonesterified phytosterols dissolved and recrystallized in oil reduce plasma cholesterol in gerbils and humans.

    PubMed

    Hayes, K C; Pronczuk, A; Perlman, D

    2004-06-01

    When free phytosterols are adequately heated and then cooled in fat, they recrystallize and are rendered bioavailable for blocking cholesterol absorption. To extend the application of phytosterols to fried foods, the activity of these modified crystals was assessed in 2 experiments with 26 male gerbils fed purified diets containing 0.15 g/100 g cholesterol with or without 0.75 g/100 g free phytosterols. The heat-modified soybean sterols were added directly to the diet (Expt. 1) or as phytosterol-enriched potato chips (Expt. 2). In the gerbil experiments, only the diet containing phytosterols significantly reduced plasma cholesterol (35-48%) and the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio (40%), as well as hepatic cholesterol esters (80%). In a subsequent human study, subjects (n = 7) consumed two 28-g servings of tortilla chips fried in oil with or without phytosterols that provided 0 or 1.5 g/d for 4-wk periods in a crossover design (Expt. 3). During consumption of the phytosterol-enriched chips, significant reductions in plasma cholesterol (10%) and LDL cholesterol (15%) were achieved without affecting HDL-C. This novel means of delivering free phytosterols proved to be both functionally efficient and effective. PMID:15173402

  13. Cholesterol: the good, the bad, and the ugly - therapeutic targets for the treatment of dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Elshourbagy, Nabil A; Meyers, Harold V; Abdel-Meguid, Sherin S

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining cholesterol and triglyceride (TG) levels within healthy limits is critical for decreasing the risk of heart disease. Dyslipidemia refers to the abnormal levels of lipids in the blood, including low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), also known as good cholesterol, high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), also known as bad cholesterol, and/or high TG levels that contribute to the development and progression of atherosclerosis. In this article we reviewed some of the current therapeutic targets for the treatment of dyslipidemia, with a primary focus on endothelial lipase and lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase for raising HDL-C, and the proprotein convertase subtilisin-like kexin type 9 (PCSK9), microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, and the messenger RNA of apolipoprotein B for lowering LDL-C. In addition, we reviewed the role of apolipoprotein AI (apoAI) in raising HDL-C, where we discuss three apoAI-based drugs under development. These are its mutated dimer (apoAI-Milano), a complex with phospholipids, and a mimetic peptide. Atherosclerosis, mainly because of dyslipidemia, is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Regarding the title of this article, the 'good' refers to HDL-C, the 'bad' refers to LDL-C, and the 'ugly' refers to atherosclerosis. PMID:24334831

  14. Synthetic High-Density Lipoprotein-Like Nanocarrier Improved Cellular Transport of Lysosomal Cholesterol in Human Sterol Carrier Protein-Deficient Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nam, Da-Eun; Kim, Ok-Kyung; Park, Yoo Kyoung; Lee, Jeongmin

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2), which is not found in tissues of people with Zellweger syndrome, facilitates the movement of cholesterol within cells, resulting in abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in SCP-2-deficient cells. This study investigated whether synthetic high-density lipoprotein-like nanocarrier (sHDL-NC) improves the cellular transport of lysosomal cholesterol to plasma membrane in SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts. Human SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts were incubated with [(3)H-cholesterol]LDL as a source of cholesterol and sHDL-NC. The cells were fractionated by centrifugation permit tracking of [(3)H]-cholesterol from lysosome into plasma membrane. Furthermore, cellular content of cholesteryl ester as a storage form and mRNA expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor were measured to support the cholesterol transport to plasma membrane. Incubation with sHDL-NC for 8 h significantly increased uptake of [(3)H]-cholesterol to lysosome by 53% and further enhanced the transport of [(3)H]-cholesterol to plasma membrane by 32%. Treatment with sHDL-NC significantly reduced cellular content of cholesteryl ester and increased mRNA expression of LDL receptor (LDL-R). In conclusion, sHDL-NC enables increased transport of lysosomal cholesterol to plasma membrane. In addition, these data were indirectly supported by decreased cellular content of cholesteryl ester and increased gene expression of LDL-R. Therefore, sHDL-NC may be a useful vehicle for transporting cholesterol, which may help to prevent accumulation of cholesterol in SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts. PMID:26684407

  15. Oyster mushroom reduced blood glucose and cholesterol in diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Khatun, K; Mahtab, H; Khanam, P A; Sayeed, M A; Khan, K A

    2007-01-01

    It has been postulated that mushroom has beneficial effect of lowering blood glucose and cholesterol in diabetic subjects. The literature so far searched and found that there was no published data in this regard. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of reducing blood glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides in diabetic patients. Additionally, this study addressed whether there was any hepatic and renal toxicity of mushroom. This clinical investigation was conducted in BIRDEM hospital from July 2005 to January 2006. Eighty-nine subjects were recruited. Baseline investigations included height, weight, blood pressure (SBP, DBP), plasma glucose for fasting (FPG) and 2-h after-breakfast (2hPG), total cholesterol (T-chol), triglycerides (TG) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL-c). Twenty- four days' study constitutes 7-days mushroom, 7-days no mushroom and then 7-days mushroom. Investigations were done at the start and each after every 7-days. Thirty subjects (M / F = 17 / 13) followed to ensure full compliance with the designed protocol for 24 days. The mean (SD) age of the participants was 46.3 (10) years. Mushroom significantly reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, p<0.01; DBP, p<0.05). It also lowered both plasma glucose significantly (FPG & 2-hPG, p<0.001). Mushroom also lowered total cholesterol and TG significantly; whereas, there was no significant change in weight and HDL-c. When mushroom was withdrawn, there were significant increases of DBP, FPG, 2hPG, T-cholesterol and TG, whereas, no significant change was observed in weight, SBP and HDL-c. Restarting mushroom there was again significant reduction of blood glucose, TG and cholesterol. We conclude that mushroom significantly reduced blood glucose, blood pressure, TG and cholesterol of diabetic subjects without any deleterious effect on liver and kidney. The effect of mushroom may be investigated in a large sample for a longer duration to evaluate its efficacy and toxicity. PMID:17344789

  16. A new model of reverse cholesterol transport: enTICEing strategies to stimulate intestinal cholesterol excretion.

    PubMed

    Temel, Ryan E; Brown, J Mark

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the largest cause of mortality in most developed countries. Although recent failed clinical trials and Mendelian randomization studies have called into question the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) hypothesis, it remains well accepted that stimulating the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) can prevent or even regress atherosclerosis. The prevailing model for RCT is that cholesterol from the artery wall must be delivered to the liver where it is secreted into bile before leaving the body through fecal excretion. However, many studies have demonstrated that RCT can proceed through a non-biliary pathway known as transintestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE). The goal of this review is to discuss the current state of knowledge of the TICE pathway, with emphasis on points of therapeutic intervention. PMID:25930707

  17. A New Model of Reverse Cholesterol Transport: EnTICEing Strategies to Stimulate Intestinal Cholesterol Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Temel, Ryan E.; Brown, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the largest cause of mortality in most developed countries. Although recent failed clinical trials and Mendelian randomization studies have called into question the high density lipoprotein (HDL) hypothesis, it remains well accepted that stimulating the process of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) can prevent or even regress atherosclerosis. The prevailing model for RCT is that cholesterol from the artery wall must be delivered to the liver where it is secreted into bile before leaving the body through fecal excretion. However, many studies have demonstrated that RCT can proceed through a non-biliary pathway known as transintestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE). The goal of this review is to discuss the current state of knowledge of the TICE pathway, with emphasis on points of therapeutic intervention. PMID:25930707

  18. Defining specific goals of therapy in treating dyslipidemia in the patient with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Belalcazar, L M; Ballantyne, C M

    1998-01-01

    Because patients with low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) are at high risk for clinical coronary artery disease (CAD) events, these patients require aggressive treatment with lifestyle modifications-increased exercise, smoking cessation, and weight loss in overweight patients-and available pharmacological agents. Drugs that raise HDL-C include nicotinic acid, fibric acid derivatives, estrogens, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins), alpha-blockers, and alcohol. However, all agents that increase HDL-C may not have the same clinical benefit, just as, as shown in genetic studies in humans and mice, genetic causes of high HDL-C do not always protect against CAD, nor do genetic causes of low HDL-C always increase risk for CAD. Better understanding of the complexities of HDL metabolism and the mechanisms by which HDL protects against CAD is needed to enable the development of new therapeutic strategies--novel drugs or gene delivery systems--to increase HDL-C and reduce CAD events. The statins are the agents with the greatest evidence for slowing progression of CAD and reducing clinical events in patients with low HDL-C, but additional research is needed to determine the potential benefits of additional interventions that increase HDL-C, including combination therapy, which may provide greater improvements in the entire lipid profile. PMID:9790415

  19. Lack of LCAT reduces the LPS-neutralizing capacity of HDL and enhances LPS-induced inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Petropoulou, Peristera-Ioanna; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Theodoropoulos, Vassilios; Hatziri, Aikaterini; Stamou, Panagiota; Karavia, Eleni A; Spyridonidis, Alexandros; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Kypreos, Kyriakos E

