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Sample records for dystonia musculorum deformans

  1. Fat embolism syndrome in a child with dystonia musculorum deformans

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Ng, Lai Ming; Chow, Wang; To, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy with dystonia musculorum deformans underwent an operation for removal of femoral implants and excision of the prominence at the greater trochanter of the left hip. He was found to have fat embolism syndrome at postoperative day 1 as evidenced by confusion, respiratory symptoms, chest radiograph changes, raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate, thrombocytopenia and fat in the urine and sputum. PMID:22604515

  2. Swimming activity in dystonia musculorum mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, R; Joyal, C C; Cote, C

    1993-07-01

    Dystonia musculorum (dt) mutant mice, characterized by degeneration of spinocerebellar fibers, were evaluated in a visible platform swim test. It was found that dt mutants were slower to reach the platform than normal mice. However, the number of quadrants traversed was not higher in dt mutants. It is concluded that spinocerebellar fibers to the vermis are important in limb control during swimming but not in visuo-motor guidance (navigational skills) of the animal towards a visible goal, at least in regard to the quadrant measure. It is not excluded that a measure tracing their path may find a mild deviation from the goal. PMID:8327590

  3. Early Illustrations of Geste Antagoniste in Cervical and Generalized Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Broussolle, Emmanuel; Laurencin, Chloé; Bernard, Emilien; Thobois, Stéphane; Danaila, Teodor; Krack, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Geste antagoniste, or sensory trick, is a voluntary maneuver that temporarily reduces the severity of dystonic postures or movements. We present a historical review of early reports and illustrations of geste antagoniste. Results In 1894, Brissaud described this phenomenon in Paris in patients with torticollis. He noted that a violent muscular contraction could be reversed by a minor voluntary action. He considered the improvement obtained by what he called “simple mannerisms, childish behaviour or fake pathological movements” was proof of the psychogenic origin of what he named mental torticollis. This concept was supported by photographical illustrations of the patients. The term geste antagoniste was used by Brissaud’s pupils, Meige and Feindel, in their 1902 monograph on movement disorders. Other reports and illustrations of this sign were published in Europe between 1894 and 1906. Although not mentioned explicitly, geste antagoniste was also illustrated in a case report of generalized dystonia in Oppenheim’s 1911 seminal description of dystonia musculorum deformans in Berlin. Discussion Brissaud-Meige’s misinterpretation of the geste antagoniste unfortunately anchored the psychogenic origin of dystonia for decades. In New York, Herz brought dystonia back into the realm of organic neurology in 1944. Thereafter, it was given prominence by other authors, notably Fahn and Marsden in the 1970–1980s. Nowadays, neurologists routinely investigate for geste antagoniste when a dystonic syndrome is suspected, because it provides a further argument in favor of dystonia. The term alleviating maneuver was proposed in 2014 to replace sensory trick or geste antagoniste. This major sign is now part of the motor phenomenology of the 2013 Movement Disorder Society’s classification of dystonia. PMID:26417535

  4. Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jinnah, H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary There has been considerable progress in our understanding of dystonia over the last century. Growing recognition of dystonia has enhanced awareness of its diverse motor phenomenology and brought attention to the importance that nonmotor features may play in this disorder, once considered to be purely motor. Using the latest technologies in human genetics, new genetic links are being discovered at an ever-quickening pace and expanding our knowledge of the disorder's complex pathogenesis. Furthermore, as we gain clearer insight into the pathophysiology of dystonia and an appreciation of the involvement of dysfunction outside the basal ganglia, dystonia has been increasingly viewed as a network disorder. Here we briefly discuss some of the recent noteworthy advances. PMID:26124980

  5. Musician's Dystonias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters & Press Releases Dystonia Dialogue Financials Contact Site Tree Home What is Dystonia? Living With Dystonia Get ... Medical Research Foundation (DMRF) has served the dystonia community since 1976. Join us in our global effort ...

  6. Oromandibular Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters & Press Releases Dystonia Dialogue Financials Contact Site Tree Home What is Dystonia? Living With Dystonia Get ... Medical Research Foundation (DMRF) has served the dystonia community since 1976. Join us in our global effort ...

  7. Dystonia: phenomenology

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY In 1984, dystonia was defined by an ad hoc committee of the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation as a syndrome of involuntary, sustained muscle contractions affecting one or more sites of the body, frequently causing twisting and repetitive movements, or abnormal postures. In 2011, dystonia remains a purely clinical diagnosis. Primary dystonia includes syndromes in which dystonia is the sole phenotypic manifestation with the exception that tremor can be present as well. Primary dystonias are typically mobile and may show task specificity. Fixed dystonias are often psychogenic or associated with complex regional pain syndrome. Fixed dystonia may also be the terminal consequence of long-standing, inadequately-treated, severe appendicular or cervical dystonia. The vast majority of primary dystonias have their onset in adults. Late-onset, primary, focal dystonia, particularly blepharospasm, may spread to affect other anatomical segments. Patients with focal dystonia may also exhibit spontaneous remissions that last for years. Although sensory tricks are commonly reported by patients with primary dystonia, they have also been described in subjects with secondary dystonia. Another important sensory aspect of dystonia is pain which is relatively common in cervical dystonia but also reported by many patients with masticatory dystonia, hand–forearm dystonia and blepharospasm. In conclusion, “dystonia” can be used to delimit a clinical sign or loosely define a neuropsychiatric sensorimotor syndrome. PMID:22166421

  8. Fluorosis and periostitis deformans as complications of prolonged voriconazole treatment.

    PubMed

    Rad, Babak; Saleem, Mohamed; Grant, Susan; Florkowski, Christopher; Coates, Penelope; Gordon, David; Rankin, Wayne

    2015-09-01

    We describe a case of development of painful periostitis deformans in a 39-year-old woman who was receiving long-term voriconazole treatment for Aspergillus infection as a complication of orthotopic liver transplant. Measurement of fluoride levels strongly supports fluorosis to be the mechanism of the voriconazole-induced periostitis deformans and supports the concept that such measurements might be of use in predicting this complication of long-term voriconazole treatment. PMID:25587196

  9. Musician's Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Frucht, MD in partnership with the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation. MWD established a network of health care practitioners ... DMRF on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. © Dystonia Medical Research Foundation 2012

  10. Musician's dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Jon

    2015-08-01

    Musician's dystonia is a task-specific dystonia that usually affects the embouchure or the most active digits of the most active hand, and therefore differs between instruments. Since it is usually painless and intermittent, the diagnosis is often delayed and it is commonly misdiagnosed as being an overuse disorder or tendon pathology. It arises from pathological brain plasticity: physiological studies suggest that it is an exaggeration of brain changes that are required to achieve advanced musical skills. Its treatment often has limited success; however, musical retraining, botulinum toxin or rehabilitation based on modifying the aberrant plasticity may help. PMID:26023204

  11. Dystonia Medical Research Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Dystonia Research Research News Funding Programs Current Research Dystonia Coalition About DMRF Mission People Dystonia Dialogue Financials For the Media Connect Contact Us Privacy Policy Support Groups Calendar

  12. Dystonia: Physical Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... accompany the dystonia. Under the guidance of a physical therapist and a physician, an individual may learn to ... the dystonia. For information about locating a local physical therapist who specializes in neurological conditions such as dystonia, ...

  13. The Genetics of Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia has been defined as a syndrome of involuntary, sustained muscle contractions affecting one or more sites of the body, frequently causing twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal postures. Dystonia is also a clinical sign that can be the presenting or prominent manifestation of many neurodegenerative and neuro-metabolic disorders. Etiological categories include primary dystonia, secondary dystonia, heredodegenerative diseases with dystonia, and dystonia plus. Primary dystonia includes syndromes in which dystonia is the sole phenotypic manifestation with the exception that tremor can be present as well. Most primary dystonia begins in adults, and approximately 10% of probands report one or more affected family members. Many cases of childhood- and adolescent-onset dystonia are due to mutations in TOR1A and THAP1. Mutations in THAP1 and CIZ1 have been associated with sporadic and familial adult-onset dystonia. Although significant recent progress had been made in defining the genetic basis for most of the dystonia-plus and heredodegenerative diseases with dystonia, a major gap remains in understanding the genetic etiologies for most cases of adult-onset primary dystonia. Common themes in the cellular biology of dystonia include G1/S cell cycle control, monoaminergic neurotransmission, mitochondrial dysfunction, and the neuronal stress response. PMID:22989765

  14. Dystonia: Emotional and Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coping Tips & Strategies Are You Severely Depressed? Dystonia & Depression Dystonia & Anxiety Finding a Mental Health Professional When a Child is Diagnosed Online Support Frequently Asked Questions Faces of Dystonia Emotional & Mental Health Although dystonia is ...

  15. Spondylosis deformans and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (dish) resulting in adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Maria; Gonçalves, Rita; Haley, Allison; Wessmann, Annette; Penderis, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Spondylosis deformans and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) are usually incidental findings and in most dogs are either asymptomatic or associated with mild clinical signs. Severe spondylosis deformans and DISH can result in complete bony fusion of consecutive vertebral segments. One of the recognised complications following vertebral fusion in human patients is the development of adjacent segment disease, which is defined as degenerative changes, most commonly degenerative intervertebral disc disease, in the mobile vertebral segment neighboring a region of complete vertebral fusion. A similar syndrome following cervical fusion in dogs has been termed the domino effect. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the hypothesis that vertebral fusion occurring secondary to spondylosis deformans or DISH in dogs would protect fused intervertebral disc spaces from undergoing degeneration, but result in adjacent segment disease at neighbouring unfused intervertebral disc spaces. Eight dogs with clinical signs of thoracolumbar myelopathy, magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracolumbar vertebral column, and spondylosis deformans or DISH producing fusion of > or = 2 consecutive intervertebral disc spaces were evaluated. Vertebral fusion of > or = 2 consecutive intervertebral disc spaces was correlated (P = 0.0017) with adjacent segment disease at the neighbouring unfused intervertebral disc space. Vertebral fusion appeared to protect fused intervertebral disc spaces from undergoing degeneration (P < 0.0001). Adjacent segment disease should be considered in dogs with severe spondylosis deformans or DISH occurring in conjunction with a thoracolumbar myelopathy. PMID:22734148

  16. [A comparative evaluation of the efficacy of magneto- and laser therapy in patients with osteoarthrosis deformans].

    PubMed

    Selivonenko, V G; Syvolap, V D; Porada, L V; Medvedeva, V N; Boev, S S; Morozov, A I; Slin'ko, V G; Berest, S M; Garbuz, L N; Sholokh, S G

    1997-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of efficacy of magneto- and laser therapy was carried out in 82 patients with osteoarthrosis deformans. The magnetic field and laser irradiation dispelled the pain syndrome and synovitis manifestations. It is recommendable that the multiple-modality therapy of patients with osteoarthrosis deformans should involve magneto- and laser therapy (15 to 20 procedures per one course) that improve results of the treatment being received and allow the time of hospitalization to be reduced at an average by 5 bed-days. Laser appeared to be a very effective mode of treatment. No unfavourable side effects were recordable. PMID:9491734

  17. Art and dystonia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J; Slawek, Jaroslaw; Sitek, Emilia J; Martinez Castrillo, Juan Carlos

    2015-09-15

    Dystonia has a recent history in medicine. Focal dystonia was described in the 19th century by classic authors including Gowers, whilst generalized dystonia was described at the turn of the century. However, it is possible to find precise descriptions of dystonia in art, centuries before the medical definition. We have reviewed several pieces of art (sculpture, painting and literature) across the history that might represent descriptions of dystonia, from ancient period to nowadays. In classic times, the first reference to abnormal postures can be tracked back to the new Empire of Egypt (equinus foot), not to mention some recently described examples of dystonia from the Moche sculptures in Peru or Veracruz culture from Mexico. In Middle Ages it is possible to find many examples of sculptures in European cathedrals representing peasants with dramatic, presumably dystonic postures that coexist with amputation of limbs. This unique combination of dystonia and limb amputation probably represents ergotism. The painters Brueghel, Ribera and Velazquez also represented figures with postures likely to be dystonic. Literature is also a source of precise pre-neurological descriptions, especially during the 19th century. In David Copperfield, Dickens depicts characters with generalized dystonia (Uriah Heep), cervical dystonia (Mr. Sharp) and spasmodic dysphonia (Mr Creakle). Finally, even in modern Art (19th and 20th centuries), there are dramatic descriptions of abnormal postures that are likely to be dystonic, such as painful cervical dystonia (Brancusi), cervical dystonia with sensory trick (Modigliani) and upper limb dystonia (Wyspianski). However some postures presented in works of art may simply be a form of artistic expression and only bear unintentional resemblance to the dystonic postures. Art may be a source of neurological information, and that includes primary and secondary dystonia. PMID:26139341

  18. Dystonia: Related and Differential Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... respond, too. What is the difference between a Parkinson's disease patient with dystonia and a dystonia patient with Parkinson's symptoms? Parkinson's disease is a neurological movement disorder ...

  19. Experimental Therapeutics for Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jinnah, H. A.; Hess, Ellen J.

    2008-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological syndrome characterized by excessive involuntary muscle contractions leading to twisting movements and unnatural postures. It has many different clinical manifestations, and many different causes. More than 3 million people worldwide suffer from dystonia, yet there are few broadly effective treatments. In the past decade, progress in research has advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of dystonia to a point where drug discovery efforts are now feasible. There are several strategies that can be used to develop novel therapeutics for dystonia. Existing therapies have only modest efficacy, but may be refined and improved to increase benefits while reducing side effects. Identifying rational targets for drug intervention based on the pathogenesis of dystonia is another strategy. The surge in both basic and clinical research discoveries has provided insights at all levels including etiological, physiological and nosological, to enable such a targeted approach. The empirical approach to drug discovery is complementary to the rational approach whereby compounds are identified using a non-mechanistic strategy. [MD1] With the recent development of multiple animal models of dystonia, it is now possible to develop assays and perform drug screens on vast number of compounds. This multifaceted approach to drug discovery in dystonia will likely provide lead compounds that can then be translated for clinical use. PMID:18394563

  20. Forms of Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the symptoms, and associated features such as additional movement disorders or neurological symptoms, and 2. Cause (which includes ... that includes prominent myoclonus symptoms. Paroxysmal dystonias and dyskinesias : Episodic movement disorders in which abnormal movements occur ...

  1. Task-specific Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Russotto, Diego; Perlmutter, Joel S.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific dystonias are primary focal dystonias characterized by excessive muscle contractions producing abnormal postures during selective motor activities that often involve highly skilled, repetitive movements. Historically these peculiar postures were considered psychogenic but have now been classified as forms of dystonia. Writer’s cramp is the most commonly identified task-specific dystonia and has features typical of this group of disorders. Symptoms may begin with lack of dexterity during performance of a specific motor task with increasingly abnormal posturing of the involved body part as motor activity continues. Initially, the dystonia may manifest only during the performance of the inciting task, but as the condition progresses it may also occur during other activities or even at rest. Neurological exam is usually unremarkable except for the dystonia-related abnormalities. Although the precise pathophysiology remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests reduced inhibition at different levels of the sensorimotor system. Symptomatic treatment options include oral medications, botulinum toxin injections, neurosurgical procedures, and adaptive strategies. Prognosis may vary depending upon body part involved and specific type of task affected. Further research may reveal new insights into the etiology, pathophysiology, natural history, and improved treatment of these conditions. PMID:18990127

  2. Table tennis dystonia.

    PubMed

    Le Floch, Anne; Vidailhet, Marie; Flamand-Rouvière, Constance; Grabli, David; Mayer, Jean-Michel; Gonce, Michel; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Roze, Emmanuel

    2010-02-15

    Focal task-specific dystonia (FTSD) occurs exclusively during a specific activity that usually involves a highly skilled movement. Classical FTSD dystonias include writer's cramp and musician's dystonia. Few cases of sport-related dystonia have been reported. We describe the first four cases of FTSD related to table tennis (TT), two involving professional international competitors. We also systematically analyzed the literature for reports of sport-related dystonia including detailed clinical descriptions. We collected a total of 13 cases of sport-related dystonia, including our four TT players. Before onset, all the patients had trained for many years, for a large number of hours per week. Practice time had frequently increased significantly in the year preceding onset. As TT is characterized by highly skilled hand/forearm movements acquired through repetitive exercises, it may carry a higher risk of FTSD than other sports. Intensive training may result in maladaptive responses and overwhelm homeostatic mechanisms that regulate cortical plasticity in vulnerable individuals. Our findings support the importance of environmental risk factors in sport-related FTSD, as also suggested in classical FTSD, and have important implications for clinical practice. PMID:20108363

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury and Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... various neurological symptoms, often including dystonia and other movement disorders. Symptoms • Symptoms of a TBI can be mild, ... following an injury. Symptoms of dystonia and other movement disorders may be delayed by several months or years ...

  4. Molecular pathways in dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bragg, D. Cristopher; Armata, Ioanna A.; Nery, Flavia C.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Sharma, Nutan

    2011-01-01

    The hereditary dystonias comprise a set of diseases defined by a common constellation of motor deficits. These disorders are most likely associated with different molecular etiologies, many of which have yet to be elucidated. Here we discuss recent advances in three forms of hereditary dystonia, DYT1, DYT6 and DYT16, which share a similar clinical picture: onset in childhood or adolescence, progressive spread of symptoms with generalized involvement of body regions and a steady state affliction without treatment. Unlike DYT1, the genes responsible for DYT6 and DYT16 have only recently been identified, with relatively little information about the function of the encoded proteins. Nevertheless, recent data suggest that these proteins may fit together within interacting pathways involved in dopaminergic signaling, transcriptional regulation, and cellular stress responses. This review focuses on these molecular pathways, highlighting potential common themes among these dystonias which may serve as areas for future research. PMID:21134457

  5. Recent Developments in Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jinnah, H. A.; Teller, Jan K.; Galpern, Wendy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The dystonias are a family of related disorders with many different clinical manifestations and causes. This review summarizes recent developments regarding these disorders, focusing mainly on advances with direct clinical relevance from the past two years. Recent findings The dystonias are generally defined by their clinical characteristics, rather than by their underlying genetic or neuropathological defects. The many varied clinical manifestations and causes contribute to the fact that they are one of the most poorly recognized of all movement disorders. A series of recent publications has addressed these issues offering a revised definition and more logical means for classifying the many subtypes. Our understanding of the genetic and neurobiological mechanisms responsible for different types of dystonias also has grown rapidly, creating new opportunities and challenges for diagnosis and identifying increasing numbers of rare subtypes for which specific treatments are available. Summary Recent advances in describing the clinical phenotypes and determining associated genotypes have pointed to the need for new strategies for diagnosis, classification and treatment of the dystonias. PMID:26110799

  6. Brain Stimulation for Torsion Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Michael D.; Alterman, Ron L.

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is a heterogeneous neurological disorder characterized by abnormal muscle contractions for which standard medical therapy is often inadequate. For such patients, therapeutic brain stimulation is becoming increasingly utilized. Here we review the evidence and effect sizes for treating different types of dystonia with different types of brain stimulation. Strong (level B) evidence supports the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of primary generalized or segmental dystonia, especially DYT-1, as well as for patients with cervical dystonia. Large effect sizes have also been reported for DBS treatment of tardive dystonia, writer’s cramp, cranial dystonia, myoclonus dystonia, and off-state dystonia associated with Parkinson’s disease. Lesser benefit is generally seen in dystonia secondary to structural brain damage. Other brain stimulation techniques including epidural cortical stimulation and noninvasive brain stimulation have been investigated, but generally report smaller effect sizes in a more limited number of patients. Recent advances relevant to patient selection, surgical approach, DBS programming, and mechanism of action are discussed. PMID:25894231

  7. Strategies for treatment of dystonia.

    PubMed

    Dressler, Dirk; Altenmueller, Eckart; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Bohlega, Saeed; Chana, Pedro; Chung, Tae Mo; Frucht, Steven; Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J; Kaelin, Alain; Kaji, Ryuji; Kanovsky, Petr; Laskawi, Rainer; Micheli, Federico; Orlova, Olga; Relja, Maja; Rosales, Raymond; Slawek, Jaroslaw; Timerbaeva, Sofia; Warner, Thomas T; Saberi, Fereshte Adib

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of dystonias is generally symptomatic. To produce sufficient therapy effects, therefore, frequently a multimodal and interdisciplinary therapeutic approach becomes necessary, combining botulinum toxin therapy, deep brain stimulation, oral antidystonic drugs, adjuvant drugs and rehabilitation therapy including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, re-training, speech therapy, psychotherapy and sociotherapy. This review presents the recommendations of the IAB-Interdisciplinary Working Group for Movement Disorders Special Task Force on Interdisciplinary Treatment of Dystonia. It reviews the different therapeutic modalities and outlines a strategy to adapt them to the dystonia localisation and severity of the individual patient. Hints to emerging and future therapies will be given. PMID:26370676

  8. Sex prevalence of focal dystonias.

    PubMed Central

    Soland, V L; Bhatia, K P; Marsden, C D

    1996-01-01

    The sex prevalence of idiopathic focal dystonia is reported from a data base review of all patients seen at the National Hospital of Neurology, Queen Square and King's College, London up to 1993. There was a higher prevalence of females to males in all categories of focal dystonia involving the craniocervical region. The female to male ratio for cranial dystonia was 1.92:1 (P < 0.01) and 1.6:1 (P < 0.001) for spasmodic torticollis. On the other hand, twice as many men than women had writer's cramp (M:F = 2.0:1, P < 0.01). At present, there is no clear explanation to account for this differences in the sex prevalence of different types of focal dystonia. PMID:8708656

  9. Symptomatic animal models for dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Bethany K.; Hess, Ellen J.

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic animal models have clinical features consistent with human disorders and are often used to identify the anatomical and physiological processes involved in the expression of symptoms and to experimentally demonstrate causality where it would be infeasible in the patient population. Rodent and primate models of dystonia have identified basal ganglia abnormalities, including alterations in striatal GABAergic and dopaminergic transmission. Symptomatic animal models have also established the critical role of the cerebellum in dystonia, particularly abnormal glutamate signaling and aberrant Purkinje cell activity. Further, experiments suggest that the basal ganglia and cerebellum are nodes in an integrated network that is dysfunctional in dystonia. The knowledge gained from experiments in symptomatic animal models may serve as the foundation for the development of novel therapeutic interventions to treat dystonia. PMID:23893454

  10. Genetics in Dystonia: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Tania; Ozelius, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    The past year has been extremely successful with regards to the genetics of dystonia with the identification of four new dystonia genes (CIZ1, ANO3, GNAL and TUBB4A). This progress was primarily achieved because of the application of a new technology, next generation DNA sequencing, which allows rapid and comprehensive assessment of patient’s genomes. In addition, a combination of next generation and traditional Sanger sequencing has expanded the phenotypic spectrum associated with some of the dystonia plus (ATP1A3) and paroxysmal loci (PRRT2). This article reviews the newly identified genes and phenotypes and discusses the future applications of next generation sequencing to dystonia research. PMID:24136457

  11. Primary dystonia: molecules and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Lauren M.; Kim, Connie E.; Alagem, Noga; Dauer, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Primary dystonia is characterized by abnormal, involuntary twisting and turning movements that reflect impaired motor system function. The dystonic brain seems normal, in that it contains no overt lesions or evidence of neurodegeneration, but functional brain imaging has uncovered abnormalities involving the cortex, striatum and cerebellum, and diffusion tensor imaging suggests the presence of microstructural defects in white matter tracts of the cerebellothalamocortical circuit. Clinical electrophysiological studies show that the dystonic CNS exhibits hyperactive plasticity—perhaps related to deficient inhibitory neurotransmission—in a range of brain structures, as well as the spinal cord. Dystonia is, therefore, best conceptualized as a motor circuit disorder, rather than an abnormalcy of a particular brain structure. None of the aforementioned abnormalities can be strictly causal, as they are not limited to regions of the CNS subserving clinically affected body parts, and are found in seemingly healthy patients with dystonia-related mutations. The study of dystonia-related genes will, hopefully, help researchers to unravel the chain of events from molecular to cellular to system abnormalities. DYT1 mutations, for example, cause abnormalities within the endoplasmic reticulum–nuclear envelope endomembrane system. Other dystonia-related gene products traffic through the endoplasmic reticulum, suggesting a potential cell biological theme underlying primary dystonia. PMID:19826400

  12. Diagnosis & Treatment of Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jinnah, H. A.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis The dystonias are a group of disorders characterized by excessive involuntary muscle contractions leading to abnormal postures and/or repetitive movements. There are many different clinical manifestations and many different causes. A careful assessment of the clinical manifestations is helpful for identifying syndromic patterns that focus diagnostic testing on potential causes. If a cause can be identified, specific etiology-based treatments may be available. However, in the majority of cases, a specific cause cannot be identified, and treatments are based on symptoms. Treatment options include counseling and education, oral medications, botulinum toxin injections, and several surgical procedures. A substantial reduction in symptoms and improved quality of life can be achieved in the majority of patients by combining these various options. PMID:25432724

  13. Psychiatric comorbidities in dystonia: emerging concepts.

    PubMed

    Zurowski, Mateusz; McDonald, William M; Fox, Susan; Marsh, Laura

    2013-06-15

    Psychiatric disorders are highly prevalent in patients with dystonia and have a profound effect on quality of life. Patients with dystonia frequently meet criteria for anxiety disorders, especially social phobia, and major depressive disorder. Deficits in emotional processing have also been demonstrated in some dystonia populations. Onset of psychiatric disturbances in patients with dystonia often precedes onset of motor symptoms, suggesting that the pathophysiology of dystonia itself contributes to the genesis of psychiatric disturbances. This article examines the hypothesis that mood and anxiety disorders are intrinsic to the neurobiology of dystonia, citing the available literature, which is derived mostly from research on focal isolated dystonias. Limitations of studies are identified, and the role of emotional reactivity, especially in the context of pain secondary to dystonia, is recognized. Available evidence underscores the need to develop dystonia assessment tools that incorporate psychiatric measures. Such tools would allow for a better understanding of the full spectrum of dystonia presentations and facilitate research on the treatment of dystonia as well as the treatment of psychiatric illnesses in the context of dystonia. This article, solicited for a special Movement Disorders issue on novel research findings and emerging concepts in dystonia, addresses the following issues: (1) To what extent are psychiatric disturbances related to the pathophysiology of dystonia? (2) What is the impact of psychiatric disturbances on outcome measures of current assessment tools for dystonia? (3) How do psychiatric comorbidities influence the treatment of dystonia? Answers to these questions will lead to an increased appreciation of psychiatric disorders in dystonia, a better understanding of brain physiology, more nuanced research questions pertaining to this population, better clinical scales that can be used to further patient management and research, and improved

  14. The Environmental Epidemiology of Primary Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Defazio, Giovanni; Gigante, Angelo F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions that cause twisting movements and abnormal postures. Primary dystonia is the most common form and is thought to be a multifactorial condition in which one or more genes combine with environmental factors to reach disease. Methods We reviewed controlled studies on possible environmental risk factors for primary early- and late-onset dystonia. Results Environmental factors associated with primary early-onset dystonia are poorly understood. Early childhood illnesses have been reported to be more frequent in patients with DYT1 dystonia than in subjects carrying the DYT1 mutation that did not manifest dystonia, thus raising the possibility that such exposures precipitate dystonia among DYT1 carriers. Conversely, several environmental factors have been associated with primary adult-onset focal dystonias compared to control subjects. Namely, eye diseases, sore throat, idiopathic scoliosis, and repetitive upper limb motor action seem to be associated with blepharospasm (BSP), laryngeal dystonia (LD), cervical dystonia (CD), and upper limb dystonia, respectively. In addition, an inverse association between coffee drinking and BSP has been observed in both case-unrelated control and family-based case-control studies. Additional evidence supporting a causal link with different forms of primary late-onset dystonia is only available for diseases of the anterior segment of the eye, writing activity, and coffee intake. Conclusion There is reasonable epidemiological evidence that some environmental factors are risk-modifying factors for specific forms of primary adult-onset focal dystonia. PMID:23724359

  15. Carbamazepine-induced dystonia in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Shwetank; Gill, Manpreet; Bhasin, Chhavi

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is sustained muscle contraction, which may be primary or secondary to other causes. Drugs comprise one of the most important causes for the secondary dystonia, the usual mechanism being a dopaminergic blockade. There are very few reports describing dystonia resulting from carbamazepine (CBZ) administration. In this case report, a 16-year-old male with mental retardation and seizure disorder developed dystonia at therapeutic blood levels of CBZ. PMID:27298509

  16. Etiology of musician’s dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, A; Jabusch, H -C.; Altenmüller, E; Hagenah, J; Brüggemann, N; Lohmann, K; Enders, L; Kramer, P L.; Saunders-Pullman, R; Bressman, S B.; Münchau, A; Klein, C

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that there is familial aggregation of dystonia and other movement disorders in relatives of patients with musician’s dystonia (MD) and to identify possible environmental triggers. Methods: The families of 28 index patients with MD (14 with a reported positive family history of focal task-specific dystonia [FTSD] and 14 with no known family history [FH−]) underwent a standardized telephone screening interview using a modified version of the Beth Israel Dystonia Screen. Videotaped neurologic examinations were performed on all participants who screened positive and consensus diagnoses established. All patients were investigated for DYT1 dystonia and suitable families were tested for linkage to DYT7. All family members were administered questionnaires covering potential triggers of FTSD. Results: A diagnosis of dystonia was established in all 28 index patients and in 19/97 examined relatives (MD: n = 8, other FTSD: n = 9, other dystonias: n = 2), 5 of whom were members of FH− families. In 27 of the 47 affected individuals, additional forms of dystonia were seen; other movement disorders were observed in 23 patients. In total, 18 families were multiplex families with two to four affected members. Autosomal dominant inheritance was compatible in at least 12 families. The GAG deletion in DYT1 was absent in all patients. Linkage to DYT7 could be excluded in 1 of the 11 informative families. With respect to potential environmental triggers, there was no significant difference between patients with MD/FTSD compared to unaffected family members. Conclusion: Our results suggest a genetic contribution to musician’s dystonia with phenotypic variability including focal task-specific dystonia. GLOSSARY BIDS = Beth Israel Dystonia Screen; FH+ = reported positive family history of focal task-specific dystonia; FH− = no known family history of focal task-specific dystonia; FTSD = focal task-specific dystonia; MD = musician’s dystonia; WC

  17. Parkinsonism following dystonia in three patients.

    PubMed

    Katchen, M; Duvoisin, R C

    1986-01-01

    Three patients who presented initially with dystonia and subsequently developed typical idiopathic parkinsonism were evaluated. One patient presented with a writer's cramp, one with axial dystonia, and one with Meige syndrome. All three displayed amelioration of their dystonia with progression of their parkinsonism over a period of 2 to 15 years. Treatment with levodopa gave some relief of the parkinsonism symptoms in two patients but exacerbated or reactivated the dystonia. It is suggested that both the dystonia and the parkinsonism represent the changing clinical expression of the same disorder at different times in its evolution. PMID:3504239

  18. Cognitive Flexibility in Primary Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Lange, Florian; Seer, Caroline; Dengler, Reinhard; Dressler, Dirk; Kopp, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    Objectives Although primary dystonia is typically characterized as a movement disorder, it is also associated with cognitive alterations in the domain of executive functioning which may arise from changes in cortico-basal ganglia circuits. Specifically, in comparison to healthy controls, patients with dystonia show deficits in neuropsychological tests of cognitive flexibility. However, it is unclear whether cognitive inflexibility is caused by the pathomechanisms underlying primary dystonia or by confounding factors such as depression or symptom-related distraction.Methods The present study aimed to eliminate these confounds by examining cognitive flexibility in dystonia patients and in patients with similar motor symptoms but without a comparable central pathophysiology. Eighteen patients with primary blepharospasm, a common form of dystonia affecting the muscles around the eyes, and 19 patients with hemifacial spasm, a facial nerve disorder causing similar eyelid spasms, completed a computerized version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (cWCST). The two groups were further compared on tests of global cognitive functioning, psychiatric symptoms, health status, and impulsiveness. Results Blepharospasm patients committed significantly more errors on the cWCST than patients with hemifacial spasm. Group differences were most pronounced with regard to integration errors, a measure of rule-inference processes on the cWCST. Integration errors were also associated with impulsiveness in patients with blepharospasm. Conclusions Primary blepharospasm is related to deficits in cognitive flexibility, even when blepharospasm patients are compared with patients who suffer from motor symptoms of non-dystonic origin. Our results support the possibility that cognitive inflexibility results from the specific pathophysiological processes underlying primary dystonia. (JINS, 2016, 22, 662-670). PMID:27333537

  19. Sertraline induced acute mandibular dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Raveendranathan, Dhanya; Rao, Swaminath Gopala

    2015-01-01

    Specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been linked with the occurrence of drug-induced parkinsonism, dystonia, dyskinesia, and akathisia. Here, we describe a patient with a diagnosis of emotionally unstable personality disorder and depression who developed severe mandibular dystonia with sertraline in the absence of concurrent prescription of medications, which have potential action on the dopaminergic system. This case highlights the need for clinicians to be aware of this alarming acute adverse effect with sertraline, which is conventionally considered to be well-tolerated and safe. PMID:26752908

  20. Oscillatory Head Movements in Cervical Dystonia: Dystonia, Tremor, or Both?

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Zee, David S.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical dystonia is characterized by abnormal posturing of the head, often combined with tremor-like oscillatory head movements. The nature and source of these oscillatory head movements is controversial, so they were quantified to delineate their characteristics and develop a hypothetical model for their genesis. A magnetic search coil system was used to measure head movements in 14 subjects with cervical dystonia. Two distinct types of oscillatory head movements were detected for most subjects, even when they were not clinically evident. One type had a relatively large amplitude and jerky irregular pattern, and the other had smaller amplitude with a more regular and sinusoidal pattern. The kinematic properties of these two types of oscillatory head movements were distinct, although both were often combined in the same subject. Both had features suggestive of a defect in a central neural integrator. The combination of different types of oscillatory head movements in cervical dystonia helps to clarify some of the current debates regarding whether they should be considered as manifestations of dystonia or tremor and provides novel insights into their potential pathogenesis. PMID:25879911

  1. Oscillatory head movements in cervical dystonia: Dystonia, tremor, or both?

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Zee, David S; Jinnah, H A

    2015-05-01

    Cervical dystonia is characterized by abnormal posturing of the head, often combined with tremor-like oscillatory head movements. The nature and source of these oscillatory head movements is controversial, so they were quantified to delineate their characteristics and develop a hypothetical model for their genesis. A magnetic search coil system was used to measure head movements in 14 subjects with cervical dystonia. Two distinct types of oscillatory head movements were detected for most subjects, even when they were not clinically evident. One type had a relatively large amplitude and jerky irregular pattern, and the other had smaller amplitude with a more regular and sinusoidal pattern. The kinematic properties of these two types of oscillatory head movements were distinct, although both were often combined in the same subject. Both had features suggestive of a defect in a central neural integrator. The combination of different types of oscillatory head movements in cervical dystonia helps to clarify some of the current debates regarding whether they should be considered as manifestations of dystonia or tremor and provides novel insights into their potential pathogenesis. PMID:25879911

  2. Dystonia rating scales: critique and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Alberto; Sorbo, Francesca Del; Comella, Cynthia; Jinnah, H.A.; Mink, Jonathan W.; Post, Bart; Vidailhet, Marie; Volkmann, Jens; Warner, Thomas T.; Leentjens, Albert F.G.; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Stebbins, Glenn T.; Goetz, Christopher G.; Schrag, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Background Many rating scales have been applied to the evaluation of dystonia, but only few have been assessed for clinimetric properties. The Movement Disorders Society commissioned this task force to critique existing dystonia rating scales and place them in the clinical and clinimetric context. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted to identify rating scales that have either been validated or used in dystonia. Results Thirty six potential scales were identified. Eight were excluded because they did not meet review criteria, leaving twenty-eight scales that were critiqued and rated by the task force. Seven scales were found to meet criteria to be “recommended”: the Blepharospasm Disability Index is recommended for rating blepharospasm; the Cervical Dystonia Impact Scale and the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale for rating cervical dystonia; the Craniocervical Dystonia Questionnaire for blepharospasm and cervical dystonia; the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) and the Vocal Performance Questionnaire (VPQ) for laryngeal dystonia; and the Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale for rating generalized dystonia. Two “recommended” scales (VHI and VPQ) are generic scales validated on few patients with laryngeal dystonia, whereas the others are disease-specific scales. Twelve scales met criteria for “suggested” and seven scales met criteria for “listed”. All the scales are individually reviewed in the online appendix. Conclusion The task force recommends five specific dystonia scales and suggests to further validate in dystonia two recommended generic voice-disorder scales. Existing scales for oromandibular, arm and task-specific dystonia should be refined and fully assessed. Scales should be developed for body regions where no scales are available, such as lower limbs and trunk. PMID:23893443

  3. Functional Imaging in Hereditary Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Carbon, Maren; Argyelan, Miklos; Eidelberg, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired cortical inhibiton and maladaptive cortical plasticity are functional hallmarks of sporadic focal dystonias. Whether or not these mechanisms translate to generalized dystonias and whether these features reflect state or trait characteristics is a topic of research in hereditary dystonias. Methods We present a series of studies using a multitracer approach with positron emission tomography (PET) and diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) in the DYT1 and the DYT6 genotype. Results In these hereditary dystonias maladaptive motor cortical plasticity was present as a state characteristic. As a trait characteristic neuroplastic changes were also found in secondary motor cortices and in multimodal association regions. Consistent abnormalities of resting regional brain metabolism were additionally found in interconnected elements of cortico-striatal-pallido-thalamocortical (CSPTC) and related cerebellar-thalamo-cortical circuits. Changes in specific subsets of these regions have been found to relate to genotype, phenotype, or both. Thus, a penetrance-related metabolic network was characterized by increases in the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and parietal association areas, associated with relative reductions in the cerebellum, brainstem, and ventral thalamus. By contrast, genotype-specific abnormalities were localized to the basal ganglia, SMA and cerebellum. In both genotypes, the striatal metabolic abnormalities were paralleled by genotype-specific reductions in D2 receptor availability. Moreover, DTI studies disclosed microstructural changes within CSPTC and related cerebellar pathways. These disruptions may represent the main intrinsic abnormality underlying cortical downstream effects, such as increased sensorimotor responsivity. Conclusions These studies are consistent with the view of primary torsion dystonia as a neurodevelopmental circuit disorder involving CSPTC and related cerebellar pathways. PMID:20590810

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE PATIENT WITH ISOLATED OR COMBINED DYSTONIA: AN UPDATE ON DYSTONIA SYNDROMES

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Victor S.C.; Jinnah, H.A.; Bhatia, Kailash; Vidailhet, Marie

    2014-01-01

    The clinical evaluation of a patient with dystonia is a stepwise process, beginning with classification of the phenomenology of the movement disorder(s), then formulation of the dystonia syndrome, which in turn leads to a targeted etiological differential diagnosis. In recent years there have been significant advances in our understanding of the etiological basis of dystonia, aided especially by discoveries in imaging and genetics. In this article, we provide an update on the assessment of a patient with dystonia, including the phenomenology of dystonia and highlighting how to integrate clinical, imaging, blood and neurophysiological investigations in order to formulate a dystonia syndrome. Evolving or emerging dystonia syndromes are reviewed and potential etiologies of these as well as established dystonia syndromes listed in order to guide diagnostic testing. PMID:23893445

  5. Task-specific dystonia: pathophysiology and management.

    PubMed

    Sadnicka, Anna; Kassavetis, Panagiotis; Pareés, Isabel; Meppelink, Anne Marthe; Butler, Katherine; Edwards, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Task-specific dystonia is a form of isolated focal dystonia with the peculiarity of being displayed only during performance of a specific skilled motor task. This distinctive feature makes task-specific dystonia a particularly mysterious and fascinating neurological condition. In this review, we cover phenomenology and its increasingly broad-spectrum risk factors for the disease, critically review pathophysiological theories and evaluate current therapeutic options. We conclude by highlighting the unique features of task-specific dystonia within the wider concept of dystonia. We emphasise the central contribution of environmental risk factors, and propose a model by which these triggers may impact on the motor control of skilled movement. By viewing task-specific dystonia through this new lens which considers the disorder a modifiable disorder of motor control, we are optimistic that research will yield novel therapeutic avenues for this highly motivated group of patients. PMID:26818730

  6. White Matter Microstructure in Idiopathic Craniocervical Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Giordanna L. S.; Guimarães, Rachel P.; Piovesana, Luiza G.; Campos, Brunno M.; Campos, Lidiane S.; Azevedo, Paula C.; Torres, Fabio R.; Amato-Filho, Augusto C.; França, Marcondes C.; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Cendes, Fernando; D’Abreu, Anelyssa

    2015-01-01

    Background Dystonias are hyperkinetic movement disorders characterized by involuntary muscle contractions resulting in abnormal torsional movements and postures. Recent neuroimaging studies in idiopathic craniocervical dystonia (CCD) have uncovered the involvement of multiple areas, including cortical ones. Our goal was to evaluate white matter (WM) microstructure in subjects with CCD using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis. Methods We compared 40 patients with 40 healthy controls. Patients were then divided into subgroups: cervical dystonia, blepharospasm, blepharospasm + oromandibular dystonia, blepharospasm + oromandibular dystonia + cervical dystonia, using tract-based spatial statistics. We performed a region of interest-based analysis and tractography as confirmatory tests. Results There was no significant difference in the mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) between the groups in any analysis. Discussion The lack of DTI changes in CCD suggests that the WM tracts are not primarily affected. PMID:26056610

  7. Intermittent dystonia in Hartnup disease.

    PubMed

    Darras, B T; Ampola, M G; Dietz, W H; Gilmore, H E

    1989-01-01

    A 6-month-old girl developed intermittent dystonic posture of the legs and eczematous dermatitis without ataxia. Qualitative and quantitative urine amino acid testing confirmed the diagnosis of Hartnup disease. Cranial computed tomography, electroencephalogram, electromyogram/nerve conduction study, posterior tibial somatosensory evoked potentials, 24-hour electroencephalographic telemetry, and metrizamide myelogram were normal. Spinal fluid hydroxy-indoleacetic acid concentration was less than or equal to 2 S.D. of normal; oral tryptophan loading (70 mg/kg) resulted in a two-fold rise in cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid concentration. Tryptophan administered alone or with nicotinic acid failed to improve the dystonia; however, trihexyphenidyl (1-2 mg/kg/day) dramatically improved it. Hartnup disease should be considered in children with unexplained dystonia. PMID:2712944

  8. An African-American family with dystonia.

    PubMed

    Puschmann, Andreas; Xiao, Jianfeng; Bastian, Robert W; Searcy, Jill A; LeDoux, Mark S; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2011-08-01

    The genetic cause of late-onset focal and segmental dystonia remains unknown in most individuals. Recently, mutations in Thanatos-associated protein domain containing, apoptosis associated protein 1 (THAP1) have been described in DYT6 dystonia and associated with some cases of familial and sporadic late-onset dystonia in Caucasians. We are not aware of any previous descriptions of familial dystonia in African-Americans or reports of THAP1 mutations in African-Americans. Herein, we characterize an African-American (AA) kindred with late-onset primary dystonia, clinically and genetically. The clinical phenotype included cervical, laryngeal and hand-forearm dystonia. Symptoms were severe and disabling for several family members, whereas others only displayed mild signs. There were no accompanying motor or cognitive signs. In this kindred, age of onset ranged from 45 to 50 years and onset was frequently sudden, with symptoms developing within weeks or months. DYT1 was excluded as the cause of dystonia in this kindred. The entire genomic region of THAP1, including non-coding regions, was sequenced. We identified 13 sequence variants in THAP1, although none co-segregated with dystonia. A novel THAP1 variant (c.-237-3G>T/A) was found in 3/84 AA dystonia patient alleles and 3/212 AA control alleles, but not in 5870 Caucasian alleles. In summary, although previously unreported, familial primary dystonia does occur in African-Americans. Genetic analysis of the entire genomic region of THAP1 revealed a novel variant that was specific for African-Americans. Therefore, genetic testing for dystonia and future studies of candidate genes must take genetic background into consideration. PMID:21601506

  9. An African-American Family with Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Puschmann, Andreas; Xiao, Jianfeng; Bastian, Robert W.; Searcy, Jill A.; LeDoux, Mark S.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.

