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Sample records for dysphagia including gastrostomy-tube

  1. Successful gefitinib treatment administration via gastrostomy tube in a patient with non-small cell lung cancer with dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Suzumura, Tomohiro; Yonesaka, Kimio; Tsukuda, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman with dysphagia was diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma and metastatic meningeal tumour that impaired the medulla. Owing to a bulky tumour beside the medulla, radiosurgical control of the meningeal tumour was achieved before systemic therapy. Genomic examination of the tumour revealed an existing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletion, for which an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor such as gefitinib was the standard therapy. However, because of dysphagia, the patient was unable to orally ingest gefitinib. Gefitinib was delivered via gastrostomy tube as a suspension after spontaneous dissolution in hot water. One month later, the patient's symptoms, including dysphagia, were drastically improved and she had recovered sufficiently to orally ingest gefitinib. Gefitinib-associated toxicity comprises only mild liver dysfunction and skin rash. CT scanning and MRI detected drastic shrinkage of the primary lung and meningeal tumours. The patient continued to take gefitinib and has remained symptom-free for 9 months. PMID:24626382

  2. Successful gefitinib treatment administration via gastrostomy tube in a patient with non-small cell lung cancer with dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Suzumura, Tomohiro; Yonesaka, Kimio; Tsukuda, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman with dysphagia was diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma and metastatic meningeal tumour that impaired the medulla. Owing to a bulky tumour beside the medulla, radiosurgical control of the meningeal tumour was achieved before systemic therapy. Genomic examination of the tumour revealed an existing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletion, for which an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor such as gefitinib was the standard therapy. However, because of dysphagia, the patient was unable to orally ingest gefitinib. Gefitinib was delivered via gastrostomy tube as a suspension after spontaneous dissolution in hot water. One month later, the patient's symptoms, including dysphagia, were drastically improved and she had recovered sufficiently to orally ingest gefitinib. Gefitinib-associated toxicity comprises only mild liver dysfunction and skin rash. CT scanning and MRI detected drastic shrinkage of the primary lung and meningeal tumours. The patient continued to take gefitinib and has remained symptom-free for 9 months. PMID:24626382

  3. The role of gastrostomy tube placement in advanced dementia with dysphagia: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Leanne S; Altman, Kenneth W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Over 4.5 million people in North America had a diagnosis of dementia in the year 2000, and more than half had advanced disease with potential aspiration risk. There is much controversy regarding the use and timing of enteral feeding support in these patients with dysphagia. The management of dysphagia is far more complex when considering quality of life, “comfort care” hand feeding, the use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube (PEG), and associated mortality rates. This study seeks to critically review the literature that evaluates PEG placement in this population. Methods A systematic literature review of PubMed, from 1995–2012, was conducted to identify studies relating to PEG placement in dementia patients with dysphagia. The principal outcomes and related survival rates for this population were compared. Results In total, 100 articles were identified in the search. Of these, ten met the search criteria and were analyzed. There was one study with a 2b level of evidence, one with 3b, and the remainder had level 4. All studies discussed long-term survival in the PEG versus non-PEG populations. No studies showed definitive evidence to suggest long-term survival rates improved in patients who underwent PEG placement as compared to those who did not. Two studies documented median survival worse in patients over age 80 with dementia and PEG placement. Conclusion There is presently no evidence to suggest long-term survival rates improved in patients with advanced dementia who underwent PEG placement for dysphagia. Relevance to quality of life, need for nutrition and hydration, and ethical considerations in the decision process are discussed. PMID:25342891

  4. Fluoroscopy-Guided Removal of Pull-Type Gastrostomy Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlers, Christopher M. Schneider, Jens; Lachmann, Ricarda; Herber, Sascha

    2008-11-15

    These case reports demonstrate a radiologic interventional technique for removal of pull-type gastrostomy tubes. This approach proved to be a safe and efficient procedure in two patients. The procedure may be applicable in situations where endoscopic attempts fail.

  5. A Model for Predicting Gastrostomy Tube Placement in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Upper Aerodigestive Tract Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Ashley C.; Moustafa, Farah; Worley, Mitch; Waltonen, Joshua D.; D'Agostino, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Identifying high-risk patients in the preoperative period can allow physicians to optimize nutritional status early for better outcomes after head and neck cancer resections. OBJECTIVE To develop a model to predict preoperatively the need for gastrostomy tube (G-tube) placement in patients undergoing surgery of the upper aerodigestive tract. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This retrospective medical record review included all adult patients diagnosed with head and neck cancers who underwent tumor resection from 2007 through 2012 at Wake Forest Baptist Health, a level 1 tertiary care center. Records were screened for patient demographics, tumor characteristics, surgical treatment type, and postoperative placement of G-tube. A total of 743 patients underwent resection of head and neck tumors. Of these, 203 were excluded for prior G-tube placement, prior head and neck resection, G-tube placement for chemoradiotherapy, and resection for solely nodal disease, leaving 540 patients for analysis. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Placement of postoperative G-tube. RESULTS Of the 540 included patients, 23% required G-tube placement. The following variables were significant and independent predictors of G-tube placement: preoperative irradiation (odds ratio [OR], 4.1; 95% CI, 2.4–6.9; P < .001), supracricoid laryngectomy (OR, 26.0; 95% CI, 4.9–142.9; P < .001), tracheostomy tube placement (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.5–4.4; P < .001), clinical node stage N0 vs N2 (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4–4.2; P = .01), clinical node stage N1 vs N2 (OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.8–3.3; P = .01), preoperative weight loss (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.2–3.2; P = .004), dysphagia (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.2–3.2; P = .005), reconstruction type (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1–2.9; P = .02), and tumor stage (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1–2.9; P = .03). A predictive model was developed based on these variables. In the validation analysis, we found that the average predicted score for patients who received G-tubes was statistically

  6. Gastrostomy Tube Use after Transoral Robotic Surgery for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-khudari, Samer; Bendix, Scott; Lindholm, Jamie; Simmerman, Erin; Hall, Francis; Ghanem, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate factors that influence gastrostomy tube (g-tube) use after transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for oropharyngeal (OP) cancer. Study Design/Methods. Retrospective review of TORS patients with OP cancer. G-tube presence was recorded before and after surgery at followup. Kaplan-Meier and Cox hazards model evaluated effects of early (T1 and T2) and advanced (T3, T4) disease, adjuvant therapy, and free flap reconstruction on g-tube use. Results. Sixteen patients had tonsillar cancer and 13 tongue base cancer. Of 22 patients who underwent TORS as primary therapy, 17 had T1 T2 stage and five T3 T4 stage. Seven underwent salvage therapy (four T1 T2 and three T3 T4). Nine underwent robotic-assisted inset free flap reconstruction. Seventeen received adjuvant therapy. Four groups were compared: primary early disease (PED) T1 and T2 tumors, primary early disease with adjunctive therapy (PEDAT), primary advanced disease (PAD) T3 and T4 tumors, and salvage therapy. Within the first year of treatment, 0% PED, 44% PEDAT, 40% PAD, and 57% salvage patients required a g-tube. Fourteen patients had a temporary nasoenteric tube (48.3%) postoperatively, and 10 required a g-tube (34.5%) within the first year. Four of 22 (18.2%) with TORS as primary treatment were g-tube dependent at one year and had received adjuvant therapy. Conclusion. PED can be managed without a g-tube after TORS. Similar feeding tube rates were found for PEDAT and PAD patients. Salvage patients have a high rate of g-tube need after TORS. PMID:23936676

  7. Gastrostomy tube placement in patients with advanced dementia or near end of life.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Denise Baird; Barrocas, Albert; Wesley, John R; Kliger, Gustavo; Pontes-Arruda, Alessandro; Márquez, Humberto Arenas; James, Rosemarie Lembo; Monturo, Cheryl; Lysen, Lucinda K; DiTucci, Angela

    2014-12-01

    Based on current scientific literature, gastrostomy tube (G-tube) placement or other long-term enteral access devices should be withheld in patients with advanced dementia or other near end-of-life conditions. In many instances healthcare providers are not optimally equipped to implement this recommendation at the bedside. Autonomy of the patient or surrogate decision maker should be respected, as should the patient's cultural, religious, social, and emotional value system. Clinical practice needs to address risks, burdens, benefits, and expected short-term and long-term outcomes in order to clarify practice changes. This paper recommends a change in clinical practice and care strategy based on the results of a thorough literature review and provides tools for healthcare clinicians, particularly in the hospital setting, including an algorithm for decision making and a checklist to use prior to the placement of G-tubes or other long-term enteral access devices. Integrating concepts of patient-centered care, shared decision making, health literacy, and the teach-back method of education enhances the desired outcome of ethical dilemma prevention. The goal is advance care planning and a timely consensus among health team members, family members, and significant others regarding end-of-life care for patients who do not have an advance directive and lack the capacity to advocate for themselves. Achieving this goal requires interdisciplinary collaboration and proactive planning within a supportive healthcare institution environment. PMID:25293595

  8. A Behavior Analysis Approach toward Chronic Food Refusal in Children with Gastrostomy-Tube Dependency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luiselli, James K.; Luiselli, Tracy Evans

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a behavior analysis treatment approach to establishing oral feeding in children with multiple developmental disabilities and gastrostomy-tube dependency. Pretreatment screening, functional assessment, and treatment are reported as implemented within a behavioral consultation model. A case study illustrates the sequence and…

  9. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Dermatomyositis: Associations with Clinical and Laboratory Features Including Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mugii, Naoki; Hasegawa, Minoru; Matsushita, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Oohata, Sacihe; Okita, Hirokazu; Yahata, Tetsutarou; Someya, Fujiko; Inoue, Katsumi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dysphagia develops with low frequency in patients with dermatomyositis. Our objective was to determine the clinical and laboratory features that can estimate the development of dysphagia in dermatomyositis. Methods This study included 92 Japanese patients with adult-onset dermatomyositis. The associations between dysphagia and clinical and laboratory features including disease-specific autoantibodies determined by immunoprecipitation assays were analyzed. Results Videofluoroscopy swallow study (VFSS) was performed for all patients with clinical dysphagia (n = 13, 14.1%) but not for patients without clinical dysphagia. Typical findings of dysphagia (pharyngeal pooling, n = 11 and/or nasal regurgitation, n = 4) was detected by VFSS in all patients with clinical dysphagia. Eleven patients with dysphagia (84.6%) had anti-transcription intermediary factor 1γ (TIF-1γ) antibody. By univariate analysis, the average age and the male to female ratio, internal malignancy, and anti-TIF-1γ antibody were significantly higher and the frequency of interstitial lung diseases and manual muscle testing (MMT) scores of sternomastoid and dertoid muscles were significantly lower in patients with dysphagia than in patients without dysphagia. Among patients with anti-TIF-1γ antibody, the mean age, the ratios of male to female and internal malignancy were significantly higher and mean MMT scores of sternomastoid muscle were significantly lower in patients with dysphagia compared with patients without dysphagia. By multivariable analysis, the risk of dysphagia was strongly associated with the existence of internal malignancy and ant-TIF-1γ antibody and was also associated with reduced scores of manual muscle test of sternomastoid muscle. Dysphagia was markedly improved after the treatment against myositis in all 13 patients. Conclusion These findings indicate that dysphagia can develop frequently in patients with internal malignancy, anti-TIF-1γ antibody, or severe muscle

  10. Replacement of Mushroom Cage Gastrostomy Tube Using a Modified Technique to Allow Percutaneous Replacement with an Endoscopic Tube in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ammar, Thoraya; Rio, Alan; Ampong, Mary Ann; Sidhu, Paul S.

    2010-06-15

    Radiologic inserted gastrostomy (RIG) is the preferred method in our institution for enteral feeding in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Skin-level primary-placed mushroom cage gastrostomy tubes become tight with weight gain. We describe a minimally invasive radiologic technique for replacing mushroom gastrostomy tubes with endoscopic mushroom cage tubes in ALS. All patients with ALS who underwent replacement of a RIG tube were included. Patients were selected for a modified replacement when the tube length of the primary placed RIG tube was insufficient to allow like-for-like replacement. Replacement was performed under local anesthetic and fluoroscopic guidance according to a preset technique, with modification of an endoscopic mushroom cage gastrostomy tube to allow percutaneous placement. Assessment of the success, safety, and durability of the modified technique was undertaken. Over a 60-month period, 104 primary placement mushroom cage tubes in ALS were performed. A total of 20 (19.2%) of 104 patients had a replacement tube positioned, 10 (9.6%) of 104 with the modified technique (male n = 4, female n = 6, mean age 65.5 years, range 48-85 years). All tubes were successfully replaced using this modified technique, with two minor complications (superficial wound infection and minor hemorrhage). The mean length of time of tube durability was 158.5 days (range 6-471 days), with all but one patient dying with a functional tube in place. We have devised a modification to allow percutaneous replacement of mushroom cage gastrostomy feeding tubes with minimal compromise to ALS patients. This technique allows tube replacement under local anesthetic, without the need for sedation, an important consideration in ALS.

  11. Rare case of dysphagia, skin blistering, missing nails in a young boy

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Jasbir; Bajantri, Bharat; Remy, Prospere

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of genetic disorders with an autosomal dominant or an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance and more than 300 mutations. The disorder is characterized by blistering mucocutaneous lesions and has several varying phenotypes due to anchoring defect between the epidermis and dermis. The variation in phenotypic expression depends on the involved structural protein that mediates cell adherence between different layers of the skin. Epidermolysis bullosa can also involve extra-cutaneous sites including eye, nose, ear, upper airway, genitourinary tract and gastrointestinal tract. The most prominent feature of the gastrointestinal tract involvement is development of esophageal stricture. The stricture results from recurrent esophageal mucosal blistering with consequent scarring and most commonly involves the upper esophagus. Here we present a case of a young boy with dominant subtype of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa who presented with dysphagia, extensive skin blistering and missing nails. Management of an esophageal stricture eventually requires dilatation of the stricture or placement of a gastrostomy tube to keep up with the nutritional requirements. Gastrostomy tube also provides access for esophageal stricture dilatation in cases where antegrade approach through the mouth has failed. PMID:25685271

  12. MAPLE fabricated Fe3O4@Cinnamomum verum antimicrobial surfaces for improved gastrostomy tubes.

    PubMed

    Anghel, Alina Georgiana; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Chirea, Mariana; Grumezescu, Valentina; Socol, Gabriel; Iordache, Florin; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Anghel, Ion; Holban, Alina Maria

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamomum verum-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles of 9.4 nm in size were laser transferred by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique onto gastrostomy tubes (G-tubes) for antibacterial activity evaluation toward Gram positive and Gram negative microbial colonization. X-ray diffraction analysis of the nanoparticle powder showed a polycrystalline magnetite structure, whereas infrared mapping confirmed the integrity of C. verum (CV) functional groups after the laser transfer. The specific topography of the deposited films involved a uniform thin coating together with several aggregates of bio-functionalized magnetite particles covering the G-tubes. Cytotoxicity assays showed an increase of the G-tube surface biocompatibility after Fe3O4@CV treatment, allowing a normal development of endothelial cells up to five days of incubation. Microbiological assays on nanoparticle-modified G-tube surfaces have proved an improvement of anti-adherent properties, significantly reducing both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria colonization. PMID:24979402

  13. Stability of Balloon-Retention Gastrostomy Tubes with Different Concentrations of Contrast Material: In Vitro Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lopera, Jorge E.; Alvarez, Alex; Trimmer, Clayton; Josephs, Shellie; Anderson, Matthew; Dolmatch, Bart

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of two balloon-retention-type gastrostomy tubes when the balloons are inflated with two types of contrast materials at different concentrations. Two commonly used balloon-retention-type tubes (MIC and Tri-Funnel) were inflated to the manufacturer's recommended volumes (4 and 20 cm{sup 3}, respectively) with normal saline or normal saline plus different concentrations of contrast material. Five tubes of each brand were inflated with normal saline and 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% contrast material dilutions, using either nonionic hyperosmolar contrast, or nonionic iso-osmolar contrast. The tubes were submerged in a glass basin containing a solution with a pH of 4. Every week the tubes were visually inspected to determine the integrity of the balloons, and the diameter of the balloons was measured with a caliper. The tests were repeated every week for a total of 12 weeks. The MIC balloons deflated slightly faster over time than the Tri-Funnel balloons. The Tri-Funnel balloons remained relatively stable over the study period for the different concentrations of contrast materials. The deflation rates of the MIC balloons were proportionally related to the concentration of saline and inversely related to the concentration of the contrast material. At high contrast material concentrations, solidification of the balloons was observed. In conclusion, this in vitro study confirms that the use of diluted amounts of nonionic contrast materials is safe for inflating the balloons of two types of balloon-retention feeding tubes. High concentrations of contrast could result in solidification of the balloons and should be avoided.

  14. Fluoroscopy-guided jejunal extension tube placement through existing gastrostomy tubes: analysis of 391 procedures

    PubMed Central

    Uflacker, Andre; Qiao, Yujie; Easley, Genevieve; Patrie, James; Lambert, Drew; de Lange, Eduard E.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of fluoroscopically placed jejunal extension tubes (J-arm) in patients with existing gastrostomy tubes. METHODS We conducted a retrospective review of 391 J-arm placements performed in 174 patients. Indications for jejunal nutrition were aspiration risk (35%), pancreatitis (17%), gastroparesis (13%), gastric outlet obstruction (12%), and other (23%). Technical success, complications, malfunctions, and patency were assessed. Percutaneous gastrostomy (PEG) tube location, J-arm course, and fluoroscopy time were correlated with success/failure. Failure was defined as inability to exit the stomach. Procedure-related complications were defined as adverse events related to tube placement occurring within seven days. Tube malfunctions and aspiration events were recorded and assessed. RESULTS Technical success was achieved in 91.9% (95% CI, 86.7%–95.2%) of new tubes versus 94.2% (95% CI, 86.7%–95.2%) of replacements (P = 0.373). Periprocedural complications occurred in three patients (0.8%). Malfunctions occurred in 197 patients (50%). Median tube patency was 103 days (95% CI, 71–134 days). No association was found between successful J-arm placement and gastric PEG tube position (P = 0.677), indication for jejunal nutrition (P = 0.349), J-arm trajectory in the stomach and incidence of malfunction (P = 0.365), risk of tube migration and PEG tube position (P = 0.173), or J-arm length (P = 0.987). A fluoroscopy time of 21.3 min was identified as a threshold for failure. Malfunctions occurred more often in tubes replaced after 90 days than in tubes replaced before 90 days (P < 0.001). A total of 42 aspiration events occurred (OR 6.4, P < 0.001, compared with nonmalfunctioning tubes). CONCLUSION Fluoroscopy-guided J-arm placement is safe for patients requiring jejunal nutrition. Tubes indwelling for longer than 90 days have higher rates of malfunction and aspiration. PMID:26380895

  15. Pharmacokinetics of two formulations of omeprazole administered through a gastrostomy tube in patients with severe neurodevelopmental problems

    PubMed Central

    Boussery, Koen; De Smet, Julie; De Cock, Pieter; Vande Velde, Saskia; Mehuys, Els; De Paepe, Peter; Remon, Jean Paul; Van Bocxlaer, Jan F P; Van Winckel, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    AIMS Omeprazole is often administered through a gastrostomy tube as either (i) a Multiple Unit Pellet System (MUPS®) tablet disintegrated in water (MUPS® formulation), or (ii) a suspension in 8.4% sodium bicarbonate (suspension formulation). This bioavailability study evaluates this practice in tube-fed patients with severe neurodevelopmental problems. METHODS Nonblinded, two-phase cross-over trial. RESULTS In seven of 10 patients, bioavailability was higher for the suspension formulation than for the MUPS® formulation. Median (90% confidence interval) area under the plasma concentration–time curve ratio (MUPS® over suspension) was 0.5 (0.06–2.37). CONCLUSIONS In this population, omeprazole MUPS® formulation has no apparent advantage over the more easily administered suspension formulation. PMID:21658093

  16. Evaluating the Role of Prophylactic Gastrostomy Tube Placement Prior to Definitive Chemoradiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Lau, Derick H.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Stuart, Kerri; Newman, Kathleen; Purdy, James A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan M.D.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of prophylactic gastrostomy tube (GT) placement on acute and long-term outcome for patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty consecutive patients were treated with chemoradiotherapy for Stage III/IV head and neck cancer to a median dose of 70 Gy (range, 64-74 Gy). The most common primary site was the oropharynx (66 patients). Sixty-seven patients (56%) were treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Seventy patients (58%) received prophylactic GT placement at the discretion of the physician before initiation of chemoradiotherapy. Results: Prophylactic GT placement significantly reduced weight loss during radiation therapy from 43 pounds (range, 0 to 76 pounds) to 19 pounds (range, 0 to 51 pounds), which corresponded to a net change of -14% (range, 0% to -30%) and -8% (range, +1% to -22%) from baseline, respectively (p < 0.001). However, the proportion of patients who were GT-dependent at 6- and 12-months after treatment was 41% and 21%, respectively, compared with 8% and 0%, respectively, for those with and without prophylactic GT (p < 0.001). Additionally, prophylactic GT was associated with a significantly higher incidence of late esophageal stricture compared with those who did not have prophylactic GT (30% vs. 6%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Although prophylactic GT placement was effective at preventing acute weight loss and the need for intravenous hydration, it was also associated with significantly higher rates of late esophageal toxicity. The benefits of this strategy must be balanced with the risks.

  17. Prevalence and Predictors of Gastrostomy Tube and Tracheostomy Placement in Anoxic/Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathic Survivors of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Rampa, Sankeerth; Nalliah, Romesh P.; Martinez-Schlurmann, Natalia I.; Lidsky, Karen B.; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Rotta, Alexandre T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current prevalence estimates of gastrostomy tube (GT) /tracheostomy placement in hospitalized patients with anoxic/hypoxic ischemic encephalopathic injury (AHIE) post cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are unknown. We sought, to estimate the prevalence of AHIE in hospitalized patients who had CPR and to identify patient/hospital level factors that predict the performance of GT/tracheostomy in those with AHIE. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (years 2004–2010). All patients who developed AHIE following CPR were included. In this cohort the odds of having GT and tracheostomy was computed by multivariable logistic regression analysis. Patient and hospital level factors were the independent variables. Results During the study period, a total of 686,578 CPR events occurred in hospitalized patients. Of these, 94,336 (13.7%) patients developed AHIE. In this AHIE cohort, 6.8% received GT and 8.3% tracheostomy. When compared to the 40–49 yrs age group, those aged >70 yrs were associated with lower odds for GT (OR = 0.65, 95% CI:0.53–0.80, p<0.0001). Those aged <18 years & those >60 years were associated with lower odds for having tracheostomy when compared to the 40–49 years group (p<0.0001). Each one unit increase in co-morbid burden was associated with higher odds for having GT (OR = 1.23,p<0.0001) or tracheostomy (OR = 1.17, p<0.0001). Blacks, Hispanics, Asians/Pacific Islanders, and other races were associated with higher odds for having GT or tracheostomy when compared to whites (p<0.05). Hospitals located in northeastern regions were associated with higher odds for performing GT (OR = 1.48, p<0.0001) or tracheostomy (OR = 1.63, p<0.0001) when compared to those in Western regions. Teaching hospitals (TH) were associated with higher odds for performing tracheostomy when compared to non-TH (OR = 1.36, 1.20–1.54, p<0.0001). Conclusions AHIE injury occurs in a significant number of in-hospital arrests

  18. Severe dysphagia as the presenting symptom of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome in a non-alcoholic man.

    PubMed

    Karaiskos, Ilias; Katsarolis, Ioannis; Stefanis, Leonidas

    2008-02-01

    We present the case of a non-alcoholic man, who, following severe malnutrition, presented with dysphagia that necessitated gastrostomy tube placement. The patient subsequently developed encephalopathy, at which point thiamine deficiency was suspected and thiamine supplementation initiated. The encephalopathy and the dysphagia resolved, but the patient was left with a dense amnestic deficit consistent with Korsakoff syndrome. MRI at the time of the encephalopathy revealed lesions consistent with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. This case represents a remarkable example of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome that for a prolonged time period had as its sole manifestation severe dysphagia. To our knowledge, there is only one similar case reported in the literature. This case serves to alert neurologists that isolated dysphagia may be the presenting symptom of this classic neurological syndrome even in the absence of alcoholism. PMID:18379741

  19. Initial Experience with Computed Tomography and Fluoroscopically Guided Placement of Push-Type Gastrostomy Tubes Using a Rupture-Free Balloon Catheter

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Takeshi Tanabe, Masahiro; Yamatogi, Shigenari; Shimizu, Kensaku; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement of push-type gastrostomy tubes using a rupture-free balloon (RFB) catheter under computed tomography (CT) and fluoroscopic guidance. A total of 35 patients (23 men and 12 women; age range 57-93 years [mean 71.7]) underwent percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement of a push-type gastrostomy tube using an RFB catheter between April 2005 and July 2008. Technical success, procedure duration, and complications were analyzed. Percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy placement was considered technically successful in all patients. The median procedure time was 39 {+-} 13 (SD) min (range 24-78). The average follow-up time interval was 103 days (range 7-812). No major complications related to the procedure were encountered. No tubes failed because of blockage, and neither tube dislodgement nor intraperitoneal leakage occurred during the follow-up period. The investigators conclude that percutaneous CT and fluoroscopically guided gastrostomy placement with push-type tubes using an RFB catheter is a safe and effective means of gastric feeding when performed by radiologists.

  20. Dysphagia in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Elderly patients are inherently predisposed to dysphagia predominately because of comorbid health conditions. With the aging of the population in the United States, along with the increased prevalence of obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease, healthcare providers will increasingly encounter older patients with either oropharyngeal or esophageal disease and complaints of dysphagia. Useful tests to evaluate dysphagia include the videofluoroscopic swallowing study and the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Swallow rehabilitation is useful to help patients compensate for swallowing difficulty and ultimately help strengthen the neuromusculature involved in swallowing. PMID:24772045

  1. Gastrostomy Tube (G-Tube)

    MedlinePlus

    ... TOPIC Finding Your Way in the Health Care System Preparing Your Child for Surgery Managing Home Health Care Preparing Your Child for Anesthesia What Happens in the Operating Room? Going to the Hospital What's It Like ...

  2. Postextubation dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Klomjit, Saranapoom; Mankongpaisarnrung, Charoen; Rakvit, Ariwan

    2015-01-01

    Postextubation dysphagia (PED) is a common problem in critically ill patients with recent intubation. Although several risk factors have been identified, most of them are nonmodifiable preexisting or concurrent conditions. Early extubation, small endotracheal tube size, and small bore of nasogastric tube potentially decrease the risk of PED. The majority of patients receive treatment based on only bedside swallow evaluations, which has an uncertain diagnostic accuracy as opposed to gold standard instrumental tests. Therefore, the treatment decision for patients may not be appropriately directed for each individual. Current treatments are mainly focused on dietary modifications and postural changes/compensatory maneuvers rather than interventions, but recent studies have shown limited proven benefits. Direct therapies in oromotor control, such as therapeutic exercises and neuromuscular stimulations, should be considered as potential effective treatments. PMID:25552788

  3. [Transdisciplinary approach for sarcopenia. Sarcopenic Dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka

    2014-10-01

    Sarcopenic dysphagia is difficulty swallowing due to sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles. Presbyphagia refers to age-related changes in the swallowing mechanism in the elderly associated with a frailty in swallowing. Presbyphagia is different from dysphagia. The most common cause of dysphagia is stroke. However, sarcopenic dysphagia may be common in the elderly with sarcopenia and dysphagia. Frail elderly with aspiration pneumonia can simultaneously experience activity-, disease-, and nutrition-related sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles, resulting in the development of sarcopenic dysphagia. Consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenic dysphagia were proposed at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Dysphagia Rehabilitation. The concept of rehabilitation nutrition as a combination of both rehabilitation and nutrition care management is useful for treatment of sarcopenic dysphagia. Therapy for sarcopenic dysphagia includes dysphagia rehabilitation, nutrition improvement and sarcopenia treatment. The core components of dysphagia rehabilitation are oral health care, rehabilitative techniques, and food modification. Nutrition improvement is important, because malnutrition contributes to the etiology of secondary sarcopenia and sarcopenic dysphagia. Assessment of the multi-factorial causes of primary and secondary sarcopenia is important because rehabilitation nutrition for sarcopenia differs depending on its etiology. Treatment of age-related sarcopenia should include resistance training and dietary supplements of amino acids. Therapy for activity-related sarcopenia includes reduced bed rest time and early mobilization and physical activity. Treatment for disease-related sarcopenia requires therapies for advanced organ failure, inflammatory disease, or malignancy, while therapy for nutrition-related sarcopenia involves appropriate nutrition management to increase muscle mass. PMID:25266097

  4. Factors Associated With Long-Term Dysphagia After Definitive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Caudell, Jimmy J.; Schaner, Philip E.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Locher, Julie L.; Nabell, Lisle M.; Carroll, William R.; Magnuson, J. Scott; Spencer, Sharon A.; Bonner, James A.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: The use of altered fractionation radiotherapy (RT) regimens, as well as concomitant chemotherapy and RT, to intensify therapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer can lead to increased rates of long-term dysphagia. Methods and Materials: We identified 122 patients who had undergone definitive RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer, after excluding those who had been treated for a second or recurrent head-and-neck primary, had Stage I-II disease, developed locoregional recurrence, had <12 months of follow-up, or had undergone postoperative RT. The patient, tumor, and treatment factors were correlated with a composite of 3 objective endpoints as a surrogate for severe long-term dysphagia: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependence at the last follow-up visit; aspiration on a modified barium swallow study or a clinical diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia; or the presence of a pharyngoesophageal stricture. Results: A composite dysphagia outcome occurred in 38.5% of patients. On univariate analysis, the primary site (p = 0.01), use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), RT schedule (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with development of composite long-term dysphagia. The use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), primary site (p = 0.02), and increasing age (p = 0.02) remained significant on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The addition of concurrent chemotherapy to RT for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer resulted in increased long-term dysphagia. Early intervention using swallowing exercises, avoidance of nothing-by-mouth periods, and the use of intensity-modulated RT to reduce the dose to the uninvolved swallowing structures should be explored further in populations at greater risk of long-term dysphagia.

  5. Management of dysphagia in advanced oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Penner, Jamie L; McClement, Susan E; Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V

    2007-05-01

    Individuals with advanced oropharyngeal cancer often experience dysphagia as a result of their illness and its treatment. Research consistently demonstrates that dysphagia and difficulty with oral intake have many implications, including a negative impact on quality of life. Nurses are in a key position to provide support and initiate appropriate interventions for individuals with dysphagia. Using the Human Response to Illness model (Mitchell et al, 1991) as an organising framework, this paper presents a critical review of the empirical literature regarding dysphagia in individuals with advanced oropharyngeal cancer that will: i) provide the reader with a comprehensive understanding of dysphagia; ii) identify current gaps in our knowledge; and iii) establish the foundation for appropriate evidence-based interventions to optimise functioning and quality of life in this patient population. PMID:17577172

  6. Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Suttrup, Inga; Warnecke, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    More than 80 % of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) develop dysphagia during the course of their disease. Swallowing impairment reduces quality of life, complicates medication intake and leads to malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia, which is a major cause of death in PD. Although the underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood, it has been shown that dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic mechanisms are involved in the development of dysphagia in PD. Clinical assessment of dysphagia in PD patients is challenging and often delivers unreliable results. A modified water test assessing maximum swallowing volume is recommended to uncover oropharyngeal dysphagia in PD. PD-specific questionnaires may also be useful to identify patients at risk for swallowing impairment. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and videofluoroscopic swallowing study are both considered to be the gold standard for evaluation of PD-related dysphagia. In addition, high-resolution manometry may be a helpful tool. These instrumental methods allow a reliable detection of aspiration events. Furthermore, typical patterns of impairment during the oral, pharyngeal and/or esophageal swallowing phase of PD patients can be identified. Therapy of dysphagia in PD consists of pharmacological interventions and swallowing treatment by speech and language therapists (SLTs). Fluctuating dysphagia with deterioration during the off-state should be treated by optimizing dopaminergic medication. The methods used during swallowing treatment by SLTs shall be selected according to the individual dysphagia pattern of each PD patient. A promising novel method is an intensive training of expiratory muscle strength. Deep brain stimulation does not seem to have a clinical relevant effect on swallowing function in PD. The goal of this review is giving an overview on current stages of epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of PD-associated dysphagia, which might be helpful for neurologists

  7. Dysphagia in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S; Hamdy, S

    2006-01-01

    Swallowing musculature is asymmetrically represented in both motor cortices. Stroke affecting the hemisphere with the dominant swallowing projection results in dysphagia and clinical recovery has been correlated with compensatory changes in the previously non‐dominant, unaffected hemisphere. This asymmetric bilaterality may explain why up to half of stroke patients are dysphagic and why many will regain a safe swallow over a comparatively short period. Despite this propensity for recovery, dysphagia carries a sevenfold increased risk of aspiration pneumonia and is an independent predictor of mortality. The identification, clinical course, pathophysiology, and treatment of dysphagia after stroke are discussed in this review. PMID:16754707

  8. Radiological evaluation of dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.; Chen, Y.M.

    1986-11-21

    Dysphagia is a common complaint in patients presenting for radiological or endoscopic examination of the esophagus and is usually due to functional or structural abnormalities of the esophageal body or esophagogastric region. The authors review the radiological evaluation of the esophagus and esophagogastric region in patients with esophageal dysphagia and discuss the roentgenographic techniques used, radiological efficacy for common structural disorders, and evaluation of esophageal motor function. Comparison is made with endoscopy in assessing dysphagia, with the conclusion that the radiological examination be used initially in patients with this complaint.