    2015-10-01

    HDL has important immunomodulatory properties, including the attenuation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response. As lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is a critical enzyme in the maturation of HDL we investigated whether LCAT-deficient (Lcat(-/-)) mice present an increased LPS-induced inflammatory response. LPS (100μg/kg body weight)-induced cytokine response in Lcat(-/-) mice was markedly enhanced and prolonged compared to wild-type mice. Importantly, reintroducing LCAT expression using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer reverted their phenotype to that of wild-type mice. Ex vivo stimulation of whole blood with LPS (1-100ng/mL) showed a similar enhanced pro-inflammatory phenotype. Further characterization in RAW 264.7 macrophages in vitro showed that serum and HDL, but not chylomicrons, VLDL or the lipid-free protein fraction of Lcat(-/-) mice, had a reduced capacity to attenuate the LPS-induced TNFα response. Analysis of apolipoprotein composition revealed that LCAT-deficient HDL lacks significant amounts of ApoA-I and ApoA-II and is primarily composed of ApoE, while HDL from Apoa1(-/-) mice is highly enriched in ApoE and ApoA-II. ApoA-I-deficiency did not affect the capacity of HDL to neutralize LPS, though Apoa1(-/-) mice showed a pronounced LPS-induced cytokine response. Additional immunophenotyping showed that Lcat(-/-) , but not Apoa1(-/-) mice, have markedly increased circulating monocyte numbers as a result of increased Cd11b(+)Ly6C(med) monocytes, whereas 'pro-inflammatory' Cd11b(+)Ly6C(hi) monocytes were reduced. In line with this observation, peritoneal macrophages of Lcat(-/-) mice showed a markedly dampened LPS-induced TNFα response. We conclude that LCAT-deficiency increases LPS-induced inflammation in mice due to reduced LPS-neutralizing capacity of immature discoidal HDL and increased monocyte number. PMID:26170061

  20. RAGE Suppresses ABCG1-Mediated Macrophage Cholesterol Efflux in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Daffu, Gurdip; Shen, Xiaoping; Senatus, Laura; Thiagarajan, Devi; Abedini, Andisheh; Hurtado Del Pozo, Carmen; Rosario, Rosa; Song, Fei; Friedman, Richard A; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes exacerbates cardiovascular disease, at least in part through suppression of macrophage cholesterol efflux and levels of the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and ABCG1. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is highly expressed in human and murine diabetic atherosclerotic plaques, particularly in macrophages. We tested the hypothesis that RAGE suppresses macrophage cholesterol efflux and probed the mechanisms by which RAGE downregulates ABCA1 and ABCG1. Macrophage cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A1 and HDL and reverse cholesterol transport to plasma, liver, and feces were reduced in diabetic macrophages through RAGE. In vitro, RAGE ligands suppressed ABCG1 and ABCA1 promoter luciferase activity and transcription of ABCG1 and ABCA1 through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARG)-responsive promoter elements but not through liver X receptor elements. Plasma levels of HDL were reduced in diabetic mice in a RAGE-dependent manner. Laser capture microdissected CD68(+) macrophages from atherosclerotic plaques of Ldlr(-/-) mice devoid of Ager (RAGE) displayed higher levels of Abca1, Abcg1, and Pparg mRNA transcripts versus Ager-expressing Ldlr(-/-) mice independently of glycemia or plasma levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides. Antagonism of RAGE may fill an important therapeutic gap in the treatment of diabetic macrovascular complications. PMID:26253613

  1. Cholesterol crystal induced arterial inflammation and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaque.

    PubMed

    Janoudi, Abed; Shamoun, Fadi E; Kalavakunta, Jagadeesh K; Abela, George S

    2016-07-01

    Evolution of plaque that is prone to rupture is characterized by inflammation and physical changes. Accumulation of low-density lipoprotein in the sub-intima provides esterified cholesterol (ESC) to macrophages and smooth muscle cells that convert it into free cholesterol (FRC) by cholesteryl ester hydrolases (CEHs). Membrane-bound cholesterol carriers transport FRC to high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Impaired HDL transport function and altered composition can lead to extracellular accumulation of FRC, whereas impaired membrane carrier activity can lead to intracellular FRC accumulation. Saturation of FRC can result in cholesterol crystallization with cell death and intimal injury. Disequilibrium between ESC and FRC can impact foam cell and cholesterol crystal (CC) formation. Cholesterol crystals initiate inflammation via NLRP3 inflammasome leading to interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production inducing C-reactive protein. Eventually, crystals growing from within the plaque and associated inflammation destabilize the plaque. Thus, inhibition of inflammation by antagonists to IL-1β or agents that dissolve or prevent CC formation may stabilize vulnerable plaques. PMID:26705388

  2. Alogliptin ameliorates postprandial lipemia and postprandial endothelial dysfunction in non- diabetic subjects: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Postprandial hyperlipidemia impairs endothelial function and participates in the development of atherosclerosis. We investigated the postprandial effects of a dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor, alogliptin, on endothelial dysfunction and the lipid profile. Methods A randomized cross-over trial design in 10 healthy volunteers (8 males and 2 females, 35 ± 10 years) was performed. The postprandial effects before and after a 1-week treatment of 25 mg/day alogliptin on endothelial function were assessed with brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and changing levels of lipids, apolipoprotein B48 (apoB-48), glucose, glucagon, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) during fasting and at 2, 4, 6, and 8 h after a standard meal loading test. Results Alogliptin treatment significantly suppressed the postprandial elevation in serum triglyceride (incremental area under the curve [AUC]; 279 ± 31 vs. 182 ± 32 mg h/dl, p = 0.01), apoB-48 (incremental AUC; 15.4 ± 1.7 vs. 11.7 ± 1.1 μg h/ml, p = 0.04), and remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RLP-C) (incremental AUC: 29.3 ± 3.2 vs. 17.6 ± 3.3 mg h/dl, p = 0.01). GLP-1 secretion was significantly increased after alogliptin treatment. Postprandial endothelial dysfunction (maximum decrease in%FMD, from −4.2 ± 0.5% to −2.6 ± 0.4%, p = 0.03) was significantly associated with the maximum change in apoB-48 (r = −0.46, p = 0.03) and RLP-C (r = −0.45, p = 0.04). Conclusion Alogliptin significantly improved postprandial endothelial dysfunction and postprandial lipemia, suggesting that alogliptin may be a promising anti-atherogenic agent. PMID:23298374

  3. Zymosan-mediated inflammation impairs in vivo reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Malik, Priya; Berisha, Stela Z; Santore, Jennifer; Agatisa-Boyle, Colin; Brubaker, Gregory; Smith, Jonathan D

    2011-05-01

    Inflammation has been proposed to impair HDL function and reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). We investigated the effects of inflammation mediated by zymosan, a yeast glucan, on multiple steps along the RCT pathway in vivo and ex vivo. Acute inflammation with 70 mg/kg zymosan impaired RCT to plasma, liver, and feces similarly by 17-22% (P < 0.05), with no additional block at the liver. Hepatic gene expression further demonstrated no change in ABCG5, ABCB4, and ABCB11 expression but a decline in ABCG8 mRNA (32% P < 0.05). Plasma from zymosan-treated mice had a 21% decrease in cholesterol acceptor ability (P < 0.01) and a 35% decrease in ABCA1-specific efflux capacity (P < 0.01) in vitro. Zymosan treatment also decreased HDL levels and led to HDL remodeling with increased incorporation of serum amyloid A. In addition, cholesterol efflux from cultured macrophages declined with zymosan treatment in a dose dependent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that zymosan impairs in vivo RCT primarily by decreasing macrophage-derived cholesterol entering the plasma, with minimal additional blocks downstream. Our study supports the notion that RCT impairment is one of the mechanisms for the increased atherosclerotic burden observed in inflammatory conditions. PMID:21335620

  4. Case report: A novel apolipoprotein A-I missense mutation apoA-I (Arg149Ser)Boston associated with decreased lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activation and cellular cholesterol efflux.

    PubMed

    Anthanont, Pimjai; Asztalos, Bela F; Polisecki, Eliana; Zachariah, Benoy; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel heterozygous apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) missense mutation (c.517C>A, p.Arg149Ser, designated as apoA-IBoston) in a 67-year-old woman and her 2 sons, who had mean serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, apoA-I, and apoA-I in very large α-1 HDL that were 10%, 35%, and 16% of normal, respectively (all P < .05). The percentage of HDL cholesterol in the esterified form was also significantly (P < .05) reduced to 52% of control values. Cholesteryl ester tranfer protein (CETP) activity was normal. The mean global, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter A1 and scavenger receptor B type I-mediated cellular cholesterol efflux capacity in apoB-depleted serum from affected family members were 41%, 37%, 47%, 54%, and 48% of control values, respectively (all P < .05). lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity in plasma was 71% of controls, whereas in the cell-based assay, it was 73% of control values (P < .05). The data indicate that this novel apoA-I missense is associated with markedly decreased levels of HDL cholesterol and very large α-1 HDL, as well as decreased serum cellular cholesterol efflux and LCAT activity, but not with premature coronary heart disease, similar to other apoA-I mutations that have been associated with decreased LCAT activity. PMID:26073399

  5. Dynamic changes in mouse lipoproteins induced by transiently expressed human phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP): importance of PLTP in prebeta-HDL generation.