    2011-01-01

    The genetic cause of late-onset focal and segmental dystonia remains unknown in most individuals. Recently, mutations in Thanatos-associated protein domain containing, apoptosis associated protein 1 (THAP1) have been described in DYT6 dystonia and associated with some cases of familial and sporadic late-onset dystonia in Caucasians. We are not aware of any previous descriptions of familial dystonia in African Americans or reports of THAP1 mutations in African Americans. Herein, we characterize an African-American (AA) kindred with late-onset primary dystonia, clinically and genetically. The clinical phenotype included cervical, laryngeal and hand-forearm dystonia. Symptoms were severe and disabling for several family members, whereas others only displayed mild signs. There were no accompanying motor or cognitive signs. In this kindred, age of onset ranged from 45 to 50 years and onset was frequently sudden, with symptoms developing within weeks or months. DYT1 was excluded as the cause of dystonia in this kindred. The entire genomic region of THAP1, including non-coding regions, was sequenced. We identified 13 sequence variants in THAP1, although none co-segregated with dystonia. A novel THAP1 variant (c.-237-3G>T/A) was found in 3/84 AA dystonia patient alleles and 3/212 AA control alleles, but not in 5,870 Caucasian alleles. In summary, although previously unreported, familial primary dystonia does occur in African Americans. Genetic analysis of the entire genomic region of THAP1 revealed a novel variant that was specific for African Americans. Therefore, genetic testing for dystonia and future studies of candidate genes must take genetic background into consideration. PMID:21601506

  10. Recent Advances in the Genetics of Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianfeng; Vemula, Satya R.

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia, a common and genetically heterogeneous neurological disorder, was recently defined as “a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both.” Via the application of whole-exome sequencing, the genetic landscape of dystonia and closely related movement disorders is becoming exposed. In particular, several “novel” genetic causes have been causally associated with dystonia or dystonia-related disorders over the past 2 years. These genes include PRRT2 (DYT10), CIZ1 (DYT23), ANO3 (DYT24), GNAL (DYT25), and TUBB4A (DYT4). Despite these advances, major gaps remain in identifying the genetic origins for most cases of adult-onset isolated dystonia. Furthermore, model systems are needed to study the biology of PRRT2, CIZ1, ANO3, Gαolf, and TUBB4A in the context of dystonia. This review focuses on these recent additions to the family of dystonia genes, genotype-phenotype correlations, and possible cellular contributions of the encoded proteins to the development of dystonia. PMID:24952478

  11. Nine Years with Munchausen Syndrome: A Case of Psychogenic Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Mirac A.; Sahin, Sevki; Cinar, Nilgun; Tiyekli, Utkan; Karsidag, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Background Munchausen syndrome presenting with psychogenic dystonia is a rare condition. Phenomenology Shown A psychogenic dystonia case presenting with an acute onset of retrocollis, lower limb dystonia and bizarre gait was diagnosed as Munchausen syndrome. Educational Value Recognizing psychogenic dystonia avoids unnecessary investigations and provides successful treatment.

  12. Primary dystonia misinterpreted as Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Neuwelt, Alexander J.; Nguyen, Tam; Leehey, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Summary Diagnosing dystonia can be challenging and depends on the recognition of subtle clinical signs. Due to clinical heterogeneity, variable age at presentation, and overlapping features with other disorders, dystonia is under-recognized. The presence of dystonic tremor is often a reason for misdiagnosis. We report an illustrative case of a patient with DYT1 dystonia who was originally misdiagnosed with Parkinson disease. Careful physical examination and history-taking can reveal dystonia and prompt appropriate diagnostic studies, which, in turn, can lead to potentially life-changing treatment. Our report illustrates typical challenges in the recognition and diagnosis of dystonia, and serves to increase clinicians' awareness of this disabling, but treatable, condition. PMID:24353921

  13. Reliability and validity of the kinematic dystonia measure for children with upper extremity dystonia.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Anne; Klejman, Sue; Fehlings, Darcy

    2012-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the test-retest reliability and construct validity of the Kinematic Dystonia Measure, a quantitative measure of upper extremity dystonia. To determine the effectiveness of various treatments, reliable and valid measures of dystonia are required. Test-retest reliability of the Kinematic Dystonia Measure using the intraclass correlation coefficient was excellent for the hand-tapping task (0.95) and substantial for the eye-blinking task (0.74). Construct validity testing for the hand-tapping task revealed that Kinematic Dystonia Measure scores correlated with total Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale scores (Pearson r = 0.79, P = .003), affected arm Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale subscores (Pearson r = 0.76, P = .0.007), and negatively correlated with Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test scores (Pearson r = -0.60, P = .05). The Kinematic Dystonia Measure has excellent test-retest reliability and good construct validity using the hand-tapping task. When combined with functional outcome measures, the Kinematic Dystonia Measure can effectively measure dystonia in children. PMID:22535705

  14. [Preliminary results of noncontact temperature measuring using an infrared thermometer on the tarsus pf swine with osteoarthrosis tarsi deformans].

    PubMed

    Sabec, D; Lazar, P

    1990-01-01

    The surface temperature on tarsus of 54 performance tested boars of about 60 kg of Swedish Landrace was measured by means of infra-red thermometer at three measuring points (MP1, MP2 and MP3). MP1 was situated above the tuberculum of os metatarsale III or, as visualised in 21 slaughtered boars, above pathoanatomical alterations of osteoarthrosis tarsi deformans (OATD). MP2 was located directly medially and MP3 laterally from MP1. A clear palpatory symptom was found only with 10 boars, while all 21 slaughtered boars showed different morphological lesions of OATD. The average temperature at MP1 was 35.69 degrees C and was significantly higher (P = .01) than at MP2 (35.34) and MP3 (35.30). The temperature differences between MP1 and MP2 or MP3 were statistically reliable. Boars, who had a clear palpatory symptoms at tuberculum, showed an average temperature at MT1 of 36.27 degrees C, which was higher (P = .0114) than of those with an unclear palpatory symptom (35.64 degrees C). The results show that the temperature differences are the consequence of OATD. PMID:2311530

  15. [Drug-induced dystonia misinterpreted as hysteria].

    PubMed

    Magnusson, A; Opjordsmoen, S; Dietrichs, E

    1996-03-10

    Psychic distress is often expressed in the form of physical pain or disease, but the converse also occurs. Illnesses with an organic aetiology are sometimes misdiagnosed as psychogenic. We describe three patients who developed rare forms of acute drug-induced dystonia when treated with antipsychotic drugs. All three cases were initially misdiagnosed as "hysteria" because the patients had psychiatric illnesses and because the symptoms were bizarre and became worse when the patients became very anxious. Furthermore, if the patients were helped to relax the symptoms disappeared for a moment. One of the patients developed dystonia 24 hours after ingestion of 750 mg tetrabenazine in an attempt at suicide. Another patient who had HIV/AIDS developed severe dystonia after receiving only 2 mg haloperidol by mouth. The clinical presentation, treatment, and possible mechanisms of the pathophysiology of acute drug-induced dystonia are briefly reviewed. PMID:8644096

  16. Structural brain abnormalities in cervical dystonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Idiopathic cervical dystonia is characterized by involuntary spasms, tremors or jerks. It is not restricted to a disturbance in the basal ganglia system because non-conventional voxel-based MRI morphometry (VBM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have detected numerous regional changes in the brains of patients. In this study scans of 24 patients with cervical dystonia and 24 age-and sex-matched controls were analysed using VBM, DTI and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) using a voxel-based approach and a region-of-interest analysis. Results were correlated with UDRS, TWSTRS and disease duration. Results We found structural alterations in the basal ganglia; thalamus; motor cortex; premotor cortex; frontal, temporal and parietal cortices; visual system; cerebellum and brainstem of the patients with dystonia. Conclusions Cervical dystonia is a multisystem disease involving several networks such as the motor, sensory and visual systems. PMID:24131497

  17. Genetics Home Reference: myoclonus-dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... that cause myoclonus-dystonia syndrome impair epsilon-sarcoglycan trafficking to the plasma membrane: modulation by ubiquitination and ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  18. Emerging Common Molecular Pathways for Primary Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S; Dauer, William T; Warner, Thomas T

    2013-01-01

    Background The dystonias are a group of hyperkinetic movement disorders whose principal cause is neuron dysfunction at one or more interconnected nodes of the motor system. The study of genes and proteins which cause familial dystonia provides critical information about the cellular pathways involved in this dysfunction which disrupts the motor pathways at systems level. In recent years study of the increasing number of DYT genes has implicated a number of cell functions which appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of dystonia. Methods Review of literature published in English language publications available on Pubmed relating to the genetics and cellular pathology of dystonia Results and Conclusions Numerous potential pathogenetic mechanisms have been identified. We describe those which fall into three emerging thematic groups: cell cycle and transcriptional regulation in the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope function, and control of synaptic function. PMID:23893453

  19. Intraoperative neurophysiology in deep brain surgery for psychogenic dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie L; Pillai, Ajay S; Lungu, Codrin; Ostrem, Jill; Starr, Philip; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic dystonia is a challenging entity to diagnose and treat because little is known about its pathophysiology. We describe two cases of psychogenic dystonia who underwent deep brain stimulation when thought to have organic dystonia. The intraoperative microelectrode recordings in globus pallidus internus were retrospectively compared with those of five patients with known DYT1 dystonia using spontaneous discharge parameters of rate and bursting, as well as movement-related discharges. Our data suggest that simple intraoperative neurophysiology measures in single subjects do not differentiate psychogenic dystonia from DYT1 dystonia. PMID:26125045

  20. Convergent mechanisms in etiologically-diverse dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Valerie B.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Dystonia is a neurological disorder associated with twisting motions and abnormal postures, which compromise normal movements and can be both painful and debilitating. It can affect a single body part (focal), several contiguous regions (segmental), or the entire body (generalized), and can arise as a result of numerous causes, both genetic and acquired. Despite the diversity of causes and manifestations, shared clinical features suggest that common mechanisms of pathogenesis may underlie many dystonias. Areas Covered This review identifies shared themes in etiologically-diverse dystonias on several biological levels. At the cellular level, abnormalities in the dopaminergic system, mitochondrial function, and calcium regulation are discussed. At the anatomical level, the roles of the basal ganglia and the cerebellum in dystonia are described. Global central nervous system dysfunction, with regard to aberrant neuronal plasticity, inhibition, and sensorimotor integration is also discussed. Using clinical data and data from animal models, this article seeks to highlight shared pathways that may be critical in understanding mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutic strategies in dystonia. Expert Opinion Identifying shared features of pathogenesis can provide insight into the biological processes that underlie etiologically-diverse dystonias, and can suggest novel targets for therapeutic intervention that may be effective in a broad group of affected individuals. PMID:22136648

  1. Diagnosing dopamine-responsive dystonias.

    PubMed

    Malek, N; Fletcher, N; Newman, E

    2015-10-01

    The clinical spectrum of dopamine-responsive dystonias (DRDs) has expanded over the last decade to comprise several distinct disorders. At the milder end of the clinical spectrum is the autosomal-dominant guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase deficiency syndrome (GTPCH-DRD), and at the more severe end is the much less common autosomal recessive tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency syndrome (TH-DRD), with intermediate forms in between. Understanding the pathophysiology of DRDs can help in their optimal diagnosis and management. These are conditions with the potential to be either underdiagnosed when not considered or overdiagnosed if there is an equivocal L-dopa (levo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) response. In this article, we discuss the clinical phenotypes of these disorders, and we outline how investigations can help in confirming the diagnosis. PMID:26045581

  2. Descriptive Epidemiology of Cervical Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Defazio, Giovanni; Jankovic, Joseph; Giel, Jennifer L.; Papapetropoulos, Spyridon

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical dystonia (CD), the most common form of adult-onset focal dystonia, has a heterogeneous clinical presentation with variable clinical features, leading to difficulties and delays in diagnosis. Owing to the lack of reviews specifically focusing on the frequency of primary CD in the general population, we performed a systematic literature search to examine its prevalence/incidence and analyze methodological differences among studies. Methods We performed a systematic literature search to examine the prevalence data of primary focal CD. Sixteen articles met our methodological criteria. Because the reported prevalence estimates were found to vary widely across studies, we analyzed methodological differences and other factors to determine whether true differences exist in prevalence rates among geographic areas (and by gender and age distributions), as well as to facilitate recommendations for future studies. Results Prevalence estimates ranged from 20–4,100 cases/million. Generally, studies that relied on service-based and record-linkage system data likely underestimated the prevalence of CD, whereas population-based studies suffered from over-ascertainment. The more methodologically robust studies yielded a range of estimates of 28–183 cases/million. Despite the varying prevalence estimates, an approximate 2:1 female:male ratio was consistent among many studies. Three studies estimated incidence, ranging from 8–12 cases/million person-years. Discussion Although several studies have attempted to estimate the prevalence and incidence of CD, there is a need for additional well-designed epidemiological studies on primary CD that include large populations; use defined CD diagnostic criteria; and stratify for factors such as age, gender, and ethnicity. PMID:24255801

  3. Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

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  4. Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... part of the brain that handles messages about muscle contractions. There is no cure. Doctors use medicines, Botox injections, surgery, physical therapy, and other treatments to reduce or eliminate muscle spasms and pain. NIH: National Institute of Neurological ...

  5. Dystonias

    MedlinePlus

    ... institute on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, National Eye Institute, and Eunice Kennnedy Shriver National Institute on Child Health and Human Development) also support research that may benefit individuals ...

  6. Dystonias

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    ... Brain Stimulation for Movement Disorders This study uses deep brain stimulation to treat movement disorders. More Information » See All Trials » See a list of all NINDS Disorders Get Web page suited for printing Email this to a ...

  7. Piriformis muscle syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuncewicz, Elzbieta; Gajewska, Ewa; Sobieska, Magdalena; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2006-01-01

    Sciatica is characterized by radiating pain from the sacro-lumbar region to the buttocks and down to the lower limb. The causes of sciatica usually relate to degenerative changes in the spine and lesions to the intervertebral discs. Secondary symptomatic sciatica may by caused by metastases to the vertebra, tuberculosis of the spine, tumors located inside the vertebral channel, or entrapment of the sciatic nerve in the piriformis muscle. The piriformis syndrome is primarily caused by fall injury, but other causes are possible, including pyomyositis, dystonia musculorum deformans, and fibrosis after deep injections. Secondary causes like irritation of the sacroiliac joint or lump near the sciatic notch have been described. In the general practice the so-called posttraumatic piriformis muscle syndrome is common. The right treatment can be started following a thorough investigation into the cause of symptoms. PMID:17385355

  8. Sensory-motor integration in focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Avanzino, Laura; Tinazzi, Michele; Ionta, Silvio; Fiorio, Mirta

    2015-12-01

    Traditional definitions of focal dystonia point to its motor component, mainly affecting planning and execution of voluntary movements. However, focal dystonia is tightly linked also to sensory dysfunction. Accurate motor control requires an optimal processing of afferent inputs from different sensory systems, in particular visual and somatosensory (e.g., touch and proprioception). Several experimental studies indicate that sensory-motor integration - the process through which sensory information is used to plan, execute, and monitor movements - is impaired in focal dystonia. The neural degenerations associated with these alterations affect not only the basal ganglia-thalamic-frontal cortex loop, but also the parietal cortex and cerebellum. The present review outlines the experimental studies describing impaired sensory-motor integration in focal dystonia, establishes their relationship with changes in specific neural mechanisms, and provides new insight towards the implementation of novel intervention protocols. Based on the reviewed state-of-the-art evidence, the theoretical framework summarized in the present article will not only result in a better understanding of the pathophysiology of dystonia, but it will also lead to the development of new rehabilitation strategies. PMID:26164472

  9. Genetic Issues in the Diagnosis of Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Petrucci, Simona; Valente, Enza Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dystonias are heterogeneous hyperkinetic movement disorders characterized by involuntary muscle contractions which result in twisting and repetitive movements and abnormal postures. Several causative genes have been identified, but their genetic bases still remain elusive. Primary Torsion Dystonias (PTDs), in which dystonia is the only clinical sign, can be inherited in a monogenic fashion, and many genes and loci have been identified for autosomal dominant (DYT1/TOR1A; DYT6/THAP1; DYT4/TUBB4a; DYT7; DYT13; DYT21; DYT23/CIZ1; DYT24/ANO3; DYT25/GNAL) and recessive (DYT2; DYT17) forms. However most sporadic cases, especially those with late-onset, are likely multifactorial, with genetic and environmental factors interplaying to reach a threshold of disease. At present, genetic counseling of dystonia patients remains a difficult task. Recently non-motor clinical findings in dystonias, new highlights in the pathophysiology of the disease, and the availability of high-throughput genome-wide techniques are proving useful tools to better understand the complexity of PTD genetics. We briefly review the genetic basis of the most common forms of hereditary PTDs, and discuss relevant issues related to molecular diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:23596437

  10. Ataxia with Vitamin E Deficiency May Present with Cervical Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Andrew E.; Vargas, Wendy; Pearson, Toni S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is an autosomal recessive disorder that usually presents with ataxia, areflexia, and proprioceptive and vibratory sensory loss. Dystonia has been reported rarely. Case Report An 11-year-old female presented with dystonic head tremor and cervical and bilateral arm dystonia. Her 14-year-old older brother had dystonic head tremor and generalized dystonia. One year later, the brother developed dysarthria, limb dysmetria, and gait ataxia. Compound heterozygous mutations in TTPA were detected, confirming the diagnosis of AVED. Discussion AVED may present with dystonia rather than ataxia, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of progressive dystonia. PMID:27274910

  11. Dystonia Associated with Idiopathic Slow Orthostatic Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Kobylecki, Christopher; Silverdale, Monty A.; Dick, Jeremy P. R.; Kellett, Mark W.; Marshall, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to characterize the clinical and electrophysiological features of patients with slow orthostatic tremor. Case Report The clinical and neurophysiological data of patients referred for lower limb tremor on standing were reviewed. Patients with symptomatic or primary orthostatic tremor were excluded. Eight patients were identified with idiopathic slow 4–8 Hz orthostatic tremor, which was associated with tremor and dystonia in cervical and upper limb musculature. Coherence analysis in two patients showed findings different to those seen in primary orthostatic tremor. Discussion Slow orthostatic tremor may be associated with dystonia and dystonic tremor. PMID:26877891

  12. ANIMAL MODELS OF DYSTONIA: LESSONS FROM A MUTANT RAT

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Dystonia is a motor sign characterized by involuntary muscle contractions which produce abnormal postures. Genetic factors contribute significantly to primary dystonia. In comparison, secondary dystonia can be caused by a wide variety of metabolic, structural, infectious, toxic and inflammatory insults to the nervous system. Although classically ascribed to dysfunction of the basal ganglia, studies of diverse animal models have pointed out that dystonia is a network disorder with important contributions from abnormal olivocerebellar signaling. In particular, work with the dystonic (dt) rat has engendered dramatic paradigm shifts in dystonia research. The dt rat manifests generalized dystonia caused by deficiency of the neuronally-restricted protein caytaxin. Electrophysiological and biochemical studies have shown that defects at the climbing fiber-Purkinje cell synapse in the dt rat lead to abnormal bursting firing patterns in the cerebellar nuclei, which increases linearly with postnatal age. In a general sense, the dt rat has shown the scientific and clinical communities that dystonia can arise from dysfunctional cerebellar cortex. Furthermore, work with the dt rat has provided evidence that dystonia (1) is a neurodevelopmental network disorder and (2) can be driven by abnormal cerebellar output. In large part, work with other animal models has expanded upon studies in the dt rat and shown that primary dystonia is a multi-nodal network disorder associated with defective sensorimotor integration. In addition, experiments in genetically-engineered models have been used to examine the underlying cellular pathologies that drive primary dystonia. PMID:21081162

  13. Dystonia and Paroxysmal Dyskinesias: Under-Recognized Movement Disorders in Domestic Animals? A Comparison with Human Dystonia/Paroxysmal Dyskinesias

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Angelika; Hamann, Melanie; Wissel, Jörg; Volk, Holger A.

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is defined as a neurological syndrome characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting, often repetitive movements, and postures. Paroxysmal dyskinesias are episodic movement disorders encompassing dystonia, chorea, athetosis, and ballism in conscious individuals. Several decades of research have enhanced the understanding of the etiology of human dystonia and dyskinesias that are associated with dystonia, but the pathophysiology remains largely unknown. The spontaneous occurrence of hereditary dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesia is well documented in rodents used as animal models in basic dystonia research. Several hyperkinetic movement disorders, described in dogs, horses and cattle, show similarities to these human movement disorders. Although dystonia is regarded as the third most common movement disorder in humans, it is often misdiagnosed because of the heterogeneity of etiology and clinical presentation. Since these conditions are poorly known in veterinary practice, their prevalence may be underestimated in veterinary medicine. In order to attract attention to these movement disorders, i.e., dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias associated with dystonia, and to enhance interest in translational research, this review gives a brief overview of the current literature regarding dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesia in humans and summarizes similar hereditary movement disorders reported in domestic animals. PMID:26664992

  14. Current and emerging strategies for treatment of childhood dystonia.

    PubMed

    Bertucco, Matteo; Sanger, Terence D

    2015-01-01

    Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting and repetitive movements, abnormal postures, or both (Sanger et al, 2003). Dystonia is a devastating neurological condition that prevents the acquisition of normal motor skills during critical periods of development in children. Moreover, it is particularly debilitating in children when dystonia affects the upper extremities such that learning and consolidation of common daily motor actions are impeded. Thus, the treatment and rehabilitation of dystonia is a challenge that continuously requires exploration of novel interventions. This review will initially describe the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of the motor impairments found in childhood dystonia followed by the clinical measurement tools that are available to document the presence and severity of symptoms. Finally, we will discuss the state-of-the-art of therapeutic options for childhood dystonia, with particular emphasis on emergent and innovative strategies. PMID:25835254

  15. Current and emerging strategies for treatment of childhood dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bertucco, Matteo; Sanger, Terence D.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting and repetitive movements, abnormal postures, or both (Sanger et al. 2003). Dystonia is a devastating neurological condition that prevents the acquisition of normal motor skills during critical periods of development in children. Moreover, it is particularly debilitating in children when dystonia affects the upper extremities such that learning and consolidation of common daily motor actions are impeded. Thus, the treatment and rehabilitation of dystonia is a challenge that continuously requires exploration of novel interventions. This review will initially describe the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of the motor impairments found in childhood dystonia followed by the clinical measurement tools that are available to document the presence and severity of symptoms. Finally, we will discuss the state-of-the-art of therapeutic options for childhood dystonia, with particular emphasis on emergent and innovative strategies. PMID:25835254

  16. Current and future medical treatment in primary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Delnooz, Cathérine C.S.

    2012-01-01

    Dystonia is a hyperkinetic movement disorder, characterized by involuntary and sustained contractions of opposing muscles causing twisting movements and abnormal postures. It is often a disabling disorder that has a significant impact on physical and psychosocial wellbeing. The medical therapeutic armamentarium used in practice is quite extensive, but for many of these interventions formal proof of efficacy is lacking. Exceptions are the use of botulinum toxin in patients with cervical dystonia, some forms of cranial dystonia (in particular, blepharospasm) and writer’s cramp; deep brain stimulation of the pallidum in generalized and segmental dystonia; and high-dose trihexyphenidyl in young patients with segmental and generalized dystonia. In order to move this field forward, we not only need better trials that examine the effect of current treatment interventions, but also a further understanding of the pathophysiology of dystonia as a first step to design and test new therapies that are targeted at the underlying biologic and neurophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:22783371

  17. Dystonia and Tremor: The Clinical Syndromes with Isolated Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Alberto; Sorbo, Francesca Del

    2016-01-01

    Background Dystonia and tremor share many commonalities. Isolated tremor is part of the phenomenological spectrum of isolated dystonia and of essential tremor. The occurrence of subtle features of dystonia may allow one to differentiate dystonic tremor from essential tremor. Diagnostic uncertainty is enhanced when no features of dystonia are found in patients with a tremor syndrome, raising the question whether the observed phenomenology is an incomplete form of dystonia. Methods Known forms of syndromes with isolated tremor are reviewed. Diagnostic uncertainties between tremor and dystonia are put into perspective. Results The following isolated tremor syndromes are reviewed: essential tremor, head tremor, voice tremor, jaw tremor, and upper-limb tremor. Their varied phenomenology is analyzed and appraised in the light of a possible relationship with dystonia. Discussion Clinicians making a diagnosis of isolated tremor should remain vigilant for the detection of features of dystonia. This is in keeping with the recent view that isolated tremor may be an incomplete phenomenology of dystonia. PMID:27152246

  18. Dystonia and Cerebellar Degeneration in the Leaner Mouse Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Raike, Robert S.; Hess, Ellen J.; Jinnah, H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar degeneration is traditionally associated with ataxia. Yet, there are examples of both ataxia and dystonia occurring in individuals with cerebellar degeneration. There is also substantial evidence suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction alone may cause dystonia. The types of cerebellar defects that may cause ataxia, dystonia, or both have not been delineated. In the current study, we explored the relationship between cerebellar degeneration and dystonia using the leaner mouse mutant. Leaner mice have severe dystonia that is associated with dysfunctional and degenerating cerebellar Purkinje cells. Whereas the density of Purkinje cells was not significantly reduced in 4 week-old leaner mice, approximately 50% of the neurons were lost by 34 weeks of age. On the other hand, the dystonia and associated functional disability became significantly less severe during this same interval. In other words, dystonia improved as Purkinje cells were lost, suggesting that dysfunctional Purkinje cells, rather than Purkinje cell loss, contribute to the dystonia. These results provide evidence that distorted cerebellar function may cause dystonia and support the concept that different types of cerebellar defects can have different functional consequences. PMID:25791619

  19. Two Task-Specific Dystonias in One Hand

    PubMed Central

    Linssen, Manon; Delnooz, Cathérine; van de Warrenburg, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Background Dystonia is characterized by involuntary muscle contractions that lead to abnormal postures and/or repetitive movements. Task-specific dystonia only manifests during a specific activity. Case report We report a case of a female with writer's cramp who developed a second task-specific hand dystonia (tremor and abnormal posturing of the hand while using a computer mouse) many years after the initial onset. Discussion This observation is in agreement with the concept that task-specific hand dystonia is induced by repetitive, skilled hand movements in those who have an intrinsic vulnerability towards developing “dystonic” motor programs. PMID:23961337

  20. Motor and Sensory Dysfunction in Musician's Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Florence C F; Frucht, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Musicians' dystonia is a task-specific and painless loss of motor control in a previously well-executed task. It is increasingly recognized in the medical and musical community. Recent advances in neuroimaging, transcranial magnetic stimulation and novel techniques in electroencephalography have shed light on its underlying pathophysiology. To date, a deranged cortical plasticity leading to abnormal sensorimotor integration, combined with reduced inhibition across several levels of the motor pathway are likely mechanisms.This paper reviews the various phenomenology of musician's dystonia across keyboard, string, brass, flute and drum players. Treatment is often challenging. Medical therapies like botulinum toxin injection and rehabilitation method with sensorimotor training offer symptomatic relief and return to baseline performance to some musicians. PMID:23814536

  1. Blepharospasm-oromandibular dystonia syndrome (Brueghel's syndrome). A variant of adult-onset torsion dystonia?

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, C D

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients with the idiopathic blepharospasm-oromandibular dystonia syndrome are described. All presented in adult life, usually in the sixth decade; women were more commonly affected than men. Thirteen had blepharospasm alone, nine had oromandibular dystonia alone, and 17 had both. Torticollis or dystonic writer's camp preceded the syndrome in two patients. Eight other patients developed toritocollis, dystonic posturing of the arms, or involvement of respiratory muscles. No cause or hereditary basis for the illness were discovered. The evidence to indicate that this syndrome is due to an abnormality of extrapyramidal function, and that it is another example of adult-onset focal dystonia akin to spasmodic torticollis and dystonic writer's cramp, is discussed. Images PMID:1011031

  2. Rating Scales for Dystonia in Cerebral Palsy: Reliability and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monbaliu, E.; Ortibus, E.; Roelens, F.; Desloovere, K.; Deklerck, J.; Prinzie, P.; De Cock, P.; Feys, H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This study investigated the reliability and validity of the Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale (BADS), the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Movement Scale (BFMMS), and the Unified Dystonia Rating Scale (UDRS) in patients with bilateral dystonic cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Three raters independently scored videotapes of 10 patients (five males, five females;…

  3. The phenotypic spectrum of dystonia in Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ainhi D; Parratt, Kaitlyn L; Rendtorff, Nanna D; Lodahl, Marianne; Ng, Karl; Rowe, Dominic B; Sue, Carolyn M; Hayes, Michael W; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth; Fung, Victor S C

    2012-07-01

    Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome (MTS) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by deafness and dystonia. However the phenotypic expression of dystonia has not been systematically defined. We report clinical, neurophysiological, and ophthalmological data on 6 subjects from 3 Australian kindreds, including 2 with novel mutations, together with a systematic review of the literature, in order to define the phenotypic expression of dystonia. Profound hearing impairment in affected males develops by infancy and precedes the development of dystonia, which varies in time of onset from the first to the sixth decades, with a peak in the second and third decades. Dystonia in MTS tends to be focal, segmental, or multifocal in distribution at onset, with a predilection for the upper body, variably involving the head, neck, and upper limbs. The majority of patients have progression or generalization of their dystonia regardless of age of onset. Within our 3 kindreds, we observed relative intrafamilial homogeneity but interfamilial variation. The median time to the development of moderate-severely disabling dystonia in these subjects was 11 years. Associated features included progressive cognitive decline, pyramidal signs, and in 1 patient, gait freezing and postural instability. Optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment were both observed. We report for the first time a female patient who developed multiple disabling neurological complications of MTS. Our findings more clearly define and expand the phenotype of both the dystonia and other neurological features of MTS and have implications for the diagnosis and management of this condition. PMID:22736418

  4. The genetics of dystonia: new twists in an old tale.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Gavin; Bhatia, Kailash P; Wood, Nicholas W

    2013-07-01

    Dystonia is a common movement disorder seen by neurologists in clinic. Genetic forms of the disease are important to recognize clinically and also provide valuable information about possible pathogenic mechanisms within the wider disorder. In the past few years, with the advent of new sequencing technologies, there has been a step change in the pace of discovery in the field of dystonia genetics. In just over a year, four new genes have been shown to cause primary dystonia (CIZ1, ANO3, TUBB4A and GNAL), PRRT2 has been identified as the cause of paroxysmal kinesigenic dystonia and other genes, such as SLC30A10 and ATP1A3, have been linked to more complicated forms of dystonia or new phenotypes. In this review, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding genetic forms of dystonia-related to both new and well-known genes alike-and incorporating genetic, clinical and molecular information. We discuss the mechanistic insights provided by the study of the genetic causes of dystonia and provide a helpful clinical algorithm to aid clinicians in correctly predicting the genetic basis of various forms of dystonia. PMID:23775978

  5. Ritual relieved axial dystonia triggered by gaze-evoked amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Jacome, D E

    1997-11-01

    A woman with chronic posttraumatic axial lateropulsion cervical dystonia ("belly dancer's head") found relief of her spontaneous dystonic spasms by the sequential performance of an elaborate motor ritual. During an episode of left optic papillitis caused by central retinal vein occlusion, gaze-evoked amaurosis of the left eye developed, preceded by achromatopsia, during left lateral gaze. Gaze-evoked amaurosis triggered axial dystonia, which was followed by her unique, stereotyped, dystonia-relieving ritual that simulated a slow dance. Visual symptoms improved progressively in 1 year. Eventually, she was unable to trigger her dystonia by eye movements. Spontaneous dystonia remained otherwise unchanged from before the episode of papillitis and was still relieved by her unique ritual. PMID:9365340

  6. A case of mitochondrial cytopathy with exertion induced dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal dystonias are a group of relatively benign hyperkinetic childhood movement disorders of varied etiology. Mitochondrial diseases are well known to produce persistent dystonias as sequelae, but paroxysmal exertion induced dystonia has been reported in only one case to the best of our knowledge. Two siblings born to consanguineous parents presented with early-onset exertion induced dystonia, which was unresponsive to diphenylhydantoin and carbamazepine. A trial with valproate in one of the siblings turned fatal within 24 h. Based on this clue, the second child was investigated and found to suffer from complex I deficiency with a paternally inherited dominant nuclear DNA mutation, which is responsive to the mitochondrial cocktail. Exertion induced dystonia can be a rare manifestation of complex I deficiency. PMID:26557169

  7. Does abnormal interhemispheric inhibition play a role in mirror dystonia?

    PubMed

    Sattler, Virginie; Dickler, Maya; Michaud, Martin; Meunier, Sabine; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion

    2014-05-01

    The presence of mirror dystonia (dystonic movement induced by a specific task performed by the unaffected hand) in the dominant hand of writer's cramp patients when the nondominant hand is moved suggests an abnormal interaction between the 2 hemispheres. In this study we compare the level of interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) in 2 groups of patients with writer's cramp, one with the presence of a mirror dystonia and the other without as well as a control group. The level of bidirectional IHI was measured in wrist muscles with dual-site transcranial magnetic stimulation with a 10-millisecond (short IHI) and a 40-millisecond (long IHI) interstimulus interval during rest and while holding a pen in 9 patients with mirror dystonia 7 without mirror dystonia, and 13 controls. The group of patients without mirror dystonia did not differ from the controls in their IHI level. In contrast, IHI was significantly decreased in the group of patients with mirror dystonia in comparison with the group without mirror dystonia and the controls in both wrist muscles of both the dystonic and unaffected hand whatever the resting or active condition (P = 0.001). The decrease of IHI level in the group of patients with mirror dystonia was negatively correlated with the severity and the duration of the disease: the weaker the level of IHI, the more severe was the disease and the longer its duration. Interhemispheric inhibition disturbances are most likely involved in the occurrence of mirror dystonia. This bilateral deficient inhibition further suggests the involvement of the unaffected hemisphere in the pathophysiology of unilateral dystonia. PMID:24352854

  8. Convergent evidence for abnormal striatal synaptic plasticity in dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, David A.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Poizner, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Dystonia is a functionally disabling movement disorder characterized by abnormal movements and postures. Although substantial recent progress has been made in identifying genetic factors, the pathophysiology of the disease remains a mystery. A provocative suggestion gaining broader acceptance is that some aspect of neural plasticity may be abnormal. There is also evidence that, at least in some forms of dystonia, sensorimotor “use” may be a contributing factor. Most empirical evidence of abnormal plasticity in dystonia comes from measures of sensorimotor cortical organization and physiology. However, the basal ganglia also play a critical role in sensorimotor function. Furthermore, the basal ganglia are prominently implicated in traditional models of dystonia, are the primary targets of stereotactic neurosurgical interventions, and provide a neural substrate for sensorimotor learning influenced by neuromodulators. Our working hypothesis is that abnormal plasticity in the basal ganglia is a critical link between the etiology and pathophysiology of dystonia. In this review we set up the background for this hypothesis by integrating a large body of disparate indirect evidence that dystonia may involve abnormalities in synaptic plasticity in the striatum. After reviewing evidence implicating the striatum in dystonia, we focus on the influence of two neuromodulatory systems: dopamine and acetylcholine. For both of these neuromodulators, we first describe the evidence for abnormalities in dystonia and then the means by which it may influence striatal synaptic plasticity. Collectively, the evidence suggests that many different forms of dystonia may involve abnormal plasticity in the striatum. An improved understanding of these altered plastic processes would help inform our understanding of the pathophysiology of dystonia, and, given the role of the striatum in sensorimotor learning, provide a principled basis for designing therapies aimed at the dynamic processes