  9. Rehabilitation Nutrition for Possible Sarcopenic Dysphagia After Lung Cancer Surgery: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Uwano, Rimiko

    2016-06-01

    Sarcopenic dysphagia is characterized by the loss of swallowing muscle mass and function associated with generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. In this report, the authors describe a patient with possible sarcopenic dysphagia after lung cancer surgery and was treated subsequently by rehabilitation nutrition. A 71-year-old man with lung cancer experienced complications of an acute myocardial infarction and pneumonia after surgery. He was ventilated artificially, and a tracheotomy was performed. The patient received diagnoses of malnutrition, severe sarcopenia, and possible sarcopenic dysphagia. His dysphagia was improved by a combination of dysphagia rehabilitation including physical and speech therapy and an improvement in nutrition initiated by a nutrition support team. Finally, he no longer had dysphagia and malnutrition. Sarcopenic dysphagia should be considered in patients with sarcopenia and dysphagia. Rehabilitation nutrition using a combination of both rehabilitation and nutritional care management is presumptively useful for treating sarcopenic dysphagia. PMID:26829095

  10. Family Involvement in School-Based Dysphagia Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angell, Maureen E.; Bailey, Rita L.; Nicholson, Joanna K.; Stoner, Julia B.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a practitioner-friendly synthesis of existing literature on family involvement in the management of dysphagia for school-age. Research reviewed includes family perspectives on programs, therapists, and characteristics that comprise effective family involvement in school-based dysphagia management programs. Also included are…

  11. Dysphagia and dentistry.

    PubMed

    Curl, Charlotte; Boyle, Carole

    2014-06-01

    Dysphagia is defined as a 'difficulty in swallowing' and is commonly found in the general population, particularly in the elderly. This article gives an overview of the more frequently encountered swallowing disorders and provides advice on how to manage the dysphagic patient in the dental surgery. Clinical Relevance: By identifying patients with dysphagia and being aware of the potential problems that the clinician may experience when treating them, the risk of aspiration, choking and healthcare-acquired upper respiratory tract infections may be reduced. PMID:25073222

  12. [Eosinophilic esophagitis: a rare cause of dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Billot, D; Pernin, M; Pillot, C; Bredin, C; Hoeffler, P; Graffin, B; Rey, P

    2010-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is an unrecognized and emerging entity. Its incidence increases with allergic disorders. A 29-year-old man presented with a 4-year history of intermittent and paroxysmal dysphagia. The triad including allergy, young age, and impaction of foreign bodies, combined with a chronic dysphagia is almost pathognomonic of eosinophilic esophagitis. Endoscopic esophageal features can be diverse, so systematic esophageal biopsies are required. Diagnosis is established with the demonstration of an eosinophilic infiltrate with a cell count exceeding 15 eosinophils per high power field (×400). First line therapy includes swallowed topical corticosteroids and removal of an allergic cause, when it could be identified. PMID:20605659

  13. Dysphagia Practice in 2035: Beyond Fluorography, Thickener, and Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ciucci, Michelle; Jones, Corinne A; Malandraki, Georgia A; Hutcheson, Katherine A

    2016-08-01

    Dysphagia evaluation and management has rapidly become the primary practice area of medical speech pathologists since its adoption in our field less than three decades ago. As a specialty, swallowing and swallowing disorders comprise the largest represented discipline with 10,059 specialty interest group members within the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and 298 board-certified specialists in the American Speech Hearing Association. There are national and international organizations, such as the Dysphagia Research Society and its interdisciplinary journal Dysphagia, that provide continuing education for clinicians and a platform for dysphagia researchers. Despite this rapid growth, herein we identify some significant needs for improving the science and practice of dysphagia clinical care, including a deeper understanding of physiology and neurophysiology, standardization of evaluation, consensus on core sets of dysphagia parameters for clinical and research reporting, personalized algorithms for implementation of evidenced-based practice, metrics for therapy efficacy, and increased buy-in and funding from agencies. The goals of this article are to summarize the status quo of dysphagia research, evaluation, and treatment as well as to make predictions about the future. Medical trends that we speculate will influence dysphagia research and care in the future include, among others, imaging advances, personalized medicine, regenerative medicine, and telehealth. PMID:27232095

  14. Dysphagia Management in Acute and Sub-acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Vose, Alicia; Nonnenmacher, Jodi; Singer, Michele L.; González-Fernández, Marlís

    2014-01-01

    Swallowing dysfunction is common after stroke. More than 50% of the 665 thousand stroke survivors will experience dysphagia acutely of which approximately 80 thousand will experience persistent dysphagia at 6 months. The physiologic impairments that result in post-stroke dysphagia are varied. This review focuses primarily on well-established dysphagia treatments in the context of the physiologic impairments they treat. Traditional dysphagia therapies including volume and texture modifications, strategies such as chin tuck, head tilt, head turn, effortful swallow, supraglottic swallow, super-supraglottic swallow, Mendelsohn maneuver and exercises such as the Shaker exercise and Masako (tongue hold) maneuver are discussed. Other more recent treatment interventions are discussed in the context of the evidence available. PMID:26484001

  15. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia after Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen K.; Arnold, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    increased risk of oropharyngeal dysphagia after ACSS are: more levels operated, female gender, increased operative time, and older age (usually >60 years). Dysphagic patients can learn compensatory strategies for the safe and effective passage of bolus material. Certain intraoperative and postoperative techniques may decrease the incidence and/or severity of oropharyngeal dysphagia after ACSS. Conclusions Large, prospective, randomized studies are required to confirm the incidence, prevalence, etiology, mechanisms, long-term natural history, and risk factors for the development of dysphagia after ACSS, as well as to identify prevention measures. Also needed is a universal outcome measurement that is specific, reliable and valid, would include global, functional, psychosocial, and physical domains, and would facilitate comparisons among studies. Results of these studies can lead to improvements in surgical techniques and/or perioperative management, and may reduce the incidence of dysphagia after ACSS. PMID:24436882

  16. [Detection and management of the neurologic dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Leemann, Beatrice; Sergi, Sabrina; Sahinpasic, Leila; Schnider, Armin

    2016-03-01

    Neurologic dysphagia is frequent and has consequences which can be severe, such as, denutrition andpneumonia. In most cases, it can be detected with a clinical exam. The management includes some general measures, an adaptation of textures, specific rehabilitation, and nutritional assessment to judge whether complementary enteral nutrition is needed. PMID:27089605

  17. Hard to swallow: Developmental biological insights into pediatric dysphagia.

    PubMed

    LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel; Moody, Sally A; Maynard, Thomas M; Karpinski, Beverly A; Zohn, Irene E; Mendelowitz, David; Lee, Norman H; Popratiloff, Anastas

    2016-01-15

    Pediatric dysphagia-feeding and swallowing difficulties that begin at birth, last throughout childhood, and continue into maturity--is one of the most common, least understood complications in children with developmental disorders. We argue that a major cause of pediatric dysphagia is altered hindbrain patterning during pre-natal development. Such changes can compromise craniofacial structures including oropharyngeal muscles and skeletal elements as well as motor and sensory circuits necessary for normal feeding and swallowing. Animal models of developmental disorders that include pediatric dysphagia in their phenotypic spectrum can provide mechanistic insight into pathogenesis of feeding and swallowing difficulties. A fairly common human genetic developmental disorder, DiGeorge/22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome (22q11DS) includes a substantial incidence of pediatric dysphagia in its phenotypic spectrum. Infant mice carrying a parallel deletion to 22q11DS patients have feeding and swallowing difficulties that approximate those seen in pediatric dysphagia. Altered hindbrain patterning, craniofacial malformations, and changes in cranial nerve growth prefigure these difficulties. Thus, in addition to craniofacial and pharyngeal anomalies that arise independently of altered neural development, pediatric dysphagia may result from disrupted hindbrain patterning and its impact on peripheral and central neural circuit development critical for feeding and swallowing. The mechanisms that disrupt hindbrain patterning and circuitry may provide a foundation to develop novel therapeutic approaches for improved clinical management of pediatric dysphagia. PMID:26554723

  18. Dysphagia in the elderly: focus on rehabilitation strategies.

    PubMed

    Di Pede, C; Mantovani, M E; Del Felice, A; Masiero, S

    2016-08-01

    Prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia among the elderly is high, but underestimated and underdiagnosed. It may give raise to relevant complications impacting on morbidity, hospital length of stay and health care costs. Dysphagia evaluation and management is a multidisciplinary task; it includes a detailed history taking, clinical and instrumental exams, and identification of the risk of aspiration. Long-standing individual abilities and impairments determine the goals of an ad hoc rehabilitation program. Currently there are no standard algorithmic approaches for the management of dysphagia in the elderly. Education of health professionals on early diagnosis and improvement of therapeutic strategies are mainstays to allow maximal recovery potential in this population. This narrative review summarizes the current rehabilitation approaches for dysphagia in the elderly. The aim is to inform the treating health care professionals, whether caring physician, physical medicine doctor, speech/swallowing therapist or nurse, on the state-of-the-art and stimulate discussion in the scientific community. PMID:26589905

  19. Telepractice for pediatric Dysphagia: a case study.

    PubMed

    Malandraki, Georgia A; Roth, Melissa; Sheppard, Justine Joan

    2014-01-01

    A closed-ended intensive pediatric swallowing telepractice program was developed and piloted in one pediatric patient with Opitz BBB/G and Asperger's Syndromes, oropharyngeal dysphagia and aerophagia. The present study is a case report. Outcome variables included behavioral, swallowing and quality of life variables, and were assessed at baseline and at the end of the four-week program. Selective variables were also assessed at a follow-up family interview four weeks post program completion. Over the four-week intervention period, the patient demonstrated substantial improvements in: oral acceptance of eating-related objects and a variety of foods (behavioral variable), timing of voluntary saliva swallows and aerophagia levels (swallowing variables) and quality of life. Follow-up interview analysis showed that most skills were retained or improved one-month post intervention. This intensive telepractice program proved to be feasible and effective for this pediatric patient with dysphagia. PMID:25945217

  20. Telepractice for Pediatric Dysphagia: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; Roth, Melissa; Sheppard, Justine Joan

    2014-01-01

    A closed-ended intensive pediatric swallowing telepractice program was developed and piloted in one pediatric patient with Opitz BBB/G and Asperger’s Syndromes, oropharyngeal dysphagia and aerophagia. The present study is a case report. Outcome variables included behavioral, swallowing and quality of life variables, and were assessed at baseline and at the end of the four-week program. Selective variables were also assessed at a follow-up family interview four weeks post program completion. Over the four-week intervention period, the patient demonstrated substantial improvements in: oral acceptance of eating-related objects and a variety of foods (behavioral variable), timing of voluntary saliva swallows and aerophagia levels (swallowing variables) and quality of life. Follow-up interview analysis showed that most skills were retained or improved one-month post intervention. This intensive telepractice program proved to be feasible and effective for this pediatric patient with dysphagia. PMID:25945217

  1. Recovery of Dysphagia in Lateral Medullary Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Hitesh; Banerjee, Alakananda

    2014-01-01

    Lateral medullary stroke is typically associated with increased likelihood of occurrence of dysphagia and exhibits the most severe and persistent form. Worldwide little research exists on dysphagia in brainstem stroke. An estimated 15% of all patients admitted to stroke rehabilitation units experience a brainstem stroke out of which about 47% suffer from dysphagia. In India, a study showed that 22.3% of posterior circulation stroke patients develop dysphagia. Dearth of literature on dysphagia and its outcome in brainstem stroke particularly lateral medullary stroke motivated the author to present an actual case study of a patient who had dysphagia following a lateral medullary infarct. This paper documents the severity and management approach of dysphagia in brainstem stroke, with traditional dysphagia therapy and VitalStim therapy. Despite being diagnosed with a severe form of dysphagia followed by late treatment intervention, the patient had complete recovery of the swallowing function. PMID:25045555

  2. Aging effects on oropharyngeal swallow and the role of dental care in oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Logemann, J A; Curro, F A; Pauloski, B; Gensler, G

    2013-11-01

    Difficulty with oropharyngeal swallow requires careful diagnosis and treatment from a team of professionals including the patients' physicians and the speech-language pathologist specializing in dysphagia. The dentist can be a critical team member in prevention, early identification, and management of oropharyngeal dysphagia. This manuscript reviews the physiology of normal oropharyngeal swallow and the effects of normal aging on this physiology. Typical etiologies for oropharyngeal dysphagia are defined as is the most commonly used physiologic diagnostic procedure, the modified barium swallow (MBS). The critical role of the dentist in identifying risk of oropharyngeal dysphagia, making appropriate referrals, and improving oral hygiene to prevent aspiration pneumonia in the elderly is discussed. PMID:23574512

  3. Does Dysphagia Indicate Recurrence of Benign Esophageal Strictures?

    PubMed Central

    Borgström, Anders; Fork, Frans-Thomas; Lövdahl, Eje

    1995-01-01

    Esophageal dilatation in dysphagic patients with benign strictures is usually considered successful if the patients' dysphagia is alleviated. However, the relation between dysphagia and the diameter of a stricture is not well understood. Moreover, the dysphagia may also be caused by an underlying esophageal motor disorder. In order to compare symptoms and objective measurements of esophageal stricture, 28 patients were studied with interview and a radiologic esophagram. The latter included swallowing of a solid bolus. All patients underwent successful balloon dilatation at least one month prior to this study. Recurrence of a stricture with a diameter of less than 13 mm was diagnosed by the barium swallow in 21 patients. Recurrence of dysphagia was seen in 15 patients. Thirteen patients denied any swallowing symptoms. Chest pain was present in 9 patients. Of 15 patients with dysphagia 2 (13%) had no narrowing but severe esophageal dysmotility. Of 13 patients without dysphagia 9 (69%) had a stricture with a diameter of 13 mm or less. Of 21 patients with a stricture of 13 mm or less 14 (67%) were symptomatic while 7 (33%) were asymptomatic. Four of 11 patients with retrosternal pain had a stricture of less than 10 mm. Three patients with retrosternal pain and obstruction had severe esophageal dysmotility. Whether or not the patients have dysphagia may be more related to diet and eating habits than to the true diameter of their esophageal narrowing. We conclude that the clinical history is non-reliable for evaluating the results of esophageal stricture dilatation. In order to get an objective measurement of therapeutic outcome, barium swallow including a solid bolus is recommended. PMID:18493375

  4. Dysphagia: warning signs and management.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Hardip

    Dysphagia is a condition in which patients have difficulty with some or all parts of the swallowing process. It can lead to penetration of food or drink into the larynx, which can cause aspiration. The prevalence varies but it is thought that 10% of acutely hospitalised elderly patients suffer from dysphagia. There are both obvious and less obvious indicators. Dysphagia is caused by a variety of conditions and can be short term or long term. It affects the patient physically, psychologically and socially. Because nurses spend the most time with patients, they are often the first ones to identify a problem. Therefore, it is sensible for nurses to be trained in how to screen patients for swallowing problems. They can then be referred to speech and language therapists for a formal and thorough assessment. There is a variety of national guidelines available to support health professionals in caring for these patients. PMID:27231737

  5. Dysphagia lusoria: extrathoracic surgical management

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael; Harris, Kenneth A.; Casson, Alan G.; DeRose, Gaetano; Jamieson, William G.

    1996-01-01

    Objective To report a case of dysphagia lusoria managed by an extrathoracic approach. Design Case report and literature review. Setting A university hospital. Patient A 39-year-old man, who presented with weight loss and dysphagia. Aortography and computed tomography revealed an aberrant subclavian artery compressing the esophagus against the aortic arch. Intervention The right subclavian artery was divided at its origin and reimplanted onto the right carotid artery. The operation was performed through a right supraclavicular incision without opening the chest. Results There was no operative morbidity. Six months postoperatively the patient was asymptomatic and had gained weight. There was no radiologic evidence of esophageal compression. Conclusions Based on the results of our case of dysphagia lusoria and the reports of others that have started to appear in the literature, consideration should be given to repairing a symptomatic, nonaneurysmal aberrant right subclavian artery through an extrathoracic approach. PMID:8599791

  6. Dyskeratosis congenita presenting with dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kalpana; Tripathi, Swati; Agarwal, Nidheesh; Bareth, Anurag

    2016-01-01

    Dyskeratosiscongenita (DKC) is a genetically heterogeneous disease of defective telomere maintenance that may demonstrate different patterns of inheritance. It is characterized by thetriad of dystrophy of the nails, leukokeratosis of the oral mucosa, and extensive net-like pigmentation of the skin. We report a case ofDKC who presented with a chief complaint of dysphagia. PMID:27559501

  7. [Dysphagia in Parkinson's Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Therapy].

    PubMed

    Suttrup, I; Warnecke, T

    2016-07-01

    Oropharyngeal and esophageal dysphagia are a frequent, but seldom diagnosed symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). More than 80 % of patients with PD develop dysphagia during the course of their disease leading to a reduced quality of life, complicated medication intake, malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia, which is a major cause of death in PD. The underlying pathophysiology is poorly understood. Impaired dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic mechanisms of the cortical swallowing network as well as peripheral neuromuscular involvement have been suggested to contribute to its multifactorial genesis. Diagnostic screening methods include PD-specific questionnaires and a modified water test. Fiber optic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) and videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS), which complement each other, are the gold standard for evaluation of PD-related dysphagia. For evaluation of esophageal dysphagia, the high-resolution manometry (HRM) may be a helpful tool. In addition to dysphagia-specific treatment by speech and language therapists (SLTs), optimized dopaminergic medication is a meaningful therapeutic option. A promising novel method is intensive training of expiratory muscle strength (EMST). Deep brain stimulation does not seem to have a clinically relevant effect on swallowing function in PD. PMID:27299944

  8. [Case of Borrelia brainstem encephalitis presenting with severe dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yuji; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Shiraishi, Yoshimasa; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Kira, Jun-Ichi

    2010-04-01

    We report the case of a 30-year-old man who developed severe dysphagia owing to neuroborreliosis. He showed dysphagia, diplopia, hiccups, and walking difficulty Neurological examination revealed mild disturbance of consciousness, diplopia on left lateral gaze, left-side-dominant blephaloptosis, gaze-evoked horizontal nystagmus on left lateral gaze, mild bilateral muscle weakness, palatoplegia, dysphagia, dysarthria, and truncal ataxia An increased pharyngeal reflex caused dysphagia in this patient. An EEG revealed intermittent high amplitude slow wave activity. However, head MRI, blood count, serum chemistry, and cerebrospinal fluid examination showed no abnormality. Initially, brainstem encephalitis with unknown etiology was diagnosed. The hiccups, diplopia, and ptosis were improved by corticosteroid therapy, but other symptoms were refractory to corticosteroid therapy and IVIg. After these immunotherapies, anti-Borrelia IgG and IgM antibodies were found to be positive, and symptoms, including dysphagia, were improved by doxycycline and cefotaxime. Because the clinical symptoms of Borrelia infection are widely variable, neuroborreliosis should be considered in patients with brainstem encephalitis refractory to conventional immunotherapies. PMID:20411811

  9. [Treatment and rehabilitation of dysphagia following cerebrovascular disease].

    PubMed

    López-Liria, Remedios; Fernández-Alonso, Melodie; Vega-Ramírez, Francisco A; Salido-Campos, M Ángeles; Padilla-Góngora, David

    2014-03-16

    INTRODUCTION. Bronchopneumonia is a frequent complication in the first days after a cerebrovascular disease and is linked with a higher rate of mortality. It occurs in patients with an altered level of consciousness or tussigenic reflex, and could be prevented with an early dysphagia rehabilitation programme. AIMS. To review the scientific literature on the treatment and rehabilitation of patients with dysphagia after suffering a stroke, published between 2002 and 2012. DEVELOPMENT. A search conducted in the PubMed, Cochrane, PEDro, CINAHL and ENFISPO databases yielded 15 papers that fulfilled eligibility criteria and the initial aims of the study, providing information about 3,212 patients. The different protocols and techniques for re-education in dysphagia are described and include compensatory strategies, orofacial regulation therapy, music therapy, sensory stimulation, lip muscle, tongue, pharynx, larynx and respiratory tract training, Mendelsohn manoeuvre, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and acupuncture. CONCLUSIONS. The studies examined in this research claim that the treatment of dysphagia following a stroke can improve the function of deglutition (coordination, speed, volume), quality of life and people's social relationships. Further work needs to be carried out to establish or define what kind of therapies, techniques, exercises or manoeuvres are the most effective in dysphagia. Generally agreed treatment or rehabilitation protocols also need to be drawn up within units that address stroke in an integrated manner. PMID:24610693

  10. Referral criteria for assessment and treatment in an ambulatory dysphagia clinic.

    PubMed

    Lorinczi, Klara; Denheyer, Vanessa; Pickard, Amanda; Lee, Alice; Mager, Diana R

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia is highly prevalent in patients with chronic neurological disorders and can increase the risk for comorbidities such as aspiration pneumonia and malnutrition. Treatment includes timely access to interdisciplinary health care teams with specialized skills in dysphagia management. A retrospective chart review (n=99 of 125 charts screened) was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of referral criteria to identify and triage patients with suspected dysphagia to an ambulatory dysphagia clinic. Variables collected included demographic information (age), anthropometric information (body mass index [BMI], each patient's sex), reason for referral, primary medical diagnosis, symptomatology (e.g., pneumonia, chest congestion), nutrition and swallowing interventions, clinic wait times, missed/cancelled appointments, and referring health care professional. The mean age and mean BMI ± standard deviation of patients reviewed were 68.7 years ± 18.4 years and 25.2 kg/m² ± 6.7 kg/m², respectively. Average clinic wait times were 158 days (13 to 368 days) for routine and 52 days (0 to 344 days) for urgent assessments (p<0.001). The most common reason(s) for referral was/were related to dysphagia (n=83), surgery (n=50), and/or gastrointestinal symptomatology (n=28); 80% to 90% of patients received varying diagnostic and treatment services for dysphagia. Development of effective referral criteria is critical to ensure that clients with dysphagia receive timely diagnostic, treatment, and nutrition interventions by interdisciplinary health care teams specializing in dysphagia. PMID:23217446

  11. Pharyngeal Electrical Stimulation for Treatment of Dysphagia in Subacute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Scutt, Polly; Love, Jo; Clavé, Pere; Cohen, David; Dziewas, Rainer; Iversen, Helle K.; Ledl, Christian; Ragab, Suzanne; Soda, Hassan; Warusevitane, Anushka; Woisard, Virginie; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Dysphagia is common after stroke, associated with increased death and dependency, and treatment options are limited. Pharyngeal electric stimulation (PES) is a novel treatment for poststroke dysphagia that has shown promise in 3 pilot randomized controlled trials. Methods— We randomly assigned 162 patients with a recent ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke and dysphagia, defined as a penetration aspiration score (PAS) of ≥3 on video fluoroscopy, to PES or sham treatment given on 3 consecutive days. The primary outcome was swallowing safety, assessed using the PAS, at 2 weeks. Secondary outcomes included dysphagia severity, function, quality of life, and serious adverse events at 6 and 12 weeks. Results— In randomized patients, the mean age was 74 years, male 58%, ischemic stroke 89%, and PAS 4.8. The mean treatment current was 14.8 (7.9) mA and duration 9.9 (1.2) minutes per session. On the basis of previous data, 45 patients (58.4%) randomized to PES seemed to receive suboptimal stimulation. The PAS at 2 weeks, adjusted for baseline, did not differ between the randomized groups: PES 3.7 (2.0) versus sham 3.6 (1.9), P=0.60. Similarly, the secondary outcomes did not differ, including clinical swallowing and functional outcome. No serious adverse device-related events occurred. Conclusions— In patients with subacute stroke and dysphagia, PES was safe but did not improve dysphagia. Undertreatment of patients receiving PES may have contributed to the neutral result. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN25681641. PMID:27165955

  12. Dysphagia and Respiratory Care in Individuals with Tetraplegia: Incidence, Associated Factors, and Preventable Complications

    PubMed Central

    Shem, Kazuko; Castillo, Kathleen; Wong, Sandra Lynn; Chang, James; Kolakowsky-Hayner, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Dysphagia occurs in a significant number of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) presenting to acute care and inpatient rehabilitation. This prospective study has found dysphagia in nearly 40% of individuals with tetraplegia. Tracheostomy, mechanical ventilation, nasogastric tube, and age are significant risk factors. The detrimental complications of dysphagia in SCI can cause significant morbidity and delays in rehabilitation. Thus, early and accurate diagnosis of dysphagia is imperative to reduce the risk of developing life-threatening complications. Incidence and risk factors of dysphagia and the use of the bedside swallow evaluation (BSE) and videofluoroscopy swallow study (VFSS) to diagnose dysphagia are presented. The often underappreciated role of respiratory therapists, including assist cough, high tidal volume ventilation, and the use of Passy-Muir valve, in the care of individuals with SCI who have dysphagia is discussed. Improved secretion management and respiratory stabilization enable the individuals with dysphagia to be evaluated sooner and safely by a speech pathologist. Early evaluation and intervention could improve upon morbidity and delayed rehabilitation, thus improving overall clinical outcomes. PMID:23459783

  13. A Systematic Review of the Prevalence of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Stroke, Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, Head Injury, and Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Claire; Gemmell, Elizabeth; Kenworthy, James; Speyer, Renée

    2016-06-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a common condition after stroke, Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD), and can cause serious complications including malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia, and premature mortality. Despite its high prevalence among the elderly and associated serious complications, dysphagia is often overlooked and under-diagnosed in vulnerable patient populations. This systematic review aimed to improve understanding and awareness of the prevalence of dysphagia in susceptible patient populations. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane library, PROSPERO, and disease-specific websites were systematically searched for studies reporting oropharyngeal dysphagia prevalence or incidence in people with stroke, PD, AD, traumatic brain injury, and community-acquired pneumonia, from the USA, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, Japan, China, and regional studies. The quality of study descriptions were assessed based on STROBE guidelines. A total of 1207 publications were identified and 33 met inclusion criteria: 24 in stroke, six in PD, two in traumatic brain injury, and one in patients with traumatic brain injury. Dysphagia was reported in 8.1-80 % of stroke patients, 11-81 % of PD, 27-30 % of traumatic brain injury patients, and 91.7 % of patients with community-acquired pneumonia. No relevant studies of dysphagia in AD were identified. This review demonstrates that dysphagia is highly prevalent in these populations, and highlights discrepancies between studies, gaps in dysphagia research, and the need for better dysphagia management starting with a reliable, standardized, and validated method for oropharyngeal dysphagia identification. PMID:26970760

  14. Bedside Diagnosis of Dysphagia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    O’Horo, John C.; Rogus-Pulia, Nicole; Garcia-Arguello, Lisbeth; Robbins, JoAnne; Safdar, Nasia

    2015-01-01

    Background Dysphagia is associated with aspiration, pneumonia and malnutrition, but remains challenging to identify at the bedside. A variety of exam protocols and maneuvers are commonly used, but the efficacy of these maneuvers is highly variable. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search of seven databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE and Scopus, from each database’s earliest inception through June 5th, 2013. Studies reporting diagnostic performance of a bedside examination maneuver compared to a reference gold standard (videofluoroscopic swallow study [VFSS] or flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing with sensory testing [FEEST]) were included for analysis. From each study, data were abstracted based on the type of diagnostic method and reference standard study population and inclusion/exclusion characteristics, design and prediction of aspiration. Results The search strategy identified 38 articles meeting inclusion criteria. Overall, most bedside examinations lacked sufficient sensitivity to be used for screening purposes across all patient populations examined. Individual studies found dysphonia assessments, abnormal pharyngeal sensation assessments, dual axis accelerometry, and one description of water swallow testing to be sensitive tools, but none were reported as consistently sensitive. A preponderance of identified studies was in post-stroke adults, limiting the generalizability of results. Conclusions No bedside screening protocol has been shown to provide adequate predictive value for presence of aspiration. Several individual exam maneuvers demonstrated reasonable sensitivity, but reproducibility and consistency of these protocols was not established. More research is needed to design an optimal protocol for dysphagia detection. PMID:25581840

  15. Dysphagia: A Short Review of the Current State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koidou, Irene; Kollias, Nikolaos; Sdravou, Katerina; Grouios, George

    2013-01-01

    Dysphagia is the clinical expression of disruption of the synchronized activity surrounding the normal swallowing mechanism. It results from a large number of causes including neurologic, myopathic, metabolic, inflammatory/autoimmune, infectious, structural, iatrogenic, and psychiatric diseases. It can have a significant impact on social and…

  16. Uses of esophageal function testing: dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Etsuro; Woodland, Philip; Sifrim, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal function testing should be used for differential diagnosis of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be the consequence of hypermotility or hypomotility of the muscles of the esophagus. Decreased esophageal or esophagogastric junction distensibility can provoke dysphagia. The most well established esophageal dysmotility is achalasia. Other motility disorders can also cause dysphagia. High-resolution manometry (HRM) is the gold standard investigation for esophageal motility disorders. Simultaneous measurement of HRM and intraluminal impedance can be useful to assess motility and bolus transit. Impedance planimetry measures distensibility of the esophageal body and gastroesophageal junction in patients with achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:25216909

  17. Clinical dysphagia risk predictors after prolonged orotracheal intubation

    PubMed Central

    de Medeiros, Gisele Chagas; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; Mangilli, Laura Davison; Zilberstein, Bruno; de Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To elucidate independent risk factors for dysphagia after prolonged orotracheal intubation. METHODS: The participants were 148 consecutive patients who underwent clinical bedside swallowing assessments from September 2009 to September 2011. All patients had received prolonged orotracheal intubations and were admitted to one of several intensive care units of a large Brazilian school hospital. The correlations between the conducted water swallow test results and dysphagia risk levels were analyzed for statistical significance. RESULTS: Of the 148 patients included in the study, 91 were male and 57 were female (mean age, 53.64 years). The univariate analysis results indicated that specific variables, including extraoral loss, multiple swallows, cervical auscultation, vocal quality, cough, choking, and other signs, were possible significant high-risk indicators of dysphagia onset. The multivariate analysis results indicated that cervical auscultation and coughing were independent predictive variables for high dysphagia risk. CONCLUSIONS: Patients displaying extraoral loss, multiple swallows, cervical auscultation, vocal quality, cough, choking and other signs should benefit from early swallowing evaluations. Additionally, early post-extubation dysfunction recognition is paramount in reducing the morbidity rate in this high-risk population. PMID:24473554

  18. [Dysphagia and Sonography: what Association?].

    PubMed

    Donati, Thierry; Badini, Matteo; Schwarzenbach, Hans-Rudolf

    2016-06-01

    Achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by dysphagia, chest pain, and drug-resistant reflux symptoms. A detailed anamnesis and esophageal manometry are essential tools for a correct diagnosis. We present a case of a 31 years old woman with typical achalasia symptoms misdiagnosed for many years due to a complex background picture. Despite the evolution in medical sciences, this clinical case underlines the cornerstones of medical profession: patient-physician relation and bedside clinical approach. At the same time, it confirms the increasing role of ultrasonography as a simple but essential tool for a complete general-internal medicine evaluation. PMID:27269778

  19. Defining and Measuring Dysphagia Following Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Stephanie K.; Schroeder, Mae Fern; DeGeorge, Pamela C.; Corey, David M.; Foundas, Anne L.; Rosenbek, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To continue the development of a quantified, standard method to differentiate individuals with stroke and dysphagia from individuals without dysphagia. Method: Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) were completed on a group of participants with acute stroke (n = 42) and healthy age-matched individuals (n = 25). Calibrated liquid…

  20. Post-stroke dysphagia: A review and design considerations for future trials.

    PubMed

    Cohen, David L; Roffe, Christine; Beavan, Jessica; Blackett, Brenda; Fairfield, Carol A; Hamdy, Shaheen; Havard, Di; McFarlane, Mary; McLauglin, Carolee; Randall, Mark; Robson, Katie; Scutt, Polly; Smith, Craig; Smithard, David; Sprigg, Nikola; Warusevitane, Anushka; Watkins, Caroline; Woodhouse, Lisa; Bath, Philip M

    2016-06-01

    Post-stroke dysphagia (a difficulty in swallowing after a stroke) is a common and expensive complication of acute stroke and is associated with increased mortality, morbidity, and institutionalization due in part to aspiration, pneumonia, and malnutrition. Although most patients recover swallowing spontaneously, a significant minority still have dysphagia at six months. Although multiple advances have been made in the hyperacute treatment of stroke and secondary prevention, the management of dysphagia post-stroke remains a neglected area of research, and its optimal management, including diagnosis, investigation and treatment, have still to be defined. PMID:27006423

  1. Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy Tube in a Syncardia™ Total Artificial Heart.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Amit; Singbartl, Kai; Boone, Jacqueline; Soleimani, Behzad; Zeriouh, Mohamad; Loebe, M; Koerner, Michael; Oei, J Elisabeth; Brehm, Christoph E; Ghodsizad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    As a bridge to transplant, the Syncardia™ total artificial heart (TAH) is an option for patients who are not candidates for left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) due to right ventricular failure. The need for nutritional support in these patients is essential for a favorable outcome. Low body mass indexes and albumin levels have been associated with increased morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgery patients [Alverdy 2003]. It is not uncommon for postoperative patients to have difficulty in consuming enough calories after surgery, which is further complicated by a hypermetabolic demand due to surgical stress. Enteral nutrition has typically been favored for gut mucosal integrity and bacterial flora [Alverdy 2003] [Engleman 1999]. We describe the need for prolonged enteral nutritional support in a TAH patient that was accomplished with a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube. PMID:26913678

  2. Dysphagia

    MedlinePlus

    ... sounds: Study unveils a key part of animal & human communication University of Utah ( 3/14/2016 ) More News ... Policies Free Publications U.S. Department of Health and ... Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 31 Center Drive, MSC 2320, Bethesda, MD ...

  3. [Diagnosis and therapy of dysphagia after partial horizontal laryngectomy].