    PubMed

    Jaari, S; van Dijk, K W; Olkkonen, V M; van der Zee, A; Metso, J; Havekes, L; Jauhiainen, M; Ehnholm, C

    2001-04-01

    The plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) plays an important role in the regulation of plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and governs the distribution of HDL sub-populations. In the present study, adenovirus mediated overexpression of human PLTP in mice was employed to investigate the distribution of PLTP in serum and its effect on plasma lipoproteins. Gel filtration experiments showed that the distributions of PLTP activity and mass in serum are different, suggesting that human PLTP circulated in mouse plasma as two distinct forms, one with high and the other with low specific activity. Our study further demonstrates that overexpression of PLTP leads to depletion of HDL and that, as PLTP activity declines, replenishment of the HDL fraction occurs. During this process, the lipoprotein profile displays transient particle populations, including apoA-IV and apoE-rich particles in the LDL size range and small particles containing apoA-II only. The possible role of these particles in HDL reassembly is discussed. The increased PLTP activity enhanced the ability of mouse sera to produce pre(beta)-HDL. The present results provide novel evidence that PLTP is an important regulator of HDL metabolism and plays a central role in the reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) process. PMID:11290460

  6. L-Arginine and vitamin C attenuate pro-atherogenic effects of high-fat diet on biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Bogdański, Paweł; Suliburska, Joanna; Szulińska, Monika; Sikora, Marta; Walkowiak, Jarosław; Jakubowski, Hieronim

    2015-12-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) is known to cause endothelial dysfunction and contribute to atherosclerosis progression. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of L-arginine (L-Arg) and vitamin C supplementation as a potentially useful strategy for modulation of serum homocysteine (Hcy) levels, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), oxidative stress, and insulin resistance induced by HFD in rats. Six weeks-old female and male Wistar rats were divided into five groups of twelve rats each and treated for six weeks with: group 1, standard diet; group 2, HFD; group 3, HFD supplemented with L-Arg (20g/kg diet); group 4, HFD supplemented with L-Arg (20g/kg diet) plus vitamin C (100mg/kg diet); group 5, HFD supplemented with vitamin C (100mg/kg diet). HFD significantly elevated TNF-α, reduced total antioxidant status (TAS), and increased insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Significant increases of total cholesterol (TCH), LDL cholesterol (LDL), triglyceride (TG) and a decrease of HDL cholesterol (HDL) were observed in HFD rats. Supplementation with l-Arg prevented the decrease of TAS and the increases in HOMA-IR, LDL, and TG levels. Moreover, Hcy and TNF-α levels were reduced in L-Arg supplemented group. Supplementation with vitamin C significantly atenuated TAS decrease and lowered LDL levels. L-Arg plus vitamin C enhanced L-Arg effect on TAS and protected against TNF-α increase. Western blot analysis showed that l-Arg supplementation of HFD rats reduced the level of protein carbonyls. Taken together, these findings indicate that supplemental l-arginine and/or vitamin C, by their abilities to modulate biomarkers of HFD-induced endothelial dysfunction, are anti-atherogenic. PMID:26653556

  7. Mathematically modelling the dynamics of cholesterol metabolism and ageing.

    PubMed

    Morgan, A E; Mooney, K M; Wilkinson, S J; Pickles, N A; Mc Auley, M T

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. This condition becomes increasingly prevalent during ageing; 34.1% and 29.8% of males and females respectively, over 75 years of age have an underlying cardiovascular problem. The dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism is inextricably correlated with cardiovascular health and for this reason low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are routinely used as biomarkers of CVD risk. The aim of this work was to use mathematical modelling to explore how cholesterol metabolism is affected by the ageing process. To do this we updated a previously published whole-body mathematical model of cholesterol metabolism to include an additional 96 mechanisms that are fundamental to this biological system. Additional mechanisms were added to cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), bile acid synthesis, and their enterohepatic circulation. The sensitivity of the model was explored by the use of both local and global parameter scans. In addition, acute cholesterol feeding was used to explore the effectiveness of the regulatory mechanisms which are responsible for maintaining whole-body cholesterol balance. It was found that our model behaves as a hypo-responder to cholesterol feeding, while both the hepatic and intestinal pools of cholesterol increased significantly. The model was also used to explore the effects of ageing in tandem with three different cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) genotypes. Ageing in the presence of an atheroprotective CETP genotype, conferring low CETP activity, resulted in a 0.6% increase in LDL-C. In comparison, ageing with a genotype reflective of high CETP activity, resulted in a 1.6% increase in LDL-C. Thus, the model has illustrated the importance of CETP genotypes such as I405V, and their potential role in healthy ageing. PMID:27157786

  8. Relationship between insulin sensitivity and the triglyceride-HDL-C ratio in overweight and obese postmenopausal women: a MONET study.

    PubMed

    Karelis, Antony D; Pasternyk, Stephanie M; Messier, Lyne; St-Pierre, David H; Lavoie, Jean-Marc; Garrel, Dominique; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship between the triglyceride-HDL-cholesterol ratio (TG:HDL-C) and insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese sedentary postmenopausal women. The study population consisted of 131 non-diabetic overweight and obese sedentary postmenopausal women (age; 57.7+/-5.0 y; body mass index (BMI), 32.2+/-4.3 kg/m2). Subjects were characterized by dividing the entire cohort into tertiles based on the TG:HDL-C (T1<0.86 vs. T2=0.86 to 1.35 vs. T3>1.35, respectively). We measured (i) insulin sensitivity (using the hyperinsulinenic-euglycemic clamp and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)), (ii) body composition (using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), (iii) visceral fat (using computed tomography), (iv) plasma lipids, C-reactive protein, 2 h glucose concentration during an oral glucose tolerance test (2 h glucose), as well as fasting glucose and insulin, (v) peak oxygen consumption, and (vi) lower-body muscle strength (using weight training equipment). Significant correlations were observed between the TG:HDL-C and the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (r=-0.45; p<0.0001), as well as with HOMA (r=0.42; p<0.0001). Moreover, the TG:HDL-C significantly correlated with lean body mass, visceral fat, 2 h glucose, C-reactive protein, and muscle strength. Stepwise regression analysis showed that the TG:HDL-C explained 16.4% of the variation in glucose disposal in our cohort, which accounted for the greatest source of unique variance. Other independent predictors of glucose disposal were 2 h glucose (10.1%), C-reactive protein (CRP; 7.6%), and peak oxygen consumption (5.8%), collectively (including the TG:HDL-C) explaining 39.9% of the unique variance. In addition, the TG:HDL-C was the second predictor for HOMA, accounting for 11.7% of the variation. High levels of insulin sensitivity were associated with low levels of the TG:HDL-C. In addition, the TG:HDL-C was a predictor for glucose disposal rates and HOMA values

  9. Bowel Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Bowel Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... rectal worse. Back to Side Effects Print | Understanding Prostate Cancer Research Faces of Prostate Cancer About PCF Take ...

  10. Age related changes in the lipoprotein substrates for the esterification of plasma cholesterol in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, S M; Kudchodkar, B J; Lacko, A G

    1991-11-15

    The activity of the enzyme lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and the properties of its lipoprotein substrates have been investigated in 6- and 19-month-old Fischer-344 rats. These studies were carried out to determine the nature of the relationship between the observed hypercholesterolemia and the age-related decrease in the fractional rate of lipoprotein cholesterol esterification. The distribution of LCAT activity of plasma fractions was determined following gel chromatography and ultracentrifugation respectively. LCAT activity was found to be associated with the high density lipoprotein (HDL) fraction when rat plasma was passed through a Bio-Gel A-5 M column. Upon density gradient ultracentrifugation for 24 h it was found associated with HDL fraction; d = 1.125-1.21 g/ml. However, following prolonged ultracentrifugation (40 h), the majority of the LCAT activity was displaced into the lipoprotein-free infranatant (d greater than 1.225 g/ml). The dissociation of LCAT from its complex with HDL occurred to a smaller extent in aged rat plasma than in young rat plasma. Substrate specificity studies indicated that HDL was a considerably better substrate for LCAT than very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) in both young and aged rats. In addition, HDL from young rats was a better substrate for LCAT than the HDL from aged rats. Incubation experiments followed by the isolation of lipoproteins and the subsequent analyses of their cholesterol contents revealed that the age-related hypercholesterolemia was mainly due to an increase in the cholesterol carried by lipoprotein fractions d = 1.025 -1.07 g/ml (LDL + HDL1). These and other low density lipoproteins (d less than 1.025 g/ml) were poor substrates for LCAT. However, these lipoproteins could provide free cholesterol for esterification by first transferring it to HDL (d = 1.07-1.21). The HDL isolated from the plasma of aged rats was enriched with apolipoprotein (apo) E and these lipoprotein particles were found to

  11. Overweight status is associated with extensive signs of microvascular dysfunction and cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sunni R.; Bellary, Srikanth; Karimzad, Said; Gherghel, Doina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this present study was to investigate if overweight individuals exhibit signs of vascular dysfunction associated with a high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). One hundred lean and 100 overweight participants were recruited for the present study. Retinal microvascular function was assessed using the Dynamic Retinal Vessel Analyser (DVA), and systemic macrovascular function by means of flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Investigations also included body composition, carotid intimal-media thickness (c-IMT), ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (BP), fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides (TG), cholesterol levels (HDL-C and LDL-C), and plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF). Overweight individuals presented with higher right and left c-IMT (p = 0.005 and p = 0.002, respectively), average 24-h BP values (all p < 0.001), plasma glucose (p = 0.008), TG (p = 0.003), TG: HDL-C ratio (p = 0.010), and vWF levels (p = 0.004). Moreover, overweight individuals showed lower retinal arterial microvascular dilation (p = 0.039) and baseline-corrected flicker (bFR) responses (p = 0.022), as well as, prolonged dilation reaction time (RT, p = 0.047). These observations emphasise the importance of vascular screening and consideration of preventive interventions to decrease vascular risk in all individuals with adiposity above normal range. PMID:27578554

  12. Overweight status is associated with extensive signs of microvascular dysfunction and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sunni R; Bellary, Srikanth; Karimzad, Said; Gherghel, Doina

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this present study was to investigate if overweight individuals exhibit signs of vascular dysfunction associated with a high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). One hundred lean and 100 overweight participants were recruited for the present study. Retinal microvascular function was assessed using the Dynamic Retinal Vessel Analyser (DVA), and systemic macrovascular function by means of flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Investigations also included body composition, carotid intimal-media thickness (c-IMT), ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (BP), fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides (TG), cholesterol levels (HDL-C and LDL-C), and plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF). Overweight individuals presented with higher right and left c-IMT (p = 0.005 and p = 0.002, respectively), average 24-h BP values (all p < 0.001), plasma glucose (p = 0.008), TG (p = 0.003), TG: HDL-C ratio (p = 0.010), and vWF levels (p = 0.004). Moreover, overweight individuals showed lower retinal arterial microvascular dilation (p = 0.039) and baseline-corrected flicker (bFR) responses (p = 0.022), as well as, prolonged dilation reaction time (RT, p = 0.047). These observations emphasise the importance of vascular screening and consideration of preventive interventions to decrease vascular risk in all individuals with adiposity above normal range. PMID:27578554