  9. Thalamic Volume Is Reduced in Cervical and Laryngeal Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, Jeff L.; Kuster, John K.; Levenstein, Jacob M.; Makris, Nikos; Multhaupt-Buell, Trisha J.; Sudarsky, Lewis R.; Breiter, Hans C.; Sharma, Nutan; Blood, Anne J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dystonia, a debilitating movement disorder characterized by abnormal fixed positions and/or twisting postures, is associated with dysfunction of motor control networks. While gross brain lesions can produce secondary dystonias, advanced neuroimaging techniques have been required to identify network abnormalities in primary dystonias. Prior neuroimaging studies have provided valuable insights into the pathophysiology of dystonia, but few directly assessed the gross volume of motor control regions, and to our knowledge, none identified abnormalities common to multiple types of idiopathic focal dystonia. Methods We used two gross volumetric segmentation techniques and one voxelwise volumetric technique (voxel based morphometry, VBM) to compare regional volume between matched healthy controls and patients with idiopathic primary focal dystonia (cervical, n = 17, laryngeal, n = 7). We used (1) automated gross volume measures of eight motor control regions using the FreeSurfer analysis package; (2) blinded, anatomist-supervised manual segmentation of the whole thalamus (also gross volume); and (3) voxel based morphometry, which measures local T1-weighted signal intensity and estimates gray matter density or volume at the level of single voxels, for both whole-brain and thalamus. Results Using both automated and manual gross volumetry, we found a significant volume decrease only in the thalamus in two focal dystonias. Decreases in whole-thalamic volume were independent of head and brain size, laterality of symptoms, and duration. VBM measures did not differ between dystonia and control groups in any motor control region. Conclusions Reduced thalamic gross volume, detected in two independent analyses, suggests a common anatomical abnormality in cervical dystonia and spasmodic dysphonia. Defining the structural underpinnings of dystonia may require such complementary approaches. PMID:27171035

  10. Impaired Inhibitory Force Feedback in Fixed Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Mugge, Winfred; Schouten, Alfred C; van Hilten, Jacobus J; van der Helm, Frans C T

    2016-04-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a multifactorial disorder associated with an aberrant host response to tissue injury. About 25% of CRPS patients suffer poorly understood involuntary sustained muscle contractions associated with dysfunctional reflexes that result in abnormal postures (fixed dystonia). A recent modeling study simulated fixed dystonia (FD) caused by aberrant force feedback. The current study aims to validate this hypothesis by experimentally recording the modulation of reflexive force feedback in patients with FD. CRPS patients with and without FD, patients with FD but without CRPS, as well as healthy controls participated in the experiment. Three task instructions and three perturbation characteristics were used to evoke a wide range of responses to force perturbations. During position tasks ("maintain posture"), healthy subjects as well as patients resisted the perturbations, becoming more stiff than when being relaxed (i.e., the relax task). Healthy subjects and CRPS patients without FD were both more compliant during force tasks ("maintain force") than during relax tasks, meaning they actively gave way to the imposed forces. Remarkably, the patients with FD failed to do so. A neuromuscular model was fitted to the experimental data to separate the distinct contributions of position, velocity and force feedback, as well as co-contraction to the motor behavior. The neuromuscular modeling indicated that inhibitory force feedback is deregulated in patients with FD, for both CRPS and non-CRPS patients. From previously published simulation results and the present experimental study, it is concluded that aberrant force feedback plays a role in fixed dystonia. PMID:25955788

  11. The functional neuroimaging correlates of psychogenic versus organic dystonia.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Anette E; Mehta, Arpan R; Bhatia, Kailash P; Brown, Richard J; Frackowiak, Richard S J; Trimble, Michael R; Ward, Nicholas S; Rowe, James B

    2013-03-01

    The neurobiological basis of psychogenic movement disorders remains poorly understood and the management of these conditions difficult. Functional neuroimaging studies have provided some insight into the pathophysiology of disorders implicating particularly the prefrontal cortex, but there are no studies on psychogenic dystonia, and comparisons with findings in organic counterparts are rare. To understand the pathophysiology of these disorders better, we compared the similarities and differences in functional neuroimaging of patients with psychogenic dystonia and genetically determined dystonia, and tested hypotheses on the role of the prefrontal cortex in functional neurological disorders. Patients with psychogenic (n = 6) or organic (n = 5, DYT1 gene mutation positive) dystonia of the right leg, and matched healthy control subjects (n = 6) underwent positron emission tomography of regional cerebral blood flow. Participants were studied during rest, during fixed posturing of the right leg and during paced ankle movements. Continuous surface electromyography and footplate manometry monitored task performance. Averaging regional cerebral blood flow across all tasks, the organic dystonia group showed abnormal increases in the primary motor cortex and thalamus compared with controls, with decreases in the cerebellum. In contrast, the psychogenic dystonia group showed the opposite pattern, with abnormally increased blood flow in the cerebellum and basal ganglia, with decreases in the primary motor cortex. Comparing organic dystonia with psychogenic dystonia revealed significantly greater regional blood flow in the primary motor cortex, whereas psychogenic dystonia was associated with significantly greater blood flow in the cerebellum and basal ganglia (all P < 0.05, family-wise whole-brain corrected). Group × task interactions were also examined. During movement, compared with rest, there was abnormal activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex that was

  12. Pallidal deep brain stimulation relieves camptocormia in primary dystonia.

    PubMed

    Hagenacker, Tim; Gerwig, Marcus; Gasser, Thomas; Miller, Dorothea; Kastrup, Oliver; Jokisch, Daniel; Sure, Ulrich; Frings, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Camptocormia, characterised by a forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine may occur in various movement disorders, mainly in Parkinson's disease or in primary dystonia. In severe cases, patients with camptocormia are unable to walk. While treatment options are limited, deep brain stimulation (DBS) with bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus or globus pallidus internus (GPi) has been proposed as a therapeutic option in refractory cases of Parkinson's disease. Here we present two patients with severe camptocormia as an isolated form of dystonia and as part of generalised dystonia, respectively, which were both treated with bilateral stimulation of the GPi. Symptoms of dystonia were assessed using the Burke-Fahn-Marsden dystonia rating scale (BFM) before and during deep brain stimulation. In both patients there was a significant functional improvement following long-term bilateral GPi stimulation and both patients gained ability to walk. In the first patient with an isolated dystonic camptocormia the BFM motor subscore for the truncal flexion improved by 75 %. The total BFM motor score in the second patient with a camptocormia in generalised dystonia improved by 45 %, while the BFM score for truncal flexion improved by 87 %. In both patients the effect of the bilateral GPi stimulation on camptocormia was substantial, independent of generalisation of dystonia. Therefore, GPi DBS is a possible treatment option for this rare disease. PMID:23483215

  13. Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in primary cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Katschnig-Winter, Petra; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Davare, Marco; Sadnicka, Anna; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rothwell, John C; Bhatia, Kailash P; Edwards, Mark J

    2014-06-01

    Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation rely on overlapping circuits predominantly involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Given the importance of these brain regions to the pathophysiology of primary dystonia, and the previous finding of abnormal motor sequence learning in DYT1 gene carriers, we explored motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in patients with primary cervical dystonia. We recruited 12 patients with cervical dystonia and 11 healthy controls matched for age. Subjects used a joystick to move a cursor from a central starting point to radial targets as fast and accurately as possible. Using this device, we recorded baseline motor performance, motor sequence learning and a visuomotor adaptation task. Patients with cervical dystonia had a significantly higher peak velocity than controls. Baseline performance with random target presentation was otherwise normal. Patients and controls had similar levels of motor sequence learning and motor adaptation. Our patients had significantly higher peak velocity compared to controls, with similar movement times, implying a different performance strategy. The preservation of motor sequence learning in cervical dystonia patients contrasts with the previously observed deficit seen in patients with DYT1 gene mutations, supporting the hypothesis of differing pathophysiology in different forms of primary dystonia. Normal motor adaptation is an interesting finding. With our paradigm we did not find evidence that the previously documented cerebellar abnormalities in cervical dystonia have a behavioral correlate, and thus could be compensatory or reflect "contamination" rather than being directly pathological. PMID:24411324

  14. The genetics of dystonia: new twists in an old tale

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Gavin; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2013-01-01

    Dystonia is a common movement disorder seen by neurologists in clinic. Genetic forms of the disease are important to recognize clinically and also provide valuable information about possible pathogenic mechanisms within the wider disorder. In the past few years, with the advent of new sequencing technologies, there has been a step change in the pace of discovery in the field of dystonia genetics. In just over a year, four new genes have been shown to cause primary dystonia (CIZ1, ANO3, TUBB4A and GNAL), PRRT2 has been identified as the cause of paroxysmal kinesigenic dystonia and other genes, such as SLC30A10 and ATP1A3, have been linked to more complicated forms of dystonia or new phenotypes. In this review, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding genetic forms of dystonia—related to both new and well-known genes alike—and incorporating genetic, clinical and molecular information. We discuss the mechanistic insights provided by the study of the genetic causes of dystonia and provide a helpful clinical algorithm to aid clinicians in correctly predicting the genetic basis of various forms of dystonia. PMID:23775978

  15. Phenomenology and classification of dystonia: a consensus update

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Alberto; Bhatia, Kailash; Bressman, Susan B.; DeLong, Mahlon R.; Fahn, Stanley; Fung, Victor S.C.; Hallett, Mark; Jankovic, Joseph; Jinnah, H.A.; Klein, Christine; Lang, Anthony E.; Mink, Jonathan W.; Teller, Jan K.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the consensus outcome of an international panel consisting of investigators with years of experience in this field that reviewed the definition and classification of dystonia. Agreement was obtained based on a consensus development methodology during three in-person meetings and manuscript review by mail. Dystonia is defined as a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both. Dystonic movements are typically patterned and twisting, and may be tremulous. Dystonia is often initiated or worsened by voluntary action and associated with overflow muscle activation. Dystonia is classified along two axes: clinical characteristics, including age at onset, body distribution, temporal pattern and associated features (additional movement disorders or neurological features), and etiology, which includes nervous system pathology and inheritance. The clinical characteristics fall into several specific dystonia syndromes that help to guide diagnosis and treatment. We provide here a new general definition of dystonia and propose a new classification. We encourage clinicians and researchers to use these innovative definition and classification and test them in the clinical setting on a variety of patients with dystonia. PMID:23649720

  16. The treatment of severe dystonia in children and adults.

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, C D; Marion, M H; Quinn, N

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-three children (aged less than 18 years) and 17 adults with severe widespread dystonia were treated with high doses of benzhexol (up to 130 mg daily introduced slowly over many weeks). Children tolerated higher doses (median 30 mg/day) than adults (median 20 mg/day). 52% of the children gained useful benefit, many (43%) without unwanted side effects. Such an approach was less successful in adults; 41% gained benefit, but only 35% had no side effects. Twelve adults with severe axial dystonia, and two children with life-threatening generalised dystonia were treated with a combination of a low constant dose of tetrabenazine to which were added pimozide and benzhexol as necessary. The dose of tetrabenazine was aimed at 75 mg daily; pimozide was increased (6 to 25 mg/day) until the dystonia was relieved or Parkinsonism and other side-effects prevented further increments; if necessary benzhexol (6 to 30 mg/day) then was added to control side-effects and to provide additional benefit. 75% of the adults with severe axial dystonia, and one of the two children with life threatening generalised dystonia gained useful benefit from this regime. It is concluded that high dose benzhexol is the present first treatment of choice for children with severe dystonia, and is worth a try in adults but with less expectation of success. When benzhexol treatment alone fails in adults with severe disabling axial dystonia, or in children with life-threatening generalised dystonia, combined therapy with tetrabenazine, pimozide and benzhexol may give valuable symptomatic relief. PMID:6502174

  17. Posttraumatic focal dystonia of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Vasileiadis, Georgios I; Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Zoubos, Aristeides B

    2012-06-01

    Focal posttraumatic shoulder dystonia is a rare and not easily identifiable entity. Its true pathophysiologic nature, predisposing factors, and disease course remain debatable.This article describes a rare case of a 40-year-old man with late symptoms of focal shoulder dystonia after peripheral trauma of his left shoulder girdle. The shoulder was indirectly injured from the impact of a fall off his motorbike 3 years earlier. He was referred to the authors' institution because remarkable reduction of arm abduction, muscle spasms, and circumscribed hypertrophy of the trapezius muscle were noted while his head and neck were in neutral position and had a full range of motion. The left shoulder had a fixed elevated posture compared with the contralateral shoulder. A continuous burning pain was localized over the area of the hypertrophied trapezius muscle, radiating to the ipsilateral side of the head and neck. Dystonic movements of the trapezius, rhomboid, and supraspinatus muscles were observed. The abduction of the shoulder was significantly decreased, and any repetitive effort for arm abduction induced an exaggeration of his movement disorder, leading to a more pronounced shoulder elevation.Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging of the left shoulder revealed a suprascapular tendinitis with no other abnormalities. Repeated needle electromyography of the left trapezius muscle and neurography of the accessory nerve on both sides were normal. Injections of botulinum toxin A were effective in the resolution of muscle hypertrophy and abnormal posture. PMID:22691679

  18. The Non-Motor Manifestations of Dystonia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kuyper, Daniel J.; Parra, Veronica; Aerts, Shanae; Okun, Michael S.; Kluger, Benzi M.

    2013-01-01

    Non-motor symptoms are increasingly recognized as important determinants of quality of life and disability in a wide range of movement disorders. There is a limited body of research suggesting that many of these symptoms are also commonly associated with primary and other genetic forms of dystonia. However, the significance, etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of these symptoms remains poorly described. The following is a review of the literature which focuses primarily on the association of these types of dystonia with psychiatric disorders, cognition, sleep, pain, and autonomic symptoms. We will also discuss potential mechanisms and approaches to treatment for non-motor features of dystonia. PMID:21484874

  19. How psychogenic is dystonia? Views from past to present.

    PubMed

    Munts, Alexander G; Koehler, Peter J

    2010-05-01

    In the last few centuries, there has been a constant sway between organic and psychogenic explanations for dystonia. In the current study, we investigate this history, assuming the perspective of a spectrum from organic to psychogenic, between which ideas were moving. We have focussed on (i) primary generalized dystonia, (ii) cervical dystonia, (iii) writer's cramp and (iv) fixed dystonia related to complex regional pain syndrome. We have studied medical texts published since the 19th century and their references. Jean-Martin Charcot advocated the concept of hysteria, disorders in which, besides predisposition, environmental factors were involved in their pathogenesis. Sigmund Freud introduced psychoanalysis as an explanatory therapy for psychic disorders. Previous theories, together with the lack of an organic substrate for dystonia, made a strong case for psychogenic explanations. Consequently, many dystonia patients were told that they suffered from psychological conflicts and were treated for them. However, after the description of new hereditary cases in the 1950s, the limited efficacy of psychotherapy in torsion dystonia, the effects of surgical treatments and the lesion studies in the 1960s, more physicians became convinced of the organic nature. The culminating point was the discovery of the DYT1 gene in 1997. In the meantime, experts had already convinced the neurological community that cervical dystonia and writer's cramp were focal dystonias, i.e. minor forms of generalized dystonia, and therefore organic disorders. In contrast, the pathophysiology of fixed dystonia related to complex regional pain syndrome remained controversial. Knowledge of this history, which played on the border between neurology and psychiatry, is instructive and reflects the difficulty in discriminating between them. Today, new insights from functional imaging and neurophysiological studies again challenge the interpretation of these disorders, while the border between psychogenic

  20. Oral methylphenidate for the treatment of refractory facial dystonias.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Kian; Choe, Christina H; Vagefi, M Reza; Gausas, Roberta E; Eckstein, Lauren A

    2015-01-01

    Oral methylphenidate (Ritalin, Novartis) has been reported to alleviate symptoms of benign essential blepharospasm in an off-label application. This series presents 3 patients with refractory periorbital and facial dystonias, including blepharospasm, apraxia of eyelid opening, and oromandibular dystonia unresponsive to standard treatments who experienced a response to oral methylphenidate therapy. While the mechanisms for facial dystonias have not been elucidated, there is evidence to suggest that they are on the spectrum with Parkinson disease. Given the role of dopamine loss in the pathogenesis of Parkinson, the authors' speculate that methylphenidate may be acting on the pathway directly involved in facial dystonias. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a case of successful treatment of blepharospasm refractory to upper eyelid myectomy with methylphenidate monotherapy. PMID:25951177

  1. Dystonia and the Role of Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    Dystonia is a painful, disabling disease whose cause in many cases remains unknown. It has historically been treated with a variety methodologies including baclofen pumps, Botox injection, peripheral denervation, and stereotactic surgery. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is emerging as a viable treatment option for selected patients with dystonia. Results of DBS for dystonia appear to be more consistently superior in patients with primary versus secondary forms of the disorder. Patients with secondary dystonia, due to a variety of causes, may still be candidates for DBS surgery, although the results may not be as consistently good. The procedure is relatively safe with a small likelihood of morbidity and mortality. A randomized trial is needed to determine who are the best patients and when it is best to proceed with surgery. PMID:22084748

  2. Understanding the Anatomy of Dystonia: Determinants of Penetrance and Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Renata P; Niethammer, Martin; Eidelberg, David

    2013-01-01

    The dystonias comprise a group of syndromes characterized by prolonged involuntary muscle contractions resulting in repetitive movements and abnormal postures. Primary dystonia has been associated with over 14 different genotypes, most of which follow an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern with reduced penetrance. Independent of etiology, the disease is characterized by extensive variability in disease phenotype and clinical severity. Recent neuroimaging studies investigating this phenomenon in manifesting and non-manifesting genetic carriers of dystonia have discovered microstructural integrity differences in the cerebello-thalamo-cortical tract in both groups related to disease penetrance. Further study suggests these differences to be specific to subrolandic white matter regions somatotopically related to clinical phenotype. Clinical severity was correlated to the degree of microstructural change. These findings suggest a mechanism for the penetrance and clinical variability observed in dystonia and may represent a novel therapeutic target for patients with refractory limb symptoms. PMID:24114145

  3. [Treatment of autonomic vascular dystonia by combined physiotherapy methods].

    PubMed

    Lobzin, V S; Poliakova, L A; Shiman, A G; Zavodnik, A I

    1989-03-01

    The use of combined physiotherapy methods in 65 patients suffering of vegetative-vascular dystonias resulted in an improvement of the clinical data, normalization or improvement of electroencephalographic, rheovasographic and thermovision indices. PMID:2750110

  4. Cervical demyelinating lesion presenting with choreoathetoid movements and dystonia.

    PubMed

    de Pasqua, Silvia; Cevoli, Sabina; Calbucci, Fabio; Liguori, Rocco

    2016-09-15

    Pseudoathetosis and dystonia are rare manifestations of spinal cord disease that have been already reported in lesions involving the posterior columns at the cervical level. We report two patients with a cervical demyelinating lesion at C3-C4 level presenting with hand dystonia and pseudoathetoid movements. The movement disorder disappeared after steroid treatment. The cases we described highlight the importance of identifying secondary causes of movement disorders that can be reversible with appropriate therapy. PMID:27538633

  5. DYT1 dystonia increases risk taking in humans.

    PubMed

    Arkadir, David; Radulescu, Angela; Raymond, Deborah; Lubarr, Naomi; Bressman, Susan B; Mazzoni, Pietro; Niv, Yael

    2016-01-01

    It has been difficult to link synaptic modification to overt behavioral changes. Rodent models of DYT1 dystonia, a motor disorder caused by a single gene mutation, demonstrate increased long-term potentiation and decreased long-term depression in corticostriatal synapses. Computationally, such asymmetric learning predicts risk taking in probabilistic tasks. Here we demonstrate abnormal risk taking in DYT1 dystonia patients, which is correlated with disease severity, thereby supporting striatal plasticity in shaping choice behavior in humans. PMID:27249418

  6. [Seasonal changes of secondary immunodeficiency in patients with vascular dystonia].

    PubMed

    Malysheva, O A; Shirinskiĭ, V S

    1998-01-01

    The examination of 60 patients with vascular dystonia (VD) and immunological disorders shows that secondary immunodeficiency is not a stable condition. It is associated with seasons of the year and VD variants. Secondary immunodeficiency is more pronounced in winter. A correlation exists between mixed vegetative vascular dystonia and combined T-lymphocyte secondary immunodeficiency in winter. The findings may help in planning immunotherapy in "critical seasons" for patients with vegetative disorders. PMID:9644934

  7. Genetic and clinical features of primary torsion dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Ozelius, Laurie J.; Bressman, Susan B.

    2011-01-01

    Primary torsion dystonia (PTD) is defined as a syndrome in which dystonia is the only clinical sign (except for tremor), and there is no evidence of neuronal degeneration or an acquired cause by history or routine laboratory assessment. Seven different loci have been recognized for PTD but only two of the genes have been identified. In this review we will described the phenotypes associated with these loci and discuss the responsible gene. PMID:21168499

  8. Deep brain stimulation for dystonia: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mehdorn, Hubertus M

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become one of the major therapy options for movement disorders including dystonia. This article should give a review of the current literature from a neurosurgical perspective. Since dystonia is a rare disease, only few studies on larger cohorts have been published, and very few randomized controlled studies are avaialable in the international literature. Our experiences gained treating 134 patients with various types of dystonia, between 1999 and 2015, will serve a guide to interpret the current literature. Symptoms of dystonia are due to a variety of medical conditions. A careful and extensive neurological evaluation is mandatory before medical and surgical treatment options are considered, since the clinical benefits of more aggressive treatment e.g. by DBS depend to a large extent on the etiology of the disease. Diagnostic steps should include also magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and possibly genetic evaluation. Therapy consists of physiotherapy, medical therapy including botulinum toxin injections in focal dystonia and DBS. This neurosurgical therapy is considered a highly effective therapy in well selected patients, which should be discussed, depending on the etiology, early in the patient's career. Patients with primary dystonia will benefit the most from DBS to the ventromediolateral part of the globus pallidus internus (GPi) with acceptable low complication rates; in order to optimize longterm results in these groups of patient, they will require an interdisciplinary individualized approach both pre- and postoperatively as well as longterm care adjusting to their needs. PMID:26977634

  9. Genetic animal models of dystonia: common features and diversities.

    PubMed

    Richter, Franziska; Richter, Angelika

    2014-10-01

    Animal models are pivotal for studies of pathogenesis and treatment of disorders of the central nervous system which in its complexity cannot yet be modeled in vitro or using computer simulations. The choice of a specific model to test novel therapeutic strategies for a human disease should be based on validity of the model for the approach: does the model reflect symptoms, pathogenesis and treatment response present in human patients? In the movement disorder dystonia, prior to the availability of genetically engineered mice, spontaneous mutants were chosen based on expression of dystonic features, including abnormal muscle contraction, movements and postures. Recent discovery of a number of genes and gene products involved in dystonia initiated research on pathogenesis of the disorder, and the creation of novel models based on gene mutations. Here we present a review of current models of dystonia, with a focus on genetic rodent models, which will likely be first choice in the future either for pathophysiological or for preclinical drug testing or both. In order to help selection of a model depending on expression of a specific feature of dystonia, this review is organized by symptoms and current knowledge of pathogenesis of dystonia. We conclude that albeit there is increasing need for research on pathogenesis of the disease and development of improved models, current models do replicate features of dystonia and are useful tools to develop urgently demanded treatment for this debilitating disorder. PMID:25034123

  10. Basic Timing Abilities Stay Intact in Patients with Musician's Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    van der Steen, M. C.; van Vugt, Floris T.; Keller, Peter E.; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonia is a movement disorder that is characterized by the loss of voluntary motor control in extensively trained movements. Musician's dystonia is a type of task-specific dystonia that is elicited in professional musicians during instrumental playing. The disorder has been associated with deficits in timing. In order to test the hypothesis that basic timing abilities are affected by musician's dystonia, we investigated a group of patients (N = 15) and a matched control group (N = 15) on a battery of sensory and sensorimotor synchronization tasks. Results did not show any deficits in auditory-motor processing for patients relative to controls. Both groups benefited from a pacing sequence that adapted to their timing (in a sensorimotor synchronization task at a stable tempo). In a purely perceptual task, both groups were able to detect a misaligned metronome when it was late rather than early relative to a musical beat. Overall, the results suggest that basic timing abilities stay intact in patients with musician's dystonia. This supports the idea that musician's dystonia is a highly task-specific movement disorder in which patients are mostly impaired in tasks closely related to the demands of actually playing their instrument. PMID:24667273

  11. The Most Cited Works in Essential Tremor and Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    King, Nicolas K. K.; Tam, Joseph; Fasano, Alfonso; Lozano, Andres M

    2016-01-01

    Background The study of the most cited works in a particular field gives an indication of the important advances, developments, and discoveries that have had the highest impact in that discipline. Our aim was to identify the most cited works in essential tremor (ET) and dystonia. Methods A bibliometric search was performed using the ISI Web of Science database using selected search terms for ET and dystonia for articles published from 1900 to 2015. The resulting citation counts were analyzed to identify the most cited works, and the studies were categorized. Results Using the criterion of more than 400 citations, there were four citation classics for ET and six for dystonia. The most cited studies were those on pathophysiology followed by medical treatments, clinical classification, genetic studies, surgical treatments, review articles, and epidemiology studies. A comparison of the most cited articles for ET and dystonia showed that there was a divergence, with ET and dystonia having a higher number of epidemiologic and genetic studies, respectively. Whereas the peak period for the number of publications was 2000–2004 for ET, it was 1995–1999 for dystonia. Discussion Given the large number of patients with these disorders, there appears to be an unmet need for further research advances in both areas, but particularly for ET as the most common movement disorder. PMID:27119049

  12. Basic timing abilities stay intact in patients with musician's dystonia.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, M C; van Vugt, Floris T; Keller, Peter E; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonia is a movement disorder that is characterized by the loss of voluntary motor control in extensively trained movements. Musician's dystonia is a type of task-specific dystonia that is elicited in professional musicians during instrumental playing. The disorder has been associated with deficits in timing. In order to test the hypothesis that basic timing abilities are affected by musician's dystonia, we investigated a group of patients (N = 15) and a matched control group (N = 15) on a battery of sensory and sensorimotor synchronization tasks. Results did not show any deficits in auditory-motor processing for patients relative to controls. Both groups benefited from a pacing sequence that adapted to their timing (in a sensorimotor synchronization task at a stable tempo). In a purely perceptual task, both groups were able to detect a misaligned metronome when it was late rather than early relative to a musical beat. Overall, the results suggest that basic timing abilities stay intact in patients with musician's dystonia. This supports the idea that musician's dystonia is a highly task-specific movement disorder in which patients are mostly impaired in tasks closely related to the demands of actually playing their instrument. PMID:24667273

  13. Familial Paroxysmal Exercise-Induced Dystonia: Atypical Presentation of Autosomal Dominant GTP-Cyclohydrolase 1 Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Russell C.; Melchers, Anna; Fung, Victor S. C.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic; Houlden, Henry; Earl, John

    2010-01-01

    Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia (PED) is one of the rarer forms of paroxysmal dyskinesia, and can occur in sporadic or familial forms. We report a family (male index case, mother and maternal grandfather) with autosomal dominant inheritance of paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia. The dystonia began in childhood and was only ever induced…

  14. The syndrome of fixed dystonia: an evaluation of 103 patients.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Anette; Trimble, Michael; Quinn, Niall; Bhatia, Kailash

    2004-10-01

    We describe the clinical features of 103 patients presenting with fixed dystonia and report the prospective assessment and investigation of 41 of them. Most patients were female (84%) and had a young age of onset [mean 29.7 (SD 13.1) years]. A peripheral injury preceded onset in 63% and spread of dystonia to other body regions occurred in 56%. After an average follow-up of 3.3 years (overall disease duration 8.6 years), partial (19%) or complete (8%) remission had occurred in a minority of patients. The fixed postures affected predominantly the limbs (90%), and rarely the neck/shoulder region (6%) or jaw (4%). In the prospectively studied group, pain was present in most patients and was a major complaint in 41%. Twenty percent of patients fulfilled criteria for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). No consistent investigational abnormalities were found and no patient tested (n = 25) had a mutation in the DYT1 gene. Thirty-seven percent of patients fulfilled classification criteria for documented or clinically established psychogenic dystonia; 29% fulfilled DSM-IV (Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition) criteria for somatization disorder, which was diagnosed only after examination of the primary care records in many cases; and 24% fulfilled both sets of criteria. Ten percent of the prospectively studied and 45% of the retrospectively studied patients did not have any evidence of psychogenic dystonia, and detailed investigation failed to reveal an alternative explanation for their clinical presentation. Detailed, semi-structured neuropsychiatric assessments in a subgroup of 26 patients with fixed dystonia and in a control group of 20 patients with classical dystonia revealed dissociative (42 versus 0%, P = 0.001) and affective disorders (85 versus 50%, P = 0.01) significantly more commonly in the fixed dystonia group. Medical and surgical treatment was largely unsuccessful. However, seven patients who underwent multidisciplinary

  15. Treatment of Myoclonus-Dystonia Syndrome with Tetrabenazine

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Angelo Y.; Jinnah, H. A.; Pfeiffer, Ronald F.; Truong, Daniel D.; Nance, Martha A.; LeDoux, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many cases of myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) are due to mutations in SGCE (DYT11). For the majority of patients, myoclonus is relatively more severe than dystonia and can lead to significant functional disability. Deep brain stimulation has been chosen as a treatment option in some patients given that M-D often responds poorly to oral pharmacotherapy. Methods Two siblings with M-D due to the same SGCE deletion mutation were evaluated with the Global Dystonia Rating Scale (GDRS), Fahn-Marsden Rating Scale (FM) and Unified Myoclonus Rating Scale (UMRS) on and off tetrabenazine. Results Both subjects showed marked improvement in myoclonus and mild-to-moderate improvement in dystonia with tetrabenazine. In addition, the response to tetrabenazine has been sustained for years. Conclusions A therapeutic trial of tetrabenazine should be considered in patients with M-D, especially before consideration of deep brain stimulation. An adequately powered multi-center, double-blind study of tetrabenazine will be required to determine the relative contributions of tetrabenazine therapy to myoclonus, dystonia, quality of life, and activities of daily living in patients with M-D. PMID:25406829

  16. Mutations in GNAL: A Novel Cause of Craniocervical Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kishore R.; Lohmann, Katja; Masuho, Ikuo; Miyamoto, Ryosuke; Ferbert, Andreas; Lohnau, Thora; Kasten, Meike; Hagenah, Johann; Brüggemann, Norbert; Graf, Julia; Münchau, Alexander; Kostic, Vladimir S.; Sue, Carolyn M.; Domingo, Aloysius R.; Rosales, Raymond L.; Lee, Lilian V.; Freimann, Karen; Westenberger, Ana; Mukai, Youhei; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Kaji, Ryuji; Klein, Christine; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Schmidt, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Importance Mutations in the GNAL gene have recently been shown to cause primary torsion dystonia. The GNAL-encoded protein (Gαolf) is important for dopamine D1 receptor function and odorant signal transduction. We sequenced all 12 exons of GNAL in 461 patients from Germany, Serbia, and Japan, including 318 patients with dystonia (190 with cervical dystonia), 51 with hyposmia and Parkinson disease, and 92 with tardive dyskinesia or acute dystonic reactions. Observations We identified the following two novel heterozygous putative mutations in GNAL: p.Gly213Ser in a German patient and p.Ala353Thr in a Japanese patient. These variants were predicted to be pathogenic in silico, were absent in ethnically matched control individuals, and impaired Gαolf coupling to D1 receptors in a bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET) assay. Two additional variants appeared to be benign because they behaved like wild-type samples in the BRET assay (p.Ala311Thr) or were detected in ethnically matched controls (p.Thr92Ala). Both patients with likely pathogenic mutations had craniocervical dystonia with onset in the fifth decade of life. No pathogenic mutations were detected in the patients with hyposmia and Parkinson disease, tardive dyskinesias, or acute dystonic reactions. Conclusions and Relevance Mutations in GNAL can cause craniocervical dystonia in different ethnicities. The BRET assay may be a useful tool to support the pathogenicity of identified variants in the GNAL gene. PMID:24535567

  17. Pain Relief in Cervical Dystonia with Botulinum Toxin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ferreira; Cattai, Lígia; Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological disorder characterized by intermittent or sustained muscle contractions that cause abnormal, usually repetitive, movements and postures. Dystonic movements can be tremulous and twisting and often follow a pattern. They are frequently associated with overflow muscle activation and may be triggered or worsened by voluntary action. Most voluntary muscles can be affected and, in the case of the neck muscles, the condition is referred to as cervical dystonia (CD), the most common form of dystonia. The high incidence of pain distinguishes CD from other focal dystonias and contributes significantly to patient disability and low quality of life. Different degrees of pain in the cervical region are reported by more than 60% of patients, and pain intensity is directly related to disease severity. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is currently considered the treatment of choice for CD and can lead to an improvement in pain and dystonic symptoms in up to 90% of patients. The results for BoNT/A and BoNT/B are similar. The complex relationship between pain and dystonia has resulted in a large number of studies and more comprehensive assessments of dystonic patients. When planning the application of BoNT, pain should be a key factor in the choice of muscles and doses. In conclusion, BoNT is highly effective in controlling pain, and its analgesic effect is sustained for a long time in most CD patients. PMID:26110508

  18. Mutations in HPCA Cause Autosomal-Recessive Primary Isolated Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Gavin; Angelova, Plamena R.; Bartolomé-Robledo, Fernando; Ryten, Mina; Trabzuni, Daniah; Stamelou, Maria; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Reports of primary isolated dystonia inherited in an autosomal-recessive (AR) manner, often lumped together as “DYT2 dystonia,” have appeared in the scientific literature for several decades, but no genetic cause has been identified to date. Using a combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a consanguineous kindred affected by AR isolated dystonia, we identified homozygous mutations in HPCA, a gene encoding a neuronal calcium sensor protein found almost exclusively in the brain and at particularly high levels in the striatum, as the cause of disease in this family. Subsequently, compound-heterozygous mutations in HPCA were also identified in a second independent kindred affected by AR isolated dystonia. Functional studies suggest that hippocalcin might play a role in regulating voltage-dependent calcium channels. The identification of mutations in HPCA as a cause of AR primary isolated dystonia paves the way for further studies to assess whether “DYT2 dystonia” is a genetically homogeneous condition or not. PMID:25799108

  19. Isolated and combined dystonia syndromes - an update on new genes and their phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Balint, B; Bhatia, K P

    2015-04-01

    Recent consensus on the definition, phenomenology and classification of dystonia centres around phenomenology and guides our diagnostic approach for the heterogeneous group of dystonias. Current terminology classifies conditions where dystonia is the sole motor feature (apart from tremor) as 'isolated dystonia', while 'combined dystonia' refers to dystonias with other accompanying movement disorders. This review highlights recent advances in the genetics of some isolated and combined dystonic syndromes. Some genes, such as ANO3, GNAL and CIZ1, have been discovered for isolated dystonia, but they are probably not a common cause of classic cervical dystonia. Conversely, the phenotype associated with TUBB4A mutations expanded from that of isolated dystonia to a syndrome of hypomyelination with atrophy of the basal ganglia and cerebellum (H-ABC syndrome). Similarly, ATP1A3 mutations cause a wide phenotypic spectrum ranging from rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism to alternating hemiplegia of childhood. Other entities entailing dystonia-parkinsonism include dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome (SLC63 mutations); dopa-responsive dystonias; young-onset parkinsonism (PARKIN, PINK1 and DJ-1 mutations); PRKRA mutations; and X-linked TAF1 mutations, which rarely can also manifest in women. Clinical and genetic heterogeneity also characterizes myoclonus-dystonia, which includes not only the classical phenotype associated with epsilon-sarcoglycan mutations but rarely also presentation of ANO3 gene mutations, TITF1 gene mutations typically underlying benign hereditary chorea, and some dopamine synthesis pathway conditions due to GCH1 and TH mutations. Thus, new genes are being recognized for isolated dystonia, and the phenotype of known genes is broadening and now involves different combined dystonia syndromes. PMID:25643588

  20. Musicians and Dystonia: Is Sleep Part of the Problem?

    PubMed

    Akamine, R T; Hirotsu, C; Andersen, M L; Tufik, S

    2015-06-01

    We would like to congratulate Lee and Altenmüller for their recent study showing important findings about the characterization of a task-specific dystonia in a young professional percussionist. The authors presented in an elegant way the EMG investigation and treatment approach and the possible differential diagnoses, raising an important question about the need for physicians' awareness of this condition when considering musicians' health. We would like to add a new point of view in order to contribute with this discussion and provide critical thinking for a multidisciplinary approach to this type of dystonia, which may affect many individuals and result in severe compromise of musical technical performance. One factor that could also be potentially associated with the percussion-related dystonia is sleep. PMID:26046619

  1. What is new in tics, dystonia and chorea?

    PubMed

    Macerollo, Antonella; Martino, Davide

    2016-08-01

    Movement disorders comprise hyperkinetic involuntary movements (eg tremor, myoclonus, tics, dystonia and chorea) and hypokinetic (parkinsonism) disorders. Tics are cardinal features of primary tic disorders encompassing Tourette syndrome (TS), but are also found in some neurodegenerative conditions and may be induced by psychoactive substances. The first line treatment for tics is pharmacological (mainly dopamine receptor blockers or alpha-2 adrenergic agonists) and behavioural. Dystonia and chorea syndromes are considerably heterogeneous in aetiology, and age at onset, body distribution of the movement disorder, accompanying neurological motor and non-motor features, and systemic manifestations are all important to reach a correct aetiological diagnosis. While symptomatic pharmacological treatment remains the mainstay of treatment for choreas, deep brain stimulation surgery has a well-defined place in the management of medically refractory dystonia. PMID:27481387

  2. Dopa-Responsive Dystonia in a Ten-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Venkatesh; Mohammed, Hussain Sadiq; Riyas, Ebrahim; Murugesan, Karuppasamy

    2012-01-01

    Children with recent onset dystonia and gait abnormalities may pose a diagnostic challenge. A ten-year-old, developmentally normal girl, presented with a six-month history of gait abnormality and dystonia. Her complaint worsened as the day progressed. In view of typical diurnal variation of dystonia, a therapeutic challenge with levodopa/carbidopa was given and there was a dramatic response. Hence, a diagnosis of dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD) was made. DRD is an inherited disorder characterized by dystonia with diurnal variation and favorable response to levodopa/carbidopa. The inheritance is usually autosomal dominant, however, in some cases, autosomal-recessive inheritance is also seen. PMID:24479026

  3. DYT1 dystonia increases risk taking in humans

    PubMed Central

    Arkadir, David; Radulescu, Angela; Raymond, Deborah; Lubarr, Naomi; Bressman, Susan B; Mazzoni, Pietro; Niv, Yael

    2016-01-01

    It has been difficult to link synaptic modification to overt behavioral changes. Rodent models of DYT1 dystonia, a motor disorder caused by a single gene mutation, demonstrate increased long-term potentiation and decreased long-term depression in corticostriatal synapses. Computationally, such asymmetric learning predicts risk taking in probabilistic tasks. Here we demonstrate abnormal risk taking in DYT1 dystonia patients, which is correlated with disease severity, thereby supporting striatal plasticity in shaping choice behavior in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14155.001 PMID:27249418

  4. Advances in the genetics of primary torsion dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Enza Maria

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge about the genetics of primary torsion dystonia (PTD) has been progressing at a very slow pace compared with other movement disorders. For many years, only one causative gene was known, DYT1/TOR1A, yet the recent identification of a second PTD causative gene (DYT6/THAP1), the detection of subclinical alterations caused by mutations in PTD genes in some healthy non-penetrant individuals, and functional studies on TOR1A and THAP1 protein products have significantly improved mutation detection, genotype-phenotype correlates, and our understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying the development of dystonia. PMID:20948792