    PubMed

    Hartmann, S; Delank, W; Weber, U

    1996-05-01

    Due to an increase in the numbers of function-preserving laryngectomies and the utilization of laser techniques in cancer surgery, more patients after supraglottic partial laryngectomies are experiencing dysphagia of different intensities. We therefore developed a functional therapy program that we use for patients after supraglottic partial laryngectomies following a special diagnostic evaluation including video-laryngoscopy and, if necessary, high-speed cine-radiography. This therapeutic treatment was developed from conventional treatment for patients with dysphagia caused by neurological disorders and includes body posture, altered mouth movements, food consistency and swallowing technique. In so doing, exercises are used to achieve closure of the vocal folds, aids for swallowing liquids and general directions. This method for evaluation and treatment is presented in 12 patients as examples. We now report our positive long-term results and demonstrate the possibilities and limits of therapy. Additional procedures for isolated cases are discussed critically with regard to their indications and treatment. PMID:8707631

  4. Dysphagia lusorium in elderly: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kantarceken, Bulent; Bulbuloglu, Ertan; Yuksel, Murvet; Cetinkaya, Ali

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Late unset of dysphagia due to vascular abnormalities is a rare condition. We aimed to present a case of right subclavian artery abnormalities caused dysphagia in the elderly. METHODS: A 68-year-old female was admitted with dysphagia seven months ago. Upper endoscopic procedures and routine examinations could not demonstrate any etiology. Multislice computed thorax tomography was performed for probable extra- esophagial lesions. RESULTS: Multislice computed thorax tomography showed right subclavian artery abnormality and esophagial compression with this aberrant artery. CONCLUSION: Causes of dysphagia in the elderly are commonly malignancies, strictures and/or motility disorders. If routine examinations and endoscopic procedures fail to show any etiology, rare vascular abnormalities can be considered in such patients. Multislice computed tomography is a usefull choice in such conditions. PMID:15285045

  5. Wallenberg's Syndrome: An Unusual Case of Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Aurora Loaeza-del; Barahona-Garrido, Josué; Criales, Sergio; Chang-Menéndez, Sergio; Torre, Aldo

    2007-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with sudden-onset oropharyngeal dysphagia and vomiting of central etiology. Neurological evaluation showed uvula deviation to the left, paresis of the mid-right portion of the soft palate, lateralization of gaze to the right side, and dysphonia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an infarction in the left lateral medullary region, therefore the diagnosis of Wallenberg's syndrome was established. The neurological issues along with the dysphagia gradually improved and the patient was discharged. PMID:21487559

  6. Palliation of Dysphagia in Carcinoma Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnaiah, Vishnu Prasad Nelamangala; Malage, Somanath; Sreenath, G.S.; Kotlapati, Sudhakar; Cyriac, Sunu

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma has a special place in gastrointestinal carcinomas because it contains two main types, namely, squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Carcinoma esophagus patients require some form of palliation because of locally advanced stage or distant metastasis, where it cannot be subjected to curable treatment with surgery and chemoradiation. Many modalities of palliation of dysphagia are available, but the procedure with least morbidity, mortality, and long-term palliation of dysphagia needs to be chosen for the patient. This study aims to discuss the recent trends in palliation of dysphagia with promising results and the most suitable therapy for palliation of dysphagia in a given patient. A total of 64 articles that were published between years 2005 and 2015 on various modes of palliation of dysphagia in carcinoma esophagus were studied, which were mainly randomized and prospective studies. Through this study, we conclude that stents are the first choice of therapy for palliation, which is safe and cost-effective, and they can be combined with either radiotherapy or chemotherapy for long-term palliation of dysphagia with good quality of life. Radiotherapy can be used as a second-line treatment modality. PMID:27279758

  7. Association of Dysphagia With Supratentorial Lesions in Patients With Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the supratentorial area associated with poststroke dysphagia, we assessed the diffusion tensor images (DTI) in subacute stroke patients with supratentorial lesions. Methods We included 31 patients with a first episode of infarction in the middle cerebral artery territory. Each subject underwent brain DTI as well as a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and patients divided were into the dysphagia and non-dysphagia groups. Clinical dysphagia scale (CDS) scores were compared between the two groups. The corticospinal tract volume (TV), fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated for 11 regions of interest in the supratentorial area—primary motor cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, supplementary motor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, parieto-occipital cortex, insular cortex, posterior limb of the internal capsule, thalamus, and basal ganglia (putamen and caudate nucleus). DTI parameters were compared between the two groups. Results Among the 31 subjects, 17 were diagnosed with dysphagia by VFSS. Mean TVs were similar across the two groups. Significant inter-group differences were observed in two DTI values: the FA value in the contra-lesional primary motor cortex and the ADC value in the bilateral posterior limbs of the internal capsule (all p<0.05). Conclusion The FA value in the primary motor cortex on the contra-lesional side and the ADC value in the bilateral PLIC can be associated with dysphagia in middle cerebral artery stroke. PMID:27606270

  8. Palliation of malignant dysphagia using the Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Carter, R; Smith, J S; Anderson, J R

    1993-01-01

    A group of 141 patients with biopsy-proved malignant dysphagia, treated with neodymium YAG laser between April 1985 and November 1988, have been prospectively evaluated. Patients treated since November 1988 have not been included to allow minimum follow-up of 18 months. The success of treatment has been assessed in terms of survival, relief of dysphagia, complications, and length of inpatient stay. One- and two-year survival rates were 12.6% and 3.5%, respectively (mean survival 24.7 weeks). Ninety-two percent of patients were returned to a semisolid diet or better. In 4% recanalization was impossible, and 4% swallowed only liquids despite an adequate channel. Tumor histology, site of tumor, and length of previous treatment had no significant influence on outcome. The presence of metastases significantly influenced survival (p = 0.007). The principal complications were perforation (6.4%) and tracheoesophageal fistula (2.8%). Laser recanalization provides effective palliation for malignant dysphagia. PMID:7505991

  9. [TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SPECIFIC FOOD PRODUCTS FOR PATIENTS WITH DYSPHAGIA].

    PubMed

    Calleja Fernández, Alicia; Pintor de la Maza, Begoña; Vidal Casariego, Alfonso; Villar Taibo, Rocío; Urioste Fondo, Ana; Cano Rodríguez, Isidoro; Ballesteros Pomar, María D

    2015-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem among elderly and also in some pathological conditions such as neurodegenerative diseases or tumors. Making an adequate diet for this disease may present some difficulties. The aim of this document is to make a detailed technical report about the characteristics of the products that are available in Spain to hydrate and to feed patients with dysphagia. Food and pharmaceutical industries have developed a range of products designed to ensure homogeneous texture and a suitable viscosity to guaranty an adequate hydration. An adequate nutritional status is also achieved with these products for patients with dysphagia, without compromising their safety. The ingredients used to achieve a suitable viscosity are different types of starches, gums and other substances. It has been developed thickeners and gellified water for hydratation, and in case of food there are purees (dehydrated, lyophilized, pasteurized and sterilized), fruit purees, fruit pudding, and dehydrated cereal. Patients who do not meet their nutritional needs have also oral supplements with different viscosities. The industry offers extensive information about the technical characteristics of the products, except for viscosity. It would be recommended for the manufacturers to include in detail the technical specifications of the used methodology and the measurement and the results obtained in the analysis of viscosity that can be consulted by professionals of the Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics Units who treat these patients. PMID:26545499

  10. Practical Assessment of Dysphagia in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung Moo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a quantitative and organ-specific practical test for the diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia based on assessment of stroke patients. Methods An initial test composed of 24 items was designed to evaluate the function of the organs involved in swallowing. The grading system of the initial test was based on the analysis of 50 normal adults. The initial test was performed in 52 stroke patients with clinical symptoms of dysphagia. Aspiration was measured via a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS). The odds ratio was obtained to evaluate the correlation between each item in the initial test and the VFSS. A polychotomous linear logistic model was used to select the final test items. Results Eighteen of 24 initial items were selected as significant for the final tests. These 18 showed high initial validity and reliability. The Spearman correlation coefficient for the total score of the test and functional dysphagia scale was 0.96 (p<0.001), indicating a statistically significant positive correlation. Conclusion This study was carried out to design a quantitative and organ-specific test that assesses the causes of dysphagia in stroke patients; therefore, this test is considered very useful and highly applicable to the diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia. PMID:26798618

  11. Dysphagia due to anterior cervical osteophytes--a case report.

    PubMed

    Kareem, B A; Sofiyan, M; Subramanian, S

    2000-09-01

    Dysphagia due to osteophytes in a young person is uncommon. We present a rare case of Forestier's disease causing dysphagia in a young lady without other bony involvement. The osteophytes were surgically removed and her symptoms resolved completely. PMID:11200721

  12. Dysphagia in Crohn's disease: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, C; Netzer, P; Scheurer, U; Seibold, F

    2002-09-01

    Dysphagia is a rare manifestation in a patient with Crohn's disease. We report on the case of a patient with long-standing Crohn's disease who developed progressive dysphagia over 3 years. Endoscopy showed minimal distal oesophagitis with non-specific histological findings. Further investigation with cinematography, barium swallow and manometry established an achalasia-like motility disorder. Biopsies obtained from the oesophagus were non-specific. Balloon dilatation was performed. Initial success was followed by recurrent dysphagia. At repeat endoscopy, an oesophageal fistula was detected. An attempt at conservative medical management failed and oesophagectomy was successfully performed. Pathology results of the resected specimen confirmed the suspected diagnosis of oesophageal Crohn's disease. Even if achalasia is suspected in a Crohn's patient, it should be taken into consideration that the motility disorder could be the result of a transmural inflammation with or without fibrosis caused by Crohn's disease. PMID:12405254

  13. [Causes, diagnosis and treatment of neurogenic dysphagia as an interdisciplinary clinical problem].

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Jurek

    2006-01-01

    The intricate mechanism of swallowing can be divided into three phases: oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal. Dysphagia is a disruption in the swallowing process, which include difficulty in transporting (or a lack of transporting) a food or liquid bolus from the mouth through the pharynx and esophagus into the stomach. Causes of disruptions in the swallowing process can be divided into superior (oropharyngeal) and inferior (esophageal) according to Paradowski et al. Neurlologic dysphagia may be caused by a disruption in different parts of the central nervous system (supranuclear level, level of motor and sensory nuclei taking part in swallowing process, peripherial nerves level and a pathology of muscle cells and spindles) or neuromuscular and muscular disorders. Neuromuscular disorders causes according to Waśko-Czopnik et al. are: stroke, brain tumors, brain injury, bulbar and pseudobulbar paralysis, neurodegenerative diseases (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis), tabes dorsalis, multisystem degenerations, Parkinson's disease, delayed dyskineses, Huntington's disease, myasthenia and myasthenic syndromes, myopathies and peripherial neuropathies. The correct diagnosis evaluation include history taking, physical examination with palpation and consultations (laryngological, gastrological and neurological). According to Halama radiological esophagogram, videofluoroscopy, flexible endoscopic examination, ultrasound examination, manometry, electromyography, scintigraphy and 24 hour pH monitoring are main diagnostic procedures of dysphagia. Some of the reasons for the neurologic dysphagia may be treated by surgical and pharmacological methods. Neurologic dysphagia rehabilitation is difficult, long-lasting and often falling far short of expected results. Primary it should include neurologic cause treatment if it is possible. According to WHO International Classification of Functioning and Health in 2001 non-invasive methods of dysphagia treatment may be

  14. The Neurobiology of Swallowing and Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Arthur J.

    2008-01-01

    The neurobiological study of swallowing and its dysfunction, defined as dysphagia, has evolved over two centuries beginning with electrical stimulation applied directly to the central nervous system, and then followed by systematic investigations that have used lesioning, transmagnetic stimulation, magnetoencephalography, and functional magnetic…

  15. Relationship between Dysphagia and Exacerbations in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Steidl, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Carla Simone; Gonçalves, Bruna Franciele; Fernandes, Natália; Antunes, Vívian; Mancopes, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The literature presents studies correlating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to dysphagia and suggesting that the aspiration laryngeal phenomenon related to changes in the pharyngeal phase contributes significantly to the exacerbation of symptoms of lung disease. Objectives This study aimed to conduct a literature review to identify the relation between dysphagia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Data Synthesis We found 21 studies and included 19 in this review. The few studies that related to the subject agreed that the presence of dysphagia, due to lack of coordination between swallowing and breathing, may be one of the triggering factors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. Conclusions The review noted that there is a relationship between dysphagia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, identified by studies demonstrating that the difficulties associated with swallowing may lead to exacerbation of the disease. There was difficulty in comparing studies by their methodological differences. More research is needed to clarify the relationship between dysphagia and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, making it possible to develop multiprofessional treatment strategies for these patients, catered to specific needs due to the systemic manifestations of the disease. PMID:25992155

  16. Number of Gastrointestinal Symptoms is a Useful Means of Identifying Patients with Cancer for Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Machi; Manabe, Noriaki; Kamada, Tomoari; Hirai, Toshihiro; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken; Inoue, Kazuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Dysphagia is a symptom suggestive of severe underlying pathology, although its causes include organic and non-organic disorders. The epidemiology of dysphagia is, however, poorly understood. We evaluated the prevalence of dysphagia in outpatients in Japan, measured the proportion ultimately found to have an organic cause, and recorded the nature of their symptoms and the underlying disorder. Of 5362 consecutive outpatients attending the Digestive Center at our hospital between June 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012, 186 patients (3.5 %) had dysphagia with a frequency score of ≥5 out of 6. The most common diagnosis was cancer (34 patients, 18.3 %), followed by gastroesophageal reflux disease (24 patients, 12.9 %). An esophageal motility disorder was diagnosed in 21 patients (11.3 %); the causes in the remaining 107 patients (57.5 %) were miscellaneous. Multivariable analysis identified the following predictors of cancer: age ≥ 54 years, weight loss, being a drinker of alcohol, and ≤2 gastrointestinal symptoms. Our findings can be used to inform the prioritization of referrals from primary care for investigation and treatment for patients with cancer for dysphagia. PMID:27115760

  17. Acoustic characteristics of voluntary expiratory sounds after swallow for detecting dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, M; Yokoyama, K; Takei, Y; Furuya, N; Nakamichi, Y; Ihara, Y; Takahashi, K; Groher, M E

    2014-09-01

    This research was designed to investigate the acoustic characteristics of voluntary expiratory sounds after swallow for detecting dysphagia. Forty-nine patients with complaints of swallow difficulty received a videofluorographic (VF) examination. They were divided into three groups: nine who did not have any apparent disease (Group N), 22 patients with head and neck cancer (Group H&N) and 18 patients with other diseases including cerebrovascular disease (Group OD). After liquid barium swallows, they exhaled voluntarily without voicing. Videofluorographic findings were classified into four groups: normal (Normal), acceptable swallow (Acceptable), swallow with residue (Resid) and swallows with penetration or aspiration (Pen/Asp). The duration of expiratory sounds was measured on the time waveform. Frequency characteristics of expiratory sounds were obtained using one-third octave band analysis ranging from 62·5 to 2000·0 Hz of central frequency. The averaged level of the 1000·0-Hz band was chosen as the reference band level (RB level). The revised averaged level of each band was obtained by subtracting the RB level from the averaged level of each band. Zero decibel of the revised magnitude of the 125·0-Hz band was set as the critical value to differentiate dysphagia (Resid or Pen/Asp) from no dysphagia (Normal or Acceptable). Comparison of this assessment with VF findings showed a significant percentage agreement (85·4%). These results suggest that frequency characteristics of post-swallow expiratory sounds can differentiate dysphagia from no dysphagia among multiple dysphagic patient groups. PMID:24841831

  18. Neurogenic dysphagia resulting from Chiari malformations.

    PubMed

    Pollack, I F; Pang, D; Kocoshis, S; Putnam, P

    1992-05-01

    Between 1980 and 1989, 15 of 46 patients (11 children, 4 adults) who underwent suboccipital craniectomy and cervical laminectomy for symptomatic Chiari malformations presented with manifestations of neurogenic dysphagia. Each of these patients had normal swallowing function before the development of dysphagic symptoms. Dysphagia was progressive in all 15 and, in most cases, preceded the onset of other severe brain stem signs. The rate of symptom progression varied depending on the age of the patient. Whereas the six infants (all Chiari II) deteriorated rapidly after the onset of initial symptoms, the five older children (two Chiari I, three Chiari II) and four adults (all Chiari I) showed a more gradual deterioration. In 11 patients with severe dysphagia, barium video esophagograms, pharyngoesophageal motility studies, continuous esophageal pH monitoring, and appropriate scintigraphic studies were useful in defining the scope of the swallowing impairment and determining whether perioperative nasogastric or gastrostomy feedings, gastric fundoplication, and/or tracheostomy were needed to maintain adequate nutrition and avoid aspiration. These patients all had widespread dysfunction of the swallowing mechanism, with a combination of diffuse pharyngoesophageal dysmotility, cricopharyngeal achalasia, nasal regurgitation, tracheal aspiration, and gastroesophageal reflux. The pathophysiology of these swallowing impairments and their relation to the hindbrain malformation is discussed. Postoperative outcome with regard to swallowing function correlated with the severity of preoperative symptoms. The four patients with mild dysphagia showed rapid improvement in swallowing function after surgery. Seven patients with more severe impairment but without other signs of severe brain stem compromise, such as central apnea or complete bilateral vocal cord paralysis, also improved, albeit more slowly. In contrast, the outcome in the four patients who developed other signs of severe

  19. Relief of dysphagia during neoadjuvant treatment for cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction.

    PubMed

    Sunde, B; Ericson, J; Kumagai, K; Lundell, L; Tsai, J A; Lindblad, M; Rouvelas, I; Friesland, S; Wang, N; Nilsson, M

    2016-07-01

    Dysphagia is the main symptom of cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction and causing nutritional problems and weight loss, often counteracted by insertion of self-expandable metal stents or nutrition via an enteral route. Clinical observations indicate that neoadjuvant therapy may effectively and promptly alleviate dysphagia, making such nutrition supportive interventions redundant before surgical resection. The objective of the current study was to carefully study the effects of induction neoadjuvant therapy on dysphagia and its subsequent course and thereby investigate the actual need for alimentary gateways for nutritional support. Thirty-five consecutive patients scheduled for neoadjuvant therapy were recruited and assessed regarding dysphagia and appetite at baseline, after the first cycle of preoperative treatment with either chemotherapy alone or with chemoradiotherapy and before surgery. Platinum-based therapy in combination with 5-fluorouracil was administered intravenously days 1-5 every 3 weeks and consisted of three treatments. Patients receiving combined chemoradiotherapy started radiotherapy on day one of second chemotherapy cycle. They received fractions of 2 Gy/day each up to a total dose of 40 Gy. Watson and Ogilvie dysphagia scores were used to assess dysphagia, while appetite was assessed by the Edmonton Assessment System Visual analogue scale-appetite questionnaire. Patients were evaluated at regular outpatient clinic visits or by telephone. The histological tumor response in the surgical specimen was assessed using the Chirieac scale. Ten patients scheduled for neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 25 patients scheduled for chemoradiotherapy were included in the analysis. There was a significant improvement in dysphagia in both treatment groups, according to both scales, already from baseline to the completion of the first chemotherapy cycle which remained to the end of the neoadjuvant treatment (P < 0.001). Appetite also improved

  20. A Longitudinal Study of Symptoms of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in an Elderly Community-Dwelling Population.

    PubMed

    Nimmons, Danielle; Michou, Emilia; Jones, Maureen; Pendleton, Neil; Horan, Michael; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-08-01

    Dysphagia has been estimated to affect around 8-16 % of healthy elderly individuals living in the community. The present study investigated the stability of perceived dysphagia symptoms over a 3-year period and whether such symptoms predicted death outcomes. A population of 800 and 550 elderly community-dwelling individuals were sent the Sydney Swallow Questionnaire (SSQ) in 2009 and 2012, respectively, where an arbitrary score of 180 or more was chosen to indicate symptomatic dysphagia. The telephone interview cognitive screen measured cognitive performance and the Geriatric Depression Scale measured depression. Regression models were used to investigate associations with dysphagia symptom scores, cognition, depression, age, gender and a history of stroke; a paired t test was used to examine if individual mean scores had changed. A total of 528 participants were included in the analysis. In 2009, dysphagia was associated with age (P = 0.028, OR 1.07, CI 1.01, 1.13) and stroke (P = 0.046, OR 2.04, CI 1.01, 4.11) but these associations were no longer present in 2012. Those who had symptomatic dysphagia in 2009 (n = 75) showed a shift towards improvement in swallowing (P < 0.001, mean = -174.4, CI -243.6, -105.3), and for those who died from pneumonia, there was no association between the SSQ derived swallowing score and death (P = 0.509, OR 0.10, CI -0.41, -0.20). We conclude that swallowing symptoms are a temporally dynamic process, which increases our knowledge on swallowing in the elderly. PMID:27307155

  1. Diagnosis and Clinical Course of Unexplained Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Jiwoon; Song, Young Seop; Lee, Won Kyung; Oh, Byung-Mo; Han, Tai Ryoon

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the final diagnosis of patients with unexplained dysphagia and the clinical and laboratory findings supporting the diagnosis. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 143 patients with dysphagia of unclear etiology who underwent a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS). The medical records were reviewed, and patients with a previous history of diseases that could affect swallowing were categorized into a missed group. The remaining patients were divided into an abnormal or normal VFSS group based on the VFSS findings. The clinical course and final diagnosis of each patient were examined. Results Among the 143 patients, 62 (43%) had a previous history of diseases that could affect swallowing. Of the remaining 81 patients, 58 (72.5%) had normal VFSS findings and 23 (27.5%) had abnormal VFSS findings. A clear cause of dysphagia was not identified in 9 of the 23 patients. In patients in whom a cause was determined, myopathy was the most common cause (n=6), followed by laryngeal neuropathy (n=4) and drug-induced dysphagia (n=3). The mean ages of the patients in the normal and abnormal VFSS groups differed significantly (62.52±15.00 vs. 76.83±10.24 years, respectively; p<0.001 by Student t-test). Conclusion Careful history taking and physical examination are the most important approaches for evaluating patients with unexplained swallowing difficulty. Even if VFSS findings are normal in the pharyngeal phase, some patients may need additional examinations. Electrodiagnostic studies and laboratory tests should be considered for patients with abnormal VFSS findings. PMID:26949675

  2. Endoscopic laser palliation for advanced malignant dysphagia.

    PubMed Central

    Bown, S G; Hawes, R; Matthewson, K; Swain, C P; Barr, H; Boulos, P B; Clark, C G

    1987-01-01

    Palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia aims to optimise swallowing for the maximum time possible with the minimum of general distress to these seriously ill patients. Thirty four patients considered unsuitable for surgery because of advanced malignancy, other major pathology or in whom previous surgery had been unsuccessful were treated endoscopically with the Nd YAG laser. Significant improvement was achieved in 29 (85%). On a scale of 0-4 (0 = normal swallowing; 4 = dysphagia for all fluids), mean improvement was 1.7, with 25 patients (74%) able to swallow most, or all solids after treatment. With increasing experience, the average number of treatment sessions required for each patient became less; initial time in hospital became comparable to that needed for intubation. Failures were caused by inappropriate patient selection (3), or laser related perforation (2). The mean survival in the whole group was 19 weeks (range 2-44). Eighteen patients needed further treatment for recurrent dysphagia, a mean of six weeks (range 2-15) after initial therapy. Ten of these responded, but eight eventually required insertion of a prosthetic tube. The duration of good palliation was very variable after initial laser therapy. Images Fig. 3 PMID:2443431

  3. Rheological Characterization and Cluster Classification of Iranian Commercial Foods, Drinks and Desserts to Recommend for Esophageal Dysphagia Diets

    PubMed Central

    ZARGARAAN, Azizollaah; OMARAEE, Yasaman; RASTMANESH, Reza; TAHERI, Negin; FADAVI, Ghasem; FADAEI, Morteza; MOHAMMADIFAR, Mohammad Amin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background In the absence of dysphagia-oriented food products, rheological characterization of available food items is of importance for safe swallowing and adequate nutrient intake of dysphagic patients. In this way, introducing alternative items (with similar ease of swallow) is helpful to improve quality of life and nutritional intake of esophageal cancer dysphagia patients. The present study aimed at rheological characterization and cluster classification of potentially suitable foodstuffs marketed in Iran for their possible use in dysphagia diets. Methods In this descriptive study, rheological data were obtained during January and February 2012 in Rheology Lab of National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute Tehran, Iran. Steady state and oscillatory shear parameters of 39 commercial samples were obtained using a Physica MCR 301 rheometer (Anton-Paar, GmbH, Graz, Austria). Matlab Fuzzy Logic Toolbox (R2012 a) was utilized for cluster classification of the samples. Results Using an extended list of rheological parameters and fuzzy logic methods, 39 commercial samples (drinks, main courses and desserts) were divided to 5 clusters and degree of membership to each cluster was stated by a number between 0 and 0.99. Conclusion Considering apparent viscosity of foodstuffs as a single criterion for classification of dysphagia-oriented food products is shortcoming of current guidelines in dysphagia diets. Authors proposed to some revisions in classification of dysphagia-oriented food products and including more rheological parameters (especially, viscoelastic parameters) in the classification. PMID:26060647

  4. Thyrotoxic Dysphagia in an 82-year-old male.

    PubMed

    Parperis, Konstantinos; Dadu, Ramona; Hoq, Sheikh; Argento, Vivian

    2011-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common problem in elderly patients and a rare manifestation of Graves' disease. We report a case of an 82-year-old male who presented with a 4-week history of dysphagia and weight loss. Workup for his dysphagia with upper endoscopy, MRI brain, electromyography, acetyl-cholinesterase receptor antibodies, and voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies were negative. Modified Barium swallow test showed oropharyngeal dysphagia. Thyroid function tests that revealed hyperthyroidism and antibodies to TSH-receptor were positive. Based on the above findings, we considered Graves' disease as the most likely diagnosis. Patient was treated with methimazole and beta-blockers and subsequently his dysphagia resolved. This paper highlights the importance to clinicians of considering thyrotoxicosis as possible diagnosis in an elderly patient presenting with unexplained dysphagia. PMID:21317989

  5. The Utility of Pitch Elevation in the Evaluation of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: Preliminary Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malandraki, Georgia A.; Hind, Jacqueline A.; Gangnon, Ronald; Logemann, Jeri A.; Robbins, JoAnne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of a pitch elevation task in the assessment of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Method: This study was a pilot prospective cohort study including 40 consecutive patients (16 male and 24 female) who were referred by their physician for a swallowing evaluation. Patients were evaluated with a noninstrumental clinical…

  6. Assessment of Pediatric Dysphagia and Feeding Disorders: Clinical and Instrumental Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvedson, Joan C.

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of infants and children with dysphagia (swallowing problems) and feeding disorders involves significantly more considerations than a clinical observation of a feeding. In addition to the status of feeding in the child, considerations include health status, broad environment, parent-child interactions, and parental concerns.…

  7. Health care systems redesign project to improve dysphagia screening.

    PubMed

    Daggett, Virginia S; Woodward-Hagg, Heather; Damush, Teresa M; Plue, Laurie; Russell, Scott; Allen, George; Williams, Linda S; Chumbler, Neale R; Bravata, Dawn M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to improve dysphagia-screening processes in a tertiary Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The dysphagia-screening tool was redesigned on the basis of frontline clinician feedback, clinical guidelines, user satisfaction, and multidisciplinary expertise. The revised tool triggered a speech-language consult for positive screens and demonstrated higher scores in user satisfaction and task efficiency. Systems redesign processes were effective for redesigning the tool and implementing practice changes with clinicians involved in dysphagia screening. PMID:25463001

  8. Dysphagia in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: practical recommendations to guide management

    PubMed Central

    Toussaint, Michel; Davidson, Zoe; Bouvoie, Veronique; Evenepoel, Nathalie; Haan, Jurn; Soudon, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rapidly progressive neuromuscular disorder causing weakness of the skeletal, respiratory, cardiac and oropharyngeal muscles with up to one third of young men reporting difficulty swallowing (dysphagia). Recent studies on dysphagia in DMD clarify the pathophysiology of swallowing disorders and offer new tools for its assessment but little guidance is available for its management. This paper aims to provide a step-by-step algorithm to facilitate clinical decisions regarding dysphagia management in this patient population. Methods: This algorithm is based on 30 years of clinical experience with DMD in a specialised Centre for Neuromuscular Disorders (Inkendaal Rehabilitation Hospital, Belgium) and is supported by literature where available. Results: Dysphagia can worsen the condition of ageing patients with DMD. Apart from the difficulties of chewing and oral fragmentation of the food bolus, dysphagia is rather a consequence of an impairment in the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. By contrast with central neurologic disorders, dysphagia in DMD accompanies solid rather than liquid intake. Symptoms of dysphagia may not be clinically evident; however laryngeal food penetration, accumulation of food residue in the pharynx and/or true laryngeal food aspiration may occur. The prevalence of these issues in DMD is likely underestimated. Conclusions: There is little guidance available for clinicians to manage dysphagia and improve feeding for young men with DMD. This report aims to provide a clinical algorithm to facilitate the diagnosis of dysphagia, to identify the symptoms and to propose practical recommendations to treat dysphagia in the adult DMD population.Implications for RehabilitationLittle guidance is available for the management of dysphagia in Duchenne dystrophy.Food can penetrate the vestibule, accumulate as residue or cause aspiration.We propose recommendations and an algorithm to guide management of

  9. Metal impaction: an unusual cause of dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Anwuzia-Iwegbu, C; Quereshi, Y; Walker, R; Patel, B

    2013-01-01

    A 41-year-old unemployed construction worker with a background of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage 3, previous incisor tooth abscess aged 9, for which he was fitted with metal dentures, underwent a right below knee amputation. Postoperative day 8 he experienced episodes of dysphagia and vomiting postparandial. CT thorax revealed a foreign body in the midline region of the mediastinum. After two failed attempts at endoscopic extraction of the metal denture, the patient underwent surgical extraction of his metal denture. PMID:23814218

  10. [Dysphagia. Are swallowing sounds diagnostically useful?].