  13. High density lipoprotein plasma fractions inhibit aortic fatty streaks in cholesterol-fed rabbits.

    PubMed

    Badimon, J J; Badimon, L; Galvez, A; Dische, R; Fuster, V

    1989-03-01

    The effects of in vivo administration of high density lipoprotein-very high density lipoprotein (HDL-VHDL) on the development of aortic fatty streaks were studied in cholesterol-fed rabbits. The rabbits received a 0.5% cholesterol-rich diet for 8 weeks. During this period, the HDL-VHDL group was intravenously administered with 50 mg/week of homologous HDL-VHDL protein; the control group received normal saline (0.9% NaCl). HDL-VHDL fraction was obtained at density range 1.063 to 1.25 gm/ml by ultracentrifugation of normal rabbit plasma. Along the study, plasma lipid levels followed a similar profile in both groups. At the completion of the study, atherosclerotic-like lipid-rich lesions covered 37.9 +/- 6% (X +/- SEM) of the intimal aortic surface in the control group, and 14.9 +/- 2.1% in the treated group (p less than 0.001). The values of total and free cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, and phospholipids deposited within vessel wall were significantly lower in the aortas of the HDL-VHDL treated group than those in the control group. Cholesterol accumulation in the livers was also significantly lower (p less than 0.01) in the treated group than in the control. We concluded that administration of homologous HDL-VHDL lipoprotein fraction to cholesterol-fed rabbits, dramatically inhibited the extent of aortic fatty streaks and lowered lipid deposition in the arterial wall and liver without modification of the plasma lipid levels. PMID:2927083

  14. Management of dyslipidemia in the metabolic syndrome: recommendations of the Spanish HDL-Forum.

    PubMed

    Ascaso, Juan; Gonzalez Santos, Pedro; Hernandez Mijares, Antonio; Mangas Rojas, Alipio; Masana, Luis; Millan, Jesus; Pallardo, Luis Felipe; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Perez Jimenez, Francisco; Pintó, Xavier; Plaza, Ignacio; Rubiés, Juan; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    In order to characterize the metabolic syndrome it becomes necessary to establish a number of diagnostic criteria. Because of its impact on cardiovascular morbidity/mortality, considerable attention has been focussed on the dyslipidemia accompanying the metabolic syndrome. The aim of this review is to highlight the fundamental aspects of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and the treatment of the metabolic syndrome dyslipidemia with recommendations to clinicians. The clinical expression of the metabolic syndrome dyslipidemia is characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and low levels of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C). In addition, metabolic syndrome dyslipidemia is associated with high levels of apolipoprotein (apo) B-100-rich particles of a particularly atherogenic phenotype (small dense low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol [LDL-C]. High levels of triglyceride-rich particles (very low-density lipoprotein) are also evident both at baseline and in overload situations (postprandial hyperlipidemia). Overall, the 'quantitative' dyslipidemia characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and low levels of HDL-C and the 'qualitative' dyslipidemia characterized by high levels of apo B-100- and triglyceride-rich particles, together with insulin resistance, constitute an atherogenic triad in patients with the metabolic syndrome. The therapeutic management of the metabolic syndrome, regardless of the control of the bodyweight, BP, hyperglycemia or overt diabetes mellitus, aims at maintaining optimum plasma lipid levels. Therapeutic goals are similar to those for high-risk situations because of the coexistence of multiple risk factors. The primary goal in treatment should be achieving an LDL-C level of <100 mg/dL (or <70 mg/dL in cases with established ischemic heart disease or risk equivalents). A further goal is increasing the HDL-C level to >or=40 mg/dL in men or 50 mg/dL in women. A non-HDL-C goal of 130 mg/dL should also be aimed at in cases of hypertriglyceridemia

  15. Association between periodontal disease and plasma levels of cholesterol and triglycerides

    PubMed Central

    Lafaurie, Gloria Inés; Millán, Lina Viviana; Ardila, Carlos Martin; Duque, Andrés; Novoa, Camilo; López, Diego; Contreras, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    Objective: untreated periodontal disease seems to cause low grade systemic inflammation and blood lipid alteration leading to increased cardiovascular disease risk. To start testing this hypothesis in colombian patients, a multicentre study was conducted including the three main state capitals: bogota, medellin and cali. Methods: in this study 192 (28.4%) advanced and 256 (37.8%) moderate periodontitis patients were investigated for socio-demographic variables, city of precedence, periodontal parameters, smoking, red complex periodontopathic bacteria, serum antibodies against porphyromonas gingivalis and aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and blood lipids including total cholesterol, hdl, ldl and triglycerides (tg). Those parameters were compared to 229 (33.8%) controls having periodontal health or gingivitis. Results: advanced periodontitis had worst periodontal indexes, than moderate periodontitis and controls. Interestingly, higher hdl and tg levels were present in periodontitis. Bmi <30 and smoking were associated with increased hdl, hdl-35, ldl and tg, while glycemia >100 mg/dl associated with hdl, hdl-35 and tg. Tannerella forsythia showed a significant association with hdl-35 in bivariate analysis and serum igg1 against p. Gingivalis associated with hdl-35 and serum igg1 against t. Forsythia associated with tg and serum igg2 against a. Actinomycetemcomitans correlated with levels of hdl y hdl-35. In logistic regression the periodontitis patients from cali presented reduced hdl levels as compared to bogota and medellin patients. Presence of igg1 antibodies against p. Gingivalis and a. Actinomycetemcomitans correlated with reduced hdl levels. Conclusion: this study confirmed that untreated periodontitis generates alteration in serum lipid levels and systemic bacterial exposure against important periodontopathic bacteria could be the biological link. PMID:24892452

  16. Some kinetic properties of plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase in hyper-alphalipoproteinemia in man

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiforova, A.A.; Alksnis, E.G.; Ivanova, E.M.

    1985-07-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study some kinetic properties of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) in the blood plasma of patients with hyper-alpha-lipoproteinemia, enabling the presence of LCAT isozymes in the blood to be detected. The velocity of the LCAT reaction was judged by determining labeled CHE formed from /sup 14/C-nonesterified CH and lecithin of HDL on incubation of the latter with the enzyme. Dependence of the velocity of the LCAT reaction on concentration of substrate (nonesterified HDL cholesterol) in four subjects with hyper-alpha-lipoproteinemia is shown.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress impairs cholesterol efflux and synthesis in hepatic cells[S

    PubMed Central

    Röhrl, Clemens; Eigner, Karin; Winter, Katharina; Korbelius, Melanie; Obrowsky, Sascha; Kratky, Dagmar; Kovacs, Werner J.; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes cause hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which affects neutral lipid metabolism. However, the role of ER stress in cholesterol metabolism is incompletely understood. Here, we show that induction of acute ER stress in human hepatic HepG2 cells reduced ABCA1 expression and caused ABCA1 redistribution to tubular perinuclear compartments. Consequently, cholesterol efflux to apoA-I, a key step in nascent HDL formation, was diminished by 80%. Besides ABCA1, endogenous apoA-I expression was reduced upon ER stress induction, which contributed to reduced cholesterol efflux. Liver X receptor, a key regulator of ABCA1 in peripheral cells, was not involved in this process. Despite reduced cholesterol efflux, cellular cholesterol levels remained unchanged during ER stress. This was due to impaired de novo cholesterol synthesis by reduction of HMG-CoA reductase activity by 70%, although sterol response element-binding protein-2 activity was induced. In mice, ER stress induction led to a marked reduction of hepatic ABCA1 expression. However, HDL cholesterol levels were unaltered, presumably because of scavenger receptor class B, type I downregulation under ER stress. Taken together, our data suggest that ER stress in metabolic disorders reduces HDL biogenesis due to impaired hepatic ABCA1 function. PMID:24179149

  18. Primary Low Level of High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Risks of Coronary Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Disease, and Death: Results From the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Haitham M; Miller, Michael; Nasir, Khurram; McEvoy, John W; Herrington, David; Blumenthal, Roger S; Blaha, Michael J

    2016-05-15

    Prior studies observing associations between low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and cardiovascular disease (CVD) have often been conducted among persons with metabolic or other lipid abnormalities. In this study, we investigated the association between primary low HDL cholesterol and coronary heart disease (CHD), CVD, and all-cause death after adjustment for confounders in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Participants who were free of clinical CVD were recruited from 6 US research centers from 2000 to 2002 and followed for a median duration of 10.2 years. We defined "primary low HDL cholesterol" as HDL cholesterol level <40 mg/dL (men) or <50 mg/dL (women), triglyceride level <100 mg/dL, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level <100 mg/dL (n = 158). We defined an "optimal" lipid profile as HDL cholesterol ≥40 mg/dL (men) or ≥50 mg/dL (women) and triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <100 mg/dL (n = 780). For participants with primary low HDL cholesterol versus those with an optimal lipid profile, adjusted hazard ratios for total CHD, CVD, and death were 2.25 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20, 4.21; P = 0.011), 1.93 (95% CI: 1.11, 3.34; P = 0.020), and 1.11 (95% CI: 0.67, 1.84; P = 0.69), respectively. Participants with primary low HDL cholesterol had higher risks of CHD and CVD than participants with optimal lipid profiles but no difference in survival after a median 10.2 years of follow-up. PMID:27189327

  19. Streptococcal serum opacity factor increases the rate of hepatocyte uptake of human plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Gillard, Baiba K; Rosales, Corina; Pillai, Biju K; Lin, Hu Yu; Courtney, Harry S; Pownall, Henry J

