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Sample records for dysmetria experimental evidence

  1. Mechanisms of human cerebellar dysmetria: experimental evidence and current conceptual bases

    PubMed Central

    Manto, Mario

    2009-01-01

    The human cerebellum contains more neurons than any other region in the brain and is a major actor in motor control. Cerebellar circuitry is unique by its stereotyped architecture and its modular organization. Understanding the motor codes underlying the organization of limb movement and the rules of signal processing applied by the cerebellar circuits remains a major challenge for the forthcoming decades. One of the cardinal deficits observed in cerebellar patients is dysmetria, designating the inability to perform accurate movements. Patients overshoot (hypermetria) or undershoot (hypometria) the aimed target during voluntary goal-directed tasks. The mechanisms of cerebellar dysmetria are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of cerebellar pathways in controlling fundamental aspects of movement control such as anticipation, timing of motor commands, sensorimotor synchronization, maintenance of sensorimotor associations and tuning of the magnitudes of muscle activities. An overview of recent advances in our understanding of the contribution of cerebellar circuitry in the elaboration and shaping of motor commands is provided, with a discussion on the relevant anatomy, the results of the neurophysiological studies, and the computational models which have been proposed to approach cerebellar function. PMID:19364396

  2. Communicating Uncertain Experimental Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Alexander L.; Fischhoff, Baruch

    2014-01-01

    Four experiments examined when laypeople attribute unexpected experimental outcomes to error, in foresight and in hindsight, along with their judgments of whether the data should be published. Participants read vignettes describing hypothetical experiments, along with the result of the initial observation, considered as either a possibility…

  3. Sexually antagonistic genes: experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Rice, W R

    1992-06-01

    When selection differs between the sexes, a mutation beneficial to one sex may be harmful to the other (sexually antagonistic). Because the sexes share a common gene pool, selection in one sex can interfere with the other's adaptive evolution. Theory predicts that sexually antagonistic mutations should accumulate in tight linkage with a new sex-determining gene, even when the harm to benefit ratio is high. Genetic markers and artificial selection were used to make a pair of autosomal genes segregate like a new pair of sex-determining genes in a Drosophila melanogaster model system. A 29-generation study provides experimental evidence that sexually antagonistic genes may be common in nature and will accumulate in response to a new sex-determining gene. PMID:1604317

  4. Schizophrenia and cognitive dysmetria: a positron-emission tomography study of dysfunctional prefrontal-thalamic-cerebellar circuitry.

    PubMed Central

    Andreasen, N C; O'Leary, D S; Cizadlo, T; Arndt, S; Rezai, K; Ponto, L L; Watkins, G L; Hichwa, R D

    1996-01-01

    Patients suffering from schizophrenia display subtle cognitive abnormalities that may reflect a difficulty in rapidly coordinating the steps that occur in a variety of mental activities. Working interactively with the prefrontal cortex, the cerebellum may play a role in coordinating both motor and cognitive performance. This positron-emission tomography study suggests the presence of a prefrontal-thalamic-cerebellar network that is activated when normal subjects recall complex narrative material, but is dysfunctional in schizophrenic patients when they perform the same task. These results support a role for the cerebellum in cognitive functions and suggest that patients with schizophrenia may suffer from a "cognitive dysmetria" due to dysfunctional prefrontal-thalamic-cerebellar circuitry. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8790444

  5. Experimental evidence of quantum randomness incomputability

    SciTech Connect

    Calude, Cristian S.; Dinneen, Michael J.; Dumitrescu, Monica; Svozil, Karl

    2010-08-15

    In contrast with software-generated randomness (called pseudo-randomness), quantum randomness can be proven incomputable; that is, it is not exactly reproducible by any algorithm. We provide experimental evidence of incomputability--an asymptotic property--of quantum randomness by performing finite tests of randomness inspired by algorithmic information theory.

  6. Experimental evidence for Abraham pressure of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; She, Weilong; Peng, Nan; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2015-05-01

    The question of how much momentum light carries in media has been debated for over a century. Two rivalling theories, one from 1908 by Hermann Minkowski and the other from 1909 by Max Abraham, predict the exact opposite when light enters an optical material: a pulling force in Minkowski's case and a pushing force in Abraham's. Most experimental tests have agreed with Minkowski's theory, but here we report the first quantitative experimental evidence for Abraham's pushing pressure of light. Our results matter in optofluidics and optomechanics, and wherever light exerts mechanical pressure.

  7. Experimental Evidence on Iterated Reasoning in Games

    PubMed Central

    Grehl, Sascha; Tutić, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence on two forms of iterated reasoning in games, i.e. backward induction and interactive knowledge. Besides reliable estimates of the cognitive skills of the subjects, our design allows us to disentangle two possible explanations for the observed limits in performed iterated reasoning: Restrictions in subjects’ cognitive abilities and their beliefs concerning the rationality of co-players. In comparison to previous literature, our estimates regarding subjects’ skills in iterated reasoning are quite pessimistic. Also, we find that beliefs concerning the rationality of co-players are completely irrelevant in explaining the observed limited amount of iterated reasoning in the dirty faces game. In addition, it is demonstrated that skills in backward induction are a solid predictor for skills in iterated knowledge, which points to some generalized ability of the subjects in iterated reasoning. PMID:26312486

  8. Experimental evidence of electromagnetic pollution of ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronenko, Vira; Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Denis

    multiple low orbiting satellites have confirmed a significant increase in their intensity over the populated areas of Europe and Asia. Recently, there are many experimental evidences of the existence of power line harmonic radiation (PLHR) in the ionosphere. Their spectra consist of succession of 50 (60) Hz harmonics which is accompanied by a set of lines separated by 50 (60) or 100 (120) Hz - the central frequency of which is shifted to high frequency. These lines cover rather wide band - according to the available experimental data, their central frequencies are observed from ~1.5 - 3 kHz up to 15 kHz, and recently the main mains frequencies are also observed. The examples of power line harmonic radiation, which were detected by “Sich-1M”, “Chibis-M” and “Demeter” satellites, have been presented and discussed. The available experimental data, as well as theoretical estimations, allow us with a high degree of certainty to say that the permanent satellite monitoring of the ionospheric and magnetospheric anthropogenic EM perturbations is necessary for: a) objective assessment and prediction of the space weather conditions; b) evaluation of the daily or seasonal changes in the level of energy consumption; c) construction of a map for estimation of near space EM pollution. This study is partially supported by SSAU contract N 4-03/13.

  9. Experimental Evidence of Chaos from Memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambuzza, Lucia Valentina; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Gale, Ella

    Until now, most memristor-based chaotic circuits proposed in the literature are based on mathematical models which assume ideal characteristics such as piecewise-linear or cubic nonlinearities. The idea, illustrated here and originating from the experimental approach for device characterization, is to realize a chaotic system exploiting the nonlinearity of only one memristor with a very simple experimental set-up using feedback. In this way, a simple circuit is obtained and chaos is experimentally observed and is confirmed by the calculation of the largest Lyapunov exponent. Numerical results using the Strukov model support the existence of robust chaos in our circuit. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental demonstration of chaos in a real memristor circuit and suggests that memristors are well placed for hardware encryption.

  10. Natural compounds as anticancer agents: Experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer prevention research has drawn much attention worldwide. It is believed that some types of cancer can be prevented by following a healthy life style. Cancer chemoprevention by either natural or synthetic agents is a promising route towards lowering cancer incidence. In recent years, the concept of cancer chemoprevention has evolved greatly. Experimental studies in animal models demonstrate that the reversal or suppression of premalignant lesions by chemopreventive agents is achievable. Natural occurring agents such as dietary phytochemicals, tea polyphenols and resveratrol show chemopreventive activity in animal models. Moreover, clinical trials for testing the safety and efficacy of a variety of natural agents in preventing or treating human malignancy have been ongoing. Here, we summarize experimental data on the chemopreventive or tumor suppressive effects of several natural compounds including curcumin, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, indole-3-carbinol, and vitamin D. PMID:24520533

  11. Experimental Evidence for a Wave Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Orvin

    1997-04-01

    I have previously reported (see Wagner Web Site) slow moving, charge and matter separating, longitudinal waves, threading through matter and space. The waves I report are apparently produced by oscillating sources such as the sun and the planets, electromagnetic sources, and experimentally using electromagnetic sources. Experimentally the excited wavelengths are found to be close to the dimensions of the electromagnetic source regardless of its frequency. Oscillations of these waves can explain the solar cycle and determine planet and other satellite locations: r=r0exp(0.625N) where N is an integer for a particular planet or satellite of a planet and r0 is the radius of the sun or planet when the satellites were placed. This equation describes waves that are speeding up as the density of the medium (dark matter?) decreases moving away from the source. These waves are found experimentally to produce standing waves around any source apparently due to special reflection from the medium. These observations are consistent with the idea that these waves produce a pattern around a star with matter tending to collect only at specific locations(N) to produce satellites.

  12. Reconciling Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Evidence on the Impact of Full-Day Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Chloe

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of how to interpret evidence on the impact of full-day kindergarten resulting from different study designs, and provides guidance on how this evidence taken in tandem may inform the design and implementation of full-day kindergarten policies. Incorporating both experimental and quasi-experimental estimates on…

  13. Experimental evidence of condensation-driven airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunyard, P.; Hodnett, M.; Poveda, G.; Burgos Salcedo, J. D.; Peña, C.

    2015-10-01

    The dominant "convection" model of atmospheric circulation is based on the premise that hot air expands and rises, to be replaced by colder air, thereby creating horizontal surface winds. A recent theory put forward by Makarieva and Gorshkov (2007, 2013) maintains that the primary motive force of atmospheric circulation derives from the intense condensation and sharp pressure reduction that is associated with regions where a high rate of evapotranspiration from natural closed-canopy forests provides the "fuel" for cloud formation. The net result of the "biotic pump" theory is that moist air flows from ocean to land, drawn in by the pressure changes associated with a high rate of condensation. To test the physics underpinning the biotic pump theory, namely that condensation of water vapour, at a sufficiently high rate, results in an uni-directional airflow, a 5 m tall experimental apparatus was designed and built, in which a 20 m3 body of atmospheric air is enclosed inside an annular 14 m long space (a "square donut") around which it can circulate freely, allowing for rotary air flows. One vertical side of the apparatus contains some 17 m of copper refrigeration coils, which cause condensation. The apparatus contains a series of sensors measuring temperature, humidity and barometric pressure every five seconds, and air flow every second. The laws of Newtonian physics are used in calculating the rate of condensation inside the apparatus. The results of more than one hundred experiments show a highly significant correlation, with r2 > 0.9, of airflow and the rate of condensation. The rotary air flows created appear to be consistent both in direction and velocity with the biotic pump hypothesis, the critical factor being the rate change in the partial pressure of water vapour in the enclosed body of atmospheric air. Air density changes, in terms of kinetic energy, are found to be orders of magnitude smaller than the kinetic energy of partial pressure change. The

  14. Experimental evidence for lattice effects in high temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, S.J.L.; Kwei, G.H.; Thompson, J.D.

    1994-01-18

    We present an overview of the experimental evidence for a role of the lattice in the mechanism of high temperature superconductivity. It appears unlikely that a solely conventional electron-phonon interaction produces the pairing. However, there is ample evidence of strong electron and spin to lattice coupling and observations of a response of the lattice to the electronic state. We draw attention to the importance of the local structure in discussions of lattice effects in high-{Tc} superconductivity.

  15. Rotational grazing on rangelands: Reconciliation of perception and experimental evidence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of overwhelming experimental evidence to the contrary, rotational grazing continues to be promoted and implemented as the only viable grazing strategy. The goals of this synthesis are to 1) reevaluate the complexity, underlying assumptions, and ecological processes of grazed ecosystems, 2) ...

  16. Single-Subject Experimental Design for Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byiers, Breanne J.; Reichle, Joe; Symons, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs) represent an important tool in the development and implementation of evidence-based practice in communication sciences and disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the strategies and tactics of SSEDs and their application in speech-language pathology research. Method: The authors…

  17. Experimental evidence of contagious yawning in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Gallup, Andrew C; Swartwood, Lexington; Militello, Janine; Sackett, Serena

    2015-09-01

    Experimental evidence of contagious yawning has only been documented in four mammalian species. Here, we report the results from two separate experimental studies designed to investigate the presence of contagious yawning in a social parrot, the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus). In Study 1, birds were paired in adjacent cages with and without visual barriers, and the temporal association of yawning was assessed between visual conditions. In Study 2, the same birds were exposed to video stimuli of both conspecific yawns and control behavior, and yawning frequency was compared between conditions. Results from both studies demonstrate that yawning is contagious. To date, this is the first experimental evidence of contagious yawning in a non-mammalian species. We propose that future research could use budgerigars to explore questions related to basic forms of empathic processing. PMID:26012708

  18. Experimental evidence of replica symmetry breaking in random lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofraniha, N.; Viola, I.; di Maria, F.; Barbarella, G.; Gigli, G.; Leuzzi, L.; Conti, C.

    2015-01-01

    Spin-glass theory is one of the leading paradigms of complex physics and describes condensed matter, neural networks and biological systems, ultracold atoms, random photonics and many other research fields. According to this theory, identical systems under identical conditions may reach different states. This effect is known as replica symmetry breaking and is revealed by the shape of the probability distribution function of an order parameter named the Parisi overlap. However, a direct experimental evidence in any field of research is still missing. Here we investigate pulse-to-pulse fluctuations in random lasers, we introduce and measure the analogue of the Parisi overlap in independent experimental realizations of the same disordered sample, and we find that the distribution function yields evidence of a transition to a glassy light phase compatible with a replica symmetry breaking.

  19. Experimental evidence of hyperbolic heat conduction in processed meat

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, K.; Kumar, S.; Vedavarz, A.; Moallemi, M.K.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to present experimental evidence of the wave nature of heat propagation in processed meat and to demonstrate that the hyperbolic heat conduction model is an accurate representation, on a macroscopic level, of the heat conduction process in such biological material. The value of the characteristic thermal time of a specific material, processed bologna meat, is determined experimentally. As a part of the work different thermophysical properties are also measured. The measured temperature distributions in the samples are compared with the Fourier results and significant deviation between the two is observed, especially during the initial stages of the transient conduction process. The measured values are found to match the theoretical non-Fourier hyperbolic predictions very well. The superposition of waves occurring inside the meat sample due to the hyperbolic nature of heat conduction is also proved experimentally. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Chemicals and cancer in humans: first evidence in experimental animals.

    PubMed Central

    Huff, J

    1993-01-01

    Certain human diseases have been traced to exposure to environmental and occupational chemicals. In many instances the first evidence of potential adverse effects came from experimental studies and were subsequently discovered in humans. Associations of human cancers, as a diverse group of diseases, and chemicals have been made since the middle 1700s. Since then, nearly 100 chemicals, mixtures of chemicals, or exposure circumstances are now recognized as being or strongly implicated as being carcinogenic to humans. Of the less than 1000 agents evaluated adequately for carcinogenicity in laboratory animals, a varying spectrum of data from studies on humans are available for only about 20-25%. So far, more than 60 agents are linked unequivocally as causing cancer in humans, and another 50 or so are strongly suspected of being carcinogenic to humans. Not all of these have been or can be evaluated in animals because some are industrial processes or "occupations," some are environmental and cultural risk factors, and some are mixtures of agents. For those that can be studied experimentally, the qualitative concordance between humans and animals approaches unity, and in every case there is at least one common organ site of cancer in both species. The evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals preceded that observed in humans for nearly 30 agents and is the subject of this paper. PMID:8354167

  1. The tripole vortex: Experimental evidence and explicit solutions.

    PubMed

    Kizner, Ziv; Khvoles, Ruvim

    2004-01-01

    Based on experimental evidence, explicit vorticity-distributed solutions to the Euler equations in two dimensions are constructed describing the tripole vortex. The vortex form and the solution outside the region of nonzero vorticity are derived analytically, while the interior is solved numerically. The continuous-vorticity solution reproduces the main features of the tripoles observed in laboratory experiments and numerical simulations-their shape, flow pattern, and the form of the nonlinear vorticity vs streamfunction relation. The approach followed in the construction of a tripole proves to be beneficial in the search for higher-order multipoles, an example being a smooth quadrupole solution. PMID:15324169

  2. Sleep Duration and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Epidemiologic and Experimental Evidence.

    PubMed

    Covassin, Naima; Singh, Prachi

    2016-03-01

    Inadequate sleep is increasingly pervasive, and the impact on health remains to be fully understood. The cardiovascular consequences alone appear to be substantial. This review summarizes epidemiologic evidence regarding the association between extremes of sleep duration and the prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular diseases. The adverse effects of experimental sleep loss on physiological functions are discussed, along with cardiovascular risk factors that may underlie the association with increased morbidity and mortality. Current data support the concept that inadequate sleep duration confers heightened cardiovascular risk. Thus implementation of preventative strategies may reduce the potential disease burden associated with this high-risk behavior. PMID:26972035

  3. Experimental Evidence for Dark Excitons in Monolayer WSe_{2}.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; You, Yumeng; Zhao, Shu Yang Frank; Heinz, Tony F

    2015-12-18

    Transition metal dichalcogenides in the class MX_{2} (M=Mo, W; X=S, Se) have been identified as direct-gap semiconductors in the monolayer limit. Here, we examine light emission of monolayer WSe_{2} using temperature-dependent photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. We present experimental evidence for the existence of an optically forbidden dark state of the band-gap exciton that lies tens of meV below the optically bright state. The presence of the dark state is manifest in the strong quenching of light emission observed at reduced temperatures. The experimental findings are consistent with theoretical predictions of spin-polarized conduction and valence bands at the K point of the Brillouin zone, with the minimum gap occurring between bands of opposite electron spin. PMID:26722944

  4. Dichlorvos carcinogenicity: an assessment of the weight of experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Mennear, J H

    1994-12-01

    After 30 years of experience with human exposure to dichlorvos (DDVP) in the home, workplace, and sickroom, the U.S. EPA has published its intent to revoke the food additive registration of this cholinesterase-inhibiting insecticide. The basis for the Agency action is the result of the National Toxicology Program (NTP) toxicology and carcinogenesis study of DDVP in rats and mice (NTP Technical Report No. 342, September 1989). In those experiments the NTP considered the result in the female mouse portion of the study to afford unequivocal evidence of carcinogenicity. The NTP considered the interpretations of the male and female rat and the male mouse studies to be less than clear. Despite the NTP interpretation, the EPA considers the male rat data (increased incidence of mononuclear cell leukemia) to be sufficient to warrant the regulatory change. The purpose of this report is to summarize a review of the interpretation of the NTP data and to assess the predictive validity of the results relative to potential human health impact. Critical review of experimental data indicates that the evidence for a carcinogenic effect of DDVP in animals is equivocal. Further, DDVP possess no in vivo mutagenic activity in mammalian assay systems and it bears no significant structural similarity to known carcinogens. Therefore, a weight-of-the-evidence analysis leads to the conclusion that DDVP poses neither mutagenic nor carcinogenic risks to humans exposed under normal conditions of use of foreseeable conditions of misuse. PMID:7724838

  5. Experimental evidence for compositional syntax in bird calls.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshitaka N; Wheatcroft, David; Griesser, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Human language can express limitless meanings from a finite set of words based on combinatorial rules (i.e., compositional syntax). Although animal vocalizations may be comprised of different basic elements (notes), it remains unknown whether compositional syntax has also evolved in animals. Here we report the first experimental evidence for compositional syntax in a wild animal species, the Japanese great tit (Parus minor). Tits have over ten different notes in their vocal repertoire and use them either solely or in combination with other notes. Experiments reveal that receivers extract different meanings from 'ABC' (scan for danger) and 'D' notes (approach the caller), and a compound meaning from 'ABC-D' combinations. However, receivers rarely scan and approach when note ordering is artificially reversed ('D-ABC'). Thus, compositional syntax is not unique to human language but may have evolved independently in animals as one of the basic mechanisms of information transmission. PMID:26954097

  6. Experimental evidence for compositional syntax in bird calls

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshitaka N.; Wheatcroft, David; Griesser, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Human language can express limitless meanings from a finite set of words based on combinatorial rules (i.e., compositional syntax). Although animal vocalizations may be comprised of different basic elements (notes), it remains unknown whether compositional syntax has also evolved in animals. Here we report the first experimental evidence for compositional syntax in a wild animal species, the Japanese great tit (Parus minor). Tits have over ten different notes in their vocal repertoire and use them either solely or in combination with other notes. Experiments reveal that receivers extract different meanings from ‘ABC' (scan for danger) and ‘D' notes (approach the caller), and a compound meaning from ‘ABC–D' combinations. However, receivers rarely scan and approach when note ordering is artificially reversed (‘D–ABC'). Thus, compositional syntax is not unique to human language but may have evolved independently in animals as one of the basic mechanisms of information transmission. PMID:26954097

  7. Experimental evidence of the double-porosity effects in geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran Ngoc, Tien; Lewandowska, Jolanta; Bertin, Henri

    2014-06-01

    Double-porosity is an important characteristic of microstructure in a large range of geomaterials. It designs porous media with connected fissures/fractures or aggregated soils. The origin of double-porosity can be natural or/and it can result from mechanical, chemical or biological damage. The presence of double-porosity can significantly affect the behaviour of geomaterials. In this paper we provide an experimental evidence of the double-porosity effects by performing laboratory experiments. Series of tracer dispersion experiments (in saturated and unsaturated steady-state water flow conditions) in a physical model of double-porosity geomaterial were carried out. For the comparative purposes, experiments of the same type were also performed in a singleporosity model medium. The results clearly showed that the double-porosity microstructure leads to the non-Fickian behaviour of the tracer (early breakthrough and long tail) in both saturated and unsaturated cases.

  8. Experimental evidence for deterministic chaos in thermal pulse combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, C.S.; Thomas, J.F.; Richards, G.A.; Narayanaswami, L.L.

    1994-12-31

    Given the existence of chaotic oscillations in reacting chemical systems, it is reasonable to ask whether or not similar phenomena can occur in combustion. In this paper, the authors present experimental evidence that kinetically driven chaos occurs in a highly simplified thermal pulse combustor. The combustor is a well-stirred reactor with a tailpipe extending from one end. Fuel and air are injected into the combustion chamber through orifices in the end opposite the tailpipe. Propane with the fuel used in all cases. From the experimental data analyses, it is clear that deterministic chaos is an important factor in thermal pulse combustor dynamics. While the authors have only observed such behavior in this particular type combustor to date, they infer from their understanding of the origins of the chaos that it is likely to exist in other pulse combustors and even nonpulsing combustion. They speculate that realization of the importance of chaos in affecting flame stability could lead to significant changes in combustor design and control.

  9. Experimental evidence for action imitation in killer whales (Orcinus orca).

    PubMed

    Abramson, José Z; Hernández-Lloreda, Victoria; Call, Josep; Colmenares, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Comparative experimental studies of imitative learning have focused mainly on primates and birds. However, cetaceans are promising candidates to display imitative learning as they have evolved in socioecological settings that have selected for large brains, complex sociality, and coordinated predatory tactics. Here we tested imitative learning in killer whales, Orcinus orca. We used a 'do-as-other-does' paradigm in which 3 subjects witnessed a conspecific demonstrator's performance that included 15 familiar and 4 novel behaviours. The three subjects (1) learned the copy command signal 'Do that' very quickly, that is, 20 trials on average; (2) copied 100 % of the demonstrator's familiar and novel actions; (3) achieved full matches in the first attempt for 8-13 familiar behaviours (out of 15) and for the 2 novel behaviours (out of 2) in one subject; and (4) took no longer than 8 trials to accurately copy any familiar behaviour, and no longer than 16 trials to copy any novel behaviour. This study provides experimental evidence for body imitation, including production imitation, in killer whales that is comparable to that observed in dolphins tested under similar conditions. These findings suggest that imitative learning may underpin some of the group-specific traditions reported in killer whales in the field. PMID:22875725

  10. Female Rose Bitterling Prefer MHC-Dissimilar Males: Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Reichard, Martin; Spence, Rowena; Bryjová, Anna; Bryja, Josef; Smith, Carl

    2012-01-01

    The role of genetic benefits in female mate choice remains a controversial aspect of sexual selection theory. In contrast to “good allele” models of sexual selection, “compatible allele” models of mate choice predict that females prefer mates with alleles complementary to their own rather than conferring additive effects. While correlative results suggest complementary genetic effects to be plausible, direct experimental evidence is scarce. A previous study on the Chinese rose bitterling (Rhodeus ocellatus) demonstrated a positive correlation between female mate choice, offspring growth and survival, and the functional dissimilarity between the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) alleles of males and females. Here we directly tested whether females used cues associated with MHC genes to select genetically compatible males in an experimental framework. By sequentially pairing females with MHC similar and dissimilar males, based on a priori known MHC profiles, we showed that females discriminated between similar and dissimilar males and deposited significantly more eggs with MHC dissimilar males. Notably, the degree of dissimilarity was an important factor for female decision to mate, possibly indicating a potential threshold value of dissimilarity for decision making, or of an indirect effect of the MHC. PMID:22815816

  11. Experimental evidence that sperm maturation drives protandry in an ectotherm.

    PubMed

    Breedveld, Merel C; Fitze, Patrick S

    2016-09-01

    Protandry, i.e., the earlier arrival to breeding areas of males than females, has attracted a lot of scientific attention. However, evidence for the evolutionary hypotheses of protandry is surprisingly scarce. Here, we experimentally manipulate the time of emergence from hibernation of males, relative to females, in the common lizard, Zootoca vivipara. We test whether the timing of emergence affects sperm maturation and mating success, to disentangle among proposed selective advantages of protandry. Our results experimentally demonstrate that the timing of emergence affects the date of sperm presence. Moreover, the degree of protandry affected whether males had sperm upon their first encounter with females, but it did not affect the probability of copulating. Mating occurred independent of male fertility and mating during infertility was least common in early emerging males. Early emergence from hibernation by males, relative to females, thus increases the male's chance of fertilising eggs and later emergence from hibernation by females reduces the female's probability of mating with infertile males. These results point to direct reproductive benefits of protandry in males and females, where earlier emergence is predicted to increase the male's opportunities to inseminate mates, and later emergence reduces the female's probability of copulating with infertile males. This suggests that protandry evolved due to the time required for sperm maturation after emergence from hibernation. PMID:27259749

  12. Origin of Aphyric Phonolitic Magmas: Natural Evidences and Experimental Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masotta, M.; Freda, C.; Gaeta, M.

    2010-12-01

    Large explosive phonolitic eruptions are commonly characterised by aphyric juvenile eruptive products. Taking into account the low density contrast among phonolitic composition and settling phases (i.e., feldspar and leucite), the almost complete lack of crystals in these differentiated compositions rises the question of which process could produce such an efficient crystal-melt separation. Seeking for an answer, we have investigated crystallization in presence of a thermal gradient as a possible mechanism for crystal-melt separation, considering both chemical and physical effects acting on a variably crystallized system. Using a natural tephri-phonolitic composition as starting material (M.te Aguzzo scoria cone, Sabatini Volcanic District, Central Italy), we have reproduced thermal gradient-driven crystallization in order to simulate the crystallization process in a thermally zoned magma chamber. Crystallization degree (paragenesis made of clinopyroxene±feldspars±leucite) as well as melt composition varies along the thermal gradient. In particular, melt composition ranges from the tephri-phonolitic starting composition at the bottom of the charge (hottest and aphyric zone) to phonolitic at the top (cooler and heterogeneously-crystallised zone). Backscattered images of experimental products clearly evidence: i) the aphyric tephri-phonolitic melt region at the bottom of the charge; ii) a drop-shaped crystal clustering in the middle zone; and iii) large aphyric belt and pockets (up to 100 µm wide) of phonolitic melt, with large deformed-shaped sanidine occurring at their margin, at the charge top region. The latter two features, resulting from solid-melt displacements, suggest that the segregation of phonolitic melt can be related to crystal sinking and compaction. On the other hand, the compositional variability of the melt along the thermal gradient is directly related to the crystallization degree, indicating that chemical diffusion and thermal migration have

  13. Experimental evidence of hepatitis A virus infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Song, Young-Jo; Park, Woo-Jung; Park, Byung-Joo; Kwak, Sang-Woo; Kim, Yong-Hyeon; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sang-Won; Seo, Kun-Ho; Kang, Young-Sun; Park, Choi-Kyu; Song, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Soo

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the leading cause of acute viral hepatitis worldwide, with HAV infection being restricted to humans and nonhuman primates. In this study, HAV infection status was serologically determined in domestic pigs and experimental infections of HAV were attempted to verify HAV infectivity in pigs. Antibodies specific to HAV or HAV-like agents were detected in 3.5% of serum samples collected from pigs in swine farms. When the pigs were infected intravenously with 2 × 10(5) 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50 ) of HAV, shedding of the virus in feces, viremia, and seroconversion were detected. In pigs orally infected with the same quantity of HAV, viral shedding was detected only in feces. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver and bile of intravenously infected pigs, but only in the bile of orally infected pigs. In further experiments, pigs were intravenously infected with 6 × 10(5) TCID50 of HAV. Shedding of HAV in feces, along with viremia and seroconversion, were confirmed in infected pigs but not in sentinel pigs. HAV genomic RNA was detected in the liver, bile, spleen, lymph node, and kidney of the infected pigs. HAV antigenomic RNA was detected in the spleen of one HAV-infected pig, suggesting HAV replication in splenic cells. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed in the livers of infected pigs but not in controls. This is the first experimental evidence to demonstrate that human HAV strains can infect pigs. PMID:26381440

  14. Semantics guide infants' vowel learning: Computational and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Ter Schure, S M M; Junge, C M M; Boersma, P P G

    2016-05-01

    In their first year, infants' perceptual abilities zoom in on only those speech sound contrasts that are relevant for their language. Infants' lexicons do not yet contain sufficient minimal pairs to explain this phonetic categorization process. Therefore, researchers suggested a bottom-up learning mechanism: infants create categories aligned with the frequency distributions of sounds in their input. Recent evidence shows that this bottom-up mechanism may be complemented by the semantic context in which speech sounds occur, such as simultaneously present objects. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether discrimination of a non-native vowel contrast improves when sounds from the contrast were paired consistently or randomly with two distinct visually presented objects, while the distribution of speech tokens suggested a single broad category. This was assessed in two ways: computationally, namely in a neural network simulation, and experimentally, namely in a group of 8-month-old infants. The neural network, trained with a large set of sound-meaning pairs, revealed that two categories emerge only if sounds are consistently paired with objects. A group of 49 real 8-month-old infants did not immediately show sensitivity to the pairing condition; a later test at 18 months with some of the same infants, however, showed that this sensitivity at 8 months interacted with their vocabulary size at 18 months. This interaction can be explained by the idea that infants with larger future vocabularies are more positively influenced by consistent training (and/or more negatively influenced by inconsistent training) than infants with smaller future vocabularies. This suggests that consistent pairing with distinct visual objects can help infants to discriminate speech sounds even when the auditory information does not signal a distinction. Together our results give computational as well as experimental support for the idea that semantic context plays a role in disambiguating

  15. Mining experimental evidence of molecular function claims from the literature

    PubMed Central

    Crangle, Colleen E.; Cherry, J. Michael; Hong, Eurie L.; Zbyslaw, Alex; Wong, Limsoon

    2011-01-01

    Motivation The rate at which gene-related findings appear in the scientific literature makes it difficult if not impossible for biomedical scientists to keep fully informed and up to date. The importance of these findings argues for the development of automated methods that can find, extract and summarize this information. This article reports on methods for determining the molecular function claims that are being made in a scientific article, specifically those that are backed by experimental evidence. Results The most significant result is that for molecular function claims based on direct assays, our methods achieved recall of 70.7% and precision of 65.7%. Furthermore, our methods correctly identified in the text 44.6% of the specific molecular function claims backed up by direct assays, but with a precision of only 0.92%, a disappointing outcome that led to an examination of the different kinds of errors. These results were based on an analysis of 1823 articles from the literature of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast). Availability The annotation files for S.cerevisiae are available from ftp://genome-ftp.stanford.edu/pub/yeast/data_download/literature_curation/gene_association.sgd.gz. The draft protocol vocabulary is available by request from the first author. Contact crangle@converspeech.com PMID:17942445

  16. Experimental evidence for bedrock erosion by suspended sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheingross, J. S.; Brun, F.; Lo, D. Y.; Omerdin, K.; Lamb, M. P.