    PubMed

    Kley, C; Biniek, R

    2005-12-01

    The origin and importance of swallowing sounds in dysphagia have been discussed in previous research. Those studies report a general similarity in the sound patterns of different swallowing actions. The current paper confirms this. In addition, the origin of swallowing sound patterns is examined more closely. Finally, we simultaneously analyzed the swallowing sounds of healthy voluntary subjects and patients with swallowing disorders using X-ray cinematography. Videoendoscopy was also done. As expected, we found a variety of sound sequences differing from those of healthy subjects. Patients with tracheal tubes or cannulae constitute a special group whose swallowing sounds give additional information about the act of swallowing. PMID:16133430

  11. Screening for dysphagia and aspiration in acute stroke: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Perry, L; Love, C P

    2001-01-01

    Stroke is a common problem, producing a variety of neurological problems that affect eating. Dysphagia is a particular concern because of its potential for airway obstruction, malnutrition, and aspiration pneumonia. With chest infection reported in up to 32% of stroke patients, this is a major clinical issue. The following research questions are raised: (1) What are the incidence and outcomes of dysphagia and aspiration in acute stroke? (2) What screening interventions are available to detect dysphagia in patients with acute stroke and what effect have they on patient outcomes? A systematic review was carried out using methods and quality criteria of the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (1996), focusing on studies of adults with acute stroke. Data were extracted, collated, and presented descriptively. Two hundred forty-eight articles were retrieved with 26 meeting inclusion and quality criteria. Clinical dysphagia is common, associated with a range of deleterious outcomes and clearly linked to development of chest infection. Interpretation of aspiration on videofluoroscopy is not as straightforward but probably also confers additional risk. Further work is required on the relationship between aspiration and pneumonia, and pneumonia prevention. This will include exploration of the effects of screening, and the further development and validation of screening methods. While studies indicate current "best practice," in this important area of patient care further work is urgently required. PMID:11213249

  12. Dysphagia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Assessed by Validated Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Sally K.; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive muscular weakness and death, most typically from respiratory complications. Dysphagia is common in DMD; however, the most appropriate swallowing assessments have not been universally agreed and the symptoms of dysphagia remain under-reported. Aims: To investigate symptoms of…

  13. Schoolchildren with Dysphagia Associated with Medically Complex Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefton-Greif, Maureen A.; Arvedson, Joan C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews population trends and general characteristics of children with dysphagia in schools, provides an overview of dysphagia teams and the roles of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in school and hospital settings, and describes assessment and treatment of swallowing and feeding problems in children with complex medical…

  14. Aspiration pneumonia after chemo–intensity-modulated radiation therapy of oropharyngeal carcinoma and its clinical and dysphagia-related predictors

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Klaudia U.; Lee, Oliver E.; Lyden, Teresa H.; Haxer, Marc J.; Feng, Felix Y.; Schipper, Mathew; Worden, Francis; Prince, Mark E.; McLean, Scott A.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Bradford, Carol R.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess aspiration pneumonia (AsPn) rates and predictors after chemo-irradiation for head and neck cancer. Methods The was a prospective study of 72 patients with stage III to IV oropharyngeal cancer treated definitively with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) concurrent with weekly carboplatin and paclitaxel. AsPn was recorded prospectively and dysphagia was evaluated longitudinally through 2 years posttherapy by observer-rated (Common Toxicity Criteria version [CTCAE]) scores, patient-reported scores, and videofluoroscopy. Results Sixteen patients (20%) developed AsPn. Predictive factors included T classification (p = .01), aspiration detected on videofluoroscopy (videofluoroscopy-asp; p = .0007), and patient-reported dysphagia (p = .02–.0003), but not observer-rated dysphagia (p = .4). Combining T classification, patient reported dysphagia, and videofluoroscopy-asp, provided the best predictive model. Conclusion AsPn continues to be an under-reported consequence of chemo-irradiation for head and neck cancer. These data support using patient-reported dysphagia to identify high-risk patients requiring videofluoroscopy evaluation for preventive measures. Reducing videofluoroscopy-asp rates, by reducing swallowing structures radiation doses and by trials reducing treatment intensity in patients predicted to do well, are likely to reduce AsPn rates. PMID:23729173

  15. Chemo-IMRT of Oropharyngeal Cancer Aiming to Reduce Dysphagia: Swallowing Organs Late Complication Probabilities and Dosimetric Correlates

    SciTech Connect

    Eisbruch, Avraham; Kim, Hyungjin M.; Feng, Felix Y.; Lyden, Teresa H.; Haxer, Marc J.; Feng, Mary; Worden, Frank P.; Bradford, Carol R.; Prince, Mark E.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Assess dosimetric correlates of long-term dysphagia after chemo-intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) sparing parts of the swallowing organs. Patients and Methods: Prospective longitudinal study: weekly chemotherapy concurrent with IMRT for Stages III/IV OPC, aiming to reduce dysphagia by sparing noninvolved parts of swallowing-related organs: pharyngeal constrictors (PC), glottic and supraglottic larynx (GSL), and esophagus, as well as oral cavity and major salivary glands. Dysphagia outcomes included patient-reported Swallowing and Eating Domain scores, Observer-based (CTCAEv.2) dysphagia, and videofluoroscopy (VF), before and periodically after therapy through 2 years. Relationships between dosimetric factors and worsening (from baseline) of dysphagia through 2 years were assessed by linear mixed-effects model. Results: Seventy-three patients participated. Observer-based dysphagia was not modeled because at >6 months there were only four Grade {>=}2 cases (one of whom was feeding-tube dependent). PC, GSL, and esophagus mean doses, as well as their partial volume doses (V{sub D}s), were each significantly correlated with all dysphagia outcomes. However, the V{sub D}s for each organ intercorrelated and also highly correlated with the mean doses, leaving only mean doses significant. Mean doses to each of the parts of the PCs (superior, middle, and inferior) were also significantly correlated with all dysphagia measures, with superior PCs demonstrating highest correlations. For VF-based strictures, most significant predictor was esophageal mean doses (48{+-}17 Gy in patients with, vs 27{+-}12 in patients without strictures, p = 0.004). Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) increased moderately with mean doses without any threshold. For increased VF-based aspirations or worsened VF summary scores, toxic doses (TDs){sub 50} and TD{sub 25} were 63 Gy and 56 Gy for PC, and 56 Gy and 39 Gy for GSL, respectively. For

  16. Giant Dermoid Cyst Causing Dysphagia and Dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Derin, Serhan; Koseoglu, Sabri; Sahan, Leyla; Dere, Yelda; Sahan, Murat

    2016-05-01

    Dermoid cysts are benign lesions seen in young adults. The second most common localization is the floor of the mouth. They are usually asymptomatic over years but can be symptomatic due to secondary changes or the size. Herein, we report a case of 19-year-old woman who applied to emergency service with dyspnea, dysphagia and enlarging of a mass in the submental region. The patient cannot be entubated because of the mass pushing the tongue base backward closing the laryngeal view. Elective tracheostomy was performed for providing airflow during the operation. After the operation a cystic mass fulfilled with keratin lined by keratinized stratified squamous epithelium in addition to the dermal appendages such as sweat glands and follicular structures were seen histopathologically and the case was diagnosed as dermoid cyst of the submental region. In such patients with quick enlarging of mass causing airway obstructions, the tracheostomy can be the preferable method because of the difficulties in entubation. PMID:26999700

  17. Type I Chiari malformation presenting with laryngomalacia and dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Christopher; Ulualp, Seckin O

    2015-08-01

    We describe clinical features of an infant with laryngomalacia and dysphagia caused by type I Chiari malformation (CM-I). A 12-month-old child presented with a 6 month history of progressive stridor, dysphagia, and gastroesophageal reflux. Examination of the airway and swallowing function indicated mild laryngomalacia and aspiration with all consistencies. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain indicated CM-I. Symptoms were resolved after posterior fossa decompression. CM-I, typically diagnosed later in life, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of laryngomalacia and dysphagia. High clinical suspicion and thorough search for abnormalities ensure early diagnosis and proper management of children with neurologic variant laryngomalacia. PMID:26031456

  18. Dysphagia among adult patients who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth

    PubMed Central

    Huynh-Trudeau, Valérie; Maynard, Stéphanie; Terzic, Tatjana; Soucy, Geneviève; Bouin, Mickael

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical experiences of adults who underwent surgery for esophageal atresia at birth is limited. There is some evidence that suggests considerable long-term morbidity, partly because of dysphagia, which has been reported in up to 85% of adult patients who undergo surgery for esophageal atresia. The authors hypothesized that dysphagia in this population is caused by dysmotility and/or anatomical anomalies. OBJECTIVE: To determine the motor and anatomical causes of dysphagia. METHODS: A total of 41 adults, followed at the Esophageal Atresia Clinic at Hôpital Saint-Luc (Montreal, Quebec), were approached to particpate in the present prospective study. Evaluation was completed using upper endoscopy, manometry and barium swallow for the participants who consented. The medical charts of respondents were systematically reviewed from the neonatal period to 18 years of age to assess medical and surgical history. RESULTS: All 41 patients followed at the clinic consented and were included in the study. Dysphagia was present in 73% of patients. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in 32 patients: hiatal hernia was present in 62% (n=20); esophageal diverticulum in 13% (n=4); macroscopic Barrett esophagus in 31% (n=10); and esophagitis in 19% (n=6). Histological esophagitis was present in 20% and intestinal metaplasia in 10%. There were no cases of dysplagia or adenocarcinoma. Esophageal manometry was performed on 56% of the patients (n=23). Manometry revealed hypomotility in 100% of patients and included an insufficient number of peristaltic waves in 96%, non-propagating peristalsis in 78% and low-wave amplitude in 95%. Complete aperistalsis was present in 78%. The lower esophageal sphincter was abnormal in 12 (52%) patients, with incomplete relaxation the most common anomaly. Of the 41 patients, 29 (71%) consented to a barium swallow, which was abnormal in 13 (45%). The anomalies found were short esophageal dilation in 28%, delay in esophageal emptying in 14

  19. Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeonhwan; Oh, Seieun; Chang, Heekyung; Bang, Hwal Lan

    2015-11-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Effects of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of Dysphagia for Nursing Home Residents" found on pages 30-39, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until October 31, 2018. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Explain the development and testing of the Evidence-Based Nursing Care Algorithm of

  20. Can IMRT or Brachytherapy Reduce Dysphagia Associated With Chemoradiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer? The Michigan and Rotterdam Experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Eisbruch, Avraham Levendag, Peter C.; Feng, Felix Y.; Teguh, David; Lyden, Teresa M.A.; Schmitz, Paul I.M.; Haxer, Marc; Noever, Inge; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Heijmen, Ben J.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Dysphagia is a major late complication of intensive chemoradiotherapy of head and neck cancer. The initial clinical results of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or brachytherapy, planned specifically to reduce dysphagia are presented. Patients and Methods: Previous research at Michigan University has suggested that the pharyngeal constrictors and glottic and supraglottic larynx are likely structures whose damage by chemo-RT causes dysphagia and aspiration. In a prospective Michigan trial, 36 patients with oropharyngeal (n = 31) or nasopharyngeal (n = 5) cancer underwent chemo-IMRT. IMRT cost functions included sparing noninvolved pharyngeal constrictors and the glottic and supraglottic larynx. After a review of published studies, the retropharyngeal nodes at risk were defined as the lateral, but not the medial, retropharyngeal nodes, which facilitated sparing of the swallowing structures. In Rotterdam, 77 patients with oropharyngeal cancer were treated with IMRT, three dimensional RT, or conventional RT; also one-half received brachytherapy. The dysphagia endpoints included videofluoroscopy and observer-assessed scores at Michigan and patient-reported quality-of-life instruments in both studies. Results: In both studies, the doses to the upper and middle constrictors correlated highly with the dysphagia endpoints. In addition, doses to the glottic and supraglottic larynx were significant in the Michigan series. In the Rotterdam series, brachytherapy (which reduced the doses to the swallowing structures) was the only significant factor on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The dose-response relationships for the swallowing structures found in these studies suggest that reducing their doses, using either IMRT aimed at their sparing, or brachytherapy, might achieve clinical gains in dysphagia.

  1. An appraisal of current dysphagia diagnosis and treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Kaindlstorfer, Adolf; Pointner, Rudolph

    2016-08-01

    Dysphagia is a common, serious health problem with a wide variety of etiologies and manifestations. This review gives a general overview of diagnostic and therapeutic options for oropharyngeal as well as esophageal swallowing disorders respecting the considerable progress made over recent years. Diagnosis can be challenging and requires expertise in interpretation of symptoms and patient history. Endoscopy, barium radiography and manometry are still the diagnostic mainstays. Classification of esophageal motor-disorders has been revolutionized with the introduction of high-resolution esophageal pressure topography and a new standardized classification algorithm. Automated integrated impedance manometry is a promising upcoming tool for objective evaluation of oropharyngeal dysphagia, in non-obstructive esophageal dysphagia and prediction of post fundoplication dysphagia risk. Impedance planimetry provides new diagnostic information on esophageal and LES-distensibility and allows controlled therapeutic dilatation without the need for radiation. Peroral endoscopic myotomy is a promising therapeutic approach for achalasia and spastic motility disorders. PMID:26906944

  2. IMRT for head and neck cancer: reducing xerostomia and dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XiaoShen; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia and xerostomia are the main sequellae of chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and the main factors in reducing long-term patient quality of life. IMRT uses advanced technology to focus the high radiation doses on the targets and avoid irradiation of non-involved tissues. The decisions about sparing organs and tissues whose damage causes xerostomia and dysphagia depends on the evidence for dose–response relationships for the organs causing these sequellae. This paper discusses the evidence for the contribution of radiotherapy to xerostomia via damage of the major salivary glands (parotid and submandibular) and minor salivary glands within the oral cavity, and the contribution of radiotherapy-related effect on important swallowing structures causing dysphagia. Recommendations for dose limits to these organs, based on measurements of xerostomia and dysphagia following radiotherapy, are provided here. PMID:27538846

  3. Left ventricular assist device hemolysis leading to dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Wuschek, Alexander; Iqbal, Sara; Estep, Jerry; Quigley, Eamonn; Richards, David

    2015-05-14

    A 41-year-old man with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device presented for evaluation of dysphagia and dark urine. He was found to have a significantly elevated L-lactate dehydrogenase and an elevated plasma free hemoglobin consistent with intravascular hemolysis. After the hemolysis ceased, both the black urine and dysphagia resolved spontaneously. Transient esophageal dysfunction, as a manifestation of gastrointestinal dysmotility, is known to occur in the setting of hemolysis. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is another recognized cause of massive hemolysis with gastrointestinal dysmotility occurring in 25%-35% of patients during a paroxysm. Intravascular hemolysis increases plasma free hemoglobin, which scavenges nitric oxide (NO), an important second messenger for smooth muscle cell relaxation. The decrease in NO can lead to esophageal spasm and resultant dysphagia. In our patient the resolution of hemolysis resulted in resolution of dysphagia. PMID:25987800

  4. IMRT for head and neck cancer: reducing xerostomia and dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Wang, XiaoShen; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2016-08-01

    Dysphagia and xerostomia are the main sequellae of chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer, and the main factors in reducing long-term patient quality of life. IMRT uses advanced technology to focus the high radiation doses on the targets and avoid irradiation of non-involved tissues. The decisions about sparing organs and tissues whose damage causes xerostomia and dysphagia depends on the evidence for dose-response relationships for the organs causing these sequellae. This paper discusses the evidence for the contribution of radiotherapy to xerostomia via damage of the major salivary glands (parotid and submandibular) and minor salivary glands within the oral cavity, and the contribution of radiotherapy-related effect on important swallowing structures causing dysphagia. Recommendations for dose limits to these organs, based on measurements of xerostomia and dysphagia following radiotherapy, are provided here. PMID:27538846

  5. Left ventricular assist device hemolysis leading to dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Wuschek, Alexander; Iqbal, Sara; Estep, Jerry; Quigley, Eamonn; Richards, David

    2015-01-01

    A 41-year-old man with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device presented for evaluation of dysphagia and dark urine. He was found to have a significantly elevated L-lactate dehydrogenase and an elevated plasma free hemoglobin consistent with intravascular hemolysis. After the hemolysis ceased, both the black urine and dysphagia resolved spontaneously. Transient esophageal dysfunction, as a manifestation of gastrointestinal dysmotility, is known to occur in the setting of hemolysis. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is another recognized cause of massive hemolysis with gastrointestinal dysmotility occurring in 25%-35% of patients during a paroxysm. Intravascular hemolysis increases plasma free hemoglobin, which scavenges nitric oxide (NO), an important second messenger for smooth muscle cell relaxation. The decrease in NO can lead to esophageal spasm and resultant dysphagia. In our patient the resolution of hemolysis resulted in resolution of dysphagia. PMID:25987800

  6. Dysphagia Secondary to Anterior Osteophytes of the Cervical Spine.

    PubMed

    Egerter, Alexander C; Kim, Eric S; Lee, Darrin J; Liu, Jonathan J; Cadena, Gilbert; Panchal, Ripul R; Kim, Kee D

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) or Forestier disease involves hyperostosis of the spinal column. Hyperostosis involving the anterior margin of the cervical vertebrae can cause dysphonia, dyspnea, and/or dysphagia. However, the natural history pertaining to the risk factors remain unknown. We present the surgical management of two cases of dysphagia secondary to cervical hyperostosis and discuss the etiology and management of DISH based on the literature review. Methods This is a retrospective review of two patients with DISH and anterior cervical osteophytes. We reviewed the preoperative and postoperative images and clinical history. Results Two patients underwent anterior cervical osteophytectomies due to severe dysphagia. At more than a year follow-up, both patients noted improvement in swallowing as well as their associated pain. Conclusion The surgical removal of cervical osteophytes can be highly successful in treating dysphagia if refractory to prolonged conservative therapy. PMID:26430607

  7. A Targeted Swallow Screen for the Detection of Postoperative Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Gee, Erica; Lancaster, Elizabeth; Meltzer, Jospeh; Mendelsohn, Abie H; Benharash, Peyman

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative dysphagia leads to aspiration pneumonia, prolonged hospital stay, and is associated with increased mortality. A simple and sensitive screening test to identify patients requiring objective dysphagia evaluation is presently lacking. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of a novel targeted swallow screen evaluation. This was a prospective trial involving all adult patients who underwent elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at our institution over an 8-week period. Within 24 hours of extubation and before the initiation of oral intake, all postsurgical patients were evaluated using the targeted swallow screen. A fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing was requested for failed screenings. During the study, 50 postcardiac surgery patients were screened. Fifteen (30%) failed the targeted swallow screen, and ten of the fifteen (66%) failed the subsequent fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing exam and were confirmed to have dysphagia. The screening test had 100 per cent sensitivity for detecting dysphagia in our patient population, and a specificity of 87.5 per cent. The overall incidence of dysphagia was 20 per cent. We have shown that a targeted swallow evaluation can efficiently screen patients during the postcardiac surgery period. Furthermore, we have shown that the true incidence of dysphagia after cardiac surgery is significantly higher than previously recognized in literature. PMID:26463293

  8. Oropharyngeal dysphagia: surveying practice patterns of the speech-language pathologist.

    PubMed

    Martino, Rosemary; Pron, Gaylene; Diamant, Nicholas E

    2004-01-01

    The present study was designed to obtain a comprehensive view of the dysphagia assessment practice patterns of speech-language pathologists and their opinion on the importance of these practices using survey methods and taking into consideration clinician, patient, and practice-setting variables. A self-administered mail questionnaire was developed following established methodology to maximize response rates. Eight dysphagia experts independently rated the new survey for content validity. Test-retest reliability was assessed with a random sample of 23 participants. The survey was sent to 50 speech-language pathologists randomly selected from the Canadian professional association database of members who practice in dysphagia. Surveys were mailed according to the Dillman Total Design Method and included an incentive offer. High survey (64%) and item response (95%) rates were achieved and clinicians were reliable reporters of their practice behaviors (ICC>0.60). Of all the clinical assessment items, 36% were reported with high (>80%) utilization and 24% with low (<20%) utilization, the former pertaining to tongue motion and vocal quality after food/fluid intake and the latter to testing of oral sensation without food. One-third (33%) of instrumental assessment items were highly utilized and included assessment of bolus movement and laryngeal response to bolus misdirection. Overall, clinician experience and teaching institutions influenced greater utilization. Opinions of importance were similar to utilization behaviors (r = 0.947, p = 0.01). Of all patients referred for dysphagia assessment, full clinical assessments were administered to 71% of patients but instrumental assessments to only 36%. A hierarchical model of practice behavior is proposed to explain this pattern of progressively decreasing item utilization. PMID:15383946

  9. Further delineation of the G syndrome: a manageable genetic cause of infantile dysphagia.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, G N; Oliver, W J

    1988-01-01

    Three families including five subjects with the G or Opitz-Frias syndrome are added to 23 published cases who had dysphagia; characteristics of the two affected relatives were added to 19 well documented published reports. The data from index cases support the concept of the G syndrome as a constellation of midline defects, which include hypertelorism or telecanthus (89%), oesophageal dysmotility (69%), laryngotracheal clefts (44%), cleft palate or bifid uvula (34%), heart defects (29%), hypospadias (100% of males), renal or ureteral anomalies (42%), and mental retardation (38%). Affected relatives, often identified by hypertelorism, dysphagia, or hypospadias, had a much lower incidence of associated defects and mental retardation. They provide a more rounded but still biased view of a syndrome compatible with normal intelligence and life span. The data do not support a highly characteristic face in the G syndrome, which discriminates it from the phenotypically similar BBB syndrome. The variable expressivity and five cases of male to male transmission observed in 18 families are consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance. Vigilance for the morphological characteristics of G syndrome in patients with dysphagia is underscored by the potential for normal development with appropriate intervention. Images PMID:3351901

  10. Oral Burning With Dysphagia and Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Seccia, Teresa Maria; Rossitto, Giacomo; Calò, Lorenzo A.; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by an abnormal pain regulation. Widespread pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance are the prevalent symptoms. When unusual symptoms are overbearingly predominant at clinical presentation, the diagnosis becomes challenging. We report on the case of a patient with fibromyalgia, who presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and glossodynia as prevalent symptoms. Difficulty in swallowing gradually developed over a month prior hospitalization, and worsened progressively so that nourishment and fluid intake were impeded. Because anemia with mild iron deficiency was found, esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed, but no lesions were seen in the upper digestive tract. Levels of zinc and vitamin B12 were normal. Intense pain at pelvis and the inferior limbs, which was at a first glance referred to as osteoarthrosis, associated with oral symptoms and feeling of being in the clouds allowed us to diagnose fibromyalgia. Amitriptyline was used, with relief of symptoms. Although oropharyngeal symptoms were occasionally reported in fibromyalgia, they are often overlooked. The present case, therefore, testifies the need to consider the diagnosis of fibromyalgia when the patient presents with such symptoms that cannot be readily explained on other grounds. PMID:26252275

  11. Oral Burning With Dysphagia and Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Seccia, Teresa Maria; Rossitto, Giacomo; Calò, Lorenzo A; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2015-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by an abnormal pain regulation. Widespread pain, fatigue, and sleep disturbance are the prevalent symptoms. When unusual symptoms are overbearingly predominant at clinical presentation, the diagnosis becomes challenging.We report on the case of a patient with fibromyalgia, who presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and glossodynia as prevalent symptoms. Difficulty in swallowing gradually developed over a month prior hospitalization, and worsened progressively so that nourishment and fluid intake were impeded.Because anemia with mild iron deficiency was found, esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed, but no lesions were seen in the upper digestive tract. Levels of zinc and vitamin B12 were normal. Intense pain at pelvis and the inferior limbs, which was at a first glance referred to as osteoarthrosis, associated with oral symptoms and feeling of being in the clouds allowed us to diagnose fibromyalgia. Amitriptyline was used, with relief of symptoms.Although oropharyngeal symptoms were occasionally reported in fibromyalgia, they are often overlooked. The present case, therefore, testifies the need to consider the diagnosis of fibromyalgia when the patient presents with such symptoms that cannot be readily explained on other grounds. PMID:26252275

  12. Palliative laser therapy for malignant dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Krasner, N; Barr, H; Skidmore, C; Morris, A I

    1987-07-01

    Seventy six patients with dysphagia caused by malignant tumours of the oesophagus or gastric cardia have been treated using the Neodymium Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (NdYag) laser. The laser was set to deliver 80-100 watts of power for 0.5-1 second pulses. To obtain improvement, patients on average needed four treatment sessions with a mean energy per treatment of 3586 joules. Follow up endoscopy and laser treatment was at four week intervals, unless the clinical or endoscopic results indicated otherwise. The immediate result was to allow 32% of patients to swallow anything they liked, a further 54% were able to take most solids and 9% were improved, or maintained on liquids only. The mortality of laser recanalisation and associated treatment was 5%. The improvement in swallowing was maintained until death in all but 15% of these patients, some of the 15% needed intubation to allow adequate swallowing. Endoscopic, or surgical intubation was required immediately in five patients after an initial laser course failed to provide improvement. The mean survival of the whole group was 19 weeks (range one to 112 weeks). PMID:2443430

  13. Swallowing Kinematics and Factors Associated with Laryngeal Penetration and Aspiration in Stroke Survivors with Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo; Han, Tai Ryoon

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate swallowing kinematics and explore kinematic factors related with penetration-aspiration in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. Videofluoroscopic images of 68 patients with post-stroke dysphagia and 34 sex- and age-matched healthy controls swallowing a thin liquid were quantitatively analyzed using two-dimensional motion digitization. The measurements included the movement distances and velocities of the hyoid and larynx, and the maximal tilt angles and angular velocities of the epiglottis. All velocity variables were significantly decreased in the stroke patients compared to the controls. There was a significant difference in the maximal horizontal displacement of the larynx, but there were no significant differences in other displacements of the larynx, the maximal displacements of the hyoid bone, and the maximum tilt angle of the epiglottis between the two groups. The maximal tilt angle of the epiglottis was lower in the aspiration subgroup than in the no penetration/aspiration and penetration subgroups as well as the controls. The maximal tilt angle from the y axis showed a dichotomous pattern at 90° of the angle, and all 11 patients with an angle <90° showed either penetration or aspiration. In the ROC curve of the angle for prediction of aspiration, the area under the curve was 0.725 (95 % CI 0.557-0.892, P = 0.008). This study suggested that sluggish rather than decreased hyolaryngeal movements during swallowing are a remarkable feature of post-stroke dysphagia. The association of reduced epiglottic movement with the risk of aspiration in patients with post-stroke dysphagia was supported by the quantitative analysis. PMID:26590571

  14. [Role of the nutritional support team in the management of dysphagia].

    PubMed

    García-Peris, Pilar; Velasco, Cristina; Frías Soriano, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia is a highly prevalent symptom, which may be due to multiple disease processes, both structural and functional, and located at the oropharyngeal or esophageal level. Oropharyngeal dysphagia can cause malnutrition even in 1/3 of patients as a result of alterations in the efficiency of swallowing and cause changes in the security of swallowing (penetration and aspiration) in up to 2/3 of the patients who present it, with high risk of aspiration pneumonia and respiratory infections. In neurological, elderly or institutionalized patients its prevalence may range from 30 to 60%, with different degrees of severity that may become necessary artificial nutrition. It is also related to greater disability, prolonged hospital stays and increased mortality. Therefore, early diagnosis is critical and the establishment of an effective treatment that includes postural exercises, nutritional support and rehabilitation. All this wouldn't be possible without a nutritional team that takes part of the multidisciplinary team patients with dysphagia required. It is the only way to ensure a longterm care to these patients in order to decrease the morbidity and mortality. PMID:25077338

  15. Dysphagia after antireflux fundoplication: endoscopic, radiological and manometric evaluation

    PubMed Central

    MORAIS, Drausio Jeferson; LOPES, Luiz Roberto; ANDREOLLO, Nelson Adami

    2014-01-01

    Background The transient dysphagia after fundoplication is common and most often disappears until six weeks postoperatively. Aim Analyze a group of patients who presented late and persistent dysphagia postoperatively. Methods Forty-one patients after Nissen fundoplication, 14 male and 27 female, mean age 48 year, were evaluated based on medical history, esophagogastroduodenoscopy, contrast radiographic examination and esophageal manometry. The results were compared with another 19 asymptomatic individuals. Results Contrast radiographic examination of the esophagus revealed in six cases delayed emptying, characterizing that four patients had achalasia and two diffuse spasm of the esophagus. Esophageal manometry showed that maximal expiratory pressure of the lower sphincter ranged from 10 to 38 mmHg and mean respiratory pressure from 14 to 47 mmHg, values similar to controls. Residual pressure ranged from 5 to 31 mmHg, and 17 patients had the same values as the control group. Conclusion The residual pressure of the lower sphincter was higher and statistically significant in patients with dysphagia compared with those operated without dysphagia. Future studies individualizing and categorizing each motility disorder, employing other techniques of manometry, and the analysis of the residual pressure may contribute to understand of persistent dysphagia in the postoperative fundoplication. PMID:25626933

  16. Food Culture, Preferences and Ethics in Dysphagia Management.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Belinda

    2015-11-01

    Adults with dysphagia experience difficulties swallowing food and fluids with potentially harmful health and psychosocial consequences. Speech pathologists who manage patients with dysphagia are frequently required to address ethical issues when patients' food culture and/ or preferences are inconsistent with recommended diets. These issues incorporate complex links between food, identity and social participation. A composite case has been developed to reflect ethical issues identified by practising speech pathologists for the purposes of illustrating ethical concerns in dysphagia management. The case examines a speech pathologist's role in supporting patient autonomy when patients and carers express different goals and values. The case presents a 68-year-old man of Australian/Italian heritage with severe swallowing impairment and strong values attached to food preferences. The case is examined through application of the dysphagia algorithm, a tool for shared decision-making when patients refuse dietary modifications. Case analysis revealed the benefits and challenges of shared decision-making processes in dysphagia management. Four health professional skills and attributes were identified as synonymous with shared decision making: communication, imagination, courage and reflection. PMID:26481206

  17. Application of ultrasonography in assessing oropharyngeal dysphagia in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ming-Yen; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Chen, Wen-Shiang; Chang, Hui-Ya; Wang, Tyng-Guey

    2012-09-01

    This study applied submental ultrasonography (SUS) to measure changes in dysphagic stroke patients' tongue thickness and hyoid bone displacement when swallowing 5 mL of water and correlated the results with the severity of clinical dysphagia. We included 60 stroke patients (30 tube-feeding-dependent and 30 on regular oral intake) and 30 healthy controls. An additional 10 healthy people were recruited to assess the reliability of SUS. Measurements of hyoid bone displacement using videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and SUS were compared for 12 stroke patients to assess the correlation between the two methods. Changes in tongue thickness and hyoid bone displacement were significantly less in the tube-feeding group. Those with a tongue thickness change of less than 1.0 cm and hyoid bone displacement of less than 1.5 cm were likely to be tube-feeding. SUS showed good intra-rater/inter-rater reliability and correlated well with VFSS measurement. SUS can be an adjunct assessment tool of swallowing. PMID:22698507

  18. A latent variable transformation model approach for exploring dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Snavely, Anna C; Harrington, David P; Li, Yi

    2014-11-10

    Multiple outcomes are often collected in applications where the quantity of interest cannot be measured directly or is difficult or expensive to measure. In a head and neck cancer study conducted at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the investigators wanted to determine the effect of clinical and treatment factors on unobservable dysphagia through collected multiple outcomes of mixed types. Latent variable models are commonly adopted in this setting. These models stipulate that multiple collected outcomes are conditionally independent given the latent factor. Mixed types of outcomes (e.g., continuous vs. ordinal) and censored outcomes present statistical challenges, however, as a natural analog of the multivariate normal distribution does not exist for mixed data. Recently, Lin et al. proposed a semiparametric latent variable transformation model for mixed outcome data; however, it may not readily accommodate event time outcomes where censoring is present. In this paper, we extend the work of Lin et al. by proposing both semiparametric and parametric latent variable models that allow for the estimation of the latent factor in the presence of measurable outcomes of mixed types, including censored outcomes. Both approaches allow for a direct estimate of the treatment (or other covariate) effect on the unobserved latent variable, greatly enhancing the interpretability of the models. The semiparametric approach has the added advantage of allowing the relationship between the measurable outcomes and latent variables to be unspecified, rendering more robust inference. The parametric and semiparametric models can also be used together, providing a comprehensive modeling strategy for complicated latent variable problems. PMID:24974798

  19. Dysphagia After Chemoradiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Dose-Effect Relationships for the Swallowing Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dirix, Piet Abbeel, Sarah; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Hermans, Robert; Nuyts, Sandra

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate late dysphagia after chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma, and to examine its correlation with clinical and dosimetric parameters. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients, treated with radiotherapy (70-72 Gy) and concomitant chemotherapy (cisplatinum 100 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks) between 2004 and 2007, were examined. Swallowing was evaluated by four quality-of-life questionnaires: EORTC C30 and H and N35, the Performance Status Scale of List, and the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory. Clinical and dosimetric parameters were correlated with late dysphagia. Results: A total of 53 disease-free patients were evaluated; mean follow-up was 20.4 months (range, 6-45 months). The volume of the middle pharyngeal constrictor muscle receiving {>=}50 Gy (p = 0.04), the mean dose to this structure (p = 0.02) and to the supraglottic larynx (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with late swallowing problems at univariate analysis, along with tumor localization (p = 0.008), T-classification (p = 0.02), and pretreatment swallowing problems (p = 0.01). Only this last factor significantly correlated with late dysphagia at multivariate analysis. Conclusion: These findings motivate further efforts to reduce the dose to the swallowing structures, especially to the pharyngeal constrictor muscles and the larynx. However, clinical parameters are also important and should be included in future prospective trials.

  20. Rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review of the speech therapy approach

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Gisela Carmona; Santos, Rosane Sampaio

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: There are an estimated 30,000–40,000 new cases of cerebral palsy per year in Brazil. Motor disorders caused by cerebral palsy can lead to dysphagia as they may alter the preparatory, oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal phases. Aim: To identify existing rehabilitation methods of swallowing disorders in cerebral palsy, with emphasis on the pursuit of research using the Bobath concept, the Castillo Morales concept, oral sensorimotor therapy, and continuing education. Summary of the findings: We performed a systematic review of the medical and speech therapy literature on the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy spanning 1977–2010 and from all languages and nations. Among the 310 articles retrieved, only 22 (7.09%) addressed therapeutic rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in children with cerebral palsy. Of the 22 reports, 12 (54.5%) were from Canada, 3 (13.6%) were from Japan, 2 (9%) were from Brazil, 2 (9%) were from Germany, 1 (4.5%) was from the USA, 1 (4.5%) was from the United Kingdom, and 1 (4.5%) was from Poland. Of these reports, 63.6% used oral sensorimotor therapy as a therapeutic method, 36.3% reported continuing education as a therapeutic approach, and only 18.1% and 9% used the Bobath concept and Castillo Morales concept, respectively. Conclusion: Even with a constantly increasing cerebral palsy population, few studies include (re)habilitation in the treatment of oropharyngeal dysphagia in these children. PMID:25991964

  1. Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: Pretreatment Evaluation, Predictive Factors, and Assessment during Radio-Chemotherapy, Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Merlano, Marco C.; Russi, Elvio G.