    2010-11-16

    Serum opacity factor (SOF), a virulence determinant of Streptococcus pyogenes, converts plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to three distinct species: lipid-free apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, neo HDL, a small discoidal HDL-like particle, and a large cholesteryl ester-rich microemulsion (CERM) that contains the cholesterol esters (CE) of up to ∼400000 HDL particles and apo E as its major protein. Similar SOF reaction products are obtained with HDL, total plasma lipoproteins, and whole plasma. We hypothesized that hepatic uptake of CERM-CE via multiple apo E-dependent receptors would be faster than that of HDL-CE. We tested our hypothesis using human hepatoma cells and lipoprotein receptor-specific Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The uptake of [(3)H]CE by HepG2 and Huh7 cells from HDL after SOF treatment, which transfers >90% of HDL-CE to CERM, was 2.4 and 4.5 times faster, respectively, than from control HDL. CERM-[(3)H]CE uptake was inhibited by LDL and HDL, suggestive of uptake by both the LDL receptor (LDL-R) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Studies in CHO cells specifically expressing LDL-R and SR-BI confirmed CERM-[(3)H]CE uptake by both receptors. RAP and heparin inhibit CERM-[(3)H]CE but not HDL-[(3)H]CE uptake, thereby implicating LRP-1 and cell surface proteoglycans in this process. These data demonstrate that SOF treatment of HDL increases the rate of CE uptake via multiple hepatic apo E receptors. In so doing, SOF might increase the level of hepatic disposal of plasma cholesterol in a way that is therapeutically useful. PMID:20879789

  20. Reference Ranges of Cholesterol Sub-Fractions in Random Healthy Adults in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Koumaré, Alice T. C. R. Kiba; Sakandé, Linda P. L.; Kabré, Elie; Sondé, Issaka; Simporé, Jacques; Sakandé, Jean

    2015-01-01

    In Burkina Faso, the values that serve as clinical chemistry reference ranges are those provided by European manufacturers’ insert sheets based on reference of the Western population. However, studies conducted so far in some African countries reported significant differences in normal laboratory ranges compared with those of the industrialized world. The aim of this study was to determine reference values of cholesterol fractions in apparently normal adults in Burkina Faso that could be used to better assess the risks related to cardiovascular diseases. Study population was 279 healthy subjects aged from 15 to 50 years including 139 men and 140 women recruited at the Regional Center of Blood Transfusion of Ouagadougou, capital city of Burkina Faso (West Africa). Exclusion criteria based on history and clinical examination were used for defining reference individuals. The dual-step precipitation of HDL cholesterol sub-fractions using dextran sulfate was performed according to the procedure described by Hirano. The medians were calculated and reference values were determined at 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles. The median and upper ranges for total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, total HDL cholesterol and HDL2 cholesterol were observed to be higher in women in comparison to men (p <0.05). These reference ranges were similar to those derived from other African countries but lower than those recorded in France and in USA. This underscores the need for such comprehensible establishment of reference values for limited resources countries. Our study provides the first cholesterol sub-fractions (HDL2 and HDL3) reference ranges for interpretation of laboratory results for cardiovascular risk management in Burkina Faso. PMID:25611320

  1. ApoA-I/HDL-C levels are inversely associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm progression.

    PubMed

    Burillo, Elena; Lindholt, Jes S; Molina-Sánchez, Pedro; Jorge, Immaculada; Martinez-Pinna, Roxana; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Tarin, Carlos; Torres-Fonseca, Monica Maria; Esteban, Margarita; Laustsen, Jesper; Ramos-Mozo, Priscilla; Calvo, Enrique; Lopez, Juan Antonio; Vega de Ceniga, Melina; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Egido, Jesus; Andrés, Vicente; Vazquéz, Jesús; Meilhac, Olivier; Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis

    2015-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) evolution is unpredictable, and there is no therapy except surgery for patients with an aortic size> 5 cm (large AAA). We aimed to identify new potential biomarkers that could facilitate prognosis and treatment of patients with AAA. A differential quantitative proteomic analysis of plasma proteins was performed in AAA patients at different stages of evolution [small AAA (aortic size=3-5 cm) vs large AAA] using iTRAQ labelling, high-throughput nano-LC-MS/MS and a novel multi-layered statistical model. Among the proteins identified, ApoA-I was decreased in patients with large AAA compared to those with small AAA. These results were validated by ELISA on plasma samples from small (n=90) and large AAA (n=26) patients (150± 3 vs 133± 5 mg/dl, respectively, p< 0.001). ApoA-I levels strongly correlated with HDL-Cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration (r=0.9, p< 0.001) and showed a negative correlation with aortic size (r=-0.4, p< 0.01) and thrombus volume (r=-0.3, p< 0.01), which remained significant after adjusting for traditional risk factors. In a prospective study, HDL-C independently predicted aneurysmal growth rate in multiple linear regression analysis (n=122, p=0.008) and was inversely associated with need for surgical repair (Adjusted hazard ratio: 0.18, 95 % confidence interval: 0.04-0.74, p=0.018). In a nation-wide Danish registry, we found lower mean HDL-C concentration in large AAA patients (n=6,560) compared with patients with aorto-iliac occlusive disease (n=23,496) (0.89± 2.99 vs 1.59± 5.74 mmol/l, p< 0.001). Finally, reduced mean aortic AAA diameter was observed in AngII-infused mice treated with ApoA-I mimetic peptide compared with saline-injected controls. In conclusion, ApoA-I/HDL-C systemic levels are negatively associated with AAA evolution. Therapies targeting HDL functionality could halt AAA formation. PMID:25789510

  2. Appropriate LDL-C-to-HDL-C Ratio Cutoffs for Categorization of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Uygur Adults in Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qing-Jie; Lai, Hong-Mei; Chen, Bang-Dang; Li, Xiao-Mei; Zhai, Hui; He, Chun-Hui; Pan, Shuo; Luo, Jun-Yi; Gao, Jing; Liu, Fen; Ma, Yi-Tong; Yang, Yi-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Elevated LDL-C/HDL-C ratio has been shown to be a marker of lipid metabolism as well as a good predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD). Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the LDL-C/HDL-C ratio is useful for detecting cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in general healthy Uygur adults in Xinjiang. A total of 4047 Uygur subjects aged ≥35 years were selected from the Cardiovascular Risk Survey (CRS) study which was carried out from October 2007 to March 2010. Anthropometric data, blood pressure, lipid profile and fasting glucose were measured in all participants. The prevalence, sensitivity, specificity and distance on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of each LDL-C/HDL-C ratio were calculated. The prevalence of high LDL-C and low HDL-C cholesterol was high and positively correlated with higher LDL-C/HDL-C ratio in the Uygur population. In both men and women, we detected a slight apparent trend of high prevalence of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia with higher LDL-C/HDL-C ratio. Our study also demonstrated that the discriminatory power of the LDL-C/HDL-C ratio for CVD risk factors was slightly stronger in men than in women. Analysis of the shortest distance in the ROC curves for hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, or ≥two of these risk factors suggested a LDL-C/HDL-C ratio cutoff of 2.5 for both men and women. The results of this study showed that a LDL-C/HDL-C ratio cut-off of 2.5 might be used as the predictive marker to detect CVD risk factors among Uygur adults in Xinjiang. PMID:26907312

  3. Cholesterol efflux monitoring in macrophage form cells by using fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young Sik; Lee, Sang Hak; Park, Byoung Hee; Kim, Soo Hyeok; Hwang, Won Sang; Kim, Dug Young

    2015-03-01

    Macrophages play a key role in atherosclerotic plaque destabilization and rupture, since they accumulate large amounts of lipid through the uptake of modified lipoproteins which results in foam cell formation. Cholesterol efflux is the process of removing cholesterol from macrophages in the subintima of the vessel wall, and efflux mechanism in a cell is one of the critical issues for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. High density lipoproteins (HDL) stimulate cholesterol efflux from macrophage foam cells in the arterial wall. Radioisotope-labeled cholesterol analysis method is well known conventional method for observing cholesterol efflux. The major drawback of this method is its long and complicated process. Fluorescence intensity imaging schemes are replacing the radioisotope-labeled method in recent years for cholesterol efflux monitoring. Various spectroscopic methods are also adapted for cholesterol efflux imaging. Here we present a fluorescence lifetime imaging method for more quantitative observation of cholesterol efflux process in macrophages, which enables us to observe cholesterol level changes with various conditions. We used J774 macrophage cell and 25-NBD-cholesterol which is a famous cholesterol specific dye. Our lifetime imaging results clearly show cholesterol efflux rate very effectively. We believe that fluorescence lifetime analysis is new and very powerful for cholesterol imaging or monitoring.

  4. Serum uric acid is associated with increased risk of idiopathic venous thromboembolism in high HDL-C population: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    YU, MIAO; LING, KEN; TENG, YUNFEI; LI, QIN; MEI, FEI; LI, YIQING; OUYANG, CHENXI

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have indicated that metabolic disorders are positively correlated with idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE), whereas the risk factor serum uric acid (SUA) for idiopathic VTE has yet to be investigated. In this retrospective case-control study, 276 idiopathic VTE patients and 536 gender- and age-matched control subjects were included. The subjects in the case and control groups exhibiting common known VTE risk factors and the patients with a first VTE onset in one month were excluded. For the control group, primary and secondary VTE patients were excluded. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, and current smoking were significantly associated with idiopathic VTE in the univariate analysis. Hyperuricemia was detected in 56/276 (20.29%) idiopathic patients compared with 71/536 (13.25%) in the control group. HDL-C was considered the most prominent interactive factor for SUA in idiopathic VTE by the interaction analysis. After testing for the interaction terms, SUA was closely associated with idiopathic VTE in the high HDL-C population (P=0.0026 for interaction), while there was no such correlation in the low HDL-C group. The results indicated no obvious correlation between triglyceride and hypertension to idiopathic VTE. In conclusion, SUA is closely associated with an increased risk of idiopathic VTE in the high HDL-C population. The abnormality of SUA may act as an important linkage between atherosclerosis and idiopathic VTE through HDL-C. PMID:27284315

  5. Amide-linked Ethanolamine Conjugate of Gemfibrozil as a Profound HDL Enhancer: Design, Synthesis, Pharmacological Screening and Docking Study.