    2013-12-01

    Fluvial bedrock incision influences channel evolution and sets the pace of landscape lowering. Bedrock incision often occurs via abrasion, and existing theory is divided on the erosional efficiency of sediment transported in suspension versus bed load, due in part to a lack of data to test model predictions. This represents a major knowledge gap as suspended sediment can account for the majority of the total fluvial sediment load, and untested models make opposite predictions of bedrock erosion in steep channels and during large floods. We performed controlled abrasion mill experiments examining suspended and bed load erosion, making use of an erodible polyurethane foam substrate as a bedrock analog to overcome previous experimental limitations and allow for measureable suspension erosion. Our results show foam erodes similar to natural rock, where erodibility is a function of tensile strength and density. To explore the role of the mode of sediment transport on erosion, we varied sediment size from gravel (42 mm diameter) to medium sand (0.4 mm diameter), while holding fixed hydraulics, sediment load, and substrate strength. Under these conditions, volumetric erosion rates decreased across the bed load (~101 - 103 cm3/hr) to suspended load (~0.01 - 100 cm3/hr) transition due to lower near-bed sediment concentrations (~25 g/l vs. 115 g/l), slower settling velocity (0.09 m/s vs. 0.49 m/s), and viscous damping of impacts (for particle Stokes numbers less than ~75) for suspended particles. Our results provide direct experimental evidence of erosion by suspended load, and upscaling results to field scale shows suspension erosion can outpace bed load erosion by up to a factor ~4 during large floods which suspend coarse sand and gravel, and where suspended sediment dominates the total load. These results imply that suspension erosion may also dominate on very steep slopes where commonly used bedrock incision models (which ignore suspension erosion) predict zero erosion

  17. Decompression to altitude: assumptions, experimental evidence, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Foster, Philip P; Butler, Bruce D

    2009-02-01

    Although differences exist, hypobaric and hyperbaric exposures share common physiological, biochemical, and clinical features, and their comparison may provide further insight into the mechanisms of decompression stress. Although altitude decompression illness (DCI) has been experienced by high-altitude Air Force pilots and is common in ground-based experiments simulating decompression profiles of extravehicular activities (EVAs) or astronauts' space walks, no case has been reported during actual EVAs in the non-weight-bearing microgravity environment of orbital space missions. We are uncertain whether gravity influences decompression outcomes via nitrogen tissue washout or via alterations related to skeletal muscle activity. However, robust experimental evidence demonstrated the role of skeletal muscle exercise, activities, and/or movement in bubble formation and DCI occurrence. Dualism of effects of exercise, positive or negative, on bubble formation and DCI is a striking feature in hypobaric exposure. Therefore, the discussion and the structure of this review are centered on those highlighted unresolved topics about the relationship between muscle activity, decompression, and microgravity. This article also provides, in the context of altitude decompression, an overview of the role of denitrogenation, metabolic gases, gas micronuclei, stabilization of bubbles, biochemical pathways activated by bubbles, nitric oxide, oxygen, anthropometric or physiological variables, Doppler-detectable bubbles, and potential arterialization of bubbles. These findings and uncertainties will produce further physiological challenges to solve in order to line up for the programmed human return to the Moon, the preparation for human exploration of Mars, and the EVAs implementation in a non-zero gravity environment. PMID:19074573

  18. Self-Organization of Blood Pressure Regulation: Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Fortrat, Jacques-Olivier; Levrard, Thibaud; Courcinous, Sandrine; Victor, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Blood pressure regulation is a prime example of homeostatic regulation. However, some characteristics of the cardiovascular system better match a non-linear self-organized system than a homeostatic one. To determine whether blood pressure regulation is self-organized, we repeated the seminal demonstration of self-organized control of movement, but applied it to the cardiovascular system. We looked for two distinctive features peculiar to self-organization: non-equilibrium phase transitions and hysteresis in their occurrence when the system is challenged. We challenged the cardiovascular system by means of slow, 20-min Tilt-Up and Tilt-Down tilt table tests in random order. We continuously determined the phase between oscillations at the breathing frequency of Total Peripheral Resistances and Heart Rate Variability by means of cross-spectral analysis. We looked for a significant phase drift during these procedures, which signed a non-equilibrium phase transition. We determined at which head-up tilt angle it occurred. We checked that this angle was significantly different between Tilt-Up and Tilt-Down to demonstrate hysteresis. We observed a significant non-equilibrium phase transition in nine healthy volunteers out of 11 with significant hysteresis (48.1 ± 7.5° and 21.8 ± 3.9° during Tilt-Up and Tilt-Down, respectively, p < 0.05). Our study shows experimental evidence of self-organized short-term blood pressure regulation. It provides new insights into blood pressure regulation and its related disorders. PMID:27065880

  19. Experimental evidence that wildflower strips increase pollinator visits to crops

    PubMed Central

    Feltham, Hannah; Park, Kirsty; Minderman, Jeroen; Goulson, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Wild bees provide a free and potentially diverse ecosystem service to farmers growing pollination-dependent crops. While many crops benefit from insect pollination, soft fruit crops, including strawberries are highly dependent on this ecosystem service to produce viable fruit. However, as a result of intensive farming practices and declining pollinator populations, farmers are increasingly turning to commercially reared bees to ensure that crops are adequately pollinated throughout the season. Wildflower strips are a commonly used measure aimed at the conservation of wild pollinators. It has been suggested that commercial crops may also benefit from the presence of noncrop flowers; however, the efficacy and economic benefits of sowing flower strips for crops remain relatively unstudied. In a study system that utilizes both wild and commercial pollinators, we test whether wildflower strips increase the number of visits to adjacent commercial strawberry crops by pollinating insects. We quantified this by experimentally sowing wildflower strips approximately 20 meters away from the crop and recording the number of pollinator visits to crops with, and without, flower strips. Between June and August 2013, we walked 292 crop transects at six farms in Scotland, recording a total of 2826 pollinators. On average, the frequency of pollinator visits was 25% higher for crops with adjacent flower strips compared to those without, with a combination of wild and commercial bumblebees (Bombus spp.) accounting for 67% of all pollinators observed. This effect was independent of other confounding effects, such as the number of flowers on the crop, date, and temperature. Synthesis and applications. This study provides evidence that soft fruit farmers can increase the number of pollinators that visit their crops by sowing inexpensive flower seed mixes nearby. By investing in this management option, farmers have the potential to increase and sustain pollinator populations over time

  20. Experimental evidence that wildflower strips increase pollinator visits to crops.

    PubMed

    Feltham, Hannah; Park, Kirsty; Minderman, Jeroen; Goulson, Dave

    2015-08-01

    Wild bees provide a free and potentially diverse ecosystem service to farmers growing pollination-dependent crops. While many crops benefit from insect pollination, soft fruit crops, including strawberries are highly dependent on this ecosystem service to produce viable fruit. However, as a result of intensive farming practices and declining pollinator populations, farmers are increasingly turning to commercially reared bees to ensure that crops are adequately pollinated throughout the season. Wildflower strips are a commonly used measure aimed at the conservation of wild pollinators. It has been suggested that commercial crops may also benefit from the presence of noncrop flowers; however, the efficacy and economic benefits of sowing flower strips for crops remain relatively unstudied. In a study system that utilizes both wild and commercial pollinators, we test whether wildflower strips increase the number of visits to adjacent commercial strawberry crops by pollinating insects. We quantified this by experimentally sowing wildflower strips approximately 20 meters away from the crop and recording the number of pollinator visits to crops with, and without, flower strips. Between June and August 2013, we walked 292 crop transects at six farms in Scotland, recording a total of 2826 pollinators. On average, the frequency of pollinator visits was 25% higher for crops with adjacent flower strips compared to those without, with a combination of wild and commercial bumblebees (Bombus spp.) accounting for 67% of all pollinators observed. This effect was independent of other confounding effects, such as the number of flowers on the crop, date, and temperature. Synthesis and applications. This study provides evidence that soft fruit farmers can increase the number of pollinators that visit their crops by sowing inexpensive flower seed mixes nearby. By investing in this management option, farmers have the potential to increase and sustain pollinator populations over time

  1. Rotational grazing on rangelands: Reconciliation of perception and experimental evidence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The experimental evaluation of grazing systems represents a highly visible and lengthy chapter in the history of the rangeland profession. Although experimentation has largely concluded, contrasting interpretations still remain regarding the potential benefits of rotational grazing systems on rangel...

  2. Auger Recombination in Indium Gallium Nitride: Experimental Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krames, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Progress in InGaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) technology has resulted in white-light emitters with efficiencies far exceeding those of conventional light sources such as tungsten-filament-based incandescence and mercury-vapor based fluorescence. Indeed, by now efficacies exceeding 150 lumens per Watt for InGaN-based phosphor-converted white LEDs are claimed, which represent a 90% energy savings compared to the conventional incandescent (i.e., ``light bulb'') solution. However, these high performance levels are obtained under conditions of very low forward current-density for the InGaN LED and do not represent true operating conditions (nor cost-effective utilization) for the device. In order to reduce the cost (and thus increase market penetration of) solid-state lighting, more lumens per unit of semiconductor area are required which in practice necessitates higher drive current densities. Unfortunately, at these higher driver current densities, the internal quantum efficiency of InGaN-based LEDs is observed to decrease significantly. In the fall of 2007, researchers at the Advanced Laboratories of Philips Lumileds were the first to propose Auger recombination as the root-cause mechanism in InGaN which was behind this ``efficiency droop'' [1]. They further proposed to circumvent the problem by employing InGaN-based active region designs that maintain low carrier density, and demonstrated an LED device design that reaches a maximum quantum efficiency above 200 A/cm2, compared to ˜1-10 A/cm^2 for typical multiple-quantum-well heterostructures [2]. In this talk we will review the experimental evidence for Auger recombination in InGaN, beginning with the early work from 2007 and then considering additional work from more recent efforts to better understand the details behind this loss mechanism. [4pt] [1] Y. C. Shen, G. O. M"uller, S. Watanabe, N. F. Gardner, A. Munkholm, and M. R. Krames, ``Auger recombination in InGaN measured by photoluminescence'', Appl. Phys

  3. Education and Cognitive Development: The Evidence from Experimental Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Donald; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Reports the results of a series of experimental studies and a sociodemographic survey designed to determine the relative influence of age and educational experience in the development of cognitive skills as manifested in formal, psychological experiments. (CM)

  4. Experimental evidence of antiphase population dynamics in lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, Eduardo; Calderon, Oscar G.; Guerra, J.M.

    2005-10-15

    We report a direct experimental observation of antiphase oscillations in population dynamics in lasers. We show that these population oscillations are intrinsically related to the well-known antiphase polarization dynamics, i.e., the antiphase oscillations of two orthogonal polarization laser field states. We have used a class B Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser.

  5. Bilateral oligopoly in pollution permit markets - experimental evidence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We experimentally investigate behavior in a bilateral oligopoly using a supply function equilibria model (Klemper and Meyer 1989; Hendricks and McAfee 2010; Malueg and Yates 2009). We focus on the role that market size and the degree of firm heterogeneity have on the market equilibrium. Our results ...

  6. Bilateral oligopoly in pollution permit markets: experimental evidence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We experimentally investigate behavior in a bilateral oligopoly using a supply function equilibria model (Klemper and Meyer 1989; Hendricks and McAfee 2010; Malueg and Yates 2009). We focus on the role that market size and the degree of firm heterogeneity have on the market equilibrium. Our results ...

  7. Experimental Evidence for Phonemic Contrasts in a Nonhuman Vocal System

    PubMed Central

    Savage, James L.; Russell, Andrew F.; Townsend, Simon W.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to generate new meaning by rearranging combinations of meaningless sounds is a fundamental component of language. Although animal vocalizations often comprise combinations of meaningless acoustic elements, evidence that rearranging such combinations generates functionally distinct meaning is lacking. Here, we provide evidence for this basic ability in calls of the chestnut-crowned babbler (Pomatostomus ruficeps), a highly cooperative bird of the Australian arid zone. Using acoustic analyses, natural observations, and a series of controlled playback experiments, we demonstrate that this species uses the same acoustic elements (A and B) in different arrangements (AB or BAB) to create two functionally distinct vocalizations. Specifically, the addition or omission of a contextually meaningless acoustic element at a single position generates a phoneme-like contrast that is sufficient to distinguish the meaning between the two calls. Our results indicate that the capacity to rearrange meaningless sounds in order to create new signals occurs outside of humans. We suggest that phonemic contrasts represent a rudimentary form of phoneme structure and a potential early step towards the generative phonemic system of human language. PMID:26121619

  8. Experimental Evidence for Phonemic Contrasts in a Nonhuman Vocal System.

    PubMed

    Engesser, Sabrina; Crane, Jodie M S; Savage, James L; Russell, Andrew F; Townsend, Simon W

    2015-06-01

    The ability to generate new meaning by rearranging combinations of meaningless sounds is a fundamental component of language. Although animal vocalizations often comprise combinations of meaningless acoustic elements, evidence that rearranging such combinations generates functionally distinct meaning is lacking. Here, we provide evidence for this basic ability in calls of the chestnut-crowned babbler (Pomatostomus ruficeps), a highly cooperative bird of the Australian arid zone. Using acoustic analyses, natural observations, and a series of controlled playback experiments, we demonstrate that this species uses the same acoustic elements (A and B) in different arrangements (AB or BAB) to create two functionally distinct vocalizations. Specifically, the addition or omission of a contextually meaningless acoustic element at a single position generates a phoneme-like contrast that is sufficient to distinguish the meaning between the two calls. Our results indicate that the capacity to rearrange meaningless sounds in order to create new signals occurs outside of humans. We suggest that phonemic contrasts represent a rudimentary form of phoneme structure and a potential early step towards the generative phonemic system of human language. PMID:26121619

  9. The fungal colonisation of rock-art caves: experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Valme; Fernandez-Cortes, Angel; Cuezva, Soledad; Laiz, Leonila; Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2009-09-01

    The conservation of rock-art paintings in European caves is a matter of increasing interest. This derives from the bacterial colonisation of Altamira Cave, Spain and the recent fungal outbreak of Lascaux Cave, France-both included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Here, we show direct evidence of a fungal colonisation of rock tablets in a testing system exposed in Altamira Cave. After 2 months, the tablets, previously sterilised, were heavily colonised by fungi and bacteria. Most fungi isolated were labelled as entomopathogens, while the bacteria were those regularly identified in the cave. Rock colonisation was probably promoted by the dissolved organic carbon supplied with the dripping and condensation waters and favoured by the displacement of aerosols towards the interior of the cave, which contributed to the dissemination of microorganisms. The role of arthropods in the dispersal of spores may also help in understanding fungal colonisation. This study evidences the fragility of rock-art caves and demonstrates that microorganisms can easily colonise bare rocks and materials introduced into the cavity. PMID:19484211

  10. The fungal colonisation of rock-art caves: experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Valme; Fernandez-Cortes, Angel; Cuezva, Soledad; Laiz, Leonila; Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2009-09-01

    The conservation of rock-art paintings in European caves is a matter of increasing interest. This derives from the bacterial colonisation of Altamira Cave, Spain and the recent fungal outbreak of Lascaux Cave, France—both included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Here, we show direct evidence of a fungal colonisation of rock tablets in a testing system exposed in Altamira Cave. After 2 months, the tablets, previously sterilised, were heavily colonised by fungi and bacteria. Most fungi isolated were labelled as entomopathogens, while the bacteria were those regularly identified in the cave. Rock colonisation was probably promoted by the dissolved organic carbon supplied with the dripping and condensation waters and favoured by the displacement of aerosols towards the interior of the cave, which contributed to the dissemination of microorganisms. The role of arthropods in the dispersal of spores may also help in understanding fungal colonisation. This study evidences the fragility of rock-art caves and demonstrates that microorganisms can easily colonise bare rocks and materials introduced into the cavity.

  11. INSTITUTIONS AND BEHAVIOR: EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE ON THE EFFECTS OF DEMOCRACY

    PubMed Central

    Bó, Pedro Dal; Foster, Andrew; Putterman, Louis

    2013-01-01

    A novel experiment is used to show that the effect of a policy on the level of cooperation is greater when it is chosen democratically by the subjects than when it is exogenously imposed. In contrast to the previous literature, our experimental design allows us to control for selection effects (e.g. those who choose the policy may be affected differently by it). Our finding implies that democratic institutions may affect behavior directly in addition to having effects through the choice of policies. Our findings have implications for the generalizability of the results of randomized policy interventions. PMID:25076785

  12. Strategic sophistication of individuals and teams. Experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Matthias; Czermak, Simon; Feri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Many important decisions require strategic sophistication. We examine experimentally whether teams act more strategically than individuals. We let individuals and teams make choices in simple games, and also elicit first- and second-order beliefs. We find that teams play the Nash equilibrium strategy significantly more often, and their choices are more often a best response to stated first order beliefs. Distributional preferences make equilibrium play less likely. Using a mixture model, the estimated probability to play strategically is 62% for teams, but only 40% for individuals. A model of noisy introspection reveals that teams differ from individuals in higher order beliefs. PMID:24926100

  13. Experimental evidence of warm electron populations in magnetron sputtering plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, B. B. Han, Jeon G.; Kim, Hye R.; Ishikawa, K.; Hori, M.

    2015-01-21

    This work report on the results obtained using the Langmuir probe (LP) measurements in high-power dc magnetron sputtering discharges. Data show clear evidence of two electron components, such as warm and bulk electrons, in the sputtering plasma in a magnetic trap. We have also used optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic method along with LP to investigate the plasma production. Data show that there is a presence of low-frequency oscillations in the 2–3 MHz range, which are expected to be generated by high-frequency waves. Analysis also suggests that the warm electrons, in the plasmas, can be formed due to the collisionless Landau damping of the bulk electrons.

  14. Predicting the Unpredictable: 75 Years of Experimental Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radin, Dean I.

    2011-11-01

    From time immemorial, people have reported foreknowledge of future events. To determine whether such experiences are best understood via conventional explanations, or whether a retrocausal phenomenon might be involved in some instances, researchers have conducted hundreds of controlled laboratory experiments over the past 75 years. These studies fall into four general classes, and each class has generated repeatable evidence consistent with retrocausation. The statistical results for a class of forced-choice studies is associated with odds against chance of about 1024; for a class of free-response studies, odds about 1020; for psychophysiological-based studies, odds about 1017; and for implicit decision studies, odds about 1010. Effect sizes observed in the latter three classes are nearly identical, indicating replication of similar underlying effects. These effects are also in close agreement with the average effect size across 25,000 conventional social psychology experiments conducted over the last century, suggesting that retrocausal phenomena may not be especially unique, at least not in terms of the magnitude of effect. Bayesian analyses of the most recent classes of experiments confirm that the evidence is strongly in favor of a genuine effect, with Bayes Factors ranging from 13,669 to 1 for implicit decision experiments, to 2.9×1013 to 1 for psychophysiological designs. For the two most recent classes of studies examining retrocausal effects via unconscious physiological or behavioral measures, 85 of 101 studies (84%) reported by 25 different laboratories from the United States, Italy, Spain, Holland, Austria, Sweden, England, Scotland, Iran, Japan, and Australia, have produced results in the direction predicted by a retrocausal effect (odds against chance = 1.3×1012, via a sign test). Assessment of the methodologies used in these studies has not identified plausible conventional alternatives for the observed outcomes, suggesting the existence of a

  15. Multiple Openings and Competitiveness of Forward Markets: Experimental Evidence.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, José Luis; Kujal, Praveen; Rassenti, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We test the competition enhancing effect of selling forward in experimental Cournot duopoly and quadropoly with multiple forward markets. We find that two forward periods yields competitive outcomes and that the results are very close to the predicted theoretical results for quantity setting duopolies and quadropolies. Our experiments lend strong support to the hypothesis that forward markets are competition enhancing. We then test a new market that allows for endogenously determined indefinitely many forward periods that only close when sellers coordinate on selling a zero amount in a forward market. We find that the outcomes under an endogenous close rule are also very competitive. These results hold for both duopolies and quadropolies. PMID:27442516

  16. Multiple Openings and Competitiveness of Forward Markets: Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, José Luis; Kujal, Praveen; Rassenti, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    We test the competition enhancing effect of selling forward in experimental Cournot duopoly and quadropoly with multiple forward markets. We find that two forward periods yields competitive outcomes and that the results are very close to the predicted theoretical results for quantity setting duopolies and quadropolies. Our experiments lend strong support to the hypothesis that forward markets are competition enhancing. We then test a new market that allows for endogenously determined indefinitely many forward periods that only close when sellers coordinate on selling a zero amount in a forward market. We find that the outcomes under an endogenous close rule are also very competitive. These results hold for both duopolies and quadropolies. PMID:27442516

  17. Experimental evidence for radiation pressure on a macroscopic dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Segundo, C.; Ramos-Ortiz, G.; Villagrán-Muniz, M.

    2003-09-01

    We have detected acoustic signals produced by laser pulses on a macroscopic glass slab, obtaining amplitudes, as function of the angle of incidence, denoted as Hp and Hs depending on the polarization orientations of the pulsed pumping laser, p and s, respectively. The relative behaviour of these curves is related to radiation pressure rather than pure absorption, in the same manner as predicted theoretically in the literature [A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, Dover Publications, New York, 1891; Phys. Rep. 52 (1979) 133; Opt. Commun. 58 (1986) 59]. In a second experiment, based on a CW Michelson interferometer, where one of the mirrors is a glass slab pumped at the Brewster angle with the pulsed beam, we verified qualitatively the relationship observed for the Hp and Hs acoustic experimental data.

  18. Experimental evidence for the thermophilicity of ancestral life

    PubMed Central

    Akanuma, Satoshi; Nakajima, Yoshiki; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Kimura, Mitsuo; Nemoto, Naoki; Mase, Tomoko; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Tanokura, Masaru; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical studies have focused on the environmental temperature of the universal common ancestor of life with conflicting conclusions. Here we provide experimental support for the existence of a thermophilic universal common ancestor. We present the thermal stabilities and catalytic efficiencies of nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDK), designed using the information contained in predictive phylogenetic trees, that seem to represent the last common ancestors of Archaea and of Bacteria. These enzymes display extreme thermal stabilities, suggesting thermophilic ancestries for Archaea and Bacteria. The results are robust to the uncertainties associated with the sequence predictions and to the tree topologies used to infer the ancestral sequences. Moreover, mutagenesis experiments suggest that the universal ancestor also possessed a very thermostable NDK. Because, as we show, the stability of an NDK is directly related to the environmental temperature of its host organism, our results indicate that the last common ancestor of extant life was a thermophile that flourished at a very high temperature. PMID:23776221

  19. NEW EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCES ABOUT THE FORMATION AND CONSUMPTION OF KETOHYDROPEROXIDES

    PubMed Central

    Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Herbinet, Olivier; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Zhou, Zhongyue; Deng, Liulin; Guo, Huijun; Xie, Mingfeng; Qi, Fei

    2013-01-01

    The formation of hydroperoxides postulated in all the kinetic models for the low temperature oxidation of alkanes have been experimentally proved thanks to a new type of apparatus associating a quartz jet-stirred reactor through a molecular-beam sampling system to a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer combined with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization. This apparatus has been used to investigate the low-temperature oxidation of n-butane and has allowed demonstrating the formation of different types of alkylhydroperoxides, namely methylhydroperoxide, ethylhydroperoxide and butylhydroperoxide, and of C4 alkylhydroperoxides including a carbonyl function (ketohydroperoxides). In addition, the formation of products deriving from these ketohydroperoxides, such as C4 molecules including either two carbonyl groups or one carbonyl and one alcohol functions, has been observed. Simulations using a detailed kinetic model have been performed to support some of the assumptions made in this work. PMID:23700382

  20. Experimental Evidence of Fermi-Luttinger Liquid State.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debray, Philippe; Muhammad, Mustafa; Herbert, Steven; Newrock, Richard

    2008-03-01

    We have measured Coulomb drag between spatially separated parallel quantum wires, made on AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures by the split-gate technique, in the absence of tunneling to experimentally probe drag by small forward momentum transfer. Drag between wires of lengths 500 and 300 nm was measured in the one-dimensional transport regime at temperatures in the range 30 mK -- 1.2 K. We have observed both positive and negative drag. The temperature dependence of drag of both types is in excellent agreement with that predicted by the recently proposed Fermi-Luttinger liquid (FLL) theory that takes into account the curvature in the fermionic dispersion. Positive drag occurs when the curvature is positive, while negative drag occurs when it is negative.

  1. GEOMORPHOLOGY. Experimental evidence for hillslope control of landscape scale.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, K E; Roering, J J; Ellis, C

    2015-07-01

    Landscape evolution theory suggests that climate sets the scale of landscape dissection by modulating the competition between diffusive processes that sculpt convex hillslopes and advective processes that carve concave valleys. However, the link between the relative dominance of hillslope and valley transport processes and landscape scale is difficult to demonstrate in natural landscapes due to the episodic nature of erosion. Here, we report results from laboratory experiments combining diffusive and advective processes in an eroding landscape. We demonstrate that rainsplash-driven disturbances in our experiments are a robust proxy for hillslope transport, such that increasing hillslope transport efficiency decreases drainage density. Our experimental results demonstrate how the coupling of climate-driven hillslope- and valley-forming processes, such as bioturbation and runoff, dictates the scale of eroding landscapes. PMID:26138970

  2. Experimental evidence of homonuclear bonds in amorphous GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimaru, Dr. Manabu; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Xuemei; Chu, Wei-Kan; Weber, William J

    2011-01-01

    Although GaN is an important semiconductor material, its amorphous structures are not well understood. Currently, theoretical atomistic structural models which contradict each other, are proposed for the chemical short-range order of amorphous GaN: one characterizes amorphous GaN networks as highly chemically ordered, consisting of heteronuclear Ga-N atomic bonds; and the other predicts the existence of a large number of homonuclear bonds within the first coordination shell. In the present study, we examine amorphous structures of GaN via radial distribution functions obtained by electron diffraction techniques. The experimental results demonstrate that amorphous GaN networks consist of heterononuclear Ga-N bonds, as well as homonuclear Ga-Ga and N-N bonds.

  3. Experimental evidence of energetic neutrals production in an ion diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, A. I.; Isakova, Y. I.; Khaylov, I. P.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents several experimental proofs of the formation of energetic charge-exchange neutrals in a self-magnetically insulated ion diode with a graphite cathode. The energetic neutrals are thought to be produced as a result of charge exchange process between accelerated ions and stationary neutral molecules. The experiments have been carried out using both a diode with externally applied magnetic insulation (single-pulse mode: 100 ns, 250-300 kV) and a diode with self-magnetic insulation (double-pulse mode: 300-500 ns, 100-150 kV (negative pulse); 120 ns, 250-300 kV (positive pulse)). The motivation for looking at the neutral component of the ion beam came when we compared two independent methods to measure the energy density of the beam. A quantitative comparison of infrared measurements with signals from Faraday cups and diode voltage was made to assess the presence of neutral atoms in the ion beam. As another proof of charge-exchange effects in ion diode we present the results of statistical analysis of diode performance. It was found that the shot-to shot variation of the energy density in a set of 50-100 shots does not exceed 11%, whilst the same variation for ion current density was 20-30%; suggesting the presence of neutrals in the beam. Moreover, the pressure in the zone of ion beam energy dissipation exceeds the results stated in cited references. The difference between our experimental data and results stated by other authors we attribute to the presence of a low-energy charge-exchange neutral component in the ion beam.

  4. Experimental evidence of indirect transmission of Mycoplasma synoviae.

    PubMed

    Marois, Corinne; Picault, Jean-Paul; Kobisch, Marylène; Kempf, Isabelle

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse experimental transmission of Mycoplasma synoviae, an avian pathogen. Three experiments using specific pathogen-free day-old chicks placed in isolators were conducted. In the first experiment, the birds were introduced in an isolator previously contaminated with a M. synoviae broth culture. After 34 days, these birds were eliminated and, for the second trial, the chicks were introduced in the same isolator without disinfecting. In the third assay, the chicks were placed in an isolator containing a mixture of food, feathers and dust collected less than an hour earlier from a M. synoviae infected laying hen flock. In the second and third experiments in order to exacerbate the M. synoviae infection, the birds were inoculated with infectious bronchitis (IB) virus. The presence of M. synoviae in the environment and in tracheal swabs was monitored by culture, a multiplex PCR (mPCR) detecting M. synoviae and Mycoplasma 16S rDNA and a multiplex RT-PCR (mRT-PCR) detecting the M. synoviae mRNA coding for a membrane protein and Mycoplasma 16S rRNA. In in vitro experimental conditions, M. synoviae mRNA and 16S rRNA were detected up to 20 min and 23 h respectively after mycoplasma death. In the first assay, the first infected bird was detected on the 13th day. In the second trial, culturable M. synoviae or viable M. synoviae were detected in the isolator for 3 or 4 to 5 days respectively after depopulation of the birds of the first assay whereas the first culture positive tracheal swabs were detected on the 33rd day, after IB inoculation. In the third experiment, the first infected birds were detected on the 54th day. Thus, the different assays showed that M. synoviae contaminated material (dust, feathers and food) can infect chicks, sometimes after remarkably long silent periods. PMID:16120251

  5. Implicit negotiation beliefs and performance: experimental and longitudinal evidence.

    PubMed

    Kray, Laura J; Haselhuhn, Michael P

    2007-07-01

    The authors argue that implicit negotiation beliefs, which speak to the expected malleability of negotiating ability, affect performance in dyadic negotiations. They expected negotiators who believe negotiating attributes are malleable (incremental theorists) to outperform negotiators who believe negotiating attributes are fixed (entity theorists). In Study 1, they gathered evidence of convergent and discriminant validity for the implicit negotiation belief construct. In Study 2, they examined the impact of implicit beliefs on the achievement goals that negotiators pursue. In Study 3, they explored the causal role of implicit beliefs on negotiation performance by manipulating negotiators' implicit beliefs within dyads. They also identified perceived ability as a moderator of the link between implicit negotiation beliefs and performance. In Study 4, they measured negotiators' beliefs in a classroom setting and examined how these beliefs affected negotiation performance and overall performance in the course 15 weeks later. Across all performance measures, incremental theorists outperformed entity theorists. Consistent with the authors' hypotheses, incremental theorists captured more of the bargaining surplus and were more integrative than their entity theorist counterparts, suggesting implicit theories are important determinants of how negotiators perform. Implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:17605588

  6. Experimental evidence of a delta-shock in nonlinear chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    We report about a new type of composition front in nonlinear chromatography that is called delta-shock, which has to be added to the family of classical transitions, i.e. simple waves, shocks and semi-shocks. Recently, the occurrence of delta-shocks in the case of mixed competitive-cooperative isotherms of the following type n{sub i} = H{sub i}c{sub i}/1 = K{sub 1}c{sub 1} + K{sub 2}c{sub 2} (i = 1,2), (with H{sub 2} > H{sub 1}, where components 1 and 2 have anti-Langmuir and Langmuir adsorption behavior, respectively) was predicted theoretically and their behavior was analyzed in the frame of the equilibrium theory of chromatography. The delta-shock can be viewed as a growing traveling spike superimposed to the discontinuity separating the initial and the feed state, which propagates along the column at constant speed and constant rate of growth. In this work we complement these findings from an experimental point of view. The binary system consisting of phenetole (component 1) and 4-tert-butylphenol (component 2) in methanol-water (about 2:1, v/v) on a Zorbax 300StableBond-C18 column from Agilent has been shown, through a series of overloaded pulse experiments and of frontal analysis experiments with the pure compounds, to be subject to the competitive-cooperative isotherm of the type above, up to rather large concentrations. This system does exhibit adelta-shock when the operating conditions are chosen according to theory, namely when phenetole initially saturating the column is displaced by 4-tert-butylphenol, both at high concentrations (the minimum concentrations exhibiting a fully developed delta-shock in this series of experiments were c{sub 1} = 20 g/L and c{sub 2} = 75 g/L). The propagation of the delta-shock matches the theoretical predictions in terms of both the effect of concentration and the effect of column length. This is the first experimental observation ever of adelta-shock in chromatography. It is noteworthy that the proof of the occurrence of

  7. Physical description of boundary-layer transition: Experimental evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S.