    2013-01-01

    Progress in head and neck cancer (HNC) therapies has improved tumor response, loco-regional control, and survival. However, treatment intensification also increases early and late toxicities. Dysphagia is an underestimated symptom in HNC patients. Impairment of swallowing process could cause malnutrition, dehydration, aspiration, and pneumonia. A comprehensive literature review finalized in May 2012 included searches of electronic databases (Medline, Embase, and CAB abstracts) and scientific societies meetings materials (American Society of Clinical Oncology, Associazione Italiana Radioterapia Oncologica, Associazione Italiana di Oncologia Cervico-Cefalica, American Head and Neck Society, and European Society for Medical Oncology). Hand-searches of HNC journals and reference lists were carried out. Approximately one-third of dysphagia patients developed pneumonia requiring treatment. Aspiration pneumonia associated mortality ranged from 20% to 65%. Unidentified dysphagia caused significant morbidity, increased mortality, and decreased the quality of life. In this review we underline definition, causes, predictive factors of dysphagia and report on pretreatment and on-treatment evaluation, suggesting some key points to avoid underestimation. A multi-parameter assessment of swallowing problems may allow an earlier diagnosis. An appropriate evaluation might lead to a better treatment of both symptoms and cancer. PMID:24069513

  2. Neural Mechanisms Contributing to Dysphagia in Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Hinkel, Cameron J; Sharma, Rishi; Thakkar, Mahesh M; Takahashi, Kazutaka; Hopewell, Bridget L; Lever, Teresa E

    2016-08-01

    Investigative research into curative treatments for dysphagia is hindered by our incomplete understanding of the neural mechanisms of swallowing in health and disease. Development of translational research models is essential to bridge this knowledge gap by fostering innovative methodology. Toward this goal, our laboratory has developed a translational research assessment tool to investigate the neural mechanistic control of swallowing in unrestrained, self-feeding mice. Here we describe our initial development of synchronous brainstem neural recordings with a videofluoroscopic swallow study assay in healthy mice across the life span. Refinement of this combined methodology is currently underway. Ultimately, we envision that this assessment tool will permit systematic analysis of therapeutic interventions for dysphagia in preclinical trials with numerous mouse models of human conditions that cause dysphagia, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, stroke, and advanced aging. PMID:27048676

  3. Videofluoroscopic predictors of aspiration in patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Perlman, A L; Booth, B M; Grayhack, J P

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relationship between aspiration and seven other variables indicative of pharyngeal stage dysphagia. Additionally, we looked at the relationship between aspiration and oral stage dysphagia. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified five independent predictors of aspiration that were significant at the p = 0.05 level: vallecular stasis, reduced hyoid elevation, deviant epiglottic function, diffuse hypopharyngeal stasis, and delayed initiation of the pharyngeal stage of the swallow. A linear trend was observed in that, as the severity of vallecular stasis, pyriform sinus stasis, diffuse hypopharyngeal stasis, or delayed initiation of the pharyngeal stage of the swallow increased, the proportion of patients who aspirated also increased. A stepwise logistic regression model furnished estimates of the odds ratio for each independent variable and can be used by clinicians to calculate the risk of aspiration in patients who demonstrate pharyngeal stage dysphagia. PMID:8005013

  4. Clozapine-induced dysphagia with secondary substantial weight loss.

    PubMed

    Osman, Mugtaba; Devadas, Vekneswaran

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is listed as a 'rare' side effect following clozapine treatment. In this case report, we describe how significant clozapine-induced dysphagia has led to significant reduction of nutritional intake with subsequent substantial weight loss. An 18-year-old single man with an established diagnosis of treatment-resistant paranoid schizophrenia recovered well on a therapeutic dose of clozapine. However, he was noted to lose weight significantly (up to 20% of his original weight) as the dose was uptitrated. This was brought about by development of dysphagia, likely to be due to clozapine. Addition of nutritional supplementary liquids and initiation of a modified behavioural dietary/swallowing programme, while repeatedly mastering the Mendelsohn manoeuvre technique, alleviated the swallowing difficulties and restored his weight. PMID:27543610

  5. A very unusual cause of dysphagia: mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zullo, Angelo; Cerro, Paola; Chios, Anastassios; Andriani, Alessandro; Balsamo, Giuseppina; Francesco, Vincenzo De; Bruzzese, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is an alarm symptom requiring a prompt investigation. Different benign and malignant diseases may present such a symptom. We describe a case of a 79-year-old patient who complained of fluctuating dysphagia episodes following solid food ingestion in the previous 5 months with mild weight loss. No other gastrointestinal symptoms were present. The patient was referred by the General Practitioner for a videofluoroscopic swallow examination which revealed nodularity of mucosa surface in the oropharynx, esophagus, fundus, and gastric body. Upper endoscopy confirmed the feature, also showing a normal mucosa of the antrum and duodenum. The histological examination revealed a mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). A stage III, MCL involving the esophagus and proximal stomach was eventually diagnosed. Esophageal MCL localization is extremely rare, and this is the first report showing a clinical onset with dysphagia. PMID:27366047

  6. Dysphagia in the setting of left ventricular assist device hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Mentz, Robert J; Schlendorf, Kelly; Hernandez, Adrian F; Milano, Carmelo A; Felker, G Michael; Blue, Laura J; Schroder, Jacob N; Rogers, Joseph G; Patel, Chetan B

    2013-01-01

    A 69-year-old man with advanced heart failure treated with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device presented for evaluation of dark urine and severe dysphagia. Because of evidence of ongoing intravascular hemolysis with device dysfunction, there was a clinical suspicion for pump thrombosis. He had progressive end-organ dysfunction and was therefore treated with tissue plasminogen activator with prompt resolution in hemolysis and dysphagia. Although symptoms of smooth muscle dystonia could represent worsening heart failure in the setting of device failure, the observation may also be related to intravascular hemolysis as described in the prototypic hemolytic disease, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. PMID:23644623

  7. Family Perceptions of Facilitators and Inhibitors of Effective School-Based Dysphagia Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angell, Maureen E.; Bailey, Rita L.; Stoner, Julia B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This qualitative study focused on the perceptions of family members of children with dysphagia by asking what the family-identified factors are that facilitate or inhibit effective school-based management of pediatric dysphagia. Method: Semistructured interviews of 7 family members of 6 children with dysphagia, ages 2 through 11 years,…

  8. Serving Students with Dysphagia in the Schools? Educational Preparation Is Essential!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power-deFur, Lissa

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the rise of students with dysphagia in schools and addresses issues associated with serving students with dysphagia in the public education setting. The role and preparation of the speech-language pathologist is serving children with dysphagia, and the accompanying continuing education and ethical requirements, are outlined.…

  9. Development of an Interdisciplinary Dysphagia Team in the Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homer, Emily M.; Bickerton, Cheryl; Hill, Sherry; Parham, Lisa; Taylor, Darlene

    2000-01-01

    This article describes the development of a school-based dysphagia team (swallowing action team (SWAT)) in Louisiana. It addresses how the team was initially formed, the process of identifying students who were exhibiting a swallowing disorder, steps taken for staff development, and problems encountered in seeking administrative approval.…

  10. Identification and Management of Dysphagia in the Public Schools: Epilogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logemann, Jeri A.; O'Toole, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    This epilogue to a series of articles on the management of dysphagia in students and the role of speech-pathologists emphasizes the need for a team approach to the management of children with swallowing disorders and the importance of interaction between clinicians in the school setting and clinicians in medical environments. (CR)

  11. Chronic dysphagia and trigeminal anesthesia after trichloroethylene exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, W.H.; Partyka, E.K.

    1981-12-01

    A patient is described who inhaled trichloroethylene fumes while working in a closed underground pit. At the time of exposure he developed dysphagia, dysarthria and dyspnea. Assessment of his condition 11 years after the incident indicated major damage of cranial nerves, particularly the trigeminal, chronic involvement of the bulbar cranial nerves, and resultant esophageal and pharnygeal motility impairment. (JMT)

  12. Identification and Management of Dysphagia in the Public Schools: Prologue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logemann, Jeri A.; O'Toole, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    This introductory article describes following articles (EC 625 128-134) that address processes and issues related to offering care for children with swallowing disorders in the public school. Procedures for screening, assessing, and treatment, issues involved in establishing a dysphagia program in a school system, and legal and ethical issues are…

  13. Effectiveness of Dysphagia Training for Adult Learning Disabilities Support Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tredinnick, Gerlind; Cocks, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a 1-day dysphagia training package delivered to support workers who work with adults with a learning disability. Thirty-eight support staff took part in this study. Twenty-five support staff received training, and 13 did not receive training and therefore acted as a control group. Three questionnaires…

  14. A Descriptive Investigation of Dysphagia in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Jolliffe, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia has rarely been investigated in adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) despite being a serious condition affecting health and quality of life. Method: This study collected information about 101 adults with ID, living in community settings, referred for an assessment of their eating and drinking. Ninety-nine people were…

  15. Carers' experiences of dysphagia in people treated for head and neck cancer: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Nund, Rebecca L; Ward, Elizabeth C; Scarinci, Nerina A; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V

    2014-08-01

    The implication of dysphagia for people treated nonsurgically for head and neck cancer (HNC) and its detrimental effects on functioning and quality of life has been well documented. To date, however, there has been a paucity of research on the effects of dysphagia following HNC on carers, independent of the consequences of a gastrostomy. The objective of this qualitative study was to report on the experiences of carers of people with dysphagia (non-gastrostomy dependent) following nonsurgical treatment for HNC and to identify the support needs of this group. A purposive, maximum-variation sampling technique was adopted to recruit 12 carers of people treated curatively for HNC since 2007. Each participated in an in-depth interview, detailing their experience of caring for someone with dysphagia and the associated impact on their life. Thematic analysis was adopted to search the transcripts for key phases and themes that emerged from the discussions. Analysis of the transcripts revealed four themes: (1) dysphagia disrupts daily life, (2) carers make adjustments to adapt to their partner's dysphagia, (3) the disconnect between carers' expectations and the reality of dysphagia, and (4) experiences of dysphagia-related services and informal supports. Carers generally felt ill-prepared for their role in dysphagia management. The qualitative methodology successfully described the impact of dysphagia on the everyday lives of carers, particularly in regard to meal preparation, social events, and family lifestyle. Clinicians should provide adequate and timely training and support to carers and view carers as copartners in dysphagia management. PMID:24844768

  16. Screening for oropharyngeal dysphagia in stroke: insufficient evidence for guidelines.

    PubMed

    Martino, R; Pron, G; Diamant, N

    2000-01-01

    There is no evaluation of the evidence for the screening of oropharyngeal dysphagia in stroke. We reviewed the literature on clinical screening for oropharyngeal dysphagia in adults with stroke to determine (a) the accuracy of different screening tests used to detect dysphagia defined by abnormal oropharyngeal physiology on videofluoroscopy and (b) the health outcomes reported and whether screening alters those outcomes. Peer-reviewed English-language and human studies were sought through Medline (from 1966 to July 1997) by using the key words cerebrovascular disorders and deglutition disorders, relevant Internet addresses, and extensive hand searching of bibliographies of identified articles. Of the 154 sources identified, 89 articles were original, peer-reviewed, and focused on oropharyngeal dysphagia in stroke patients. To evaluate the evidence, the next selection identified 10 articles on the comparison of screening and videofluoroscopic findings and three articles on screening and health outcomes. Evidence was rated according to the level of study design by using the values of the Canadian Task Force on Periodic Health Examination. From the identified screening tests, most of the screenings were related to laryngeal signs (63%) and most of the outcomes were related to physiology (74%). Evidence for screening accuracy was limited because of poor study design and the predominant use of aspiration as the diagnostic reference. Only two screening tests were identified as accurate: failure on the 50-ml water test (likelihood ratio = 5.7, 95% confidence interval = 2.5-12.9) and impaired pharyngeal sensation (likelihood ratio = 2.5, 95% confidence interval = 1.7-3.7). Limited evidence for screening benefit suggested a reduction in pneumonia, length of hospital stay, personnel costs, and patient charges. In conclusion, screening accuracy needs to be assessed by using both abnormal physiology and aspiration as diagnostic markers for dysphagia. Large well-designed trials

  17. Hypnobehavioral approaches for school-age children with dysphagia and food aversion: a case series.

    PubMed

    Culbert, T P; Kajander, R L; Kohen, D P; Reaney, J B

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe hypnobehavioral treatment of five school-age children with maladaptive eating behaviors, including functional dysphagia, food aversion, globus hystericus, and conditioned fear of eating (phagophobia). The unique treatment approach described emphasizes the successful use of self-management techniques, particularly hypnosis, by all five children. Common etiological factors, treatment strategies, and proposed mechanisms of change are discussed. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first such case series in the mainstream pediatric literature describing the use of a hypnobehavioral approach for children with these maladaptive eating problems. PMID:8897222

  18. Safety of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement in patients with continuous-flow ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Keshmiri, Hesam; Yousuf, Tariq; Issa, Rasha; Kurien, Sudha; Silva, Roeglio

    2016-06-01

    In this retrospective study, the safety of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube placement was evaluated as maintaining adequate nutritional support for patients with left ventricular assist devices is crucial. Nineteen patients who underwent PEG tube placement were followed for an average of 40 days. Overall, minor complications such as infections, bleeding, and PEG tube malposition occurred in just 19% of patients while the rate of major complications such as perforation was 5%. Further randomized control trials are necessary to validate this assertion that the safety of PEG placement in patients with left ventricular assist devices is similar to that of the general population. PMID:27101842

  19. Postoperative dysphagia correlates with increased morbidity, mortality, and costs in anterior cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jacob R; Smith, Brandon W; Mummaneni, Praveen V; La Marca, Frank; Park, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Anterior cervical fusion (ACF) after discectomy and/or corpectomy is a common procedure with traditionally good patient outcomes. Though typically mild, postoperative dysphagia can result in significant patient morbidity. In this study, we examine the relationship between postoperative dysphagia and in-hospital outcomes, readmissions, and overall costs. The University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) database was utilized to perform a retrospective cohort study of all adults who underwent a principal procedure of ACF of the anterior column (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9] procedure code 81.02) between 2013 and 2015. Patients with a diagnosis of dysphagia (ICD-9 78720-78729) were compared to those without. Patient demographics, length of stay, in-hospital mortality, 30-day readmissions, and direct costs were recorded. A total of 49,300 patients who underwent ACF were identified. Mean age was 54.5years and 50.2% were male. Dysphagia was documented in 3,137 patients (6.4%) during their hospital stay. Patients with dysphagia had an average 2.1 comorbidities, while patients without dysphagia had 1.5 (p<0.01). Mean length of stay was 6.38days in patients with dysphagia, and 2.13days in those without (p<0.01). In-hospital mortality was 0.10% in patients without dysphagia, and 0.61% in those with dysphagia (p<0.01). Direct costs were $13,099 in patients without dysphagia, and $21,245 in those with dysphagia (p<0.01). Thirty-day readmission rate was 2.9% in patients without dysphagia, and 5.3% in those with dysphagia (p=0.01). In summary, dysphagia in patients who undergo ACF correlates with significantly increased length of stay, 30-day readmissions, and in-hospital mortality. Direct costs are similarly increased as a result. PMID:27234612

  20. Exploring scale-up, spread, and sustainability: an instrumental case study tracing an innovation to enhance dysphagia care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adoption, adaptation, scale-up, spread, and sustainability are ill-defined, undertheorised, and little-researched implementation science concepts. An instrumental case study will track the adoption and adaptation, or not, of a locally developed innovation about dysphagia as a patient safety issue. The case study will examine a conceptual framework with a continuum of spread comprising hierarchical control or ‘making it happen’, participatory adaptation or ‘help it happen’, and facilitated evolution or ‘let it happen’. Methods This case study is a prospective, longitudinal design using mixed methods. The fifteen-month (October 2012 to December 2013) instrumental case study is set in large, healthcare organisation in England. The innovation refers to introducing a nationally recognised, inter-disciplinary dysphagia competency framework to guide workforce development about fundamental aspects of care. Adoption and adaptation will be examined at an organisational level and along two, contrasting care pathways: stroke and fractured neck of femur. A number of educational interventions will be deployed, including training a cadre of trainers to cascade the essentials of dysphagia management and developing a Dysphagia Toolkit as a learning resource. Mixed methods will be used to investigate scale-up, spread, and sustainability in acute and community settings. A purposive sample of senior managers and clinical leaders will be interviewed to identify path dependency or the context specific particularities of implementation. A pre- and post-evaluation, using mealtime observations and a survey, will investigate the learning effect on staff adherence to patient specific dysphagia recommendations and attitudes towards dysphagia, respectively. Official documents and an ethnographic field journal allow critical junctures, temporal aspects and confounding factors to be explored. Discussion Researching spread and sustainability presents methodological and

  1. Social importance of dysphagia: its impact on diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Farri, A; Accornero, A; Burdese, C

    2007-04-01

    Until now, a limited number of studies have been carried out on the social importance of dysphagia and its consequences on the quality of life. Dysphagia is considered a disabling disorder for the individual from the functional point of view of swallowing, as well as the emotional-relational viewpoint. Aim of the study was to detect both the social consequences and the emotional implications which lead the dysphagic patient to evaluate the worsening of the quality of life after the onset of the disorder and how speech therapy can improve it. A survey was carried out on 73 patients, aged between 40-80 years, who had undergone one of the following operations: ENT, maxillo-facial, neurological and presbiphagic. A questionnaire was prepared comprising 25 questions concerning: medical history, eating habits, personal feelings, information about dysphagia and state of health. Research was carried out on a sample of patients who were still actively working and enjoyed an intense social life; almost 50% were under 60 years of age. After the surgical operation, they were found to be more fragile, lacked self-confidence, with limited social relationships and consequently, a tendency to isolation. Most patients, who had previously considered mealtimes an opportunity to meet others and a social gathering, no longer believed them to be a pleasant aspect of their day on account of the difficulty in swallowing. As a result, food consistency had to be changed and strategies had to be invented in order to make the meal less embarrassing. All patients agree they received, initially, little information on dysphagia. They maintain they benefited from speech therapy re-education and placed their confidence in the doctors who were treating them. Dysphagia is a disorder which has a negative influence on the patient's life, worsening it qualitatively from both a social and an emotional point of view. The patient tends to isolate him/herself, and experiences a sense of discomfort and

  2. An Unusual Cause of Dysphagia: A Large Expectorated Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Aaron S.; Gunasena, Rivindi; Schaefer, Nathan R.; Kennedy, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    Background Vascular malformations are generally detected in childhood or adolescence with first presentations in adulthood being rare. Case Report We report the case of a 52-year-old female with threatened compromise of her airway after expectorating a massive arteriovenous malformation anchored at the supraglottis. The only preceding symptom was dysphagia. The lesion was resected, the patient had a quick recovery, and she has shown no evidence of recurrence. Conclusion Although uncommon, vascular malformations of the supraglottis or hypopharynx should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with dysphagia because of the potential to cause disastrous airway compromise. Although a lesion presenting acutely mandates a definitive airway plan, when clinically possible, computed tomography scan and indirect laryngoscopy can provide useful information for the airway and operative teams. PMID:26130989

  3. Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Dysphagia Caused by Wilson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon Yeong; Yang, Hee Seung; Lee, Seung Hwa; Jeung, Hae Won; Park, Young Ok

    2012-01-01

    Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of abnormal copper metabolism. Although dysphagia is a common complaint of patients with Wilson's disease and pneumonia is an important cause of death in these patients, management of swallowing function has rarely been reported in the context of Wilson's disease. Hence, we report a case of Wilson's disease presenting with dysphagia. A 33-year-old man visited our hospital with a complaint of difficulty in swallowing, since about last 7 years and which had worsened since the last 2-3 months. He was diagnosed with Wilson's disease about 13 years ago. On the initial VFSS, reduced hyoid bone movement, impaired epiglottic movement and moderate amount of residue in the valleculae during the pharyngeal phase were noted. After 10 sessions of neuromuscular electrical stimulation for 1 hour per day, decreased amount of residue was observed in the valleculae during the pharyngeal phase on the follow-up VFSS. PMID:22837979

  4. Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy improves dysphagia after brainstem stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Hong; Bian, Jin-Ling; Meng, Zhi-Hong; Meng, Li-Na; Ren, Xue-Song; Wang, Zhi-Lin; Guo, Xiao-Yan; Shi, Xue-Min

    2016-02-01

    Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy has been shown to effectively treat dysphagia after stroke-based pseudobulbar paralysis. We presumed that this therapy would be effective for dysphagia after bulbar paralysis in patients with brainstem infarction. Sixty-four patients with dysphagia following brainstem infarction were recruited and divided into a medulla oblongata infarction group (n = 22), a midbrain and pons infarction group (n = 16), and a multiple cerebral infarction group (n = 26) according to their magnetic resonance imaging results. All patients received Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture for 28 days. The main acupoints were Neiguan (PC6), Renzhong (DU26), Sanyinjiao (SP6), Fengchi (GB20), Wangu (GB12), and Yifeng (SJ17). Furthermore, the posterior pharyngeal wall was pricked. Before and after treatment, patient swallowing functions were evaluated with the Kubota Water Test, Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale, and the Standard Swallowing Assessment. The Barthel Index was also used to evaluate their quality of life. Results showed that after 28 days of treatment, scores on the Kubota Water Test and Standard Swallowing Assessment had decreased, but scores on the Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale and Barthel Index had increased in each group. The total efficacy rate was 92.2% after treatment, and was most obvious in patients with medulla oblongata infarction (95.9%). These findings suggest that Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy can repair the connection of upper motor neurons to the medulla oblongata motor nucleus, promote the recovery of brainstem infarction, and improve patient's swallowing ability and quality of life. PMID:27073382

  5. Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy improves dysphagia after brainstem stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-hong; Bian, Jin-ling; Meng, Zhi-hong; Meng, Li-na; Ren, Xue-song; Wang, Zhi-lin; Guo, Xiao-yan; Shi, Xue-min

    2016-01-01

    Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy has been shown to effectively treat dysphagia after stroke-based pseudobulbar paralysis. We presumed that this therapy would be effective for dysphagia after bulbar paralysis in patients with brainstem infarction. Sixty-four patients with dysphagia following brainstem infarction were recruited and divided into a medulla oblongata infarction group (n = 22), a midbrain and pons infarction group (n = 16), and a multiple cerebral infarction group (n = 26) according to their magnetic resonance imaging results. All patients received Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture for 28 days. The main acupoints were Neiguan (PC6), Renzhong (DU26), Sanyinjiao (SP6), Fengchi (GB20), Wangu (GB12), and Yifeng (SJ17). Furthermore, the posterior pharyngeal wall was pricked. Before and after treatment, patient swallowing functions were evaluated with the Kubota Water Test, Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale, and the Standard Swallowing Assessment. The Barthel Index was also used to evaluate their quality of life. Results showed that after 28 days of treatment, scores on the Kubota Water Test and Standard Swallowing Assessment had decreased, but scores on the Fujishima Ichiro Rating Scale and Barthel Index had increased in each group. The total efficacy rate was 92.2% after treatment, and was most obvious in patients with medulla oblongata infarction (95.9%). These findings suggest that Tongguan Liqiao acupuncture therapy can repair the connection of upper motor neurons to the medulla oblongata motor nucleus, promote the recovery of brainstem infarction, and improve patient's swallowing ability and quality of life. PMID:27073382

  6. Dysphagia in psychiatric patients: clinical and videofluoroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Bazemore, P H; Tonkonogy, J; Ananth, R

    1991-01-01

    Deaths due to airway obstruction are more common in psychiatric inpatients than in the normal population. A dysphagia program was started in a 400 bed Massachusetts psychiatric hospital after 4 patients in 1 year died from asphyxia. In the year after the program was started, there were no deaths; however, 28 patients experienced 32 choking incidents. The 28 patients received clinical evaluations by speech pathologists, neurologists, psychiatrists, and internists. Of the incidents, 55% required use of the Heimlich maneuver to open the airway. Choking incidents could be classified into five types based on results of clinical examination: bradykinetic, dyskinetic, fast eating syndrome, paralytic, and medical. Twenty-one of the 28 patients were studied by videofluoroscopy and 86% of the videos were abnormal, showing aspiration in eight, webs in five, and delay in the oral phase in five. Patients with bradykinetic dysphagia (secondary to neuroleptic-induced extra-pyramidal syndrome [EPS]) and paralytic dysphagia appeared to experience a more severe form of choking. PMID:1884635

  7. Tongue acupuncture in treatment of post-stroke dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Haiyan; Ma, Benxu; Gao, Xia; Gao, Huanmin

    2015-01-01

    Tongue acupuncture is a technique that treats illness through acupuncture applied to the tongue. This study was designed to assess its therapeutic effects in the treatment of post-stroke dysphagia. A clinical control study was conducted with randomly selected 180 patients with post-stroke dysphagia. The patients were assigned into 2 groups: 90 in the Tongue acupuncture group received tongue acupuncture on the basis of conventional medication, 90 in the conventional acupuncture group received acupuncture on the neck and wrist. Acupoints in the tongue are Juanquan (EX-HN10) (at the midpoint of dorsal raphe of the tongue) and Haiquan (EX-HN11) (Sublingual frenulum midpoint). Acupoits on the body are Fengchi (GB20) and Neiguan (PC6). The effective rate, the national institutes of health stroke scale (NIHSS), TV X-ray fluoroscopy swallowing function (VFSS), the incidence rate of pneumonia were used to evaluate the efficacy after 4 weeks treatment. The NIHSS and VFSS of tongue acupuncture group were improved significantly than that of the conventional group (P < 0.01, respectively). The incidence rate of pneumonia decreased (P < 0. 01). The effective rate of the tongue acupuncture group was higher than that of conventional group (96.67% vs. 66.67%, P < 0. 01). On the basis of the conventional medication, tongue acupuncture would effectively improve the swallow functions, decrease the neurological deficit and reduce the incidence of pneumonia in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. PMID:26550374

  8. Effect of IQoro® training on impaired postural control and oropharyngeal motor function in patients with dysphagia after stroke.

    PubMed

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion All patients with dysphagia after stroke have impaired postural control. IQoro® screen (IQS) training gives a significant and lasting improvement of postural control running parallel with significant improvement of oropharyngeal motor dysfunction (OPMD). Objectives The present investigation aimed at studying the frequency of impaired postural control in patients with stroke-related dysphagia and if IQS training has any effect on impaired postural control in parallel with effect on OPMD. Method A prospective clinical study was carried out with 26 adult patients with stroke-related dysphagia. The training effect was compared between patients consecutively investigated at two different time periods, the first period with 15 patients included in the study more than half a year after stroke, the second period with 11 patients included within 1 month after stroke. Postural control tests and different oropharyngeal motor tests were performed before and after 3 months of oropharyngeal sensorimotor training with an IQS, and at a late follow-up (median 59 weeks after end of training). Result All patients had impaired postural control at baseline. Significant improvement in postural control and OPMD was observed after the completion of IQS training in both intervention groups. The improvements were still present at the late follow-up. PMID:26924256

  9. Dysphagia in stroke, neurodegenerative disease, and advanced dementia.

    PubMed

    Altman, Kenneth W; Richards, Amanda; Goldberg, Leanne; Frucht, Steven; McCabe, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    Aspiration risk from dysphagia increases with central and peripheral neurologic disease. Stroke, microvascular ischemic disease, a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases, and advancing dementia all have unique aspects. However, there are distinct commonalities in this population. Increasing nutritional requirements to stave off oropharyngeal muscular atrophy and a sedentary lifestyle further tax the patient's abilities to safely swallow. This article reviews stroke, muscular dystrophy, myasthenia gravis, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and advanced dementia. Approaches to screening and evaluation, recognizing sentinel indicators of decline that increase aspiration risk, and options for managing global laryngeal dysfunction are also presented. PMID:24262965

  10. Dysphagia Therapy in Stroke: A Survey of Speech and Language Ttherapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, S. K.; Wellwood, I.; Smith, C. H.; Newham, D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia is common after stroke, leading to adverse outcome. There is a paucity of high-quality evidence for dysphagia therapy, thus making it difficult to determine the best approaches to treatment. Clinical decisions are often based on usual practice, however no formal method of monitoring practice patterns exists. Aims: To…

  11. Current Evaluation of Upper Oesophageal Sphincter Opening in Dysphagia Practice: An International SLT Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regan, Julie; Walshe, Margaret; McMahon, Barry P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The assessment of adequate upper oesophageal sphincter (UOS) opening during swallowing is an integral component of dysphagia evaluation. Aims: To ascertain speech and language therapists' (SLTs) satisfaction with current methods for assessing UOS function in people with dysphagia and to identify challenges encountered by SLTs with UOS…

  12. Establishing a Public School Dysphagia Program: A Model for Administration and Service Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Homer, Emily M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Many school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are hampered in participating in managing children with dysphagia by their school systems' lack of supportive policies and procedures. A need exists to better define the dysphagia-trained SLP's role and clarify the district's responsibility. The purpose of this article is to address…

  13. Adherence to Eating and Drinking Guidelines for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Dysphagia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Jolliffe, Jane; Goldbart, Juliet

    2003-01-01

    The extent to which 40 individuals with intellectual disorders and dysphagia and their caregivers adhered to speech and language pathology dysphagia guidelines was evaluated across four settings. Although adherence was generally high, there were significant differences across settings, type of guidelines, and between people who were fed by…

  14. Translocation of an Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery With Resolution of Dysphagia Lusoria.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jess L; Burkhart, Harold M

    2016-07-01

    The presence of a left aortic arch with an aberrant right subclavian artery is a well-described anatomic variant that rarely causes symptoms. When symptoms of dysphagia lusoria do occur, however, operative intervention may be necessary. The purpose of this report is to describe our preferred surgical approach to treat dysphagia lusoria secondary to an aberrant right subclavian artery. PMID:27343538

  15. School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists' Perspectives on Dysphagia Management in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Rita L.; Stoner, Julia B.; Angell, Maureen E.; Fetzer, Alycia

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Although provision of dysphagia services is within the scope of practice of speech-language pathologists (SLPs), little is known about the perspectives of school-based SLPs in relation to these services. The purpose of this study was to examine SLPs' perspectives related to school-based management of students with dysphagia. Method: Focus…

  16. Barriers to Caregiver Compliance with Eating and Drinking Recommendations for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Jolliffe, Jane; Goldbart, Juliet; Burton, Mark H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: There is scant research on the subject of dysphagia and people with intellectual disabilities. This study explores the barriers which caregivers believe make following Speech and Language Therapists' (SLTs) dysphagia management strategies more difficult. Method: Semi-structured open-ended interviews were conducted with 46 caregivers…

  17. Dysphagia Management: A Survey of School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists in Vermont

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Tiffany L.; Gerety, Katherine W.; Mulligan, Moira

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study (a) gathered information about the kinds of dysphagia management services school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) provide, (b) examined the attitudes of SLPs related to dysphagia management, (c) compared the responses of SLPs on the basis of their experience working in a medical setting, and (d) investigated the…

  18. Successful treatment of cricopharyngeal dysphagia with bilateral myectomy in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Daniel K.; Stanley, Bryden J.; Ballegeer, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    An 8-month-old golden retriever/standard poodle mixed breed dog was diagnosed with cricopharyngeal dysphagia and possibly asynchrony. After failing standard unilateral cricopharyngeal myectomy, the dog underwent a second surgery to completely resect the contralateral musculature resulting in immediate and complete resolution of clinical signs. Bilateral myectomy can be considered for dogs with cricopharyngeal dysphagia that fail unilateral myectomy. PMID:25477545

  19. Development of a Multimedia Dysphagia Assessment Learning System Using Responsive Web Design: From e-Learning to m-Learning.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Chi; Guo, Sophie Huey-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Swallowing problems have significant affect the health outcome of some residents in long-term care facilities. Nursing staff who care these residents should have the ability of assessing dysphagia. However, nursing continued education to improve the performance of dysphagia assessment is still challenged. To enhance nurses' capability of dysphagia assessment, a Multimedia Dysphagia Assessment learning System was developed for nursing staff in long-term care institutions. This system was evaluated by performing a user usability test. PMID:27332279

  20. Anterior Herniation of Partially Calcified and Degenerated Cervical Disc Causing Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ozdol, Cagatay; Turk, Cezmi Cagri; Yildirim, Ali Erdem; Dalgic, Ali

    2015-08-01

    We report a rare case of anterior cervical disc herniation associated with dysphagia. A 32-year-old man presented with complaints of dysphagia and concomitant pain in the right arm resistant to conservative therapy. On physical examination with respect to the muscle strength, the right shoulder abduction and flexion of the forearm were 3/5. Lateral X-ray revealed calcified osteophytes at the anterior C4-5 level. Magnetic resonance imaging showed soft disc herniation involving the right C6 root at the C5-6 level and anterior herniation of the C4-5 cervical disc. Anterior discectomies for C4-5 and C5-6 levels stabilized and ameliorated the dysphagia and pain. Cervical disc herniation usually presents with radicular findings. However, dysphagia may be an uncommon presentation. Anterior cervical disc herniation should be considered in a patient presenting with dysphagia. PMID:26240723

  1. Assessing dysphagia via telerehabilitation: patient perceptions and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shobha; Ward, Elizabeth C; Burns, Clare; Theodoros, Deborah; Russell, Trevor

    2013-04-01

    To gain insight into factors which may influence future acceptance of dysphagia management via telerehabilitation, patients' perceptions were examined before and after a telerehabilitation assessment session. Forty adult patients with dysphagia (M =66 years, SD =16.25) completed pre- and post-session questionnaires which consisted of 14 matched questions worded to suit pre- and post-conditions. Questions explored comfort with the use of telerehabilitation, satisfaction with audio and video quality, benefits of telerehabilitation assessments and patients' preferred assessment modality. Questions were rated on a 5-point scale (1 = strongly disagree, 3 = unsure, 5 = strongly agree). Patients' comfort with assessment via telerehabilitation was high in over 80% of the group both pre- and post-assessment. Pre-assessment, patients were unsure what to expect with the auditory and visual aspects of the videoconference, however there were significant positive changes reported post-experience. In relation to perceived benefits of telerehabilitation services in general, most patients believed in the value of telerehabilitation and post-assessment this increased to 90-100% agreement. Although 92% felt they would be comfortable receiving services via telerehabilitation, 45% of patients indicated ultimate preference for a traditional face-to-face assessment. The data highlight that patients are interested in and willing to receive services via telerehabilitation; however, any concerns should be addressed pre-assessment. PMID:22663016

  2. Dysphagia, dystussia, and aspiration pneumonia in elderly people

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Hideki; Miyagi, Midori; Ebihara, Takae; Okazaki, Tatsuma

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development and wide distribution of guidelines for pneumonia, death from pneumonia is increasing due to population aging. Conventionally, aspiration pneumonia was mainly thought to be one of the infectious diseases. However, we have proven that chronic repeated aspiration of a small amount of sterile material can cause the usual type of aspiration pneumonia in mouse lung. Moreover, chronic repeated aspiration of small amounts induced chronic inflammation in both frail elderly people and mouse lung. These observations suggest the need for a paradigm shift of the treatment for pneumonia in the elderly. Since aspiration pneumonia is fundamentally based on dysphagia, we should shift the therapy for aspiration pneumonia from pathogen-oriented therapy to function-oriented therapy. Function-oriented therapy in aspiration pneumonia means therapy focusing on slowing or reversing the functional decline that occurs as part of the aging process, such as “dementia → dysphagia → dystussia → atussia → silent aspiration”. Atussia is ultimate dysfunction of cough physiology, and aspiration with atussia is called silent aspiration, which leads to the development of life-threatening aspiration pneumonia. Research pursuing effective strategies to restore function in the elderly is warranted in order to decrease pneumonia deaths in elderly people. PMID:27076964

  3. Older people with dysphagia: transitioning to texture-modified food.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Sandra; Crichton, Jonathan

    Older people with dysphagia are at high risk of malnutrition. To maintain safe oral and nutritional intake, solid food may be texture-modified. Little is known about the transition experiences of older people who move from normal to texture-modified foods. The aim of this study was to describe residents' experiences as they transitioned from normal food to texture-modified food. The study used a qualitative descriptive design and individual interviews were conducted with a study group of 28 participants (residents, family members, nursing and care staff, and speech and language therapists). The interviews were thematically analysed. The findings suggest that transition creates the risk of distress, reducing eating to a matter of necessity and hunger, and that the process is perceived as abrupt, and characterised by lack of communication and awareness of the need for change. A key finding is that the language used during transition can be adversely affected by the management of risk. This language promotes a culture of care that emphasises the limitations of residents, reduces their motivation to eat and hinders the delivery of person-centred care. The findings suggest that care facilities for older people need to revisit their dysphagia management protocols to ensure that they support a person-centred approach for recipients of texture-modified food. PMID:26153808