    PubMed

    Rai, Himanshu; Dhaneshwar, Suneela S

    2015-01-01

    Elevated concentration of any or all types of lipids in the plasma including hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia leads to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Effective medication needs multiple drug therapy as recommended cholesterol and triglyceride levels are difficult to achieve by monotherapy and frequently require the use of more than one lipid-lowering medication. Gemfibrozil lowers plasma triglyceride-rich lipoproteins mainly VLDL and increases HDL. It is associated with short plasma half-life (1.5h) and GIT distress on long term use. In a study it was found that ethanolamine decreases serum cholesterol, especially VLDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol in rats fed an HF/HC diet. In the present work, we thought of exploring the effect of co-drug of gemfibrozil with ethanolamine (GE-I) as a potential combination therapy for the management of mixed hyperlipidemia. Synthesis of GE-I was effected by CDI coupling. Structure was confirmed spectrally. Interestingly kinetic studies revealed that GE-I resisted chemical and enzymatic hydrolysis. In tritoninduced hyperlipidemia, significant lowering of serum lipid levels was observed. The hallmark of GEI was its profound effect on HDL level which was raised above the normal level by 15%. Docking study also supported modulatory effect of GE-I (docking score -7.012) on PPAR-α which was comparable to docking score of gemfibrozil (-9.432). These preliminary observations prompt us to consider GE-I as a novel, serendipitous, hybrid anti-hyperlipidemic new chemical entity which needs be studied extensively to prove it as an HDL enhancing anti-hyperlipidemic agent. PMID:26285608

  6. Development and partial metabolic characterization of a dietary cholesterol-resistant colony of rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Overturf, M.L.; Smith, S.A.; Hewett-Emmett, D.; Loose-Mitchell, D.S.; Soma, M.R.; Gotto, A.M. Jr.; Morrisett, J.D. )

    1989-02-01

    A colony of New Zealand white rabbits has been developed which, when fed a cholesterol-supplemented diet, exhibit unusual resistance to hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis, disorders usually observed in normal cholesterol-fed rabbits. When resistant rabbits (RT) were fed a normal low cholesterol diet (ND), their plasma lipoprotein patterns were significantly different from those of normal rabbits (NR) fed the same diet. The low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c)/high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) ratio and LDL-c/very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-c) ratio were lower in the resistant rabbits. The hydrated density of HDL of the normal-responsive rabbits was greater than that of the resistant rabbits. LDL from resistant rabbits contained a lower proportion of esterified cholesterol and protein than LDL from normal rabbits. Peripheral mononuclear cells from resistant rabbits bound about 30% more {sup 125}I-labeled rabbit LDL than mononuclear cells from normal rabbits. These results demonstrate that the plasma cholesterol levels of these animals is at least partly under genetic control and that compositional differences exist between the major plasma lipoprotein classes of normal and resistant rabbits even during the ingestion of low-cholesterol diet. The results indicate that at least a part of the difference in the cholesterolemic responses between the two rabbit groups is due to an enhanced LDL uptake by the mononuclear cells, and presumably by other somatic cells of the resistant group.

  7. Cholesterol-lowering probiotics: in vitro selection and in vivo testing of bifidobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bordoni, Alessandra; Amaretti, Alberto; Leonardi, Alan; Boschetti, Elisa; Danesi, Francesca; Matteuzzi, Diego; Roncaglia, Lucia; Raimondi, Stefano; Rossi, Maddalena

    2013-09-01

    Thirty-four strains of bifidobacteria belonging to Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium animalis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, and Bifidobacterium pseu-docatenulatum were assayed in vitro for the ability to assimilate cholesterol and for bile salt hydrolase (BSH) against glycocholic and taurodeoxycholic acids (GCA and TDCA). Cholesterol assimilation was peculiar characteristic of two strains belonging to the species B. bifidum (B. bifidum MB 107 and B. bifidum MB 109), which removed 81 and 50 mg of cholesterol per gram of biomass, being the median of specific cholesterol absorption by bifidobacteria 19 mg/g. Significant differences in BSH activities were not established among bifidobacterial species. However, the screening resulted in the selection of promising strains able to efficiently deconjugate GCA and TDCA. No relationship was recognized between BSH phenotype and the extent of cholesterol assimilation. On the basis of cholesterol assimilation or BSHGCA and BSHTDCA activities, B. bifidum MB 109 (DSMZ 23731), B. breve MB 113 (DSMZ 23732), and B. animalis subsp. lactis MB 2409 (DSMZ 23733) were combined in a probiotic mixture to be fed to hypercholesterolemic rats. The administration of this probiotic formulation resulted in a significant reduction of total cholesterol and low-density cholesterol (LDL-C), whereas it did not affect high-density cholesterol (HDL-C) and HDL-C/LDL-C ratio. PMID:23872958

  8. Prospective multicentre study of the effect of voluntary plasmapheresis on plasma cholesterol levels in donors

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Bray, M; Wisdom, C; Wada, S; Johnson, BR; Grifols-Roura, V; Grifols-Lucas, V

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives LDL apheresis is used to treat patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia, and low-volume plasmapheresis for plasma donation may similarly lower cholesterol levels in some donors. This study was designed to assess the effect of plasmapheresis on total, LDL and HDL cholesterol levels in a plasma donor population. Materials and Methods This was a prospective, unblinded longitudinal cohort study in which a blood sample was obtained for analysis before each donation. Data from 663 donors were analysed using a multivariable repeated measures regression model with a general estimating equations approach with changes in cholesterol as the primary outcome measure. Results The model predicted a significant decrease in total and LDL cholesterol for both genders and all baseline cholesterol levels (P < 0·01). The greatest total cholesterol decreases (women, −46·8 mg/dL; men, −32·2 mg/dL) were associated with high baseline levels and 2–4 days between donations. Small but statistically significant increases (P ≤ 0·01) in HDL cholesterol were predicted for donors with low baseline levels. Conclusions These results suggest that, in donors with elevated baseline cholesterol levels, total and LDL cholesterol levels may decrease during routine voluntary plasmapheresis. PMID:23517282

  9. The amount of dietary cholesterol changes the mode of effects of (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid on lipoprotein cholesterol in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei-Huei; Lu, Shao-Chun; Huang, Po-Chao; Liu, Young-Chau; Liu, Shyun-Yeu

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of the interaction between dietary (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and different dietary cholesterol content on plasma and liver cholesterol in hamsters. Male Syrian hamsters consumed diets containing an incremental increase in dietary cholesterol content (0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2%, w/w) with either (n-3) PUFA (21 g/100 g fatty acids) or (n-6) PUFA (37.4 g/100 g fatty acids) fat for 6 weeks. In hamsters fed the nonatherogenic diet (0 or 0.025% dietary cholesterol), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-cholesterol levels in the (n-3) PUFA group were not significantly different from those in the (n-6) PUFA group, and low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol levels in the (n-3) PUFA group were significantly lower than those in the (n-6) PUFA group. In contrast, in hamsters fed the atherogenic diet (0.1 or 0.2% dietary cholesterol), VLDL- and LDL-cholesterol levels in the (n-3) PUFA group were significantly higher than those in the (n-6) PUFA group, in a dose-dependent manner. When the hamsters were fed with 0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1 or 0.2% (w/w) dietary cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration was significantly lower in the (n-3) PUFA group than those in the (n-6) PUFA group. Hepatic cholesteryl esters were significantly lower, while hepatic microsomal acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase activity and VLDL-cholesteryl esters were significantly higher in hamsters fed (n-3) PUFA with the atherogenic diet (0.1 or 0.2% dietary cholesterol) than in those fed (n-6) PUFA with the atherogenic diet. Our results demonstrate that the amount of dietary cholesterol is an important factor in determining the mode and extent of effects of dietary (n-3) PUFA, especially on VLDL- and LDL-cholesterol levels. When dietary cholesterol intake was above 0.1% (w/w), the plasma cholesterol-lowering effect of (n-3) PUFA disappeared, and instead, it showed a cholesterol-increasing effect. However, the

  10. Isoform dependent regulation of human HCN channels by cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Oliver; D’Avanzo, Nazzareno

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol has been shown to regulate numerous ion channels. HCN channels represent the molecular correlate of If or Ih in sinoatrial node (SAN) and neuronal cells. Previous studies have implicated a role for cholesterol in the regulation of rabbit HCN4 channels with effects on pacing in the rabbit SAN. Using electrophysiological and biochemical approaches, we examined the effect of cholesterol modulation on human HCN1, HCN2 and HCN4 isoforms. Patch-clamp experiments uncovered isoform specific differences in the effect of cholesterol on gating kinetics upon depletion by MβCD or mevastatin or enrichment using MβCD/cholesterol. Most dramatically cholesterol had isoform specific effects on mode-shifting, which has been suggested to play a key role in stabilizing firing rate and preventing arrhythmic firing in SAN cells and neurons. Mode-shifting in HCN1 channels was insensitive to cholesterol manipulation, while HCN2 and HCN4 were strongly affected. Trafficking of each isoform to the plasma membrane was also affected by cholesterol modulation differentially between isoforms, however, each isoform remained localized in lipid raft domains after cholesterol depletion. These effects may contribute to the side effects of cholesterol reducing therapies including disrupted heart rhythm and neuropathic pain, as well as the susceptibility of sinus dysfunction in patients with elevated cholesterol. PMID:26404789

  11. Implications of Total to High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio Discordance With Alternative Lipid Parameters for Coronary Atheroma Progression and Cardiovascular Events.