    1994-01-01

    The problems of understanding the origins of turbulent flow and transition to turbulent flow are the most important unsolved problems of fluid mechanics and aerodynamics. It is well known that the stability, transition, and turbulent characteristics of bounded shear layers are fundamentally different from those of free shear layers. Likewise, the stability, transition, and turbulent characteristics of open systems are fundamentally different from those of closed systems. Because of the influence of indigenous disturbances, surface geometry and roughness, sound, heat transfer, and ablation, it is not possible to develop general prediction schemes for transition location and the nature of turbulent structures in boundary-layer flows. At the present time no mathematical model exists that can predict the transition Reynolds number on a flat plate. The recent progress in this area is encouraging, in that a number of distinct transition mechanisms have been found experimentally. The theoretical work finds them to be amplitude and Reynolds-number dependent. The theory remains rather incomplete with regard to predicting transition. Amplitude and spectral characteristics of the disturbances inside the laminar viscous layer strongly influence which type of transition occurs. The major need in this area is to understand how freestream disturbances are entrained into the boundary layer, i.e., to answer the question of receptivity. We refer receptivity to the mechanism(s) that cause freestream disturbances to enter the boundary layer and create the initial amplitudes for unstable waves.

  8. [Is it possible a bioethics based on the experimental evidence?].

    PubMed

    Pastor, Luis Miguel

    2013-01-01

    For years there are different types of criticism about principialist bioethics. One alternative that has been proposed is to introduce empirical evidence within the bioethical discourse to make it less formal, less theoretical and closer to reality. In this paper we analyze first in synthetic form diverse alternative proposals to make an empirical bioethics. Some of them are strongly naturalistic while others aim to provide empirical data only for correct or improve bioethical work. Most of them are not shown in favor of maintaining a complete separation between facts and values, between what is and what ought to be. With different nuances these proposals of moderate naturalism make ethical judgments depend normative social opinion resulting into a certain social naturalism. Against these proposals we think to make a bioethics in that relates the empirical facts with ethical duties, we must rediscover empirical reality of human action. Only from it and, in particular, from the activity of discernment that makes practical reason, when judged on the object of his action, it is possible to integrate the mere descriptive facts with ethical judgments of character prescriptive. In conclusion we think that it is not possible to perform bioethics a mode of empirical science, as this would be contrary to natural reason, leading to a sort of scientific reductionism. At the same time we believe that empirical data are important in the development of bioethics and to enhance and improve the innate ability of human reason to discern good. From this discernment could develop a bioethics from the perspective of ethical agents themselves, avoiding the extremes of an excessive normative rationalism, accepting empirical data and not falling into a simple pragmatism. PMID:24206254

  9. Gender differences in cooperation: experimental evidence on high school students.

    PubMed

    Molina, J Alberto; Giménez-Nadal, J Ignacio; Cuesta, José A; Gracia-Lazaro, Carlos; Moreno, Yamir; Sanchez, Angel

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of cooperation among unrelated human subjects is a long-standing conundrum that has been amply studied both theoretically and experimentally. Within the question, a less explored issue relates to the gender dependence of cooperation, which can be traced back to Darwin, who stated that "women are less selfish but men are more competitive". Indeed, gender has been shown to be relevant in several game theoretical paradigms of social cooperativeness, including prisoner's dilemma, snowdrift and ultimatum/dictator games, but there is no consensus as to which gender is more cooperative. We here contribute to this literature by analyzing the role of gender in a repeated Prisoners' Dilemma played by Spanish high-school students in both a square lattice and a heterogeneous network. While the experiment was conducted to shed light on the influence of networks on the emergence of cooperation, we benefit from the availability of a large dataset of more 1200 participants. We applied different standard econometric techniques to this dataset, including Ordinary Least Squares and Linear Probability models including random effects. All our analyses indicate that being male is negatively associated with the level of cooperation, this association being statistically significant at standard levels. We also obtain a gender difference in the level of cooperation when we control for the unobserved heterogeneity of individuals, which indicates that the gender gap in cooperation favoring female students is present after netting out this effect from other socio-demographics factors not controlled for in the experiment, and from gender differences in risk, social and competitive preferences. PMID:24367608

  10. Experimental Evidence for LENR in a Polarized Pd/D Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szpak, S.

    2005-03-01

    Experimental evidence in support of claims that excess enthalpy production in a polarized Pd/D lattice is of a nuclear origin is questioned on various grounds, eg marginal intensity and difficulty in reproducing. Here, evidence is presented that is 100% reproducible and of sufficient intensity to be well outside of experimental errors. In addition to the thermal behavior, the nuclear manifestations include: X-ray emission; tritium production; and, when an operating cell is placed in an external electric field, fusion to create heavier metals such as Ca, Al, Mg, and Zn.

  11. Evidence for chaos in an experimental time series from serrated plastic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkadesan, S.; Valsakumar, M. C.; Murthy, K. P. N.; Rajasekar, S.

    1996-07-01

    An experimental time series from a tensile test of an Al-Mg alloy in the serrated plastic flow domain is analyzed for signature of chaos. We employ state space reconstruction by embedding of time delay vectors. The minimum embedding dimension is found to be 4 and the largest Lyapunov exponent is positive, thereby providing prima facie evidence for chaos in an experimental time series of serrated plastic flow data.

  12. Electric field driven fractal growth in polymer electrolyte composites: Experimental evidence of theoretical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawar, Anit; Chandra, Amita

    2012-11-01

    The influence of electric field on the diffusion limited aggregation has been observed experimentally. The observation provides experimental confirmation of the theoretical model proposed by Zhi-Jie Tan et al. [Phys. Lett. A 268 (2000) 112]. Most strikingly, a transition from a disordered ramified pattern to an ordered pattern (chain-like growth) has been observed. The growth is governed by diffusion, convection and migration in an electric field which give rise to the different patterns. This Letter can also be considered as an experimental evidence of computer simulated fractal growth given by Huang and Hibbert [Physica A 233 (1996) 888].

  13. Experimental evidence of the decrease of kinetic energy of hadrons in passing through atomic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strugalski, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Hadrons with kinetic energies higher than the pion production threshold lose their kinetic energies monotonically in traversing atomic nuclei, due to the strong interactions in nuclear matter. This phenomenon is a crude analogy to the energy loss of charged particles in their passage through materials. Experimental evidence is presented.

  14. Kaon properties in dense nuclear matter: are there experimental evidences of in medio effects?

    SciTech Connect

    Mangiarotti, A.

    2009-06-03

    Beyond the general interest for nuclear matter theory, the K{sup -} in medio mass modification could have important astrophysical consequences. Experimental evidences of how a nuclear medium affects K{sup +} and K{sup -} properties will be summarised. To reach a firm conclusion about the K{sup -}, the missing information on the flow will be shown to be still relevant.

  15. Teacher Incentives in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from India. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "Teacher Incentives in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from India"--a paper presented at the National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference in February--Karthik Muralidharan (Harvard University) and Venkatesh Sundararaman (The World Bank) present findings from a randomized experiment conducted in India to…

  16. Teacher Incentives in Developing Countries: Recent Experimental Evidence from Kenya. Working Paper 2008-09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glewwe, Paul; Ilias, Nauman; Kremer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews recent evidence on the impact of a teacher incentives program in Kenya. The results are based on a randomized trial, which removes many sources of bias that can arise in analyses of non-experimental data. One hundred schools in a rural area were randomly divided into 50 that participated in a teacher incentives program and 50…

  17. Teacher Incentives in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from Kenya. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Performance Incentives, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In "Teacher Incentives in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from Kenya"--a paper presented at the National Center on Performance Incentives research to policy conference in February--Paul Glewwe (University of Minnesota), Nauman Illias (The Brattle Group), and Michael Kremer (Harvard University) review findings from recent research in…

  18. Experimental evidence for the K-LM radiative Auger effect in medium-mass atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herren, Ch.; Dousse, J.-Cl.

    1997-10-01

    High-resolution measurements of the Kα1,2 low-energy satellites were performed for the elements 42Mo, 44Ru, 46Pd, 48Cd, and 50Sn. The photoinduced x-ray spectra were measured using a high-resolution transmission-type bent-crystal spectrometer in modified DuMond slit geometry. Experimental evidence for the K-LM radiative Auger effect (RAE) in solid medium-mass atoms was found and particular groups of the K-LM RAE transitions were identified. The experimental intensity ratios I(K-LM RAE) / I(Kα1,2) as well as the relative intensity of the K-L3M4,5 transition group were extracted from the measured spectra. A comparison of the experimental results with relativistic Hartree-Fock theoretical predictions from Scofield shows a good agreement. The experimental energies of the K-LM RAE edges are compared with calculated Auger transition energies.

  19. Experimental evidence of the superfocusing effect for axially channeled MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motapothula, M.; Petrović, S.; Nešković, N.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2016-08-01

    Sub-Ångström focusing of megaelectronvolt (MeV) ions within axial channels was predicted over 10 years ago, but evidence proved elusive. We present experimental angular distributions of axially channeled MeV protons in a 55-nm-thick (001) silicon membrane through which multiple scattering is negligible. Fine angular structure is in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations based on three interaction potentials, providing indirect evidence of the existence of the superfocusing effect with flux enhancement of around 800 within a focused beam width of ˜20 pm .

  20. Role of Oxidative Stress in Refractory Epilepsy: Evidence in Patients and Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Cardenas-Rodriguez, Noemi; Huerta-Gertrudis, Bernardino; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Montesinos-Correa, Hortencia; Bandala, Cindy; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress, a state of imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen, is induced by a wide variety of factors. This biochemical state is associated with systemic diseases, and diseases affecting the central nervous system. Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder with refractoriness to drug therapy at about 30%. Currently, experimental evidence supports the involvement of oxidative stress in seizures, in the process of their generation, and in the mechanisms associated with refractoriness to drug therapy. Hence, the aim of this review is to present information in order to facilitate the handling of this evidence and determine the therapeutic impact of the biochemical status for this pathology. PMID:23344052

  1. Island of Rare Earth Nuclei with Tetrahedral and Octahedral Symmetries: Possible Experimental Evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, J.; Dubray, N.; Pangon, V.; Dobaczewski, J.; Olbratowski, P.; Schunck, N.

    2006-08-18

    Calculations using realistic mean-field methods suggest the existence of nuclear shapes with tetrahedral T{sub d} and/or octahedral O{sub h} symmetries sometimes at only a few hundreds of keV above the ground states in some rare earth nuclei around {sup 156}Gd and {sup 160}Yb. The underlying single-particle spectra manifest exotic fourfold rather than Kramers's twofold degeneracies. The associated shell gaps are very strong, leading to a new form of shape coexistence in many rare earth nuclei. We present possible experimental evidence of the new symmetries based on the published experimental results--although an unambiguous confirmation will require dedicated experiments.

  2. Experimental Evidence of the Origin of Nanophase Separation in Low Hole-Doped Colossal Magnetoresistant Manganites.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Gil, Raquel; Ruiz-González, M Luisa; González-Merchante, Daniel; Alonso, José M; Hernando, Antonio; Trasobares, Susana; Vallet-Regí, María; Rojo, Juan M; González-Calbet, José M

    2016-01-13

    While being key to understanding their intriguing physical properties, the origin of nanophase separation in manganites and other strongly correlated materials is still unclear. Here, experimental evidence is offered for the origin of the controverted phase separation mechanism in the representative La1-xCaxMnO3 system. For low hole densities, direct evidence of Mn(4+) holes localization around Ca(2+) ions is experimentally provided by means of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy. These localized holes give rise to the segregated nanoclusters, within which double exchange hopping between Mn(3+) and Mn(4+) remains restricted, accounting for the insulating character of perovskites with low hole density. This localization is explained in terms of a simple model in which Mn(4+) holes are bound to substitutional divalent Ca(2+) ions. PMID:26683223

  3. The Development of Experimentation and Evidence Evaluation Skills at Preschool Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piekny, Jeanette; Grube, Dietmar; Maehler, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Researchers taking a domain-general approach to the development of scientific reasoning long thought that the ability to engage in scientific reasoning did not develop until adolescence. However, more recent studies have shown that preschool children already have a basic ability to evaluate evidence and a basic understanding of experimentation. Data providing insights into when exactly in the preschool years significant gains in these abilities occur are scarce. Drawing on a sample of 138 preschool children, this longitudinal study therefore examined how children's ability to evaluate evidence and their understanding of experimentation develop between the ages of four and six. Findings showed that the ability to evaluate evidence was already well developed at age four and increased steadily and significantly over time as long as the pattern of covariation was perfect. In the case of imperfect covariation, the proportion of correct answers was low over the period of observation, but showed a significant increase between the ages of four and five. If the data did not allow relationship between variables to be inferred, the proportion of correct answers was low, with a significant increase between the ages of five and six. The children's understanding of experimentation increased significantly between the ages of five and six. The implications of these findings for age-appropriate science programs in preschool are discussed.

  4. Experimental evidence for inherent Lévy search behaviour in foraging animals.

    PubMed

    Kölzsch, Andrea; Alzate, Adriana; Bartumeus, Frederic; de Jager, Monique; Weerman, Ellen J; Hengeveld, Geerten M; Naguib, Marc; Nolet, Bart A; van de Koppel, Johan

    2015-05-22

    Recently, Lévy walks have been put forward as a new paradigm for animal search and many cases have been made for its presence in nature. However, it remains debated whether Lévy walks are an inherent behavioural strategy or emerge from the animal reacting to its habitat. Here, we demonstrate signatures of Lévy behaviour in the search movement of mud snails (Hydrobia ulvae) based on a novel, direct assessment of movement properties in an experimental set-up using different food distributions. Our experimental data uncovered clusters of small movement steps alternating with long moves independent of food encounter and landscape complexity. Moreover, size distributions of these clusters followed truncated power laws. These two findings are characteristic signatures of mechanisms underlying inherent Lévy-like movement. Thus, our study provides clear experimental evidence that such multi-scale movement is an inherent behaviour rather than resulting from the animal interacting with its environment. PMID:25904671

  5. Experimental evidence for inherent Lévy search behaviour in foraging animals

    PubMed Central

    Kölzsch, Andrea; Alzate, Adriana; Bartumeus, Frederic; de Jager, Monique; Weerman, Ellen J.; Hengeveld, Geerten M.; Naguib, Marc; Nolet, Bart A.; van de Koppel, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Recently, Lévy walks have been put forward as a new paradigm for animal search and many cases have been made for its presence in nature. However, it remains debated whether Lévy walks are an inherent behavioural strategy or emerge from the animal reacting to its habitat. Here, we demonstrate signatures of Lévy behaviour in the search movement of mud snails (Hydrobia ulvae) based on a novel, direct assessment of movement properties in an experimental set-up using different food distributions. Our experimental data uncovered clusters of small movement steps alternating with long moves independent of food encounter and landscape complexity. Moreover, size distributions of these clusters followed truncated power laws. These two findings are characteristic signatures of mechanisms underlying inherent Lévy-like movement. Thus, our study provides clear experimental evidence that such multi-scale movement is an inherent behaviour rather than resulting from the animal interacting with its environment. PMID:25904671

  6. Experimental evidence for the acceleration of thermal electrons by ion cyclotron waves in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, A. J.; Sojka, J. J.; Wrenn, G. L.; Johnson, J. F. E.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Perraut, S.; Roux, A.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental evidence is presented for the acceleration of thermal electrons by large amplitude ion cyclotron waves (ICWs). The wave power in the ULF range near the helium gyrofrequency is compared with the distribution function of low energy electrons measured by GEOS satellite instruments. This comparison shows that electrons are accelerated near the geomagnetic equator along field lines, at times when the ICW energy is large and the cold plasma density is below a threshold value. It is suggested that these accelerated electrons can account for the ELF emissions, modulated at the ICW frequency, observed by Wehrlin (1981). A very efficient acceleration of thermal electrons along field lines results from other ULF events having frequencies close to the proton gyrofrequency. Evidence for this lies in the fact that medium energy protons having large temperature anisotropies in the 100-500 eV range are responsible for the ICW wave generation.

  7. Experimental evidence for the stability of the depletion zone around a growing protein crystal under microgravity.

    PubMed

    Otálora, F; Novella, M L; Gavira, J A; Thomas, B R; García Ruiz, J M

    2001-03-01

    Experimental evidence is presented for the first time for the development and time evolution of concentration-depletion zones around protein crystals growing in microgravity and gelled on-ground experiments. Crystal motion and buoyancy-driven fluid movements as a result of residual accelerations and g-jitters are demonstrated to have an adverse effect on the stability of these depletion zones, provoking the breakdown of their radial symmetry. These findings may explain some of the controversial results reported on the quality of single crystals grown under microgravity in previous space missions. PMID:11223518

  8. Experimental evidence of Ga-vacancy induced room temperature ferromagnetic behavior in GaN films

    SciTech Connect

    Roul, Basanta; Kumar, Mahesh; Rajpalke, Mohana K.; Bhat, Thirumaleshwara N.; Krupanidhi, S. B.; Kalghatgi, A. T.; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, A.

    2011-10-17

    We have grown Ga deficient GaN epitaxial films on (0001) sapphire substrate by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy and report the experimental evidence of room temperature ferromagnetic behavior. The observed yellow emission peak in room temperature photoluminescence spectra and the peak positioning at 300 cm{sup -1} in Raman spectra confirms the existence of Ga vacancies. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements further confirmed the formation of Ga vacancies; since the N/Ga is found to be >1. The ferromagnetism is believed to originate from the polarization of the unpaired 2p electrons of N surrounding the Ga vacancy.

  9. Experimental evidence for chirality in the odd-A 105Rh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timár, J.; Joshi, P.; Starosta, K.; Dimitrov, V. I.; Fossan, D. B.; Molnár, J.; Sohler, D.; Wadsworth, R.; Algora, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Curien, D.; Dombrádi, Zs.; Duchene, G.; Gizon, A.; Gizon, J.; Jenkins, D. G.; Koike, T.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Paul, E. S.; Raddon, P. M.; Rainovski, G.; Scheurer, J. N.; Simons, A. J.; Vaman, C.; Wilkinson, A. R.; Zolnai, L.; Frauendorf, S.

    2004-09-01

    High-spin states in 105Rh were populated by the 96Zr(13C, p3n) reaction at beam energies of 51 and 58 MeV, and studied using the EUROBALL IV γ-ray spectrometer and the DIAMANT charged particle array. A pair of nearly degenerate ΔI = 1 three-quasiparticle bands with the same spins and parity have been observed. Comparison of the experimental results with tilted axis cranking calculations confirms the chiral character of the two bands, while arguments based on the excitation of particles within the πg9 / 2 ν(h11 / 2) 2 configuration of the yrast band and comparison with the previously observed γ band exclude the other possible interpretations. This is the first experimental evidence for three-quasiparticle chiral structure in the A ∼ 100 region, and the first simultaneous observation of a γ band and chiral partner bands in one nucleus.

  10. Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording.

    PubMed

    Holman, Luke; Head, Megan L; Lanfear, Robert; Jennions, Michael D

    2015-07-01

    Observer bias and other "experimenter effects" occur when researchers' expectations influence study outcome. These biases are strongest when researchers expect a particular result, are measuring subjective variables, and have an incentive to produce data that confirm predictions. To minimize bias, it is good practice to work "blind," meaning that experimenters are unaware of the identity or treatment group of their subjects while conducting research. Here, using text mining and a literature review, we find evidence that blind protocols are uncommon in the life sciences and that nonblind studies tend to report higher effect sizes and more significant p-values. We discuss methods to minimize bias and urge researchers, editors, and peer reviewers to keep blind protocols in mind. PMID:26154287

  11. Comparison of ordered and disordered silicon nanowire arrays: experimental evidence of photonic crystal modes.

    PubMed

    Dhindsa, Navneet; Saini, Simarjeet S

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally compared the reflectance between ordered and disordered silicon nanowires to observe the evidence of photonic crystal modes. For similar diameters, the resonance peaks for the ordered nanowires at a spacing of 400 nm was at a shorter wavelength than the disordered nanowires, consistent to the excitation of photonic crystal modes. Furthermore, the resonant wavelength didn't shift while changing the density of the disordered nanowires, whereas there was a significant shift observed in the ordered ones. At an ordered spacing of 800 nm, the resonance wavelength approached that of the disordered structures, indicating that the ordered structures were starting to behave like individual waveguides. To our knowledge, this is the first direct experimental observation of photonic crystal modes in vertical periodic silicon nanowire arrays. PMID:27128070

  12. Experimental evidence of deterministic coherence resonance in coupled chaotic systems with frequency mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Vellisca, M. A.; Pisarchik, A. N.; Jaimes-Reátegui, R.

    2016-07-01

    We present the experimental evidence of deterministic coherence resonance in unidirectionally coupled two and three Rössler electronic oscillators with mismatch between their natural frequencies. The regularity in both the amplitude and the phase of chaotic fluctuations is experimentally proven by the analyses of normalized standard deviations of the peak amplitude and interpeak interval and Lyapunov exponents. The resonant chaos suppression appears when the coupling strength is increased and the oscillators are in phase synchronization. In two coupled oscillators, the coherence enhancement is associated with negative third and fourth Lyapunov exponents, while the largest first and second exponents remain positive. Distinctly, in three oscillators coupled in a ring, all exponents become negative, giving rise to periodicity. Numerical simulations are in good agreement with the experiments.

  13. Experimental and theoretical evidence for an ionic crystal of ammonia at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninet, S.; Datchi, F.; Dumas, P.; Mezouar, M.; Garbarino, G.; Mafety, A.; Pickard, C. J.; Needs, R. J.; Saitta, A. M.

    2014-05-01

    We report experimental and theoretical evidence that solid molecular ammonia becomes unstable at room temperature and high pressures and transforms into an ionic crystalline form. This material has been characterized in both hydrogenated (NH3) and deuterated (ND3) ammonia samples up to about 180 and 200 GPa, respectively, by infrared absorption, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The presence of a new strong infrared absorption band centered at 2500 cm-1 in NH3 (1900 cm-1 in ND3) is in line with previous theoretical predictions regarding the ionization of ammonia molecules into NH2- and NH4+ ions. The experimental data suggest the coexistence of two crystalline ionic forms, which our ab initio structure searches predict to be the most stable at the relevant pressures. The ionic crystalline form of ammonia appears stable at low temperatures, which contrasts with the behavior of water in which no equivalent crystalline ionic phase has been found.

  14. Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording

    PubMed Central

    Lanfear, Robert; Jennions, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Observer bias and other “experimenter effects” occur when researchers’ expectations influence study outcome. These biases are strongest when researchers expect a particular result, are measuring subjective variables, and have an incentive to produce data that confirm predictions. To minimize bias, it is good practice to work “blind,” meaning that experimenters are unaware of the identity or treatment group of their subjects while conducting research. Here, using text mining and a literature review, we find evidence that blind protocols are uncommon in the life sciences and that nonblind studies tend to report higher effect sizes and more significant p-values. We discuss methods to minimize bias and urge researchers, editors, and peer reviewers to keep blind protocols in mind. PMID:26154287

  15. Experimental evidence of high-frequency complete elastic bandgap in pillar-based phononic slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Pourabolghasem, Reza; Mohammadi, Saeed; Eftekhar, Ali A.; Adibi, Ali; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2014-12-08

    We present strong experimental evidence for the existence of a complete phononic bandgap, for Lamb waves, in the high frequency regime (i.e., 800 MHz) for a pillar-based phononic crystal (PnC) membrane with a triangular lattice of gold pillars on top. The membrane is composed of an aluminum nitride film stacked on thin molybdenum and silicon layers. Experimental characterization shows a large attenuation of at least 20 dB in the three major crystallographic directions of the PnC lattice in the frequency range of 760 MHz–820 MHz, which is in agreement with our finite element simulations of the PnC bandgap. The results of experiments are analyzed and the physics behind the attenuation in different spectral windows is explained methodically by assessing the type of Bloch modes and the in-plane symmetry of the displacement profile.

  16. Poverty, inequality, and increased consumption of high calorie food: Experimental evidence for a causal link.

    PubMed

    Bratanova, Boyka; Loughnan, Steve; Klein, Olivier; Claassen, Almudena; Wood, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Rising obesity represents a serious, global problem. It is now well established that obesity is associated with poverty and wealth inequality, suggesting that these factors may promote caloric intake. Whereas previous work has examined these links from an epidemiological perspective, the current paper examined them experimentally. In Study 1 we found that people experimentally induced to view themselves as poor (v. wealthy) exhibited increased calorie intake. In Study 2, participants who believed that they were poorer or wealthier than their interaction partners exhibited higher levels of anxiety compared to those in an equal partners condition; this anxiety in turn led to increased calorie consumption for people who had a strong need to belong. The findings provide causal evidence for the poverty-intake and inequality-intake links. Further, we identify social anxiety and a strong need to belong as important social psychological factors linking inequality to increased calorie intake. PMID:26809142

  17. Experimental evidence of a symbiosis between red-cockaded woodpeckers and fungi.

    PubMed

    Jusino, Michelle A; Lindner, Daniel L; Banik, Mark T; Rose, Kevin R; Walters, Jeffrey R

    2016-03-30

    Primary cavity excavators, such as woodpeckers, are ecosystem engineers in many systems. Associations between cavity excavators and fungi have long been hypothesized to facilitate cavity excavation, but these relationships have not been experimentally verified. Fungi may help excavators by softening wood, while excavators may facilitate fungal dispersal. Here we demonstrate that excavators facilitate fungal dispersal and thus we report the first experimental evidence of a symbiosis between fungi and a cavity excavator, the red-cockaded woodpecker (RCW,Picoides borealis). Swab samples of birds showed that RCWs carry fungal communities similar to those found in their completed excavations. A 26-month field experiment using human-made aseptically drilled excavations in live trees, half of which were inaccessible to RCWs, demonstrated that RCWs directly alter fungal colonization and community composition. Experimental excavations that were accessible to RCWs contained fungal communities similar to natural RCW excavations, whereas inaccessible experimental excavations contained significantly different fungal communities. Our work demonstrates a complex symbiosis between cavity excavators and communities of fungi, with implications for forest ecology, wildlife management, and conservation. PMID:27009222

  18. Experimental evidence that brighter males sire more extra-pair young in tree swallows.

    PubMed

    Whittingham, Linda A; Dunn, Peter O

    2016-08-01

    Across taxa, extra-pair mating is widespread among socially monogamous species, but few studies have identified male ornamental traits associated with extra-pair mating success, and even fewer studies have experimentally manipulated male traits to determine whether they are related directly to paternity. As a consequence, there is little experimental evidence to support the widespread hypothesis that females choose more ornamented males as extra-pair mates. Here, we conducted an experimental study of the relationship between male plumage colour and fertilization success in tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor), which have one of the highest levels of extra-pair mating in birds. In this study, we experimentally dulled the bright blue plumage on the back of males (with nontoxic ink markers) early in the breeding season prior to most mating. Compared with control males, dulled males sired fewer extra-pair young, and, as a result, fewer young overall. Among untreated males, brighter blue males also sired more extra-pair young, and in paired comparisons, extra-pair sires had brighter blue plumage than the within-pair male they cuckolded. These results, together with previous work on tree swallows, suggest that extra-pair mating behaviour is driven by benefits to both males and females. PMID:27105297

  19. Experimental evidence for a liquid-liquid crossover in deeply cooled confined water.

    PubMed

    Cupane, Antonio; Fomina, Margarita; Piazza, Irina; Peters, Judith; Schirò, Giorgio

    2014-11-21

    In this work we investigate, by means of elastic neutron scattering, the pressure dependence of mean square displacements (MSD) of hydrogen atoms of deeply cooled water confined in the pores of a three-dimensional disordered SiO2 xerogel; experiments have been performed at 250 and 210 K from atmospheric pressure to 1200 bar. The "pressure anomaly" of supercooled water (i.e., a mean square displacement increase with increasing pressure) is observed in our sample at both temperatures; however, contrary to previous simulation results and to the experimental trend observed in bulk water, the pressure effect is smaller at lower (210 K) than at higher (250 K) temperature. Elastic neutron scattering results are complemented by differential scanning calorimetry data that put in evidence, besides the glass transition at about 170 K, a first-order-like endothermic transition occurring at about 230 K that, in view of the neutron scattering results, can be attributed to a liquid-liquid crossover. Our results give experimental evidence for the presence, in deeply cooled confined water, of a crossover occurring at about 230 K (at ambient pressure) from a liquid phase predominant at 210 K to another liquid phase predominant at 250 K; therefore, they are fully consistent with the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis. PMID:25479506

  20. Delayed school start times and adolescent sleep: A systematic review of the experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Minges, Karl E; Redeker, Nancy S

    2016-08-01

    Many schools have instituted later morning start times to improve sleep, academic, and other outcomes in response to the mismatch between youth circadian rhythms and early morning start times. However, there has been no systematic synthesis of the evidence on the effects of this practice. To examine the impact of delayed school start time on students' sleep, health, and academic outcomes, electronic databases were systematically searched and data were extracted using the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Six studies satisfied selection criteria and used pre-post, no control (n = 3), randomized controlled trial (n = 2), and quasi-experimental (n = 1) designs. School start times were delayed 25-60 min, and correspondingly, total sleep time increased from 25 to 77 min per weeknight. Some studies revealed reduced daytime sleepiness, depression, caffeine use, tardiness to class, and trouble staying awake. Overall, the evidence supports recent non-experimental study findings and calls for policy that advocates for delayed school start time to improve sleep. This presents a potential long-term solution to chronic sleep restriction during adolescence. However, there is a need for rigorous randomized study designs and reporting of consistent outcomes, including objective sleep measures and consistent measures of health and academic performance. PMID:26545246

  1. Experimental evidence for drought induced alternative stable states of soil moisture.

    PubMed

    Robinson, David A; Jones, Scott B; Lebron, Inma; Reinsch, Sabine; Domínguez, María T; Smith, Andrew R; Jones, Davey L; Marshall, Miles R; Emmett, Bridget A

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystems may exhibit alternative stable states (ASS) in response to environmental change. Modelling and observational data broadly support the theory of ASS, however evidence from manipulation experiments supporting this theory is limited. Here, we provide long-term manipulation and observation data supporting the existence of drought induced alternative stable soil moisture states (irreversible soil wetting) in upland Atlantic heath, dominated by Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull. Manipulated repeated moderate summer drought, and intense natural summer drought both lowered resilience resulting in shifts in soil moisture dynamics. The repeated moderate summer drought decreased winter soil moisture retention by ~10%. However, intense summer drought, superimposed on the experiment, that began in 2003 and peaked in 2005 caused an unexpected erosion of resilience and a shift to an ASS; both for the experimental drought manipulation and control plots, impairing the soil from rewetting in winter. Measurements outside plots, with vegetation removal, showed no evidence of moisture shifts. Further independent evidence supports our findings from historical soil moisture monitoring at a long-term upland hydrological observatory. The results herald the need for a new paradigm regarding our understanding of soil structure, hydraulics and climate interaction. PMID:26804897

  2. Experimental evidence for drought induced alternative stable states of soil moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, David. A.; Jones, Scott B.; Lebron, Inma; Reinsch, Sabine; Domínguez, María T.; Smith, Andrew R.; Jones, Davey L.; Marshall, Miles R.; Emmett, Bridget A.