  5. New genetic insights highlight 'old' ideas on motor dysfunction in dystonia.

    PubMed

    Goodchild, Rose E; Grundmann, Kathrin; Pisani, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Primary dystonia is a poorly understood but common movement disorder. Recently, several new primary dystonia genes were identified that provide new insight into dystonia pathogenesis. The GNAL dystonia gene is central for striatal responses to dopamine (DA) and is a component of a molecular pathway already implicated in DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD). Furthermore, this pathway is also dysfunctional and pathogenically linked to mTOR signaling in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID). These new data suggest that striatal DA responses are central to primary dystonia, even when symptoms do not benefit from DA therapies. Here we integrate these new findings with current understanding of striatal microcircuitry and other dystonia-causing insults to develop new ideas on the pathophysiology of this incapacitating movement disorder. PMID:24144882

  6. DRD1 rare variants associated with tardive-like dystonia: a pilot pathway sequencing study in dystonia.

    PubMed

    Groen, Justus L; Ritz, Katja; Warner, Tom T; Baas, Frank; Tijssen, Marina A J

    2014-07-01

    The dystonias are a clinical heterogeneous group with a complex genetic background. To gain more insight in genetic risk factors in dystonia we used a pathway sequence approach in patients with an extreme dystonia phenotype (n = 26). We assessed all coding and non-coding variants in candidate genes in D1-like subclass of dopamine receptor genes (DRD1, DRD5) and the synaptic vesicle pathway linked to torsinA (TOR1A, STON2, SNAPIN, KLC1 and THAP1), spanning 96 Kb. Two rare missense variants in DRD1 were found: c.68G>A(p.Arg23His) in the screening group and c.776C>A(p.Ser259Tyr) in an additional screen of 15 selected dystonia patients. Genetic burden analysis of DRD1 rare variants in patients (4.8%) versus European American controls from ESP (0.72%) reveals an OR 5.35 (95% CI 1.29-23.1). No rare missense SNVs in the synaptic vesicle pathway were found. Sequencing of TOR1A showed variant enrichment in haplotype 2, possibly accountable for contradictive results in previous association studies. Two new rare SNVs were detected in THAP1, including a nonsense mutation (p.Gln167Ter) and a splice site variant (c.72-1G>A). Screening for rare SNV of candidate pathways in a phenotype extreme population appears to be a promising alternative method to identify genetic risk factors in complex disorders like primary torsion dystonia. These findings indicate a role for rare genetic variation in dopamine processing genes in dystonia pathophysiology. PMID:24768614

  7. Delayed awakening in dystonia patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery.

    PubMed

    Trombetta, Carlos; Deogaonkar, Anupa; Deogaonkar, Milind; Ebrahim, Zeyd; Rezai, Ali; Machado, Andre; Farag, Ehab

    2010-07-01

    We aimed to identify the incidence, duration and causes of delayed emergence from anesthesia in patients with dystonia undergoing surgery for deep brain stimulation (DBS) placement. A retrospective review of patients with dystonia who underwent DBS placement was conducted and the following characteristics were noted: age, gender, comorbid conditions, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, anesthetic agents used, amount of initial dose, amount of infusion dose, duration of the infusion and the time needed for emergence. Twenty-four patients underwent 33 DBS procedures for dystonia. Propofol was administered to 21 patients, in 29 of the 33 procedures. Dexmedetomidine was administered to three patients, in four procedures. The average propofol loading dose was 0.7mg/kg, and the infusion rate was 80microg/kg per minute (min), for an average duration of 89min. The average time of emergence was 36min. Only 31% of patients emerged from propofol anesthesia during the expected time frame, 69% of patients had some degree of delayed emergence, and 24% had a significant delay in emergence. Delayed emergence was more common in younger patients due to the higher loading doses these patients received. This study shows a 69% incidence of delayed emergence in dystonia patients undergoing DBS surgery. It also suggests an association between delayed emergence and younger patients who receive higher loading doses. A possible cause of delayed emergence is excessive anesthetic potentiation of the low output pallidal state in dystonia which may depress the pallido-thalamo-cortical circuitry. Delayed emergence could also result from depression of the previously affected ventral pallidal inputs to the septo-hippocampal system that mediates general anesthesia and awareness. Complex neurotransmitter disturbances may also be involved. PMID:20466547

  8. Cortico-pallidal oscillatory connectivity in patients with dystonia.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Wolf-Julian; Jha, Ashwani; Bock, Antje; Huebl, Julius; Horn, Andreas; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Sander, Tillmann H; Litvak, Vladimir; Kühn, Andrea A

    2015-07-01

    Primary dystonia has been associated with an underlying dysfunction of a wide network of brain regions including the motor cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord. Dystonia can be effectively treated by pallidal deep brain stimulation although the mechanism of this effect is not well understood. Here, we sought to characterize cortico-basal ganglia functional connectivity using a frequency-specific measure of connectivity-coherence. We recorded direct local field potentials from the human pallidum simultaneously with whole head magnetoencephalography to characterize functional connectivity in the cortico-pallidal oscillatory network in nine patients with idiopathic dystonia. Three-dimensional cortico-pallidal coherence images were compared to surrogate images of phase shuffled data across patients to reveal clusters of significant coherence (family-wise error P < 0.01, voxel extent 1000). Three frequency-specific, spatially-distinct cortico-pallidal networks have been identified: a pallido-temporal source of theta band (4-8 Hz) coherence, a pallido-cerebellar source of alpha band (7-13 Hz) coherence and a cortico-pallidal source of beta band (13-30 Hz) coherence over sensorimotor areas. Granger-based directionality analysis revealed directional coupling with the pallidal local field potentials leading in the theta and alpha band and the magnetoencephalographic cortical source leading in the beta band. The degree of pallido-cerebellar coupling showed an inverse correlation with dystonic symptom severity. Our data extend previous findings in patients with Parkinson's disease describing motor cortex-basal ganglia oscillatory connectivity in the beta band to patients with dystonia. Source coherence analysis revealed two additional frequency-specific networks involving the temporal cortex and the cerebellum. Pallido-cerebellar oscillatory connectivity and its association with dystonic symptoms provides further confirmation of cerebellar involvement

  9. Limb Amputations in Fixed Dystonia: A Form of Body Integrity Identity Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Mark J; Alonso-Canovas, Araceli; Schrag, Arnette; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Thompson, Philip D; Bhatia, Kailash

    2011-01-01

    Fixed dystonia is a disabling disorder mainly affecting young women who develop fixed abnormal limb postures and pain after apparently minor peripheral injury. There is continued debate regarding its pathophysiology and management. We report 5 cases of fixed dystonia in patients who sought amputation of the affected limb. We place these cases in the context of previous reports of patients with healthy limbs and patients with chronic regional pain syndrome who have sought amputation. Our cases, combined with recent data regarding disorders of mental rotation in patients with fixed dystonia, as well as previous data regarding body integrity identity disorder and amputations sought by patients with chronic regional pain syndrome, raise the possibility that patients with fixed dystonia might have a deficit in body schema that predisposes them to developing fixed dystonia and drives some to seek amputation. The outcome of amputation in fixed dystonia is invariably unfavorable. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society PMID:21484872

  10. Spatial reorganization of putaminal dopamine D2-like receptors in cranial and hand dystonia.

    PubMed

    Black, Kevin J; Snyder, Abraham Z; Mink, Jonathan W; Tolia, Veeral N; Revilla, Fredy J; Moerlein, Stephen M; Perlmutter, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    The putamen has a somatotopic organization of neurons identified by correspondence of firing rates with selected body part movements, as well as by complex, but organized, differential cortical projections onto putamen. In isolated focal dystonia, whole putaminal binding of dopamine D2-like receptor radioligands is quantitatively decreased, but it has not been known whether selected parts of the putamen are differentially affected depending upon the body part affected by dystonia. The radioligand [(18)F]spiperone binds predominantly to D2-like receptors in striatum. We hypothesized that the spatial location of [(18)F]spiperone binding within the putamen would differ in patients with dystonia limited to the hand versus the face, and we tested that hypothesis using positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. To address statistical and methodological concerns, we chose a straightforward but robust image analysis method. An automated algorithm located the peak location of [(18)F]spiperone binding within the striatum, relative to a brain atlas, in each of 14 patients with cranial dystonia and 8 patients with hand dystonia. The mean (left and right) |x|, y, and z coordinates of peak striatal binding for each patient were compared between groups by t test. The location of peak [(18)F]spiperone binding within the putamen differed significantly between groups (cranial dystonia zdystonia z, p = 0.016). We conclude that in isolated focal dystonia, dopamine D2-like receptors are distributed differently in the putamen depending on the body part manifesting dystonia. PMID:24520350

  11. Direct interaction between causative genes of DYT1 and DYT6 primary dystonia.

    PubMed

    Gavarini, Sophie; Cayrol, Corinne; Fuchs, Tania; Lyons, Natalia; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Girard, Jean-Philippe; Ozelius, Laurie J

    2010-10-01

    Primary dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by sustained muscle contractions and in which dystonia is the only or predominant clinical feature. TOR1A(DYT1) and the transcription factor THAP1(DYT6) are the only genes identified thus far for primary dystonia. Using electromobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), we demonstrate a physical interaction between THAP1 and the TOR1A promoter that is abolished by pathophysiologic mutations. Our findings provide the first evidence that causative genes for primary dystonia intersect in a common pathway and raise the possibility of developing novel therapies targeting this pathway. PMID:20865765

  12. Progressive dystonia symptomatic of juvenile GM2 gangliosidosis.

    PubMed

    Nardocci, N; Bertagnolio, B; Rumi, V; Angelini, L

    1992-01-01

    A 9-year-old boy showed a progressive generalized dystonia, with onset at the age of 4 years, combined with mental deterioration and behavioral disturbances. The values of beta-hexosaminidase activities studied in plasma, leukocytes, and fibroblasts obtained using two different substrates (MUG-NAc and MUG-NAc-6-S) were significantly reduced but higher than in Tay-Sachs disease and similar to those found in the juvenile chronic form of GM2 gangliosidosis. With anticholinergic therapy, for 1.5 years, the dystonic symptoms did not progress and the boy can still care for himself and attend school. The description of another case of the disease, clinically expressed as dystonia, corroborates the existence of a dystonic phenotype of GM2 gangliosidosis. PMID:1532632

  13. Motor and Sensory Dysfunction in Musician’s Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Florence C F; Frucht, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Musicians’ dystonia is a task-specific and painless loss of motor control in a previously well-executed task. It is increasingly recognized in the medical and musical community. Recent advances in neuroimaging, transcranial magnetic stimulation and novel techniques in electroencephalography have shed light on its underlying pathophysiology. To date, a deranged cortical plasticity leading to abnormal sensorimotor integration, combined with reduced inhibition across several levels of the motor pathway are likely mechanisms.This paper reviews the various phenomenology of musician’s dystonia across keyboard, string, brass, flute and drum players. Treatment is often challenging. Medical therapies like botulinum toxin injection and rehabilitation method with sensorimotor training offer symptomatic relief and return to baseline performance to some musicians. PMID:23814536

  14. Clinical spectrum of dopa-responsive dystonia and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woong-Woo; Jeon, Beom Seok

    2014-07-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD) has a classic presentation of childhood or adolescent-onset dystonia, mild parkinsonism, marked diurnal fluctuations, improvement with sleep or rest, and a dramatic and sustained response to low doses of L-dopa without motor fluctuations or dyskinesias. However, there have been many papers on patients with a wide range of features, which report them as DRD mainly because they had dystonic syndromes with L-dopa responsiveness. Many mutations in the dopaminergic system have been found as molecular genetic defects. Therefore, the clinical and genetic spectra of DRD are unclear, which lead to difficulties in diagnostic work-ups and planning treatments. We propose the concept of DRD and DRD-plus to clarify the confusion in this area and to help understand the pathophysiology and clinical features, which will help in guiding diagnostic investigations and planning treatments. We critically reviewed the literature on atypical cases and discussed the limitations of the gene study. PMID:24844652

  15. Dystonia in Ashkenazi Jews: clinical characterization of a founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Bressman, S B; de Leon, D; Kramer, P L; Ozelius, L J; Brin, M F; Greene, P E; Fahn, S; Breakefield, X O; Risch, N J

    1994-11-01

    A gene (DYT1) for idiopathic torsion dystonia maps to chromosome 9q34 in Ashkenazi Jewish families with early onset of symptoms. Further, there is linkage disequilibrium between DYT1 and a particular haplotype of alleles at 9q34 loci in this population. This implies that a large proportion of early-onset idiopathic torsion dystonia in Ashkenazi Jews is due to a founder mutation in DYT1. To characterize the phenotypic range of this mutation, we studied 174 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals affected with idiopathic torsion dystonia. We used GT(n) markers on chromosome 9q34 (D9S62, D9S63, and ASS) and classified individuals as having ("carriers"), not having ("noncarriers"), or being ambiguous with respect to a DYT1-associated haplotype. We assessed clinical features and found marked clinical differences between haplotype carriers and noncarriers. There were 90 carriers, 70 noncarriers, and 14 ambiguous individuals. The mean age at onset of symptoms was significantly lower in carriers than in noncarriers (12.5 +/- 8.2 vs 36.5 +/- 16.4 years). In 94% of carriers, symptoms began in a limb (arm or leg equally); rarely the disorder started in the neck (3.3%) or larynx (2.2%). In contrast, the neck, larynx, and other cranial muscles were the sites of onset in 79% of noncarriers; onset in the arms occurred in 21% and onset in the legs never occurred. Limb onset, leg involvement in the course of disease, and age at onset distinguished haplotype carriers from noncarriers with 90% accuracy. In conclusion, there are clinical differences between Ashkenazi Jewish individuals with idiopathic torsion dystonia who do or do not have a unique DYT1 mutation, as determined by a DYT1-associated haplotype of 9q34 alleles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7979224

  16. Myoclonus-dystonia syndrome due to tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Cordivari, Carla; Batla, Amit; Wood, Nick W.; Houlden, Henry; Hardy, John; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To present a new family with tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency (THD) that presented with a new phenotype of predominant, levodopa-responsive myoclonus with dystonia due to compound heterozygosity of one previously reported mutation in the promoter region and a novel nonsynonymous mutation in the other allele, thus expanding the clinical and genetic spectrum of this disorder. Methods: We performed detailed clinical examination of the family and electrophysiology to characterize the myoclonus. We performed analysis of the TH gene and in silico prediction of the possible effect of nonsynonymous substitutions on protein structure. Results: Electrophysiology suggested that the myoclonus was of subcortical origin. Genetic analysis of the TH gene revealed compound heterozygosity of a point mutation in the promoter region (c.1-71 C>T) and a novel nonsynonymous substitution in exon 12 (c.1282G>A, p.Gly428Arg). The latter is a novel variant, predicted to have a deleterious effect on the TH protein function and is the first pathogenic TH mutation in patients of African ancestry. Conclusion: We presented a THD family with predominant myoclonus-dystonia and a new genotype. It is important to consider THD in the differential diagnosis of myoclonus-dystonia, because early treatment with levodopa is crucial for these patients. PMID:22815559

  17. Cannabis in the Treatment of Dystonia, Dyskinesias, and Tics.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Barbara S

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has been used for many medicinal purposes, including management of spasms, dystonia, and dyskinesias, with variable success. Its use for tetanus was described in the second century BCE, but the literature continues to include more case reports and surveys of its beneficial effects in managing symptoms of hyperkinetic movement disorders than randomized controlled trials, making evidence-based recommendations difficult. This paper reviews clinical research using various formulations of cannabis (botanical products, oral preparations containing ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and/or cannabidiol) and currently available preparations in the USA (nabilone and dronabinol). This has been expanded from a recent systematic review of cannabis use in several neurologic conditions to include case reports and case series and results of anonymous surveys of patients using cannabis outside of medical settings, with the original evidence classifications marked for those papers that followed research protocols. Despite overlap in some patients, dyskinesias will be treated separately from dystonia and chorea; benefit was not established beyond individual patients for these conditions. Tics, usually due to Tourettes, did respond to cannabis preparations. Side effects reported in the trials will be reviewed but those due to recreational use, including the dystonia that can be secondary to synthetic marijuana preparations, are outside the scope of this paper. PMID:26271953

  18. Neural correlates of abnormal sensory discrimination in laryngeal dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Ramdhani, Ritesh A.; Battistella, Giovanni; Rubien-Thomas, Estee; Choy, Melissa; Farwell, Ian M.; Velickovic, Miodrag; Blitzer, Andrew; Frucht, Steven J.; Reilly, Richard B.; Hutchinson, Michael; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Simonyan, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant sensory processing plays a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of dystonia; however, its underpinning neural mechanisms in relation to dystonia phenotype and genotype remain unclear. We examined temporal and spatial discrimination thresholds in patients with isolated laryngeal form of dystonia (LD), who exhibited different clinical phenotypes (adductor vs. abductor forms) and potentially different genotypes (sporadic vs. familial forms). We correlated our behavioral findings with the brain gray matter volume and functional activity during resting and symptomatic speech production. We found that temporal but not spatial discrimination was significantly altered across all forms of LD, with higher frequency of abnormalities seen in familial than sporadic patients. Common neural correlates of abnormal temporal discrimination across all forms were found with structural and functional changes in the middle frontal and primary somatosensory cortices. In addition, patients with familial LD had greater cerebellar involvement in processing of altered temporal discrimination, whereas sporadic LD patients had greater recruitment of the putamen and sensorimotor cortex. Based on the clinical phenotype, adductor form-specific correlations between abnormal discrimination and brain changes were found in the frontal cortex, whereas abductor form-specific correlations were observed in the cerebellum and putamen. Our behavioral and neuroimaging findings outline the relationship of abnormal sensory discrimination with the phenotype and genotype of isolated LD, suggesting the presence of potentially divergent pathophysiological pathways underlying different manifestations of this disorder. PMID:26693398

  19. Domperidone-induced dystonia: a rare and troublesome complication

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Om Prakash; Dhakal, Mona; Bhandari, Dhurba

    2014-01-01

    Domperidone is a commonly prescribed antiemetic drug but its side effects are rarely seen. Extrapyramidal side effects are a very rare complication of the drug occurring in 1/10 000 population. They usually occur in infants and very young children due to a poorly developed blood–brain barrier. We report a case of acute dystonia in a 13-year-old boy induced by domperidone. The boy was treated for viral fever and was started on domperidone 30 mg/day, sustained release form (0.7 mg/kg/day), for persistent vomiting along with other supportive treatment. On the fourth day of treatment, although the fever and vomiting subsided, the child developed oromandibular dystonia despite giving the drug in the recommended dose. Fortunately, drug-induced dystonias are a reversible condition and the child improved in 7–8 days after discontinuation of the drug. There was no recurrence at 1 month follow-up. Usually, dystonic reactions do not threaten life but are troublesome and life altering, so judicious use of the drug is advised. PMID:24973343

  20. Writer’s cramp: is focal dystonia the best explanation?

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Michael H

    2013-01-01

    Often considered no more than an historical curiosity, writer’s cramp remains an important disability in the workplace and the mechanism, which has puzzled the best medical minds for generations, remains contentious. A remarkable range of hypotheses has been put forward to try and explain a disability which periodically reached epidemic and economically worrying levels, but in the end medical opinion has accepted the explanation put forward by neurologists Sheehy and Marsden in 1983 that this was caused by a form of focal dystonia. However, the majority of the historical descriptions of writer’s cramp do not fit the classical parameters of focal dystonia and are more accurately described as a progressive forearm muscle fatigue. Today’s keyboard operators continue to complain of symptoms identical to their clerical forebears demonstrating that this is a problem which has evolved but not disappeared; this has the paradoxical advantage that modern research techniques enable this complaint to be revisited. The result shows that two varieties of writer’s cramp have always existed and while focal dystonia remains a valid explanation for a minority of cases, the much more common fatigue-based complaint is better explained by chronic compartment syndrome of the forearm. PMID:23885297

  1. Review: genetics and neuropathology of primary pure dystonia.

    PubMed

    Paudel, R; Hardy, J; Revesz, T; Holton, J L; Houlden, H

    2012-10-01

    Neuropathology has been the key to understanding the aetiology of many neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal degeneration and cerebellar ataxias. Dystonia shares many clinical features with these conditions but research in general, has been unrewarding in providing information on disease processes. Neuropathological studies are few in number and only limited morphological abnormalities have been described. In the genetic literature, dystonia loci are represented as DYT and are assigned ascending numerals chronologically as they are identified. This review will concentrate on the neuropathology of primary pure dystonia, focusing on DYT1 and DYT6 and the correlation between clinical and genetic findings. Research in this area is incomplete and confounded by the rarity of post mortem brain tissue. However, recent findings, indicating a direct interaction between the torsinA (TOR1A) gene responsible for DYT1 and the thanatos-associated domain-containing apoptosis-associated protein 1 (THAP1) gene responsible for DYT6, have important implications in understanding these two entities and also for other members of this group of disorders. PMID:22897341

  2. Central Motor Conduction Studies and Diagnostic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Children with Severe Primary and Secondary Dystonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Verity; Mills, Kerry; Siddiqui, Ata; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Dystonia in childhood has many causes. Imaging may suggest corticospinal tract dysfunction with or without coexistent basal ganglia damage. There are very few published neurophysiological studies on children with dystonia; one previous study has focused on primary dystonia. We investigated central motor conduction in 62 children (34 males, 28…

  3. Update on Deep Brain Stimulation for Dyskinesia and Dystonia: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    TODA, Hiroki; SAIKI, Hidemoto; NISHIDA, Namiko; IWASAKI, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been an established surgical treatment option for dyskinesia from Parkinson disease and for dystonia. The present article deals with the timing of surgical intervention, selecting an appropriate target, and minimizing adverse effects. We provide an overview of current evidences and issues for dyskinesia and dystonia as well as emerging DBS technology. PMID:27053331

  4. The non-motor syndrome of primary dystonia: clinical and pathophysiological implications

    PubMed Central

    Stamelou, Maria; Edwards, Mark J.; Hallett, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Dystonia is typically considered a movement disorder characterized by motor manifestations, primarily involuntary muscle contractions causing twisting movements and abnormal postures. However, growing evidence indicates an important non-motor component to primary dystonia, including abnormalities in sensory and perceptual functions, as well as neuropsychiatric, cognitive and sleep domains. Here, we review this evidence and discuss its clinical and pathophysiological implications. PMID:21933808

  5. Striatal cholinergic dysfunction as a unifying theme in the pathophysiology of dystonia.

    PubMed

    Eskow Jaunarajs, K L; Bonsi, P; Chesselet, M F; Standaert, D G; Pisani, A

    2015-04-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder of both genetic and non-genetic causes, which typically results in twisted posturing due to abnormal muscle contraction. Evidence from dystonia patients and animal models of dystonia indicate a crucial role for the striatal cholinergic system in the pathophysiology of dystonia. In this review, we focus on striatal circuitry and the centrality of the acetylcholine system in the function of the basal ganglia in the control of voluntary movement and ultimately clinical manifestation of movement disorders. We consider the impact of cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) on dopamine-acetylcholine interactions and examine new evidence for impairment of ChIs in dysfunction of the motor systems producing dystonic movements, particularly in animal models. We have observed paradoxical excitation of ChIs in the presence of dopamine D2 receptor agonists and impairment of striatal synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of DYT1 dystonia, which are improved by administration of recently developed M1 receptor antagonists. These findings have been confirmed across multiple animal models of DYT1 dystonia and may represent a common endophenotype by which to investigate dystonia induced by other types of genetic and non-genetic causes and to investigate the potential effectiveness of pharmacotherapeutics and other strategies to improve dystonia. PMID:25697043

  6. Temporal profile of improvement of tardive dystonia after globus pallidus deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Mewes, Klaus; DeLong, Mahlon R.; Gross, Robert E.; Triche, Shirley D.; Jinnah, H.A.; Boulis, Nicholas; Willie, Jon T.; Freeman, Alan; Alexander, Garrett E.; Aia, Pratibha; Butefisch, Cathrine M.; Esper, Christine D.; Factor, Stewart A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Several case reports and small series have indicated that tardive dystonia is responsive to globus pallidus deep brain stimulation. Whether different subtypes or distributions of tardive dystonia are associated with different outcomes remains unknown. Methods We assessed the outcomes and temporal profile of improvement of eight tardive dystonia patients who underwent globus pallidus deep brain stimulation over the past six years through record review. Due to the retrospective nature of this study, it was not blinded or placebo controlled. Results: Consistent with previous studies, deep brain stimulation improved the overall the Burkee–Fahn–Marsden motor scores by 85.1 ± 13.5%. The distributions with best responses in descending order were upper face, lower face, larynx/pharynx, limbs, trunk, and neck. Patients with prominent cervical dystonia demonstrated improvement in the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale but improvements took several months. In four patients the effects of deep brain stimulation on improvement in Burke Fahn Marsden score was rapid, while in four cases there was partial rapid response of neck and trunk dystonia followed by was gradual resolution of residual symptoms over 48 months. Conclusion Our retrospective analysis shows excellent resolution of tardive dystonia after globus pallidus deep brain stimulation. We found instantaneous response, except with neck and trunk dystonia where partial recovery was followed by further resolution at slower rate. Such outcome is encouraging for using deep brain stimulation in treatment of tardive dystonia. PMID:25465373

  7. Striatal cholinergic dysfunction as a unifying theme in the pathophysiology of dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jaunarajs, K.L. Eskow; Bonsi, P.; Chesselet, M.F.; Standaert, D.G.; Pisani, A.

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder of both genetic and non-genetic causes, which typically results in twisted posturing due to abnormal muscle contraction. Evidence from dystonia patients and animal models of dystonia indicate a crucial role for the striatal cholinergic system in the pathophysiology of dystonia. In this review, we focus on striatal circuitry and the centrality of the acetylcholine system in the function of the basal ganglia in the control of voluntary movement and ultimately clinical manifestion of movement disorders. We consider the impact of cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) on dopamine-acetylcholine interactions and examine new evidence for impairment of ChIs in dysfunction of the motor systems producing dystonic movements, particularly in animal models. We have observed paradoxical excitation of ChIs in the presence of dopamine D2 receptor agonists and impairment of striatal synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of DYT1 dystonia, which are improved by administration of recently developed M1 receptor antagonists. These findings have been confirmed across multiple animal models of DYT1 dystonia and may represent a common endophenotype by which to investigate dystonia induced by other types of genetic and non-genetic causes and to investigate the potential effectiveness of pharmacotherapeutics and other strategies to improve dystonia. PMID:25697043

  8. A rare sequence variant in intron 1 of THAP1 is associated with primary dystonia.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Satya R; Xiao, Jianfeng; Zhao, Yu; Bastian, Robert W; Perlmutter, Joel S; Racette, Brad A; Paniello, Randal C; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Uitti, Ryan J; Van Gerpen, Jay A; Hedera, Peter; Truong, Daniel D; Blitzer, Andrew; Rudzińska, Monika; Momčilović, Dragana; Jinnah, Hyder A; Frei, Karen; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; LeDoux, Mark S

    2014-05-01

    Although coding variants in THAP1 have been causally associated with primary dystonia, the contribution of noncoding variants remains uncertain. Herein, we examine a previously identified Intron 1 variant (c.71+9C>A, rs200209986). Among 1672 subjects with mainly adult-onset primary dystonia, 12 harbored the variant in contrast to 1/1574 controls (P < 0.01). Dystonia classification included cervical dystonia (N = 3), laryngeal dystonia (adductor subtype, N = 3), jaw-opening oromandibular dystonia (N = 1), blepharospasm (N = 2), and unclassified (N = 3). Age of dystonia onset ranged from 25 to 69 years (mean = 54 years). In comparison to controls with no identified THAP1 sequence variants, the c.71+9C>A variant was associated with an elevated ratio of Isoform 1 (NM_018105) to Isoform 2 (NM_199003) in leukocytes. In silico and minigene analyses indicated that c.71+9C>A alters THAP1 splicing. Lymphoblastoid cells harboring the c.71+9C>A variant showed extensive apoptosis with relatively fewer cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Differentially expressed genes from lymphoblastoid cells revealed that the c.71+9C>A variant exerts effects on DNA synthesis, cell growth and proliferation, cell survival, and cytotoxicity. In aggregate, these data indicate that THAP1 c.71+9C>A is a risk factor for adult-onset primary dystonia. PMID:24936516

  9. A rare sequence variant in intron 1 of THAP1 is associated with primary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Satya R; Xiao, Jianfeng; Zhao, Yu; Bastian, Robert W; Perlmutter, Joel S; Racette, Brad A; Paniello, Randal C; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Uitti, Ryan J; Van Gerpen, Jay A; Hedera, Peter; Truong, Daniel D; Blitzer, Andrew; Rudzińska, Monika; Momčilović, Dragana; Jinnah, Hyder A; Frei, Karen; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; LeDoux, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Although coding variants in THAP1 have been causally associated with primary dystonia, the contribution of noncoding variants remains uncertain. Herein, we examine a previously identified Intron 1 variant (c.71+9C>A, rs200209986). Among 1672 subjects with mainly adult-onset primary dystonia, 12 harbored the variant in contrast to 1/1574 controls (P < 0.01). Dystonia classification included cervical dystonia (N = 3), laryngeal dystonia (adductor subtype, N = 3), jaw-opening oromandibular dystonia (N = 1), blepharospasm (N = 2), and unclassified (N = 3). Age of dystonia onset ranged from 25 to 69 years (mean = 54 years). In comparison to controls with no identified THAP1 sequence variants, the c.71+9C>A variant was associated with an elevated ratio of Isoform 1 (NM_018105) to Isoform 2 (NM_199003) in leukocytes. In silico and minigene analyses indicated that c.71+9C>A alters THAP1 splicing. Lymphoblastoid cells harboring the c.71+9C>A variant showed extensive apoptosis with relatively fewer cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Differentially expressed genes from lymphoblastoid cells revealed that the c.71+9C>A variant exerts effects on DNA synthesis, cell growth and proliferation, cell survival, and cytotoxicity. In aggregate, these data indicate that THAP1 c.71+9C>A is a risk factor for adult-onset primary dystonia. PMID:24936516

  10. Update on Deep Brain Stimulation for Dyskinesia and Dystonia: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Toda, Hiroki; Saiki, Hidemoto; Nishida, Namiko; Iwasaki, Koichi

    2016-05-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been an established surgical treatment option for dyskinesia from Parkinson disease and for dystonia. The present article deals with the timing of surgical intervention, selecting an appropriate target, and minimizing adverse effects. We provide an overview of current evidences and issues for dyskinesia and dystonia as well as emerging DBS technology. PMID:27053331

  11. Exhaustive Analysis of BH4 and Dopamine Biosynthesis Genes in Patients with Dopa-Responsive Dystonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clot, Fabienne; Grabli, David; Cazeneuve, Cecile; Roze, Emmanuel; Castelnau, Pierre; Chabrol, Brigitte; Landrieu, Pierre; Nguyen, Karine; Ponsot, Gerard; Abada, Myriem; Doummar, Diane; Damier, Philippe; Gil, Roger; Thobois, Stephane; Ward, Alana J.; Hutchinson, Michael; Toutain, Annick; Picard, Fabienne; Camuzat, Agnes; Fedirko, Estelle; San, Chankannira; Bouteiller, Delphine; LeGuern, Eric; Durr, Alexandra; Vidailhet, Marie; Brice, Alexis

    2009-01-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia is a childhood-onset dystonic disorder, characterized by a dramatic response to low dose of L-Dopa. Dopa-responsive dystonia is mostly caused by autosomal dominant mutations in the "GCH1" gene (GTP cyclohydrolase1) and more rarely by autosomal recessive mutations in the "TH" (tyrosine hydroxylase) or "SPR" (sepiapterin…

  12. Globus pallidus deep brain stimulation for adult-onset axial dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Mewes, Klaus; Jinnah, H.A.; DeLong, Mahlon R.; Gross, Robert E.; Triche, Shirley; Freeman, Alan; Factor, Stewart A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Generalized dystonia, both primary and secondary forms, and axial dystonias such as tardive dystonia, and idiopathic cervical dystonia are responsive to globus pallidus interna (GPi) DBS. There is a paucity of investigations probing the impact of DBS on adult-onset axial dystonia. We assessed the efficacy of GPi DBS in four patients with rare adult-onset axial dystonia. Methods Primary outcome measure was improvement in the motor component of the Burke-Fahn-Marsden (BFM) rating scale. Secondary outcome measures were quality of life as determined by the SF-36 questionnaire, time to achieve best possible benefit and DBS parameters that accounted for the best response. In patients with prominent concomitant cervical dystonia we also used the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS). Results GPi DBS improved BFM scores by 87.63 ± 11.46%. Improvement in total severity scale of TWSTRS was 71.5 ± 12.7%. Quality of life also remarkably improved as evidenced by 109.38 ± 82.97 and 7.05 ± 21.48% percent change in psychometrically-based physical component summary (PCS), and a mental component summary (MCS) score respectively. Conclusions GPi DBS is a very effective treatment for adult-onset axial dystonia. Considering its refractoriness to medical therapy and significant impact on quality of life DBS should be considered for this disorder. PMID:25260969

  13. Oromandibular dystonia in yemeni patients with khat chewing: a response to botulinum toxin treatment.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Hatem S; El-Tamawy, Mohamed S; Mohieldin, Nevin; Edrees, Mohammed; Bohlega, Saeed

    2014-04-22

    Khat-(Catha edulis)related oromandibular dystonia is a difficult-to-treat subset of movement disorders that involve masticatory muscles with diverse and incapacitating manifestations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Botulinum toxin-type A therapy in khat chewer Yemeni patients with oromandibular dystonia. This prospective study included 18 khat-chewers Yemeni patients with refractory oromandibular dystonia, who were subjected to Botulinum toxin-A injection and followed up for 3 months thereafter. Primary efficacy outcome was the global impression scale, and secondary outcome measure was the Unified Dystonia Rating Scale. Patients showed improvement of both efficacy measures, maximum satisfactory responses were detected at the forth week after injection. No major adverse events were detected. Botulinum toxin-A is considered an effective and safe treatment option for refractory oromandibular dystonia in khat-chewers. PMID:24987506

  14. Patient considerations in the treatment of cervical dystonia: focus on botulinum toxin type A

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Reversa R; Pagan, Fernando L

    2015-01-01

    Cervical dystonia is the most common form of focal dystonia characterized by involuntary muscle contractions causing abnormal movements and posturing of the head and neck and is associated with significant pain. Botulinum toxin is considered first-line therapy in the treatment of pain and abnormal head posturing associated with cervical dystonia. There are currently three botulinum toxin type A neurotoxins and one botulinum type B neurotoxin commercially available and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) labeled for the treatment of cervical dystonia. This review will focus on the efficacy, safety, and therapeutic use of botulinum type A neurotoxins in the treatment of cervical dystonia. We conclude with a discussion of factors influencing toxin selection including therapeutic effect, duration of effect, side effect profile, cost, and physician preference. PMID:26082621

  15. Myoclonus-dystonia: An under-recognized entity - Report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Jain, Puneet; Sharma, Suvasini; van Ruissen, Fred; Aneja, Satinder

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary myoclonus-dystonia (DYT 11) is caused by the epsilon-sarcoglycan (SGCE) mutation. The clinical details and investigations of cases diagnosed with myoclonus-dystonia were reviewed. We describe 5 patients (3 families) with myoclonus-dystonia diagnosed at our center. Majority of the patients had the classical phenotype with few atypical features (adult-onset disease and onset in lower limbs). Four patients carried a mutant variant in the SGCE-gene. A diagnosis of myoclonus-dystonia should be considered in cognitively normal patients with early-onset myoclonus (that may occur both at rest and/or action) with or without dystonia and with or without psychiatric-disturbances. PMID:27625242

  16. Novel Dystonia Genes: Clues on Disease Mechanisms and the Complexities of High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Aloysius; Erro, Roberto; Lohmann, Katja

    2016-04-01

    Dystonia is a genetically heterogenous disease and a prototype disorder where next-generation sequencing has facilitated the identification of new pathogenic genes. This includes the first two genes linked to recessively inherited isolated dystonia, that is, HPCA (hippocalcin) and COL6A3 (collagen VI alpha 3). These genes are proposed to underlie cases of the so-called DYT2-like dystonia, while also reiterating two distinct pathways in dystonia pathogenesis. First, deficiency in HPCA function is thought to alter calcium homeostasis, a mechanism that has previously been forwarded for CACNA1A and ANO3. The novel myoclonus-dystonia genes KCTD17 and CACNA1B also implicate abnormal calcium signaling in dystonia. Second, the phenotype in COL6A3-loss-of-function zebrafish models argues for a neurodevelopmental defect, which has previously been suggested as a possible biological mechanism for THAP1, TOR1A, and TAF1 based on expression data. The newly reported myoclonus-dystonia gene, RELN, plays also a role in the formation of brain structures. Defects in neurodevelopment likewise seem to be a recurrent scheme underpinning mainly complex dystonias, for example those attributable to biallelic mutations in GCH1, TH, SPR, or to heterozygous TUBB4A mutations. To date, it remains unclear whether dystonia is a common phenotypic outcome of diverse underlying disease mechanisms, or whether the different genetic causes converge in a single pathway. Importantly, the relevance of pathways highlighted by novel dystonia genes identified by high-throughput sequencing depends on the confirmation of mutation pathogenicity in subsequent genetic and functional studies. However, independent, careful validation of genetic findings lags behind publications of newly identified genes. We conclude with a discussion on the characteristics of true-positive reports. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26991507

  17. The Subthalamic Nucleus in Primary Dystonia: Single-Unit Discharge Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Schrock, Lauren E.; Ostrem, Jill L.; Turner, Robert S.; Shimamoto, Shoichi A.