    PubMed

    Elshazly, Mohamed B; Nicholls, Stephen J; Nissen, Steven E; St John, Julie; Martin, Seth S; Jones, Steven R; Quispe, Renato; Stegman, Brian; Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat; Puri, Rishi

    2016-09-01

    The total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TC/HDL-C) ratio may quantify atherogenic lipoproteins beyond low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), non-HDL-C and apolipoprotein B (apoB). We analyzed pooled data from 9 trials involving 4,957 patients with coronary artery disease undergoing serial intravascular ultrasonography to assess changes in percent atheroma volume (ΔPAV) and 2-year major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) rates when TC/HDL-C levels were discordant with LDL-C, non-HDL-C, and apoB. Discordance was investigated when lipid levels were stratified by HDL-C 3.3 vs LDL-C 80, non-HDL-C 107, and apoB 76 mg/dl) or HDL-C 2.5 vs LDL-C 70, non-HDL-C 89, and apoB 59 mg/dl). When stratified by median levels, TC/HDL-C was commonly observed to be discordant with LDL-C (26%), non-HDL-C (20%), and apoB (27%). In patients with LDL-C, non-HDL-C, or apoB HDL-C ≥median demonstrated less PAV regression and greater MACE (18.9%, 17.7%, 19.8%, respectively) compared with TC/HDL-C HDL-C, or apoB ≥median, those with a discordant TC/HDL-C HDL-C ≥median (24.7%, 24.2%, 26.4%; p <0.001, 0.003, 0.03, respectively). In conclusion, the TC/HDL-C ratio reclassifies atheroma progression and MACE rates when discordant with LDL-C, non-HDL-C, and apoB within subjects. Thus, using the ratio, in addition to individual lipid parameters, may identify patients who may benefit from more intensive lipid modification. PMID:27392507

  12. Get Your Cholesterol Checked

    MedlinePlus

    ... You also get cholesterol by eating foods like egg yolks, fatty meats, and regular cheese. If you have too much cholesterol in your body, it can build up inside your blood vessels and make it hard for blood to ...

  13. Evidence for low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in Australian indigenous peoples: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are a strong, independent, but poorly understood risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although this atherogenic lipid abnormality has been widely reported in Australia’s Indigenous peoples, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, the evidence has not come under systematic review. This review therefore examines published data for Indigenous Australians reporting 1) mean HDL-C levels for both sexes and 2) factors associated with low HDL-C. Methods PubMed, Medline and Informit ATSI Health databases were systematically searched between 1950 and 2012 for studies on Indigenous Australians reporting mean HDL-C levels in both sexes. Retrieved studies were evaluated by standard criteria. Low HDL-C was defined as: <1.0 mmol/L. Analyses of primary data associating measures of HDL-C with other CVD risk factors were also performed. Results Fifteen of 93 retrieved studies were identified for inclusion. These provided 58 mean HDL-C levels; 29 for each sex, most obtained in rural/regional (20%) or remote settings (60%) and including 51–1641 participants. For Australian Aborigines, mean HDL-C values ranged between 0.81-1.50 mmol/L in females and 0.76-1.60 mmol/L in males. Two of 15 studies reported HDL-C levels for Torres Strait Islander populations, mean HDL-C: 1.00 or 1.11 mmol/L for females and 1.01 or 1.13 mmol/L for males. Low HDL-C was observed only in rural/regional and remote settings - not in national or urban studies (n = 3) in either gender. Diabetes prevalence, mean/median waist-to-hip ratio and circulating C-reactive protein levels were negatively associated with HDL-C levels (all P < 0.05). Thirty-four per cent of studies reported lower mean HDL-C levels in females than in males. Conclusions Very low mean HDL-C levels are common in Australian Indigenous populations living in rural and remote communities. Inverse associations between HDL-C and central obesity, diabetes

  14. Printed Circuit Board Design (PCB) with HDL Designer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkert, Thomas K.; LaFourcade, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: PCB design with HDL designer, design process and schematic capture - symbols and diagrams: 1. Motivation: time savings, money savings, simplicity. 2. Approach: use single tool PCB for FPGA design, more FPGA designs than PCB designers. 3. Use HDL designer for schematic capture.

  15. Myeloperoxidase, paraoxonase-1, and HDL form a functional ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Wu, Zhiping; Riwanto, Meliana; Gao, Shengqiang; Levison, Bruce S; Gu, Xiaodong; Fu, Xiaoming; Wagner, Matthew A; Besler, Christian; Gerstenecker, Gary; Zhang, Renliang; Li, Xin-Min; DiDonato, Anthony J; Gogonea, Valentin; Tang, W H Wilson; Smith, Jonathan D; Plow, Edward F; Fox, Paul L; Shih, Diana M; Lusis, Aldons J; Fisher, Edward A; DiDonato, Joseph A; Landmesser, Ulf; Hazen, Stanley L

    2013-09-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) are high-density lipoprotein-associated (HDL-associated) proteins mechanistically linked to inflammation, oxidant stress, and atherosclerosis. MPO is a source of ROS during inflammation and can oxidize apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) of HDL, impairing its atheroprotective functions. In contrast, PON1 fosters systemic antioxidant effects and promotes some of the atheroprotective properties attributed to HDL. Here, we demonstrate that MPO, PON1, and HDL bind to one another, forming a ternary complex, wherein PON1 partially inhibits MPO activity, while MPO inactivates PON1. MPO oxidizes PON1 on tyrosine 71 (Tyr71), a modified residue found in human atheroma that is critical for HDL binding and PON1 function. Acute inflammation model studies with transgenic and knockout mice for either PON1 or MPO confirmed that MPO and PON1 reciprocally modulate each other's function in vivo. Further structure and function studies identified critical contact sites between APOA1 within HDL, PON1, and MPO, and proteomics studies of HDL recovered from acute coronary syndrome (ACS) subjects revealed enhanced chlorotyrosine content, site-specific PON1 methionine oxidation, and reduced PON1 activity. HDL thus serves as a scaffold upon which MPO and PON1 interact during inflammation, whereupon PON1 binding partially inhibits MPO activity, and MPO promotes site-specific oxidative modification and impairment of PON1 and APOA1 function. PMID:23908111

  16. Lack of Association between High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Angiographic Coronary Lesion Severity in Chinese Patients with Low Background Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chieh-Shou; Chen, Kuan-Ju; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng; Yang, Ya-Ling; Liu, Tsun-Jui; Chang, Wei-Chun; Wang, Kuo-Yang; Lee, Wen-Lieng

    2015-01-01

    Background The atheroprotective role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) particles as measured by HDL-C level in coronary arterial disease (CAD) remains unsettled. The aim of our study was to ascertain whether HDL-C was associated with the development and severity of coronary artery disease in Chinese patients who underwent coronary angiogram with low background Low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) levels, which has not been previously investigated. Methods Between March 1995 and May 2000, 566 consecutive patients (408 males, 66.7 ± 11.3 years of age) with background LDL-C less than 100 mg/dl who underwent coronary artery angiography at our cath lab for suspected CAD were retrospectively recruited into the study. The severity of coronary lesions was measured by conventional coronary angiography and modified Gensini scores. Results In those subjects with significant coronary lesions, there were more males and conventional CAD risk factors of diabetes mellitus, smoking, and chronic renal disease. They were also older compared to those in the control group. However, total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglyceride levels and use of statins were similar in both groups. In those subjects with significant coronary lesions, there was no difference in conventional coronary lesion severity or modified Gensini score between the quartered HDL-C subgroups. Furthermore, there was no significant correlation between serum HDL-C level and modified Gensini scores. In linear regression analysis, HDL-C was not an independent predictor for modified Gensini scores. Furthermore, HDL-C was also not an independent risk factor for the presence of significant coronary lesions in low LDL-C patients in logistic regression analysis. Conclusions In Chinese patients with low background LDL-C, serum HDL-C was not associated with development of CAD or lesion severity in patients with suspected CAD. Therefore, HDL-C did not appear to be atheroprotective in these patients. PMID:27122918

  17. Association of Triple Therapy with Improvement in Cholesterol Profiles over Two Year Follow-up in the TEAR Trial

    PubMed Central

    Charles-Schoeman, Christina; Wang, Xiaoyan; Lee, Yuen Yin; Shahbazian, Ani; Navarro-Millán, Iris; Yang, Shuo; Chen, Lang; Cofield, Stacey S; Moreland, Larry W; O’Dell, James; Bathon, Joan; Paulus, Harold; Bridges, S. Louis; Curtis, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate long term changes in cholesterol levels in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients randomized to initiate methotrexate (MTX) monotherapy, methotrexate + etanercept (MTX+ETA), or triple therapy (TT) [MTX + sulfasalazine (SSZ) + hydroxychloroquine (HCQ)] in the Treatment of Early Aggressive Rheumatoid Arthritis (TEAR) trial. Methods Total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels were analyzed in 416 patients participating in the TEAR trial over 102 weeks of follow-up. Associations of cholesterol changes with disease activity and drug treatment were evaluated using repeated measures analysis with mixed effect linear models to model the within-subject covariance over time. Results Mixed effect models controlling for traditional CV risk factors, TEAR treatment, and baseline prednisone and statin use demonstrated significant inverse associations of RA disease activity with changes in cholesterol over time. Decreases in DAS28, CRP, or ESR were associated with increases in HDL-C, LDL-C, and TC in all treatment groups (p values <0.001–0.035). TT was strongly associated with higher HDL-C and lower LDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratios (p values <0.001) compared to MTX monotherapy and MTX + ETA over two year follow-up. Conclusion Decreases in RA disease activity over long term follow-up was associated with increases in cholesterol in early RA patients treated with either biologic or non-biologic therapies. The use of TT over two year follow-up was associated with higher HDL-C and lower LDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratios compared to MTX monotherapy or MTX + ETA combination therapy. PMID:26606398

  18. Increased plasma cholesterol esterification by LCAT reduces diet-induced atherosclerosis in SR-BI knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Seth G; Rousset, Xavier; Esmail, Safiya; Zarzour, Abdalrahman; Jin, Xueting; Collins, Heidi L; Sampson, Maureen; Stonik, John; Demosky, Stephen; Malide, Daniela A; Freeman, Lita; Vaisman, Boris L; Kruth, Howard S; Adelman, Steven J; Remaley, Alan T