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystems may exhibit alternative stable states (ASS) in response to environmental change. Modelling and observational data broadly support the theory of ASS, however evidence from manipulation experiments supporting this theory is limited. Here, we provide long-term manipulation and observation data supporting the existence of drought induced alternative stable soil moisture states (irreversible soil wetting) in upland Atlantic heath, dominated by Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull. Manipulated repeated moderate summer drought, and intense natural summer drought both lowered resilience resulting in shifts in soil moisture dynamics. The repeated moderate summer drought decreased winter soil moisture retention by ~10%. However, intense summer drought, superimposed on the experiment, that began in 2003 and peaked in 2005 caused an unexpected erosion of resilience and a shift to an ASS; both for the experimental drought manipulation and control plots, impairing the soil from rewetting in winter. Measurements outside plots, with vegetation removal, showed no evidence of moisture shifts. Further independent evidence supports our findings from historical soil moisture monitoring at a long-term upland hydrological observatory. The results herald the need for a new paradigm regarding our understanding of soil structure, hydraulics and climate interaction.

  3. Experimental evidence for drought induced alternative stable states of soil moisture

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, David. A.; Jones, Scott B.; Lebron, Inma; Reinsch, Sabine; Domínguez, María T.; Smith, Andrew R.; Jones, Davey L.; Marshall, Miles R.; Emmett, Bridget A.

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystems may exhibit alternative stable states (ASS) in response to environmental change. Modelling and observational data broadly support the theory of ASS, however evidence from manipulation experiments supporting this theory is limited. Here, we provide long-term manipulation and observation data supporting the existence of drought induced alternative stable soil moisture states (irreversible soil wetting) in upland Atlantic heath, dominated by Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull. Manipulated repeated moderate summer drought, and intense natural summer drought both lowered resilience resulting in shifts in soil moisture dynamics. The repeated moderate summer drought decreased winter soil moisture retention by ~10%. However, intense summer drought, superimposed on the experiment, that began in 2003 and peaked in 2005 caused an unexpected erosion of resilience and a shift to an ASS; both for the experimental drought manipulation and control plots, impairing the soil from rewetting in winter. Measurements outside plots, with vegetation removal, showed no evidence of moisture shifts. Further independent evidence supports our findings from historical soil moisture monitoring at a long-term upland hydrological observatory. The results herald the need for a new paradigm regarding our understanding of soil structure, hydraulics and climate interaction. PMID:26804897

  4. Experimental evidence for state-dependent nest weight in the blue tit, Cyanistes caeruleus.

    PubMed

    Mainwaring, Mark C; Hartley, Ian R

    2009-05-01

    Parental investment in reproduction is generally limited by food availability, and so avian life-history research has traditionally focused on the brood rearing phase, when food requirements are greatest. Only relatively recently has the focus extended to the incubation phase, and even more recently to the nest-building phase, where observational and comparative evidence suggest that avian nest building is an energetically expensive and time-consuming activity. We aimed to experimentally test the limitations on this cost in a hole-breeding passerine, the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus), by providing supplementary food to experimental pairs during the nest-building period. In comparison with control females, that did not receive supplementary food, experimental females constructed heavier nests, with greater amounts of moss base but similar amounts of cup lining, despite there being no differences in the time taken to build the nest. This study provides empirical support for the hypothesis that avian nest building is a costly behaviour, limited by food availability. PMID:19429209

  5. Insight of scent: experimental evidence of olfactory capabilities in the wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans).

    PubMed

    Mardon, J; Nesterova, A P; Traugott, J; Saunders, S M; Bonadonna, F

    2010-02-15

    Wandering albatrosses routinely forage over thousands of kilometres of open ocean, but the sensory mechanisms used in the food search itself have not been completely elucidated. Recent telemetry studies show that some spatial behaviours of the species are consistent with the 'multimodal foraging strategy' hypothesis which proposes that birds use a combination of olfactory and visual cues while foraging at sea. The 'multimodal foraging strategy' hypothesis, however, still suffers from a lack of experimental evidence, particularly regarding the olfactory capabilities of wandering albatrosses. As an initial step to test the hypothesis, we carried out behavioural experiments exploring the sensory capabilities of adult wandering albatrosses at a breeding colony. Three two-choice tests were designed to investigate the birds' response to olfactory and visual stimuli, individually or in combination. Perception of the different stimuli was assessed by comparing the amount of exploration directed towards an 'experimental' display or a 'control' display. Our results indicate that birds were able to perceive the three types of stimulus presented: olfactory, visual and combined. Moreover, olfactory and visual cues were found to have additional effects on the exploratory behaviours of males. This simple experimental demonstration of reasonable olfactory capabilities in the wandering albatross supports the 'multimodal foraging strategy' and is consistent with recent hypotheses of the evolutionary history of procellariiforms. PMID:20118306

  6. Live Fast, Die Young: Experimental Evidence of Population Extinction Risk due to Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Bestion, Elvire; Teyssier, Aimeric; Richard, Murielle; Clobert, Jean; Cote, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated in recent decades on the drastic impact of climate change on biodiversity. Warming temperatures have induced changes in species physiology, phenology, and have decreased body size. Such modifications can impact population dynamics and could lead to changes in life cycle and demography. More specifically, conceptual frameworks predict that global warming will severely threaten tropical ectotherms while temperate ectotherms should resist or even benefit from higher temperatures. However, experimental studies measuring the impacts of future warming trends on temperate ectotherms' life cycle and population persistence are lacking. Here we investigate the impacts of future climates on a model vertebrate ectotherm species using a large-scale warming experiment. We manipulated climatic conditions in 18 seminatural populations over two years to obtain a present climate treatment and a warm climate treatment matching IPCC predictions for future climate. Warmer temperatures caused a faster body growth, an earlier reproductive onset, and an increased voltinism, leading to a highly accelerated life cycle but also to a decrease in adult survival. A matrix population model predicts that warm climate populations in our experiment should go extinct in around 20 y. Comparing our experimental climatic conditions to conditions encountered by populations across Europe, we suggest that warming climates should threaten a significant number of populations at the southern range of the distribution. Our findings stress the importance of experimental approaches on the entire life cycle to more accurately predict population and species persistence in future climates. PMID:26501958

  7. Live Fast, Die Young: Experimental Evidence of Population Extinction Risk due to Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Bestion, Elvire; Teyssier, Aimeric; Richard, Murielle; Clobert, Jean; Cote, Julien

    2015-10-01

    Evidence has accumulated in recent decades on the drastic impact of climate change on biodiversity. Warming temperatures have induced changes in species physiology, phenology, and have decreased body size. Such modifications can impact population dynamics and could lead to changes in life cycle and demography. More specifically, conceptual frameworks predict that global warming will severely threaten tropical ectotherms while temperate ectotherms should resist or even benefit from higher temperatures. However, experimental studies measuring the impacts of future warming trends on temperate ectotherms' life cycle and population persistence are lacking. Here we investigate the impacts of future climates on a model vertebrate ectotherm species using a large-scale warming experiment. We manipulated climatic conditions in 18 seminatural populations over two years to obtain a present climate treatment and a warm climate treatment matching IPCC predictions for future climate. Warmer temperatures caused a faster body growth, an earlier reproductive onset, and an increased voltinism, leading to a highly accelerated life cycle but also to a decrease in adult survival. A matrix population model predicts that warm climate populations in our experiment should go extinct in around 20 y. Comparing our experimental climatic conditions to conditions encountered by populations across Europe, we suggest that warming climates should threaten a significant number of populations at the southern range of the distribution. Our findings stress the importance of experimental approaches on the entire life cycle to more accurately predict population and species persistence in future climates. PMID:26501958

  8. The Scientific Consensus on Climate Change as a Gateway Belief: Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    van der Linden, Sander L.; Leiserowitz, Anthony A.; Feinberg, Geoffrey D.; Maibach, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    There is currently widespread public misunderstanding about the degree of scientific consensus on human-caused climate change, both in the US as well as internationally. Moreover, previous research has identified important associations between public perceptions of the scientific consensus, belief in climate change and support for climate policy. This paper extends this line of research by advancing and providing experimental evidence for a “gateway belief model” (GBM). Using national data (N = 1104) from a consensus-message experiment, we find that increasing public perceptions of the scientific consensus is significantly and causally associated with an increase in the belief that climate change is happening, human-caused and a worrisome threat. In turn, changes in these key beliefs are predictive of increased support for public action. In short, we find that perceived scientific agreement is an important gateway belief, ultimately influencing public responses to climate change. PMID:25714347

  9. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-01-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear. PMID:26979092

  10. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Andrey I; Voll, Lars B; Psakhie, Sergey G; Popov, Valentin L

    2016-01-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting ("periodic rolling"). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear. PMID:26979092

  11. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremers, Dorothee; López Marulanda, Juliana; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2014-11-01

    Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation/navigation in some terrestrial and aquatic species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans' migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking. Here, we tested the spontaneous response of six captive bottlenose dolphins to the presentation of two magnetized and demagnetized controlled devices while they were swimming freely. Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation.

  12. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremers, Dorothee; López Marulanda, Juliana; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2014-09-01

    Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation/navigation in some terrestrial and aquatic species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans' migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking. Here, we tested the spontaneous response of six captive bottlenose dolphins to the presentation of two magnetized and demagnetized controlled devices while they were swimming freely. Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation.

  13. Enjoyment: A Conceptual Exploration and Overview of Experimental Evidence in the Context of Games for Health.

    PubMed

    Crutzen, Rik; van 't Riet, Jonathan; Short, Camille E

    2016-02-01

    Enjoyment is consistently noted as important for engaging audiences in games for health. However, as a term, enjoyment is often used interchangeably with a host of other terms, some of which overlap conceptually. This obscures what does and what does not constitute enjoyment, and in turn slows scientific progress by making the study of enjoyment and the synthesis of enjoyment-related research difficult. This article is aimed at improving our understanding of enjoyment by distinguishing enjoyment from other important constructs, such as fun and engagement, and by providing an overview of the experimental evidence on the determinants of enjoyment in videogames. Competence, narrative transportation, and relevance are identified as key factors related to enjoyment, and future studies examining these factors using games for health are recommended. PMID:26699455

  14. First experimental evidence of the feasibility of multi-color magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmer, J.; Halkola, A.; Gleich, B.; Schmale, I.; Borgert, J.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a new approach to visualizing magnetic nanoparticles. It is capable of 3D real-time in vivo imaging of particles injected into the blood stream and is a candidate for medical imaging applications. To date, only one particle type has been imaged at a time, however, the ability to separate signals acquired simultaneously from different particle types or from particles in different environments would substantially increase the scope of the method. Different colors could be assigned to different signal sources to allow for visualization in a single image. Successful signal separation has been reported in spectroscopic experiments, but it was unclear how well separation would work in conjunction with spatial encoding in an imaging experiment. This work presents experimental evidence of the separability of signals from different particle types and aggregation states (fluid versus powder) using a ‘multi-color’ reconstruction approach. Several mechanisms are discussed that may form the basis for successful signal separation.

  15. Effect of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia on the central nervous system: evidence from experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Jensen, V F H; Bøgh, I B; Lykkesfeldt, J

    2014-03-01

    Insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (IIH) is a major acute complication in type 1 as well as in type 2 diabetes, particularly during intensive insulin therapy. The brain plays a central role in the counter-regulatory response by eliciting parasympathetic and sympathetic hormone responses to restore normoglycaemia. Brain glucose concentrations, being approximately 15-20% of the blood glucose concentration in humans, are rigorously maintained during hypoglycaemia through adaptions such as increased cerebral glucose transport, decreased cerebral glucose utilisation and, possibly, by using central nervous system glycogen as a glucose reserve. However, during sustained hypoglycaemia, the brain cannot maintain a sufficient glucose influx and, as the cerebral hypoglycaemia becomes severe, electroencephalogram changes, oxidative stress and regional neuronal death ensues. With particular focus on evidence from experimental studies on nondiabetic IIH, this review outlines the central mechanisms behind the counter-regulatory response to IIH, as well as cerebral adaption to avoid sequelae of cerebral neuroglycopaenia, including seizures and coma. PMID:24428753

  16. Hypertension and Dementia: Epidemiological and Experimental Evidence Revealing a Detrimental Relationship.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Marialuisa; Lembo, Giuseppe; Carnevale, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension and dementia represent two major public health challenges worldwide, notably in the elderly population. Although these two conditions have classically been recognized as two distinct diseases, mounting epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence suggest that hypertension and dementia are strictly intertwined. Here, we briefly report how hypertension profoundly affects brain homeostasis, both at the structural and functional level. Chronic high blood pressure modifies the cerebral vasculature, increasing the risk of Aβ clearance impairment. The latter, excluding genetic etiologies, is considered one of the main causes of Aβ deposition in the brain. Studies have shown that hypertension induces cerebral arterial stiffening and microvascular dysfunction, thus contributing to dementia pathophysiology. This review examines the existing and the updated literature which has attempted to explain and clarify the relationship between hypertension and dementia at the pathophysiological level. PMID:27005613

  17. Hypertension and Dementia: Epidemiological and Experimental Evidence Revealing a Detrimental Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Perrotta, Marialuisa; Lembo, Giuseppe; Carnevale, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension and dementia represent two major public health challenges worldwide, notably in the elderly population. Although these two conditions have classically been recognized as two distinct diseases, mounting epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence suggest that hypertension and dementia are strictly intertwined. Here, we briefly report how hypertension profoundly affects brain homeostasis, both at the structural and functional level. Chronic high blood pressure modifies the cerebral vasculature, increasing the risk of Aβ clearance impairment. The latter, excluding genetic etiologies, is considered one of the main causes of Aβ deposition in the brain. Studies have shown that hypertension induces cerebral arterial stiffening and microvascular dysfunction, thus contributing to dementia pathophysiology. This review examines the existing and the updated literature which has attempted to explain and clarify the relationship between hypertension and dementia at the pathophysiological level. PMID:27005613

  18. Experimental evidence for alleviating nociceptive hypersensitivity by single application of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Fang-Xiong; Dong, Fei; Bao, Lan; Zhang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    The single application of high-concentration of capsaicin has been used as an analgesic therapy of persistent pain. However, its effectiveness and underlying mechanisms remain to be further evaluated with experimental approaches. The present study provided evidence showing that the single application of capsaicin dose-dependently alleviated nociceptive hypersensitivity, and reduced the action potential firing in small-diameter neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in rats and mice. Pre-treatment with capsaicin reduced formalin-induced acute nocifensive behavior after a brief hyperalgesia in rats and mice. The inhibitory effects of capsaicin were calcium-dependent, and mediated by the capsaicin receptor (transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1). We further found that capsaicin exerted inhibitory effects on the persistent nociceptive hypersensitivity induced by peripheral inflammation and nerve injury. Thus, these results support the long-lasting and inhibitory effects of topical capsaicin on persistent pain, and the clinic use of capsaicin as a pain therapy. PMID:25896608

  19. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Kremers, Dorothee; López Marulanda, Juliana; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2014-11-01

    Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation/navigation in some terrestrial and aquatic species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans' migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking. Here, we tested the spontaneous response of six captive bottlenose dolphins to the presentation of two magnetized and demagnetized controlled devices while they were swimming freely. Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation. PMID:25267469

  20. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-03-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear.

  1. Developmental neurotoxicity of ortho-phthalate diesters: review of human and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Miodovnik, Amir; Edwards, Andrea; Bellinger, David C; Hauser, Russ

    2014-03-01

    Ortho-phthalate diesters, or phthalates, are widely used synthetic chemicals found primarily in consumer products and polyvinyl chloride plastics. Experimental evidence suggests that several phthalates possess antiandrogenic properties and may disrupt endocrine pathways resulting in abnormal reproductive outcomes. Low-level exposure to phthalates has been well documented in humans, with higher levels found in children and women of childbearing age. Recent epidemiologic studies postulate that prenatal exposure to measurable urine phthalate concentrations may be associated with altered genital and pubertal development in infants and children. This review addresses the emerging evidence that some phthalates may have an adverse impact on the developing brain. The supporting animal studies and proposed mechanisms underlying the deleterious properties of phthalates in relation to neurodevelopmental outcomes are also discussed. While the observed associations are based on limited studies with a broad range of endpoints, the implications of such outcomes are of concern from a public health standpoint and merit further investigation given the widespread nature of the exposure. PMID:24486776

  2. Speciation in caves: experimental evidence that permanent darkness promotes reproductive isolation.

    PubMed

    Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin; Schlupp, Ingo

    2011-12-23

    Divergent selection through biotic factors like predation or parasitism can promote reproductive isolation even in the absence of geographical barriers. On the other hand, evidence for a role of adaptation to abiotic factors during ecological speciation in animals is scant. In particular, the role played by perpetual darkness in establishing reproductive isolation in cave animals (troglobites) remains elusive. We focused on two reproductively isolated ecotypes (surface- and cave-dwelling) of the widespread livebearer Poecilia mexicana, and raised offspring of wild-caught females to sexual maturity in a 12-month common-garden experiment. Fish were reared in light or darkness combined with high- or low-food conditions. Females, but not males, of the surface ecotype suffered from almost complete reproductive failure in darkness, especially in the low-food treatment. Furthermore, surface fish suffered from a significantly higher rate of spontaneous, stress-related infection with bacterial columnaris disease. This experimental evidence for strong selection by permanent darkness on non-adapted surface-dwelling animals adds depth to our understanding of the selective forces establishing and maintaining reproductive isolation in cave faunas. PMID:21561964

  3. Role of Chronic Inflammation in Myopia Progression: Clinical Evidence and Experimental Validation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ju; Wei, Chang-Ching; Chang, Ching-Yao; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Hsu, Yu-An; Hsieh, Yi-Ching; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Wan, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Prevention and treatment of myopia is an important public problem worldwide. We found a higher incidence of myopia among patients with inflammatory diseases such as type 1 diabetes mellitus (7.9%), uveitis (3.7%), or systemic lupus erythematosus (3.5%) compared to those without inflammatory diseases (p<0.001) using data from children (<18years old) in the National Health Insurance Research database. We then examined the inhibition of myopia by atropine in Syrian hamsters with monocular form deprivation (MFD), an experimental myopia model. We found atropine downregulated inflammation in MFD eyes. The expression levels of c-Fos, nuclear factor κB (NFκB), interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were upregulated in myopic eyes and downregulated upon treatment with atropine. The relationship between the inflammatory response and myopia was investigated by treating MFD hamsters with the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine A (CSA) or the inflammatory stimulators lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or peptidoglycan (PGN). Myopia progression was slowed by CSA application but was enhanced by LPS and PGN administration. The levels of c-Fos, NF-κB, IL-6, and TNF-α were upregulated in LPS- and PGN-treated eyes and downregulated by CSA treatment. These findings provide clinical and experimental evidence that inflammation plays a crucial role in the development of myopia. PMID:27470424

  4. Lightning injury as a blast injury of skull, brain, and visceral lesions: clinical and experimental evidences.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, M; Hosoda, Y; Fujishiro, Y; Tuyuki, A; Kikuchi, K; Obara, H; Kitagawa, N; Ishikawa, T

    2001-12-01

    The present study attempts to better understand the mechanism of injuries associated with direct lightning strikes. We reviewed the records of 256 individuals struck by lightning between 1965 and 1999, including 56 people who were killed. Basal skull fracture, intracranial haemorrhage, pulmonary haemorrhage, or solid organ rupture was suspected in three men who died. Generally these lesions have been attributed to current flow or falling after being struck. However, examination of surface injuries sustained suggested that the true cause was concussion secondary to blast injury resulting from vaporization of water on the body surface by a surface flashover spark. To investigate this hypothesis, an experimental model of a lightning strike was created in the rat. Saline-soaked blotting paper was used to simulate wet clothing or skin, and an artificial lightning impulse was applied. The resultant lesions were consistent with our hypothesis that the blast was reinforced by the concussive effect of water vaporization. The concordance between the clinical and experimental evidence argues strongly for blast injury as an important source of morbidity and mortality in lightning strikes. PMID:11806503

  5. Genetic and experimental evidence for cross-species infection by swine hepatitis E virus.

    PubMed

    Meng, X J; Halbur, P G; Shapiro, M S; Govindarajan, S; Bruna, J D; Mushahwar, I K; Purcell, R H; Emerson, S U

    1998-12-01

    Prior to the recent discovery of the swine hepatitis E virus (swine HEV) in pigs from the midwestern United States, HEV was not considered endemic to this country. Since swine HEV is antigenically and genetically related to human strains of HEV, it was important to characterize this new virus further. The infectivity titer of a pool of swine HEV in pigs was determined in order to prepare a standardized reagent and to evaluate the dose response in pigs. Although the sequence of swine HEV varied extensively from those of most human strains of HEV, it was very closely related to the two strains of human HEV (US-1 and US-2) isolated in the United States. The U.S. strains which were recently recovered from two patients with clinical hepatitis E in the United States shared >/=97% amino acid identity with swine HEV in open reading frames 1 and 2. Phylogenetic analyses of different regions of the genome revealed that swine HEV and the U.S. strains grouped together and formed a distinct branch. These results suggested that swine HEV may infect humans. When we inoculated rhesus monkeys and a chimpanzee, experimental surrogates of humans, with swine HEV, the primates became infected. Furthermore, in a reciprocal experiment, specific-pathogen-free pigs were experimentally infected with the US-2 strain of human HEV that is genetically similar to swine HEV. These results provided experimental evidence for cross-species infection by the swine virus. Thus, humans appear to be at risk of infection with swine HEV or closely related viruses. PMID:9811705

  6. The benefits of synchronous collaborative information visualization: evidence from an experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bresciani, Sabrina; Eppler, Martin J

    2009-01-01

    A great corpus of studies reports empirical evidence of how information visualization supports comprehension and analysis of data. The benefits of visualization for synchronous group knowledge work, however, have not been addressed extensively. Anecdotal evidence and use cases illustrate the benefits of synchronous collaborative information visualization, but very few empirical studies have rigorously examined the impact of visualization on group knowledge work. We have consequently designed and conducted an experiment in which we have analyzed the impact of visualization on knowledge sharing in situated work groups. Our experimental study consists of evaluating the performance of 131 subjects (all experienced managers) in groups of 5 (for a total of 26 groups), working together on a real-life knowledge sharing task. We compare (1) the control condition (no visualization provided), with two visualization supports: (2) optimal and (3) suboptimal visualization (based on a previous survey). The facilitator of each group was asked to populate the provided interactive visual template with insights from the group, and to organize the contributions according to the group consensus. We have evaluated the results through both objective and subjective measures. Our statistical analysis clearly shows that interactive visualization has a statistically significant, objective and positive impact on the outcomes of knowledge sharing, but that the subjects seem not to be aware of this. In particular, groups supported by visualization achieved higher productivity, higher quality of outcome and greater knowledge gains. No statistically significant results could be found between an optimal and a suboptimal visualization though (as classified by the pre-experiment survey). Subjects also did not seem to be aware of the benefits that the visualizations provided as no difference between the visualization and the control conditions was found for the self-reported measures of satisfaction

  7. Experimental evidence of transport of pesticides through field soils - a review

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, M.

    1996-01-01

    Much information is available in the literature about pesticide transport through soils at the field scale. The purpose of this study is to review the literature with a focus on pesticide leaching to groundwater. The literature was compiled and discussed with respect to different factors that influence pesticide leaching. Pesticide leaching below the root zone has been demonstrated in sandy as well as in loamy soils. Particularly in loamy soils, there is evidence that even strongly adsorbing chemicals can move along preferential flow pathways and that the travel times of pesticides are comparable to those of conservative solutes. The amounts of pesticides leached below the root zone by worst case rainfall events depend on the chemical properties and can reach up to 5% of the applied mass. When there is no heavy rainfall shortly following application of chemicals, the mass annually leached below the root zone is in the range of <0.1 to 1%, occasionally it can reach up to 4%. Although a direct comparison cannot be made, the mass lost by leaching seems generally to be smaller than that lost by runoff, depending of course on the slope of the fields. Several factors that affect pesticide leaching, such as surface preparation, soil structure, soil water content, type of irrigation, pesticide formulation, time of application and rainfall events, are discussed with support of experimental evidence. While some factors showed inconsistent effects, others show promise in controlling leaching mechanisms. These latter factors include initial water content, surface preparation, and time of pesticide application. Based on the reviewed literature recommendations were made for future research activities. 172 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  8. Transanal total mesorectal excision: a systematic review of the experimental and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Araujo, S E; Crawshaw, B; Mendes, C R; Delaney, C P

    2015-02-01

    Achieving a clear distal or circumferential resection margins with laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) may be laborious, especially in obese males and when operating on advanced distal rectal tumors with a poor response to neoadjuvant treatment. Transanal (TaTME) is a new natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery modality in which the rectum is mobilized transanally using endoscopic techniques with or without laparoscopic assistance. We conducted a comprehensive systematic review of publications on this new technique in PubMed and Embase databases from January, 2008, to July, 2014. Experimental and clinical studies written in English were included. Experimental research with TaTME was done on pigs with and without survival models and on human cadavers. In these studies, laparoscopic or transgastric assistance was frequently used resulting in an easier upper rectal dissection and in a longer rectal specimen. To date, 150 patients in 16 clinical studies have undergone TaTME. In all but 15 cases, transabdominal assistance was used. A rigid transanal endoscopic operations/transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEO/TEM) platform was used in 37 patients. Rectal adenocarcinoma was the indication in all except for nine cases of benign diseases. Operative times ranged from 90 to 460 min. TME quality was deemed intact, satisfactory, or complete. Involvement in circumferential resection margins was detected in 16 (11.8 %) patients. The mean lymph node harvest was equal or greater than 12 in all studies. Regarding morbidity, pneumoretroperitoneum, damage to the urethra, and air embolism were reported intraoperatively. Mean hospital stay varied from 4 to 14 days. Postoperative complications occurred in 34 (22.7 %) patients. TaTME with TEM is feasible in selected cases. Oncologic safety parameters seem to be adequate although the evidence relies on small retrospective series conducted by highly trained surgeons. Further studies are expected. PMID:25380741

  9. Biparental incubation-scheduling: no experimental evidence for major energetic constraints

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Will; Rutten, Anne L.; Valcu, Mihai; Kempenaers, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Incubation is energetically demanding, but it is debated whether these demands constrain incubation-scheduling (i.e., the length, constancy, and timing of incubation bouts) in cases where both parents incubate. Using 2 methods, we experimentally reduced the energetic demands of incubation in the semipalmated sandpiper, a biparental shorebird breeding in the harsh conditions of the high Arctic. First, we decreased the demands of incubation for 1 parent only by exchanging 1 of the 4 eggs for an artificial egg that heated up when the focal bird incubated. Second, we reanalyzed the data from the only published experimental study that has explicitly tested energetic constraints on incubation-scheduling in a biparentally incubating species (Cresswell et al. 2003). In this experiment, the energetic demands of incubation were decreased for both parents by insulating the nest cup. We expected that the treated birds, in both experiments, would change the length of their incubation bouts, if biparental incubation-scheduling is energetically constrained. However, we found no evidence that heating or insulation of the nest affected the length of incubation bouts: the combined effect of both experiments was an increase in bout length of 3.6min (95% CI: −33 to 40), which is equivalent to a 0.5% increase in the length of the average incubation bout. These results demonstrate that the observed biparental incubation-scheduling in semipalmated sandpipers is not primarily driven by energetic constraints and therefore by the state of the incubating bird, implying that we still do not understand the factors driving biparental incubation-scheduling. PMID:25713473

  10. Photorespiratory Bypasses Lead to Increased Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana: Are Predictions Consistent with Experimental Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Basler, Georg; Küken, Anika; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Arguably, the biggest challenge of modern plant systems biology lies in predicting the performance of plant species, and crops in particular, upon different intracellular and external perturbations. Recently, an increased growth of Arabidopsis thaliana plants was achieved by introducing two different photorespiratory bypasses via metabolic engineering. Here, we investigate the extent to which these findings match the predictions from constraint-based modeling. To determine the effect of the employed metabolic network model on the predictions, we perform a comparative analysis involving three state-of-the-art metabolic reconstructions of A. thaliana. In addition, we investigate three scenarios with respect to experimental findings on the ratios of the carboxylation and oxygenation reactions of Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). We demonstrate that the condition-dependent growth phenotypes of one of the engineered bypasses can be qualitatively reproduced by each reconstruction, particularly upon considering the additional constraints with respect to the ratio of fluxes for the RuBisCO reactions. Moreover, our results lend support for the hypothesis of a reduced photorespiration in the engineered plants, and indicate that specific changes in CO2 exchange as well as in the proxies for co-factor turnover are associated with the predicted growth increase in the engineered plants. We discuss our findings with respect to the structure of the used models, the modeling approaches taken, and the available experimental evidence. Our study sets the ground for investigating other strategies for increase of plant biomass by insertion of synthetic reactions. PMID:27092301

  11. Lanthanide humic substances complexation. I. Experimental evidence for a lanthanide contraction effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonke, Jeroen E.; Salters, Vincent J. M.