    2009-01-01

    Most models of dystonia pathophysiology predict alterations of activity in the basal ganglia thalamocortical motor circuit. The globus pallidus interna (GPi) shows bursting and oscillatory neuronal discharge in both human dystonia and in animal models, but it is not clear which intrinsic basal ganglia pathways are implicated in this abnormal output. The subthalamic nucleus (STN) receives prominent excitatory input directly from cortical areas implicated in dystonia pathogenesis and inhibitory input from the external globus pallidus. The goal of this study was to elucidate the role of the STN in dystonia by analyzing STN neuronal discharge in patients with idiopathic dystonia. Data were collected in awake patients undergoing microelectrode recording for implantation of STN deep brain stimulation electrodes. We recorded 62 STN neurons in 9 patients with primary dystonia. As a comparison group, we recorded 143 STN neurons in 20 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Single-unit activity was discriminated off-line by principal component analysis and evaluated with respect to discharge rate, bursting, and oscillatory activity. The mean STN discharge rate in dystonia patients was 26.3 Hz (SD 13.6), which was lower than that in the PD patients (35.6 Hz, SD 15.2), but higher than published values for subjects without basal ganglia dysfunction. Oscillatory activity was found in both disorders, with a higher proportion of units oscillating in the beta range in PD. Bursting discharge was a prominent feature of both dystonia and PD, whereas sensory receptive fields were expanded in PD compared with dystonia. The STN firing characteristics, in conjunction with those previously published for GPi, suggest that bursting and oscillatory discharge in basal ganglia output may be transmitted via pathways involving the STN and provide a pathophysiologic rationale for STN as a surgical target in dystonia. PMID:19846625

  18. Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) syndrome following cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Dheeraj; Singla, Deepak; Singh, Jasveer; Jindal, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) appears to be a unique syndrome following brain injury. It can echo many life-threatening conditions, making its early recognition and management a challenge for intensivists. A delay in early recognition and subsequent management may result in increased morbidity, which is preventable in affected patients. Herein, we report the case of a patient who was diagnosed with PAID syndrome following prolonged cardiac arrest, and discuss the pathophysiology, clinical presentation and management of this rare and under-recognised clinical entity. PMID:25189311

  19. Paroxysmal Autonomic Instability with Dystonia after Pneumococcal Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Safadieh, Layal; Sharara-Chami, Rana; Dabbagh, Omar

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of bacterial meningitis, frequently resulting in severe neurological impairment. A seven-month-old child presenting with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis developed right basal ganglia and hypothalamic infarctions. Daily episodes of agitation, hypertension, tachycardia, diaphoresis, hyperthermia, and decerebrate posturing were observed. The diagnosis of paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia was established. The patient responded to clonidine, baclofen, and benzodiazepines. Although this entity has been reported in association with traumatic brain injury, and as a sequel to some nervous system infections, this is the first case, to our knowledge, associated with pneumococcal meningoencephalitis. PMID:23093976

  20. Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia after pneumococcal meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Safadieh, Layal; Sharara-Chami, Rana; Dabbagh, Omar

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of bacterial meningitis, frequently resulting in severe neurological impairment. A seven-month-old child presenting with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis developed right basal ganglia and hypothalamic infarctions. Daily episodes of agitation, hypertension, tachycardia, diaphoresis, hyperthermia, and decerebrate posturing were observed. The diagnosis of paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia was established. The patient responded to clonidine, baclofen, and benzodiazepines. Although this entity has been reported in association with traumatic brain injury, and as a sequel to some nervous system infections, this is the first case, to our knowledge, associated with pneumococcal meningoencephalitis. PMID:23093976

  1. Normal motor adaptation in cervical dystonia: a fundamental cerebellar computation is intact.

    PubMed

    Sadnicka, Anna; Patani, Bansi; Saifee, Tabish A; Kassavetis, Panagiotis; Pareés, Isabel; Korlipara, Prasad; Bhatia, Kailash P; Rothwell, John C; Galea, Joseph M; Edwards, Mark J

    2014-10-01

    The potential role of the cerebellum in the pathophysiology of dystonia has become a focus of recent research. However, direct evidence for a cerebellar contribution in humans with dystonia is difficult to obtain. We examined motor adaptation, a test of cerebellar function, in 20 subjects with primary cervical dystonia and an equal number of aged matched controls. Adaptation to both visuomotor (distorting visual feedback by 30°) and forcefield (applying a velocity-dependent force) conditions were tested. Our hypothesis was that cerebellar abnormalities observed in dystonia research would translate into deficits of cerebellar adaptation. We also examined the relationship between adaptation and dystonic head tremor as many primary tremor models implicate the cerebellothalamocortical network which is specifically tested by this motor paradigm. Rates of adaptation (learning) in cervical dystonia were identical to healthy controls in both visuomotor and forcefield tasks. Furthermore, the ability to adapt was not clearly related to clinical features of dystonic head tremor. We have shown that a key motor control function of the cerebellum is intact in the most common form of primary dystonia. These results have important implications for current anatomical models of the pathophysiology of dystonia. It is important to attempt to progress from general statements that implicate the cerebellum to a more specific evidence-based model. The role of the cerebellum in this enigmatic disease perhaps remains to be proven. PMID:24872202

  2. Proprioceptive Dysfunction in Focal Dystonia: From Experimental Evidence to Rehabilitation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Avanzino, Laura; Fiorio, Mirta

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia has historically been considered a disorder of the basal ganglia, mainly affecting planning and execution of voluntary movements. This notion comes from the observation that most lesions responsible for secondary dystonia involve the basal ganglia. However, what emerges from recent research is that dystonia is linked to the dysfunction of a complex neural network that comprises basal ganglia–thalamic–frontal cortex, but also the inferior parietal cortex and the cerebellum. While dystonia is clearly a motor problem, it turned out that sensory aspects are also fundamental, especially those related to proprioception. We outline experimental evidence for proprioceptive dysfunction in focal dystonia from intrinsic sensory abnormalities to impaired sensorimotor integration, which is the process by which sensory information is used to plan and execute volitional movements. Particularly, we will focus on proprioceptive aspects of dystonia, including: (i) processing of vibratory input, (ii) temporal discrimination of two passive movements, (iii) multimodal integration of visual-tactile and proprioceptive inputs, and (iv) motor control in the absence of visual feedback. We suggest that these investigations contribute not only to a better understanding of dystonia pathophysiology, but also to develop rehabilitation strategies aimed at facilitating the processing of proprioceptive input. PMID:25538612

  3. Spatial Reorganization of Putaminal Dopamine D2-Like Receptors in Cranial and Hand Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Black, Kevin J.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Mink, Jonathan W.; Tolia, Veeral N.; Revilla, Fredy J.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Perlmutter, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    The putamen has a somatotopic organization of neurons identified by correspondence of firing rates with selected body part movements, as well as by complex, but organized, differential cortical projections onto putamen. In isolated focal dystonia, whole putaminal binding of dopamine D2-like receptor radioligands is quantitatively decreased, but it has not been known whether selected parts of the putamen are differentially affected depending upon the body part affected by dystonia. The radioligand [18F]spiperone binds predominantly to D2-like receptors in striatum. We hypothesized that the spatial location of [18F]spiperone binding within the putamen would differ in patients with dystonia limited to the hand versus the face, and we tested that hypothesis using positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. To address statistical and methodological concerns, we chose a straightforward but robust image analysis method. An automated algorithm located the peak location of [18F]spiperone binding within the striatum, relative to a brain atlas, in each of 14 patients with cranial dystonia and 8 patients with hand dystonia. The mean (left and right) |x|, y, and z coordinates of peak striatal binding for each patient were compared between groups by t test. The location of peak [18F]spiperone binding within the putamen differed significantly between groups (cranial dystonia zdystonia z, p = 0.016). We conclude that in isolated focal dystonia, dopamine D2-like receptors are distributed differently in the putamen depending on the body part manifesting dystonia. PMID:24520350

  4. The clinical spectrum of laryngeal dystonia includes dystonic cough: observations of a large series.

    PubMed

    Payne, Susannah; Tisch, Stephen; Cole, Ian; Brake, Helen; Rough, Judy; Darveniza, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Laryngeal dystonia is a movement disorder of the muscles within the larynx, which most commonly manifests as spasmodic dysphonia (SD). Rarer reported manifestations include dystonic respiratory stridor and dyscoordinate breathing. Laryngeal dystonia has been treated successfully with botulinum neurotoxin (BTX) injections since 1984. We reviewed prospectively collected data in a consecutive series of 193 patients with laryngeal dystonia who were seen at St. Vincent's Hospital between 1991 and 2011. Patient data were analyzed in Excel, R, and Prism. Laryngeal dystonia manifested as SD (92.7%), stridor (11.9%), dystonic cough (6.2%), dyscoordinate breathing (4.1%), paroxysmal hiccups (1.6%), and paroxysmal sneezing (1.6%). There were more women (68.4%) than men (31.6%), and the average age at onset was 47 years. A positive family history of dystonia was present in 16.1% of patients. A higher incidence of extra-laryngeal dystonia (ie, torticollis and blepharospasm) and concurrent manifestations of laryngeal dystonia were present in patients with dystonic cough, dyscoordinate breathing, paroxysmal sneezing, and hiccups than in other patients (P = 0.003 and P < 0.0001, respectively). The average starting dose of BTX decreased from 2.3 to 0.5 units between 1991 and 2011. The median treatment rating was excellent across all subgroups. Patients with adductor SD, stridor, extra-laryngeal dystonia and male patients had relatively better treatment outcomes. Technical failures were rare (1.1%). Dysphonia secondary to vocal cord paresis followed 38.7% of treatments. Laryngeal dystonia manifests predominantly as SD, but other manifestations include stridor, dyscoordinate breathing, paroxysmal cough, hiccups, and sneezing. BTX injections are very effective across all subgroups. Severe adverse events are rare. PMID:24753288

  5. Noninvasive Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease and Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Allan D.; Fregni, Felipe; Simon, David K.; Deblieck, Choi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    Summary Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are promising noninvasive cortical stimulation methods for adjunctive treatment of movement disorders. They avoid surgical risks and provide theoretical advantages of specific neural circuit neuromodulation. Neuromodulatory effects depend on extrinsic stimulation factors (cortical target, frequency, intensity, duration, number of sessions), intrinsic patient factors (disease process, individual variability and symptoms, state of medication treatment), and outcome measures. Most studies to date have shown beneficial effects of rTMS or tDCS on clinical symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and support the notion of spatial specificity to the effects on motor and non-motor symptoms. However, stimulation parameters have varied widely and some studies are poorly controlled. Studies of rTMS or tDCS in dystonia have provided abundant data on physiology, but few on clinical effects. Multiple mechanisms likely contribute to the clinical effects of rTMS and tDCS in movement disorders, including normalization of cortical excitability, rebalancing of distributed neural network activity, and induction of dopamine release. However, it remains unclear how to individually adjust rTMS or tDCS factors for the most beneficial effects on symptoms of PD or dystonia. Nonetheless the noninvasive nature, minimal side effects, positive effects in preliminary clinical studies, and increasing evidence for rational mechanisms make rTMS and tDCS attractive for ongoing investigation. PMID:18394576

  6. Dopa-responsive dystonia--clinical and genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Wijemanne, Subhashie; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD) encompasses a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders that typically manifest as limb-onset, diurnally fluctuating dystonia and exhibit a robust and sustained response to levodopa treatment. Autosomal dominant GTP cyclohydrolase 1 deficiency, also known as Segawa disease, is the most common and best-characterized condition that manifests as DRD, but a similar presentation can be seen with genetic abnormalities that lead to deficiencies in tyrosine hydroxylase, sepiapterin reductase or other enzymes that are involved in the biosynthesis of dopamine. In rare cases, DRD can result from conditions that do not affect the biosynthesis of dopamine; single case reports have shown that DRD can be a manifestation of hereditary spastic paraplegia type 11, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 and ataxia telangiectasia. This heterogeneity of conditions that underlie DRD frequently leads to misdiagnosis, which delays the appropriate treatment with levodopa. Correct diagnosis at an early stage requires use of the appropriate diagnostic tests, which include a levodopa trial, genetic testing (including whole-exome sequencing), cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitter analysis, the phenylalanine loading test, and enzyme activity measurements. The selection of tests for use depends on the clinical presentation and level of complexity. This Review presents the common and rarer causes of DRD and their clinical features, and considers the most appropriate approaches to ensure early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26100751

  7. Acute Dystonia Following a Switch in Treatment from Atomoxetine to Low-dose Aripiprazole.

    PubMed

    Başay, Ömer; Basay, Burge Kabukcu; Öztürk, Önder; Yüncü, Zeki

    2016-05-31

    The present report describes the cases of a 17-year-old male patient and a 13-year-old female patient who developed acute dystonia following the administration of low-dose aripiprazole (5 mg/day) after the cessation of atomoxetine treatment. Although aripiprazole-induced dystonia has been previously reported in the literature, it is rare, and most of these cases were associated with doses higher than 5 mg/day. Furthermore, both of the patients in the present study discontinued atomoxetine prior to the initiation of aripiprazole treatment; thus, this report also discussed the possible mechanisms underlying the manifestation of dystonia from the perspective of neurotransmitter activity. PMID:27121436

  8. A novel gene mutation in PANK2 in a patient with severe jaw-opening dystonia.

    PubMed

    Yapici, Zuhal; Akcakaya, Nihan Hande; Tekturk, Pinar; Iseri, Sibel Aylin Ugur; Ozbek, Ugur

    2016-09-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a rare neurodegenerative condition. Major clinical features include progressive dystonia, pigmentary retinopathy, spasticity, and cognitive decline. The typical MRI sign of the disease, known as "eye-of-the-tiger", is what makes differential diagnosis possible. We here describe a 16-year-old male patient with PKAN presenting with severe and sustained jaw-opening dystonia which may be due to heterogeneous etiologies showing poor response to treatment. Herein, long-term follow-up and genetic results of a PKAN case who experienced severe jaw-opening dystonia are presented and discussed. PMID:27185474

  9. Acute Dystonia Following a Switch in Treatment from Atomoxetine to Low-dose Aripiprazole

    PubMed Central

    Başay, Ömer; Basay, Burge Kabukcu; Öztürk, Önder; Yüncü, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    The present report describes the cases of a 17-year-old male patient and a 13-year-old female patient who developed acute dystonia following the administration of low-dose aripiprazole (5 mg/day) after the cessation of atomoxetine treatment. Although aripiprazole-induced dystonia has been previously reported in the literature, it is rare, and most of these cases were associated with doses higher than 5 mg/day. Furthermore, both of the patients in the present study discontinued atomoxetine prior to the initiation of aripiprazole treatment; thus, this report also discussed the possible mechanisms underlying the manifestation of dystonia from the perspective of neurotransmitter activity. PMID:27121436

  10. Cranial dystonia, blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm: clinical features and treatment, including the use of botulinum toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, S P; Lang, A E

    1988-01-01

    Blepharospasm, the most frequent feature of cranial dystonia, and hemifacial spasm are two involuntary movement disorders that affect facial muscles. The cause of blepharospasm and other forms of cranial dystonia is not known. Hemifacial spasm is usually due to compression of the seventh cranial nerve at its exit from the brain stem. Cranial dystonia may result in severe disability. Hemifacial spasm tends to be much less disabling but may cause considerable distress and embarrassment. Patients affected with these disorders are often mistakenly considered to have psychiatric problems. Although the two disorders are quite distinct pathophysiologically, therapy with botulinum toxin has proven very effective in both. We review the clinical features, proposed pathophysiologic features, differential diagnosis and treatment, including the use of botulinum toxin, of cranial dystonia and hemifacial spasm. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3052771

  11. Japanese familial case of myoclonus-dystonia syndrome with a splicing mutation in SGCE.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takahito; Takano, Kyoko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Osaka, Hitoshi

    2015-04-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia syndrome (MDS) is a rare autosomal-dominant movement disorder characterized by brief, frequently alcohol-responsive myoclonic jerks that begin in childhood or early adolescence, caused by mutations in the ε-sarcoglycan gene (SGCE). The patient was a 6-year-old boy. At 2 years 8 months, he had abnormal movement when he ran due to dystonia of his left leg. At 3 years 5 months, he exhibited dystonia and myoclonic movement of his arms when eating. Myoclonus was likely to develop when he felt anxiety or exhaustion. Genomic DNA showed a heterozygous mutation in SGCE (c.109 + 1 G > T). His father and uncle with the same mutation also experienced milder dystonia or myoclonic movements. SGCE mutation can cause a broad range of clinical symptoms between and within families. We should consider MDS as a differential diagnosis for patients with paroxysmal walking abnormalities and/or myoclonic movements. PMID:25868953

  12. Refractory Case of Paroxysmal Autonomic Instability With Dystonia Syndrome Secondary to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kern, John; Bodek, Daniel; Niazi, Osama Tariq; Maher, James

    2016-02-01

    Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) is a syndrome commonly related to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and rarely to anoxia associated with symptoms of dystonia, tachycardia, tachypnea, and diaphoresis. This is a case of a 20-year-old man who was stabbed in the heart. He underwent surgical repair of a ventricular septal defect and mitral valve replacement. Postoperatively, he developed dystonia with tachycardia and tachypnea consistent with PAID syndrome, secondary to prolonged hypoxia. Traditionally, this poorly understood syndrome is treated with morphine, clonazepam, and nonselective β-blockers. Second-line medications commonly used are baclofen, dantrolene, and gabapentin, which are aimed at the dystonia itself. In this case, both first- and second-line agents were ineffective. A 72-hour dexmedetomidine infusion resulted in complete resolution of symptoms. This is the first case of anoxia-induced PAID syndrome to be effectively treated with dexmedetomidine, which was previously used in a case induced by TBI. PMID:26867852

  13. Musicians' social representations of health and illness: a qualitative case study about focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Zosso, Amélie; Schoeb, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    Musicians are artists who use the entire body when playing their instruments. Since over-practicing may lead to physical problems, musicians might encounter focal dystonia, a hand's motor disorder. The cause seems to be the brain's confusion between afferent and efferent information transfer provoking a disharmony with the instrument. Although focal dystonia may have serious consequences for a musician's career, it is unclear how musicians perceive this trouble. This case study describes two musicians with focal dystonia. Qualitative research was used to study their social representations of health and illness. The results show the central role of the hand during music playing, the passion for music and the understanding for focal dystonia as "brain panic". Therapists should account for those specific features inherent to this population in order to better help them in their quest for art through music. Giving a voice to musicians may improve their quality of care. PMID:22246303

  14. Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Internal Globus Pallidus Deep Brain Stimulation for Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Ran; Lee, Jae Meen; Ehm, Gwanhee; Yang, Hui-Jun; Song, In Ho; Lim, Yong Hoon; Kim, Mi-Ryoung; Kim, Keyoung Ran; Lee, Woong-Woo; Kim, Young Eun; Hwang, Jae Ha; Shin, Chae Won; Park, Hyeyoung; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Cheolyoung; Kim, Dong Gyu; Jeon, Beom Seok; Paek, Sun Ha

    2016-01-01

    Background GPi (Internal globus pallidus) DBS (deep brain stimulation) is recognized as a safe, reliable, reversible and adjustable treatment in patients with medically refractory dystonia. Objectives This report describes the long-term clinical outcome of 36 patients implanted with GPi DBS at the Neurosurgery Department of Seoul National University Hospital. Methods Nine patients with a known genetic cause, 12 patients with acquired dystonia, and 15 patients with isolated dystonia without a known genetic cause were included. When categorized by phenomenology, 29 patients had generalized, 5 patients had segmental, and 2 patients had multifocal dystonia. Patients were assessed preoperatively and at defined follow-up examinations postoperatively, using the Burke-Fahn-Marsden dystonia rating scale (BFMDRS) for movement and functional disability assessment. The mean follow-up duration was 47 months (range, 12–84) Results The mean movement scores significantly decreased from 44.88 points preoperatively to 26.45 points at 60-month follow up (N = 19, P = 0.006). The mean disability score was also decreased over time, from 11.54 points preoperatively to 8.26 points at 60-month follow up, despite no statistical significance (N = 19, P = 0.073). When analyzed the movement and disability improvement rates at 12-month follow up point, no significant difference was noted according to etiology, disease duration, age at surgery, age of onset, and phenomenology. However, the patients with DYT-1 dystonia and isolated dystonia without a known genetic cause showed marked improvement. Conclusions GPi DBS is a safe and efficient therapeutic method for treatment of dystonia patients to improve both movement and disability. However, this study has some limitations caused by the retrospective design with small sample size in a single-center. PMID:26745717

  15. Meta-analytical and electrophysiological evidence for executive dysfunction in primary dystonia.

    PubMed

    Lange, Florian; Seer, Caroline; Salchow, Carolin; Dengler, Reinhard; Dressler, Dirk; Kopp, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Impaired motor control in primary dystonia has been linked to cortico-basal ganglia alterations that may also give rise to changes in executive functioning. However, no conclusive evidence for executive dysfunction in patients with primary dystonia has been reported yet. We conducted a meta-analysis of the relationship between primary dystonia and performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), an established test of executive functioning. Its results revealed a significant effect of medium size, indicating that primary dystonia is associated with moderate performance deficits on the WCST. Building on this finding, we conducted an event-related potential (ERP) study to elucidate the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying executive dysfunction in primary dystonia. Eighteen patients with blepharospasm, a common form of primary focal dystonia, and 34 healthy matched controls completed a computerized version of the WCST. We specifically compared indicators of two distinct components of executive functioning: set shifting and rule inference. On a behavioral level, blepharospasm patients seemed to have particular difficulty integrating information to infer the correct task rule. In addition, P3a amplitude (as an electrophysiological marker of rule-inference processes) was selectively attenuated in blepharospasm patients. Executive dysfunction in blepharospasm can thus rather be attributed to a rule-inference deficit, whereas set-shifting abilities appear to be relatively unaffected by the disease. Moreover, P3a amplitude attenuation was related to disease duration, indicating that this ERP might serve as a neural indicator of disease progression and executive dysfunction in primary dystonia. These results demonstrate for the first time that pathophysiological alterations in primary dystonia might affect cortical activation for executive functioning. PMID:27376933

  16. Acute dystonia in a young schizophrenic patient associated with ingestion of a cloperastine containing cough syrup.

    PubMed

    Linazasoro, G; Garmendia, M T; Lizaso, X

    2000-01-01

    Acute dystonic reactions are usually observed after exposure to drugs with antidopaminergic actions. We report on one patient with acute dystonia associated with ingestion of a cloperastine containing syrup, who suffered from schizophrenia but had been neuroleptic-free for 6months. Cloperastine has antihistaminic properties. We suggest that antihistaminic agents may induce acute dystonia by altering the balance between dopamine and acetylcholine in the striatum. PMID:18591150

  17. Dystonia and tremor following exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Klawans, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-seven railroad workers who were exposed to polychlorinated phenols, including dioxin (TCDD), during 1979 while cleaning up the chemical spillage following damage to a tank car filled with these chemicals were followed medically for the subsequent 6 years. Two committed suicide. The initial neurological complaints included a sense of fatigue and muscle aching, both of which have been reported in other individuals following dioxin exposure. On detailed neurological examination in December, 1985, 24 of 45 had dystonic writer's cramp and/or other action dystonias of the hands. None of the involved individuals had a family history of dystonia, and all 24 dated the onset of the dystonia to the first 2 to 3 years subsequent to their toxic exposure. The dystonias varied in severity but were usually mild. No other types of dystonic involvement were recognized. Thirty-five of the 45 individuals also manifested postural and terminal intention tremor which resembled benign essential tremor. None of the involved individuals had a family history of tremor, and all 35 of those affected dated the onset of the tremor to some time subsequent to their toxic exposure. Forty-three of 45 patients had histories and findings suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. This is the first report relating any type of dystonia to prior dioxin exposure and the first report relating action dystonia, such as dystonic writer's cramp, and postural/terminal intention tremor, to toxic exposure of any type.

  18. Syndrome of fixed dystonia in adolescents--short term outcome in 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Anirban; López-Casas, Jesús; Poo, Pilar; Colomer, Jaume; Galvan, Marta; Lingappa, Lokesh; Short, Clare; Jardine, Philip E; Fernández-Alvarez, Emilio

    2009-09-01

    We describe the clinical features, investigations and outcome of 4 adolescents aged 13, 16, 17 and 19 years, with fixed dystonia. The diagnosis was made within 6 months of the onset of symptoms. One patient had an identifiable traumatic precipitant. All the affected extremities had pain, sudomotor and vascular changes which were consistent with complex regional pain syndrome. The extremities affected by dystonia were the foot and the hand. The dystonia spread to affect other extremities in one patient. One patient had hemifacial spasm. Examination of the central and peripheral nervous system and allied investigations failed to reveal an organic cause. Common genetic causes for dystonia were excluded. The response to physical treatments for the affected extremities, such as Botulinum Toxin and surgery was poor. In all our cases there were significant psychological and psychiatric factors. Three patients fully met the criteria for psychogenic dystonia and responded well to psychological intervention. Fixed dystonia in adolescents is an uncommon disorder of unknown aetiology, usually presenting in girls, which can be very disabling and difficult to treat. The affected parts of the body are usually painful and show vascular changes. The condition is allied to CRPS. Treatment with multidisciplinary approach including psychological measures and physiotherapy is more likely to be successful and may prevent unnecessary physical measures. PMID:18996036

  19. An interesting case of metabolic dystonia: L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Padma; Viswanathan, V; Chellathurai, Amarnath; Panigrahi, Debasis

    2014-01-01

    L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (L-2-HGA), a neurometabolic disorder caused by mutations in the L-2 hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (L-2-HGDH) gene, presents with psychomotor retardation, cerebellar ataxia, extrapyramidal symptoms, macrocephaly and seizures. Characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings include subcortical cerebral white matter abnormalities with T2 hyperintensities of the dentate nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen and caudate nucleus. The diagnosis can be confirmed by elevated urinary L-2 hydroxyglutaric acid and mutational analysis of the L-2-HGDH gene. We report two siblings with dystonia diagnosed by classical neuroimaging findings with elevated urinary 2 hydroxyglutaric acid. Riboflavin therapy has shown promising results in a subset of cases, thus highlighting the importance of making the diagnosis in these patients. PMID:24753671

  20. An interesting case of metabolic dystonia: L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Padma; Viswanathan, V.; Chellathurai, Amarnath; Panigrahi, Debasis

    2014-01-01

    L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (L-2-HGA), a neurometabolic disorder caused by mutations in the L-2 hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (L-2-HGDH) gene, presents with psychomotor retardation, cerebellar ataxia, extrapyramidal symptoms, macrocephaly and seizures. Characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings include subcortical cerebral white matter abnormalities with T2 hyperintensities of the dentate nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen and caudate nucleus. The diagnosis can be confirmed by elevated urinary L-2 hydroxyglutaric acid and mutational analysis of the L-2-HGDH gene. We report two siblings with dystonia diagnosed by classical neuroimaging findings with elevated urinary 2 hydroxyglutaric acid. Riboflavin therapy has shown promising results in a subset of cases, thus highlighting the importance of making the diagnosis in these patients. PMID:24753671

  1. Sonographic Alteration of Basal Ganglia in Different Forms of Primary Focal Dystonia: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Ying-Chun; Sheng, Yu-Jing; Chen, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Cai-Shan; Ma, Qi; Chen, Han-Bing; Yu, Li-Fang; Mao, Cheng-Jie; Xiong, Kang-Ping; Luo, Wei-Feng; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Few studies have addressed whether abnormalities in the lenticular nucleus (LN) are characteristic transcranial sonography (TCS) echo features in patients with primary dystonia. This study aimed to explore alterations in the basal ganglia in different forms of primary focal dystonia. Methods: cross-sectional observational study was performed between December 2013 and December 2014 in 80 patients with different forms of primary focal dystonia and 55 neurologically normal control subjects. TCS was performed in patients and control subjects. Multiple comparisons of multiple rates were used to compare LN hyperechogenicity ratios between control and patient groups. Results: Thirteen individuals were excluded due to poor temporal bone windows, and two subjects were excluded due to disagreement in evaluation by sonologists. Totally, 70 patients (cervical dystonia, n = 30; blepharospasm, n = 30; oromandibular dystonia, n = 10) and 50 normal controls were included in the final analysis. LN hyperechogenicity was observed in 51% (36/70) of patients with primary focal dystonia, compared with 12% (6/50) of controls (P < 0.001). Substantia nigra hyperechogenicity did not differ between the two groups. LN hyperechogenicity was observed in 73% (22/30) of patients with cervical dystonia, a greater prevalence than in patients with blepharospasm (33%, 10/30, P = 0.002) and oromandibular dystonia (40%, 4/10, P = 0.126). LN hyperechogenicity was more frequently observed in patients with cervical dystonia compared with controls (73% vs. 12%, P < 0.001); however, no significant difference was detected in patients with blepharospasm (33% vs. 12%, P = 0.021) or oromandibular dystonia (40% vs. 12%, P = 0.088). Conclusions: LN hyperechogenicity is more frequently observed in patients with primary focal dystonia than in controls. It does not appear to be a characteristic TCS echo feature in patients with blepharospasm or oromandibular dystonia. PMID:27064039

  2. An osteoporotic fracture mimicking cervical dystonia in idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Caroline; Ronan, Lindsay; Sheridan, Ray; Pearce, Vaughan

    2013-09-01

    We report on a case of a 65-year-old (CD) woman who sustained an atraumatic neck fracture. A combination of Parkinson's disease with motor fluctuations, chronic cervical dystonia and osteoporosis provided the basis for this interesting diagnosis. Mrs CD had progressed to complex phase idiopathic Parkinson's disease within 13 years of diagnosis. During this time she remained independent, only using a wheelchair when her motor fluctuations were bad. In 2011, she developed a sudden onset of neck spasm and occipital neuralgia, initially attributed to severe spasmodic cervical dystonia. Despite a titration regime of analgesics and weaning off of her Parkinson's disease medications, the pain persisted. An X-ray of her cervical spine showed degenerative discopathies from C4 to C7. Mrs CD underwent a trial of Botox injections to no avail and she was admitted acutely under the spinal team after an MRI of her spine showed abnormal oedema of the odontoid peg. Subsequent CT diagnosed a type II fracture of the odontoid peg on the background of severe osteoporotic bone (spinal T score -3.4 on subsequent DEXA scan) and she underwent a successful occipital cervical fusion of C1-C6. What makes this case interesting is the fact that this lady's profound powerful neck movements on a background of osteoporosis led to fracture of her neck. Post-operatively, she admitted to non-adherence to her bisphosphonates, prioritising levodopa in the morning with food rather than taking her alendronate on an empty stomach. She is now pain free and receives annual zolendronate infusions. PMID:23672934

  3. [Psychogenic hand dystonia and hereditary polyneuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. A contribution to etiology of dystonias].

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Speidel, H; Albert, E; Helbig, B

    1996-01-01

    We report on a case of a female who had developed a fixed flexion contracture of the 4th and 5th fingers of the right hand which was painless and at-rest right in the beginning at the age of 19. By means of neurographical examinations a hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies was established in her and her mother, which had clinically manifested with symptoms of the ulnar nerve at the affected hand. The dystonic symptoms did not show any progression within ten years follow-up. A remarkable feature of the course was the twice repeated occurrence of short, sudden and complete remissions immediately following invasive diagnostic procedures. The thorough discussion of differential diagnostic aspects and the analysis of the familiar situation and psychodynamics of the patient resulted in the diagnosis of a psychogenic hand dystonia. PMID:8850092

  4. Clinical and genetic features of cervical dystonia in a large multicenter cohort

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Satya R.; Xiao, Jianfeng; Thompson, Misty M.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Wright, Laura J.; Jinnah, H.A.; Rosen, Ami R.; Hedera, Peter; Comella, Cynthia L.; Weissbach, Anne; Junker, Johanna; Jankovic, Joseph; Barbano, Richard L.; Reich, Stephen G.; Rodriguez, Ramon L.; Berman, Brian D.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Severt, Lawrence; Agarwal, Pinky; Stover, Natividad P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the clinical and genetic features of cervical dystonia (CD). Methods: Participants enrolled in the Dystonia Coalition biorepository (NCT01373424) with initial manifestation as CD were included in this study (n = 1,000). Data intake included demographics, family history, and the Global Dystonia Rating Scale. Participants were screened for sequence variants (SVs) in GNAL, THAP1, and Exon 5 of TOR1A. Results: The majority of participants were Caucasian (95%) and female (75%). The mean age at onset and disease duration were 45.5 ± 13.6 and 14.6 ± 11.8 years, respectively. At the time of assessment, 68.5% had involvement limited to the neck, shoulder(s), and proximal arm(s), whereas 47.4% had dystonia limited to the neck. The remaining 31.5% of the individuals exhibited more extensive anatomical spread. A head tremor was noted in 62% of the patients. Head tremor and laryngeal dystonia were more common in females. Psychiatric comorbidities, mainly depression and anxiety, were reported by 32% of the participants and were more common in females. Family histories of dystonia, parkinsonian disorder, and tremor were present in 14%, 11%, and 29% of the patients, respectively. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic SVs in THAP1, TOR1A, and GNAL were identified in 8 participants (0.8%). Two individuals harbored novel missense SVs in Exon 5 of TOR1A. Synonymous and noncoding SVs in THAP1 and GNAL were identified in 4% of the cohort. Conclusions: Head tremor, laryngeal dystonia, and psychiatric comorbidities are more common in female participants with CD. Coding and noncoding variants in GNAL, THAP1, and TOR1A make small contributions to the pathogenesis of CD. PMID:27123488

  5. Altered sensorimotor activation patterns in idiopathic dystonia-an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional brain imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Løkkegaard, Annemette; Herz, Damian M; Haagensen, Brian N; Lorentzen, Anne K; Eickhoff, Simon B; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2016-02-01

    Dystonia is characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements or postures. Functional neuroimaging studies have yielded abnormal task-related sensorimotor activation in dystonia, but the results appear to be rather variable across studies. Further, study size was usually small including different types of dystonia. Here we performed an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies in patients with primary dystonia to test for convergence of dystonia-related alterations in task-related activity across studies. Activation likelihood estimates were based on previously reported regional maxima of task-related increases or decreases in dystonia patients compared to healthy controls. The meta-analyses encompassed data from 179 patients with dystonia reported in 18 functional neuroimaging studies using a range of sensorimotor tasks. Patients with dystonia showed bilateral increases in task-related activation in the parietal operculum and ventral postcentral gyrus as well as right middle temporal gyrus. Decreases in task-related activation converged in left supplementary motor area and left postcentral gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus and dorsal midbrain. Apart from the midbrain cluster, all between-group differences in task-related activity were retrieved in a sub-analysis including only the 14 studies on patients with focal dystonia. For focal dystonia, an additional cluster of increased sensorimotor activation emerged in the caudal cingulate motor zone. The results show that dystonia is consistently associated with abnormal somatosensory processing in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex along with abnormal sensorimotor activation of mesial premotor and right lateral temporal cortex. Hum Brain Mapp 37:547-557, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26549606

  6. Mouse model of rare TOR1A variant found in sporadic focal dystonia impairs domains affected in DYT1 dystonia patients and animal models.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Srishti L; Qiu, Sunny; Caffall, Zachary F; Wan, Yehong; Pan, Yuanji; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Wetsel, William C; Badea, Alexandra; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Calakos, Nicole

    2016-09-01

    Rare de novo mutations in genes associated with inherited Mendelian disorders are potential contributors to sporadic disease. DYT1 dystonia is an autosomal dominant, early-onset, generalized dystonia associated with an in-frame, trinucleotide deletion (n. delGAG, p. ΔE 302/303) in the Tor1a gene. Here we examine the significance of a rare missense variant in the Tor1a gene (c. 613T>A, p. F205I), previously identified in a patient with sporadic late-onset focal dystonia, by modeling it in mice. Homozygous F205I mice have motor impairment, reduced steady-state levels of TorsinA, altered corticostriatal synaptic plasticity, and prominent brain imaging abnormalities in areas associated with motor function. Thus, the F205I variant causes abnormalities in domains affected in people and/or mouse models with the DYT1 Tor1a mutation (ΔE). Our findings establish the pathological significance of the F205I Tor1a variant and provide a model with both etiological and phenotypic relevance to further investigate dystonia mechanisms. PMID:27168150

  7. A new knock-in mouse model of l-DOPA-responsive dystonia.

    PubMed

    Rose, Samuel J; Yu, Xin Y; Heinzer, Ann K; Harrast, Porter; Fan, Xueliang; Raike, Robert S; Thompson, Valerie B; Pare, Jean-Francois; Weinshenker, David; Smith, Yoland; Jinnah, Hyder A; Hess, Ellen J

    2015-10-01

    Abnormal dopamine neurotransmission is associated with many different genetic and acquired dystonic disorders. For instance, mutations in genes critical for the synthesis of dopamine, including GCH1 and TH cause l-DOPA-responsive dystonia. Despite evidence that implicates abnormal dopamine neurotransmission in dystonia, the precise nature of the pre- and postsynaptic defects that result in dystonia are not known. To better understand these defects, we generated a knock-in mouse model of l-DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD) mice that recapitulates the human p.381Q>K TH mutation (c.1141C>A). Mice homozygous for this mutation displayed the core features of the human disorder, including reduced TH activity, dystonia that worsened throughout the course of the active phase, and improvement in the dystonia in response to both l-DOPA and trihexyphenidyl. Although the gross anatomy of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons was normal in DRD mice, the microstructure of striatal synapses was affected whereby the ratio of axo-spinous to axo-dendritic corticostriatal synaptic contacts was reduced. Microinjection of l-DOPA directly into the striatum ameliorated the dystonic movements but cerebellar microinjections of l-DOPA had no effect. Surprisingly, the striatal dopamine concentration was reduced to ∼1% of normal, a concentration more typically associated with akinesia, suggesting that (mal)adaptive postsynaptic responses may also play a role in the development of dystonia. Administration of D1- or D2-like dopamine receptor agonists to enhance dopamine signalling reduced the dystonic movements, whereas administration of D1- or D2-like dopamine receptor antagonists to further reduce dopamine signalling worsened the dystonia, suggesting that both receptors mediate the abnormal movements. Further, D1-dopamine receptors were supersensitive; adenylate cyclase activity, locomotor activity and stereotypy were exaggerated in DRD mice in response to the D1-dopamine receptor agonist SKF

  8. Aggregation of Actin and Cofilin in Identical Twins with Juvenile-Onset Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Gearing, Marla; Juncos, Jorge L.; Procaccio, Vincent; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Marino-Rodriguez, Elaine M.; Gyure, Kymberly A.; Ono, Shoichiro; Santoianni, Robert; Krawiecki, Nicolas S.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Wainer, Bruce H.