  4. Botulinum toxin a treatment of cricopharyngeal dysphagia after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Krause, Eike; Schirra, Jörg; Gürkov, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Elevated muscular tone associated with spastic syndromes can cause excessive contractility at the upper esophageal sphincter and impede swallowing. A 47-year-old male patient with spasticity predominantly of the lower extremities after a subarachnoid hemorrhage suffered from severe dysphagia and chronic salivary aspiration. He was dependent on a cuffed tracheostomy tube and a percutaneous enterogastric feeding tube. Barium swallow and esophageal manometry revealed cricopharyngeal spasm, while laryngeal elevation and pharyngeal contractility were well preserved. We endoscopically injected 180 MU botulinum toxin A into the cricopharyngeus muscle. Two days post injection, swallowing function had improved and oral nutrition was possible. This improvement lasted for six weeks. After another injection 8 weeks later, an undesired diffusion into the hypopharynx occurred and manometry showed diminished contractility without amelioration of dysphagia. Botulinum toxin therapy of cricopharyngeal spasm improves swallowing function in a subgroup of patients with spastic syndromes. The therapeutic effect is of limited duration. Toxin diffusion into the pharynx should be avoided. Manometry is useful in planning and monitoring the therapy. PMID:18437465

  5. Investigation of compensatory postures with videofluoromanometry in dysphagia patients

    PubMed Central

    Solazzo, Antonio; Monaco, Luigi; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Tamburrini, Stefania; Iacobellis, Francesca; Berritto, Daniela; Pizza, Nunzia Luisa; Reginelli, Alfonso; Di Martino, Natale; Grassi, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of head compensatory postures to ensure safe oropharyngeal transit. METHODS: A total of 321 dysphagia patients were enrolled and assessed with videofluoromanometry (VFM). The dysphagia patients were classified as follows: safe transit; penetration without aspiration; aspiration before, during or after swallowing; multiple aspirations and no transit. The patients with aspiration or no transit were tested with VFM to determine whether compensatory postures could correct their swallowing disorder. RESULTS: VFM revealed penetration without aspiration in 71 patients (22.1%); aspiration before swallowing in 17 patients (5.3%); aspiration during swallowing in 32 patients (10%); aspiration after swallowing in 21 patients (6.5%); multiple aspirations in six patients (1.9%); no transit in five patients (1.6%); and safe transit in 169 patients (52.6%). Compensatory postures guaranteed a safe transit in 66/75 (88%) patients with aspiration or no transit. A chin-down posture achieved a safe swallow in 42/75 (56%) patients, a head-turned posture in 19/75 (25.3%) and a hyperextended head posture in 5/75 (6.7%). The compensatory postures were not effective in 9/75 (12%) cases. CONCLUSION: VFM allows the speech-language the-rapist to choose the most effective compensatory posture without a trial-and-error process and check the effectiveness of the posture. PMID:22736921

  6. Cervical esophageal dysphagia: indications for and results of cricopharyngeal myotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, F H; Crozier, R E

    1981-01-01

    Twenty patients with cervical esophageal dysphagia were treated by cricopharyngeal myotomy. Of these 20 patients, ten had pharyngoesophageal diverticula, four had a hypertensive upper esophageal sphincter (UES), four had bulbar palsy, and two has miscellaneous forms of cricopharyngeal dysfunction. Preoperative esophageal manometric examination revealed mean UES pressures of 37.2 mmHg +/- 4.8 SEM in patients with diverticula-markedly lower (p = 0.01) than in normal patients (55.9 mmHg +/- 5.0 SEM). In patients with hypertensive UES the mean pressure was 166.2 mmHg +/- 13.4, significantly higher (p less than 0.001) than normal. Incoordination of the deglutitive response of the UES characterised by premature relaxation and contraction was present in all patients with diverticula and in one other patient. Another patient exhibited incomplete sphincteric relaxation (achalasia). A 4-5 cm myotomy of the cricopharyngeus muscle and adjacent esophageal muscle was performed in all patients. On the patients with diverticula two also had diverticulectomy. No patient with bulbar palsy was benefited. All other patients were relieved of dysphagia by the operation, with the exception of one patient with a diverticulum. A subsequent diverticulectomy was required in this patient. Postoperative manometric examination revealed an average decrease in UES pressure of 63% and an average decreased in length of the high pressure zone of 1.4 cm. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:6791598

  7. Clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis☆

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Lisiane De Rosa; Gomes, Erissandra; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the occurrence of clinical signs of dysphagia in infants with acute viral bronchiolitis, to compare the respiratory parameters during deglutition, and to ensure the intra- and inter- examiners agreement, as well as to accomplish intra and interexaminators concordance of the clinical evaluation of the deglutition. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 42 infants aged 0-12 months. The clinical evaluation was accompanied by measurements of respiratory rate and pulse oximetry. A score of swallowing disorders was designed to establish associations with other studied variables and to ensure the intra- and interrater agreement of clinical feeding assessments. Caregivers also completed a questionnaire about feeding difficulties. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results: Changes in the oral phase (prolonged pauses) and pharyngeal phase (wheezing, coughing and gagging) of swallowing were found. A significant increase in respiratory rate between pre- and post-feeding times was found, and it was determined that almost half of the infants had tachypnea. An association was observed between the swallowing disorder scores and a decrease in oxygen saturation. Infants whose caregivers reported feeding difficulties during hospitalization stated a significantly greater number of changes in the swallowing evaluation. The intra-rater agreement was considered to be very good. Conclusions: Infants with acute viral bronchiolitis displayed swallowing disorders in addition to changes in respiratory rate and measures of oxygen saturation. It is suggested, therefore, that infants displaying these risk factors have a higher probability of dysphagia. PMID:25479843

  8. Reconstructive and rehabilitating methods in patients with dysphagia and nutritional disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Motsch, Christiane

    2005-01-01

    As diverse as the causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia can be, as broad is the range of potential therapeutical approaches. In the past two decades, methods of plastic-reconstructive surgery, in particular microsurgically revascularised tissue transfer and minimally invasive, endoscopic techniques of every hue have substantially added to the portfolio of reconstructive surgery available for rehabilitating deglutition. Numerically, reconstructing the pharyngolaryngeal tract following resection of squamous-cell carcinomas in the oral cavity, the pharynx and the larynx has been gaining ground, as has functional deglutitive therapy performed to treat posttherapeutical sequelae. Dysphagia and malnutrition are closely interrelated. Every third patient hospitalised in Germany suffers from malnutrition; ENT tumour patients are not excluded. For patients presenting with advancing malnutrition, the mortality, the morbidity and the individual complication rate have all been observed to increase; also a longer duration of stay in hospital has been noted and a lesser individual toleration of treatment, diminished immunocompetence, impaired general physical and psychical condition and, thus, a less favourable prognosis on the whole. Therefore, in oncological patients, the dietotherapy will have to assume a key role in supportive treatment. It is just for patients, who are expected to go through a long process of deglutitive rehabilitation, that enteral nutrition through percutaneous endoscopically controlled gastrostomy (PEG) performed at an early stage can provide useful and efficient support to the therapeutic efforts. Nutrition and oncology are mutually influencing fields where, sooner or later, a change in paradigms will have to take place, i.e. gradually switching from therapy to prevention. While cancer causes malnutrition, feasible changes in feeding and nutrition-associated habits, including habitual drinking and smoking, might lower the incidence of cancer worldwide by 30

  9. Reconstructive and rehabilitating methods in patients with dysphagia and nutritional disturbances.

    PubMed

    Motsch, Christiane

    2005-01-01

    As diverse as the causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia can be, as broad is the range of potential therapeutical approaches. In the past two decades, methods of plastic-reconstructive surgery, in particular microsurgically revascularised tissue transfer and minimally invasive, endoscopic techniques of every hue have substantially added to the portfolio of reconstructive surgery available for rehabilitating deglutition. Numerically, reconstructing the pharyngolaryngeal tract following resection of squamous-cell carcinomas in the oral cavity, the pharynx and the larynx has been gaining ground, as has functional deglutitive therapy performed to treat posttherapeutical sequelae. Dysphagia and malnutrition are closely interrelated. Every third patient hospitalised in Germany suffers from malnutrition; ENT tumour patients are not excluded. For patients presenting with advancing malnutrition, the mortality, the morbidity and the individual complication rate have all been observed to increase; also a longer duration of stay in hospital has been noted and a lesser individual toleration of treatment, diminished immunocompetence, impaired general physical and psychical condition and, thus, a less favourable prognosis on the whole. Therefore, in oncological patients, the dietotherapy will have to assume a key role in supportive treatment. It is just for patients, who are expected to go through a long process of deglutitive rehabilitation, that enteral nutrition through percutaneous endoscopically controlled gastrostomy (PEG) performed at an early stage can provide useful and efficient support to the therapeutic efforts. Nutrition and oncology are mutually influencing fields where, sooner or later, a change in paradigms will have to take place, i.e. gradually switching from therapy to prevention. While cancer causes malnutrition, feasible changes in feeding and nutrition-associated habits, including habitual drinking and smoking, might lower the incidence of cancer worldwide by 30

  10. Dysphagia and anorexia as presentations of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Rohit; Engelman, Ester; Xue, Wei; Yu, Edward

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman presented to the emergency department, with a 4-day history of isolated oropharyngeal dysphagia associated with anorexia and weight loss over the previous 4 weeks. She had no other focal neurological symptoms and no deficits on examination. She had been in a 4-year remission of breast cancer postmastectomy and chemoradiation. Neuroimaging showed enhancement of cranial nerves VII, VIII, cisternal segment of cranial V, dorsal and ventral surfaces of the cervical and thoracic cord as well as enhancement of the cauda equina. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed carcinomatous cells. The patient was diagnosed as having leptomeningeal carcinomatosis secondary to lobular breast cancer and was started on radiation therapy, antihormonal treatments and intrathecal methotrexate. PMID:27073151

  11. Endoscopic palliation for inoperable malignant dysphagia: long term follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Maunoury, V; Brunetaud, J M; Cochelard, D; Boniface, B; Cortot, A; Paris, J C

    1992-01-01

    This prospective non-randomised trial of 128 selected patients with unresectable oesophageal or gastrooesophageal junction cancers aims to evaluate the initial relief of malignant obstruction by means of bipolar electrocoagulation for both circumferential and submucosal strictures of Nd:YAG laser for the other patients. A limited dilatation was performed initially if a small calibre endoscope was unable to pass through the stricture. Prompt and significant relief of dysphagia without complications was achieved in 83% of patients. Improved patients were retreated monthly during the follow up period. Radiotherapy was recommended when possible. Symptomatic relief of obstruction lasted 4.2 months on average and 76% of patients remained palliated until death. Monthly retreatment using the most appropriate endoscopic procedure for the tumour configuration and radiotherapy after endoscopic relief of obstruction seems to give the best palliation for patients with unresectable cancers of the oesophagus or gastrooesophageal junction. PMID:1283144

  12. Progressive dysphagia in a dog caused by a scirrhous, poorly differentiated perioesophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wray, J D; Blunden, A S

    2006-01-01

    Investigation of canine dysphagia is performed by a combination of diagnostic imaging, direct visualisation of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and ancillary diagnostic testing to differentiate between structural and functional causes. Video fluoroscopy may be especially helpful. The case of a seven-year-old Border collie that presented with a history of progressive pharyngeal dysphagia is described. Fluoroscopic investigation was initially suggestive of functional pharyngeal disease, but magnetic resonance imaging and surgical exploration demonstrated the presence of a diffuse, scirrhous, poorly differentiated carcinoma with extensive oesophageal involvement. This case highlights that, in some circumstances, fluoroscopy may occasionally be of limited use in the investigation of dysphagia in the dog. PMID:16417607

  13. Pathophysiology of Radiation-Induced Dysphagia in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    King, Suzanne N; Dunlap, Neal E; Tennant, Paul A; Pitts, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    Oncologic treatments, such as curative radiotherapy and chemoradiation, for head and neck cancer can cause long-term swallowing impairments (dysphagia) that negatively impact quality of life. Radiation-induced dysphagia comprised a broad spectrum of structural, mechanical, and neurologic deficits. An understanding of the biomolecular effects of radiation on the time course of wound healing and underlying morphological tissue responses that precede radiation damage will improve options available for dysphagia treatment. The goal of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology of radiation-induced injury and elucidate areas that need further exploration. PMID:27098922

  14. Real-time remote telefluoroscopic assessment of patients with dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Adrienne L; Witthawaskul, Weerasak

    2002-01-01

    Dysphagia is a serious health problem that affects persons of all ages, from the neonate to those of advanced age. Many smaller communities and areas with sparse populations do not have regular access to professionals with expertise in the area of oral/pharyngeal dysphagia. Telemedicine is one method by which people in these areas can receive quality of service. The intent of this work was to develop an Internet system that permits real-time, remote, interactive evaluation of oral/pharyngeal swallowing function. The system consists of two major components. The first is a PC that is located in the fluoroscopy suite of a hospital. The computer is connected to the fluoroscope output and is responsible for (1) capturing video signals, (2) converting the analog video data into digitized video formats of both full resolution and transmission-optimized resolution, (3) simultaneously transmitting the transmission-optimized video stream over the network while the examination is being performed, and (4) storing the full-resolution data as a file in local storage for later retrieval. The second component is the controller computer which is located at a site some distance from the hospital. That controller computer manages the video capture process at the remote hospital site, manages the transmission of the stored images, and is then used for video analysis. The delay between the image as it was captured at the remote hospital site and viewed on the controller computer in the Principal Investigator's (PI's) laboratory ranged from 3 to 5 s. Video transmission occurred over a standard T1 line. PMID:11956842

  15. Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation combined with effortful swallowing on post-stroke oropharyngeal dysphagia: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Park, J-S; Oh, D-H; Hwang, N-K; Lee, J-H

    2016-06-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been used as a therapeutic intervention for dysphagia. However, the therapeutic effects of NMES lack supporting evidence. In recent years, NMES combined with traditional swallowing therapy has been used to improve functional recovery in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. This study aimed to investigate the effects of effortful swallowing combined with neuromuscular electrical stimulation on hyoid bone movement and swallowing function in stroke patients. Fifty stroke patients with mild dysphagia who were able to swallow against the resistance applied by using NMES and cooperate actively in training were included. This study was designed as a 6-week single-blind, randomised, controlled study. In the experimental group, two pairs of electrodes were placed horizontally in the infrahyoid region to depress the hyoid bone. The NMES intensity was increased gradually until the participants felt a grabbing sensation in their neck and performed an effortful swallow during the stimulation. In the placebo group, the same procedure was followed except for the intensity, which was increased gradually until the participants felt an electrical sensation. All participants underwent this intervention for 30 min per session, 5 sessions per week, for 6 weeks. Videofluoroscopic swallowing studies (VFSS) were carried out before and after the intervention and kinematics of the hyoid bone and swallowing function were analysed based on the VFSS. The experimental group revealed a significant increase in anterior and superior hyoid bone movement and the pharyngeal phase of the swallowing function. This intervention can be used as a novel remedial approach in dysphagic stroke patients. PMID:26969528

  16. Diagnostic Assessment and Management of Dysphagia in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Boccardi, Virginia; Ruggiero, Carmelinda; Patriti, Alberto; Marano, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    A growing concern in patients affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) is dysphagia, or swallowing impairment, which leads to malnutrition, dehydration, weight loss, functional decline and fear of eating and drinking, as well as a decrease in the quality of life. Thus the diagnostic assessment of dysphagia in patients with AD is imperative to ensure that they receive effective management, avoiding complications, and reducing comorbidity and mortality in such a growing population. Dysphagia management requires a multidisciplinary approach considering that no single strategy is appropriate for all patients. However, evidence for clinical diagnostic assessment, interventions, and medical management of dysphagia in these patients are still limited: few studies are reporting the evaluation and the management among this group of patients. Here we analyzed the most recent findings in diagnostic assessment and management of swallowing impairment in patients affected by AD. PMID:26836016

  17. Churg-Strauss Syndrome as an Unusual Cause of Dysphagia: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jihye; Moon, Su-Jin; Park, Geun-Young; Jang, Yongjun; Kim, Yeonjin

    2015-01-01

    Systemic vasculitis is a rare disease, and the diagnosis is very difficult when patient shows atypical symptoms. We experienced an unusual case of dysphagia caused by Churg-Strauss syndrome with lower cranial nerve involvement. A 74-year-old man, with a past history of sinusitis, asthma, and hearing deficiency, was admitted to our department for evaluation of dysphagia. He also complained of recurrent bleeding of nasal cavities and esophagus. Brain magnetic resonance imaging did not show definite abnormality, and electrophysiologic findings were suggestive of mononeuritis multiplex. Dysphagia had not improved after conventional therapy. Biopsy of the nasal cavity showed extravascular eosinophilic infiltration. All these findings suggested a rare form of Churg-Strauss syndrome involving multiple lower cranial nerves. Dysphagia improved after steroid therapy. PMID:26161355

  18. Maintaining endotracheal tube cuff pressure at 20 mm Hg to prevent dysphagia after anterior cervical spine surgery; protocol of a double-blind randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In anterior cervical spine surgery a retractor is obligatory to approach the spine. Previous studies showed an increase of endotracheal tube cuff pressure after placement of a retractor. It is known that high endotracheal tube cuff pressure increases the incidence of postoperative dysphagia, hoarseness, and sore throat. However, until now no evidence supports the fact whether adjusting the endotracheal tube cuff pressure during anterior cervical spine surgery will prevent this comorbidity. We present the design of a randomized controlled trial to determine whether adjusting endotracheal tube cuff pressure after placement of a retractor during anterior cervical spine surgery will prevent postoperative dysphagia. Methods/design 177 patients (aged 18–90 years) scheduled for anterior cervical spine surgery on 1 or more levels will be included. After intubation, endotracheal tube cuff pressure is manually inflated to 20 mm Hg in all patients. Patients will be randomized into two groups. In the control group endotracheal tube cuff pressure is not adjusted after retractor placement. In the intervention group endotracheal tube cuff pressure after retractor placement is maintained at 20 mm Hg and air is withdrawn when cuff pressure exceeds 20 mm Hg. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure is measured after intubation, before and after placement and removal of the retractor. Again air is inflated if cuff pressure sets below 20 mmHg after removal of the retractor. The primary outcome measure is postoperative dysphagia. Other outcome measures are postoperative hoarseness, postoperative sore throat, degree of dysphagia, length of hospital stay, and pneumonia. The study is a single centre double blind randomized trial in which patients and research nurses will be kept blinded for the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 2 months. Discussion Postoperative dysphagia occurs frequently after anterior cervical spine surgery. This may be related to high

  19. Assessment of early and late dysphagia using videofluoroscopy and quality of life questionnaires in patients with head and neck cancer treated with radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Backgorund The aim of this study was to evaluate dysphagia in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) undergoing three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy using objective and subjective tools simultaneously and to associate the clinical correlates of dysphagia with dosimetric parameters. Methods Twenty patients were included in the study. The primary tumor and the involved lymph nodes (LN) were treated with 66-70 Gy, the uninvolved LN were treated with 46-50 Gy. Six swallowing structures were identified: the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (SPCM), the middle pharyngeal constrictor muscle (MPCM), the inferior pharyngeal constrictor muscle (IPCM), the base of tongue (BOT), the larynx and the proximal esophageal sphincter (PES). Dysphagia was evaluated using videofluoroscopy and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QoL questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and supplemental EORTC QoL module for HNC (QLQ-H&N35). The evaluations were performed before treatment, at 3 months and at 6 months following treatment. Results On objective evaluation, the Dmax for the larynx and the sub-structures of the PCM were correlated with impaired lingual movement, BOT weakness and proximal esophageal stricture at 3 months, whereas the V65, the V70and the Dmax for the larynx was correlated with BOT weakness and the V65, the V70, the Dmax or the Dmean for the sub-structures of the PCM were correlated with impaired lingual movement, BOT weakness, reduced laryngeal elevation, reduced epiglottic inversion and aspiration at 6 months following treatment. On subjective evaluation, the V60, the Dmax and the Dmean for SPCM were correlated with QoL scores for HNSO at 3 months, whereas the V70 for SPCM were correlated with QoL scores for HNPA and the V60, the V65, the V70, the Dmax and the Dmean for SPCM were correlated with QoL scores for HNSO at 6 months following treatment. Conclusions The use of multiple dysphagia-related endpoints to complement eachother rather than to

  20. Radiation enhancement of laser palliation for malignant dysphagia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, I R; Loizou, L A; Tobias, J S; Blackman, G; Thorpe, S; Bown, S G

    1992-12-01

    Laser therapy offers rapid relief of dysphagia for patients with cancers of the oesophagus and gastric cardia but repeat treatments are required approximately every five weeks to maintain good swallowing. To try to prolong the treatment interval, 22 elderly patients were given additional external beam radiotherapy. Nine had squamous cell carcinoma and 13 adenocarcinoma: five had documented metastases. Six received 40 Gy and 16,30 Gy in 10-20 fractions. A 'check' endoscopy was performed three weeks after external beam radiotherapy. Dysphagia was graded from 0-4 (0 = normal; 4 = dysphagia for liquids). The median dysphagia grade improved from 3 to 1 after laser treatment. This improvement was maintained in the 30 Gy group but there was a noticeable deterioration in three of those who had received the higher radiation dose. A lifelong dysphagia grade of 2 or better was enjoyed by 14 of 16 patients in the 30 Gy group but only two of six in the 40 Gy group. The dysphagia controlled interval was 9 weeks (median) after check endoscopy and subsequent endoscopic procedures were required every 13 weeks to maintain good swallowing. There were no endoscopy related complications. Combined treatment is a promising approach for reducing the frequency of endoscopic treatments. The 30 Gy dose seems more appropriate and may prolong survival. A randomised study to test these conclusions is in progress. PMID:1283143

  1. Dysphagia due to oesophageal obstruction: A case report of unusual occupational aetiology

    PubMed Central

    Makaram, Navnit; Gohil, Rohit; Majumdar, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We report the rare case of a patient presenting with dysphagia secondary to a large vertebral osteophyte, which formed from his previous occupation. Presentation of case A 76-year-old gentleman presented with a year-long history of dysphagia to solids, at the laryngeal level. He was otherwise well, with no red-flag symptoms. Nasoendoscopy showed a left-sided bulge obstructing the piriform fossa. Barium swallow demonstrated a large C4/C5 vertebral osteophyte. Excluding other abnormalities the patient's dysphagia was determined to be due to the osteophyte. The patient mentioned carrying large (50 kg) bags of coal for his previous occupation. This chronic trauma was concluded to be the cause for the osteophyte. Discussion We use this case as an opportunity to outline mechanism of swallowing, and the causes and classification of dysphagia are additionally described. We also review the literature regarding vertebral osteophytes to contextualise the rarity of this case, especially in regard to the strong occupational association. Conclusion A structured and thorough history and examination in dysphagia is emphasized. It is important to enquire about ‘red-flag’ symptoms, suggestive of head and neck or upper gastrointestinal malignancy. Barium swallow is a critical investigation in dysphagia-it can also demonstrate large bony abnormalities, which is a rare causative factor. PMID:26693007

  2. Serum trace elements in elderly frail patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Leibovitz, Arthur; Lubart, Emilia; Wainstein, Julio; Dror, Yosef; Segal, Refael

    2009-01-01

    Microelements have an important role in many vital enzymatic functions. Their optimal intake and serum concentration are not properly defined. For nursing home residents, this issue is further complicated by the high prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia. The purpose of this study was to measure microelement concentrations in 3 groups of elderly subjects that differ in their feeding methods and functional state. Forty-six frail elderly patients, in stable clinical condition, 15 on naso-gastric tube (NGT) feeding, 15 orally fed (OF), from skilled nursing departments were recruited to this study. As controls, we studied a group of 16 elderly independent ambulatory patients. A battery of 16 microelements was examined using the Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The OF frail elderly patients had significantly lower levels of chromium as compared to the NGT fed and the control group. Both frail elderly groups had lower levels of zinc and copper as compared to the controls. In contrast, in the nursing groups, we found higher levels of aluminum, boron, barium, bromine and nickel. Elderly, in particular frail and disabled subjects, are vulnerable to insufficiency or overload of microelements. There is a need to evaluate the actual requirements for each microelement for this population. PMID:19926926

  3. A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge involving a case of dysphagia in association with cervical osteophytosis and a dental pain

    PubMed Central

    Dable, Rajani A.; Wasnik, Pradnya B.; Nagmode, Sunilkumar L.; Ali, Mukkaram Faridi

    2013-01-01

    Herein, presenting a case of a 42-year-old female with the chief complaint of dysphagia. The problem was assumed to be of dental origin, due to the onset of dental pain followed by dysphagia. A cervical radiograph revealed the presence of osteophytic lipping which proved to be the cause of dysphagia. Confusing and overlapping disease entities showing similar symptoms need thorough investigation. Dysphagia related to cervical spondylosis may have a direct connection with the person's occupation. Dentistry is considered a potentially hazardous occupation with regard to musculoskeletal disorders. However, additional studies are required to understand the occupational hazards faced by dentists. PMID:24250178

  4. Effects of early intervention of swallowing therapy on recovery from dysphagia following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiyari, Jalal; Sarraf, Payam; Nakhostin-Ansari, Noureddin; Tafakhori, Abbas; Logemann, Jeri; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat; Harirchian, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia is common after stroke. The onset time of swallowing rehabilitation following stroke has an important role in the recovery of dysphagia and preventing of its complications, but it was either highly variable or was not stated in previous trials. The aim of this study was investigation effects of onset time of swallowing therapy on recovery from dysphagia following stroke. Methods: Sixty dysphagia patients due to stroke range of age 60-74 (67.1 ± 3.8), participated in this randomized clinical trial study. The patients allocated in Early, Medium and Late groups, on the base of initiation of swallowing therapy after the stroke. After basic clinical and video fluoroscopic swallowing study assessments, traditional swallowing therapy was initiated 3 times per week for 3 months. The outcome measures were North-Western dysphagia patient check sheet, functional oral intake scale, video fluoroscopy, and frequency of pneumonia. Statistical analysis was done by repeated measure ANOVA, Bonferroni and χ2 tests. Results: Three groups of patients in terms of demographic and clinical characteristics were similar in the pre-treatment P > 0.050. Onset time of swallowing therapy after stroke was effective on swallowing recovery on the main outcome variables. So that in first group patients, recovery was rather than other groups P < 0.050. Furthermore, the frequency of pneumonia in the early group was less than other groups and in the early group no patients experienced pneumonia P = 0.002. Conclusion: Our data suggested that early interventions for dysphagia in stroke have an important role in recovery from dysphagia and prevention of complications like aspiration pneumonia. PMID:26622975

  5. Determination of the cut-off score of an endoscopic scoring method to predict whether elderly patients with dysphagia can eat pureed diets

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Torao; Horiuchi, Akira; Makino, Toshiyuki; Kajiyama, Masashi; Tanaka, Naoki; Hyodo, Masamitsu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify the cut-off value for predicting the ability of elderly patients with dysphagia to swallow pureed diets using a new endoscopy scoring method. METHODS: Endoscopic swallowing evaluation of pureed diets were done in patients ≥ 65 years with dysphagia. The Hyodo-Komagane score for endoscopic swallowing evaluation is expressed as the sum (0-12) of four degrees (0-3) with four parameters: (1) salivary pooling in the vallecula and piriform sinuses; (2) the response of glottal closure reflex induced by touching the epiglottis with the endoscope; (3) the location of the bolus at the time of swallow onset assessed by “white-out” following swallowing of test jelly; and (4) pharyngeal clearance after swallowing of test jelly. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to retrospectively analyze the association between the total score and successful oral intake of pureed diets. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy-eight patients were enrolled including 113 men (63%), mean age 83 years (range, 66-98). One hundred and twenty-six patients (71%) were able to eat pureed diets during the observation period (mean ± SD, 19 ± 14 d). In ROC analysis, the cut-off value of the score for eating the pureed diets was 7 (sensitivity = 0.98; specificity = 0.91). CONCLUSION: The Hyodo-Komagane endoscopic score is useful to predict the ability to eat pureed diets in elderly patients with dysphagia. PMID:27014424

  6. Effect of Laryngopharyngeal Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on Dysphonia Accompanied by Dysphagia in Post-stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of laryngopharyngeal neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on dysphonia in patients with dysphagia caused by stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods Eighteen patients participated in this study. The subjects were divided into NMES (n=12) and conventional swallowing training only (CST, n=6) groups. The NMES group received NMES combined with CST for 2 weeks, followed by CST without NMES for the next 2 weeks. The CST group received only CST for 4 weeks. All of the patients were evaluated before and at 2 and 4 weeks into the study. The outcome measurements included perceptual, acoustic and aerodynamic analyses. The correlation between dysphonia and swallowing function was also investigated. Results There were significant differences in the GRBAS (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia and strain scale) total score and sound pressure level (SPL) between the two groups over time. The NMES relative to the CST group showed significant improvements in total GRBAS score and SPL at 2 weeks, though no inter-group differences were evident at 4 weeks. The improvement of the total GRBAS scores at 2 weeks was positively correlated with the improved pharyngeal phase scores on the functional dysphagia scale at 2 weeks. Conclusion The results demonstrate that laryngopharyngeal NMES in post-stroke or TBI patients with dysphonia can have promising effects on phonation. Therefore, laryngopharyngeal NMES may be considered as an additional treatment option for dysphonia accompanied by dysphagia after stroke or TBI. PMID:27606266

  7. Objective Measures of Swallowing Function Applied to the Dysphagia Population: A One Year Experience.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Katherine A; Ellerston, Julia; Heller, Amanda; Houtz, Daniel R; Zhang, Chong; Presson, Angela P

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative, reliable measures of swallowing physiology can be made from an modified barium swallowing study. These quantitative measures have not been previously employed to study large dysphagic patient populations. The present retrospective study of 139 consecutive patients with dysphagia seen in a university tertiary voice and swallowing clinic sought to use objective measures of swallowing physiology to (1) quantify the most prevalent deficits seen in the patient population, (2) identify commonly associated diagnoses and describe the most prevalent swallowing deficits, and (3) determine any correlation between objective deficits and Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) scores and body mass index. Poor pharyngeal constriction (34.5 %) and airway protection deficits (65.5 %) were the most common swallowing abnormalities. Reflux-related dysphagia (36 %), nonspecific pharyngeal dysphagia (24 %), Parkinson disease (16 %), esophageal abnormality (13 %), and brain insult (10 %) were the most common diagnoses. Poor pharyngeal constriction was significantly associated with an esophageal motility abnormality (p < 0.001) and central neurologic insult. In general, dysphagia symptoms as determined by the EAT-10 did not correlate with swallowing function abnormalities. This preliminary study indicates that reflux disease is common in patients with dysphagia and that associated esophageal abnormalities are common in dysphagic populations and may be associated with specific pharyngeal swallowing abnormalities. However, symptom scores from the EAT-10 did not correspond to swallowing pathophysiology. PMID:27106909

  8. Dysphagia and cerebrovascular accident: relationship between severity degree and level of neurological impairment.

    PubMed

    Itaquy, Roberta Baldino; Favero, Samara Regina; Ribeiro, Marlise de Castro; Barea, Liselotte Menke; Almeida, Sheila Tamanini de; Mancopes, Renata

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this case study was to verify the occurrence of dysphagia in acute ischemic stroke within 48 hours after the onset of the first symptoms, in order to establish a possible relationship between the level of neurologic impairment and the severity degree of dysphagia. After emergency hospital admission, three patients underwent neurological clinical evaluation (general physical examination, neurological examination, and application of the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale - NIHSS), and clinical assessment of swallowing using the Protocolo Fonoaudiológico de Avaliação do Risco para Disfagia (PARD--Speech-Language Pathology Protocol for Risk Evaluation for Dysphagia). One of the patients presented functional swallowing (NIHSS score 11), while the other two had mild and moderate oropharyngeal dysphagia (NIHSS scores 15 and 19, respectively). The service flow and the delay on the patients' search for medical care determined the small sample. The findings corroborate literature data regarding the severity of the neurological condition and the manifestation of dysphagia. PMID:22231062

  9. Small caliber covered self-expanding metal stents in the management of malignant dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Kucera, Stephen; Barthel, James; Klapman, Jason; Shridhar, Ravi; Hoffe, Sarah; Harris, Cynthia; Almhanna, Khaldoun

    2016-01-01

    Background Use of large caliber [≥18 mm body diameter (BD)] self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) for management of malignant dysphasia is associated with substantial adverse event (AE) and mortality rates (MRs). We sought to determine dysphagia response, stent migration rates, and AE and MRs, for small caliber covered SEMS (sccSEMS) with BDs between 10–16 mm in malignant dysphagia. Methods Thirty-one patients underwent direct endoscopic placement of 50 sccSEMS between January 2008 and March 2011. Patients were monitored for change in dysphagia score (DS), stent migration, AEs, and death through May 2011. Results DS improved in 30 of 31 patients (97%). The median DS decreased from 3 to 2 (P<0.0001). The median effective duration of first sccSEMS placement was 116 (95% CI: 75–196) days. Major and minor AE rates were 6.5% and 19.4% respectively. No stent related deaths were encountered. The overall migration rate was 36% (18/50). The anticipated migration rate was 45.7% (16/35) and the unanticipated migration rate was 13.3% (2/15) (P=0.052). Positive effective clinical outcome occurred in 93.5% (29/31) of cases. Conclusions In malignant dysphagia, direct endoscopic sccSEMS placement provided acceptable dysphagia control and migration rates with substantial reductions in stent related AEs and MRs compared to those reported for large caliber SEMS. PMID:27284474