    2006-03-01

    The interaction of the lanthanides (Ln) with humic substances (HS) was investigated with a novel chemical speciation tool, Capillary Electrophoresis-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (CE-ICP-MS). By using an EDTA-ligand competition method, a bi-modal species distribution of LnEDTA and LnHS is attained, separated by CE, and detected online by sector field ICP-MS. We quantified the binding of all 14 rare earth elements (REEs), Sc and Y with Suwannee river fulvic acid, Leonardite coal humic acid, and Elliot soil humic acid under environmental conditions (pH 6-9, 0.001-0.1 mol L -1 NaNO 3, 1-1000 nmol L -1 Ln, 10-20 mg L -1 HS). Conditional binding constants for REE-HS interaction ( Kc) ranged from 8.9 < log Kc < 16.5 under all experimental conditions, and display a lanthanide contraction effect, ΔLKc: a gradual increase in Kc from La to Lu by 2-3 orders of magnitude as a function of decreasing ionic radius. HS polyelectrolyte effects cause Kc to increase with increasing pH and decreasing ionic strength. ΔLKc increases significantly with increasing pH, and likely with decreasing ionic strength. Based on a strong correlation between ΔLKc values and denticity for organic acids, we suggest that HS form a range of tri- to tetra-dentate complexes under environmental conditions. These results confirm HS to be a strong complexing agent for Ln, and show rigorous experimental evidence for potential REE fractionation by HS complexation.

  12. Bisphenol A and Reproductive Health: Update of Experimental and Human Evidence, 2007–2013

    PubMed Central

    Peretz, Jackye; Vrooman, Lisa; Ricke, William A.; Hunt, Patricia A.; Ehrlich, Shelley; Hauser, Russ; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Taylor, Hugh S.; Swan, Shanna H.; VandeVoort, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    health: update of experimental and human evidence, 2007–2013. Environ Health Perspect 122:775–786; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1307728 PMID:24896072

  13. Experimental evidence for the formation of liquid saline water on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Erik; Martínez, Germán M; Elliott, Harvey M; Rennó, Nilton O

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for deliquescence of perchlorate salts has been discovered in the Martian polar region while possible brine flows have been observed in the equatorial region. This appears to contradict the idea that bulk deliquescence is too slow to occur during the short periods of the Martian diurnal cycle during which conditions are favorable for it. We conduct laboratory experiments to study the formation of liquid brines at Mars environmental conditions. We find that when water vapor is the only source of water, bulk deliquescence of perchlorates is not rapid enough to occur during the short periods of the day during which the temperature is above the salts' eutectic value, and the humidity is above the salts' deliquescence value. However, when the salts are in contact with water ice, liquid brine forms in minutes, indicating that aqueous solutions could form temporarily where salts and ice coexist on the Martian surface and in the shallow subsurface. Key Points The formation of brines at Martian conditions was studied experimentally Bulk deliquescence from water vapor is too slow to occur diurnally on Mars Brines form in minutes when salts are placed in direct contact with ice PMID:25821267

  14. Experimental evidence that microbial activity lowers the albedo of glacier surfaces: the cryoconite casserole experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musilova, M.; Tranter, M.; Takeuchi, N.; Anesio, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Darkened glacier and ice sheet surfaces have lower albedos, absorb more solar radiation and consequently melt more rapidly. The increase in glacier surface darkening is an important positive feedback to warming global temperatures, leading to ever growing world-wide ice mass loss. Most studies focus primarily on glacial albedo darkening caused by the physical properties of snow and ice surfaces, and the deposition of dark impurities on glaciers. To date, however, the important effects of biological activity have not been included in most albedo reduction models. This study provides the first experimental evidence that microbial activity can significantly decrease the albedo of glacier surfaces. An original laboratory experiment, the cryoconite casserole, was designed to test the microbial darkening of glacier surface debris (cryoconite) under simulated Greenlandic summer conditions. It was found that minor fertilisation of the cryoconite (at nutrient concentrations typical of glacial ice melt) stimulated extensive microbial activity. Microbes intensified their organic carbon fixation and even mined phosphorous out of the glacier surface sediment. Furthermore, the microbial organic carbon production, accumulation and transformation caused the glacial debris to darken further by 17.3% reflectivity (albedo analogue). These experiments are consistent with the hypothesis that enhanced fertilisation by anthropogenic inputs results in substantial amounts of organic carbon fixation, debris darkening and ultimately to a considerable decrease in the ice albedo of glacier surfaces on global scales. The sizeable amounts of microbially produced glacier surface organic matter and nutrients can thus be a vital source of bioavailable nutrients for subglacial and downstream environments.

  15. Experimental evidence for non-Abelian gauge potentials in twisted graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Long-Jing; Qiao, Jia-Bin; Zuo, Wei-Jie; Li, Wen-Tian; He, Lin

    2015-08-01

    Non-Abelian gauge potentials are quite relevant in subatomic physics, but they are relatively rare in a condensed matter context. Here we report the experimental evidence for non-Abelian gauge potentials in twisted graphene bilayers by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. At a magic twisted angle, θ ≈(1.11±0.05 ) ∘ , a pronounced sharp peak, which arises from the nondispersive flat bands at the charge neutrality point, is observed in the tunneling density of states due to the action of the non-Abelian gauge fields. Moreover, we observe confined electronic states in the twisted bilayer, as manifested by regularly spaced tunneling peaks with energy spacing δ E ≈vF/D ≈70 meV (here vF is the Fermi velocity of graphene and D is the period of the moiré patterns). This indicates that the non-Abelian gauge potentials in twisted graphene bilayers confine low-energy electrons into a triangular array of quantum dots following the modulation of the moiré patterns. Our results also directly demonstrate that the Fermi velocity in twisted bilayers can be tuned from about 106m /s to zero by simply reducing the twisted angle of about 2∘.

  16. Experimental evidence of spatial memory and home range affinity in White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    The role of spatial memory in the movement of animals through landscapes remains elusive. To examine spatial memory and home range affinity of White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in northeastern Minnesota during 1995–2007, I translocated 17 adult does with known home ranges to unfamiliar sites and radio-tracked them after their release. Twelve does wearing transmitting radio-collars returned to their home ranges. Death and collar expiration precluded determination of whether the remaining five does would have returned to home ranges. Three of five does wearing global positioning system collars traveled throughout hundreds of square kilometres, circling, backtracking, and returning to release sites, while two others exhibited directional movement for tens of kilometres. Four does that survived to parturition stopped traveling and moved at hourly rates similar to those of control does during the first three weeks of the typical fawn-rearing period, but continued traveling later. Their aberrant extensive travel before and after interruption by parturition suggests that they recognized they were in unfamiliar areas, demonstrating both their capacity and propensity to search for and occupy the familiar space of their individual home ranges. Their successful return to home ranges provided experimental evidence of spatial memory and further elucidated its pervasive role in White-tailed Deer spatial ecology.

  17. Experimental evidence of massive-scale emotional contagion through social networks.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Adam D I; Guillory, Jamie E; Hancock, Jeffrey T

    2014-06-17

    Emotional states can be transferred to others via emotional contagion, leading people to experience the same emotions without their awareness. Emotional contagion is well established in laboratory experiments, with people transferring positive and negative emotions to others. Data from a large real-world social network, collected over a 20-y period suggests that longer-lasting moods (e.g., depression, happiness) can be transferred through networks [Fowler JH, Christakis NA (2008) BMJ 337:a2338], although the results are controversial. In an experiment with people who use Facebook, we test whether emotional contagion occurs outside of in-person interaction between individuals by reducing the amount of emotional content in the News Feed. When positive expressions were reduced, people produced fewer positive posts and more negative posts; when negative expressions were reduced, the opposite pattern occurred. These results indicate that emotions expressed by others on Facebook influence our own emotions, constituting experimental evidence for massive-scale contagion via social networks. This work also suggests that, in contrast to prevailing assumptions, in-person interaction and nonverbal cues are not strictly necessary for emotional contagion, and that the observation of others' positive experiences constitutes a positive experience for people. PMID:24889601

  18. Experimental Evidence for an Eco-Evolutionary Coupling between Local Adaptation and Intraspecific Competition.

    PubMed

    Siepielski, Adam M; Nemirov, Alex; Cattivera, Matthew; Nickerson, Avery

    2016-04-01

    Determining how adaptive evolution can be coupled to ecological processes is key for developing a more integrative understanding of the demographic factors that regulate populations. Intraspecific competition is an especially important ecological process because it generates negative density dependence in demographic rates. Although ecological factors are most often investigated to determine the strength of density dependence, evolutionary processes such as local adaptation could also feed back to shape variation in the strength of density dependence among populations. Using an experimental approach with damselflies, a predaceous aquatic insect, we find evidence that both density-dependent intraspecific competition and local adaptation can reduce per capita growth rates. In some cases, the effects of local adaptation on reducing per capita growth rates exceeded the ecological competitive effects of a doubling of density. However, we also found that these ecological and evolutionary properties of populations are coupled, and we offer two interpretations of the causes underlying this pattern: (1) the strength of density-dependent competition depends on the extent of local adaptation, or (2) the extent of local adaptation is shaped by the strength of density-dependent competition. Regardless of the underlying causal pathway, these results show how eco-evolutionary dynamics can affect a key demographic process regulating populations. PMID:27028073

  19. Bacteria are not too small for spatial sensing of chemical gradients: An experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Thar, Roland; Kühl, Michael

    2003-01-01

    By analyzing the chemotactic behavior of a recently described marine bacterial species, we provide experimental evidence that bacteria are not too small for sensing chemical gradients spatially. The bipolar flagellated vibrioid bacteria (typical size 2 × 6 μm) exhibit a unique motility pattern as they translate along as well as rotate around their short axis, i.e., the pathways of the cell poles describe a double helix. The natural habitat of the bacteria is characterized by steep oxygen gradients where they accumulate in a band at their preferred oxygen concentration of ≈2 μM. Single cells leaving the band toward the oxic region typically return to the band within 16 s following a U-shaped track. A detailed analysis of the tracks reveals that the cells must be able to sense the oxygen gradient perpendicular to their swimming direction. Thus, they can detect oxygen gradients along a distance of ≈5 μm corresponding to the extension of their long axis. The observed behavior can be explained by the presence of two independent sensor regions at either cell pole that modulate the rotation speed of the polar flagellar bundles, i.e., the flagellar bundle at the cell pole exposed to higher oxygen concentration is rotating faster than the other bundle. A mathematical model based on these assumptions reproduces the observed swimming behavior of the bacteria. PMID:12719518

  20. Spontaneous Time Symmetry Breaking in System with Mixed Strategy Nash Equilibrium: Evidences in Experimental Economics Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhijian; Xu, Bin; Zhejiang Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    In social science, laboratory experiment with human subjects' interaction is a standard test-bed for studying social processes in micro level. Usually, as in physics, the processes near equilibrium are suggested as stochastic processes with time-reversal symmetry (TRS). To the best of our knowledge, near equilibrium, the breaking time symmetry, as well as the existence of robust time anti-symmetry processes, has not been reported clearly in experimental economics till now. By employing Markov transition method to analysis the data from human subject 2x2 Games with wide parameters and mixed Nash equilibrium, we study the time symmetry of the social interaction process near Nash equilibrium. We find that, the time symmetry is broken, and there exists a robust time anti-symmetry processes. We also report the weight of the time anti-symmetry processes in the total processes of each the games. Evidences in laboratory marketing experiments, at the same time, are provided as one-dimension cases. In these cases, time anti-symmetry cycles can also be captured. The proposition of time anti-symmetry processes is small, but the cycles are distinguishable.

  1. Self-deception as self-signalling: a model and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Mijović-Prelec, Danica; Prelec, Draz̆en

    2010-01-01

    Self-deception has long been the subject of speculation and controversy in psychology, evolutionary biology and philosophy. According to an influential ‘deflationary’ view, the concept is an over-interpretation of what is in reality an instance of motivationally biased judgement. The opposite view takes the interpersonal deception analogy seriously, and holds that some part of the self actively manipulates information so as to mislead the other part. Building on an earlier self-signalling model of Bodner and Prelec, we present a game-theoretic model of self-deception. We propose that two distinct mechanisms collaborate to produce overt expressions of belief: a mechanism responsible for action selection (including verbal statements) and an interpretive mechanism that draws inferences from actions and generates emotional responses consistent with the inferences. The model distinguishes between two modes of self-deception, depending on whether the self-deceived individual regards his own statements as fully credible. The paper concludes with a new experimental study showing that self-deceptive judgements can be reliably and repeatedly elicited with financial incentives in a categorization task, and that the degree of self-deception varies with incentives. The study also finds evidence of the two forms of self-deception. The psychological benefits of self-deception, as measured by confidence, peak at moderate levels. PMID:20026461

  2. Experimental evidence of lateral flow in unsaturated homogeneous isotropic sloping soil due to rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinai, G.; Dirksen, C.

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes laboratory experimental evidence for lateral flow in the top layer of unsaturated sloping soil due to rainfall. Water was applied uniformly on horizontal and V-shaped surfaces of fine sand, at rates about 100 times smaller than the saturated hydraulic conductivity. Flow regimes near the surface and in the soil bulk were studied by using dyes. Streamlines and streak lines and wetting fronts were visually studied and photographed through a vertical glass wall. Near wetting fronts the flow direction was always perpendicular to the fronts owing to dominant matrix potential gradients. Thus, during early wetting of dry sloping sand, the flow direction is directed upslope. Far above a wetting front the flow was vertical due to the dominance of gravity. Downslope flow was observed during decreasing rainfall and dry periods. The lateral movement was largest near the soil surface and decayed with soil depth. Unstable downslope lateral flow close to the soil surface was attributed to non-Darcian flow due to variable temporal and spatial raindrop distributions. The experiments verify the theory that predicts unsaturated downslope lateral flow in sloping soil due to rainfall dynamics only, without apparent soil texture difference or anisotropy. This phenomenon could have significant implications for hillside hydrology, desert agriculture, irrigation management, etc., as well as for the basic mechanisms of surface runoff and erosion.

  3. Proprioceptive Dysfunction in Focal Dystonia: From Experimental Evidence to Rehabilitation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Avanzino, Laura; Fiorio, Mirta

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia has historically been considered a disorder of the basal ganglia, mainly affecting planning and execution of voluntary movements. This notion comes from the observation that most lesions responsible for secondary dystonia involve the basal ganglia. However, what emerges from recent research is that dystonia is linked to the dysfunction of a complex neural network that comprises basal ganglia–thalamic–frontal cortex, but also the inferior parietal cortex and the cerebellum. While dystonia is clearly a motor problem, it turned out that sensory aspects are also fundamental, especially those related to proprioception. We outline experimental evidence for proprioceptive dysfunction in focal dystonia from intrinsic sensory abnormalities to impaired sensorimotor integration, which is the process by which sensory information is used to plan and execute volitional movements. Particularly, we will focus on proprioceptive aspects of dystonia, including: (i) processing of vibratory input, (ii) temporal discrimination of two passive movements, (iii) multimodal integration of visual-tactile and proprioceptive inputs, and (iv) motor control in the absence of visual feedback. We suggest that these investigations contribute not only to a better understanding of dystonia pathophysiology, but also to develop rehabilitation strategies aimed at facilitating the processing of proprioceptive input. PMID:25538612

  4. First experimental evidence of the feasibility of multi-color magnetic particle imaging.

    PubMed

    Rahmer, J; Halkola, A; Gleich, B; Schmale, I; Borgert, J

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic particle imaging is a new approach to visualizing magnetic nanoparticles. It is capable of 3D real-time in vivo imaging of particles injected into the blood stream and is a candidate for medical imaging applications. To date, only one particle type has been imaged at a time, however, the ability to separate signals acquired simultaneously from different particle types or from particles in different environments would substantially increase the scope of the method. Different colors could be assigned to different signal sources to allow for visualization in a single image. Successful signal separation has been reported in spectroscopic experiments, but it was unclear how well separation would work in conjunction with spatial encoding in an imaging experiment. This work presents experimental evidence of the separability of signals from different particle types and aggregation states (fluid versus powder) using a 'multi-color' reconstruction approach. Several mechanisms are discussed that may form the basis for successful signal separation. PMID:25658130

  5. Experimental evidence of dual emission in a negatively solvatochromic push-pull pyridinium derivative.

    PubMed

    Carlotti, B; Cesaretti, A; Fortuna, C G; Spalletti, A; Elisei, F

    2015-01-21

    We report here experimental evidence of dual emission in a cationic push-pull system (bearing a methyl pyridinium group as an electron acceptor and a diphenylamino group as an electron donor), which shows negative solvatochromism. An intriguing blue shift and enlargement of the fluorescence band upon increasing the solvent polarity have suggested a possible contribution of an upper excited state to the stationary emission. Ultrafast transient absorption has indeed revealed the presence of an intermediate transient species in some solvents. The investigation of the fluorescence properties at low temperatures and in the rigid matrix has given a clear indication of this additional emission at shorter wavelengths. Femtosecond up-conversion measurements have shown interesting rise-decay dynamics in the kinetics and two well distinguished emission bands characterized by different deactivations. A single isoemissive point in the time-resolved area-normalized spectra has unambiguously pointed out the presence of two consecutive emissive species: the locally excited and the intramolecular charge transfer excited states. PMID:25474173

  6. Field experimental evidence that stochastic processes predominate in the initial assembly of bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yi-Qi; Zhao, Xin-Feng; Zhang, Da-Yong

    2016-06-01

    To assess the relative importance of environmental selection, dispersal and stochastic processes in structuring ecological communities, we conducted a bacterial community assembly experiment using microcosms filled with sterile liquid medium under field conditions in the Inner Mongolian grasslands. Multiple replicate microcosms containing different carbon substrates were placed at nine locations across three spatial scales (10, 300 and 10 000 m distance between locations) in such a way that the environment of microcosms varies independently of the geographical distance. The operational taxonomic units within the experimental communities were assessed via the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques on the 10th and 17th days after the onset of the experiment. We found no evidence of distance decay in community similarity, and communities within a given location were more similar to each other regardless of environment than communities at other locations within the same spatial scale. Variance partitioning indicated that location explained more compositional variation in microbial communities than environment, particularly on the 17th day, despite that environment and location in combination could only explain less than half of the total variation. These results suggest that bacterial dispersal is not limited by distance in this experiment, and community assembly in microcosms is not environmentally determined but governed by stochastic processes. PMID:25809418

  7. The fishermen were right: experimental evidence for tributary refuge hypothesis during floods.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Itsuro; Kanazawa, Yukiyo; Tanaka, Yuuki

    2013-05-01

    Fishermen often anecdotally report an unexpected increase of fish caught in small tributary streams during floods, presumably due to refuge-seeking behavior from the main stem. From a population perspective, this implies the significance of refuge habitats and connectivity for population viability against natural disturbances. Despite the plausibility, however, surprisingly few studies have examined the tributary refuge hypothesis, mainly due to the difficulty in field survey during floods. Here, we made use of a large-scale controlled flood to assess whether fishes move into tributaries during flooding in the main stem. A planned water release from the Satsunai River Dam located on Hokkaido Island in Japan rapidly increased the main stem discharge by more than 20-fold. Before, during, and after flooding censuses in four tributaries provided evidence of the refuge-seeking behavior of fishes from the main stem. For example, more than 10 Dolly Varden char, a salmonid fish, were caught in a tributary during the flood, even though almost no individuals were captured before or after the flood. The fish responded immediately to the flooding, suggesting the need for studies during disturbances. In addition, the likelihood of refuge movements varied among tributaries, suggesting the importance of local environmental differences between tributary and the main stem habitats. This is the first study to experimentally confirm the tributary refuge hypothesis, and underscores the roles of habitat diversity and connectivity during disturbances, even though some habitats are not used during normal conditions. PMID:23646942

  8. Experimental evidence of O-H—S hydrogen bonding in supersonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Himansu S.; Chakraborty, Shamik; Wategaonkar, Sanjay

    2008-11-01

    Experimental evidence is presented for the O-H—S hydrogen bonding in the complexes of simple model compounds of methionine (dimethyl sulphide) and tyrosine (phenol, p-cresol, and 2-naphthol). The complexes were formed in the supersonic jet and were detected using resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. In all the complexes, the band origins for the S1-S0 electronic transition were redshifted relative to that of their respective monomers. The resonant ion depletion IR spectra of all the complexes show redshifts of 123-140 cm-1 in the O-H stretching frequency, indicating that the OH group acts as the hydrogen bond donor and sulfur as an acceptor. The density functional theory calculations also predict the stable structures in support of this and predict the redshifted O-H stretching frequency in the complex. The atoms-in-molecules and natural bond orbital calculations confirm the O-H—S hydrogen bonding interaction. The significant finding of this study is that the magnitudes of redshifts in the O-H stretch in the O-H—S hydrogen bonded complexes reported here are comparable to those reported for the O-H—O hydrogen bonded complexes where H2O acts as the H-bond acceptor, which suggests that the OH-S interaction is perhaps as strong as the OH-O interaction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such report on the O-H—S hydrogen bonded complexes.

  9. Experimental evidence for paternal effects on offspring growth rate in Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus)

    PubMed Central

    Eilertsen, Eirik Mack; Bårdsen, Bård-Jørgen; Liljedal, Ståle; Rudolfsen, Geir; Folstad, Ivar

    2008-01-01

    Sexual selection theory predicts that females should choose males that signal viability and quality. However, few studies have found fitness benefits among females mating with highly ornamented males. Here, we use Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus), a teleost fish with no parental care, to investigate whether females could gain fitness benefits by mating with highly ornamented and large-sized males. Carotenoid-based coloration signalled by males during spawning is believed to be an indicator of good genes for this species. Paternal effects on offspring size (body length and dry body mass) were examined experimentally by crossing eggs and sperm in vitro from 12 females and 24 males in a split-brood design and raising larvae to 30 days past hatching. We clearly demonstrated that there was a relationship between offspring size and paternal coloration. However, a negative interaction between paternal length and coloration was evident for offspring length, indicating that positive effects of paternal coloration were only present for smaller males. Thus, the red spawning coloration of the male Arctic charr seems to be an indicator of good genes, but the effect of paternal coloration on offspring length, an indicator of ‘offspring quality’, is size dependent. PMID:18782751

  10. Infectivity of DWV associated to flower pollen: experimental evidence of a horizontal transmission route.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Maurizio; Carrozza, Maria Luisa; Luisi, Elena; Forzan, Mario; Giusti, Matteo; Sagona, Simona; Tolari, Francesco; Felicioli, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Deformed wing virus (DWV) is a honeybee pathogen whose presence is generally associated with infestation of the colony by the mite Varroa destructor, leading to the onset of infections responsible for the collapse of the bee colony. DWV contaminates bee products such as royal jelly, bee-bread and honey stored within the infected hive. Outside the hive, DWV has been found in pollen loads collected directly from infected as well as uninfected forager bees. It has been shown that the introduction of virus-contaminated pollen into a DWV-free hive results in the production of virus-contaminated food, whose role in the development of infected bees from virus-free eggs has been experimentally demonstrated. The aim of this study was twofold: (i) to ascertain the presence of DWV on pollen collected directly from flowers visited by honeybees and then quantify the viral load and (ii) determine whether the virus associated with pollen is infective. The results of our investigation provide evidence that DWV is present on pollen sampled directly from visited flowers and that, following injection in individuals belonging to the pollinator species Apis mellifera, it is able to establish an active infection, as indicated by the presence of replicating virus in the head of the injected bees. We also provide the first indication that the pollinator species Osmia cornuta is susceptible to DWV infection. PMID:25419704

  11. Smectite clays in Mars soil - Evidence for their presence and role in Viking biology experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Rishpon, J.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence for the presence of smectite clays in Martian soils is reviewed and results of experiments with certain active clays simulating the Viking biology experiments are reported. Analyses of Martian soil composition by means of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and dust storm spectroscopy and Martian geological history strongly suggest the presence of a mixture of weathered ferro-silicate minerals, mainly nontronite and montmorillonite, accompanied by soluble sulphate salts, as major constituents. Samples of montmorillonite and nontronite incubated with (C-14)-formate or the radioactive nutrient medium solution used in the Viking Labeled Release experiment, were found to produce patterns of release of radioactive gas very similar to those observed in the Viking experiments, indicating the iron-catalyzed decomposition of formate as the reaction responsible for the Viking results. The experimental results of Hubbard (1979) simulating the results of the Viking Pyrolytic Release experiment using iron montmorillonites are pointed out, and it is concluded that many of the results of the Viking biology experiments can be explained in terms of the surface activity of smectite clays in catalysis and adsorption.

  12. Evidence for effects of chronic lead exposure on blood pressure in experimental animals: an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Victery, W.

    1988-06-01

    Information obtained in a number of experimental studies conducted over the last 40 years on the effects of lead on blood pressure is reviewed. Differences in animal species, age at beginning of exposure, level of lead exposure, indices of lead burden, and blood pressure effects on each study are reported. In several of the high-dose experiments, hypertension was observed, but nephrotoxicity of lead may have contributed to its development. Moreover, in other high-dose experiments, no hypertension was observed, and in at least one experiment, the evidence suggested that lead could reduce an elevated blood pressure. In contrast, the lower dose experiments consistently demonstrated a hypertensive effect. Overall, the data suggest a biphasic dose response. Establishment of an appropriate animal model to study blood pressure effects of lead will require careful assessment of dietary interactions with lead, unstressed blood pressure monitoring with standardized techniques, and documentation of biologically effective lead burden. Future research should examine lead exposure at more environmentally appropriate levels in order to determine the validity of associating this pollutant with blood pressure effects in human population.

  13. Experimental evidence for a new single-event upset (SEU) mode in a CMOS SRAM obtained from model verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Smith, L. S.; Soli, G. A.; Lo, R. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Modeling of SEU has been done in a CMOS static RAM containing 1-micron-channel-length transistors fabricated from a p-well epilayer process using both circuit-simulation and numerical-simulation techniques. The modeling results have been experimentally verified with the aid of heavy-ion beams obtained from a three-stage tandem van de Graaff accelerator. Experimental evidence for a novel SEU mode in an ON n-channel device is presented.

  14. Scientific Reasoning in Early and Middle Childhood: The Development of Domain-General Evidence Evaluation, Experimentation, and Hypothesis Generation Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piekny, Jeanette; Maehler, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    According to Klahr's (2000, 2005; Klahr & Dunbar, 1988) Scientific Discovery as Dual Search model, inquiry processes require three cognitive components: hypothesis generation, experimentation, and evidence evaluation. The aim of the present study was to investigate (a) when the ability to evaluate perfect covariation, imperfect…

  15. Experimental Evidence for Cerenkov Emission of Whistler Waves by Electron Holes Associated with Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastwood, J. P.; Goldman, M. V.; Zhang, X.; Hietala, H.; Krupar, V.; Newman, D. L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Lapenta, G.

    2015-12-01

    Whistler waves are a ubiquitous plasma phenomenon, observed in a variety of space and laboratory plasma environments. They play a key role in many important and diverse processes, such as particle acceleration in the radiation belts and auroral acceleration region, the dissipation of plasma turbulence at small scales below the inertial range, collisionless shock physics, and magnetic reconnection. In reconnection they may modify the reconnection rate and also whistler physics is crucial to enabling fast reconnection in the Hall reconnection model. Consequently, understanding how whistler waves are generated and how they subsequently interact with the plasma is a problem of wide importance and application. It is well known that whistlers can arise as a result of kinetic instabilities, which grow exponentially from noise as a consequence of unstable electron distributions, for example temperature anisotropy. This is used ubiquitously to predict where and when whistler waves are likely to exist and therefore be of importance in many plasma phenomena. Recently it has been demonstrated theoretically and via computer simulations that whistler waves may also arise via Cerenkov emission from electron hole quasi-particles [Goldman et al., PRL, 2014]. Such wave emission can arise even when the temperature anisotropy leads to damping; in this case the system is analogous to a damped forced oscillator. Here we present novel experimental analysis from THEMIS showing for the first time evidence consistent with the generation of whistlers via Cerenkov emission during magnetotail reconnection. By considering the electromagnetic properties of the electron holes, the amplitude, phase speed and frequency of the associated whistlers, and also the available sub-spin observations of the electron distribution function, we find that the data are best explained by the Cerenkov emission theory rather than by kinetic instabilities due to the electron temperature anisotropy. Whilst the

  16. Experimental evidence for thermal generation of interstitials in a metallic crystal near the melting temperature.

    PubMed

    Safonova, E V; Mitrofanov, Yu P; Konchakov, R A; Yu Vinogradov, A; Kobelev, N P; Khonik, V A

    2016-06-01

    The only intrinsic point defects of simple crystalline metals known from solid state physics are vacancies and interstitials. It is widely believed that while vacancies play a major role in crystal properties and their concentration reaches relatively big values near the melting temperature T m, interstitials essentially do not occur in thermodynamic equilibrium and their influence on properties is minor. Here, taking aluminum single crystals as an example, we present compelling experimental evidence for rapid thermoactivated growth of interstitial concentration upon approaching T m. Using high precision measurements of the shear modulus we found a diaelastic effect of up to [Formula: see text] near T m. It is argued that this effect is mostly due to the generation of dumbbell (split) interstitials. The interstitial concentration c i rapidly increases upon approaching T m and becomes only 2-3 times smaller than that of vacancies just below T m. The reason for this c i -increase is conditioned by a decrease of the Gibbs free energy with temperature, which in turn originates from the high formation entropy of dumbbell interstitials and a decrease of their formation enthalpy at high c i . Special molecular dynamic simulation confirmed all basic aspects of the proposed interpretation. The results obtained (i) demonstrate the significance of interstitial concentration near T m that could lead to the revaluation of vacancy concentration at high temperatures, (ii) suggest that dumbbell interstitials play a major role in the melting mechanism of monatomic metallic crystals and (iii) support a new avenue for in-depth understanding of glassy metals. PMID:27143564

  17. Experimental evidence for thermal generation of interstitials in a metallic crystal near the melting temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safonova, E. V.; Mitrofanov, Yu P.; Konchakov, R. A.; Vinogradov, A. Yu; Kobelev, N. P.; Khonik, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    The only intrinsic point defects of simple crystalline metals known from solid state physics are vacancies and interstitials. It is widely believed that while vacancies play a major role in crystal properties and their concentration reaches relatively big values near the melting temperature T m, interstitials essentially do not occur in thermodynamic equilibrium and their influence on properties is minor. Here, taking aluminum single crystals as an example, we present compelling experimental evidence for rapid thermoactivated growth of interstitial concentration upon approaching T m. Using high precision measurements of the shear modulus we found a diaelastic effect of up to -1.5% near T m. It is argued that this effect is mostly due to the generation of dumbbell (split) interstitials. The interstitial concentration c i rapidly increases upon approaching T m and becomes only 2–3 times smaller than that of vacancies just below T m. The reason for this c i -increase is conditioned by a decrease of the Gibbs free energy with temperature, which in turn originates from the high formation entropy of dumbbell interstitials and a decrease of their formation enthalpy at high c i . Special molecular dynamic simulation confirmed all basic aspects of the proposed interpretation. The results obtained (i) demonstrate the significance of interstitial concentration near T m that could lead to the revaluation of vacancy concentration at high temperatures, (ii) suggest that dumbbell interstitials play a major role in the melting mechanism of monatomic metallic crystals and (iii) support a new avenue for in-depth understanding of glassy metals.

  18. Life in varying environments: experimental evidence for delayed effects of juvenile environment on adult life history.