    2005-01-01

    The neuropathology of the primary dystonias is not well understood. We examined brains from identical twins with DYT1-negative, dopa-unresponsive dystonia. The twins exhibited mild developmental delays until age 12 years when they began developing rapidly progressive generalized dystonia. Genetic, metabolic, and imaging studies ruled out known causes of dystonia. Cognition was subnormal but stable until the last few years. Death occurred at ages 21 and 22 years. The brains were macroscopically unremarkable. Microscopic examination showed unusual glial fibrillary acidic protein–immunoreactive astrocytes in multiple regions and iron accumulation in pallidal and nigral neurons. However, the most striking findings were 1) eosinophilic, rod-like cytoplasmic inclusions in neocortical and thalamic neurons that were actin depolymerizing factor/cofilin-immunoreactive but only rarely actin-positive; and 2) abundant eosinophilic spherical structures in the striatum that were strongly actin- and actin depolymerizing factor/cofilin-positive. Electron microscopy suggested that these structures represent degenerating neurons and processes; the accumulating filaments had the same dimensions as actin microfilaments. To our knowledge, aggregation of actin has not been reported previously as the predominant feature in any neurodegenerative disease. Thus, our findings may shed light on a novel neuropathological change associated with dystonia that may represent a new degenerative mechanism involving actin, a ubiquitous constituent of the cytoskeletal system. PMID:12325076

  9. Utilization and perceived effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine in patients with dystonia.

    PubMed

    Junker, Judith; Oberwittler, Christoph; Jackson, Didi; Berger, Klaus

    2004-02-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing worldwide, especially by patients with chronic diseases. To date, no data are available about utilization and perceived effectiveness of CAM in patients with dystonia. A questionnaire survey on utilization and costs of CAM was completed by 180 members of the German Dystonia Society, a patient advocate group. In total, 131 dystonia patients (73%) were current or former users of CAM, 55 patients used CAM in addition to botulinum toxin A injections, and 86 patients had experience with three or more CAM methods. The options used most widely were acupuncture (56%), relaxation techniques (44%), homeopathy (27%), and massages (26%). Among users of specific CAM methods, breathing therapy, Feldenkrais, massages, and relaxation techniques were perceived as most effective. On average, patients spent 1,513 Euro on CAM without reimbursement. There was no correlation between costs and perceived effectiveness of different methods. In line with other studies on chronically ill patients, our results show that dystonia patients frequently utilize CAM methods, often in addition to conventional treatment. There is a growing need to evaluate scientifically the effect of CAM methods on symptom severity and quality of life in dystonia, to prevent utilization of costly and ineffective CAM treatments. PMID:14978670

  10. Cervical dystonia: a disorder of the midbrain network for covert attentional orienting.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Michael; Isa, Tadashi; Molloy, Anna; Kimmich, Okka; Williams, Laura; Molloy, Fiona; Moore, Helena; Healy, Daniel G; Lynch, Tim; Walsh, Cathal; Butler, John; Reilly, Richard B; Walsh, Richard; O'Riordan, Sean

    2014-01-01

    While the pathogenesis of cervical dystonia remains unknown, recent animal and clinical experimental studies have indicated its probable mechanisms. Abnormal temporal discrimination is a mediational endophenotype of cervical dystonia and informs new concepts of disease pathogenesis. Our hypothesis is that both abnormal temporal discrimination and cervical dystonia are due to a disorder of the midbrain network for covert attentional orienting caused by reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibition, resulting, in turn, from as yet undetermined, genetic mutations. Such disinhibition is (a) subclinically manifested by abnormal temporal discrimination due to prolonged duration firing of the visual sensory neurons in the superficial laminae of the superior colliculus and (b) clinically manifested by cervical dystonia due to disinhibited burst activity of the cephalomotor neurons of the intermediate and deep laminae of the superior colliculus. Abnormal temporal discrimination in unaffected first-degree relatives of patients with cervical dystonia represents a subclinical manifestation of defective GABA activity both within the superior colliculus and from the substantia nigra pars reticulata. A number of experiments are required to prove or disprove this hypothesis. PMID:24803911

  11. Focal hand dystonia in musicians: phenomenology, etiology, and psychological trigger factors.

    PubMed

    Altenmüller, Eckart; Jabusch, Hans-Christian

    2009-01-01

    NARRATIVE REVIEW: Musician's dystonia is a task-specific movement disorder, which manifests itself as a loss of voluntary motor control in extensively trained movements. In many cases, the disorder terminates the careers of affected musicians. Approximately 1% of all professional musicians are affected. In the past, focal dystonia (FD) was classified as a psychological disorder. Over time, the problem was classified as a neurological problem. Although the specific pathophysiology of the disorder is still unclear, it appears the etiology is multifactorial. While there may be a family history, neurophysiological, physical, and environmental factors, trauma and stress contribute to the phenotypic development of FD. This manuscript analyzes the evidence supporting the potential contribution of the emotional brain systems in the etiology of focal hand dystonia in musicians. In addition, the psychological findings from a large descriptive study comparing healthy musicians, musicians with dystonia, and musicians with chronic pain. Information about psychogenic characteristics might be used to modify intervention strategies and music instruction to reduce the incidence of musician's dystonia. PMID:19278826

  12. Effects of two weeks of cerebellar theta burst stimulation in cervical dystonia patients.

    PubMed

    Koch, Giacomo; Porcacchia, Paolo; Ponzo, Viviana; Carrillo, Fatima; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Brusa, Livia; Desiato, Maria Teresa; Arciprete, Flavio; Di Lorenzo, Francesco; Pisani, Antonio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Palomar, Francisco J; Mir, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia is generally regarded as a disorder of the basal ganglia and their efferent connections to the thalamus and brainstem, but an important role of cerebellar-thalamo-cortical (CTC) circuits in the pathophysiology of dystonia has been invoked. Here in a sham controlled trial, we tested the effects of two-weeks of cerebellar continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) in a sample of cervical dystonia (CD) patients. Clinical evaluations were performed by administering the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) and the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS). We used TMS to measure the inhibitory connectivity between the cerebellum and the contralateral motor cortex (cerebellar brain inhibition [CBI]), and the excitability of the contralateral primary motor cortex assessing intracortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF) and cortical silent period (CSP). Paired associative stimulation (PAS) was tested to evaluate the level and the topographical specificity of cortical plasticity, which is abnormally enhanced and non-focal in CD patients. Two weeks of cerebellar stimulation resulted in a small but significant clinical improvement as measured by the TWSTRS of approximately 15%. Cerebellar stimulation modified the CBI circuits and reduced the heterotopic PAS potentiation, leading to a normal pattern of topographic specific induced plasticity. These data provide novel evidence CTC circuits could be a potential target to partially control some dystonic symptoms in patients with cervical dystonia. PMID:24881805

  13. Screening of GABA(A)-receptor gene mutations in primary dystonia.

    PubMed

    Shang, H; Lang, D; Burgunder, J-M; Kaelin-Lang, A

    2007-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that GABA-ergic neurotransmission plays a role in the pathogenesis of primary dystonia in humans. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that mutations in the GABRA1, GABRB3, and GABRG2 genes encoding the alpha1, beta3, and gamma subunits of the GABA(A) receptor are involved in familial primary dystonia. All exons and exon-intron boundaries of the above genes were amplified by PCR from genomic DNA in 28 patients who had primary dystonia and a positive family history but had no mutation in any other genes known to be involved in primary dystonia. The PCR products were analyzed by single strand conformation polymorphism followed by sequencing of variant conformers compared with normal controls (n = 54). We found no mutations in these genes. We did, however, find a new polymorphism, 559 + 80G>A in intron 5 of GABRA1, and we also confirmed several that were previously reported, including 315C>T in exon 3 and 588C>T in exon 5 of GABRG2, but there were no significant differences between controls and patients in the allele and genotype frequencies of these polymorphisms. In conclusion, mutations of GABRA1, GABRB3, and GABRG2 appear not to play a major role in the development of familial primary dystonia. PMID:17880575

  14. Explicit Agency in Patients with Cervical Dystonia: Altered Recognition of Temporal Discrepancies between Motor Actions and Their Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Cécile; Roze, Emmanuel; Grabli, David; Mayer, Jean-Michel; Degos, Bertrand; Vidailhet, Marie; Worbe, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Background Abnormalities in the cognitive processing of movement have been demonstrated in patients with dystonia. The sense of agency, which is the experience of initiating and controlling one’s own actions, has never before been studied in these patients. Objectives We investigated whether the sense of agency is altered in patients with cervical dystonia. Methods We used an explicit metacognitive agency task in which participants had to catch targets with a cursor by moving a computer’s mouse. The task included several conditions in which the control over the cursor could be disrupted by adding a spatial or a temporal discrepancy between the mouse and the cursor’s movements. Participants had to acknowledge these discrepancies and reflect them in metacognitive judgements of agency. Results Twenty cervical dystonia patients and 20 matched controls were included in the study. Despite performing equally well as the matched controls, cervical dystonia patients did not fully recognize alterations of agency when a temporal lag was added between their movement and the visual feedback. Moreover, they relied predominantly on their perceived performance to provide judgements of agency and less on their objective degree of controls. There was no correlation between agency scores and clinical severity of dystonia measured by the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale. Conclusion We demonstrated an abnormal processing of agency in cervical dystonia patients, even for motor actions not affected by dystonia. The exact contribution of abnormal agency to dystonia pathophysiology remains to be clarified. PMID:27575487

  15. Why are voluntary head movements in cervical dystonia slow?

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Wong, Aaron; Zee, David S.; Jinnah, H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rapid head movements associated with a change in fixation (head saccades) have been reported to be slow in cervical dystonia (CD). Such slowing is typically measured as an increase in time to complete a movement. The mechanisms responsible for this slowing are poorly understood. Methods We measured head saccades in 11 CD patients and 11 healthy subjects using a magnetic search coil technique. Results Head saccades in CD took longer to reach a desired target location. This longer duration was due to multiple pauses in the trajectory of the head movement. The head velocity of each segment of the (interrupted) head movement was appropriate for the desired total movement amplitude. The head velocity was, however, higher for the amplitude of the individual interrupted movements. These results suggest that brain programs the proper head movement amplitude, but the movement is interrupted by pathological pauses. Conclusion Voluntary head saccades have a longer duration in CD due to frequent pauses. The frequent pauses reflect pathological interruptions of normally programmed intended head movement. PMID:25818535

  16. Neuroimaging characteristics of patients with focal hand dystonia.

    PubMed

    Hinkley, Leighton B N; Webster, Rebecca L; Byl, Nancy N; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2009-01-01

    NARRATIVE REVIEW: Advances in structural and functional imaging have provided both scientists and clinicians with information about the neural mechanisms underlying focal hand dystonia (FHd), a motor disorder associated with aberrant posturing and patterns of muscle contraction specific to movements of the hand. Consistent with the hypothesis that FHd is the result of reorganization in cortical fields, studies in neuroimaging have confirmed alterations in the topography and response properties of somatosensory and motor areas of the brain. Noninvasive stimulation of these regions also demonstrates that FHd may be due to reductions in inhibition between competing sensory and motor representations. Compromises in neuroanatomical structure, such as white matter density and gray matter volume, have also been identified through neuroimaging methods. These advances in neuroimaging have provided clinicians with an expanded understanding of the changes in the brain that contribute to FHd. These findings should provide a foundation for the development of retraining paradigms focused on reversing overlapping sensory representations and interactions between brain regions in patients with FHd. Continued collaborations between health professionals who treat FHd and research scientists who examine the brain using neuroimaging tools are imperative for answering difficult questions about patients with specific movement disorders. PMID:19217255

  17. Clinical and Neurophysiological Improvement of SGCE Myoclonus-Dystonia with GPi Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kurtis, Monica M; San Luciano, Marta; Yu, Qiping; Goodman, Robert R; Ford, Blair; Raymond, Deborah; Pullman, Seth

    2009-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is characterized by early onset myoclonus and dystonia. It is thought to be subcortical in origin. Response to oral medications may be incomplete, such that deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery to the globus pallidum interna (GPi) or ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (VIM) may be considered. The optimal site is not known. The physiology and surgical response for a 63 year-old woman who underwent GPi DBS for M-D with onset at age 2 and related to a mutation in the epsilon-sarcoglycan gene (SGCE) is described. She showed excellent clinical and neurophysiological improvement of both myoclonus and dystonia, suggesting that modulation by DBS is effective even after long disease duration and only partial response to oral medications. PMID:19896264

  18. Precise Muscle Selection Using Dynamic Polyelectromyography for Treatment of Post-stroke Dystonia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia has a wide range of causes, but treatment of dystonia is limited to minimizing the symptoms as there is yet no successful treatment for its cause. One of the optimal treatment methods for dystonia is chemodenervation using botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A), alcohol injection, etc., but its success depends on how precisely the dystonic muscle is selected. Here, we reported a successful experience in a 49-year-old post-stroke female patient who showed paroxysmal repetitive contractions involving the right leg, which may be of dystonic nature. BTX-A and alcohol were injected into the muscles which were identified by dynamic polyelectromyography. After injection, the dystonic muscle spasm, cramping pain, and the range of motion of the affected lower limb improved markedly, and she was able to walk independently indoors. In such a case, dynamic polyelectromyography may be a useful method for selecting the dominant dystonic muscles. PMID:27446795

  19. The costs and benefits of deep brain stimulation surgery for patients with dystonia: an initial exploration.

    PubMed

    Yianni, John; Green, Alexander L; McIntosh, Emma; Bittar, Richard G; Joint, Carol; Scott, Richard; Gregory, Ralph; Bain, Peter G; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2005-07-01

    Objectives.  To perform a preliminary cost-utility and cost-benefit of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the treatment of dystonia, Materials and Methods.  We conducted a prospective study of 26 patients undergoing DBS for the treatment of dystonia. We performed a cost-utility analysis using the Euroquol (EQ-5D) questionnaire. A cost-benefit analysis used the willingness-to-pay principle and costs of treatment were calculated retrospectively in order to calculate the cost-benefit. Results.  We found that the EQ-5D score improved from 29 to 76.2 points after surgery, an incremental utility of 0.47. There was an overall gain of 0.94 quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) with a cost of £33,980 per QALY. Conclusions.  DBS for dystonia, while an expensive treatment, compares favorably to therapies that are commonly used for other conditions. PMID:22151484

  20. Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation in children with dystonia: a sham-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Young, Scott J; Bertucco, Matteo; Sanger, Terence D

    2014-02-01

    Increased motor cortex excitability is a common finding in dystonia, and transcranial direct current stimulation can reduce motor cortex excitability. In an earlier study, we found that cathodal direct-current stimulation decreased motor overflow for some children with dystonia. To investigate this observation further, we performed a sham-controlled, double-blind, crossover study of 14 children with dystonia. We found a significant reduction in overflow following real stimulation, when participants performed the experimental task with the hand contralateral to the cathode. While these results suggest that cathodal stimulation may help some children to reduce involuntary overflow, the size of the effect is small. Further research will need to investigate ways to increase the magnitude of the effect of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation. PMID:23760989

  1. Eligibility Criteria for Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease, Tremor, and Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, Renato P; Picillo, Marina; Fox, Susan H; Bruno, Veronica; Panisset, Michel; Honey, Christopher R; Fasano, Alfonso

    2016-07-01

    In this review, the available evidence to guide clinicians regarding eligibility for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the main conditions in which these forms of therapy are generally indicated-Parkinson's disease (PD), tremor, and dystonia-is presented. In general, the literature shows that DBS is effective for PD, essential tremor, and idiopathic dystonia. In these cases, key points in patient selection must include the level of disability and inability to manage symptoms using the best available medical therapy. Results are, however, still not optimal when dealing with other aetiologies, such as secondary tremors and symptomatic dystonia. Also, in PD, issues such as age and neuropsychiatric profile are still debatable parameters. Overall, currently available literature is able to guide physicians on basic aspects of patient selection and indications for DBS; however, a few points are still debatable and controversial. These issues should be refined and clarified in future studies. PMID:27139127

  2. Subthalamic local field potentials in Parkinson's disease and isolated dystonia: An evaluation of potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Doris D; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Qasim, Salman E; Miller, Andrew M; Ostrem, Jill L; Galifianakis, Nicholas B; San Luciano, Marta; Starr, Philip A

    2016-05-01

    Local field potentials (LFP) recorded from the subthalamic nucleus in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) demonstrate prominent oscillations in the beta (13-30Hz) frequency range, and reduction of beta band spectral power by levodopa and deep brain stimulation (DBS) is correlated with motor symptom improvement. Several features of beta activity have been theorized to be specific biomarkers of the parkinsonian state, though these have rarely been studied in non-parkinsonian conditions. To compare resting state LFP features in PD and isolated dystonia and evaluate disease-specific biomarkers, we recorded subthalamic LFPs from 28 akinetic-rigid PD and 12 isolated dystonia patients during awake DBS implantation. Spectral power and phase-amplitude coupling characteristics were analyzed. In 26/28 PD and 11/12 isolated dystonia patients, the LFP power spectrum had a peak in the beta frequency range, with similar amplitudes between groups. Resting state power did not differ between groups in the theta (5-8Hz), alpha (8-12Hz), beta (13-30Hz), broadband gamma (50-200Hz), or high frequency oscillation (HFO, 250-350Hz) bands. Analysis of phase-amplitude coupling between low frequency phase and HFO amplitude revealed significant interactions in 19/28 PD and 6/12 dystonia recordings without significant differences in maximal coupling or preferred phase. Two features of subthalamic LFPs that have been proposed as specific parkinsonian biomarkers, beta power and coupling of beta phase to HFO amplitude, were also present in isolated dystonia, including focal dystonias. This casts doubt on the utility of these metrics as disease-specific diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:26884091

  3. Long-term neuropsychiatric outcomes after pallidal stimulation in primary and secondary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Meoni, Sara; Zurowski, Mateusz; Lozano, Andres M.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Poon, Yu-Yan; Fallis, Melanie; Voon, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate changes in the diagnosis of Axis I psychiatric disorders in patients with primary and secondary dystonia after deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus internus (GPi). Methods: Structured Clinical Interviews for the DSM-IV, Axis I psychiatric disorders, were prospectively performed before and after surgery. Diagnoses were made based on DSM-IV criteria. Psychiatric disorders were grouped into 5 categories: mood, anxiety, addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorders, and psychosis. Patients could be stratified to more than one category. Rates for unchanged diagnoses, diagnoses in remission, and new-onset diagnoses after surgery for each category were calculated. Results: Fifty-seven patients with primary and secondary dystonia were included. Mean ± SD age at surgery and dystonia duration at time of surgery was 50.6 ± 13.8 and 19.0 ± 13.2 years, respectively. Preoperatively, 37 Axis I diagnoses were made in 25 patients, 43.8% of those presenting with at least 1 Axis I diagnosis (mostly mood and anxiety disorders). Mean ± SD duration of psychiatric follow-up was 24.4 ± 19.6 months. Overall, after surgery no significant changes (p = 0.16) were found in Axis I diagnoses (23 patients, 40.3%): 27 (73%) unchanged, 10 (27%) in complete remission, and 4 (12.9%) new-onset diagnoses. Conclusions: Our results support the overall psychiatric stability of patients with primary and secondary dystonia treated with GPi DBS. However, considering the high psychiatric morbidity in the dystonia population, psychiatric assessments before and after surgery are strongly recommended. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that GPi DBS does not change Axis I psychiatric diagnoses in patients with primary and secondary dystonia. PMID:26156506

  4. Genomewide association study in cervical dystonia demonstrates possible association with sodium leak channel

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Kin Y; Schneider, Susanne A; Trabzuni, Daniah; Stamelou, Maria; Edwards, Mark; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Silverdale, Monty; Hardy, John; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia is a common movement disorder. A number of monogenic causes have been identified. However, the majority of dystonia cases are not explained by single gene defects. Cervical dystonia is one of the commonest forms without genetic causes identified. This pilot study aimed to identify large effect-size risk loci in cervical dystonia. A genomewide association study (GWAS) was performed. British resident cervical dystonia patients of European descent were genotyped using the Illumina-610-Quad. Comparison was made with controls of European descent from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium using logistic regression algorithm from PLINK. SNPs not genotyped by the array were imputed with 1000 Genomes Project data using the MaCH algorithm and minimac. Postimputation analysis was done with the mach2dat algorithm using a logistic regression model. After quality control measures, 212 cases were compared with 5173 controls. No single SNP passed the genomewide significant level of 5 × 10−8 in the analysis of genotyped SNP in PLINK. Postimputation, there were 5 clusters of SNPs that had P value <5 × 10−6, and the best cluster of SNPs was found near exon 1 of NALCN, (sodium leak channel) with P = 9.76 × 10−7. Several potential regions were found in the GWAS and imputation analysis. The lowest P value was found in NALCN. Dysfunction of this ion channel is a plausible cause for dystonia. Further replication in another cohort is needed to confirm this finding. We make this data publicly available to encourage further analyses of this disorder. PMID:24227479

  5. Acute Dystonia in a Patient with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Maillis, Antonis; Maltezou, Maria; Tsiori, Sofia; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C.

    2015-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (di George syndrome) is one of the most prevalent genetic disorders. The clinical features of the syndrome are distinct facial appearance, velopharyngeal insufficiency, conotruncal heart disease, parathyroid and immune dysfunction; however, little is known about possible neurodegenerative diseases. We describe the case of an 18-year old patient suffering from 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Since adolescence, he presented with behavioral disorders, recommended treatment with 2 mg aloperidin and he presented cervical dystonia and emergence of torticollis and trunk dystonia. Antipsychotic medications either accelerate or reveal dystonic symptoms. PMID:26605035

  6. Brain Metabolic Changes of Cervical Dystonia with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 after Botulinum Toxin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Akio; Takeda, Atsushi; Sugeno, Naoto; Miura, Emiko; Kato, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Takafumi; Baba, Toru; Konno, Masatoshi; Oshima, Ryuji; Watanuki, Shoichi; Hiraoka, Kotaro; Tashiro, Manabu; Aoki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We occasionally observe long-term remission of cervical dystonia after several botulinum toxin treatments. However, botulinum toxin transiently acts on neuromuscular junctions. We herein report that a cervical dystonia patient with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 could have long-term remission as a result of the depression of hypermetabolism in the bilateral putamen and primary sensorimotor cortex after botulinum toxin therapy. We suggest that botulinum toxin impacts the central nervous system, causing prolonged improvement through the normalization of basal ganglia circuits in addition to its effects at neuromuscular junctions. PMID:27432104

  7. [Thermography in healthy subjects and in the syndrome of vegetative-vascular dystonia].

    PubMed

    Solov'eva, A D; Kolosova, O A; Loseva, M M; Mindlina, G E; Ginzburg, L I

    1985-01-01

    The effectiveness and information content of thermography were studied in 20 normal subjects and 40 patients with vegetative vascular dystonia. There were some individuals in the control group who had "thermal amputation" and who also had some specific features of psychovegetative nature. Patients with vegetative vascular dystonia, apart from the syndrome of "thermoamputation" observed in a great number of cases, particularly in neurotic patients, had other types of skin temperature distribution as well. Thus, patients with hypothalamic insufficiency presented with hyperthermia of the distal portions of the extremities and asymmetry. PMID:4024817

  8. Asymmetric pallidal neuronal activity in patients with cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Moll, Christian K E; Galindo-Leon, Edgar; Sharott, Andrew; Gulberti, Alessandro; Buhmann, Carsten; Koeppen, Johannes A; Biermann, Maxine; Bäumer, Tobias; Zittel, Simone; Westphal, Manfred; Gerloff, Christian; Hamel, Wolfgang; Münchau, Alexander; Engel, Andreas K

    2014-01-01

    The origin of asymmetric clinical manifestation of symptoms in patients suffering from cervical dystonia (CD) is hitherto poorly understood. Dysregulated neuronal activity in the basal ganglia has been suggested to have a role in the pathophysiology of CD. Here, we re-assessed the question to what extent relative changes occur in the direct vs. indirect basal ganglia pathway in CD, whether these circuit changes are lateralized, and how these alterations relate to CD symptoms. To this end, we recorded ongoing single cell and local field potential (LFP) activity from the external (GPe) and internal pallidal segment (GPi) of 13 CD patients undergoing microelectrode-guided stereotactic surgery for deep brain stimulation in the GPi. We compared pallidal recordings from CD patients operated under local anaesthesia (LA) with those obtained in CD patients operated under general anaesthesia (GA). In awake patients, mean GPe discharge rate (52 Hz) was lower than that of GPi (72 Hz). Mean GPi discharge ipsilateral to the side of head turning was higher than contralateral and correlated with torticollis symptom severity. Lateralized differences were absent at the level of the GPe and in recordings from patients operated under GA. Furthermore, in the GPi of CD patients there was a subpopulation of theta-oscillatory cells with unique bursting characteristics. Power and coherence of GPe- and GPi-LFPs were dominated by a theta peak and also exhibited band-specific interhemispheric differences. Strong cross-frequency coupling of low-gamma amplitude to theta phase was a feature of pallidal LFPs recorded under LA, but not GA. These results indicate that CD is associated with an asymmetric pallidal outflow. Based on the finding of symmetric neuronal discharges in the GPe, we propose that an imbalanced interhemispheric direct pathway gain may be involved in CD pathophysiology. PMID:24574981

  9. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation to the cerebellum improves handwriting and cyclic drawing kinematics in focal hand dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bradnam, Lynley V.; Graetz, Lynton J.; McDonnell, Michelle N.; Ridding, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the cerebellum has a role in the pathophysiology of primary focal hand dystonia and might provide an intervention target for non-invasive brain stimulation to improve function of the affected hand. The primary objective of this study was to determine if cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) improves handwriting and cyclic drawing kinematics in people with hand dystonia, by reducing cerebellar-brain inhibition (CBI) evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Eight people with dystonia (5 writer’s dystonia, 3 musician’s dystonia) and eight age-matched controls completed the study and underwent cerebellar anodal, cathodal and sham tDCS in separate sessions. Dystonia severity was assessed using the Writer’s Cramp Rating Scale (WRCS) and the Arm Dystonia Disability Scale (ADDS). The kinematic measures that differentiated the groups were; mean stroke frequency during handwriting and fast cyclic drawing and average pen pressure during light cyclic drawing. TMS measures of cortical excitability were no different between people with FHD and controls. There was a moderate, negative relationship between TMS-evoked CBI at baseline and the WRCS in dystonia. Anodal cerebellar tDCS reduced handwriting mean stroke frequency and average pen pressure, and increased speed and reduced pen pressure during fast cyclic drawing. Kinematic measures were not associated with a decrease in CBI within an individual. In conclusion, cerebellar anodal tDCS appeared to improve kinematics of handwriting and circle drawing tasks; but the underlying neurophysiological mechanism remains uncertain. A study in a larger homogeneous population is needed to further investigate the possible therapeutic benefit of cerebellar tDCS in dystonia. PMID:26042019

  10. Recessive Mutations in the α3 (VI) Collagen Gene COL6A3 Cause Early-Onset Isolated Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Zech, Michael; Lam, Daniel D.; Francescatto, Ludmila; Schormair, Barbara; Salminen, Aaro V.; Jochim, Angela; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Lochmüller, Hanns; Strom, Tim M.; Haslinger, Bernhard; Katsanis, Nicholas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    Isolated dystonia is a disorder characterized by involuntary twisting postures arising from sustained muscle contractions. Although autosomal-dominant mutations in TOR1A, THAP1, and GNAL have been found in some cases, the molecular mechanisms underlying isolated dystonia are largely unknown. In addition, although emphasis has been placed on dominant isolated dystonia, the disorder is also transmitted as a recessive trait, for which no mutations have been defined. Using whole-exome sequencing in a recessive isolated dystonia-affected kindred, we identified disease-segregating compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3, a collagen VI gene associated previously with muscular dystrophy. Genetic screening of a further 367 isolated dystonia subjects revealed two additional recessive pedigrees harboring compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3. Strikingly, all affected individuals had at least one pathogenic allele in exon 41, including an exon-skipping mutation that induced an in-frame deletion. We tested the hypothesis that disruption of this exon is pathognomonic for isolated dystonia by inducing a series of in-frame deletions in zebrafish embryos. Consistent with our human genetics data, suppression of the exon 41 ortholog caused deficits in axonal outgrowth, whereas suppression of other exons phenocopied collagen deposition mutants. All recessive mutation carriers demonstrated early-onset segmental isolated dystonia without muscular disease. Finally, we show that Col6a3 is expressed in neurons, with relevant mRNA levels detectable throughout the adult mouse brain. Taken together, our data indicate that loss-of-function mutations affecting a specific region of COL6A3 cause recessive isolated dystonia with underlying neurodevelopmental deficits and highlight the brain extracellular matrix as a contributor to dystonia pathogenesis. PMID:26004199

  11. Recessive mutations in the α3 (VI) collagen gene COL6A3 cause early-onset isolated dystonia.

    PubMed

    Zech, Michael; Lam, Daniel D; Francescatto, Ludmila; Schormair, Barbara; Salminen, Aaro V; Jochim, Angela; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Lochmüller, Hanns; Strom, Tim M; Haslinger, Bernhard; Katsanis, Nicholas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2015-06-01

    Isolated dystonia is a disorder characterized by involuntary twisting postures arising from sustained muscle contractions. Although autosomal-dominant mutations in TOR1A, THAP1, and GNAL have been found in some cases, the molecular mechanisms underlying isolated dystonia are largely unknown. In addition, although emphasis has been placed on dominant isolated dystonia, the disorder is also transmitted as a recessive trait, for which no mutations have been defined. Using whole-exome sequencing in a recessive isolated dystonia-affected kindred, we identified disease-segregating compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3, a collagen VI gene associated previously with muscular dystrophy. Genetic screening of a further 367 isolated dystonia subjects revealed two additional recessive pedigrees harboring compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3. Strikingly, all affected individuals had at least one pathogenic allele in exon 41, including an exon-skipping mutation that induced an in-frame deletion. We tested the hypothesis that disruption of this exon is pathognomonic for isolated dystonia by inducing a series of in-frame deletions in zebrafish embryos. Consistent with our human genetics data, suppression of the exon 41 ortholog caused deficits in axonal outgrowth, whereas suppression of other exons phenocopied collagen deposition mutants. All recessive mutation carriers demonstrated early-onset segmental isolated dystonia without muscular disease. Finally, we show that Col6a3 is expressed in neurons, with relevant mRNA levels detectable throughout the adult mouse brain. Taken together, our data indicate that loss-of-function mutations affecting a specific region of COL6A3 cause recessive isolated dystonia with underlying neurodevelopmental deficits and highlight the brain extracellular matrix as a contributor to dystonia pathogenesis. PMID:26004199

  12. Abnormal surround inhibition does not affect asymptomatic limbs in people with cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Laura; Kiernan, Dovin; Kiss, Zelma H T; Suchowersky, Oksana; Welsh, Timothy N

    2015-09-14

    Surround inhibition is a neural mechanism hypothesized to facilitate goal-directed action by disinhibiting agonist muscle activity while simultaneously inhibiting antagonist and other uninvolved muscle activity. The present study was designed to investigate if abnormalities in surround inhibition are found in asymptomatic body parts (the hand) of people with focal cervical dystonia (neck). Participants with (n=7) and without (n=17) cervical dystonia completed a protocol in which they abducted their index finger while EMG was recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (agonist) and abductor digiti minimi (uninvolved) muscles. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered over the primary motor cortex at intervals ranging from 0 to 950+ms after the onset of agonist muscle activity. Motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes from both muscles were compared. In control participants, MEPs from the uninvolved muscle were significantly lower than agonist MEPs at intervals from 0 to 480ms. Similarly, in the hands of participants with cervical dystonia - the asymptomatic body part - MEPs from the uninvolved muscle were significantly lower than agonist MEPs from 0 to 175ms. These findings suggest that surround inhibition in people with focal dystonia may be intact in asymptomatic hands. In other words, abnormalities in surround inhibition may be restricted to the dystonic limb. PMID:26219986

  13. Dystonia an unusual presentation in pediatric moyamoya disease: Imaging findings of a case.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Sudhir; Jhobta, Anupam; Sood, Ram Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebrovascular disease characterized by idiopathic occlusion of bilateral internal carotid arteries and the development of characteristic leptomeningeal collateral vessels along anterior or posterior circulation. We present an unusual case of MMD presenting with generalized dystonia as the predominant manifestation. PMID:27606018

  14. Pallidal stimulation for primary generalised dystonia: effect on cognition, mood and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, Marjan; Torkamani, Mariam; Beigi, Mazda; Wilkinson, Leonora; Page, Donna; Madeley, Laura; Bhatia, Kailash; Hariz, Marwan; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Ruge, Diane; Tisch, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of pallidal deep brain stimulation (GPi-DBS) in dystonia on cognition, mood, and quality of life and also assessed if DYT1 gene status influenced cognitive outcome following GPi-DBS. Fourteen patients with primary generalized dystonia (PGD) were assessed, measuring their estimated premorbid and current IQ, memory for words and faces, and working memory, language, executive function, and sustained attention, one month before and one year or more after surgery. Changes in mood and behaviour and quality of life were also assessed. There was a significant improvement of dystonia with GPi-DBS (69 % improvement in Burke-Fahn-Marsden score, p < 0.0001). Performance on five cognitive tests either improved or declined at post-surgical follow-up. Calculation of a reliable change index suggested that deterioration in sustained attention on the PASAT was the only reliable change (worse after surgery) in cognition with GPi-DBS. DYT1 gene status did not influence cognitive outcome following GPi-DBS. Depression, anxiety and apathy were not significantly altered, and ratings of health status on the EQ5D remained unchanged. In our sample, GPi-DBS was only associated with an isolated deficit on a test of sustained attention, confirming that GPi-DBS in PGD is clinically effective and safe, without adverse effects on the main domains of cognitive function. The dissociation between GPi-DBS improving dystonia, but not having a significant positive impact on the patients' QoL, warrants further investigation. PMID:24178706

  15. Apparent G syndrome presenting as neck and upper limb dystonia and severe gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Williams, C A; Frias, J L

    1987-10-01

    We have studied a 3-month-old boy with severe gastroesophageal reflux, feeding difficulties, neck and upper limb dystonia, abnormal ears, normal genitalia, and anatomically apparently normal larynx and trachea. Initially diagnosed as suffering from Sandifer "syndrome," he was treated with a gastrostomy and Nissen fundoplication. However, his characteristic facial appearance subsequently led to the diagnosis of G syndrome. PMID:3425612

  16. Improvement of Isolated Myoclonus Phenotype in Myoclonus Dystonia after Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ramdhani, Ritesh A.; Frucht, Steven J.; Behnegar, Anousheh; Kopell, Brian H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Myoclonus–dystonia is a condition that manifests predominantly as myoclonic jerks with focal dystonia. It is genetically heterogeneous with most mutations in the epsilon sarcoglycan gene (SGCE). In medically refractory cases, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to provide marked sustainable clinical improvement, especially in SGCE-positive patients. We present two patients with myoclonus–dystonia (one SGCE positive and the other SGCE negative) who have the isolated myoclonus phenotype and had DBS leads implanted in the bilateral globus pallidus internus (GPi). Methods We review their longitudinal Unified Myoclonus Rating Scale scores along with their DBS programming parameters and compare them with published cases in the literature. Results Both patients demonstrated complete amelioration of all aspects of myoclonus within 6–12 months after surgery. The patient with the SGCE-negative mutation responded just as well as the patient who was SGCE positive. High-frequency stimulation (130 Hz) with amplitudes greater than 2.5 V provided therapeutic benefit. Discussion This case series demonstrates that high frequency GPi-DBS is effective in treating isolated myoclonus in myoclonus–dystonia, regardless of the presence of SGCE mutation. PMID:26989574

  17. Therapeutic immobilisation for small guitar player’s dystonia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Waissman, Flavia; Pereira, João Santos; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M

    2009-01-01

    The development of focal hand dystonia through repetitive tasks is a result of degradation of cortical somatosensory representation due to repetitive fast stimuli sufficient to alter the sensory-motor stimulus, harming the motor control. A sensory-motor training program can modify this disorder. A behavioural intervention focusing on movement could help reduce or eliminate these conditions. PMID:21686815

  18. Multitarget Multiscale Simulation for Pharmacological Treatment of Dystonia in Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Neymotin, Samuel A.; Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Lakatos, Peter; Sanger, Terence D.; Lytton, William W.

    2016-01-01

    A large number of physiomic pathologies can produce hyperexcitability in cortex. Depending on severity, cortical hyperexcitability may manifest clinically as a hyperkinetic movement disorder or as epilpesy. We focus here on dystonia, a movement disorder that produces involuntary muscle contractions and involves pathology in multiple brain areas including basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, and sensory and motor cortices. Most research in dystonia has focused on basal ganglia, while much pharmacological treatment is provided directly at muscles to prevent contraction. Motor cortex is another potential target for therapy that exhibits pathological dynamics in dystonia, including heightened activity and altered beta oscillations. We developed a multiscale model of primary motor cortex, ranging from molecular, up to cellular, and network levels, containing 1715 compartmental model neurons with multiple ion channels and intracellular molecular dynamics. We wired the model based on electrophysiological data obtained from mouse motor cortex circuit mapping experiments. We used the model to reproduce patterns of heightened activity seen in dystonia by applying independent random variations in parameters to identify pathological parameter sets. These models demonstrated degeneracy, meaning that there were many ways of obtaining the pathological syndrome. There was no single parameter alteration which would consistently distinguish pathological from physiological dynamics. At higher dimensions in parameter space, we were able to use support vector machines to distinguish the two patterns in different regions of space and thereby trace multitarget routes from dystonic to physiological dynamics. These results suggest the use of in silico models for discovery of multitarget drug cocktails. PMID:27378922

  19. Mutations in ANO3 Cause Dominant Craniocervical Dystonia: Ion Channel Implicated in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Gavin; Plagnol, Vincent; Holmström, Kira M.; Bras, Jose; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Preza, Elisavet; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Ryten, Mina; Schneider, Susanne A.; Stamelou, Maria; Trabzuni, Daniah; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we combined linkage analysis with whole-exome sequencing of two individuals to identify candidate causal variants in a moderately-sized UK kindred exhibiting autosomal-dominant inheritance of craniocervical dystonia. Subsequent screening of these candidate causal variants in a large number of familial and sporadic cases of cervical dystonia led to the identification of a total of six putatively pathogenic mutations in ANO3, a gene encoding a predicted Ca2+-gated chloride channel that we show to be highly expressed in the striatum. Functional studies using Ca2+ imaging in case and control fibroblasts demonstrated clear abnormalities in endoplasmic-reticulum-dependent Ca2+ signaling. We conclude that mutations in ANO3 are a cause of autosomal-dominant craniocervical dystonia. The locus DYT23 has been reserved as a synonym for this gene. The implication of an ion channel in the pathogenesis of dystonia provides insights into an alternative mechanism that opens fresh avenues for further research. PMID:23200863

  20. Multitarget Multiscale Simulation for Pharmacological Treatment of Dystonia in Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Neymotin, Samuel A; Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Lakatos, Peter; Sanger, Terence D; Lytton, William W

    2016-01-01

    A large number of physiomic pathologies can produce hyperexcitability in cortex. Depending on severity, cortical hyperexcitability may manifest clinically as a hyperkinetic movement disorder or as epilpesy. We focus here on dystonia, a movement disorder that produces involuntary muscle contractions and involves pathology in multiple brain areas including basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, and sensory and motor cortices. Most research in dystonia has focused on basal ganglia, while much pharmacological treatment is provided directly at muscles to prevent contraction. Motor cortex is another potential target for therapy that exhibits pathological dynamics in dystonia, including heightened activity and altered beta oscillations. We developed a multiscale model of primary motor cortex, ranging from molecular, up to cellular, and network levels, containing 1715 compartmental model neurons with multiple ion channels and intracellular molecular dynamics. We wired the model based on electrophysiological data obtained from mouse motor cortex circuit mapping experiments. We used the model to reproduce patterns of heightened activity seen in dystonia by applying independent random variations in parameters to identify pathological parameter sets. These models demonstrated degeneracy, meaning that there were many ways of obtaining the pathological syndrome. There was no single parameter alteration which would consistently distinguish pathological from physiological dynamics. At higher dimensions in parameter space, we were able to use support vector machines to distinguish the two patterns in different regions of space and thereby trace multitarget routes from dystonic to physiological dynamics. These results suggest the use of in silico models for discovery of multitarget drug cocktails. PMID:27378922

  1. Screening for dopa-responsive dystonia in patients with Scans Without Evidence of Dopaminergic Deficiency (SWEDD).

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Anna; Carducci, Claudia; Carducci, Carla; Peluso, Silvio; Lieto, Maria; Mazzella, Andrea; Saccà, Francesco; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo; Pappatà, Sabina; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; De Michele, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    The clinical diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease (PD) is not supported by Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) using dopamine transporter radioligand in 4-15 % of patients. It has been hypothesized that this phenomenon, named "Scans Without Evidence of Dopaminergic Deficiency" (SWEDD), may be an adult-onset dystonia. We investigated the hypothesis that these patients might be affected by Dopa-Responsive Dystonia (DRD). We enrolled eleven unrelated patients (8 F and 3 M) with clinical parkinsonism and normal [(123)I]FP-CIT SPECT. The GTP-cyclohydrolase1 (GCH1) gene was sequenced in all patients; urine biopterin and neopterin analysis was carried out in nine and oral phenylalanine (Phe) loading in seven. Neurological examination showed bradykinesia and resting/postural tremor in all patients, and rigidity in ten, suggesting a clinical diagnosis of PD. We detected mild dystonic signs in eight cases. In particular, five of them presented cranial dyskinesias. No mutation of the GCH1 gene was found. The results of the urine biopterin and neopterin analysis and the oral Phe loading did not reveal biochemical abnormalities suggestive of reduced GCH1 activity. We confirm that some clinical features, namely the presence of focal or segmental dystonia, suggest an adult-onset dystonia in SWEDD cases. However, we exclude DRD caused by GCH1 gene mutations in the present series. PMID:25182701

  2. A Patient With Focal Dystonia That Occurred Secondary to a Peripheral Neurogenic Tumor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minho; Lee, Jong Ha; Yun, Dong Hwan; Chon, Jinmann; Han, Yoo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions. Patients with dystonia may experience uncontrollable twisting, repetitive movements, or abnormal posture. A 55-year-old man presented with an involuntary left forearm supination, which he had experienced for five years. There was no history of antecedent trauma to the wrist or elbow. Although conventional therapeutic modalities had been performed, the symptoms persisted. When he visited our hospital, electromyography was performed. Reduced conduction velocity was evident at the elbow-axilla segment of the left median nerve. We suspected that there was a problem on the median nerve between the elbow and the axilla. For this reason, we performed an ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging study. A spindle-shaped soft tissue mass was observed at the left median nerve that suggested the possibility of neurofibroma. Dystonia caused by traumatic or compressive peripheral nerve injury has often been reported, but focal dystonia due to a neurogenic tumor is extremely rare. Here, we report our case with a review of the literature. PMID:26361606

  3. Dystonia an unusual presentation in pediatric moyamoya disease: Imaging findings of a case

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Sudhir; Jhobta, Anupam; Sood, Ram Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebrovascular disease characterized by idiopathic occlusion of bilateral internal carotid arteries and the development of characteristic leptomeningeal collateral vessels along anterior or posterior circulation. We present an unusual case of MMD presenting with generalized dystonia as the predominant manifestation. PMID:27606018

  4. Accumulation of rare variants in the arylsulfatase G (ARSG) gene in task-specific dystonia.

    PubMed

    Nibbeling, Esther; Schaake, Susen; Tijssen, Marina A; Weissbach, Anne; Groen, Justus L; Altenmüller, Eckart; Verbeek, Dineke S; Lohmann, Katja