  10. A Rare Case of Esophageal Dysphagia in Children: Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Claudia; Carucci, Nicolina Stefania; Romano, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Dysphagia is an impairment of swallowing that may involve any structures from the mouth to the stomach. Esophageal dysphagia presents with the sensation of food sticking, pain with swallowing, substernal pressure, or chronic heartburn. There are many causes of esophageal dysphagia, such as motility disorders and mechanical and inflammatory diseases. Infrequently dysphagia arises from extrinsic compression of the esophagus from any vascular anomaly of the aortic arch. The most common embryologic abnormality of the aortic arch is aberrant right subclavian artery, clinically known as arteria lusoria. This abnormality is usually silent. Here, we report a case of six-year-old child presenting to us with a history of progressive dysphagia without respiratory symptoms. A barium esophagogram showed an increase of the physiological esophageal narrowing at the level of aortic arch, while at esophagogastroduodenoscopy there was an extrinsic pulsatile compression of the posterior portion of the esophagus suggesting an extrinsic compression by an aberrant vessel. Angio-CT (computed tomography) scan confirmed the presence of an aberrant right subclavian artery. PMID:26904341

  11. Effect of tongue strength training using the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument in stroke patients with dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Su; Kim, Hee-Jeong; Oh, Dong-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a structured program of resistance training for the tongue in order to improve swallowing function in stroke patients with dysphagia. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-seven stroke patients with dysphagia were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group participated in a resistance-training program involving a 1-repetition maximum, with an intensity of 80%, along with 50 repetitions per day each for the anterior and posterior regions of the tongue. Both groups received conventional therapy for dysphagia for 30 min per day, 5 times per week, for 6 weeks. [Results] The experimental group showed statistically significant improvements in both, the anterior and posterior regions of the tongue. In contrast, the control group showed significant improvements only in the anterior region of the tongue. In the videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale evaluation, improvement was noted at both, the oral and pharyngeal stages in the experimental group, whereas significant improvements were only noted in the oral stage and total score in the control group. [Conclusion] Our study confirmed that tongue resistance training is an effective intervention for stroke patients with dysphagia, offering improved tongue muscle strength and overall improvement in swallowing. PMID:26834320

  12. Effect of liquid bolus consistency and delivery method on aspiration and pharyngeal retention in dysphagia patients.

    PubMed

    Kuhlemeier, K V; Palmer, J B; Rosenberg, D

    2001-01-01

    There is no empirically derived consensus as to what food consistency types and method of food delivery (spoon, cup, straw) should be included in the videofluoroscopic swallowing (VFSS) studies. In the present study, we examine the rates of aspiration and pharyngeal retention in 190 dysphagic patients given thin (apple juice) and thick (apricot nectar) liquids delivered by teaspoon and cup and ultrathick (pudding-like) liquid delivered by teaspoon. Each patient was tested with each of the bolus/delivery method combinations. The fractions of patients exhibiting aspiration for each bolus/method of delivery combination were (1) thick liquids (cup), 13.2%; (2) thick liquids (spoon), 8.9%; (3) thin liquids (cup), 23.7%; (4) thin liquids (spoon), 15.8%, (5) ultrathick liquids (spoon), 5.8%. In each comparison [thick liquid (cup) vs. thick liquid (spoon), thin liquid (cup) vs. thin liquid (spoon), thick liquid (cup) vs. thin liquid (cup), thick liquid (spoon) vs. thin liquid (spoon), and thick liquid (spoon) vs. ultrathick liquid (spoon)], the p value for chi 2 was < 0.001. These results suggest that utilizing thin, thick, and ultrathick liquids and delivery by cup and spoon during a VFSS of a patient with mild or moderate dysphagia can increase the chances of identifying a consistency that the patient can swallow without aspirating and without pharyngeal retention after swallowing. PMID:11305221

  13. The Relationship Between Tongue Pressure and Oral Dysphagia in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relationships between tongue pressure and different aspects of the oral-phase swallowing function. Methods We included 96 stroke patients with dysphagia, ranging in age from 40 to 88 years (mean, 63.7 years). Measurements of tongue pressure were obtained with the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument, a device with established normative data. Three trials of maximum performance were performed for lip closure pressure (LP), anterior hard palate-to-tongue pressure (AP), and posterior hard palate-to-tongue pressure (PP); buccal-to-tongue pressures on both sides were also recorded (buccal-to-tongue pressure, on the weak side [BW]; buccal-to-tongue pressure, on the healthy side [BH]). The average pressure in each result was compared between the groups. Clinical evaluation of the swallowing function was performed with a videofluoroscopic swallowing study. Results The average maximum AP and PP values in the intact LC group were significantly higher than those in the inadequate lip closure group (AP, p=0.003; PP, p<0.001). AP and PP showed significant relationships with bolus formation (BF), mastication, premature bolus loss (PBL), tongue to palate contact (TP), and oral transit time (OTT). Furthermore, LP, BW, and BH values were significantly higher in the groups with intact mastication, without PBL and intact TP. Conclusion These findings indicate that the tongue pressure appears to be closely related to the oral-phase swallowing function in post-stroke patients, especially BF, mastication, PBL, TP and OTT. PMID:27606268

  14. Safety of pull-type and introducer percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes in oncology patients: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) allows long-term tube feeding. Safety of pull-type and introducer PEG placement in oncology patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancies is unknown. Methods Retrospective analysis of 299 patients undergoing PEG tube placement between January 2006 and December 2008 revealed 57 oncology patients. All patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancy were treated with chemo- and radiotherapy. In case of high-grade stenosis introducer Freka® Pexact PEG tube was placed (n = 24) and in all other patients (n = 33) conventional pull-type PEG tube. Short-term complications and mortality rates were compared. Results Patients' characteristics and clinical status were comparable in both groups. Short-term complications were encountered in 11/24 (48%) introducer PEG patients as compared to only 4/33 (12%) pull-type PEG patients (P < 0.05). Accidental removal of the introducer PEG tube occurred in 4/24 (17%) with need for surgical intervention in 1 vs. 0/33 (0%, P < 0.05). Wound infection occurred in 3/24 (12%) leading to septic shock and admission to intensive care unit (ICU) in 1 vs. 3/33 (9%, NS). Finally, 3/24 gastrointestinal perforations (12%) resulted from a difficult placement procedure vs. 1/33 (3%), leading to urgent surgical intervention and admission to ICU. Two introducer PEG patients died at ICU, resulting in an overall mortality rate of 8% vs. 0% (P = 0.091). Conclusion The introducer Freka® Pexact PEG procedure for long-term tube feeding may lead to significantly higher complication and mortality rates in patients with head/neck or oesophageal malignancies treated with chemo- and radiotherapy. It is suggested to use the conventional pull-type PEG tube placement in this group of patients, if possible. PMID:21410958

  15. A case of small-bowel obstruction after insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube due to mesenteric penetration.

    PubMed

    Roos, J

    2015-07-01

    A case of small-bowel obstruction after insertion of a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube is described. At laparotomy, the PEG tube was found to have penetrated the jejunal mesentery at two points, thereby acting as a focus for a volvulus. Direct injury and obstruction to the small bowel have been described but volvulus due to mesenteric penetration has not. PMID:26264109

  16. Cross-system effects of dysphagia treatment on dysphonia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    LaGorio, Lisa A; Carnaby-Mann, Giselle D; Crary, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, treatment of dysphagia and dysphonia has followed a specificity approach whereby treatment plans have focused on each dysfunction individually. Recently however, a therapeutic cross-system effect has been proposed between these two dysfunctions. At least one study has demonstrated swallowing improvement in subjects who completed a dysphonia treatment program. However, we are unaware of any evidence demonstrating the converse effect. In this paper, we present a case-report of a 74 year old male who demonstrated improvement in selected vocal parameters after completion of a dysphagia therapy program. Dysphagia therapy resulted in improved laryngeal function in this subject. Results implicate improved vocal fold tension with increased glottal closure. Further investigation into the potential for this cross-system effect is warranted. PMID:18667069

  17. Huge Parathyroid Adenoma with Dysphagia Presentation; A Case Report from Southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Ziaeean, Bizhan; Sohrabi-Nazari, Sahar

    2016-09-01

    Parathyroid adenoma is a benign tumor of the parathyroid glands. The cause of most parathyroid adenomas is unknown. Parathyroid adenoma increases the secretion of parathyroid hormone and results in primary hyperparathyroidism. High amounts of parathyroid hormone in the blood cause the imbalance of calcium, which leads to various complications such as kidney stones, depression, lethargy, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, myalgia, bone and joint pain, hoarseness, etc. Oropharyngeal dysphagia is defined as having problem in swallowing due to abnormalities in the structure and function of oropharynx and other related organs. The exact prevalence of dysphagia caused by parathyroid adenoma is unknown, but since this complication can lead to increased mortality and morbidity, its diagnosis is important. It is difficult to distinguish parathyroid malignancies from parathyroid adenoma even after surgery. Therefore, the final diagnosis is possible through surgery and histopathological evaluation. Here, a case of parathyroid adenoma with first presentation of generalized weakness and dysphagia has been reported. PMID:27582595

  18. Huge Parathyroid Adenoma with Dysphagia Presentation; A Case Report from Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ziaeean, Bizhan; Sohrabi-Nazari, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Parathyroid adenoma is a benign tumor of the parathyroid glands. The cause of most parathyroid adenomas is unknown. Parathyroid adenoma increases the secretion of parathyroid hormone and results in primary hyperparathyroidism. High amounts of parathyroid hormone in the blood cause the imbalance of calcium, which leads to various complications such as kidney stones, depression, lethargy, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, myalgia, bone and joint pain, hoarseness, etc. Oropharyngeal dysphagia is defined as having problem in swallowing due to abnormalities in the structure and function of oropharynx and other related organs. The exact prevalence of dysphagia caused by parathyroid adenoma is unknown, but since this complication can lead to increased mortality and morbidity, its diagnosis is important. It is difficult to distinguish parathyroid malignancies from parathyroid adenoma even after surgery. Therefore, the final diagnosis is possible through surgery and histopathological evaluation. Here, a case of parathyroid adenoma with first presentation of generalized weakness and dysphagia has been reported. PMID:27582595

  19. Rehabilitation or Compensation: Time for a Fresh Perspective on Speech and Language Therapy for Dysphagia and Parkinson's Disease?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sarah K.; Roddam, Hazel; Sheldrick, Heulwen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia is a common symptom of Parkinson's disease and can have negative consequences for physical health and quality of life. A variety of treatment options are available to clinicians working with people who have dysphagia and Parkinson's disease. These options can be broadly categorized as being compensatory or rehabilitative in…

  20. Survivors' Experiences of Dysphagia-Related Services Following Head and Neck Cancer: Implications for Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nund, Rebecca L.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Scarinci, Nerina A.; Cartmill, Bena; Kuipers, Pim; Porceddu, Sandro V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is known that people with dysphagia experience a number of negative consequences as a result of their swallowing difficulties following head and neck cancer management (HNC). However their perceptions and experiences of adjusting to dysphagia in the post-treatment phase, and the services received to assist this process, has not been…

  1. Evaluating and Reporting Dysphagia in Trials of Chemoirradiation for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gluck, Iris; Feng, Felix Y.; Lyden, Teresa; Haxer, Marc

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Reporting long-term toxicities in trials of chemoirradiation (CRT) of head-and-neck cancer (HNC) has mostly been limited to observer-rated maximal Grades {>=}3. We evaluated this reporting approach for dysphagia by assessing patient-reported dysphagia (PRD) and objective swallowing dysfunction through videofluoroscopy (VF) in patients with various grades of maximal observer-reported dysphagia (ORD). Methods and Materials: A total of 62 HNC patients completed quality-of-life questionnaires periodically through 12 months post-CRT. Five PRD items were selected: three dysphagia-specific questions, an Eating-Domain, and 'Overall Bother.' They underwent VF at 3 and 12 months, and ORD (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) scoring every 2 months. We classified patients into four groups (0-3) according to maximal ORD scores documented 3-12 months post-CRT, and assessed PRD and VF summary scores in each group. Results: Differences in ORD scores among the groups were considerable throughout the observation period. In contrast, PRD scores were similar between Groups 2 and 3, and variable in Group 1. VF scores were worse in Group 3 compared with 2 at 3 months but similar at 12 months. In Group 1, PRD and VF scores from 3 through 12 months were close to Groups 2 and 3 if ORD score 1 persisted, but were similar to Group 0 in patients whose ORD scores improved by 12 months. Conclusions: Patients with lower maximal ORD grades, especially if persistent, had similar rates of PRD and objective dysphagia as patients with highest grades. Lower ORD grades should therefore be reported. These findings may have implications for reporting additional toxicities besides dysphagia.

  2. Evaluating and Reporting Dysphagia in Trials of Chemoirradiation for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gluck, Iris; Feng, Felix Y; Lyden, Teresa; Haxer, Marc; Worden, Francis; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Reporting long-term toxicities in trials of chemo-irradiation (CRT) of head and neck cancer (HNC) has mostly been limited to observer-rated maximal grades ≥3. We evaluated this reporting approach for dysphagia by assessing 1) patient-reported dysphagia (PRD), and 2) objective swallowing dysfunction through videofluoroscopy (VF), in patients with various grades of maximal observer-reported dysphagia (ORD). Methods 62 HNC patients completed quality-of-life questionnaires periodically through 12m post-CRT. Five PRD items were selected: three dysphagia-specific questions, an Eating-Domain, and “Overall Bother”. They underwent VF at 3m and 12m, and ORD (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) scoring every 2 months. We classified patients into four groups (0-3) according to maximal ORD scores documented 3-12 months post-CRT, and assessed PRD and VF summary scores in each group. Results Differences in ORD scores among the groups were considerable throughout the observation period. In contrast, PRD scores were similar between Groups 2 and 3, and variable in Group 1. VF scores were worse in Group 3 compared to 2 at 3m but similar at 12m. In Group 1, PRD and VF scores from 3 through 12 months were close to Groups 2 and 3 if ORD score 1 persisted, but were similar to Group 0 in patients whose ORD scores improved by 12m. Conclusions Patients with lower maximal ORD grades, especially if persistent, had similar rates of PRD and objective dysphagia as patients with highest grades. Lower ORD grades should therefore be reported. These findings may have implications for reporting additional toxicities besides dysphagia. PMID:19783380

  3. Oropharyngeal dysphagia, free water protocol and quality of life: an update from a prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Martha; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2014-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia, typically associated with older adults, represents a spectrum of swallowing disorders with potentially serious complications and a negative impact on quality of life. A major complication of dysphagia is caused by aspiration, predominantly of thin liquids, which may cause aspiration pneumonia. Given that thin liquids are typically aspirated, the conventional therapy involves altering the diet to one consisting of modified solid consistencies and thickened fluids. While it is well known that this approach is appropriate for aspiration, it does represent difficulties with compliancy and quality of life. We have undertaken a relatively large scale clinical trial to investigate the relationships between the effects of free access to water and the development of aspiration, aspects of hydration and issues related to quality in people with dysphagia. Along with clinical observations and findings from others we have previously stratified people with dysphagia, namely those that are immobile or who have low mobility and severe degenerative neurological dysfunction, at highest risk of developing aspiration pneumonia following intake of water. In the present study, we have extended our previous clinical results. Our findings indicate that following purposeful selection of people with dysphagia with their own mobility and relatively healthy cognitive function, free access to water did not result in aspiration pneumonia, improved measures of hydration and in particular, significantly increased quality of life when compared to a diet consisting of thickened fluids only. Overall, we conclude that in people with good mobility and cognitive ability, there is no need to deviate from the Frazier Rehabilitation Centre free water protocol, which allows for the provision of water to people with dysphagia with strict guidelines particularly in relation to good physical ability. PMID:24392465

  4. Understanding the Viscosity of Liquids used in Infant Dysphagia Management.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Jacqueline; Chestnut, Amanda H; Jackson, Arwen; Barbon, Carly E A; Steele, Catriona M; Pickler, Laura

    2016-10-01

    When assessing swallowing in infants, it is critical to have confidence that the liquids presented during the swallow study closely replicate the viscosity of liquids in the infant's typical diet. However, we lack research on rheological properties of frequently used infant formulas or breastmilk, and various forms of barium contrast media used in swallow studies. The aim of the current study was to provide objective viscosity measurements for typical infant liquid diet options and barium contrast media. A TA-Instruments AR2000 Advanced Rheometer was used to measure the viscosity of five standard infant formulas, three barium products, and two breastmilk samples. Additionally, this study measured the viscosity of infant formulas and breastmilk when mixed with powdered barium contrast in a 20 % weight-to-volume (w/v) concentration. The study findings determined that standard infant formulas and the two breastmilk samples had low viscosities, at the lower end of the National Dysphagia Diet (NDD) thin liquid range. Two specialty formulas tested had much thicker viscosities, close to the lower boundary of the NDD nectar-thick liquid range. The study showed differences in viscosity between 60 % w/v barium products (Liquid E-Z-Paque(®) and E-Z-Paque(®) powder); the powdered product had a much lower viscosity, despite identical barium concentration. When E-Z-Paque(®) powdered barium was mixed in a 20 % w/v concentration using water, standard infant formulas, or breastmilk, the resulting viscosities were at the lower end of the NDD thin range and only slightly thicker than the non-barium comparator liquids. When E-Z-Paque(®) powdered barium was mixed in a 20 % w/v concentration with the two thicker specialty formulas (Enfamil AR 20 and 24 kcal), unexpected alterations in their original viscosity occurred. These findings highlight the clinical importance of objective measures of viscosity as well as objective data on how infant formulas or breastmilk may change in

  5. Congenital cataract, ataxia, external ophthalmoplegia and dysphagia in two siblings. A Marinesco-Sjögren-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schulz, S; Vielhaber, S; Muschke, P; Mohnike, K; Gooding, R; Wieacker, P

    2007-04-01

    Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome (MSS) is an autosomal recessive multiorgan disorder with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. The key features of MSS include cerebellar ataxia, early bilateral cataracts, delayed motor development, and to a varying degree mental retardation. The syndrome was recently mapped to chromosome 5q31, and loss-of-function mutations in the SIL1 gene have been identified as the primary pathology. Here, we describe two German siblings with clinical characteristics resembling those seen in many cases of MSS except that a marked cerebellar atrophy was not detectable in our patients. In addition, both patients presented with external ophthalmoplegia and paralytic dysphagia. Sequencing of all 10 exons of the SIL1 gene did not detect any SIL1 mutation in our patients. PMID:17712737

  6. Dysphagia and disrupted cranial nerve development in a mouse model of DiGeorge (22q11) deletion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karpinski, Beverly A.; Maynard, Thomas M.; Fralish, Matthew S.; Nuwayhid, Samer; Zohn, Irene E.; Moody, Sally A.; LaMantia, Anthony-S.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We assessed feeding-related developmental anomalies in the LgDel mouse model of chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a common developmental disorder that frequently includes perinatal dysphagia – debilitating feeding, swallowing and nutrition difficulties from birth onward – within its phenotypic spectrum. LgDel pups gain significantly less weight during the first postnatal weeks, and have several signs of respiratory infections due to food aspiration. Most 22q11 genes are expressed in anlagen of craniofacial and brainstem regions critical for feeding and swallowing, and diminished expression in LgDel embryos apparently compromises development of these regions. Palate and jaw anomalies indicate divergent oro-facial morphogenesis. Altered expression and patterning of hindbrain transcriptional regulators, especially those related to retinoic acid (RA) signaling, prefigures these disruptions. Subsequently, gene expression, axon growth and sensory ganglion formation in the trigeminal (V), glossopharyngeal (IX) or vagus (X) cranial nerves (CNs) that innervate targets essential for feeding, swallowing and digestion are disrupted. Posterior CN IX and X ganglia anomalies primarily reflect diminished dosage of the 22q11DS candidate gene Tbx1. Genetic modification of RA signaling in LgDel embryos rescues the anterior CN V phenotype and returns expression levels or pattern of RA-sensitive genes to those in wild-type embryos. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage, including but not limited to Tbx1, disrupts oro-facial and CN development by modifying RA-modulated anterior-posterior hindbrain differentiation. These disruptions likely contribute to dysphagia in infants and young children with 22q11DS. PMID:24357327

  7. Characteristics of Dysphagia in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Comparison With Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Kyung; Yeom, Jiwoon; Lee, Woo Hyung; Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the swallowing characteristics of dysphagic patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) with those of dysphagic stroke patients. Methods Forty-one patients with TBI were selected from medical records (between December 2004 to March 2013) and matched to patients with stroke (n=41) based on age, sex, and disease duration. Patients' swallowing characteristics were analyzed retrospectively using a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and compared between both groups. Following thorough review of medical records, patients who had a history of diseases that could affect swallowing function at the time of the study were excluded. Dysphagia characteristics and severity were evaluated using the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association National Outcome Measurement System swallowing scale, clinical dysphagia scale, and the videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale. Results There was a significant difference in radiological lesion location (p=0.024) between the two groups. The most common VFSS finding was aspiration or penetration, followed by decreased laryngeal elevation and reduced epiglottis inversion. Swallowing function, VFSS findings, or quantified dysphagia severity showed no significant differences between the groups. In a subgroup analysis of TBI patients, the incidence of tube feeding was higher in patients with surgical intervention than in those without (p=0.011). Conclusion The swallowing characteristics of dysphagic patients after TBI were comparable to those of dysphagic stroke patients. Common VFSS findings comprised aspiration or penetration, decreased laryngeal elevation, and reduced epiglottis inversion. Patients who underwent surgical intervention after TBI were at high risk of tube feeding requirement. PMID:27446779

  8. Vocal Variability Post Swallowing in Individuals with and without Oropharyngeal Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Karoline Weber dos; Scheeren, Betina; Maciel, Antonio Carlos; Cassol, Mauriceia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Voice modification after swallowing may indicate changes in the transit of the bolus. Objective The aim of this study is to verify the use of perceptual voice analysis to detect oropharyngeal dysphagia. Study Design Case series. Methods Twenty-seven patients with dysphagia as diagnosed by videofluoroscopy and 25 without were evaluated. The sustained vowel /a/ was recorded before this exam and after swallowing different consistencies (pasty, liquid and solid). For the voice evaluation, the GRBAS scale (grade, roughness, breathiness, asthenia and strain) and the parameter “wet voice” were used. Three judges blinded to study group and time of emission performed voice analysis. Results Individuals with dysphagia showed significant decrease in grade of voice and asthenia and increase in strain after swallowing pasty substances, differing from individuals without dysphagia who showed no modification of the parameters after swallowing. The wet voice parameter showed no difference after swallowing in both study groups. Conclusion The decrease in grade and asthenia and increased strain are indicative of a swallowing disorder, indicating increased vocal strain to clean the vocal tract of food. The modification of vocal production after swallowing proved to be a trusted resource for detection of swallowing disorders. PMID:25992153

  9. Effect of Human Saliva on the Consistency of Thickened Drinks for Individuals with Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallons, Katleen J. R.; Helmens, Harold J.; Oudhuis, A. A. C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thickening of foods and fluids is commonly used in the management of dysphagia to reduce the risk of aspiration. The use of starch-based thickeners is established. However, the use of gums in thickeners is gaining interest as they are resistant to salivary amylase, which may promote safer swallowing. Aims: To compare the effect of…

  10. Predictors of Asphyxiation Risk in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Dysphagia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, R.; Chadwick, D. D.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Adults with learning disabilities referred for assessment of their eating and drinking are frequently reported to cough and choke when eating and drinking. The research literature investigating dysphagia has often overlooked asphyxiation risk, highlighting coughing and choking as indicators of aspiration only. This is a notable…

  11. Assessment of Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Patients With Parkinson Disease: Use of Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Eun Hyun; Seo, Jin Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare tongue thickness, the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation (distance between the hyoid bone and thyroid cartilage), and the time interval between the initiation of tongue movement and the time of the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation, by using ultrasonography in healthy controls and patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Methods Healthy controls and PD patients with dysphagia were compared. Ultrasonography was performed 3 times for the evaluation of tongue thickness, the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation, and the time between the initiation of tongue movement and the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation. Results A total of 24 healthy controls and 24 PD patients with dysphagia were enrolled. No significant differences were demonstrated between the two groups for the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation (controls, 1.19±0.34 cm; PD patients, 1.37±0.5 cm; p=0.15) and tongue thickness (controls, 4.42±0.46 cm; PD patients, 4.27±0.51 cm; p=0.3). In contrast, the time to the shortest hyoid-thyroid approximation was significantly different between the two groups (controls, 1.53±0.87 ms; PD patients, 2.4±1.4 ms, p=0.048). Conclusion Ultrasonography can be useful in evaluating dysphagia in patients with PD by direct visualization and measurement of the hyoid bone. Moreover, ultrasonography might contribute to a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of dysphagia in PD. PMID:27152267

  12. Clinical and videofluoroscopic diagnosis of dysphagia in chronic encephalopathy of childhood*

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Brenda Carla Lima; Motta, Maria Eugênia Almeida; de Castro, Adriana Guerra; de Araújo, Claudia Marina Tavares

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the contribution of deglutition videofluoroscopy in the clinical diagnosis of dysphagia in chronic encephalopathy of childhood. Materials and Methods The study sample consisted of 93 children diagnosed with chronic encephalopathy, in the age range between two and five years, selected by convenience among patients referred to the authors' institution by speech therapists, neurologists and gastroenterologists in the period from March 2010 to September 2011. The data collection was made at two different moments, by different investigators who were blind to each other. Results The method presented low sensitivity for detecting aspiration with puree consistency (p = 0.04). Specificity and negative predictive value were high for clinical diagnosis of dysphagia with puree consistency. Conclusion In the present study, the value for sensitivity in the clinical diagnosis of dysphagia demonstrates that this diagnostic procedure may not detect any change in the swallowing process regardless of the food consistency used during the investigation. Thus, the addition of the videofluoroscopic method can significantly contribute to the diagnosis of dysphagia. PMID:25741054

  13. Swallowing and Dysphagia Rehabilitation: Translating Principles of Neural Plasticity into Clinically Oriented Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, JoAnne; Butler, Susan G.; Daniels, Stephanie K.; Gross, Roxann Diez; Langmore, Susan; Lazarus, Cathy L.; Martin-Harris, Bonnie; McCabe, Daniel; Musson, Nan; Rosenbek, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This review presents the state of swallowing rehabilitation science as it relates to evidence for neural plastic changes in the brain. The case is made for essential collaboration between clinical and basic scientists to expand the positive influences of dysphagia rehabilitation in synergy with growth in technology and knowledge. The…

  14. A prospective comparison of laser therapy and intubation in endoscopic palliation for malignant dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Loizou, L A; Grigg, D; Atkinson, M; Robertson, C; Bown, S G

    1991-05-01

    There is little objective long-term follow-up comparing laser therapy with intubation for palliation of malignant dysphagia. In a prospective, nonrandomized two-center trial 43 patients treated with the neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser were compared with 30 patients treated by endoscopic intubation; the two groups were comparable for mean age and tumor position, length, and histology. Dysphagia was graded from 0 to 4 (0, normal swallowing; 4, dysphagia for liquids). Pretreatment mean dysphagia grades were similar: laser-treated group, 2.9 (SD, 0.6); intubated group, 3.2 (SD, 0.55). For thoracic esophageal tumors, the percentage of patients achieving an improvement in dysphagia grade by greater than or equal to 1 grade initially and over the long term was similar (laser, 95% and 77%; intubation, 100% and 86%). For tumors crossing the cardia, intubation was significantly better (laser, 59% and 50%; intubation, 100% and 92%, respectively; P less than 0.001). In patients palliated over a long period, however, the mean dysphagia grade over the remainder of their mean dysphagia grade over the remainder of their lives (mean survival: laser, 6.1 months; intubation, 5.1 months) was better in the laser group (1.6 vs. 2.0; P less than 0.01); 33% of laser-treated and 11% of intubated patients could eat most or all solids (P less than 0.05). For long-term palliation, laser-treated patients required on average more procedures (4.6 vs. 1.4; P less than 0.05) and days in the hospital (14 vs. 9; P less than 0.05). The perforation rate was lower in the laser-treated group (2% vs. 13%; P less than 0.02); no treatment-related deaths occurred in either group. For individual patients, the best results are likely to be achieved when the two techniques are used in a complementary fashion in specialist centers. PMID:1707386

  15. Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes In The Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-And-Neck Radiotherapy To Dysphagia Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Minh Tam; Lee, Richard; Saito, Naoko; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Ozonoff, Al; Romesser, Paul B.; Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2,4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6–44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0–2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0–2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT. PMID:21669502

  16. Correlating Computed Tomography Perfusion Changes in the Pharyngeal Constrictor Muscles During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy to Dysphagia Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Minh Tam; Lee, Richard; Saito, Naoko; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Ozonoff, Al; Romesser, Paul B.; Wang, Jimmy; Sakai, Osamu

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To measure changes in perfusion of the pharyngeal constrictor muscles (PCM) using CT perfusion (CTP) imaging during a course of definitive radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) patients and correlate with dysphagia outcome after RT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen HNC patients underwent CTP imaging of the PCM at baseline and Weeks 2, 4, and 6 during RT and 6 weeks after RT. Blood flow and blood volume were measured in the PCM, and percentage change from baseline scan was determined. A single physician-based assessment of dysphagia was performed every 3 months after RT using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 grading system. Results: With a median follow-up of 28 months (range, 6-44 months), Grade 3 dysphagia was present in 7 of 15 patients, and 8 patients experienced Grade 0-2 dysphagia. The CTP parameters at Week 2 of RT demonstrated an increase in mean PCM blood flow of 161.9% vs. 12.3% (p = 0.007) and an increase in mean PCM blood volume of 96.6% vs. 8.7% (p = 0.039) in patients with 6-month post-RT Grade 3 dysphagia and Grade 0-2 dysphagia, respectively. On multivariate analysis, when adjusting for smoking history, tumor volume, and baseline dysphagia status, an increase in blood flow in the second week of RT was significant for 3- and 6-month Grade 3 dysphagia (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Perfusion changes in the PCM during Week 2 of RT in the PCM may predict the severity of dysphagia after HNC RT.

  17. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer Aiming to Reduce Dysphagia: Early Dose-Effect Relationships for the Swallowing Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Felix Y.; Kim, Hyungjin M.; Lyden, Teresa H.; Haxer, Marc J.; Feng, Mary; Worden, Frank P.; Eisbruch, Avraham . E-mail: eisbruch@umich.edu

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To present initial results of a clinical trial of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) aiming to spare the swallowing structures whose dysfunction after chemoradiation is a likely cause of dysphagia and aspiration, without compromising target doses. Methods and Materials: This was a prospective, longitudinal study of 36 patients with Stage III-IV oropharyngeal (31) or nasopharyngeal (5) cancer. Definitive chemo-IMRT spared salivary glands and swallowing structures: pharyngeal constrictors (PC), glottic and supraglottic larynx (GSL), and esophagus. Lateral but not medial retropharyngeal nodes were considered at risk. Dysphagia endpoints included objective swallowing dysfunction (videofluoroscopy), and both patient-reported and observer-rated scores. Correlations between doses and changes in these endpoints from pre-therapy to 3 months after therapy were assessed. Results: Significant correlations were observed between videofluoroscopy-based aspirations and the mean doses to the PC and GSL, as well as the partial volumes of these structures receiving 50-65 Gy; the highest correlations were associated with doses to the superior PC (p = 0.005). All patients with aspirations received mean PC doses >60 Gy or PC V{sub 65} >50%, and GSL V{sub 50} >50%. Reduced laryngeal elevation and epiglottic inversion were correlated with mean PC and GSL doses (p < 0.01). All 3 patients with strictures had PC V{sub 70} >50%. Worsening patient-reported liquid swallowing was correlated with mean PC (p = 0.05) and esophageal (p 0.02) doses. Only mean PC doses were correlated with worsening patient-reported solid swallowing (p = 0.04) and observer-rated swallowing scores (p = 0.04). Conclusions: These dose-volume-effect relationships provide initial IMRT optimization goals and motivate further efforts to reduce swallowing structures doses to reduce dysphagia and aspiration.

  18. The Use of Biodegradable Stents in Malignant Oesophageal Strictures for the Treatment of Dysphagia Before Neoadjuvant Treatment or Radical Radiotherapy: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Krokidis, Miltiadis Burke, Chris; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Gkoutzios, Panos; Hynes, Orla; Ahmed, Irfan; Dourado, Renato; Sabharwal, Tarun; Mason, Robert; Adam, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the clinical results of the use of biodegradable oesophageal stents in malignant strictures.MethodsEleven patients were included in this prospective analysis in which a woven polydioxanone biodegradable oesophageal stent was used. The inclusion criterion was that the patient underwent neoadjuvant treatment or radical radiotherapy after the stent insertion. Primary end points were dysphagia score at discharge, stent patency, and complication rate. Secondary end points were overall survival and surgical outcome of surgery.ResultsThere was a 100 % procedure technical success rate. Early complications occurred in three patients resulting in failure to restore oral nutrition. In the remaining eight patients, dysphagia was significantly improved at discharge. Mean stent patency rate in this group was 71.5 days. Stent dysfunction occurred in five of eight patients (62.5 %); in two of five patients this was due to local inflammatory reaction, and in three of five patients it was due to tumour growth after a mean time of 97.8 days, and a new metallic stent was consequently placed in four of five patients. One patient was successfully treated with esophagectomy. At the end of follow-up (mean time 102.1 days), three of eight stents were patent. The overall patient survival rate was 81.8 %.ConclusionAlthough short-term dysphagia scores improved, biodegradable stents do not appear to offer a clear beneficial effect in most cases of malignant strictures, particularly due to a local inflammatory reaction that may be induced. Technical improvement of the device and delineation of the patient group that would benefit from its use is necessary if further studies are to be conducted in the future.