    PubMed

    Helle, Heikki; Koskela, Esa; Mappes, Tapio

    2012-05-01

    1. The effects of environment experienced during early development on phenotype as an adult has started to gain vast amounts of interest in various taxa. Some evidence on long-term effects of juvenile environment is available, but replicated experimental studies in wild animals are still lacking. 2. Here we report the first replicated experiment in wild mammals which examines the long-term effects of juvenile and adult environments on individual fitness (reproduction, survival and health). The early development of bank vole (Myodes glareolus) individuals took place in either food-supplemented or un-supplemented outdoor enclosures. After the summer, adult individuals were reciprocally changed to either a similar or opposite resource environment to overwinter. 3. Adult environment had an overriding effect on reproductive success of females so that females overwintering in food-supplemented enclosures had a higher probability of breeding and advanced the initiation of breeding. However, the characteristics of their litters were determined by juvenile environment: females initially grown in food-supplemented conditions subsequently produced larger litters with bigger pups and a male-biased sex ratio. 4. In males, individuals growing in un-supplemented conditions had the highest survival irrespective of adult environment during winter, whereas in females, neither the juvenile nor adult environments affected their survival significantly. The physiological condition of voles in spring, as determined by haematological parameters, was also differentially affected by juvenile (plasma proteins and male testosterone) and adult (haematocrit) environments. 5. Our results suggest that (i) life-history trajectories of voles are not strictly specialized to a certain environment and (ii) the plastic life-history responses to present conditions can actually be caused by delayed effects of the juvenile environment. More generally, the results are important for understanding

  19. Evidence of Experimental Vertical Transmission of Emerging Novel ECSA Genotype of Chikungunya Virus in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ankita; Dash, Paban Kumar; Singh, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Shashi; Gopalan, Natarajan; Rao, Putcha Venkata Lakshmana; Parida, Man Mohan; Reiter, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has emerged as one of the most important arboviruses of public health significance in the past decade. The virus is mainly maintained through human-mosquito-human cycle. Other routes of transmission and the mechanism of maintenance of the virus in nature are not clearly known. Vertical transmission may be a mechanism of sustaining the virus during inter-epidemic periods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to determine whether Aedes aegypti, a principal vector, is capable of vertically transmitting CHIKV or not. Methodology/Principal Findings Female Ae. aegypti were orally infected with a novel ECSA genotype of CHIKV in the 2nd gonotrophic cycle. On day 10 post infection, a non-infectious blood meal was provided to obtain another cycle of eggs. Larvae and adults developed from the eggs obtained following both infectious and non-infectious blood meal were tested for the presence of CHIKV specific RNA through real time RT-PCR. The results revealed that the larvae and adults developed from eggs derived from the infectious blood meal (2nd gonotrophic cycle) were negative for CHIKV RNA. However, the larvae and adults developed after subsequent non-infectious blood meal (3rd gonotrophic cycle) were positive with minimum filial infection rates of 28.2 (1∶35.5) and 20.2 (1∶49.5) respectively. Conclusion/Significance This study is the first to confirm experimental vertical transmission of emerging novel ECSA genotype of CHIKV in Ae. aegypti from India, indicating the possibilities of occurrence of this phenomenon in nature. This evidence may have important consequence for survival of CHIKV during adverse climatic conditions and inter-epidemic periods. PMID:25080107

  20. Euphol prevents experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice: evidence for the underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Rafael Cypriano; de Souza, Paula Roberta de Cezaro; Bento, Allisson Freire; Marcon, Rodrigo; Bicca, Maíra Assunção; Pianowski, Luiz Francisco; Calixto, João B

    2012-02-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe chronic T cell-mediated autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS), the existing therapy of which is only partially effective and is associated with undesirable side effects. Euphol, an alcohol tetracyclic triterpene, has a wide range of pharmacological properties and is considered to have anti-inflammatory action. However there are no reports about the effects and mechanisms of euphol in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an established model of MS. Here we report the effects and the underlying mechanisms of action of euphol in EAE. Euphol (1-10mg/kg) was administered orally at different time-points of EAE. Immunological and inflammatory responses were evaluated by real-time PCR, Western blot and flow cytometry assays. We provide evidence that euphol significantly attenuates neurological signs of EAE. These beneficial effects of euphol seem to be associated with the down-regulation of mRNA and protein expression of some pro-inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the CNS. Furthermore, in vitro, euphol consistently inhibited the T cell-mediated immune response including the production of T(H)1 and T(H)17 cytokines in spleen cells of untreated EAE animals. Likewise, oral euphol treatment inhibited the infiltration of T(H)17 myelin-specific cells into the CNS through the adhesion molecule, lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1). Our findings reveal that oral administration of euphol consistently reduces and limits the severity and development of EAE. Therefore, euphol might represent a potential molecule of interest for the treatment of MS and other T(H)17 cell-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:22155310

  1. Designing a light fabric metamaterial being highly macroscopically tough under directional extension: first experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dell'Isola, Francesco; Lekszycki, Tomasz; Pawlikowski, Marek; Grygoruk, Roman; Greco, Leopoldo

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we study a metamaterial constructed with an isotropic material organized following a geometric structure which we call pantographic lattice. This relatively complex fabric was studied using a continuous model (which we call pantographic sheet) by Rivlin and Pipkin and includes two families of flexible fibers connected by internal pivots which are, in the reference configuration, orthogonal. A rectangular specimen having one side three times longer than the other is cut at 45° with respect to the fibers in reference configuration, and it is subjected to large-deformation plane-extension bias tests imposing a relative displacement of shorter sides. The continuum model used, the presented numerical models and the extraordinary advancements of the technology of 3D printing allowed for the design of some first experiments, whose preliminary results are shown and seem to be rather promising. Experimental evidence shows three distinct deformation regimes. In the first regime, the equilibrium total deformation energy depends quadratically on the relative displacement of terminal specimen sides: Applied resultant force depends linearly on relative displacement. In the second regime, the applied force varies nonlinearly on relative displacement, but the behavior remains elastic. In the third regime, damage phenomena start to occur until total failure, but the exerted resultant force continues to be increasing and reaches a value up to several times larger than the maximum shown in the linear regime before failure actually occurs. Moreover, the total energy needed to reach structural failure is larger than the maximum stored elastic energy. Finally, the volume occupied by the material in the fabric is a small fraction of the total volume, so that the ratio weight/resistance to extension is very advantageous. The results seem to require a refinement of the used theoretical and numerical methods to transform the presented concept into a promising technological

  2. Experimental evidence that RNA recombination occurs in the Japanese encephalitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, C.-K.; Chen, W.-J.

    2009-11-25

    Due to the lack of a proofreading function and error-repairing ability of genomic RNA, accumulated mutations are known to be a force driving viral evolution in the genus Flavivirus, including the Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus. Based on sequencing data, RNA recombination was recently postulated to be another factor associated with genomic variations in these viruses. We herein provide experimental evidence to demonstrate the occurrence of RNA recombination in the JE virus using two local pure clones (T1P1-S1 and CJN-S1) respectively derived from the local strains, T1P1 and CJN. Based on results from a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay on the C/preM junction comprising a fragment of 868 nucleotides (nt 10-877), the recombinant progeny virus was primarily formed in BHK-21 cells that had been co-infected with the two clones used in this study. Nine of 20 recombinant forms of the JE virus had a crossover in the nt 123-323 region. Sequencing data derived from these recombinants revealed that no nucleotide deletion or insertion occurred in this region favoring crossovers, indicating that precisely, not aberrantly, homologous recombination was involved. With site-directed mutagenesis, three stem-loop secondary structures were destabilized and re-stabilized in sequence, leading to changes in the frequency of recombination. This suggests that the conformation, not the free energy, of the secondary structure is important in modulating RNA recombination of the virus. It was concluded that because RNA recombination generates genetic diversity in the JE virus, this must be considered particularly in studies of viral evolution, epidemiology, and possible vaccine safety.

  3. Nitrate ammonification by Nautilia profundicola AmH: experimental evidence consistent with a free hydroxylamine intermediate

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Thomas E.; Campbell, Barbara J.; Kalis, Katie M.; Campbell, Mark A.; Klotz, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    The process of nitrate reduction via nitrite controls the fate and bioavailability of mineral nitrogen within ecosystems; i.e., whether it is retained as ammonium (ammonification) or lost as nitrous oxide or dinitrogen (denitrification). Here, we present experimental evidence for a novel pathway of microbial nitrate reduction, the reverse hydroxylamine:ubiquinone reductase module (reverse-HURM) pathway. Instead of a classical ammonia-forming nitrite reductase that performs a 6 electron-transfer process, the pathway is thought to employ two catalytic redox modules operating in sequence: the reverse-HURM reducing nitrite to hydroxylamine followed by a hydroxylamine reductase that converts hydroxylamine to ammonium. Experiments were performed on Nautilia profundicola strain AmH, whose genome sequence led to the reverse-HURM pathway proposal. N. profundicola produced ammonium from nitrate, which was assimilated into biomass. Furthermore, genes encoding the catalysts of the reverse-HURM pathway were preferentially expressed during growth of N. profundicola on nitrate as an electron acceptor relative to cultures grown on polysulfide as an electron acceptor. Finally, nitrate-grown cells of N. profundicola were able to rapidly and stoichiometrically convert high concentrations of hydroxylamine to ammonium in resting cell assays. These experiments are consistent with the reverse-HURM pathway and a free hydroxylamine intermediate, but could not definitively exclude direct nitrite reduction to ammonium by the reverse-HURM with hydroxylamine as an off-pathway product. N. profundicola and related organisms are models for a new pathway of nitrate ammonification that may have global impact due to the wide distribution of these organisms in hypoxic environments and symbiotic or pathogenic associations with animal hosts. PMID:23847604

  4. Pursuing Quality Evidence: Applying Single-Subject Quality Indicators to Non-Experimental Qualitative Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stodden, Robert A.; Yamamoto, Kathryn K.; Folk, Eric; Kong, Eran; Otsuji, Derek N.

    2013-01-01

    The need for quality evidence in support of strategies used while working with persons with autism and intellectual disability (ID) has been long been recognized by researchers and practitioners. The authors reviewed and applied a number of evidence-based indicators, developed through the "What Works Clearinghouse" (WWC), to the conduct…

  5. Metal loading effect on rare earth element binding to humic acid: Experimental and modelling evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsac, Rémi; Davranche, Mélanie; Gruau, Gérard; Dia, Aline

    2010-03-01

    The effect of metal loading on the binding of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) was studied by combining ultrafiltration and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry techniques. REE-HA complexation experiments were performed at pH 3 for REE/C molar ratios ranging from ca 4 × 10 -4 to 2.7 × 10 -2. Results show that the relative amount of REE bound to HA strongly increases with decreasing REE/C. A middle-REE (MREE) downward concavity is shown by patterns at high metal loading, whereas patterns at low metal loading display a regular increase from La to Lu. Humic Ion Model VI modelling are close to the experimental data variations, provided that (i) the ΔLK 2 parameter (i.e. the Model VI parameter taken into account the presence of strong but low density binding sites) is allowed to increase regularly from La to Lu (from 1.1 to 2.1) and (ii) the published log KMA values (i.e. the REE-HA binding constants specific to Model VI) are slightly modified, in particular with respect to heavy REE. Modelling approach provided evidence that logKdREE patterns with varying REE/C likely arises because REE binding to HA occurs through two types of binding sites in different density: (i) a few strong sites that preferentially complex the heavy REE and thus control the logKdREE atterns at low REE/C; (ii) a larger amount of weaker binding sites that preferentially complex the middle-REE and thus control the logKdREE pattern at high REE/C. Hence, metal loading exerts a major effect on HA-mediated REE binding, which could explain the diversity of published conditional constants for REE binding with HA. A literature survey suggests that the few strong sites activated at low REE/C could be multidentate carboxylic sites, or perhaps N-, or P-functional groups. Finally, an examination of the literature field data proposed that the described loading effect could account for much of the variation in REE patterns observed in natural organic-rich waters (DOC > 5 mg L -1 and 4

  6. On the early emergence of reverse transcription: theoretical basis and experimental evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazcano, A.; Valverde, V.; Hernandez, G.; Gariglio, P.; Fox, G. E.; Oro, J.

    1992-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase (RT) was first discovered as an essential catalyst in the biological cycle of retroviruses. However, in the past years evidence has accumulated showing that RTs are involved in a surprisingly large number of RNA-mediated transpositional events that include both viral and nonviral genetic entities. Although it is probable that some RT-bearing genetic elements like the different types of AIDS viruses and the mammalian LINE family have arisen in recent geological times, the possibility that reverse transcription first took place in the early Archean is supported by (1) the hypothesis that RNA preceded DNA as cellular genetic material; (2) the existence of homologous regions of the subunit tau of the E. coli DNA polymerase III with the simian immunodeficiency virus RT, the hepatitis B virus RT, and the beta' subunit of the E. coli RNA polymerase (McHenry et al. 1988); (3) the presence of several conserved motifs, including a 14-amino-acid segment that consists of an Asp-Asp pair flanked by hydrophobic amino acids, which are found in all RTs and in most cellular and viral RNA polymerases. However, whether extant RTs descend from the primitive polymerase involved in the RNA-to-DNA transition remains unproven. Substrate specificity of the AMV and HIV-1 RTs can be modified in the presence of Mn2+, a cation which allows them to add ribonucleotides to an oligo (dG) primer in a template-dependent reaction. This change in specificity is comparable to that observed under similar conditions in other nucleic acid polymerases. This experimentally induced change in RT substrate specificity may explain previous observations on the misincorporation of ribonucleotides by the Maloney murine sarcoma virus RT in the minus and plus DNA of this retrovirus (Chen and Temin 1980). Our results also suggest that HIV-infected macrophages and T-cell cells may contain mixed polynucleotides containing both ribo- and deoxyribonucleotides. The evolutionary significance of these

  7. Experimental evidence for asymmetric mate preference and aggression: behavioral interactions in a woodrat (Neotoma) hybrid zone

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Female mate preferences may be under strong selection in zones of contact between closely related species because of greater variation in available mates and the potential costs of hybridization. We studied female mate preferences experimentally in a zone of secondary contact between Desert and Bryant’s Woodrat (Neotoma lepida and N. bryanti) in the southern foothills of the Sierra Nevada of California. We tested female preference for conspecific versus heterospecific males in paired choice trials in which females could interact freely with males, but males could not interact directly with each other. We compared preferences of females from both allopatric and sympatric sites. Results We did not find evidence of the process of reinforcement as assortative preferences were not stronger in sympatry than in allopatry. Mate preferences, however, were asymmetric, with N. lepida females mating preferentially with conspecifics and N. bryanti females showing no preference by species. Sympatric females were less likely to mate than allopatric females, due in part to an increase in aggressive interactions. However, even in the absence of aggression, courtship led to mating less often in sympatric females, suggesting they were choosier or had lower sexual motivation than allopatric females. Conclusions Patterns of mate choice in this woodrat system appear to be strongly impacted by body size and aggressive behavior. In particular, females of the smaller-bodied species rarely interact with the relatively large heterospecific males. In contrast females of the larger-bodied species accept the relatively small heterospecific males. For sympatric animals, rates of aggression were markedly higher than for allopatric animals and reduced affiliative and reproductive behavior in our trials. Sympatric animals are larger and more aggressive, traits that are likely under strong ecological selection across the sharp resource gradient that characterizes the contact zone

  8. Rare Earth Element - Humic Acid Interaction: Experimental Evidence for Kinetic and Equilibrium Fractionation in Aqueous Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonke, J. E.; Salters, V. J.; Benedetti, M. F.

    2003-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is well known for it's strong binding capacity for trace metals. In order to better predict the role of DOM in the speciation and transport of trace metals in the environment we coupled capillary electrophoresis (CE), a molecular separation technique, to a Sector Field Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (SF-ICP-MS). The combination of these two techniques allows for the study of non-labile metal speciation in aquatic samples. By separating Rare Earth Element (REE) complexes with EDTA and Humic Acid's (i.e. ligand competition) we have been able to determine conditional equilibrium binding constants (Kc) and kinetic rate constants for all 14 REE's with Humic (HA) and Fulvic Acids (FA) as a function of pH (6-9) and ionic strength (IS, 0.01-0.1 mol/L). Assuming a 1:1 binding mechanism, logKc values for REE-FA varied from 9.0 (La) to 10.5 (Lu) at pH 6, 0.1 mol/L IS, and 11.7 (La) to 14.6 (Lu) at pH 9, 0.1 mol/L IS. LogKc values for REE-HA were 10.6 (La) to 12.2 (Lu) at pH 6, 0.1 mol/L IS and 13.2 (La) to 16.5 (Lu) at pH 9, 0.1 mol/L IS. Slightly higher values for Kc were obtained at 0.01 mol/L IS. The general observations of stronger REE-HA binding compared to REE-FA, and stronger binding with increasing pH and decreasing IS correlate with our current understanding of metal-DOM interactions (1). Both Kc's as well as kinetic rate constants increase with increasing REE mass number (decreasing ionic radius); a reflection of the well-known lanthanide contraction. This is the first comprehensive metal binding dataset between REE and DOM, and the first experimental evidence for differential equilibrium and kinetic binding behavior between REE's and DOM. The 30-1000 fold increase in binding strength of heavy REE's with DOM provides for a an equilibrium fractionation mechanism that may explain features of the global geochemical REE cycle such as fractionation related to weathering, estuarine mixing, and REE scavenging in the deep ocean

  9. Chemopreventive properties of 3,3'-diindolylmethane in breast cancer: evidence from experimental and human studies.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Cynthia A; Ho, Emily; Strom, Meghan B

    2016-07-01

    Diet is a modifiable factor associated with the risk of several cancers, with convincing evidence showing a link between diet and breast cancer. The role of bioactive compounds of food origin, including those found in cruciferous vegetables, is an active area of research in cancer chemoprevention. This review focuses on 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), the major bioactive indole in crucifers. Research of the cancer-preventive activity of DIM has yielded basic mechanistic, animal, and human trial data. Further, this body of evidence is largely supported by observational studies. Bioactive DIM has demonstrated chemopreventive activity in all stages of breast cancer carcinogenesis. This review describes current evidence related to the metabolism and mechanisms of DIM involved in the prevention of breast cancer. Importantly, this review also focuses on current evidence from human observational and intervention trials that have contributed to a greater understanding of exposure estimates that will inform recommendations for DIM intake. PMID:27261275

  10. Counter-intuitive experimental evidence on the initiation of radical crack in ceramic thin films at the atomic scale

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Chunqiang Li, Zhipeng; Lin, Songsheng

    2015-10-15

    The basic issue related to radial crack in ceramic thin films has received considerable attention due to the fact that the radial crack plays an important role in evaluating the toughness properties of ceramic materials. In this work, an atomic-scale new experimental evidence is clearly presented to reveal the counter-intuitive initiation, the nucleation and the propagation mechanism of the radial crack in Al-Cr-N ceramic thin films.

  11. Towards the evidence of a purely spatial Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in images: measurement scheme and first experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaux, F.; Mougin-Sisini, J.; Moreau, P. A.; Lantz, E.

    2012-07-01

    We propose a scheme to evidence the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox for photons produced by spontaneous down conversion, from measurement of purely spatial correlations of photon positions both in the near- and in the far-field. Experimentally, quantum correlations have been measured in the far-field of parametric fluorescence created in a type II BBO crystal. Imaging is performed in the photon counting regime with an electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) camera.

  12. Counter-intuitive experimental evidence on the initiation of radical crack in ceramic thin films at the atomic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Chunqiang; Li, Zhipeng; Lin, Songsheng

    2015-10-01

    The basic issue related to radial crack in ceramic thin films has received considerable attention due to the fact that the radial crack plays an important role in evaluating the toughness properties of ceramic materials. In this work, an atomic-scale new experimental evidence is clearly presented to reveal the counter-intuitive initiation, the nucleation and the propagation mechanism of the radial crack in Al-Cr-N ceramic thin films.

  13. Evidence of alkali rich melt reactions with mantle peridotite : Natural observations and experimental analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, T. B.; Milke, R.; Wunder, B.

    2012-04-01

    The Heldburg Phonolite, (Thuringia, Germany) is peculiar in its nature due to its absence of a Eu anomaly, and hence lack of feldspar fractionation, as well as the presence of spinel lherzolite xenocrysts. These observations suggest a higher than normal (mantle) pressure of origin, and its potential as a metasomatic agent at depth is explored in this work. Disequilibrium between the phonolite and its entrained upper mantle xenocrysts resulted in the development of secondary reaction rim assemblages of; (1) phlogopite + minor diopside around olivine, (2) pargasitic amphibole, phlogopite and minor diopside around orthopyroxene. We document both the natural rims and the attempts to reproduce them under experimental conditions, in order to elucidate the likely origin of the phonolite and its efficacy for metasomatising the upper mantle. Platinum capsules were loaded with mixtures of crushed mineral separates, (of pure synthetic forsterite, San Carlos olivine, synthetic enstatite or a natural enstatite from Kilosa, Tanzania) with a synthetic Fe-free phonolite melt in a 16:84% weight ratio, respectively. Experiments were run in a piston cylinder apparatus with CaF2 as the pressure medium. In addition to varying PT conditions, a wide range of water contents were tested (0-14wt%). It was found that pressures of 10-14 kbar, and temperatures of 900-1000°C, satisfy the conditions at which the reactions can form, thus, it is likely that the phonolite existed at upper mantle conditions. Water must be present to stabilize the desired hydrous phases, with >6wt% required at 900°C and 10 kbar. The destabilization of feldspar is also essential to the process, hence higher water contents are needed at the lowest PT conditions compared to 4-5 wt. % H2O at greater PT. The formation of amphibole around enstatite appears to be affected by sluggish reaction kinetics and the orientation of the host pyroxene, sometimes leading to diopside single rims. Furthermore we note some of the

  14. Experimental Evidence Linking Elevated CO2, Rhizosphere C/N Stoichiometry and Microbial Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Y.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Pendall, E.; LeCain, D. R.; Morgan, J.

    2012-12-01

    expected to be more efficient in their C use. Decreasing the C/N ratio of roots decreased SOM respiration and increased the efficiency of SOM-consuming microbes. Direct N additions had a similar but stronger effect. Increased C efficiency with greater nutrient availability is consistent with theoretical expectations of C utilization under nutrient limitation. Notably, the response of C use to N treatments occurred only under eCO2 conditions. This functional contrast was supported by differential responses of microbial PLFA profiles to N treatments under CO2 treatments. Together, these results suggest that the eCO2 environment was more conducive to N limitation, via changes in microbial community structure and function. Our results provide direct experimental evidence of plant-mediated alteration of decomposer C efficiency due to changes in atmospheric CO2 and N availability from both plant and soil sources. An increase in SOM-consuming microbes efficiency in an eCO2 world is likely to have important ecosystem-level implications as it could enhance the amount of C that remains in soil relative to the amount released to the atmosphere. The interactive effects of CO2 and N treatments suggest that microbial efficiency will be more sensitive to changes in nutrient status under the future eCO2 atmosphere.

  15. Experimental and theoretical evidence for the chaotic dynamics of complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agop, M.; Dimitriu, D. G.; Niculescu, O.; Poll, E.; Radu, V.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental results on the formation, dynamics and evolution towards chaos of complex space charge structures that emerge in front of a positively biased electrode immersed in a quiescent plasma. In certain experimental conditions, we managed to obtain the so-called multiple double layers (MDLs) with non-concentric configuration. Our experiments show that the interactions between each MDL's constituent entities are held responsible for the complex dynamics and eventually for its transition to chaos through cascades of spatio-temporal sub-harmonic bifurcations. Further, we build a theoretical model based on the fractal approximation (scale relativity theory) in order to reproduce the experimental results (plasma self-structuring and scenario of evolution to chaos). Comparing the experimental results with the theoretical ones, we observe a good correlation between them.

  16. Evidence for a resonant cyclotron interaction between runaway electrons and MHD modes in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li Erzhong; Zhou Ruijie; Hu Liqun

    2011-09-15

    In the past, the resonant cyclotron interaction between runaway electrons and lower hybrid waves via anomalous Doppler broadening was experimentally investigated, and it was shown to be able to create a barrier to the energy that could be reached by the runaway electrons [E. Li et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 621, 566 (2010)]. In this paper, to our knowledge for the first time, experimental evidence will be provided for a resonant cyclotron interaction between runaway electrons and magnetohydrodynamics modes in a stochastic magnetic field in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST), which has been theoretically proposed as a mechanism able to limit the maximum attainable energy by runaway electrons in tokamak plasmas [J. R. Martin-Solis and R. Sanchez, Phys. Plasmas 15, 112505 (2008)].

  17. Persistence of Learning Gains from Computer Assisted Learning: Experimental Evidence from China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mo, D.; Zhang, L.; Wang, J.; Huang, W.; Shi, Y.; Boswell, M.; Rozelle, S.

    2015-01-01

    Computer assisted learning (CAL) programs have been shown to be effective in improving educational outcomes. However, the existing studies on CAL have almost all been conducted over a short period of time. There is very little evidence on how the impact evolves over time. In response, we conducted a clustered randomized experiment involving 2741…

  18. Evidence for Tempo-Specific Timing in Music Using a Web-Based Experimental Setup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honing, Henkjan

    2006-01-01

    Perceptual invariance has been studied and found in several domains of cognition, including those of speech, motor behavior, and object motion. It has also been the topic of several studies in music perception. However, the existing perceptual studies present rather inconclusive evidence with regard to the perceptual invariance of expressive…

  19. Long-Term Effects of Teacher Performance Pay: Experimental Evidence from India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muralidharan, Karthik

    2012-01-01

    While the idea of teacher performance-pay is increasingly making its way into policy, the evidence on the effectiveness of such programs is both limited and mixed. The central questions in the literature on teacher performance pay to date have been whether teacher performance pay based on test scores can improve student achievement, and whether…

  20. Teacher Incentives in Developing Countries: Experimental Evidence from India. Working Paper 2008-13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muralidharan, Karthik; Sundararaman, Venkatesh

    2008-01-01

    Performance pay for teachers is frequently suggested as a way of improving educational outcomes in schools, but the empirical evidence to date on its effectiveness is limited and mixed. We present results from a randomized evaluation of a teacher incentive program implemented across a representative sample of government-run rural primary schools…

  1. Teacher Performance Pay: Experimental Evidence from India. NBER Working Paper No. 15323

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muralidharan, Karthik; Sundararaman, Venkatesh

    2009-01-01

    Performance pay for teachers is frequently suggested as a way of improving education outcomes in schools, but the theoretical predictions regarding its effectiveness are ambiguous and the empirical evidence to date is limited and mixed. We present results from a randomized evaluation of a teacher incentive program implemented across a large…

  2. What Makes an Effective Teacher? Quasi-Experimental Evidence. NBER Working Paper No. 16885

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavy, Victor

    2011-01-01

    This paper measures empirically the relationship between classroom teaching practices and student achievements. Based on primary- and middle-school data from Israel, I find very strong evidence that two important elements of teaching practices cause student achievements to improve. In particular, classroom teaching that emphasizes the instilment…

  3. The price elasticity of demand for heroin: matched longitudinal and experimental evidence#

    PubMed Central

    Olmstead, Todd A.; Alessi, Sheila M.; Kline, Brendan; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Petry, Nancy M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports estimates of the price elasticity of demand for heroin based on a newly constructed dataset. The dataset has two matched components concerning the same sample of regular heroin users: longitudinal information about real-world heroin demand (actual price and actual quantity at daily intervals for each heroin user in the sample) and experimental information about laboratory heroin demand (elicited by presenting the same heroin users with scenarios in a laboratory setting). Two empirical strategies are used to estimate the price elasticity of demand for heroin. The first strategy exploits the idiosyncratic variation in the price experienced by a heroin user over time that occurs in markets for illegal drugs. The second strategy exploits the experimentally-induced variation in price experienced by a heroin user across experimental scenarios. Both empirical strategies result in the estimate that the conditional price elasticity of demand for heroin is approximately −0.80. PMID:25702687

  4. The price elasticity of demand for heroin: Matched longitudinal and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Todd A; Alessi, Sheila M; Kline, Brendan; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Petry, Nancy M

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports estimates of the price elasticity of demand for heroin based on a newly constructed dataset. The dataset has two matched components concerning the same sample of regular heroin users: longitudinal information about real-world heroin demand (actual price and actual quantity at daily intervals for each heroin user in the sample) and experimental information about laboratory heroin demand (elicited by presenting the same heroin users with scenarios in a laboratory setting). Two empirical strategies are used to estimate the price elasticity of demand for heroin. The first strategy exploits the idiosyncratic variation in the price experienced by a heroin user over time that occurs in markets for illegal drugs. The second strategy exploits the experimentally induced variation in price experienced by a heroin user across experimental scenarios. Both empirical strategies result in the estimate that the conditional price elasticity of demand for heroin is approximately -0.80. PMID:25702687

  5. Experimental evidence of the theoretical spatial frequency response of cubic phase mask wavefront coding imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Somayaji, Manjunath; Bhakta, Vikrant R; Christensen, Marc P

    2012-01-16

    The optical transfer function of a cubic phase mask wavefront coding imaging system is experimentally measured across the entire range of defocus values encompassing the system's functional limits. The results are compared against mathematical expressions describing the spatial frequency response of these computational imagers. Experimental data shows that the observed modulation and phase transfer functions, available spatial frequency bandwidth and design range of this imaging system strongly agree with previously published mathematical analyses. An imaging system characterization application is also presented wherein it is shown that the phase transfer function is more robust than the modulation transfer function in estimating the strength of the cubic phase mask. PMID:22274533

  6. Income Mobility Breeds Tolerance for Income Inequality: Cross-National and Experimental Evidence.

    PubMed

    Shariff, Azim F; Wiwad, Dylan; Aknin, Lara B

    2016-05-01

    American politicians often justify income inequality by referencing the opportunities people have to move between economic stations. Though past research has shown associations between income mobility and resistance to wealth redistribution policies, no experimental work has tested whether perceptions of mobility influence tolerance for inequality. In this article, we present a cross-national comparison showing that income mobility is associated with tolerance for inequality and experimental work demonstrating that perceptions of higher mobility directly affect attitudes toward inequality. We find support for both the prospect of upward mobility and the view that peoples' economic station is the product of their own efforts, as mediating mechanisms. PMID:27217250

  7. An experimental evidence-based computational paradigm for new logic-gates in neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi, R.; Guberman, S.; Goldental, A.; Kanter, I.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a new experimentally corroborated paradigm in which the functionality of the brain's logic-gates depends on the history of their activity, e.g. an OR-gate that turns into a XOR-gate over time. Our results are based on an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on circuits of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro. The underlying biological mechanism is the unavoidable increase of neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulations, which imposes a non-uniform gradual stretching of network delays.

  8. Experimental evidence of skyrmion-like configurations in bilayer nanodisks with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Stebliy, Maxim E. Kolesnikov, Alexander G.; Davydenko, Alexander V.; Ognev, Alexey V.; Samardak, Alexander S.; Chebotkevich, Ludmila A.

    2015-05-07

    Formation and existence of magnetic skyrmion-like configurations in bilayer nanodisks (Ta(3 nm)/[Co(0.37 nm)/Ni(0.58 nm)]{sub 10}){sub 2} with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are shown experimentally at room temperature. Magnetization reversal through the skyrmion state is studied using magnetic hysteresis measurements. An evolution of skyrmion configurations in the nanodisk structure is analyzed. Experimental methods and micromagnetic simulations help to understand the magnetization reversal processes occurring through the stable skyrmion-like configurations. Formation of the intermediate C-states during magnetization reversal is demonstrated. The skyrmion number for all possible spin configurations is calculated.