    2015-05-01

    Musician's dystonia and writer's cramp are examples of task-specific dystonia. Recently, the arylsulfatase G (ARSG) locus was suggested to be associated with musician's dystonia and writer's cramp by a genome-wide association study. To test for the presence of causal variants, the entire coding region and exon-intron boundaries of ARSG were sequenced in DNA samples from 158 musician's dystonia patients which were collected at the University of Music, Drama, and Media (Hanover, Germany), and 72 patients with writer's cramp which were recruited at the Academic Medical Centers in Amsterdam and Groningen, the Netherlands. The frequency of variants within ARSG was compared to publically available data at the exome variant server (EVS) from the NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project. We identified 11 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the patients including eight non-synonymous substitutions. All variants have previously been reported at EVS including two SNVs with a reported minor allele frequency <1%. One rare missense variant, rs61999318 (p.I493T), was significantly enriched in the group of writer's cramp patients compared to European Americans in EVS database (p = 0.0013). In patients with writer's cramp, there was an overall enrichment for rare, protein-changing variants compared to controls (p < 0.01). In conclusion, we did not detect any conclusive mutation in ARSG. However, we showed an association with rs61999318 in patients with writer's cramp that contributed to an overall enrichment for rare, protein-changing variants in these patients. Thus, our data provide further support for a role of ARSG variants in task-specific dystonia, especially writer's cramp. PMID:25825126

  5. Sensory representation abnormalities that parallel focal hand dystonia in a primate model

    PubMed Central

    Blake, David T.; Byl, Nancy N.; Cheung, Steven; Bedenbaugh, Purvis; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Lamb, Michelle; Merzenich, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In our hypothesis of focal dystonia, attended repetitive behaviors generate aberrant sensory representations. Those aberrant representations interfere with motor control. Abnormal motor control strengthens sensory abnormalities. The positive feedback loop reinforces the dystonic condition. Previous studies of primates with focal hand dystonia have demonstrated multi-digit or hairy-glabrous responses at single sites in area 3b, receptive fields that average ten times larger than normal, and high receptive field overlap as a function of horizontal distance. In this study, we strengthen and elaborate these findings. One animal was implanted with an array of micro-electrodes that spanned the border between the face and digits. After the animal developed hand dystonia, responses in the initial hand representation increasingly responded to low threshold stimulation of the face in a columnar substitution. The hand-face border that is normally sharp became patchy and smeared over one millimeter of cortex within six weeks. Two more trained animals developed a focal hand dystonia variable in severity across the hand. Receptive field size, presence of multi-digit or hairy-glabrous receptive fields, and columnar overlap covaried with the animal’s ability to use specific digits. A fourth animal performed the same behaviors without developing dystonia. Many of its physiological measures were similar to the dystonic animals, but receptive field overlap functions were minimally abnormal, and no sites shared response properties that are normally segregated such as hairy-glabrous combined fields, or multi-digit fields. Thalamic mapping demonstrated proportionate levels of abnormality in thalamic representations as was found in cortical representations. PMID:12590836

  6. Genotype-phenotype correlations in THAP1 dystonia: molecular foundations and description of new cases

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S.; Xiao, Jianfeng; Rudzińska, Monika; Bastian, Robert W.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Van Gerpen, Jay A.; Puschmann, Andreas; Momčilović, Dragana; Vemula, Satya R.; Zhao, Yu

    2012-01-01

    An extensive variety of THAP1 sequence variants have been associated with focal, segmental and generalized dystonia with age of onset ranging from 3 to over 60 years. In previous work, we screened 1,114 subjects with mainly adult-onset primary dystonia (Neurology 2010;74:229-238) and identified 6 missense mutations in THAP1. For this report, we screened 750 additional subjects for mutations in coding regions of THAP1 and interrogated all published descriptions of THAP1 phenotypes (gender, age of onset, anatomical distribution of dystonia, family history and site of onset) to explore the possibility of THAP1 genotype-phenotype correlations and facilitate a deeper understanding of THAP1 pathobiology. We identified 5 additional missense mutations in THAP1 (p.A7D, p.K16E, p.S21C, p.R29Q, and p.I80V). Three of these variants are associated with appendicular tremors, which were an isolated or presenting sign in some of the affected subjects. Abductor laryngeal dystonia and mild blepharospasm can be manifestations of THAP1 mutations in some individuals. Overall, mean age of onset for THAP1 dystonia is 16.8 years and the most common sites of onset are the arm and neck, and the most frequently affected anatomical site is the neck. In addition, over half of patients exhibit either cranial or laryngeal involvement. Protein truncating mutations and missense mutations within the THAP domain of THAP1 tend to manifest at an earlier age and exhibit more extensive anatomical distributions than mutations localized to other regions of THAP1. PMID:22377579

  7. Abnormalities of motor function, transcription and cerebellar structure in mouse models of THAP1 dystonia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Marta; Perez-Garcia, Georgina; Ortiz-Virumbrales, Maitane; Méneret, Aurelie; Morant, Andrika; Kottwitz, Jessica; Fuchs, Tania; Bonet, Justine; Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro; Hof, Patrick R; Ozelius, Laurie J; Ehrlich, Michelle E

    2015-12-20

    DYT6 dystonia is caused by mutations in THAP1 [Thanatos-associated (THAP) domain-containing apoptosis-associated protein] and is autosomal dominant and partially penetrant. Like other genetic primary dystonias, DYT6 patients have no characteristic neuropathology, and mechanisms by which mutations in THAP1 cause dystonia are unknown. Thap1 is a zinc-finger transcription factor, and most pathogenic THAP1 mutations are missense and are located in the DNA-binding domain. There are also nonsense mutations, which act as the equivalent of a null allele because they result in the generation of small mRNA species that are likely rapidly degraded via nonsense-mediated decay. The function of Thap1 in neurons is unknown, but there is a unique, neuronal 50-kDa Thap1 species, and Thap1 levels are auto-regulated on the mRNA level. Herein, we present the first characterization of two mouse models of DYT6, including a pathogenic knockin mutation, C54Y and a null mutation. Alterations in motor behaviors, transcription and brain structure are demonstrated. The projection neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei are especially altered. Abnormalities vary according to genotype, sex, age and/or brain region, but importantly, overlap with those of other dystonia mouse models. These data highlight the similarities and differences in age- and cell-specific effects of a Thap1 mutation, indicating that the pathophysiology of THAP1 mutations should be assayed at multiple ages and neuronal types and support the notion of final common pathways in the pathophysiology of dystonia arising from disparate mutations. PMID:26376866

  8. Biochemical and cellular analysis of human variants of the DYT1 dystonia protein, torsinA

    PubMed Central

    Hettich, Jasmin; Ryan, Scott D.; Norberto de Souza, Osmar; Timmers, Luís Fernando Saraiva Macedo; Tsai, Shelun; Atai, Nadia A.; da Hora, Cintia C.; Zhang, Xuan; Kothary, Rashmi; Snapp, Erik; Ericsson, Maria; Grundmann, Kathrin; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Nery, Flávia C.

    2014-01-01

    Early-onset dystonia is associated with the deletion of one of a pair of glutamic acid residues (c.904_906delGAG/c.907_909delGAG; p.Glu302del/Glu303del; ΔE 302/303) near the carboxyl-terminus of torsinA, a member of the AAA+ protein family that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen and nuclear envelope (NE). This deletion commonly underlies early-onset DYT1 dystonia. While the role of the disease-causing mutation, torsinAΔE, has been established through genetic association studies, it is much less clear whether other rare human variants of torsinA are pathogenic. Two missense variations have been described in single patients; R288Q (c.863G>A; p.Arg288Gln; R288Q) identified in a patient with onset of severe generalized dystonia and myoclonus since infancy, and F205I (c.613T>A, p.Phe205Ile; F205I) in a psychiatric patient with late-onset focal dystonia. In this study, we have undertaken a series of analyses comparing the biochemical and cellular effects of these rare variants to torsinAΔE and wild-type (wt) torsinA in order to reveal whether there are common dysfunctional features. The results revealed that the variants, R288Q and F205I, are more similar in their properties to torsinAΔE protein than to torsinAwt. These findings provide functional evidence for the potential pathogenic nature of these rare sequence variants in the TOR1A gene, thus implicating these pathologies in the development of dystonia. PMID:24930953

  9. Botulinum toxin assessment, intervention and aftercare for cervical dystonia and other causes of hypertonia of the neck: international consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Novak, I; Campbell, L; Boyce, M; Fung, V S C

    2010-08-01

    Dystonia in the neck region can be safely and effectively reduced with injections of Botulinum neurotoxin-A and B. People with idiopathic cervical dystonia have been studied the most. Benefits following injection include increased range of movement at the neck for head turning, decreased pain, and increased functional capacity (Class I evidence, level A recommendation). The evidence for efficacy and safety in patients with secondary dystonia in the neck is unclear based on the lack of rigorous research conducted in this heterogeneous population (level U recommendation). Psychometrically sound assessments and outcome measures exist to guide decision-making (Class I evidence, level A recommendation). Much less is known about the effectiveness of therapy to augment the effects of the injection (Class IV, level U recommendation). More research is needed to answer questions about safety and efficacy in secondary spastic neck dystonia, effective adjunctive therapy, dosing and favourable injection techniques. PMID:20633181

  10. Screening of GNAL variants in Brazilian patients with isolated dystonia reveals a novel mutation with partial loss of function.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Camila Oliveira; Masuho, Ikuo; da Silva-Júnior, Francisco Pereira; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Silva, Sonia Maria Cesar Azevedo; Borges, Vanderci; Ferraz, Henrique Ballalai; Rocha, Maria Sheila Guimarães; Limongi, João Carlos Papaterra; Martemyanov, Kirill A; de Carvalho Aguiar, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    GNAL was identified as a cause of dystonia in patients from North America, Europe and Asia. In this study, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of GNAL variants in Brazilian patients with dystonia. Ninety-one patients with isolated idiopathic dystonia, negative for THAP1 and TOR1A mutations, were screened for GNAL variants by Sanger sequencing. Functional characterization of the Gαolf protein variant was performed using the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assay. A novel heterozygous nonsynonymous variant (p. F133L) was identified in a patient with cervical and laryngeal dystonia since the third decade of life, with no family history. This variant was not identified in healthy Brazilian controls and was not described in 63,000 exomas of the ExAC database. The F133L mutant exhibited significantly elevated levels of basal BRET and severely diminished amplitude of response elicited by dopamine, that both indicate substantial functional impairment of Gαolf in transducing receptor signals, which could be involved in dystonia pathophysiology. GNAL mutations are not a common cause of dystonia in the Brazilian population and have a lower prevalence than THAP1 and TOR1A mutations. We present a novel variant that results in partial Gαolf loss of function. PMID:26810727

  11. Patterns of Cortical Synchronization in Isolated Dystonia Compared With Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miocinovic, Svjetlana; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Qasim, Salman; Ostrem, Jill L.; Starr, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Isolated dystonia and Parkinson disease (PD) are disorders of the basal gangliothalamocortical network. They have largely distinct clinical profiles, but both disorders respond to deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the same subcortical targets using similar stimulation paradigms, suggesting pathophysiologic overlap. We hypothesized that, similar to PD, isolated dystonia is associated with elevated cortical neuronal synchronization. OBJECTIVE To investigate the electrophysiologic characteristics of the sensorimotor cortex arm-related area using a temporary subdural electrode strip in patients with isolated dystonia and PD undergoing DBS implantation in the awake state. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS An observational study recruited patients scheduled for DBS at the University of California, San Francisco and the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Data were collected from May 1, 2008, through April 1, 2015. Findings are reported for 22 patients with isolated cervical or segmental dystonia (8 with [DYST-ARM] and 14 without [DYST] arm symptoms] and 14 patients with akinetic rigid PD. Data were analyzed from November 1, 2014, through May 1, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cortical local field potentials, power spectral density, and phase-amplitude coupling (PAC). RESULTS Among our 3 groups that together included 36 patients, cortical PAC was present in primary motor and premotor arm-related areas for all groups, but the DYST group was less likely to exhibit increased PAC (P = .008). Similar to what has been shown for patients with PD, subthalamic DBS reversibly decreased PAC in a subset of patients with dystonia who were studied before and during intraoperative test stimulation (n = 4). At rest, broadband gamma (50–200 Hz) power in the primary motor cortex was greater in the DYST-ARM and PD groups compared with the DYST group, whereas alpha (8–13 Hz) and beta (13–30 Hz) power was comparable in all 3 groups. During movement, the DYST

  12. Aberrant Purkinje cell activity is the cause of dystonia in a shRNA-based mouse model of Rapid Onset Dystonia-Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Fremont, Rachel; Tewari, Ambika; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2015-10-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the α3 isoform of the sodium pump are responsible for Rapid Onset Dystonia-Parkinsonism (RDP). A pharmacologic model of RDP replicates the most salient features of RDP, and implicates both the cerebellum and basal ganglia in the disorder; dystonia is associated with aberrant cerebellar output, and the parkinsonism-like features are attributable to the basal ganglia. The pharmacologic agent used to generate the model, ouabain, is selective for sodium pumps. However, close to the infusion sites in vivo it likely affects all sodium pump isoforms. Therefore, it remains to be established whether selective loss of α3-containing sodium pumps replicates the pharmacologic model. Moreover, while the pharmacologic model suggested that aberrant firing of Purkinje cells was the main cause of abnormal cerebellar output, it did not allow the scrutiny of this hypothesis. To address these questions RNA interference using small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) delivered via adeno-associated viruses (AAV) was used to specifically knockdown α3-containing sodium pumps in different regions of the adult mouse brain. Knockdown of the α3-containing sodium pumps mimicked both the behavioral and electrophysiological changes seen in the pharmacologic model of RDP, recapitulating key aspects of the human disorder. Further, we found that knockdown of the α3 isoform altered the intrinsic pacemaking of Purkinje cells, but not the neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei. Therefore, acute knockdown of proteins associated with inherited dystonias may be a good strategy for developing phenotypic genetic mouse models where traditional transgenic models have failed to produce symptomatic mice. PMID:26093171

  13. Differences in globus pallidus neuronal firing rates and patterns relate to different disease biology in children with dystonia

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, V M; Valentin, A; Rey, H G; Lumsden, D E; Elze, M C; Selway, R; Alarcon, G; Lin, J-P

    2016-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology underlying different types of dystonia is not yet understood. We report microelectrode data from the globus pallidus interna (GPi) and globus pallidus externa (GPe) in children undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) for dystonia and investigate whether GPi and GPe firing rates differ between dystonia types. Methods Single pass microelectrode data were obtained to guide electrode position in 44 children (3.3–18.1 years, median 10.7) with the following dystonia types: 14 primary, 22 secondary Static and 8 progressive secondary to neuronal brain iron accumulation (NBIA). Preoperative stereotactic MRI determined coordinates for the GPi target. Digitised spike trains were analysed offline, blind to clinical data. Electrode placement was confirmed by a postoperative stereotactic CT scan. Findings We identified 263 GPi and 87 GPe cells. Both GPi and GPe firing frequencies differed significantly with dystonia aetiology. The median GPi firing frequency was higher in the primary group than in the secondary static group (13.5 Hz vs 9.6 Hz; p=0.002) and higher in the NBIA group than in either the primary (25 Hz vs 13.5 Hz; p=0.006) or the secondary static group (25 Hz vs 9.6 Hz; p=0.00004). The median GPe firing frequency was higher in the NBIA group than in the secondary static group (15.9 Hz vs 7 Hz; p=0.013). The NBIA group also showed a higher proportion of regularly firing GPi cells compared with the other groups (p<0.001). A higher proportion of regular GPi cells was also seen in patients with fixed/tonic dystonia compared with a phasic/dynamic dystonia phenotype (p<0.001). The GPi firing frequency showed a positive correlation with 1-year outcome from DBS measured by improvement in the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS-m) score (p=0.030). This association was stronger for the non-progressive patients (p=0.006). Interpretation Pallidal firing rates and patterns differ significantly with dystonia aetiology

  14. Task-specific hand dystonia: can too much plasticity be bad for you?

    PubMed

    Quartarone, Angelo; Siebner, Hartwig R; Rothwell, J C

    2006-04-01

    Patients with occupational hand dystonias have task-specific involuntary co-contraction and overflow of activity to inappropriate muscles. This interferes with highly skilled movements such as handwriting (writer's cramp) or playing a musical instrument (musician's cramp). Transcranial stimulation methods that probe mechanisms of synaptic plasticity in the motor cortex show an abnormal modifiability of sensorimotor circuits in patients with writer's cramp, probably because homeostatic control of the range of modification is deficient. We argue that during skilled motor practice, this leads to an excessive tendency to form associations between sensory inputs and motor outputs (abnormal potentiation) and to a failure to weaken already existing associations (deficient depotentiation). Deficient homeostatic control might be an important mechanism that triggers maladaptive reorganization and produces symptoms of occupational hand dystonias. PMID:16519953

  15. Influence of development and aging on brain biopterin: implications for dopa-responsive dystonia onset.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Y; Kish, S J

    1998-08-01

    Reduction of biopterin (BP) due to a mutation in the GTP-cyclohydrolase I gene causes hereditary progressive dystonia/dopa-responsive dystonia (HPD/DRD). To determine whether an age-related BP decline may contribute to HPD/DRD onset (from 1 to 13 years of age), we measured brain BP levels in 57 normal subjects ranging in age from 1 day to 92 years. Putaminal BP showed a significant increase in postnatal period, reaching a plateau at 1 to 13 years of age, and a decrease in adulthood. The HPD/DRD onset in childhood is unlikely to be caused by a brain BP decline during the first decade of life, but that in adulthood could be related to the age-dependent decrease. PMID:9710058

  16. Self-awareness of executive dysfunction in Huntington's disease: comparison with Parkinson's disease and cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sitek, Emilia J; Sołtan, Witold; Wieczorek, Dariusz; Schinwelski, Michał; Robowski, Piotr; Harciarek, Michał; Guzińska, Katarzyna; Sławek, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed self-awareness of executive deficits in patients with Huntington's disease (HD) in comparison to patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and with cervical dystonia (CD). Eighty-nine patient-proxy pairs participated in the study (23 with HD, 25 with advanced PD, 21 with mild PD and 20 with CD). Executive function was assessed with the Stroop test and the Dysexecutive Questionnaire. Insight into executive impairment in HD is mildly affected, when compared to PD and CD. PMID:23331288

  17. A Missense Mutation in KCTD17 Causes Autosomal Dominant Myoclonus-Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M.P.; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R.; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C.; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M.; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%–50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  18. Intraventricular versus Intrathecal Baclofen for SecondaryDystonia: A Comparison of Complications

    PubMed Central

    Rocque, Brandon G.; Albright, A. Leland

    2012-01-01

    Background Intrathecal baclofen (ITB) is an effective treatment for secondary dystonia. However, in many patients with dystonia, placement of an intrathecal catheter is difficult due to anatomic anomalies or spinal fusion. Intraventricular baclofen (IVB) has been shown to be an effective alternate route for drug delivery in a small series of patients. Objective To present the largest series of IVB cases to date, and compare the complication rate to that of a concurrent cohort of ITB cases. Methods The senior author’s series of IVB cases were reviewed. All contemporaneous cases of ITB for dystonia were reviewed as a control group. Data were collected by retrospective medical records review. Results Thirty IVB patients and 33 ITB patients were identified. Mean follow up was 15 and 16 months, respectively. IVB patients were younger, more commonly underweight, and had more severe dystonia, though no difference between groups was significant. Eleven patients (37%) experienced complications in the IVB group, and 16 (48%) in the ITB group. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed an odds ratio of 0.67 (95% CI 0.30–1.48, p=0.31) in favor of IVB. Adjusting for age and underweight status yielded an odds ratio of 0.64 (95% CI 0.29–1.42, p=0.27) in favor of IVB. There were 7 catheter or leak-related complications in the ITB group and 2 in the IVB group (p=0.15). Conclusion Intraventricular baclofen is as safe as intrathecal baclofen. There may be a lower risk of catheter or leak-related complications with IVB, though this study was too small to show significance. PMID:22555626

  19. Dopamine Receptor and Gα(olf) Expression in DYT1 Dystonia Mouse Models during Postnatal Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; McCarthy, Deirdre M.; Sharma, Nutan; Bhide, Pradeep G.

    2015-01-01

    Background DYT1 dystonia is a heritable, early-onset generalized movement disorder caused by a GAG deletion (ΔGAG) in the DYT1 gene. Neuroimaging studies and studies using mouse models suggest that DYT1 dystonia is associated with dopamine imbalance. However, whether dopamine imbalance is key to DYT1 or other forms of dystonia continues to be debated. Methodology/Principal Findings We used Dyt1 knock out (Dyt1 KO), Dyt1 ΔGAG knock-in (Dyt1 KI), and transgenic mice carrying one copy of the human DYT1 wild type allele (DYT1 hWT) or human ΔGAG mutant allele (DYT1 hMT). D1R, D2R, and Gα(olf) protein expression was analyzed by western blot in the frontal cortex, caudate-putamen and ventral midbrain in young adult (postnatal day 60; P60) male mice from all four lines; and in the frontal cortex and caudate putamen in juvenile (postnatal day 14; P14) male mice from the Dyt1 KI and KO lines. Dopamine receptor and Gα(olf) protein expression were significantly decreased in multiple brain regions of Dyt1 KI and Dyt1 KO mice and not significantly altered in the DYT1 hMT or DYT1 hWT mice at P60. The only significant change at P14 was a decrease in D1R expression in the caudate-putamen of the Dyt1 KO mice. Conclusion/Significance We found significant decreases in key proteins in the dopaminergic system in multiple brain regions of Dyt1 KO and Dyt1 KI mouse lines at P60. Deletion of one copy of the Dyt1 gene (KO mice) produced the most pronounced effects. These data offer evidence that impaired dopamine receptor signaling may be an early and significant contributor to DYT1 dystonia pathophysiology. PMID:25860259

  20. Cholinergic dysregulation produced by selective inactivation of the dystonia-associated protein TorsinA

    PubMed Central

    Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Hollis, Robert; Ball, Chelsea; Martella, Giuseppina; Tassone, Annalisa; Marshall, Andrea; Parsons, Dee; Li, Xinru; Yokoi, Fumiaki; Zhang, Lin; Li, Yuqing; Pisani, Antonio; Standaert, David G.

    2012-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia, a common and severe primary dystonia, is caused by a 3-bp deletion in TOR1A which encodes torsinA, a protein found in the endoplasmic reticulum. Several cellular functions are altered by the mutant protein, but at a systems level the link between these and the symptoms of the disease is unclear. The most effective known therapy for DYT1 dystonia is use of anticholinergic drugs. Previous studies have revealed that in mice, transgenic expression of human mutant torsinA under a non-selective promoter leads to abnormal function of striatal cholinergic neurons. To investigate what pathological role torsinA plays in cholinergic neurons, we created a mouse model in which the Dyt1 gene, the mouse homolog of TOR1A, is selectively deleted in cholinergic neurons (ChKO animals). These animals do not have overt dystonia, but do have subtle motor abnormalities. There is no change in the number or size of striatal cholinergic cells or striatal acetylcholine content, uptake, synthesis, or release in ChKO mice. There are, however, striking functional abnormalities of striatal cholinergic cells, with paradoxical excitation in response to D2 receptor activation and loss of muscarinic M2/M4 receptor inhibitory function. These effects are specific for cholinergic interneurons, as recordings from nigral dopaminergic neurons revealed normal responses. Amphetamine stimulated dopamine release was also unaltered. These results demonstrate a cell-autonomous effect of Dyt1 deletion on striatal cholinergic function. Therapies directed at modifying the function of cholinergic neurons may prove useful in the treatment of the human disorder. PMID:22579992

  1. A commentary on the utility of a new L-DOPA-responsive dystonia mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Samuel J.; Hess, Ellen J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a recent issue of Brain, we reported on the generation and characterization of a mouse model of the rare disease L-DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD). Here, we discuss the utility of these mice for understanding broader disease processes and treatment strategies. Using specific experimental designs that either work “forward” from genetic etiology or “backward” from the symptomatic presentation, we discuss how our data and future work can be used to understand broader themes. PMID:27141408

  2. A commentary on the utility of a new L-DOPA-responsive dystonia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rose, Samuel J; Hess, Ellen J

    2016-01-01

    In a recent issue of Brain, we reported on the generation and characterization of a mouse model of the rare disease L-DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD). Here, we discuss the utility of these mice for understanding broader disease processes and treatment strategies. Using specific experimental designs that either work "forward" from genetic etiology or "backward" from the symptomatic presentation, we discuss how our data and future work can be used to understand broader themes. PMID:27141408

  3. A missense mutation in KCTD17 causes autosomal dominant myoclonus-dystonia.

    PubMed

    Mencacci, Niccolo E; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H R; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M P; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P; Wood, Nicholas W

    2015-06-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%-50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  4. Failure of cathodal direct current stimulation to improve fine motor control in musician's dystonia.

    PubMed

    Buttkus, Franziska; Weidenmüller, Matthias; Schneider, Sabine; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Nitsche, Michael A; Paulus, Walter; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2010-02-15

    Musician's dystonia (MD) is a task-specific movement disorder with a loss of voluntary motor control in highly trained movements. Defective inhibition on different levels of the central nervous system is involved in its pathophysiology. Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (ctDCS) diminishes excitability of the motor cortex and improves performance in overlearned tasks in healthy subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ctDCS improves fine motor control in MD. Professional guitarists (n = 10) with MD played exercises before, directly after ctDCS, and 60 min after ctDCS. ctDCS (2 mA, 20 min) was applied on the primary motor cortex contralateral to the affected hand. Guitar exercises were video-documented and symptoms were evaluated by three independent experts. No beneficial effect of ctDCS on fine motor control was found for the entire group. However, motor control of one guitarist improved after stimulation. This patient suffered from arm dystonia, whereas the other guitarists suffered from hand dystonia. PMID:20063390

  5. The effectiveness of physiotherapy for cervical dystonia: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Joke; Van der Velden, Kevin; Meirte, Jill; Van Daele, Ulrike; Truijen, Steven; Cras, Patrick; Mercelis, Rudy; De Hertogh, Willem

    2014-10-01

    Cervical dystonia is a form of adult-onset, focal dystonia characterized by involuntary contractions of the neck muscles, leading to a disabling, abnormal head posture. CD has a great impact on the activities of daily living (ADL) and quality of life. Currently, the most widely used and recommended first line treatment is botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) injections. Physiotherapy is a potentially useful adjuvant, but little is known about its effectiveness. Consequently, our objective was to investigate the effectiveness of physiotherapy alone or as an adjuvant treatment to BoNT/A injections in cervical dystonia (CD) by means of a systematic literature review. Two online databases, PubMed and Web of Science, were searched for articles describing the effectiveness of physiotherapy treatment for CD. After screening, based on predefined in- and exclusion criteria, 16 studies were retained. Their methodological quality was assessed according to Cochrane guidelines. The methodological quality of most studies was low. Examples of shortcomings are small sample sizes, lack of randomization or blinding, and diversity in therapeutic techniques and outcome measures. Only seven studies were clinical trials; the remaining were either case reports or case series. The reported physiotherapy treatments included EMG biofeedback training, muscular elongation, postural exercises and electrotherapy. Improvements in head position, pain, cervical range of motion, quality of life and ADL have been reported, which is promising. Cautious interpretation on the effectiveness of physiotherapy as an adjuvant therapy is required. Before firm conclusions can be drawn, additional high quality trials are needed. PMID:24413637

  6. Neural stem cell transplantation for the treatment of primary torsion dystonia: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wen-Qing; Yin, Feng; Zhang, Jian-Ning; Lu, Wang-Sheng; Liang, Ying-Kui; Adlerberth, Josefin; Tian, Zeng-Min

    2016-01-01

    Primary torsion dystonia (PTD) occurs due to a genetic mutation and often advances gradually. Currently, there is no therapy available that is able to inhibit progression. Neural stem cells (NSCs) are being investigated as potential therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, such as stroke and trauma. The present study evaluated the clinical effectiveness of NSC transplantation in an 18-year-old male patient with PTD, to assess the ability of this therapy to inhibit PTD progression. Genetic testing of the patient revealed a mutation in the torsion dystonia-1 (DYT1) gene (907–909 delGAG). NSCs were bilaterally implanted in the globus pallidus of the patient through stereotactic surgery. Prior to surgery, the patient's Burke-Fahn-Marsden dystonia movement score (BFMDMS) was 21, which progressively decreased after surgery to 18, 17, 15 and 13 at 1, 2, 3 and 4 postoperative years, respectively. BFMDMS was improved by 38.1% over the 4 postoperative years. Although computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examinations showed no significant changes prior to and following surgery, postoperative brain positron emission tomography scans revealed increased glucose metabolism in the transplanted region. The clinical efficacy of NSC transplantation in this patient suggests its potential for the treatment of DYT1-positive patients with PTD. PMID:27446258

  7. The clinical phenomenology and associations of trick maneuvers in cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Filip, Pavel; Šumec, Rastislav; Baláž, Marek; Bareš, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Sensory trick is an unusual clinical feature in cervical dystonia that attenuates disease symptoms by slight touch to a specific area of the face or head. Using a semi-quantitative questionnaire-based study of 197 patients with idiopathic cervical dystonia, we sought to determine probable pathophysiologic correlates, with the wider aim of examining its eventual clinical significance. The typical sensory trick, i.e., light touch, not necessitating the use of force leading to simple overpowering of dystonic activity, was present in 83 (42.1 %) patients. The vast majority of the patients required a specific sequence of sensorimotor inputs, including touch sensation on the face or different areas of the head, and also sensory and motor input of the hand itself. Deviations often led to a significant decrease in effectiveness and lack of expected benefit. Moreover, patients able to perform the maneuver reported compellingly higher subjective effect of botulinum toxin treatment (median 7 vs. 5 on a scale of 0-10; p < 0.0001) and lower depression score (median 10 vs. 14 on the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating scale; p < 0.001). Overall, the results point to marked disruption of sensorimotor networks in cervical dystonia. The mechanism of the sensory trick action may be associated with balancing the abnormal activation patterns by specific sensorimotor inputs. Its presence may be considered a positive predictive factor for responsiveness to botulinum toxin treatment. PMID:26645376

  8. Pallidal stimulation in dystonia: effects on cognition, mood, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Hälbig, T D; Gruber, D; Kopp, U A; Schneider, G-H; Trottenberg, T; Kupsch, A

    2005-12-01

    Bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus internus (GPi) alleviates symptoms in patients with dystonia but its effects on cognition, neuropsychiatric status, and quality of life have not been examined. This is a case series report of 15 consecutive patients with different forms of dystonia who underwent bilateral implantation of DBS electrodes in the GPi. The patients were evaluated preoperatively and after 3-12 months of DBS with tests of cognition (Mattis Dementia Rating Scale, Stroop Test, Trail Making Test, Phonemic and Category Word Fluency, Digit Span, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Tonic and Phasic Alertness), neuropsychiatric status (Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories, Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale, Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale), quality of life, and motor functions. GPi DBS significantly improved dystonic symptoms, functional abilities, and quality of life allowing for a significant reduction of antidystonic medications. No deterioration was observed in cognitive scores and neuropsychiatric measures. The present case series report thus provides preliminary evidence for the safety of GPi DBS regarding cognitive and neuropsychiatric functions in patients with dystonia. PMID:16291900

  9. Mutations in the Autoregulatory Domain of β-Tubulin 4a Cause Hereditary Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Hersheson, Joshua; Mencacci, Niccolo E; Davis, Mary; MacDonald, Nicola; Trabzuni, Daniah; Ryten, Mina; Pittman, Alan; Paudel, Reema; Kara, Eleanna; Fawcett, Katherine; Plagnol, Vincent; Bhatia, Kailash P; Medlar, Alan J; Stanescu, Horia C; Hardy, John; Kleta, Robert; Wood, Nicholas W; Houlden, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Dystonia type 4 (DYT4) was first described in a large family from Heacham in Norfolk with an autosomal dominantly inherited whispering dysphonia, generalized dystonia, and a characteristic hobby horse ataxic gait. We carried out a genetic linkage analysis in the extended DYT4 family that spanned 7 generations from England and Australia, revealing a single LOD score peak of 6.33 on chromosome 19p13.12-13. Exome sequencing in 2 cousins identified a single cosegregating mutation (p.R2G) in the β-tubulin 4a (TUBB4a) gene that was absent in a large number of controls. The mutation is highly conserved in the β-tubulin autoregulatory MREI (methionine–arginine–glutamic acid–isoleucine) domain, highly expressed in the central nervous system, and extensive in vitro work has previously demonstrated that substitutions at residue 2, specifically R2G, disrupt the autoregulatory capability of the wild-type β-tubulin peptide, affirming the role of the cytoskeleton in dystonia pathogenesis. PMID:23424103

  10. Modulation of the basal ganglia dopaminergic system in a transgenic mouse exhibiting dystonia-like features

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulou, D.; Armata, I. A.; Mitsacos, A.; Shashidharan, P.; Giompres, P.

    2011-01-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary excessive muscle activity and abnormal postures. There are data supporting the hypothesis that basal ganglia dysfunction, and specifically dopaminergic system dysfunction, plays a role in dystonia. In the present study, we used hyperkinetic transgenic mice generated as a model of DYT1 dystonia and compared the basal ganglia dopaminergic system between transgenic mice exhibiting hyperkinesia (affected) transgenic mice not showing movement abnormalities (unaffected), and non-transgenic littermates A decrease in the density of striatal D2 binding sites, measured by [3H]raclopride binding, and D2 mRNA expression in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) was revealed in affected an unaffected transgenic mice when compared with non-transgenic. No difference in D1 receptor binding and DAT binding, measured by [3H]SCH23390 and [3H]WIN35428 binding, respectively, was found in striatum of transgenic animals. In SNpc, increased levels of DAT binding sites were observed in affected and unaffected animals compared to non-transgenic, whereas no change in DAT mRNA expression was found. Our results show selective neurochemical changes in the basal ganglia dopaminergic system, suggesting a possible involvement in the pathophysiology of dystonialike motor hyperactivity. PMID:21136125

  11. Dysregulation of striatal dopamine release in a mouse model of dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Li; Patel, Jyoti C.; Walker, Ruth H.; Shashidharan, Pullanipally; Rice, Margaret E.

    2010-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary movements. We examined striatal dopamine function in hyperactive transgenic mice generated as a model of dystonia. Evoked extracellular dopamine concentration was monitored with carbon-fiber microelectrodes and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in striatal slices from non-transgenic mice, transgenic mice with a positive motor phenotype, and phenotype-negative transgenic littermates. Peak single-pulse evoked dopamine concentration was significantly lower in phenotype-positive mice than in non-transgenic or phenotype-negative mice, but indistinguishable between non-transgenic and phenotype-negative mice. Phenotype-positive mice also had higher functional D2 dopamine autoreceptor sensitivity than non-transgenic mice, which would be consistent with lower extracellular dopamine concentration in vivo. Multiple-pulse (phasic) stimulation (5 pulses, 10-100 Hz) revealed an enhanced frequency dependence of evoked dopamine release in phenotype-positive versus non-transgenic or phenotype-negative mice, which was exacerbated when extracellular Ca2+ concentration was lowered. Enhanced sensitivity to phasic stimulation in phenotype-positive mice was reminiscent of the pattern seen with antagonism of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Consistent with a role for altered cholinergic regulation, the difference in phasic responsiveness among groups was lost when nicotinic receptors were blocked by mecamylamine. Together, these data implicate compromised dopamine release regulation, possibly from cholinergic dysfunction, in the motor symptoms of this dystonia model. PMID:20626557

  12. Sporadic and familial myoclonic dystonia: Report of three cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B.; Roy, Arijit; Biswas, Atanu; Pal, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Myoclonic dystonia refers to a clinical syndrome characterized by rapid jerky movements along with dystonic posturing of the limbs. Clinically, it is characterized by sudden, brief, electric shock-like movements, mostly involving the upper extremities, shoulders, neck and trunk. Characteristically, the movements wane with consumption of small dose of alcohol in about 50% of cases. Additionally, dystonic contractions are observed in most of the patients in the affected body parts and some patients may exhibit cervical dystonia or graphospasm as well. It may manifest as an autosomal dominant condition or sometimes, as a sporadic entity, though there are doubts whether these represent cases with reduced penetrance. The condition is usually treated with a combination of an anticholinergic agent like, benztropine, pimozide and tetrabenazine. We report one sporadic case and one familial case where the father and the son are affected. The cases were collected from the Movement Disorders Clinic of Bangur Institute of Neurosciences, Kolkata, West Bengal in a period of ten months. Myoclonic dystonia is a rare condition and to the best of our knowledge, this series is the first one reported from our country. Videos of the patients are also provided with the article. PMID:27293342

  13. Relevance of sonography for botulinum toxin treatment of cervical dystonia: an expert statement.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Axel; Bäumer, Tobias; Fietzek, Urban; Heitmann, Susanne; Walter, Uwe; Jost, Wolfgang H

    2015-10-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT A) is the first-line treatment for cervical dystonia. However, although BoNT A has a favorable safety profile and is effective in the majority of patients, in some cases the treatment outcome is disappointing or side effects occur when higher doses are used. It is likely that in such cases either the target muscles were not injected accurately or unintended weakness of non-target muscles occurred. It has been demonstrated in clinical trials for spastic movement disorders that sonography-guided BoNT A injections could improve treatment outcome. As the published evidence for a benefit of sonography-guided BoNT injection in patients with cervical dystonia is scarce, it is the aim of this review to discuss the relevance of sonography in this indication and provide a statement from clinical experts for its use. The clear advantage of sonography-guided injections is non-invasive, real-time visualization of the targeted muscle, thus improving the precision of injections and potentially the treatment outcomes as well as avoiding adverse effects. Other imaging techniques are of limited value due to high costs, radiation exposure or non-availability in clinical routine. In the hands of a trained injector, sonography is a quick and non-invasive imaging technique. Novel treatment concepts of cervical dystonia considering the differential contributions of distinct cranial and cervical muscles can reliably be implemented only by use of imaging-guided injection protocols. PMID:25547861

  14. Genetic Diagnosis of Two Dopa-Responsive Dystonia Families by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhan-fang; Zhang, Yu-han; Guo, Ji-feng; Sun, Qi-ying; Mei, Jun-pu; Zhou, Han-lin; Guan, Li-ping; Tian, Jin-yong; Hu, Zheng-mao; Li, Jia-da; Xia, Kun; Yan, Xin-xiang; Tang, Bei-sha

    2014-01-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia, a rare disorder typically presenting in early childhood with lower limb dystonia and gait abnormality, responds well to levodopa. However, it is often misdiagnosed with the wide spectrum of phenotypes. By exome sequencing, we make a rapid genetic diagnosis for two atypical dopa-responsive dystonia pedigrees. One pedigree, presented with prominent parkinsonism, was misdiagnosed as Parkinson's disease until a known mutation in GCH1 (GTP cyclohydrolase 1) gene (NM_000161.2: c.631_632delAT, p.Met211ValfsX38) was found. The other pedigree was detected with a new compound heterozygous mutation in TH (tyrosine hydroxylase) gene [(NM_000360.3: c.911C>T, p.Ala304Val) and (NM_000360.3: c.1358G>A, p.Arg453His)], whose proband, a pregnant woman, required a rapid and less-biased genetic diagnosis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that exome sequencing could provide a precise and rapid genetic testing in the diagnosis of Mendelian diseases, especially for diseases with wide phenotypes. PMID:25181484

  15. CYP2U1 mutations in two Iranian patients with activity induced dystonia, motor regression and spastic paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kariminejad, A.; Schöls, L.; Schüle, R.; Tonekaboni, S.H.; Abolhassani, A.; Fadaee, M.; Rosti, R.O.; Gleeson, J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness in the lower limbs. It is divided into two major groups, complicated and uncomplicated, based on the presence of additional features such as intellectual disability, ataxia, seizures, peripheral neuropathy and visual problems. SPG56 is an autosomal recessive form of HSP with complicated and uncomplicated manifestations, complicated being more common. CYP2U1 gene mutations have been identified as responsible for SPG56. Intellectual disability, dystonia, subclinical sensory motor neuropathy, pigmentary degenerative maculopathy, thin corpus callosum and periventricular white-matter hyperintensities were additional features noted in previous cases of SPG56. Here we identified two novel mutations in CYP2U1 in two unrelated patients by whole exome sequencing. Both patients had complicated HSP with activity-induced dystonia, suggesting dystonia as an additional finding in SPG56. Two out of 14 previously reported patients had dystonia, and the addition of our patients suggests dystonia in a quarter of SPG56 patients. Developmental regression has not been reported in SPG56 patients so far but both of our patients developed motor regression in infancy. PMID:27292318

  16. CYP2U1 mutations in two Iranian patients with activity induced dystonia, motor regression and spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Kariminejad, A; Schöls, L; Schüle, R; Tonekaboni, S H; Abolhassani, A; Fadaee, M; Rosti, R O; Gleeson, J G

    2016-09-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness in the lower limbs. It is divided into two major groups, complicated and uncomplicated, based on the presence of additional features such as intellectual disability, ataxia, seizures, peripheral neuropathy and visual problems. SPG56 is an autosomal recessive form of HSP with complicated and uncomplicated manifestations, complicated being more common. CYP2U1 gene mutations have been identified as responsible for SPG56. Intellectual disability, dystonia, subclinical sensory motor neuropathy, pigmentary degenerative maculopathy, thin corpus callosum and periventricular white-matter hyperintensities were additional features noted in previous cases of SPG56. Here we identified two novel mutations in CYP2U1 in two unrelated patients by whole exome sequencing. Both patients had complicated HSP with activity-induced dystonia, suggesting dystonia as an additional finding in SPG56. Two out of 14 previously reported patients had dystonia, and the addition of our patients suggests dystonia in a quarter of SPG56 patients. Developmental regression has not been reported in SPG56 patients so far but both of our patients developed motor regression in infancy. PMID:27292318

  17. Pallidal deep brain stimulation for the treatment of DYT6 dystonia: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Miri, Shahnaz; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Parvaresh, Mansour; Rohani, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the results of pallidal deep brain stimulation (DBS) in DYT6 dystonia. This will be the first report of DYT6 dystonia treated with pallidal DBS from Iran. A 21 years old male patient with DYT6 dystonia underwent bilateral deep brain stimulation. The target of DBS was the sensorimotor region of the posteroventral globus pallidus internus (GPi). DBS parameters included an amplitude of 2.7 V, frequency of 160 Hz, and pulse width of 90 μs which were adjusted according to the patient's response 12 months after surgery. Treatment outcome was measured by the patient’s Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS) score. Before surgery, the patient's BFMDRS score was 32. However, BFMDRS score reduced to 7 at one year follow up after surgery (78% improvement of total score). Dystonic symptoms of extremities and mouth completely resolved. Also speech and swallowing function significantly improved. Although previous observations reported a poor to moderate response in speech, we found DBS as an effective treatment not only for dystonic features, but also for speech improvement of DYT6 dystonia. PMID:25250280

  18. Homozygous mutation of VPS16 gene is responsible for an autosomal recessive adolescent-onset primary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiaodong; Chen, Xin; Wu, Song; Liu, Wenlan; Zhang, Xiejun; Zhang, Doudou; He, Sijie; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Mali; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Zongyang; Luo, Kun; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological movement disorder that is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Herein, we report the identification a novel homozygous missense mutation, c.156 C > A in VPS16, co-segregating with disease status in a Chinese consanguineous family with adolescent-onset primary dystonia by whole exome sequencing and homozygosity mapping. To assess the biological role of c.156 C > A homozygous mutation of VPS16, we generated mice with targeted mutation site of Vps16 through CRISPR-Cas9 genome-editing approach. Vps16 c.156 C > A homozygous mutant mice exhibited significantly impaired motor function, suggesting that VPS16 is a new causative gene for adolescent-onset primary dystonia. PMID:27174565

  19. 4-Phenylbutyrate Attenuates the ER Stress Response and Cyclic AMP Accumulation in DYT1 Dystonia Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin A.; Zhang, Xuan; Miller, Gregory M.; Lencer, Wayne I.; Nery, Flavia C.