  19. Relative Efficacy of Swallowing versus Non-swallowing Tasks in Dysphagia Rehabilitation: Current Evidence and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Drulia, Teresa C.; Ludlow, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials published in 2012 and the first six months of 2013 were reviewed. These involved either traditional dysphagia therapy, indirect methods not involving dysphagia therapy or a combination of direct and indirect methods. Of 27 studies, 7 were RCTs, 5 were controlled clinical trials and the remainder were uncontrolled case series. Sixteen studies combined an indirect treatment with traditional dysphagia therapy; only one study examined one technique for direct swallowing therapy. Effect sizes were computed and contrasted for each trial. Traditional dysphagia therapy had small to moderate effect sizes (between 0.3 and 0.6) while spontaneous recovery in acute stroke had effect sizes of 1.2. Placebo effects on patient ratings of degree of improvement on swallowing were estimated as small to moderate. To improve effect sizes, adaptive research designs are needed to develop the optimal methods and dosages of therapy before future clinical trials. PMID:24470988

  20. Dysphagia in the high-risk infant: potential factors and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jadcherla, Sudarshan

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal dysphagia, or abnormalities of swallowing, represent a major global problem, and consequences of dysfunctional feeding patterns carry over into infancy and toddler age groups. Growth, development, and independent feeding skills are all delayed among high-risk infants. Such a group comprises premature birth, low-birth-weight, congenital anomalies, perinatal asphyxia, postsurgical, and sepsis categories. The conflict between pathophysiologic and pragmatic feeding strategies remains a major conundrum and is largely due to a lack of validated diagnostic approaches amid heterogeneity of the patient phenotype. Thus, well-tested feeding management strategies that can be generalizable are lacking. Furthermore, the aerodigestive symptoms and signs, potential risk factors, and contributory etiologies remain nonspecific. This article presents mechanistic evidence related to the pathophysiologic basis of neonatal dysphagia as well as potential opportunities to improve feeding abilities and long-term development. PMID:26791178

  1. Prolonged dysphagia due to Listeria-rhombencephalitis with brainstem abscess and acute polyradiculoneuritis.

    PubMed

    Smiatacz, Tomasz; Kowalik, Maciej Michal; Hlebowicz, Maria

    2006-06-01

    We report a case of previously healthy student with acute rhombencephalitis and brainstem abscess caused by Listeria monocytogenes. The disease begun with uncharacteristic prodromal symptoms of gastrointestinal infection followed by headache and vertigo. After hospital admission the patient rapidly deteriorated, presenting pronounced dysphagia and respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. The diagnosis was established upon clinical symptoms of infection, brainstem involvement, typical MRI findings and positive for L. monocytogenes blood culture. Infection was complicated by acute, demyelinating neuropathy, diagnosed upon clinical symptoms of frail palsy confirmed by ENG. Initially introduced empirical doxycyclin/ceftriaxon treatment was subsequently changed to targeted ampicillin/gentamycin therapy, mechanical ventilation, intravenous human immunoglobulin treatment, tracheostomy and endoscopic gastrostomy. Prolonged dysphagia resolved after rehabilitation. After one year the patient remains well with only slight dysmetria. PMID:16260041

  2. Managing eating and drinking difficulties (dysphagia) with children who have learning disabilities: What is effective?

    PubMed

    Harding, Celia; Cockerill, Helen

    2015-07-01

    People who work with children who have neurological and learning disabilities frequently need to manage the health and emotional risks associated with eating, drinking and swallowing (dysphagia). Some approaches can support children to develop oral feeding competence or to maximise their ability to maintain some oral intake supplemented with tube feeding. However, some clinicians feel that oral-motor exercises can support eating and drinking skills as well as speech and language development, whereas there is little evidence to support this.The implied "beneficial" association between oral-motor exercises, speech and swallowing skills gives a false impression in terms of future outcomes for parents and carers of children with learning disabilities. This paper considers oral-motor approaches in the remediation of dysphagia and the need for a cultural shift away from this view. Realistic and useful outcomes for people with learning disabilities need to be an essential part of therapeutic intervention. PMID:24414040

  3. Improved Dysphagia After Decannulation of Tracheostomy in Patients With Brain Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Kyun; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Yoon, Jeong-Gyu; Lee, Jang-Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate improved dysphagia after the decannulation of a tracheostomy in patients with brain injuries. Methods The subjects of this study are patients with brain injuries who were admitted to the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine in Myongji Hospital and who underwent a decannulation between 2012 and 2014. A video fluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) was performed in order to investigate whether the patients' dysphagia had improved. We measured the following 5 parameters: laryngeal elevation, pharyngeal transit time, post-swallow pharyngeal remnant, upper esophageal width, and semisolid aspiration. We analyzed the patients' results from VFSS performed one month before and one month after decannulation. All VFSS images were recorded using a camcorder running at 30 frames per second. An AutoCAD 2D screen was used to measure laryngeal elevation, post-swallow pharyngeal remnant, and upper esophageal width. Results In this study, a number of dysphagia symptoms improved after decannulation. Laryngeal elevation, pharyngeal transit time, and semisolid aspiration showed no statistically significant differences (p>0.05), however after decannulation, the post-swallow pharyngeal remnant (pre 37.41%±24.80%, post 21.02%±11.75%; p<0.001) and upper esophageal width (pre 3.57±1.93 mm, post 4.53±2.05 mm; p<0.001) showed statistically significant differences. Conclusion When decannulation is performed on patients with brain injuries who do not require a ventilator and who are able to independently excrete sputum, improved esophageal dysphagia can be expected. PMID:26605176

  4. FLUOROSCOPIC EVALUATION OF ORO-PHARYNGEAL DYSPHAGIA: ANATOMY, TECHNIQUE, AND COMMON ETIOLOGIES

    PubMed Central

    Edmund, Dr; Au, Frederick Wing-Fai; Steele, Catriona M.

    2015-01-01

    Target Audience Radiologists and other professionals involved in imaging of oropharyngeal swallowing Objectives To review anatomy of the upper GI tract To review techniques and contrast agents used in the fluoroscopic examination of the oropharynx and hypopharynx To provide a pictorial review of some important causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia, and to link these to key findings in the clinical history to assist in establishing a clinical diagnosis To provide self-assessment questions to reinforce key learning points PMID:25539237

  5. Stent-Graft Repair of a Large Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm Causing Dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Vivek Niranjan, Khandelwal; Rawat, Lokesh; Gupta, A. K.

    2009-05-15

    Pseudoaneurysms of the cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) are rare and most frequently result from trauma, infection, or sometimes spontaneously. They have the potential to cause life-threatening hemorrhage; thus, their immediate management is necessary. Endovascular treatment by stent graft placement in the affected artery appears to be a safe and effective treatment option. We present a case of a child who presented with neck swelling and dysphagia caused by a ruptured cervical ICA pseudoaneurysm which was managed by stent graft placement.

  6. Nd-YAG laser as a palliative treatment for malignant dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Maciel, J; Barbosa, J; Leal, A S

    1996-02-01

    Two hundred and twenty-four patients with histologically-confirmed carcinoma of the oesophagus received palliative Nd-YAG laser therapy for malignant dysphagia between January 1986 and December 1994. The results are appraised in terms of the degree of relief obtained, its relation to the macroscopic type and the size of the tumour, peri-operative complications, duration of hospitalization and survival after treatment. Recannulation of the oesophageal lumen was obtained in 98.2% of the patients, after which 93.7% were able to ingest at least semi-solids. Although the lumen was permeable for a 9.8 mm endoscope, the remainder could only ingest liquids. The only complication was a perforation is six cases (2.7%). After treatment, 14.8% survived more than 1 year and 3.4% more than 2 years. After discussing the role of lasers in the palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia, the authors conclude that it can be considered effective in that it relieves the dysphagia and improves the patients' quality of life. PMID:8846872

  7. Effect of the Masako maneuver and neuromuscular electrical stimulation on the improvement of swallowing function in patients with dysphagia caused by stroke

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare improvements in swallowing function by the intervention of the Masako maneuver and neuromuscular electrical stimulation in patients with dysphagia caused by stroke. [Subjects and Methods] The Masako maneuver (n=23) and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (n=24) were conducted in 47 patients with dysphagia caused by stroke over a period of 4 weeks. Swallowing recovery was recorded using the functional dysphagia scale based on videofluoroscopic studies. [Results] Mean functional dysphagia scale values for the Masako maneuver and neuromuscular electrical stimulation groups decreased after the treatments. However, the pre-post functional dysphagia scale values showed no statistically significant differences between the groups. [Conclusion] The Masako maneuver and neuromuscular electrical stimulation each showed significant effects on the improvement of swallowing function for the patients with dysphagia caused by stroke, but no significant difference was observed between the two treatment methods. PMID:27512266

  8. Esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms before and after oral IQoroR training

    PubMed Central

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita; Franzén, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether muscle training with an oral IQoroR screen (IQS) improves esophageal dysphagia and reflux symptoms. METHODS: A total of 43 adult patients (21 women and 22 men) were consecutively referred to a swallowing center for the treatment and investigation of long-lasting nonstenotic esophageal dysphagia. Hiatal hernia was confirmed by radiologic examination in 21 patients before enrollment in the study (group A; median age 52 years, range: 19-85 years). No hiatal hernia was detected by radiologic examination in the remaining 22 patients (group B; median age 57 years, range: 22-85 years). Before and after training with an oral IQS for 6-8 mo, the patients were evaluated using a symptom questionnaire (esophageal dysphagia and acid chest symptoms; score 0-3), visual analogue scale (ability to swallow food: score 0-100), lip force test (≥ 15 N), velopharyngeal closure test (≥ 10 s), orofacial motor tests, and an oral sensory test. Another twelve patients (median age 53 years, range: 22-68 years) with hiatal hernia were evaluated using oral IQS traction maneuvers with pressure recordings of the upper esophageal sphincter and hiatus canal as assessed by high-resolution manometry. RESULTS: Esophageal dysphagia was present in all 43 patients at entry, and 98% of patients showed improvement after IQS training [mean score (range): 2.5 (1-3) vs 0.9 (0-2), P < 0.001]. Symptoms of reflux were reported before training in 86% of the patients who showed improvement at follow-up [1.7 (0-3) vs 0.5 (0-2), P < 0.001). The visual analogue scale scores were classified as pathologic in all 43 patients, and 100% showed improvement after IQS training [71 (30-100) vs 22 (0-50), P < 0.001]. No significant difference in symptom frequency was found between groups A and B before or after IQS training. The lip force test [31 N (12-80 N) vs 54 N (27-116), P < 0.001] and velopharyngeal closure test values [28 s (5-74 s) vs 34 s (13-80 s), P < 0.001] were significantly higher

  9. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in older persons - from pathophysiology to adequate intervention: a review and summary of an international expert meeting.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Rainer; Dziewas, Rainer; Beck, Anne Marie; Clavé, Pere; Hamdy, Shaheen; Heppner, Hans Juergen; Langmore, Susan; Leischker, Andreas Herbert; Martino, Rosemary; Pluschinski, Petra; Rösler, Alexander; Shaker, Reza; Warnecke, Tobias; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Volkert, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a highly prevalent and growing condition in the older population. Although OD may cause very severe complications, it is often not detected, explored, and treated. Older patients are frequently unaware of their swallowing dysfunction which is one of the reasons why the consequences of OD, ie, aspiration, dehydration, and malnutrition, are regularly not attributed to dysphagia. Older patients are particularly vulnerable to dysphagia because multiple age-related changes increase the risk of dysphagia. Physicians in charge of older patients should be aware that malnutrition, dehydration, and pneumonia are frequently caused by (unrecognized) dysphagia. The diagnosis is particularly difficult in the case of silent aspiration. In addition to numerous screening tools, videofluoroscopy was the traditional gold standard of diagnosing OD. Recently, the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is increasingly utilized because it has several advantages. Besides making a diagnosis, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is applied to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic maneuvers and texture modification of food and liquids. In addition to swallowing training and nutritional interventions, newer rehabilitation approaches of stimulation techniques are showing promise and may significantly impact future treatment strategies. PMID:26966356

  10. Late-onset dysphagia caused by severe spastic peristalsis of a free jejunal graft in a case of hypopharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takayuki; Goto, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Ko; Kurosawa, Koreyuki; Asada, Yukinori; Saijo, Shigeru; Matsuura, Kazuto

    2016-12-01

    Free jejunal transfer is the main technique used for reconstructing a circumferential defect caused by total pharyngo-laryngo-cervical-esophagectomy in certain cancer cases. We report a rare case of severe late-onset dysphagia caused by autonomous spastic peristalsis, which led to complete obstruction of the free jejunal route. A 70-year-old man underwent treatment for hypopharyngeal cancer involving total pharyngolaryngectomy with free jejunal transfer. After uneventful peri- and postoperative recovery, he developed sudden-onset severe dysphagia 22 months later. Gastrografin fluoroscopy revealed abnormal peristalsis and contraction of the transferred jejunum, leading to complete obstruction. Nutritional treatment, application of depressants of peristalsis, and xylocaine injection into the outer space of the jejunal mucosa all failed to alleviate the dysphagia. Surgical treatment involving a longitudinal incision of the jejunal graft, and interposing a cutaneous flap, as a fixed wall, between the incised jejunal margins to prevent obstruction was performed. After further reconstructive surgery involving using a pectoralis major musculocutaneous flap and a split-thickness skin graft to close a refractory jejunum-skin fistula, the dysphagia was permanently alleviated. To our knowledge, this is the first report of severe dysphagia caused by peristalsis of a free jejunal graft. PMID:27068782

  11. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in older persons – from pathophysiology to adequate intervention: a review and summary of an international expert meeting

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Rainer; Dziewas, Rainer; Beck, Anne Marie; Clavé, Pere; Hamdy, Shaheen; Heppner, Hans Juergen; Langmore, Susan; Leischker, Andreas Herbert; Martino, Rosemary; Pluschinski, Petra; Rösler, Alexander; Shaker, Reza; Warnecke, Tobias; Sieber, Cornel Christian; Volkert, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) is a highly prevalent and growing condition in the older population. Although OD may cause very severe complications, it is often not detected, explored, and treated. Older patients are frequently unaware of their swallowing dysfunction which is one of the reasons why the consequences of OD, ie, aspiration, dehydration, and malnutrition, are regularly not attributed to dysphagia. Older patients are particularly vulnerable to dysphagia because multiple age-related changes increase the risk of dysphagia. Physicians in charge of older patients should be aware that malnutrition, dehydration, and pneumonia are frequently caused by (unrecognized) dysphagia. The diagnosis is particularly difficult in the case of silent aspiration. In addition to numerous screening tools, videofluoroscopy was the traditional gold standard of diagnosing OD. Recently, the fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is increasingly utilized because it has several advantages. Besides making a diagnosis, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing is applied to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic maneuvers and texture modification of food and liquids. In addition to swallowing training and nutritional interventions, newer rehabilitation approaches of stimulation techniques are showing promise and may significantly impact future treatment strategies. PMID:26966356

  12. Dysphagia May Be an Independent Marker of Poor Outcome in Acute Lateral Medullary Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Jung; Nam, Hyunwoo; Hong, Jeong-Ho; Yeo, Min-Ju; Chang, Jun-Young; Jeong, Jin-Heon; Kim, Beom Joon; Bae, Hee-Joon; Ahn, Jin Young; Kim, Jong Sung

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The functional recovery after the lateral medullary infarction (LMI) is usually good. Little is known about the prognostic factors associated with poor outcome following acute LMI. The aim of this study was to identify the factors associated with poor long-term outcome after acute LMI, based on experiences at a single center over 11 years. Methods A consecutive series of 157 patients with acute LMI who were admitted within 7 days after symptom onset was evaluated retrospectively. Clinical symptoms were assessed within 1 day after admission, and outcomes were evaluated over a 1-year period after the initial event. The lesions were classified into three vertical types (rostral, middle, and caudal), and the patients were divided into two groups according to the outcome at 1 year: favorable [modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score ≤1] and unfavorable (mRS score ≥2). Results Of the 157 patients, 93 (59.2%) had a favorable outcome. Older age, hypertension, dysphagia, requirement for intensive care, and pneumonia were significantly more prevalent in the unfavorable outcome group. The frequencies of intensive care (13%) and mortality (16.7%) were significantly higher in the rostral lesion (p=0.002 and p=0.002). Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that older age and initial dysphagia were independently related to an unfavorable outcome at 1 year [odds ratio (OR)=1.04, 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=1.001-1.087, p=0.049; OR=2.46, 95% CI=1.04-5.84, p=0.041]. Conclusions These results suggest that older age and initial dysphagia in the acute phase are independent risk factors for poor long-term prognosis after acute LMI. PMID:26256660

  13. The experiential meaning of eating, handicap, adaptedness, and confirmation in living with esophageal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, B

    1995-01-01

    This article is mainly based on interview studies of pensioners' (n = 62), patients' (n = 19), and students' (n = 87) experiences of living with longstanding esophageal dysphagia. The aim is to describe the experiential meaning of dysphagic patients' lives by interpreting their experiences, problems, and emotions and by specifying these into scales according to the model of goal-directed action by Pörn [43-49]. The experiential meaning will be articulated in terms of attainment or nonattainment of goals in relation to eating, handicap, adaptedness, and confirmation. In the experiential meaning of eating, the emphasis is on the attainment of nourishing goals or goals attained by means of food with desired hedonistic qualities and linked with feelings of hope or no hope of a shared life. The experiential meaning of handicap is interpreted as the dysphagic individual's experiences of an actual nonattainment of eating goals due to swallowing disabilities and with experiences of nonattainment of other important goals and related emotions; for example, shame for human incompetence. The experiential meaning of adaptedness is understood as the dysphagic individual's experiences of actual capacity for goal attainments interpreted as a sense of control in the daily living with dysphagia and linked with security, or in the negative case, reduced self-esteem and feelings of panic or fear. The experiential meaning of confirmation is interpreted as the dysphagic individual's experiences of actual or potential repertoire for goal attainment, i.e., self-assessment strengthened by evidence obtained in relationships linked with emotions of hope of self-realization. In conclusion, a specific model for understanding the dysphagic patient's concealment of dysphagia in the medical encounter has been developed. PMID:7600857

  14. Clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia in preschool children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Benfer, Katherine A; Weir, Kelly A; Bell, Kristie L; Ware, Robert S; Davies, Peter S W; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the discriminative validity, reproducibility, and prevalence of clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia according to gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). It was a cross-sectional population-based study of 130 children diagnosed with CP at 18-36 months (mean=27.4, 81 males) and 40 children with typical development (TD, mean=26.2, 18 males). Sixteen signs suggestive of pharyngeal phase impairment were directly observed in a videoed mealtime by a speech pathologist, and reported by parents on a questionnaire. Gross motor function was classified using the Gross Motor Function Classification System. The study found that 67.7% of children had clinical signs, and this increased with poorer gross motor function (OR=1.7, p<0.01). Parents reported clinical signs in 46.2% of children, with 60% agreement with direct clinical mealtime assessment (kappa=0.2, p<0.01). The most common signs on direct assessment were coughing (44.7%), multiple swallows (25.2%), gurgly voice (20.3%), wet breathing (18.7%) and gagging (11.4%). 37.5% of children with TD had clinical signs, mostly observed on fluids. Dysphagia cut-points were modified to exclude a single cough on fluids, with a modified prevalence estimate proposed as 50.8%. Clinical signs suggestive of pharyngeal dysphagia are common in children with CP, even those with ambulatory CP. Parent-report on 16 specific signs remains a feasible screening method. While coughing was consistently identified by clinicians, it may not reflect children's regular performance, and was not sufficiently discriminative in children aged 18-36 months. PMID:25562439

  15. Rehabilitation of Dysphagia Following Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pauloski, Barbara R.

    2008-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Patients with cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx or larynx may be treated with surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these modalities. Each treatment type may have a negative impact on posttreatment swallowing function; these effects are presented in this chapter. The clinician has a number of rehabilitative procedures available to reduce or eliminate swallowing disorders in patients treated for cancer of the head and neck. The various procedures--including postures, maneuvers, modifications to bolus volume and viscosity, range of motion exercises, and strengthening exercises--and their efficacy in treated head and neck cancer patients are discussed. PMID:18940647

  16. Trans-tracheostomic endoscopy of the larynx in the evaluation of dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Ricci Maccarini, A; Stacchini, M; Salsi, D; Pieri, F; Magnani, M; Casolino, D

    2007-01-01

    Summary Laryngeal endoscopy plays a determinant role in clinical evaluation of dysphagia. The examination is performed by means of a trans-nasal approach with a flexible fiberoptic endoscope, able to visualize the pre- and post-deglutitory steps of the pharyngeal phase of swallowing. In patients with tracheostomy, it is possible to visualize the glottic or neoglottic function during the intra-deglutitory phase, performing the examination through a trans-tracheostomic route. The procedure and indications of this endoscopic technique are described. PMID:18320834

  17. [Aural Stimulation with Capsaicin Ointment Improved the Swallowing Function in Patients with Dysphagia: Evaluation by the SMRC Scale].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Eiji; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Ohnishi, Hiroki; Kawata, Ikuji; Takeda, Noriaki

    2015-11-01

    Cough and swallowing reflexes are important airway-protective mechanisms against aspiration. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, one of the side effects of which is cough, have been reported to reduce the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in hypertensive patients with stroke. ACE inhibitors have also been reported to improve the swallowing function in post-stroke patients. On the other hand, stimulation of the Arnold nerve, the auricular branch of the vagus, triggers the cough reflex (Arnold's ear-cough reflex). Capsaicin, an agonist of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), has been shown to activate the peripheral sensory C-fibers. Stimulation of the sensory branches of the vagus in the laryngotracheal mucosa with capsaicin induces the cough reflex and has been reported to improve the swallowing function in patients with dysphagia. In our previous study, we showed that aural stimulation of the Arnold nerve with 0.025% capsaicin ointment improved the swallowing function, as evaluated by the endoscopic swallowing score, in 26 patients with dysphagia. In the present study, the video images of swallowing recorded in the previous study were re-evaluated using the SMRC scale by an independent otolaryngologist who was blinded to the information about the patients and the endoscopic swallowing score. The SMRC scale is used to evaluate four aspects of the swallowing function: 1) Sensory: the initiation of the swallowing reflex as assessed by the white-out timing; 2) Motion: the ability to hold blue-dyed water in the oral cavity and induce laryngeal elevation; 3) Reflex: glottal closure and the cough reflex induced by touching the epiglottis or arytenoid with the endoscope; 4) Clearance: pharyngeal clearance of the blue-dyed water after swallowing. Accordingly, we demonstrated that a single application of capsaicin ointment to the external auditory canal of patients with dysphagia significantly improved the R, but not the S, M or C scores, and this

  18. Cough Reflex Testing in Dysphagia Following Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Anna; Zeng, Irene S.L.; McLauchlan, Helen; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee

    2013-01-01

    Background Significant health issues and service delivery costs are associated with post-stroke pneumonia related to dysphagia. Silent aspiration is known to increase pneumonia and mortality in this population. The utility of cough reflex testing (CRT) for reducing pneumonia in acute stroke patients was the subject of this randomised, controlled trial. Methods Patients referred for swallowing evaluation (N = 311) were assigned to either 1) a control group receiving standard evaluation or 2) an experimental group receiving standard evaluation with CRT. Participants in the experimental group were administered nebulised citric acid with test results contributing to clinical decisions. Outcomes for both groups were measured by pneumonia rates at 3 months post evaluation and other clinical indices of swallowing management. Results Analysis of the data identified no significant differences between groups in pneumonia rate (P = 0.38) or mortality (P = 0.15). Results of CRT were shown to influence diet recommendations (P < 0.0001) and referrals for instrumental assessment (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Despite differences in clinical management between groups, the end goal of reducing pneumonia in post stroke dysphagia was not achieved. PMID:23671548

  19. A Therapeutic Maneuver for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Valter Nilton; Corrêa, Sabrina Mello Alves; Soares, Renato José

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study investigates resources to provide better conditions for oropharyngeal swallowing for improvement in the quality of life of Parkinson’s disease patients. METHOD Three men and one woman with an average age of 70.25 years had been afflicted with Parkinson’s disease for an average of 9.25 years. The patients were submitted to a rehabilitation program for oropharyngeal dysphagia after a clinical evaluation of swallowing. The rehabilitation program consisted of daily sessions for two consecutive weeks during which a biofeedback resource adapted especially for this study was used. The patients were then reevaluated for swallowing ability at follow-up. RESULTS The patients presenting difficulties with swallowing water displayed no such problems after rehabilitation. Only one patient exhibited slow oral transit of food and other discrete oropharyngeal food remnants when swallowing a biscuit. The sample variance was used to analyze the pressure measurements, demonstrating a numerical similarity of the results obtained with the swallowing of saliva or of biscuits (VAR = 4.41). A statistical difference was observed between the swallowing of saliva and biscuits, showing a significant pressure increase at the end of the rehabilitation program (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION The effortful swallow maneuver reinforced by using biofeedback appears to be a therapeutic resource in the rehabilitation of oropharyngeal dysphagia in Parkinson’s disease patients. PMID:18925327

  20. Altered swallowing function in elderly patients without dysphagia: radiologic findings in 56 cases.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, O; Feinberg, M J

    1991-06-01

    Swallowing disorder is an increasing problem in our aging population. A majority of these patients have a functional abnormality of the oral, pharyngeal, and/or esophageal stage of swallowing. However, what constitutes normalcy is not well understood, and baseline swallowing in elderly persons without dysphagia has not been adequately described. We therefore evaluated 56 persons with a mean age of 83 years who had no symptoms of dysphagia or eating difficulty. Videofluoroscopy and radiographs with the subject erect and recumbent were obtained. Normal deglutition, as defined in young persons, was present in only 16%. Oral abnormalities (difficulty ingesting, controlling, and delivering bolus relative to swallowing initiation) were seen in 63%. Pharyngeal dysfunction (bolus retention and lingual propulsion or pharyngeal constrictor paresis) was seen in 25%. Pharyngoesophageal segment abnormalities were observed in 39% (mostly cricopharyngeal muscle dysfunction). Esophageal abnormalities (mostly motor in nature) were observed in 36%. What has been described as swallowing dysfunction in young persons may not be abnormal in very elderly persons. It is difficult to distinguish the effect of normal aging from the effects of specific diseases or gradual degenerative changes. PMID:2028863

  1. Recanalization of tube overgrowth: a useful new indication for laser in palliation of malignant dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, I R; Loizou, L A; Tulloch, M; Thorpe, S; Brown, S G

    1992-01-01

    Overgrowth of an esophageal prosthesis by cancer is a late complication of insertion which presents a difficult management problem. We have treated 14 such patients; 9 had Celestin tubes and 5 Atkinson tubes in situ for a median of 7 months. The median patient age was 75 years; 3 had squamous cell carcinomas and 11 adenocarcinomas; 12 were at the lowest thoracic esophagus or cardia, and 2 were anastomotic. Eleven tubes were overgrown at the top, two at the bottom only, and one at both ends. Dysphagia was graded from 0 to 4 (0 = normal; 4 = dysphagia for liquids). All patients but one improved with treatment. The median pre-treatment grade was 4 (range, 2 to 4) and post-treatment was 2 (0 to 3). This improvement was significant (p less than 0.01) Wilcoxon-signal rank). Most patients required only one or two endoscopies. The median survival was 9 weeks from first laser session (range, 3 to 36 weeks). We feel these results justify laser treatment in most patients in whom cancer overgrowth causes blockage of an esophageal prosthesis. PMID:1373700

  2. The natural history and functional consequences of dysphagia after hemispheric stroke.

    PubMed Central

    Barer, D H

    1989-01-01

    Data from 357 conscious stroke patients taking part in an acute intervention trial and assessed within 48 hours of the onset of symptoms, were used to investigate the prevalence and natural history of swallowing problems. Nearly 30% of patients with single-hemisphere strokes were initially found to have difficulty swallowing a mouthful of water, but in most of those who survived, the deficit had resolved by the end of the first week. Strong correlations were found between dysphagia and speech impairment (comprehension and expression) and with facial weakness, but there was no association with the side of the stroke. After controlling for other markers of overall stroke severity such as conscious level, urinary continence, white blood cell count and strength in the affected limbs, swallowing impairment still showed a significant inverse correlation with functional ability at 1 and 6 months. These results indicate that, even if dysphagia itself is not responsible for much excess mortality in acute stroke, it might still lead to complications which hamper functional recovery. PMID:2564884

  3. Screening Adult Patients with a Tracheostomy Tube for Dysphagia: A Mixed-Methods Study of Practice in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginnelly, Aeron; Greenwood, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with tracheostomy tubes are at risk of aspiration and swallowing problems (dysphagia), and because of their medical acuity, complications in this patient population can be severe. It is well recognized that swallow screening in stroke significantly reduces potential complications by allowing early identification and…

  4. Training and Self-Reported Confidence for Dysphagia Management among Speech-Language Pathologists in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donoghue, Cynthia R.; Dean-Claytor, Ashli

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The number of children requiring dysphagia management in the schools is increasing. This article reports survey findings relative to speech-language pathologists' (SLPs') training and self-rated confidence to treat children with swallowing and feeding disorders in the schools. Method: Surveys were completed by 222 SLPs representing…

  5. Training Support Staff to Modify Fluids to Appropriate Safe Consistencies for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Dysphagia: An Efficacy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, D. D.; Stubbs, J.; Fovargue, S.; Anderson, D.; Stacey, G.; Tye, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Modifying the consistency of food and drink is a strategy commonly used in the management of dysphagia for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). People with ID often depend on others for the preparation of food and drink and therefore depend on those caregivers achieving the correct consistency to keep them safe and avoid…

  6. The Role of the School-based Speech-Language Pathologist Serving Preschool Children with Dysphagia: A Personal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurjan, Randy Moskowitz

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the role of speech-language pathologists in serving preschool children with dysphagia. Current approaches to feeding and swallowing intervention, etiologies and programs, transdisciplinary teaming, developmental and feeding evaluation, and types of service delivery models (home-based and center-based) for preschool children…

  7. A Descriptive Study of the Fluid Intake, Hydration, and Health Status of Rehabilitation Inpatients without Dysphagia Following Stroke.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jo; Doeltgen, Sebastian; Miller, Michelle; Scholten, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Adequate hydration is important for all people, particularly when hospitalized with illness. Individuals with dysphagia following stroke are considered to be at risk of inadequate fluid intake and, therefore, dehydration, but there is little information about the fluid intake or hydration of individuals without dysphagia poststroke. This cohort study measured the average beverage intake, calculated the urea/creatinine ratio as a measure of hydration, and documented specific health outcomes of 86 people without dysphagia poststroke who were inpatients in rehabilitation centers. Participants drank on average 1504 ml per day (SD 359 ml), which typically represented 67% of their estimated daily requirement. Approximately 44% of the participants in the sample were dehydrated based on a blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio >20:1. Sixteen percent of participants were diagnosed with one or more of the health outcomes of dehydration/hypernatremia, urinary tract infection, or constipation. A greater level of dependence was associated with poorer beverage intake and higher risk of an adverse health outcome. Those in the older/elderly age range (particularly older women) and those with poor mobility were most at risk of poor hydration. This study highlights that patients in rehabilitation facilities poststroke, even without dysphagia, may be at risk of suboptimal fluid intake and hydration. PMID:26267442

  8. Neural and cortical analysis of swallowing and detection of motor imagery of swallow for dysphagia rehabilitation-A review.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Ang, K K; Wang, C; Phua, K S; Guan, C

    2016-01-01

    Swallowing is an essential function in our daily life; nevertheless, stroke or other neurodegenerative diseases can cause the malfunction of swallowing function, ie, dysphagia. The objectives of this review are to understand the neural and cortical basis of swallowing and tongue, and review the latest techniques on the detection of motor imagery of swallow (MI-SW) and motor imagery of tongue movements (MI-TM), so that a practical system can be developed for the rehabilitation of poststroke dysphagia patients. Specifically, we firstly describe the swallowing process and how the swallowing function is assessed clinically. Secondly, we review the techniques that performed the neural and cortical analysis of swallowing and tongue based on different modalities such as functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and magnetoencephalography. Thirdly, we review the techniques that performed detection and analysis of MI-SW and MI-TM for dysphagia stroke rehabilitation based on electroencephalography (EEG) and NIRS. Finally, discussions on the advantages and limitations of the studies are presented; an example system and future research directions for the rehabilitation of stroke dysphagia patients are suggested. PMID:27590970

  9. The Relation Between the Presence of Aspiration or Penetration and the Clinical Indicators of Dysphagia in Poststroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyeju; Shin, Gayoung; Jun, Ahyoung; Park, Taeok; Ko, Doheung; Choi, Eunhee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the relation between the presence of penetration or aspiration and the occurrence of the clinical indicators of dysphagia. The presence of penetration or aspiration is closely related to the clinical indicators of dysphagia. It is essential to understand these relationships in order to implement proper diagnosis and treatment of dysphagia. Methods Fifty-eight poststroke survivors were divided into two groups: patients with or without penetration or aspiration. Medical records and videofluoroscopic swallowing examinations were reviewed. The occurrence of clinical indicators of dysphagia between two groups was analyzed with Cross Tabulation and the Pearson chi-square test (p<0.05). Results Poststroke survivors with penetration or aspiration had significantly high occurrences of delayed initiation of the swallow (p=0.04) and reduced hyolaryngeal elevation (p<0.01) than those without penetration or aspiration. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that delayed initiation of the swallow is a strong physiological indicator of penetration or aspiration during the oral stage of swallowing in poststroke survivors. For the pharyngeal stage of swallowing, hyoid and laryngeal elevation is a key event related to occurrence of penetration or aspiration. Clinical indicators should be investigated further to allow appropriate implementation of treatment strategies for stroke survivors. PMID:26949674

  10. The use of the Amplatzer plug to treat dysphagia lusoria caused by an aberrant right subclavian artery.

    PubMed

    Morris, Marvin E; Benjamin, Makamson; Gardner, Glenn P; Nichols, W Kirt; Faizer, Rumi

    2010-04-01

    Emerging technology with endovascular techniques has expanded our armamentarium to treat the aberrant right subclavian artery. We describe a hybrid technique using an Amplatzer plug in combination with a carotid subclavian bypass to treat a patient with dysphagia lusoria. PMID:20004549