  9. Exercise and Physical Activity in Mental Disorders: Clinical and Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Zschucke, Elisabeth; Gaudlitz, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have shown that exercise (EX) and physical activity (PA) can prevent or delay the onset of different mental disorders, and have therapeutic benefits when used as sole or adjunct treatment in mental disorders. This review summarizes studies that used EX interventions in patients with anxiety, affective, eating, and substance use disorders, as well as schizophrenia and dementia/mild cognitive impairment. Despite several decades of clinical evidence with EX interventions, controlled studies are sparse in most disorder groups. Preliminary evidence suggests that PA/EX can induce improvements in physical, subjective and disorder-specific clinical outcomes. Potential mechanisms of action are discussed, as well as implications for psychiatric research and practice. PMID:23412549

  10. Experimental evidence and the Landau-Zener promotion in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cindro, N.; Freeman, R.M.; Haas, F.

    1986-04-01

    Recent data from C+O collisions are analyzed in terms of the Landau-Zener promotion in nuclei. Evidence for the presence of this mechanism in nuclear collisions is of considerable interest, since it provides a signature of single-particle orbitals in molecular-type potentials and, at the same time, paves the way to a microscopic understanding of the collision dynamics, in particular of the energy dissipation rate. The analyzed data are of two types: integrated cross sections and angular distributions of inelastically scattered particles. The first set of data shows structure qualitatively consistent with recent calculations of the Landau-Zener effect; for this set of data no other reasonable explanation is presently available. The second set of data, while consistent with the presence of the Landau-Zener promotion, is examined in terms of other possible explanations too. The combined data show evidence favoring the presence of the Landau-Zener promotion in nucleus-nucleus collisions.

  11. When and why do territorial coalitions occur? Experimental evidence from a fiddler crab.

    PubMed

    Detto, Tanya; Jennions, Michael D; Backwell, Patricia R Y

    2010-05-01

    Neighboring territory owners are often less aggressive toward each other than to strangers ("dear enemy" effect). There is, however, little evidence for territorial defense coalitions whereby a neighbor will temporarily leave his/her own territory, enter that of a neighbor, and cooperate in repelling a conspecific intruder. This is surprising, as theoreticians have long posited the existence of such coalitions and the circumstances under which they should evolve. Here we document territorial defense coalitions in the African fiddler crab Uca annulipes, which lives in large colonies wherein each male defends a burrow and its surrounding area against neighbors and "floaters" (burrowless males). Fights between a resident and a floater sometimes involve another male who has left his territory to fight the floater challenging his neighbor. Using simple experiments, we provide the first evidence of the rules determining when territorial coalitions form. Our results support recent models that suggest that these coalitions arise from by-product mutualism. PMID:20302425

  12. Oxytocin and Major Depressive Disorder: Experimental and Clinical Evidence for Links to Aetiology and Possible Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, David A.; Neumann, Inga D.

    2010-01-01

    Affective disorders represent the most common psychiatric diseases, with substantial co-morbidity existing between major depressive disorders (MDD) and anxiety disorders. The lack of truly novel acting compounds has led to non-monoaminergic based research and hypotheses in recent years. The large number of brain neuropeptides, characterized by discrete synthesis sites and multiple receptors, represent likely research candidates for novel therapeutic targets. The present review summarises the available preclinical and human evidence regarding the neuropeptide, oxytocin, and its implications in the aetiology and treatment of MDD. While the evidence is not conclusive at present additional studies are warranted to determine whether OXT may be of therapeutic benefit in subsets of MDD patients such as those with comorbid anxiety symptoms and low levels of social attachment.

  13. Verb Form Indicates Discourse Segment Type in Biological Research Papers: Experimental Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Waard, Anita; Maat, Henk Pander

    2012-01-01

    Corpus studies suggest that verb tense is a differentiating feature between, on the one hand, text pertaining to experimental results (involving methods and results) and on the other hand, text pertaining to more abstract concepts (i.e. regarding background knowledge in a field, hypotheses, problems or claims). In this paper, we describe a user…

  14. Teacher Pay for Performance: Experimental Evidence from the Project on Incentives in Teaching (POINT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Matthew G.; Ballou, Dale; Hamilton, Laura; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Lockwood, J. R.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Pepper, Matthew; Stecher, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a rigorous experiment examining the impact of pay for performance on student achievement and instructional practice. This study, conducted by the National Center on Performance Incentives in partnership with the RAND Corporation examines an experimental pay for performance program administered via a randomized…

  15. Mimicking Aphasic Semantic Errors in Normal Speech Production: Evidence from a Novel Experimental Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Catherine; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Semantic errors are commonly found in semantic dementia (SD) and some forms of stroke aphasia and provide insights into semantic processing and speech production. Low error rates are found in standard picture naming tasks in normal controls. In order to increase error rates and thus provide an experimental model of aphasic performance, this study…

  16. Evidence That Counts: 12 Teacher-Led Randomised Controlled Trials and Other Styles of Experimental Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churches, Richard; McAleavy, Tony

    2016-01-01

    This publication contains 12 (A3 open-out) poster-style reports of teacher experimental research. The style of presentation parallels the type of preliminary reporting common at academic conferences and postgraduate events. At the same time, it aims to act as a form of short primer to introduce teachers to the basic options that there are when…

  17. Criminogenic Effects of the Prison Environment on Inmate Behavior: Some Experimental Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Scott D.; Gaes, Gerald G.

    2005-01-01

    The current study analyzed a subset of the experimental data collected by Berk, Ladd, Graziano, and Baek (2003) to test whether different intensities of incarceration make inmates more criminal while incarcerated. There were 561 male inmates whose equivalent classification scores indicated they had the same level of risk to commit institutional…

  18. EVIDENCE FOR EFFECTS OF CHRONIC LEAD EXPOSURE ON BLOOD PRESSURE IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS: AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information obtained in a number of experimental studies conducted over the last forty years on the effects of lead on blood pressure is reviewed. Differences in animal species, age at beginning of exposure, level of lead exposure, indices of lead burden, and blood pressure effec...

  19. Experimental Evidence for Dynamic Social Impact: The Emergence of Subcultures in Electronic Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latane, Bibb; Bourgeois, Martin J.

    1996-01-01

    Presents results of experimental tests of Dynamic Social Impact Theory (DSIT) in which participants engaged in discussions over electronic mail. Finds support for the emergence of four group phenomena predicted by DSIT. Shows how, rewarded for being in the majority, individuals' choices resulted in the emergence of four forms of group level…

  20. Work Towards Experimental Evidence Of Hard X-Ray Photoionization In Highly Charged Krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Kirby, K.; Lin, T.; Gillaspy, J. D.; Gokhale, P.; Kanter, E. P.; Dunford, R. W.; Seifert, S.; Young, L.; McDonald, J.; Schneider, D.

    2011-06-01

    Ions of almost any charge state can be produced through electron-impact ionization. Here we describe our first experiments designed to photoionize these highly charged ions with hard x-rays by pairing an electron and photon beam. A spectral line at 12.7(1) keV with an intensity corroborated by theory may be the first evidence of hard x-ray photoionization of a highly charged ion.

  1. Work toward experimental evidence of hard x-ray photoionization in highly charged krypton.

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E.; Gillaspy, J.D.; Gokhale, P.; Kanter, E.P.; Brickhouse, N.S.; Dunford, R.W.; Kirby, K.; Lin, T.; McDonald, J.; Schneider, D.; Seifert, S.; Young, L.

    2011-06-01

    Ions of almost any charge state can be produced through electron-impact ionization. Here we describe our first experiments designed to photoionize these highly charged ions with hard x-rays by pairing an electron and photon beam. A spectral line at 12.7(1) keV with an intensity corroborated by theory may be the first evidence of hard x-ray photoionization of a highly charged ion.

  2. Experimental evidence of resonant tunneling via localized DQW states in an asymmetric triple barrier structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velásquez, Rober

    2003-04-01

    In this work we report on field-induced features appearing in the tunneling current traces of a biased asymmetric triple barrier resonant tunneling device in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field. A theoretical model that satisfactorily explains the origin of these features is discussed. The reported data evidences the localized nature of the quantum states in thin layer asymmetric double-quantum-well structures.

  3. Theoretical and experimental evidence of non-symmetric doubly localized rogue waves

    PubMed Central

    He, Jingsong; Guo, Lijuan; Zhang, Yongshuai; Chabchoub, Amin

    2014-01-01

    We present determinant expressions for vector rogue wave (RW) solutions of the Manakov system, a two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. As a special case, we generate a family of exact and non-symmetric RW solutions of the NLS equation up to third order, localized in both space and time. The derived non-symmetric doubly localized second-order solution is generated experimentally in a water wave flume for deep-water conditions. Experimental results, confirming the characteristic non-symmetric pattern of the solution, are in very good agreement with theory as well as with numerical simulations, based on the modified NLS equation, known to model accurately the dynamics of weakly nonlinear wave packets in deep water. PMID:25383023

  4. Experimental Evidence of Weak Excluded Volume Effects for Nanochannel Confined DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Damini; Miller, Jeremy J.; Muralidhar, Abhiram; Mahshid, Sara; Reisner, Walter; Dorfman, Kevin D.

    In the classical de Gennes picture of weak polymer nanochannel confinement, the polymer contour is envisioned as divided into a series of isometric blobs. Strong excluded volume interactions are present both within a blob and between blobs. In contrast, for semiflexible polymers like DNA, excluded volume interactions are of borderline strength within a blob but appreciable between blobs, giving rise to a chain description consisting of a string of anisometric blobs. We present experimental validation of this subtle effect of excluded volume for DNA nanochannel confinement by performing measurements of variance in chain extension of T4 DNA molecules as a function of effective nanochannel size (305-453 nm). Additionally, we show an approach to systematically reduce the effect of molecular weight dispersity of DNA samples, a typical experimental artifact, by combining confinement spectroscopy with simulations.

  5. Experimental evidence of Xe incorporation in Schottky defects in UO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bès, René; Martin, Philippe; Vathonne, Emerson; Delorme, Rémy; Sabathier, Catherine; Freyss, Michel; Bertolus, Marjorie; Glatzel, Pieter

    2015-03-01

    We report here the direct experimental observation of the preferential xenon incorporation site in uranium dioxide and analyse how its incorporation evolves with the annealing temperature. We show that High Energy Resolution Fluorescence Detection X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure in combination with first-principles calculations enable a precise determination of the Xe incorporation site. Our finding provides important insight for the understanding and modeling of noble gases behavior in nuclear oxide fuel.

  6. Experimental evidence of Xe incorporation in Schottky defects in UO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Bès, René; Martin, Philippe Vathonne, Emerson; Delorme, Rémy; Sabathier, Catherine; Freyss, Michel; Bertolus, Marjorie; Glatzel, Pieter

    2015-03-16

    We report here the direct experimental observation of the preferential xenon incorporation site in uranium dioxide and analyse how its incorporation evolves with the annealing temperature. We show that High Energy Resolution Fluorescence Detection X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure in combination with first-principles calculations enable a precise determination of the Xe incorporation site. Our finding provides important insight for the understanding and modeling of noble gases behavior in nuclear oxide fuel.

  7. Recent experimental evidence for the Los Alamos proton storage ring beam instability

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.A.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Johnson, D.

    1997-09-01

    The peak intensity of the PSR is limited by a fast transverse instability. In 1996 the authors started a project to upgrade the PSR to 200 {mu}A at 30 Hz, which requires operation above the instability threshold achieved with the present rf system. The authors have, therefore, resumed their experimental program to understand and control the instability. In this paper they will present their latest data.

  8. Investigation of a model vertical motion liquid damper: comparing numerical simulation and experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Chris; Tabatabai, Habib; Buechel, Craig

    2005-05-01

    Tuned Liquid Dampers (TLD) are used to limit horizontal vibrations in structures, and offer practical alternatives to Tuned Mass Dampers (TMD). However, to our knowledge, liquid damping systems have not been developed to reduce vertical vibrations. In this work, we develop a model for a Vertical Motion Liquid Damper (VMLD), idealized as a discrete, two degree of freedom system. One degree of freedom represents the 'target' structure that is to be damped, and the other represents the approximate, one-dimensional motion of a liquid in a U-shaped tube. Internal losses due to the fluid oscillation serve to limit and control motions of the target structure. The U-shaped tube has a flexible joint such that one vertical portion and the horizontal portion of the tube remain fixed, and the remaining vertical portion of the tube is affixed to the vibrating structure, allowing the liquid to become excited. The equations of motion are derived using Lagrange's Equations, and are integrated using Runge-Kutta algorithms that are available in Matlab. An experimental model was built in the laboratory, consisting of a mass attached to the end of a cantilevered beam (corresponding to the target structure), and a U-tube made from PVC pipe. The various damping and stiffness parameters of the system were calibrated independently based on experimental data. Measured data from the experimental model show reasonable agreement with numerical simulations.

  9. Experimental evidence for strong stabilizing forces at high functional diversity of aquatic microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Carrara, Francesco; Giometto, Andrea; Seymour, Mathew; Rinaldo, Andrea; Altermatt, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Unveiling the mechanisms that promote coexistence in biological communities is a fundamental problem in ecology. Stable coexistence of many species is commonly observed in natural communities. Most of these natural communities, however, are composed of species from multiple trophic and functional groups, while theory and experiments on coexistence have been focusing on functionally similar species. Here, we investigated how functional diversity affects the stability of species coexistence and productivity in multispecies communities by characterizing experimentally all pairwise species interactions in a pool of 11 species of eukaryotes (10 protists and one rotifer) belonging to three different functional groups. Species within the same functional group showed stronger competitive interactions compared to among-functional group interactions. This often led to competitive exclusion between species that had higher functional relatedness, but only at low levels of species richness. Communities with higher functional diversity resulted in increased species coexistence and community biomass production. Our experimental findings and the results of a stochastic model tailored to the experimental interaction matrix suggest the emergence of strong stabilizing forces when species from different functional groups interact in a homogeneous environment. By combining theoretical analysis with experiments we could also disentangle the relationship between species richness and functional diversity, showing that functional diversity per se is a crucial driver of productivity and stability in multispecies community. PMID:26236847

  10. Impact of SOL plasma profiles on lower hybrid current drive: Experimental evidence, mitigation and modeling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, S.; Baek, S. G.; Faust, I.; Wallace, G.; Bonoli, P.; Meneghini, O.; Mumgaard, R.; Parker, R.; Scott, S.; Harvey, R. W.; Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Lin, S. Y.; Yang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent progress in understanding and mitigating parasitic wave absorption in edge plasmas is presented. Experimental observations collected on Alcator C-Mod suggest multiple physics mechanisms are involved in such losses. Localized measurement of parametric decay instabilities (PDIs) has been performed using RF Langmuir probes. The divertor heat flux due to LH and ionization power loss have been evaluated quantitatively. We observe that the LHCD efficiency can be recovered when the SOL density profile is controlled by operating the tokamak at high current. The experimental progresses motivated a re-examination of the LHCD simulation model based on the ray-tracing/Fokker-Planck code (GENRAY/CQL3D). The effect of introducing a relatively small wave number broadening in the launched power spectrum and using 2D SOL density and temperature profiles was investigated. Comparison with C-Mod experiment indicates that the new model can explain the experimental trend over a wider density range including the density regime where disagreement was seen previously, suggesting that including realistic SOL geometry is a key to improve the simulation accuracy.

  11. Natural and experimental evidence of viscerotropic infection caused by Leishmania tropica from North Sinai, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Doha, Said A; Shehata, Magdi G; Fahmy, Adel R; Samy, Abdallah M

    2014-08-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a neglected clinical form that is quite prevalent in Eastern North parts of the country in Sinai Peninsula. Leishmania tropica was identified by previous reports as the causative agent responsible for viscerotropic infections in-patients and experimental animals. Here, we reported the viscerotropic infections from naturally infected rodent Gerbillus pyramidum floweri collected from North-Sinai. Footpad and tail lesions, spleenomegaly, and malformed dark-colored spleen were the characteristic CL symptoms. The spleen of the rodent found positive to amastigote impression smear. ITS-1 DNA was sequenced and revealed 100% identity of the strain in the current study to the other L. tropica sequences identified from the patients with the suspected CL and inhabited the same study area. The current findings confirmed the susceptibility of gerbil to L. tropica, and raise the concerns for the role of rodents as accidental host suffering the infections. The susceptibility of wild and experimental rodents to the same L. tropica strain was also investigated; BALB/c and G. pyramidum were more susceptible to L. tropica (24.33 ± 4.37 and 25 ± 4.58 days post-infection, respectively). Similar viscerotropic pathologies were reported in experimental infection of only golden hamster (≈ 120 days post-infection), and G. p. floweri (≈ 160 days post-infection). PMID:25597157

  12. Can exercise affect the course of inflammatory bowel disease? Experimental and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Bilski, Jan; Mazur-Bialy, Agnieszka; Brzozowski, Bartosz; Magierowski, Marcin; Zahradnik-Bilska, Janina; Wójcik, Dagmara; Magierowska, Katarzyna; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Mach, Tomasz; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2016-08-01

    The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) consisting of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are defined as idiopathic, chronic and relapsing intestinal disorders occurring in genetically predisposed individuals exposed to environmental risk factors such as diet and microbiome changes. Since conventional drug therapy is expensive and not fully efficient, there is a need for alternative remedies that can improve the outcome in patients suffering from IBD. Whether exercise, which has been proposed as adjunct therapy in IBD, can be beneficial in patients with IBD remains an intriguing question. In this review, we provide an overview of the effects of exercise on human IBD and experimental colitis in animal models that mimic human disease, although the information on exercise in human IBD are sparse and poorly understood. Moderate exercise can exert a beneficial ameliorating effect on IBD and improve the healing of experimental animal colitis due to the activity of protective myokines such as irisin released from working skeletal muscles. CD patients with higher levels of exercise were significantly less likely to develop active disease at six months. Moreover, voluntary exercise has been shown to exert a positive effect on IBD patients' mood, weight maintenance and osteoporosis. On the other hand, depending on its intensity and duration, exercise can evoke transient mild systemic inflammation and enhances pro-inflammatory cytokine release, thereby exacerbating the gastrointestinal symptoms. We discuss recent advances in the mechanism of voluntary and strenuous exercise affecting the outcome of IBD in patients and experimental animal models. PMID:27255494

  13. Infiltration on sloping surfaces: Laboratory experimental evidence and implications for infiltration modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, Renato; Saltalippi, Carla; Flammini, Alessia; Cifrodelli, Marco; Corradini, Corrado; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2015-04-01

    Infiltration on sloping surfaces occupies an important role in our understanding of surface and subsurface hydrology. Previous studies have provided conflicting results about the role of slope on infiltration. Here, our main objective is to highlight, by well-controlled experiments, the slope role in the absence of the conflicting contributions generated by other physical processes observed in previous studies under natural or laboratory conditions. The experimental program was designed to resolve some of the confounding factors such as lower impermeable boundary condition, range of rainfall rates relative to soil saturated hydraulic conductivity, surface sealing, and erosion of top soil. The experimental apparatus consists of a box containing a natural bare soil with slope angle γ chosen between 0° and 10°, two sensors of surface and deep flow, one probe for moisture content and an artificial rainfall generator. The primary experimental results suggest that under steady conditions and rainfall rate, r, greater than saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, the deep flow, Qd, decreases with increasing slope angle, γ, up to a value leading to Qd(γ = 1°)/Qd(γ = 10°) equal to ≈4 which is in contrast with the results provided in a few earlier papers. Furthermore, in sloping bare soils surface runoff is produced even for r < Ks. Finally, we discuss the link between Qd(γ) and the shear stress at the soil surface as a guideline in the determination of an effective saturated hydraulic conductivity to be incorporated in the existing horizontal infiltration models.

  14. The impact of product information and trials on demand for smokeless tobacco and cigarettes: Evidence from experimental auctions

    PubMed Central

    Rousu, Matthew C.; O'Connor, Richard; Thrasher, James F; June, Kristie; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Pitcavage, James

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Epidemiological and toxicological evidence suggests lower risk of smokeless tobacco (ST) products compared to cigarettes. Less is known, however, about consumer perceptions and use of novel forms of ST, including snus and dissolvable tobacco. Methods In this study, we conducted in-person experimental auctions in Buffalo, NY, Columbia, SC, and Selinsgrove, PA with 571 smokers to test the impact of information and product trials on smokers’ preferences. Auctions were conducted between November 2010-November 2011. Results We found no evidence of an impact of product trials on demand in our auctions. Anti-ST information increased demand for cigarettes when presented alone, but when presented with Pro-ST information it decreased demand for cigarettes. It did not decrease demand for ST products. Anti-smoking information increased demand for ST products, but did not affect cigarette demand. Conclusions These findings suggest that credible and effective communications about tobacco harm reduction should reinforce the negative effects of smoking. PMID:24321456

  15. Experimental evidence for self-organized criticality in tokamak plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, T. L.; Moyer, R. A.; Groebner, R.; Doyle, E. J.; Lehmer, R.; Peebles, W. A.; Rettig, C. L.

    1999-03-01

    Measurements of plasma turbulence spectra and particle flux from the DIII-D tokamak exhibit significant agreement with predictions of self-organized criticality (SOC) modeling. Power spectra of density ñ, potential g˜f, and particle flux Γ, are observed to have three regions of frequency dependence: f0, f-1 and f-4. In addition, the particle flux probability distribution displays a Γ-1 scaling over two decades in Γ. These results provide the first evidence that the plasma is in a state consistent with SOC models and place a constraint on plasma transport models.

  16. Experimental Evidence for a Light and Broad Scalar Resonance in D+ --> π-π+π+ Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Devmal, S.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K.; Santoro, A. F.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    2001-01-01

    From a sample of 1172+/-61 D+-->π-π+π+ decays, we find γ\\(D+-->π- π+π+\\)/γ\\(D+-->K-π+π+\\) = 0.0311+/-0.0018+0.0016-0.0026. Using a coherent amplitude analysis to fit the Dalitz plot of these decays, we find strong evidence that a scalar resonance of mass 478+24-23+/-17 MeV/c2 and width 324+42-40+/-21 MeV/c2 accounts for approximately half of all decays.

  17. The influence of iron deficiency on the functioning of skeletal muscles: experimental evidence and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Stugiewicz, Magdalena; Tkaczyszyn, Michał; Kasztura, Monika; Banasiak, Waldemar; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal and respiratory myopathy not only constitutes an important pathophysiological feature of heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but also contributes to debilitating symptomatology and predicts worse outcomes in these patients. Accumulated evidence from laboratory experiments, animal models, and interventional studies in sports medicine suggests that undisturbed systemic iron homeostasis significantly contributes to the effective functioning of skeletal muscles. In this review, we discuss the role of iron status for the functioning of skeletal muscle tissue, and highlight iron deficiency as an emerging therapeutic target in chronic diseases accompanied by a marked muscle dysfunction. PMID:26800032

  18. Theoretical approaches and experimental evidence for liquid-vapor phase transitions in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.; Elliott, J.B.; Phair, L.; Wozniak, G.J.; Mader, C.M.; Chappars, A.

    2001-01-01

    The leptodermous approximation is applied to nuclear systems for T > 0. The introduction of surface corrections leads to anomalous caloric curves and to negative heat capacities in the liquid-gas coexistence region. Clusterization in the vapor is described by associating surface energy to clusters according to Fisher's formula. The three-dimensional Ising model, a leptodermous system par excellence, does obey rigorously Fisher's scaling up to the critical point. Multifragmentation data from several experiments including the ISiS and EOS Collaborations, as well as compound nucleus fragment emission at much lower energy follow the same scaling, thus providing the strongest evidence yet of liquid-vapor coexistence.

  19. Understanding Counterfactuality: A Review of Experimental Evidence for the Dual Meaning of Counterfactuals

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwland, Mante S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cognitive and linguistic theories of counterfactual language comprehension assume that counterfactuals convey a dual meaning. Subjunctive‐counterfactual conditionals (e.g., ‘If Tom had studied hard, he would have passed the test’) express a supposition while implying the factual state of affairs (Tom has not studied hard and failed). The question of how counterfactual dual meaning plays out during language processing is currently gaining interest in psycholinguistics. Whereas numerous studies using offline measures of language processing consistently support counterfactual dual meaning, evidence coming from online studies is less conclusive. Here, we review the available studies that examine online counterfactual language comprehension through behavioural measurement (self‐paced reading times, eye‐tracking) and neuroimaging (electroencephalography, functional magnetic resonance imaging). While we argue that these studies do not offer direct evidence for the online computation of counterfactual dual meaning, they provide valuable information about the way counterfactual meaning unfolds in time and influences successive information processing. Further advances in research on counterfactual comprehension require more specific predictions about how counterfactual dual meaning impacts incremental sentence processing. PMID:27512408

  20. Experimental Evidence for Anomalous Retroactive Influences on Human Cognition and Affect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bem, Daryl J.

    2011-11-01

    Six experiments are described that take well-established psychological effects on human cognition and affect and "time-reverse" them so that the individual's responses are obtained before the putatively causal stimulus events occur. Two of the experiments tested for the retroactive facilitation of recall: It is well known that rehearsing or practicing a set of verbal materials enhances an individual's ability to recall them on a subsequent test. In our experiments, participants were first shown 48 common words one at a time and were then asked to recall as many of those words as they could. They were then given practice exercises on a randomly selected subset of those words. The results show that participants recalled more of the words they later practiced than the control words they did not practice. Two experiments on retroactive priming provide evidence for retroactive influence on an individual's response times when judging the pleasantness or unpleasantness of visual stimuli. Finally, two experiments provide evidence for the retroactive habituation to emotionally arousing visual stimuli. Each of the six experiments yielded statistically significant results, with a combined z = 3.66, p = .0001, and an effect size (d) of 0.25. The six experiments are a subset of nine retroactive influence experiments reported in Bem [1] that yielded a combined z = 6.66, p = 1.34×10-11, and an effect size of 0.22.

  1. Experimental evidence for convergent evolution of maternal care heuristics in industrialized and small-scale populations.

    PubMed

    Kushnick, Geoff; Hanowell, Ben; Kim, Jun-Hong; Langstieh, Banrida; Magnano, Vittorio; Oláh, Katalin

    2015-06-01

    Maternal care decision rules should evolve responsiveness to factors impinging on the fitness pay-offs of care. Because the caretaking environments common in industrialized and small-scale societies vary in predictable ways, we hypothesize that heuristics guiding maternal behaviour will also differ between these two types of populations. We used a factorial vignette experiment to elicit third-party judgements about likely caretaking decisions of a hypothetical mother and her child when various fitness-relevant factors (maternal age and access to resources, and offspring age, sex and quality) were varied systematically in seven populations-three industrialized and four small-scale. Despite considerable variation in responses, we found that three of five main effects, and the two severity effects, exhibited statistically significant industrialized/ small-scale population differences. All differences could be explained as adaptive solutions to industrialized versus small-scale caretaking environments. Further, we found gradients in the relationship between the population-specific estimates and national-level socio-economic indicators, further implicating important aspects of the variation in industrialized and small-scale caretaking environments in shaping heuristics. Although there is mounting evidence for a genetic component to human maternal behaviour, there is no current evidence for interpopulation variation in candidate genes. We nonetheless suggest that heuristics guiding maternal behaviour in diverse societies emerge via convergent evolution in response to similar selective pressures. PMID:26543577

  2. Effects of Bisphenol A on ion channels: Experimental evidence and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Sergi; Ripoll, Cristina; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Fuentes, Esther; Quesada, Ivan; Nadal, Angel; Martinez-Pinna, Juan

    2016-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) produced in huge quantities in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. It is present in most humans in developed countries, acting as a xenoestrogen and it is considered an environmental risk factor associated to several diseases. Among the whole array of identified mechanisms by which BPA can interfere with physiological processes in living organisms, changes on ion channel activity is one of the most poorly understood. There is still little evidence about BPA regulation of ion channel expression and function. However, this information is key to understand how BPA disrupts excitable and non-excitable cells, including neurons, endocrine cells and muscle cells. This report is the result of a comprehensive literature review on the effects of BPA on ion channels. We conclude that there is evidence to say that these important molecules may be key end-points for EDCs acting as xenoestrogens. However, more research on channel-mediated BPA effects is needed. Particularly, mechanistic studies to unravel the pathophysiological actions of BPA on ion channels at environmentally relevant doses. PMID:26930576

  3. Experimental evidence for convergent evolution of maternal care heuristics in industrialized and small-scale populations

    PubMed Central

    Kushnick, Geoff; Hanowell, Ben; Kim, Jun-Hong; Langstieh, Banrida; Magnano, Vittorio; Oláh, Katalin

    2015-01-01

    Maternal care decision rules should evolve responsiveness to factors impinging on the fitness pay-offs of care. Because the caretaking environments common in industrialized and small-scale societies vary in predictable ways, we hypothesize that heuristics guiding maternal behaviour will also differ between these two types of populations. We used a factorial vignette experiment to elicit third-party judgements about likely caretaking decisions of a hypothetical mother and her child when various fitness-relevant factors (maternal age and access to resources, and offspring age, sex and quality) were varied systematically in seven populations—three industrialized and four small-scale. Despite considerable variation in responses, we found that three of five main effects, and the two severity effects, exhibited statistically significant industrialized/ small-scale population differences. All differences could be explained as adaptive solutions to industrialized versus small-scale caretaking environments. Further, we found gradients in the relationship between the population-specific estimates and national-level socio-economic indicators, further implicating important aspects of the variation in industrialized and small-scale caretaking environments in shaping heuristics. Although there is mounting evidence for a genetic component to human maternal behaviour, there is no current evidence for interpopulation variation in candidate genes. We nonetheless suggest that heuristics guiding maternal behaviour in diverse societies emerge via convergent evolution in response to similar selective pressures. PMID:26543577

  4. Renin-angiotensin system as a potential therapeutic target in stroke and retinopathy: experimental and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Fouda, Abdelrahman Y; Artham, Sandeep; El-Remessy, Azza B; Fagan, Susan C

    2016-02-01

    As our knowledge expands, it is now clear that the renin-angiotensin (Ang) system (RAS) mediates functions other than regulating blood pressure (BP). The RAS plays a central role in the pathophysiology of different neurovascular unit disorders including stroke and retinopathy. Moreover, the beneficial actions of RAS modulation in brain and retina have been documented in experimental research, but not yet exploited clinically. The RAS is a complex system with distinct yet interconnected components. Understanding the different RAS components and their functions under brain and retinal pathological conditions is crucial to reap their benefits. The aim of the present review is to provide an experimental and clinical update on the role of RAS in the pathophysiology and treatment of stroke and retinopathy. Combining the evidence from both these disorders allows a unique opportunity to move both fields forward. PMID:26769658

  5. Time-lag in extinction dynamics in experimental populations: evidence for a genetic Allee effect?

    PubMed

    Vercken, Elodie; Vincent, Flora; Mailleret, Ludovic; Ris, Nicolas; Tabone, Elisabeth; Fauvergue, Xavier

    2013-05-01

    1. Propagule pressure, i.e. the number of individuals introduced, is thought to be a major predictor of the establishment success of introduced populations in the field. Its influence in laboratory experimental systems has however been questioned. In fact, other factors involved in long-term population persistence, like habitat size, were usually found to explain most of the dynamics of experimental populations. 2. To better understand the respective influence of short- and long-term factors and their potential interaction on extinction dynamics in experimental systems, we investigated the influence of propagule pressure, habitat size and genetic background on the early dynamics of laboratory-based populations of a hymenopteran parasitoid. 3. The amount of demographic variance differed between establishment and persistence phase and was influenced by habitat size and genetic background (geographic strain), but independent of propagule pressure. In contrast, the probability of extinction within five generations depended on the genetic background and on the interaction between propagule pressure and habitat size. Vulnerability to extinction in small size habitats was increased when populations were founded with a small number of individuals, but this effect was delayed until the third to fifth generations. 4. These results indicate that demographic stochasticity is influential during population establishment, but is not affected by the genetic variability of propagules. On the other hand, extinction might be influenced by a genetic Allee effect triggered by the combination of low propagule pressure and genetic drift. Finally, we documented consistent differences between genetic backgrounds in both deterministic and stochastic population dynamics patterns, with major consequences on extinction risk and ultimately population establishment. PMID:23398653

  6. Experimental evidence for the conditions necessary to sustain meandering in coarse-bedded rivers

    PubMed Central

    Braudrick, Christian A.; Dietrich, William E.; Leverich, Glen T.; Sklar, Leonard S.