    2015-07-01

    LCAT, a plasma enzyme that esterifies cholesterol, has been proposed to play an antiatherogenic role, but animal and epidemiologic studies have yielded conflicting results. To gain insight into LCAT and the role of free cholesterol (FC) in atherosclerosis, we examined the effect of LCAT over- and underexpression in diet-induced atherosclerosis in scavenger receptor class B member I-deficient [Scarab(-/-)] mice, which have a secondary defect in cholesterol esterification. Scarab(-/-)×LCAT-null [Lcat(-/-)] mice had a decrease in HDL-cholesterol and a high plasma ratio of FC/total cholesterol (TC) (0.88 ± 0.033) and a marked increase in VLDL-cholesterol (VLDL-C) on a high-fat diet. Scarab(-/-)×LCAT-transgenic (Tg) mice had lower levels of VLDL-C and a normal plasma FC/TC ratio (0.28 ± 0.005). Plasma from Scarab(-/-)×LCAT-Tg mice also showed an increase in cholesterol esterification during in vitro cholesterol efflux, but increased esterification did not appear to affect the overall rate of cholesterol efflux or hepatic uptake of cholesterol. Scarab(-/-)×LCAT-Tg mice also displayed a 51% decrease in aortic sinus atherosclerosis compared with Scarab(-/-) mice (P < 0.05). In summary, we demonstrate that increased cholesterol esterification by LCAT is atheroprotective, most likely through its ability to increase HDL levels and decrease pro-atherogenic apoB-containing lipoprotein particles. PMID:25964513

  19. Cholesterol and Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrman, E. J.; Gopalan, Venkat

    2005-01-01

    There is a widespread belief among the public and even among chemist that plants do not contain cholesterol. This wrong belief is the result of the fact that plants generally contain only small quantities of cholesterol and that analytical methods for the detection of cholesterol in this range were not developed until recently.

  20. HDL as a drug and nucleic acid delivery vehicle

    PubMed Central

    Lacko, Andras G.; Sabnis, Nirupama A.; Nagarajan, Bhavani; McConathy, Walter J.

    2015-01-01

    This review is intended to evaluate the research findings and potential clinical applications of drug transport systems, developed based on the concepts of the structure/function and physiological role(s) of high density lipoprotein type nanoparticles. These macromolecules provide targeted transport of cholesteryl esters (a highly lipophilic payload) in their natural/physiological environment. The ability to accommodate highly water insoluble constituents in their core regions enables High density lipoproteins (HDL) type nanoparticles to effectively transport hydrophobic drugs subsequent to systemic administration. Even though the application of reconstituted HDL in the treatment of a number of diseases is reviewed, the primary focus is on the application of HDL type drug delivery agents in cancer chemotherapy. The use of both native and synthetic HDL as drug delivery agents is compared to evaluate their respective potentials for commercial and clinical development. The current status and future perspectives for HDL type nanoparticles are discussed, including current obstacles and future applications in therapeutics. PMID:26578957

  1. Is HIV-1 infection associated with endothelial dysfunction in a population of African ancestry in South Africa?

    PubMed

    Fourie, C; van Rooyen, J; Pieters, M; Conradie, K; Hoekstra, T; Schutte, A

    2011-01-01

    The chronic infection status suffered by HIV-infected individuals promotes chronic arterial inflammation and injury, which leads to dysfunction of the endothelium, atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Although HIV-1 subtype C is prevalent in South Africa and accounts for almost a third of the infections worldwide, this subtype differs genetically from HIV-1 subtype B on which the majority of studies have been done. The objective of this study was to assess whether newly identified, never-treated, HIV-1-infected South African participants showed signs of endothelial dysfunction, accelerated atherosclerosis and increased blood coagulation. We compared 300 newly diagnosed (never antiretroviraltreated) HIV-infected participants to 300 age-, gender-, body mass index- and locality-matched uninfected controls. Levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides, interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), fibrinogen and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and carotid radialis pulse wave velocity (cr-PWV) were determined. The HIV-infected participants showed lower HDL-C and higher IL-6, CRP, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 levels compared to the uninfected controls. No differences in fibrinogen and PAI-1 levels were detected. A continuous positive trend of increasing age with cr-PWV was detected in the HIV-infected group. Our findings suggest inflammatory injury of the endothelium, pointing to endothelial dysfunction of never-treated HIV-1-infected South Africans of African ancestry. Although no indication of a prothrombotic state could be detected, there was an indication of accelerated vascular aging and probable early atherosclerosis in the older HIV-infected participants. PMID:21713302

  2. Apolipoprotein B but not LDL Cholesterol Is Associated With Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 2 Diabetic Whites

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Seth S.; Qasim, Atif N.; Mehta, Nehal N.; Wolfe, Megan; Terembula, Karen; Schwartz, Stanley; Iqbal, Nayyar; Schutta, Mark; Bagheri, Roshanak; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Evidence favors apolipoprotein B (apoB) over LDL cholesterol as a predictor of cardiovascular events, but data are lacking on coronary artery calcification (CAC), especially in type 2 diabetes, where LDL cholesterol may underestimate atherosclerotic burden. We investigated the hypothesis that apoB is a superior marker of CAC relative to LDL cholesterol. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed cross-sectional analyses of white subjects in two community-based studies: the Penn Diabetes Heart Study (N = 611 type 2 diabetic subjects, 71.4% men) and the Study of Inherited Risk of Coronary Atherosclerosis (N = 803 nondiabetic subjects, 52.8% men) using multivariate analysis of apoB and LDL cholesterol stratified by diabetes status. RESULTS In type 2 diabetes, apoB was associated with CAC after adjusting for age, sex, and medications [Tobit regression ratio of increased CAC for 1-SD increase in apoB; 1.36 (95% CI 1.06–1.75), P = 0.016] whereas LDL cholesterol was not [1.09 (0.85–1.41)]. In nondiabetic subjects, both were associated with CAC [apoB 1.65 (1.38–1.96), P < 0.001; LDL cholesterol 1.56 (1.30–1.86), P < 0.001]. In combined analysis of diabetic and nondiabetic subjects, apoB provided value in predicting CAC scores beyond LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol and triglyceride/HDL cholesterol ratios, and marginally beyond non-HDL cholesterol. CONCLUSIONS Plasma apoB, but not LDL cholesterol, levels were associated with CAC scores in type 2 diabetic whites. ApoB levels may be particularly useful in assessing atherosclerotic burden and cardiovascular risk in type 2 diabetes. PMID:19491209

  3. Microvascular dysfunction in schizophrenia: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Martin W; Martin, Billie-Jean; Fung, Marinda; Pajevic, Milada; Anderson, Todd J; Raedler, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia is a mental illness associated with cardiovascular disease at a younger age than in the general population. Endothelial dysfunction has predictive value for future cardiovascular events; however, the impact of a diagnosis of schizophrenia on this marker is unknown. Aims: We tested the hypothesis that subjects with schizophrenia have impaired endothelial function. Methods: A total of 102 subjects (34.5±7.5 years) participated in this study. This sample consisted of 51 subjects with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 51 healthy subjects, who were matched for age (P=0.442), sex (P>0.999), and smoking status (P=0.842). Peripheral artery microvascular and conduit vessel endothelial function was measured using hyperemic velocity time integral (VTI), pulse arterial tonometry (PAT), and flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Results: Significantly lower values of VTI were noted in subjects with schizophrenia (104.9±33.0 vs. 129.1±33.8 cm, P<0.001), whereas FMD (P=0.933) and PAT (P=0.862) did not differ between the two groups. A multivariable-linear-regression analysis, built on data from univariate and partial correlations, showed that only schizophrenia, sex, lipid-lowering medications, antihypertensive medications, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol were predictive of attenuated VTI, whereas age, ethnicity, family history of cardiovascular disease, smoking status, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), antidiabetic medications, antidepressant medications, mood stabilizers, benzodiazepines, and anticholinergic medications did not predict VTI in this model (adjusted R 2=0.248). Conclusions: Our findings suggest that a diagnosis of schizophrenia is associated with impaired microvascular function as indicated by lower values of VTI, irrespective of many other clinical characteristics. It might be an early indicator of

  4. Synthesis of HDL apolipoproteins by rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, M.M.; Kelley, M.; Zannis, V.I.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have used 2D-PAGE to study the synthesis, intracellular modification, and secretion of rat HDL apolipoproteins by primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. ApoA-IV, apoA-II and apoE synthesized after a 10 min pulse with /sup 35/S-methionine coincided on 2D-gels with their corresponding plasma forms and they were not modified further intracellularly or following secretion. A fraction (< 10%) of apoE was modified intracellularly to minor isoprotein forms that were insensitive to neuraminidase treatment. These later forms also constituted a minor component of the secreted and plasma rat apoE. The intracellular and newly secreted apoA-I differed from its plasma counterpart by -1 charge as described previously. The intracellular forms of rat apoA-I, apoA-IV and unmodified apoE differed from the products of cell free translation of rat liver mRNA by +1 charge. Their findings (a) establish the charge relationship between nascent and plasma rat apolipoproteins, (b) indicate that rat apoA-I, apoA-II and apoA-IV are not modified intracellularly, (c) suggest that there is a difference in the post-translational modification patterns between the rat and human hepatic apoE.

  5. Role of hepatic lipase and endothelial lipase in high-density lipoprotein-mediated reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Annema, Wijtske; Tietge, Uwe J F

    2011-06-01

    Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) constitutes a key part of the atheroprotective properties of high-density lipoproteins (HDL). Hepatic lipase (HL) and endothelial lipase (EL) are negative regulators of plasma HDL cholesterol levels. Although overexpression of EL decreases overall macrophage-to-feces RCT, knockout of both HL and EL leaves RCT essentially unaffected. With respect to important individual steps of RCT, current data on the role of EL and HL in cholesterol efflux are not conclusive. Both enzymes increase he