    2009-01-01

    Meandering rivers are common on Earth and other planetary surfaces, yet the conditions necessary to maintain meandering channels are unclear. As a consequence, self-maintaining meandering channels with cutoffs have not been reproduced in the laboratory. Such experimental channels are needed to explore mechanisms controlling migration rate, sinuosity, floodplain formation, and planform morphodynamics and to test theories for wavelength and bend propagation. Here we report an experiment in which meandering with near-constant width was maintained during repeated cutoff and regeneration of meander bends. We found that elevated bank strength (provided by alfalfa sprouts) relative to the cohesionless bed material and the blocking of troughs (chutes) in the lee of point bars via suspended sediment deposition were the necessary ingredients to successful meandering. Varying flood discharge was not necessary. Scaling analysis shows that the experimental meander migration was fast compared to most natural channels. This high migration rate caused nearly all of the bedload sediment to exchange laterally, such that bar growth was primarily dependent on bank sediment supplied from upstream lateral migration. The high migration rate may have contributed to the relatively low sinuosity of 1.19, and this suggests that to obtain much higher sinuosity experiments at this scale may have to be conducted for several years. Although patience is required to evolve them, these experimental channels offer the opportunity to explore several fundamental issues about river morphodynamics. Our results also suggest that sand supply may be an essential control in restoring self-maintaining, actively shifting gravel-bedded meanders. PMID:19805077

  7. Experimental evidences of a large extrinsic spin Hall effect in AuW alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Laczkowski, P.; Rojas-Sánchez, J.-C.

    2014-04-07

    We report an experimental study of a gold-tungsten alloy (7 at. % W concentration in Au host) displaying remarkable properties for spintronics applications using both magneto-transport in lateral spin valve devices and spin-pumping with inverse spin Hall effect experiments. A very large spin Hall angle of about 10% is consistently found using both techniques with the reliable spin diffusion length of 2 nm estimated by the spin sink experiments in the lateral spin valves. With its chemical stability, high resistivity, and small induced damping, this AuW alloy may find applications in the nearest future.

  8. Experimental evidence and isotopomer analysis of mixotrophic glucose metabolism in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterotrophic fermentation using simple sugars such as glucose is an established and cost-effective method for synthesizing bioproducts from bacteria, yeast and algae. Organisms incapable of metabolizing glucose have limited applications as cell factories, often despite many other advantageous characteristics. Therefore, there is a clear need to investigate glucose metabolism in potential cell factories. One such organism, with a unique metabolic network and a propensity to synthesize highly reduced compounds as a large fraction of its biomass, is the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Pt). Although Pt has been engineered to metabolize glucose, conflicting lines of evidence leave it unresolved whether Pt can natively consume glucose. Results Isotope labeling experiments in which Pt was mixotrophically grown under light on 100% U-13C glucose and naturally abundant (~99% 12C) dissolved inorganic carbon resulted in proteinogenic amino acids with an average 13C-enrichment of 88%, thus providing convincing evidence of glucose uptake and metabolism. The dissolved inorganic carbon was largely incorporated through anaplerotic rather than photosynthetic fixation. Furthermore, an isotope labeling experiment utilizing 1-13C glucose and subsequent metabolic pathway analysis indicated that (i) the alternative Entner-Doudoroff and Phosphoketolase glycolytic pathways are active during glucose metabolism, and (ii) during mixotrophic growth, serine and glycine are largely synthesized from glyoxylate through photorespiratory reactions rather than from 3-phosphoglycerate. We validated the latter result for mixotrophic growth on glycerol by performing a 2-13C glycerol isotope labeling experiment. Additionally, gene expression assays showed that known, native glucose transporters in Pt are largely insensitive to glucose or light, whereas the gene encoding cytosolic fructose bisphosphate aldolase 3, an important glycolytic enzyme, is overexpressed in light but

  9. Camera perspective bias in videotaped confessions: experimental evidence of its perceptual basis.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, Jennifer J; Lassiter, G Daniel; Schmidt, Heather C; Snyder, Celeste J

    2006-12-01

    The camera perspective from which a criminal confession is videotaped influences later assessments of its voluntariness and the suspect's guilt. Previous research has suggested that this camera perspective bias is rooted in perceptual rather than conceptual processes, but these data are strictly correlational. In 3 experiments, the authors directly manipulated perceptual processing to provide stronger evidence of its mediational role. Prior to viewing a videotape of a simulated confession, participants were shown a photograph of the confessor's apparent victim. Participants in a perceptual interference condition were instructed to visualize the image of the victim in their minds while viewing the videotape; participants in a conceptual interference condition were instructed instead to rehearse an 8-digit number. Because mental imagery and actual perception draw on the same available resources, the authors anticipated that the former, but not the latter, interference task would disrupt the camera perspective bias, if indeed it were perceptually mediated. Results supported this conclusion. PMID:17154769

  10. Sharks shape the geometry of a selfish seal herd: experimental evidence from seal decoys

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, Alta; O'Riain, M. Justin

    2010-01-01

    Many animals respond to predation risk by forming groups. Evolutionary explanations for group formation in previously ungrouped, but loosely associated prey have typically evoked the selfish herd hypothesis. However, despite over 600 studies across a diverse array of taxa, the critical assumptions of this hypothesis have remained collectively untested, owing to several confounding problems in real predator–prey systems. To solve this, we manipulated the domains of danger of Cape fur seal (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus) decoys to provide evidence that a selfish reduction in a seals' domain of danger results in a proportional reduction in its predation risk from ambush shark attacks. This behaviour confers a survival advantage to individual seals within a group and explains the evolution of selfish herds in a prey species. These findings empirically elevate Hamilton's selfish herd hypothesis to more than a ‘theoretical curiosity’. PMID:19793737

  11. The Impact of Smoking Bans on Smoking and Consumer Behavior: Quasi-Experimental Evidence from Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Boes, Stefan; Marti, Joachim; Maclean, Johanna Catherine

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we exploit the progressive implementation of smoking bans in public venues at the state level in Switzerland to evaluate both the direct effects on smoking and the potential unintended consequences of these legislations on consumer behaviors as measured by visiting restaurants/bars and discos ('going out'). Our results indicate that public venue smoking bans in Switzerland reduce smoking rates, but the findings do not emerge until 1 year following the ban. This pattern of results is consistent with delays in ban enforcement on the part of business owners, difficulties in changing addictive behaviors such as smoking, and/or learning on the part of smokers. We find evidence that smoking bans influence going-out behavior and there is substantial heterogeneity across venue and consumer characteristics. PMID:25251559

  12. Fayalite Oxidation Processes: Experimental Evidence for the Stability of Pure Ferric Fayalite?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Keller, L. P.; Medard, E.; Devouard, B.; Rahman, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Olivine is one of the most important minerals in Earth and planetary sciences. Fayalite Fe2(2+)SiO4, the ferrous end-member of olivine, is present in some terrestrial rocks and primitive meteorites (CV3 chondrites). A ferric fayalite (or ferri-fayalite), Fe(2+) Fe2(3+)(SiO4)2 laihunite, has been reported in Earth samples (magnetite ore, metamorphic and volcanic rocks...) and in Martian meteorites (nakhlites). Laihunite was also synthesized at 1 atmosphere between 400 and 700 C. We show evidence for the stability of a pure ferrifayalite end-member and for potential minerals with XFe(3+) between 2/3 and 1.

  13. Eliciting health care priorities in developing countries: experimental evidence from Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Font, Joan Costa; Forns, Joan Rovira; Sato, Azusa

    2016-02-01

    Although some methods for eliciting preferences to assist participatory priority setting in health care in developed countries are available, the same is not true for poor communities in developing countries whose preferences are neglected in health policy making. Existing methods grounded on self-interested, monetary valuations that may be inappropriate for developing country settings where community care is provided through 'social allocation' mechanisms. This paper proposes and examines an alternative methodology for eliciting preferences for health care programmes specifically catered for rural and less literate populations but which is still applicable in urban communities. Specifically, the method simulates a realistic collective budget allocation experiment, to be implemented in both rural and urban communities in Guatemala. We report evidence revealing that participatory budget-like experiments are incentive compatible mechanisms suitable for revealing collective preferences, while simultaneously having the advantage of involving communities in health care reform processes. PMID:25841770

  14. Rapid communication: experimental evidence that juvenile pelagic jacks (Carangidae) respond behaviorally to DMSP.

    PubMed

    Debose, Jennifer L; Nevitt, Gabrielle A; Dittman, Andrew H

    2010-03-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is produced by marine algae and released during foraging activity by zooplankton and fish. Pelagic fishes depend on patchily distributed foraging opportunities, and DMSP may be an important signaling molecule for these events. We have previously shown that the abundance of carangid jacks is positively associated with elevated DMSP levels over coral reefs in the Gulf of Mexico, suggesting that these fishes may use spatial and temporal variation in DMSP to locate foraging opportunities. Here, we extend this work by demonstrating that juveniles of two species of pelagic jack, crevalle jack, Caranx hippos, and bluefin trevally, C. melampygus, detect and respond to DMSP in a flow-through tank in the laboratory. Juveniles of these species showed elevated swimming activity in response to ecologically relevant concentrations of DMSP (10(-9) M). These results provide further evidence that this chemical may serve as a chemosensory cue for carangid species. PMID:20177745

  15. Experimental evidence showing that no mitotically active female germline progenitors exist in postnatal mouse ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hua; Zheng, Wenjing; Shen, Yan; Adhikari, Deepak; Ueno, Hiroo; Liu, Kui

    2012-01-01

    It has been generally accepted for more than half a century that, in most mammalian species, oocytes cannot renew themselves in postnatal or adult life, and that the number of oocytes is already fixed in fetal or neonatal ovaries. This assumption, however, has been challenged over the past decade. In this study, we have taken an endogenous genetic approach to this question and generated a multiple fluorescent Rosa26rbw/+;Ddx4-Cre germline reporter mouse model for in vivo and in vitro tracing of the development of female germline cell lineage. Through live cell imaging and de novo folliculogenesis experiments, we show that the Ddx4-expressing cells from postnatal mouse ovaries did not enter mitosis, nor did they contribute to oocytes during de novo folliculogenesis. Our results provide evidence that supports the traditional view that no postnatal follicular renewal occurs in mammals, and no mitotically active Ddx4-expressing female germline progenitors exist in postnatal mouse ovaries. PMID:22778414

  16. Evidence of experimental postcyclic transmission of Bothriocephalus acheilognathi in bonytail chub (Gila elegans)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, S.P.; Choudhury, A.; Cole, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the role that predation of infected conspecific fish and postcyclic transmission might play in the life cycle of the Asian fish tapeworm, Bothriocephalus acheilognathi (Cestoda: Pseudophyllidea) Yamaguti, 1934. Young-of-the-year (YOY) bonytail chub (Gila elegans) were exposed to copepods infected with B. acheilognathi and subsequently fed to subadult bonytail chub. Within 1 wk after consumption of the YOY chub, subadults were necropsied and found infected with gravid and nongravid tapeworms. This study provides evidence that postcyclic transfer of B. acheilognathi can occur. Postcyclic transmission may be an important life history trait of B. acheilognathi that merits consideration when studying the impact and distribution of this invasive and potentially pathogenic tapeworm. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2007.

  17. Experimental evidence of vocal recognition in young and adult black-legged kittiwakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulard, Hervé; Aubin, T.; White, J.F.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Danchin, E.

    2008-01-01

    Individual recognition is required in most social interactions, and its presence has been confirmed in many species. In birds, vocal cues appear to be a major component of recognition. Curiously, vocal recognition seems absent or limited in some highly social species such as the black-legged kittiwake, Rissa tridactyla. Using playback experiments, we found that kittiwake chicks recognized their parents vocally, this capacity being detectable as early as 20 days after hatching, the youngest age tested. Mates also recognized each other's long calls. Some birds reacted to their partner's voice when only a part of the long call was played back. Nevertheless, only about a third of the tested birds reacted to their mate's or parents' call and we were unable to detect recognition among neighbours. We discuss the low reactivity of kittiwakes in relation to their cliff-nesting habit and compare our results with evidence of vocal recognition in other larids. ?? 2008 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  18. Thioredoxin System Regulation in the Central Nervous System: Experimental Models and Clinical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Gonsebatt, María E.; Guevara, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    The reactive oxygen species produced continuously during oxidative metabolism are generated at very high rates in the brain. Therefore, defending against oxidative stress is an essential task within the brain. An important cellular system against oxidative stress is the thioredoxin system (TS). TS is composed of thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase, and NADPH. This review focuses on the evidence gathered in recent investigations into the central nervous system, specifically the different brain regions in which the TS is expressed. Furthermore, we address the conditions that modulate the thioredoxin system in both, animal models and the postmortem brains of human patients associated with the most common neurodegenerative disorders, in which the thioredoxin system could play an important part. PMID:24723994

  19. Theoretical and experimental evidence of level repulsion states and evanescent modes in sonic crystal stubbed waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-García, V.; Vasseur, J. O.; Garcia-Raffi, L. M.; Hladky-Hennion, A. C.

    2012-02-01

    The complex band structures calculated using the extended plane wave expansion (EPWE) reveal the presence of evanescent modes in periodic systems, never predicted by the classical \\omega(\\vec {k}) methods, providing novel interpretations of several phenomena as well as a complete picture of the system. In this work, we theoretically and experimentally observe that in the ranges of frequencies where a deaf band is traditionally predicted, an evanescent mode with excitable symmetry appears, changing drastically the interpretation of the transmission properties. On the other hand, the simplicity of the sonic crystals in which only the longitudinal polarization can be excited is used to interpret, without loss of generality, the level repulsion between symmetric and antisymmetric bands in sonic crystals as the presence of an evanescent mode connecting both repelled bands. These evanescent modes, obtained using EPWE, explain both the attenuation produced in this range of frequencies and the transfer of symmetry from one band to the other in good agreement with both experimental results and multiple scattering predictions. Thus, the evanescent properties of the periodic system have been revealed to be necessary for the design of new acoustic and electromagnetic applications based on periodicity.

  20. Experimental evidence of population differences in reproductive investment conditional on environmental stochasticity.

    PubMed

    Gauthey, Zoé; Panserat, Stéphane; Elosegi, Arturo; Herman, Alexandre; Tentelier, Cédric; Labonne, Jacques

    2016-01-15

    Environmental stochasticity is expected to shape life histories of species, wherein organisms subjected to strong environmental variation should display adaptive response by being able to tune their reproductive investment. For riverine ecosystems, climate models forecast an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme events such as floods and droughts. The speed and the mechanisms by which organisms may adapt their reproductive investment are therefore of primary importance to understand how species will cope with such radical environmental changes. In the present study, we sampled spawners from two different populations of wild brown trout, originating from two environments with contrasting levels of flow stochasticity. We placed them in sympatry within an experimental channel during reproductive season. In one modality, water flow was maintained constant, whereas in another modality, water flow was highly variable. Reproductive investment of all individuals was monitored using weight and energetic plasma metabolite variation throughout the reproductive season. Only the populations originating from the most variable environment showed a plastic response to experimental manipulation of water flow, the females being able to reduce their weight variation (from 19.2% to 13.1%) and metabolites variations (from 84.2% to 18.6% for triglycerides for instance) under variable flow conditions. These results imply that mechanisms to cope with environmental stochasticity can differ between populations of the same species, where some populations can be plastic whereas other cannot. PMID:26406108

  1. Benthic Foraminifera as Proxies of Organic Flux: Experimental and Field Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zwaan, G. J.; Duijnstee, I. A. P.; de Nooijer, L. J.; Ernst, S. R.

    2003-04-01

    Food is one of the most important parameters in the marine realm, structuring faunal communities. Therefore, changing food flux from the mixed layer to the sea bottom is expected to be of great importance to the benthic community. In this poster we present data from 5 years of experimental work in which shallow and deeper water benthic foraminiferal associations were subjected to variable food fluxes, and even to artificial marine snow events. The experiments took place under well-controlled or well-monitored oxygen conditions. At the same time field research in the Adriatic Sea and the Levantine Basin suggests that variation in the input of nutrients greatly affects the benthic foraminiferal communities indeed, but mostly by variation of the oxygen content at the sea floor. This is confirmed by experiments. Deeper water assemblages, however, appear to be rather sensitive to changing food fluxes. In experiments with material from the Bay of Biscay high doses of organic matter result in significant response of the meiofauna: many microhabitat patterns shift to shallower depth. Some species, notably Epistominella exigua, respond after some weeks with increasing abundances; this suggests that they are good markers of eutrophic conditions. The main conclusion of experimental and field research is that short-term changes in associations are governed by the oxygen regime. Although on short time scales food does not have much effect in our experiments, it seems that on longer time scales food is of profound importance for structuring the foraminiferal community.

  2. Theoretical and experimental evidence for the post-cotunnite phase transition in zirconia at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio-Hamane, Daisuke; Dekura, Haruhiko; Seto, Yusuke; Yagi, Takehiko

    2015-05-01

    A post-cotunnite phase transition in zirconia (ZrO2) at high pressure was investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements and ab initio calculations based on density functional theory. This study successfully demonstrated a cotunnite- to Fe2P-type phase transition. Static enthalpy difference (Δ H) calculations predicted the appearance of the Fe2P phase at 124 GPa (LDA) and 143 GPa (GGA), and experimental trials demonstrated the coexistence of the Fe2P and cotunnite phases at 175 GPa after heating to 3,000 K. Both phases were quenchable to ambient conditions. The volume of the Fe2P phase was slightly less (~Δ 0.6 %) than that of the cotunnite phase over the experimental pressure range, indicating that the Fe2P phase is the higher pressure phase. The coexistence of both phases in this study may be attributed to the slow kinetics of the phase transition resulting from the close structural relationship of the two phases. An Fe2P-type structural model can be derived by applying a simple operation to the cotunnite-type structure, consisting of a 1/2 shift of several zirconium arrangements parallel to the b-axis of the cotunnite-type unit cell. It is concluded that the high-pressure cotunnite-to-Fe2P phase transition may be a common trend in many dioxides.

  3. Experimental evidence that keeping eggs dry is a mechanism for the antimicrobial effects of avian incubation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alba, Liliana; Oborn, Allison; Shawkey, Matthew D.

    2010-12-01

    Avian incubation dramatically reduces the abundance and diversity of microbial assemblages on eggshells, and this effect has been hypothesized as an adaptive explanation for partial incubation, the bouts of incubation that some birds perform during the egg-laying period. However, the mechanisms for these antimicrobial effects are largely unknown. In this study, we hypothesized that microbial inhibition is partly achieved through removal of liquid water, which generally enhances microbial growth, from eggshells, and experimentally tested this hypothesis in two ways. First, we placed the first- and second-laid eggs of tree swallow ( Tachycineta bicolor) clutches in unincubated holding nests with either ambient or increased water on eggshells. Second, we added water to eggshells in naturally partially incubated nests. We compared microbial growth on shells during a 5-day experimental period and found that, as predicted, both unincubated groups had higher microbial growth than naturally partially incubated controls, and that only in the absence of incubation did wetted eggs have higher microbial growth than unwetted eggs. Thus, we have shown that water increases microbial growth on eggshells and that incubation nullifies these effects, suggesting that removal of water from egg surfaces is one proximate mechanism for the antimicrobial effects of incubation.

  4. Serial correlation in neural spike trains: Experimental evidence, stochastic modeling, and single neuron variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkhooi, Farzad; Strube-Bloss, Martin F.; Nawrot, Martin P.

    2009-02-01

    The activity of spiking neurons is frequently described by renewal point process models that assume the statistical independence and identical distribution of the intervals between action potentials. However, the assumption of independent intervals must be questioned for many different types of neurons. We review experimental studies that reported the feature of a negative serial correlation of neighboring intervals, commonly observed in neurons in the sensory periphery as well as in central neurons, notably in the mammalian cortex. In our experiments we observed the same short-lived negative serial dependence of intervals in the spontaneous activity of mushroom body extrinsic neurons in the honeybee. To model serial interval correlations of arbitrary lags, we suggest a family of autoregressive point processes. Its marginal interval distribution is described by the generalized gamma model, which includes as special cases the log-normal and gamma distributions, which have been widely used to characterize regular spiking neurons. In numeric simulations we investigated how serial correlation affects the variance of the neural spike count. We show that the experimentally confirmed negative correlation reduces single-neuron variability, as quantified by the Fano factor, by up to 50%, which favors the transmission of a rate code. We argue that the feature of a negative serial correlation is likely to be common to the class of spike-frequency-adapting neurons and that it might have been largely overlooked in extracellular single-unit recordings due to spike sorting errors.

  5. Experimental evidence that livestock grazing intensity affects the activity of a generalist predator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villar, Nacho; Lambin, Xavier; Evans, Darren; Pakeman, Robin; Redpath, Steve

    2013-05-01

    Grazing by domestic ungulates has substantial impacts on ecosystem structure and composition. In grasslands of the northern hemisphere, livestock grazing limits populations of small mammals, which are a main food source for a variety of vertebrate predators. However, no experimental studies have described the impact of livestock grazing on vertebrate predators. We experimentally manipulated sheep and cattle grazing intensity in the Scottish uplands to test its impact on a relatively abundant small mammal, the field vole (Microtus agrestis), and its archetypal generalist predator, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes). We demonstrate that ungulate grazing had a strong consistent negative impact on both vole densities and indices of fox activity. Ungulate grazing did not substantially affect the relationship between fox activity and vole densities. However, the data suggested that, as grazing intensity increased i) fox activity indices tended to be higher when vole densities were low, and ii) the relationship between fox activity and vole density was weaker. All these patterns are surprising given the relative small scale of our experiment compared to large red fox territories in upland habitats of Britain, and suggest that domestic grazing intensity causes a strong response in the activity of generalist predators important for their conservation in grassland ecosystems.

  6. Experimental and clinical evidence for the protective role of progesterone in motoneuron degeneration and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Deniselle, M C; Garay, L; Meyer, M; Gargiulo-Monachelli, G; Labombarda, F; Gonzalez, S; Guennoun, R; Schumacher, M; De Nicola, Alejandro F

    2011-10-01

    Far beyond its role in reproduction, progesterone exerts neuro-protective, promyelinating, and anti-inflammatory effects in the nervous system. These effects are amplified under pathological conditions, implying that changes of the local environment sensitize nervous tissues to steroid therapy. The present survey covers our results of progesterone neuroprotection in a motoneuron neurodegeneration model and a neuroinflammation model. In the degenerating spinal cord of the Wobbler mouse, progesterone reverses the impaired expression of neurotrophins, increases enzymes of neurotransmission and metabolism, prevents oxidative damage of motoneurons and their vacuolar degeneration (paraptosis), and attenuates the development of mitochondrial abnormalities. After long-term treatment, progesterone also increases muscle strength and the survival of Wobbler mice. Subsequently, this review describes the effects of progesterone in mice with induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a commonly used model of multiple sclerosis. In EAE mice, progesterone attenuates the clinical severity, decreases demyelination and neuronal dysfunction, increases axonal counts, reduces the formation of amyloid precursor protein profiles, and decreases the aberrant expression of growth-associated proteins. These actions of progesterone may be due to multiple mechanisms, considering that classic nuclear receptors, extranuclear receptors, and membrane receptors are all expressed in the spinal cord. Although many aspects of progesterone action in humans remain unsolved, data provided by experimental models makes getting to this objective closer than previously expected. PMID:25961276

  7. Serial correlation in neural spike trains: experimental evidence, stochastic modeling, and single neuron variability.

    PubMed

    Farkhooi, Farzad; Strube-Bloss, Martin F; Nawrot, Martin P

    2009-02-01

    The activity of spiking neurons is frequently described by renewal point process models that assume the statistical independence and identical distribution of the intervals between action potentials. However, the assumption of independent intervals must be questioned for many different types of neurons. We review experimental studies that reported the feature of a negative serial correlation of neighboring intervals, commonly observed in neurons in the sensory periphery as well as in central neurons, notably in the mammalian cortex. In our experiments we observed the same short-lived negative serial dependence of intervals in the spontaneous activity of mushroom body extrinsic neurons in the honeybee. To model serial interval correlations of arbitrary lags, we suggest a family of autoregressive point processes. Its marginal interval distribution is described by the generalized gamma model, which includes as special cases the log-normal and gamma distributions, which have been widely used to characterize regular spiking neurons. In numeric simulations we investigated how serial correlation affects the variance of the neural spike count. We show that the experimentally confirmed negative correlation reduces single-neuron variability, as quantified by the Fano factor, by up to 50%, which favors the transmission of a rate code. We argue that the feature of a negative serial correlation is likely to be common to the class of spike-frequency-adapting neurons and that it might have been largely overlooked in extracellular single-unit recordings due to spike sorting errors. PMID:19391776

  8. Experimental Evidence of melt-brake at seismic rates in sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, L.; Suppe, J.; Song, S.; Song, Y.; Yeh, E.; Dong, J.; Wang, C.; Yang, C.

    2011-12-01

    Frictional melts generated along seismic faults theoretically may act either as a lubricant or as a viscous brake. Present geological and geophysical evidence supports melt-lubrication, which is also in good agreement with extreme strength weakening in laboratory frictional experiments. On the contrary, the strengthening behavior of viscous melts at seismic rates is not well reported, especially in sedimentary rocks. Here we provide laboratory evidence of progressive increase in frictional resistance on sandstone at a slip rate of 1.3 m/s with melt generation. The produced melt/pseudotachylyte is observed with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and is in-situ analyzed with X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) in synchrotron radiation. These analytical results show that the formation of pseudotachylyte is composed of pulverized quartz grains suspending in amorphous melts from thermally decomposed clay minerals. The observation of TXM also indicates that the shapes of quartz grains in the slip zone vary from rounded in the central area to angular on the rim. In-situ microstructures and high frictional resistance of sandstones in experiments indicate that the dominant strengthening mechanism is possibly controlled by viscous melts with suspending quartz grains. The melt rheology at high slip rates is not well understood, but the frictional behavior of melt with nano-sized quartz grains appears to be rheopetic instead of melt lubrication and/or powder lubrication. Thus, it suggests that the first-time rupture of sedimentary faults is not lubricated by melts during earthquake; in contrast melts from thermally decomposed clay minerals with suspending quartz grains produced by faulting may be an important process for the dynamic strengthening of faults.

  9. Experimental Evidence for Polybaric Intracrustal Differentiation of Primitive Arc Basalt beneath St. Vincent, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blundy, Jon; Melekhova, Lena; Robertson, Richard

    2014-05-01

    We present experimental phase equilibria for a primitive, high-Mg basalt from St. Vincent, Lesser Antilles. Experimental details were presented in Melekhova et al (Nature Geosci, 2013); the objective here is to compare experimental phase compositions to those of erupted lavas and cumulates from St. Vincent. Starting material with 4.5 wt% H2O is multiply-saturated with a lherzolite assemblage at 1.3 GPa and 1180 ° C, consistent with mantle wedge derivation. Experimental glasses from our study, in addition to those of Pichavant et al (GCA, 2002) and Pichavant & Macdonald (CMP 2007) on a similar high-Mg basalt, encompass a compositional range from high-magnesian basalt to dacite, with a systematic dependence on H2O content, temperature and pressure. We are able to match the glasses from individual experiments to different lava types, so as to constrain the differentiation depths at which these magmas could be generated from a high-Mg parent, as follows: Composition wt% H2OP (GPa) T (° C) High-Mg basalt 3.9-4.8 1.45-1.751180-1200 Low-Mg basalt 2.3-4.5 1.0-1.3 1065-1150 High alumina basalt 3.0-4.5 0.4 1050-1080 Basaltic andesite 0.6-4.5 0.7-1.0 1050-1130 Andesite 0.6 1.0 1060-1080 The fact that St. Vincent andesites (and some basaltic andesites) appear to derive from a low-H2O (0.6 wt%) parent suggest that they are products of partial melting of older, high-Mg gabbroic rocks, as 0.6 wt% H2O is approximately the amount that can be stored in amphibole-bearing gabbros. The higher H2O contents of parents for the other lava compositions is consistent with derivation by crystallization of basalts with H2O contents that accord with those of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from St. Vincent (Bouvier et al, J Petrol, 2008). The generation of evolved melts both by basalt crystallization and gabbro melting is consistent with the hot zone concept of Annen et al (J Petrol, 2006) wherein repeated intrusion of mantle-derived basalt simultaneously crystallize by cooling and melt

  10. Evidence evaluation: measure Z corresponds to human utility judgments better than measure L and optimal-experimental-design models.

    PubMed

    Rusconi, Patrice; Marelli, Marco; D'Addario, Marco; Russo, Selena; Cherubini, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Evidence evaluation is a crucial process in many human activities, spanning from medical diagnosis to impression formation. The present experiments investigated which, if any, normative model best conforms to people's intuition about the value of the obtained evidence. Psychologists, epistemologists, and philosophers of science have proposed several models to account for people's intuition about the utility of the obtained evidence with respect either to a focal hypothesis or to a constellation of hypotheses. We pitted against each other the so-called optimal-experimental-design models (i.e., Bayesian diagnosticity, log₁₀ diagnosticity, information gain, Kullback-Leibler distance, probability gain, and impact) and measures L and Z to compare their ability to describe humans' intuition about the value of the obtained evidence. Participants received words-and-numbers scenarios concerning 2 hypotheses and binary features. They were asked to evaluate the utility of "yes" and "no" answers to questions about some features possessed in different proportions (i.e., the likelihoods) by 2 types of extraterrestrial creatures (corresponding to 2 mutually exclusive and exhaustive hypotheses). Participants evaluated either how an answer was helpful or how an answer decreased/increased their beliefs with respect either to a single hypothesis or to both hypotheses. We fitted mixed-effects models and used the Akaike information criterion and the Bayesian information criterion values to compare the competing models of the value of the obtained evidence. Overall, the experiments showed that measure Z was the best fitting model of participants' judgments of the value of obtained answers. We discussed the implications for the human hypothesis-evaluation process. PMID:24446753