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological disorder in which sustained muscle contractions induce twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal posturing. DYT1 early-onset primary dystonia is the most common form of hereditary dystonia and is caused by deletion of a glutamic acid residue (302/303) near the carboxyl-terminus of encoded torsinA. TorsinA is localized primarily within the contiguous lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and nuclear envelope (NE), and is hypothesized to function as a molecular chaperone and an important regulator of the ER stress-signaling pathway, but how the mutation in torsinA causes disease remains unclear. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the clinical symptoms of dystonia result from abnormalities in dopamine (DA) signaling, and possibly involving its down-stream effector adenylate cyclase that produces the second messenger cyclic adenosine-3′, 5′-monophosphate (cAMP). Here we find that mutation in torsinA induces ER stress, and inhibits the cyclic adenosine-3′, 5′-monophosphate (cAMP) response to the adenylate cyclase agonist forskolin. Both defective mechanins are corrected by the small molecule 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) that alleviates ER stress. Our results link torsinA, the ER-stress-response, and cAMP-dependent signaling, and suggest 4-PBA could also be used in dystonia treatment. Other pharmacological agents known to modulate the cAMP cascade, and ER stress may also be therapeutic in dystonia patients and can be tested in the models described here, thus supplementing current efforts centered on the dopamine pathway. PMID:25379658

  20. Heterogeneity in primary dystonia: lessons from THAP1, GNAL, and TOR1A in Amish-Mennonites.

    PubMed

    Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Fuchs, Tania; San Luciano, Marta; Raymond, Deborah; Brashear, Alison; Ortega, Robert; Deik, Andres; Ozelius, Laurie J; Bressman, Susan B

    2014-05-01

    A founder mutation in the Thanatos-associated (THAP) domain containing, apoptosis associated protein 1 (THAP1) gene causing primary dystonia was originally described in the Amish-Mennonites. However, there may be both genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity of dystonia in this population that may also inform studies in other ethnic groups. Genotyping for THAP1 and for guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein), α-activating activity polypeptide, olfactory type (GNAL) mutations and genotype-phenotype comparisons were performed for 76 individuals of Amish-Mennonites heritage with primary dystonia. Twenty-seven individuals had mutations in THAP1-most with the founder indel mutation-but two had different THAP1 mutations, 8 had mutations in GNAL, and 1 had a de novo GAG deletion in torsin 1A (TOR1A) (dystonia 1 [DYT1]). In the primary analysis comparing THAP1 carriers versus all non-THAP1, non-GNAL, non-TOR1A individuals, age at onset was lower in THAP1 carriers (mean age ± standard deviation, 15.5 ± 9.2 years [range, 5-38 years] vs. 39.2 ± 17.7 years [range, 1-70 years]; P < 0.001), and THAP1 carriers were more likely to have onset of dystonia in an arm (44.4% vs. 15.0%; P = 0.02) and to have arm involvement (88.9% vs. 22.5%; P < 0.01), leg involvement (51.9% vs. 10.0%; P = 0.01), and jaw/tongue involvement (33.3% vs. 7.5%; P = 0.02) involvement at their final examination. Carriers were less likely to have dystonia restricted to a single site (11.11% in carriers vs. 65.9% in noncarriers; P < 0.01) and were less likely to have dystonia onset in cervical regions (25.9% of THAP1 carriers vs. 52.5% of noncarriers; P = 0.04). Primary dystonia in the Amish-Mennonites is genetically diverse and includes not only the THAP1 indel founder mutation but also different mutations in THAP1 and GNAL as well as the TOR1A GAG deletion. Phenotype, particularly age at onset combined with final distribution, may be highly specific for the genetic etiology. PMID:24500857

  1. The role of mutations in COL6A3 in isolated dystonia.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Katja; Schlicht, Felix; Svetel, Marina; Hinrichs, Frauke; Zittel, Simone; Graf, Julia; Lohnau, Thora; Schmidt, Alexander; Mir, Pablo; Krause, Patricia; Lang, Antony E; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Wolters, Alexander; Kamm, Christoph; Zeuner, Kirsten E; Altenmüller, Eckart; Naz, Sadaf; Chung, Sun Ju; Kostic, Vladimir S; Münchau, Alexander; Kühn, Andrea A; Brüggemann, Norbert; Klein, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Specific mutations in COL6A3 have recently been reported as the cause of isolated recessive dystonia, which is a rare movement disorder. In all patients, at least one mutation was located in Exons 41 and 42. In an attempt to replicate these findings, we assessed by direct sequencing the frequency of rare variants in Exons 41 and 42 of COL6A3 in 955 patients with isolated or combined dystonia or with another movement disorder with dystonic features. We identified nine heterozygous carriers of rare variants including five different missense mutations and an extremely rare synonymous variant. In these nine patients, we sequenced the remaining 41 coding exons of COL6A3 to test for a second mutation in the compound heterozygous state. In only one of them, a second rare variant was identified (Thr732Met + Pro3082Arg). Of note, this patient had been diagnosed with Parkinson´s disease (with dystonic posturing) due to homozygous PINK1 mutations. The COL6A3 mutations clearly did not segregate with the disease in the four affected siblings of this family. Further, there was no indication for a disease-modifying effect of the COL6A3 mutations since disease severity or age at onset did not correlate with the number of COL6A3 mutated alleles in this family. In conjunction with the relatively high frequency of homozygous carriers of reported mutations in publically available databases, our data call a causal role for variants in COL6A3 in isolated dystonia into question. PMID:26872670

  2. Dysgraphia as a Mild Expression of Dystonia in Children with Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Guerrini, Renzo; Melani, Federico; Brancati, Claudia; Ferrari, Anna Rita; Brovedani, Paola; Biggeri, Annibale; Grisotto, Laura; Pellacani, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Background Absence epilepsy (AE) is etiologically heterogeneous and has at times been associated with idiopathic dystonia. Objectives Based on the clinical observation that children with AE often exhibit, interictally, a disorder resembling writer’s cramp but fully definable as dysgraphia, we tested the hypothesis that in this particular population dysgraphia would represent a subtle expression of dystonia. Methods We ascertained the prevalence of dysgraphia in 82 children with AE (mean age 9.7) and average intelligence and compared them with 89 age-, gender- and class-matched healthy children (mean age 10.57) using tests for handwriting fluency and quality, based on which we divided patients and controls into four subgroups: AE/dysgraphia, AE without dysgraphia, controls with dysgraphia and healthy controls. We compared the blink reflex recovery cycle in children belonging to all four subgroups. Results We identified dysgraphia in 17/82 children with AE and in 7/89 controls (20.7 vs 7.8%; P = 0.016) with the former having a 3.4-times higher risk of dysgraphia regardless of age and gender (odd ratio: 3.49; 95% CI 1.2, 8.8%). The AE/dysgraphia subgroup performed worse than controls with dysgraphia in one test of handwriting fluency (P = 0.037) and in most trials testing handwriting quality (P< 0.02). In children with AE/dysgraphia the blink reflex showed no suppression at short interstimulus intervals, with a difference for each value emerging when comparing the study group with the three remaining subgroups (P<0.001). Conclusions In children with AE, dysgraphia is highly prevalent and has a homogeneous, distinctive pathophysiological substrate consistent with idiopathic dystonia. PMID:26132164

  3. Characterization of human torsinA and its dystonia-associated mutant form.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhonghua; Zolkiewska, Anna; Zolkiewski, Michal

    2003-01-01

    Deletion of a single glutamate in torsinA correlates with early-onset dystonia, the most severe form of a neurological disorder characterized by uncontrollable muscle contractions. TorsinA is targeted to the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) in eukaryotic cells. We investigated the processing and membrane association of torsinA and the dystonia-associated Glu-deletion mutant (torsinAdeltaE). We found that the signal sequence of torsinA (residues 1-20 from the 40 amino-acid long N-terminal hydrophobic region) is cleaved in Drosophila S2 cells, as shown by the N-terminal sequencing after partial protein purification. TorsinA is not secreted from S2 cells. Consistently, sodium carbonate extraction and Triton X-114 treatment showed that torsinA is associated with the ER membrane in CHO (Chinese-hamster ovary) cells. In contrast, a variant of torsinA that contains the native signal sequence without the hydrophobic region Ile24-Pro40 does not associate with the membranes in CHO cells, and a truncated torsinA without the 40 N-terminal amino acids is secreted in the S2 culture. Thus the 20-amino-acid-long hydrophobic segment in torsinA, which remains at the N-terminus after signal-peptide cleavage, is responsible for the membrane anchoring of torsinA. TorsinAdeltaE showed similar cleavage of the 20 N-terminal amino acids and membrane association properties similar to wild-type torsinA but, unlike the wild-type, torsinAdeltaE was not secreted in the S2 culture even after deletion of the membrane-anchoring segment. This indicates that the dystonia-associated mutation produces a structurally distinct, possibly misfolded, form of torsinA, which cannot be properly processed in the secretory pathway of eukaryotic cells. PMID:12780349

  4. Early deep brain stimulation in patients with myoclonus-dystonia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Helena; Linhares, Paulo; Chamadoira, Clara; Rosas, Maria José; Vaz, Rui

    2016-05-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (MD) is a rare movement disorder which is disabling and frequently refractory to medical treatment. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus interna (GPi) has been used to treat some patients. Although there is significant motor improvement with DBS, the impact on disability and on quality of life has been infrequently reported. Also, the benefit of the procedure is not established in patients without ε-sarcoglycan gene (SGCE) mutations. We present two patients with severe MD treated with GPi-DBS, one of the patients without a SGCE mutation. Motor improvements (rest/action/total subscores of the Unified Myoclonus Rating Scale and movement subscore of the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale [BFMRS]) and disability (BFMRS disability subscore) were carefully evaluated preoperatively and at 6 and 12months after surgery. Quality of life (addressed using the Portuguese version of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form General Health Survey, version 2.0 [SF-36v2]) was tested preoperatively and 12months after DBS. At 12-month follow-up, myoclonus improved 78.6% in Patient 1 and 80.7% in Patient 2, while dystonia improved 37% and 86.7%, respectively. Improvements in disability ranged from 71.4% to 75%. With regard to quality of life, all parameters addressed by the SF-36v2 improved or stabilized in both patients. No major adverse effects were noticed. Improvements in motor symptoms are consistent with reports in the literature and were obtained regardless of the identification of a SGCE gene mutation. There were also significant benefits on disability and quality of life. DBS should be considered for MD. PMID:26810467

  5. Anticholinergic drugs rescue synaptic plasticity in DYT1 dystonia: role of M1 muscarinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Maltese, M.; Martella, G.; Madeo, G.; Fagiolo, I.; Tassone, A.; Ponterio, G.; Sciamanna, G.; Burbaud, P.; Conn, P.J.; Bonsi, P.; Pisani, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Broad spectrum muscarinic receptor antagonists have represented the first available treatment for different movement disorders such as dystonia. However, the specificity of these drugs and their mechanism of action is not entirely clear. Methods We performed a systematic analysis of the effects of anticholinergic drugs on short- and long-term plasticity recorded from striatal medium spiny neurons from DYT1 dystonia knock-in (Tor1a+/Δgag) mice heterozygous for ΔE-torsinA and their controls (Tor1a+/+ mice). Results Antagonists were chosen that had previously been proposed to be selective for muscarinic receptor subtypes and included pirenzepine, trihexyphenydil, biperiden, orphenadrine, and a novel selective M1 antagonist, VU0255035. Tor1a+/Δgag mice exhibited a significant impairment of corticostriatal synaptic plasticity. Anticholinergics had no significant effects on intrinsic membrane properties and on short-term plasticity of striatal neurons. However, they exhibited a differential ability to restore the corticostriatal plasticity deficits. A complete rescue of both long-term depression (LTD) and synaptic depotentiation (SD) was obtained by applying the M1-preferring antagonists pirenzepine and trihexyphenidyl as well as VU0255035. Conversely, the non-selective antagonists orphenadrine produced only a partial rescue of synaptic plasticity, whereas biperiden and ethopropazine failed to restore plasticity. The selectivity for M1 receptors was further demonstrated by their ability to counteract the M1-dependent potentiation of NMDA current recorded from striatal neurons. Conclusions Our study demonstrate that selective M1 muscarinic receptor antagonism offsets synaptic plasticity deficits in the striatum of mice with the DYT1 dystonia mutation, providing a potential mechanistic rationale for the development of improved antimuscarinic therapies for this movement disorder. PMID:25195914

  6. Arm Posturing in a Patient Following Stroke: Dystonia, Levitation, Synkinesis, or Spasticity?

    PubMed Central

    Irmady, Krithi; Jabbari, Bahman; Louis, Elan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-stroke movement disorders occur in up to 4% of stroke patients. The movements can be complex and difficult to classify, which presents challenges when attempting to understand the clinical phenomenology and provide appropriate treatment. Case Report We present a 64-year-old male with an unusual movement in the arm contralateral to his ischemic stroke. The primary feature of the movement was an involuntary elevation of the arm, occurring only when he was walking. Discussion The differential diagnosis includes dystonia, spontaneous arm levitation, synkinesis, and spasticity. We discuss each of these diagnostic possibilities in detail. PMID:26682091

  7. Transcranial direct current stimulation improves neurorehabilitation of task-specific dystonia: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rosset-Llobet, Jaume; Fàbregas-Molas, Sílvia; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-03-01

    Sensory-motor returning (SMR) can help the symptoms of task-specific focal hand dystonia. However, effects vary across patients and take many sessions. Here, we present proof of principle evidence that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can enhance these effects. We compared the effects of a combined tDCS-SMR protocol (n=4 patients) with the efficacy of SMR alone (n=30 patients). All 4 patients treated with the combined protocol showed greater improvement than those undergoing SMR alone. Results encourage a larger, parallel-group clinical trial with sham tDCS control. PMID:24647456

  8. Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation for Treatment of Focal Hand Dystonia: Update and Future Direction

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Joo; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Focal hand dystonia (FHD) is characterized by excessive and unwanted muscle activation in both the hand and arm resulting in impaired performance in particular tasks. Understanding the pathophysiology of FHD has progressed significantly for several decades and this has led to consideration of other potential therapies such as non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS). A number of studies have been conducted to develop new therapy for FHD using transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. In this paper, we review previous studies and describe the potential therapeutic use of NIBS for FHD. We also discuss the future direction of NIBS to treat FHD. PMID:27240806

  9. Speech-activated Myoclonus Mimicking Stuttering in a Patient with Myoclonus–Dystonia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, David A.; Hedera, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Acquired neurogenic stuttering has been considered a fairly uncommon clinical occurrence; speech-activated myoclonus is a rare entity that can mimic stuttering and is caused by a wide array of etiologies. Case Report Here we report a patient with myoclonus–dystonia syndrome (MDS), due to an identified disease-causing mutation, who displayed speech-activated myoclonus mimicking stuttering. Discussion In MDS, myoclonus has only infrequently been reported to affect speech. This case further expands the spectrum of conditions causing the rare clinical phenomenon of speech-activated myoclonus. PMID:27441098

  10. Evidence of TAF1 dysfunction in peripheral models of X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Aloysius; Amar, David; Grütz, Karen; Lee, Lillian V; Rosales, Raymond; Brüggemann, Norbert; Jamora, Roland Dominic; Cutiongco-Dela Paz, Eva; Rolfs, Arndt; Dressler, Dirk; Walter, Uwe; Krainc, Dimitri; Lohmann, Katja; Shamir, Ron; Klein, Christine; Westenberger, Ana

    2016-08-01

    The molecular dysfunction in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism is not completely understood. Thus far, only noncoding alterations have been found in genetic analyses, located in or nearby the TATA-box binding protein-associated factor 1 (TAF1) gene. Given that this gene is ubiquitously expressed and is a critical component of the cellular transcription machinery, we sought to study differential gene expression in peripheral models by performing microarray-based expression profiling in blood and fibroblasts, and comparing gene expression in affected individuals vs. ethnically matched controls. Validation was performed via quantitative polymerase chain reaction in discovery and independent replication sets. We observed consistent downregulation of common TAF1 transcripts in samples from affected individuals in gene-level and high-throughput experiments. This signal was accompanied by a downstream effect in the microarray, reflected by the dysregulation of 307 genes in the disease group. Gene Ontology and network analyses revealed enrichment of genes involved in RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription, a pathway relevant to TAF1 function. Thus, the results converge on TAF1 dysfunction in peripheral models of X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism, and provide evidence of altered expression of a canonical gene in this disease. Furthermore, our study illustrates a link between the previously described genetic alterations and TAF1 dysfunction at the transcriptome level. PMID:26879577

  11. Dystonia gene in Ashkenazi Jewish population is located on chromosome 9q32-34.

    PubMed

    Kramer, P L; de Leon, D; Ozelius, L; Risch, N; Bressman, S B; Brin, M F; Schuback, D E; Burke, R E; Kwiatkowski, D J; Shale, H

    1990-02-01

    Idiopathic torsion dystonia (ITD) is a neurological disorder characterized by sustained muscle contractions that appear as twisting movements of the limbs, trunk, and/or neck, which can progress to abnormal postures. Most familial forms of ITD follow autosomal dominant transmission with reduced penetrance. The frequency of ITD in the Ashkenazi Jewish population is five to ten times greater than that in other groups. Recently, a gene for ITD (DYT1) in a non-Jewish kindred was located on chromosome 9q32-34, with tight linkage to the gene encoding gelsolin (GSN). In the present study linkage analysis using DNA polymorphisms is used to locate a gene responsible for susceptibility to ITD in 12 Ashkenazi Jewish families. This dystonia gene exhibits close linkage with the gene encoding argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS), and appears by multipoint analysis to lie in the q32-34 region of chromosome 9, a region that also contains the loci for gelsolin and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase. The same gene may be responsible for ITD both in the non-Jewish kindred mentioned above and in the Ashkenazi Jewish families presented here. However, because there is substantial difference between the penetrance of the dominant allele in these two groups, two different mutations may be operating to produce susceptibility to this disease in the two groups. PMID:2317008

  12. CACNA1B mutation is linked to unique myoclonus-dystonia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Groen, Justus L.; Andrade, Arturo; Ritz, Katja; Jalalzadeh, Hamid; Haagmans, Martin; Bradley, Ted E.J.; Jongejan, Aldo; Verbeek, Dineke S.; Nürnberg, Peter; Denome, Sylvia; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Lipscombe, Diane; Baas, Frank; Tijssen, Marina A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Using exome sequencing and linkage analysis in a three-generation family with a unique dominant myoclonus-dystonia-like syndrome with cardiac arrhythmias, we identified a mutation in the CACNA1B gene, coding for neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels CaV2.2. This mutation (c.4166G>A;p.Arg1389His) is a disruptive missense mutation in the outer region of the ion pore. The functional consequences of the identified mutation were studied using whole-cell and single-channel patch recordings. High-resolution analyses at the single-channel level showed that, when open, R1389H CaV2.2 channels carried less current compared with WT channels. Other biophysical channel properties were unaltered in R1389H channels including ion selectivity, voltage-dependent activation or voltage-dependent inactivation. CaV2.2 channels regulate transmitter release at inhibitory and excitatory synapses. Functional changes could be consistent with a gain-of-function causing the observed hyperexcitability characteristic of this unique myoclonus-dystonia-like syndrome associated with cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:25296916

  13. What we can learn about hereditary dystonia from HSDI of the glottis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Mette; Eeg, Martin

    2012-02-01

    This study examined efficacy of the innate immune defence via the mannose binding lectin (MBL) in a cohort of 55 dystonic patients prospectively referred to the clinic with laryngeal mucosal complaints, who were placed on local steroids (budesonid inhaler, 400 μg 2 times daily) and antihistamines (fexofenadin 180 mg mostly 3 times daily) with adjuvant lifestyle corrections. Treatment efficacy of the larynx was assessed based on mucosal findings of the vocal folds examined with High speed mucosa studies comprising simultaneous high speed digital imagines (HSDI), kymography, electroglottography (EGG) and voice acoustics combined with a visual score of arytenoids oedema, as these measures are indicative of the magnitude of laryngitis. Lactose and gluten intolerance and immunological analyses of the innate system were made systematically. Results showed that the genetic aspects of immunology did not reveal a role for the innate immune system, represented by the mannose binding lectin (MBL). An unexpected positive effect of the larynx treatment on dystonia symptoms was found evidenced by reduction of dystonic complaints and more normative results of High speed mucosa, and a reduction of oedema of the inter arytenoids region. Symptoms relieve and better quality of life was observed on follow up for the dystonia complaints.

  14. Changes in the Relationship Between Movement Velocity and Movement Distance in Primary Focal Hand Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Prodoehl, Janey; Corcos, Daniel M.; Leurgans, Sue; Comella, Cynthia L.; Weis-McNulty, Annette; MacKinnon, Colum D.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship between movement velocity and distance and the associated muscle activation patterns in 18 individuals with focal hand dystonia (FHD) compared with a control group of 18 individuals with no known neuromuscular condition. Participants performed targeted voluntary wrist and elbow flexion movements as fast as possible across 5 movement distances. Individuals with FHD were slower than controls across all distances, and this difference was accentuated for longer movements. Muscle activation patterns were triphasic in the majority of individuals with FHD, and muscle activation scaled with distance in a similar manner to controls. Cocontraction did not explain movement slowing in individuals with dystonia, but there was a trend toward underactivation of the 1st agonist burst in the dystonic group. The authors concluded that slowness is a consistent feature of voluntary movement in FHD and is present even in the absence of dystonic posturing. Underactivation of the 1st agonist burst appears to be the most likely reason to explain slowing. PMID:18628107

  15. Combined Anterior and Posterior Lumbar Rhizotomy for Treatment of Mixed Dystonia and Spasticity in Children With Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Nada, Mohamed; Mahran, Mahmoud A.; Aboud, Ahmed; Mahran, Moustafa G.; Nasef, Marwa A.A.; Gaber, Mohamed; Sabry, Tamer; Ibrahim, Mohamed H.; Taha, Mohamed H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with cerebral palsy (CP) can present with severe secondary dystonia with or without associated spasticity of their extremities. OBJECTIVE: To assess the outcomes of combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomy for the treatment of mixed hypertonia in the lower extremities of children with CP. METHODS: Fifty children with CP were subjected to combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomies in a prospective study. Clinical outcome measurements were recorded preoperatively and were evaluated at 2, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The operative techniques were performed by laminotomy from L1-S1, and intraoperative monitoring was used in all cases. All patients underwent intensive postoperative physiotherapy programs. RESULTS: Changes in muscle tone, joint range of motion, and dystonia were significant (P = .000) at postoperative assessment visits. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated the potential of combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomies to improve activities of daily living in children with CP and with mixed spasticity and dystonia. ABBREVIATIONS: BAD, Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale CAPR, combined anterior and posterior lumbar rhizotomy CP, cerebral palsy ITB, intrathecal baclofen MAS, modified Ashworth Scale ROM, range of motion SDR, selective dorsal rhizotomy PMID:27244465

  16. Subtle Microstructural Defects of the Cerebellum in a Knock-in Mouse Model of DYT1 Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chang-Hyun; Bernhard, Doug; Hess, Ellen J.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    The dystonias are a group of disorders characterized by involuntary twisting and repetitive movements. DYT1 dystonia is an inherited form of dystonia caused by a mutation in the TOR1A gene, which encodes torsinA. TorsinA is expressed in many regions of the nervous system, and the regions responsible for causing dystonic movements remain uncertain. Most prior studies have focused on the basal ganglia, although there is emerging evidence for abnormalities in the cerebellum too. In the current studies, we examined the cerebellum for structural abnormalities in a knock-in mouse model of DYT1 dystonia. The gross appearance of the cerebellum appeared normal in the mutant mice, but stereological measures revealed the cerebellum to be 5% larger in mutant compared to control mice. There were no changes in the numbers of Purkinje cells, granule cells, or neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei. However, Golgi histochemical studies revealed Purkinje cells to have thinner dendrites, and fewer and less complex dendritic spines. There also was a higher frequency of heterotopic Purkinje cells displaced into the molecular layer. These results reveal subtle structural abnormalities of the cerebellum that are similar to those reported for the basal ganglia in the DYT1 knock-in mouse model. PMID:24121114

  17. Heterogeneity in primary dystonia: lessons from THAP1, GNAL and TOR1A in Amish-Mennonites

    PubMed Central

    Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Fuchs, Tania; San Luciano, Marta; Raymond, Deborah; Brashear, Alison; Ortega, Robert; Deik, Andres; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Bressman, Susan B.

    2014-01-01

    Background A founder mutation in the THAP1 gene causing primary dystonia was originally described in the Amish-Mennonites. However there may be both genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity of dystonia in this population that may also inform studies in other ethnic groups. Methods Genotyping for THAP1, and GNAL mutations and genotype-phenotype comparisons were performed for 76 individuals of Amish-Mennonites heritage with primary dystonia. Results 27 had mutations in THAP1—most with the founder indel mutation, but two had different THAP1 mutations; 8 had mutations in GNAL; and 1 had a de novo GAG deletion in TOR1A. In the primary analysis comparing THAP1 carriers to all non-THAP1, non-GNAL, non-TOR1A individuals, age at onset was lower in THAP1 carriers (15.46±9.20, range 5–38 vs. 39.18±17.65, range 1–70, p<0.001), carriers were more likely to have onset of dystonia in an arm (44.4% vs. 15%, p=0.02), and to have arm (88.9% vs. 22.5%, p<0.01), leg (51.9% vs. 10% p=0.01), and jaw/tongue (33.3% vs. 7.5%, p=0.02) involvement at final examination. Carriers were less likely to have dystonia restricted to a single site (11.11% in carriers vs. 65.85% (p<0.01)), and less likely to have dystonia onset in cervical regions (25.9% THAP1 vs. 52.5% in non-carriers, p=0.04). Conclusions Primary dystonia in the Amish-Mennonites is genetically diverse, and includes not only the THAP1 indel founder mutation but also different mutations in THAP1 and GNAL as well as the TOR1A GAG deletion. Phenotype, particularly age at onset combined with final distribution, may be highly specific for the genetic etiology. PMID:24500857

  18. Combined cognitive–behavioural and mindfulness programme for people living with dystonia: a proof-of-concept study

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, H; Bernstein, C J; Davies, G; Tang, N K Y; Belhag, M; Tingle, A; Field, M; Foss, J; Lindahl, A; Underwood, M; Ellard, D R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To design and test the delivery of an intervention targeting the non-motor symptoms of dystonia and pilot key health and well-being questionnaires in this population. Design A proof-of-concept study to test the delivery, acceptability, relevance, structure and content for a 3-day group residential programme for the management of dystonia. Setting Participants were recruited from a single botulinum toxin clinic. The intervention was delivered in the community. Participants 14 participants consented to take part (2 withdrew prior to the starting of intervention). The average age was 60 years (range 44–77), 8 of whom were female. After drop-out, 9 participants completed the 3-day programme. Intervention A 3-day group residential programme. Primary and secondary outcome measures Process evaluation and interviews were carried out before and after the intervention to explore participant's views and expectations, as well as experiences of the intervention. Select questionnaires were completed at baseline, 1-month and 3-month follow-up. Results Although participants were not sure what to expect from the programme, they found it informative and for many this together with being in a group with other people with dystonia legitimised their condition. Mindfulness was accepted and adopted as a coping strategy. This was reflected in the 1-month follow-up. Conclusions We successfully delivered a 3-day residential programme to help those living with dystonia manage their condition. Further improvements are suggested. The quantitative outcome measures were acceptable to this group of patients with dystonia. PMID:27496234

  19. Increased long-latency reflex activity as a sufficient explanation for childhood hypertonic dystonia: a neuromorphic emulation study

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Won J.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder that interferes with daily movements and can have a devastating effect on quality of life for children and their families. Although injury to basal ganglia is associated with dystonia, the neurophysiological mechanisms leading to the clinical manifestations of dystonia are not understood. Previous work suggested that long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is hyperactive in children with hypertonia due to secondary dystonia. We hypothesize that abnormal activity in motor cortices may cause an increase in the long-latency stretch reflex leading to hypertonia. Approach We modelled two possibilities of hyperactive LLSR by either creating a tonic involuntary drive to cortex, or increasing the synaptic gain in cortical neurons. Both models are emulated using programmable Very-Large-Scale-Integrated-circuit (VLSI) hardware to test their sufficiency for producing dystonic symptoms. The emulation includes a joint with two Hill-type muscles, realistic muscle spindles, and 2,304 Izhikevich-type spiking neurons. The muscles are regulated by a monosynaptic spinal pathway with 32ms delay and a long-latency pathway with 64ms loop-delay representing transcortical/supra-spinal connections. Main results When the limb is passively stretched, both models produce involuntary resistance with increased antagonist EMG responses similar to human data; also the muscle relaxation is delayed similar to human data. Both models predict reduced range of motion in voluntary movements. Significance Although our model is a highly simplified and limited representation of reflex pathways, it shows that increased activity of the long-latency stretch reflex is by itself sufficient to cause many of the features of hypertonic dystonia. PMID:25946372

  20. Increased long-latency reflex activity as a sufficient explanation for childhood hypertonic dystonia: a neuromorphic emulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Won J.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2015-06-01

    Objective. Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder that interferes with daily movements and can have a devastating effect on quality of life for children and their families. Although injury to basal ganglia is associated with dystonia, the neurophysiological mechanisms leading to the clinical manifestations of dystonia are not understood. Previous work suggested that long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is hyperactive in children with hypertonia due to secondary dystonia. We hypothesize that abnormal activity in motor cortices may cause an increase in the LLSR leading to hypertonia. Approach. We modeled two possibilities of hyperactive LLSR by either creating a tonic involuntary drive to cortex, or increasing the synaptic gain in cortical neurons. Both models are emulated using programmable very-large-scale-integrated-circuit hardware to test their sufficiency for producing dystonic symptoms. The emulation includes a joint with two Hill-type muscles, realistic muscle spindles, and 2,304 Izhikevich-type spiking neurons. The muscles are regulated by a monosynaptic spinal pathway with 32 ms delay and a long-latency pathway with 64 ms loop-delay representing transcortical/supra-spinal connections. Main results. When the limb is passively stretched, both models produce involuntary resistance with increased antagonist EMG responses similar to human data; also the muscle relaxation is delayed similar to human data. Both models predict reduced range of motion in voluntary movements. Significance. Although our model is a highly simplified and limited representation of reflex pathways, it shows that increased activity of the LLSR is by itself sufficient to cause many of the features of hypertonic dystonia.

  1. Imaging the pre- and postsynaptic side of striatal dopaminergic synapses in idiopathic cervical dystonia: a SPECT study using [123I] epidepride and [123I] beta-CIT.

    PubMed

    Naumann, M; Pirker, W; Reiners, K; Lange, K W; Becker, G; Brücke, T

    1998-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that a dysfunction of the dopaminergic system may be involved in the pathogenesis of idiopathic dystonia. To visualize possible alterations of the pre- and postsynaptic side of striatal dopaminergic synapses, SPECT studies using the radiotracers [123I] epidepride and [123I] beta-CIT were performed in 10 patients with idiopathic cervical dystonia. Eleven age- and sex-matched subjects served as controls. [123I] Epidepride is a new highly affine marker of D2 receptors, and [123I] beta-CIT binds to dopamine transporters on dopaminergic nerve endings. [123I] Epidepride binding was significantly reduced in both striata of dystonia patients compared with controls (p < 0.05). In contrast, striatal [123I beta-CIT uptake did not differ from controls. We conclude that dopaminergic dysfunction in idiopathic focal dystonia mainly involves postsynaptic mechanisms and suggest a disturbance of the indirect pathway of the motor circuit resulting in a disinhibited thalamocortical stimulation. PMID:9539347

  2. "ATP1A3" Mutations in Infants: A New Rapid-Onset Dystonia-Parkinsonism Phenotype Characterized by Motor Delay and Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brashear, Allison; Mink, Jonathan W.; Hill, Deborah F.; Boggs, Niki; McCall, W. Vaughn; Stacy, Mark A.; Snively, Beverly; Light, Laney S.; Sweadner, Kathleen J.; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Morrison, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    We report new clinical features of delayed motor development, hypotonia, and ataxia in two young children with mutations (R756H and D923N) in the "ATP1A3" gene. In adults, mutations in "ATP1A3" cause rapid-onset dystonia-Parkinsonism (RDP, DYT12) with abrupt onset of fixed dystonia. The parents and children were examined and videotaped, and…

  3. DYT6 dystonia: review of the literature and creation of the UMD Locus-Specific Database (LSDB) for mutations in the THAP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Arnaud; Ea, Vuthy; Roubertie, Agathe; Martin, Mélanie; Coquart, Coline; Claustres, Mireille; Béroud, Christophe; Collod-Béroud, Gwenaëlle

    2011-11-01

    By family-based screening, first Fuchs and then many other authors showed that mutations in THAP1 (THAP [thanatos-associated protein] domain-containing, apoptosis-associated protein 1) account for a substantial proportion of familial, early-onset, nonfocal, primary dystonia cases (DYT6 dystonia). THAP1 is the first transcriptional factor involved in primary dystonia and the hypothesis of a transcriptional deregulation, which was primarily proposed for the X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (DYT3 dystonia), provided thus a new way to investigate the possible mechanism underlying the development of dystonic movements. Currently, 56 families present with a THAP1 mutation; however, no genotype/phenotype relationship has been found. Therefore, we carried out a systematic review of the literature on the THAP1 gene to colligate all reported patients with a specific THAP1 mutation and the associated clinical signs in order to describe the broad phenotypic continuum of this disorder. To facilitate the comparison of the identified mutations, we created a Locus-Specific Database (UMD-THAP1 LSDB) available at http://www.umd.be/THAP1/. Currently, the database lists 56 probands and 43 relatives with the associated clinical phenotype when available. The identification of a larger number of THAP1 mutations and collection of high-quality clinical information for each described mutation through international collaborative effort will help investigating the structure-function and genotype-phenotype correlations in DYT6 dystonia. PMID:21793105

  4. Mandibular angle and coronoid process fracture secondary to orofacial dystonia: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sujata; Gulati, Ujjwal

    2013-11-01

    As the angle is a weak region in the continuity of mandible, so it is more prone to fracture. It has been proven time and again that coronoid fracture results from a strong sudden contraction of temporalis. Muscular forces influence the remodeling of bones. Orofacial dystonia is a centrally mediated disease in which there is an uncontrolled spasmodic contraction of facial and masticatory muscles. This continuous force applied over a long period of time has the potential to unfavorably remodel or weaken bone. A case is presented in which the dystonic action of facial musculature gradually resorbed the bone to such an extent that there was spontaneous fracture at the right angle of mandible as well as the contra lateral coronoid. Management of this fracture posed a challenge at every step eventually leading to resection of the ramus-condyle unit. No case has been reported so far in the literature where dystonic movements have resulted in fracture of the mandible. PMID:24946659

  5. Ataxia with Parkinsonism and dystonia after intentional inhalation of liquefied petroleum gas

    PubMed Central

    Godani, Massimiliano; Canavese, Francesca; Migliorini, Sonia; Sette, Massimo Del

    2015-01-01

    The practice of inhaling liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) to commit suicide is uncommon and almost exclusively a prerogative of the prison population. Numerous cases of sudden deaths caused by intentional propane and/or butane inhalation have been described, but these cases survived and a description of the consequences is very rare. We describe a prisoner who survived after voluntary inhalation of LPG, and who developed ataxia, Parkinsonism, and dystonia. Brain MRI showed bilateral hyperintensity in the basal ganglia and in the cerebellar hemispheres. The clinical evolution and the MRI abnormalities are similar to those described in cases of poisoning by CO where the mechanism of brain injury is related to histotoxic hypoxia. We believe that LPG, considered until now a mixture of gas with low neurotoxic power, may have caused direct toxic damage to the brain, mediated by a mechanism of hypoxia, such as in CO intoxication. PMID:26005350

  6. Microcephaly-dystonia due to mutated PLEKHG2 with impaired actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Edvardson, Simon; Wang, Haibo; Dor, Talya; Atawneh, Osamah; Yaacov, Barak; Gartner, Jutta; Cinnamon, Yuval; Chen, Songhai; Elpeleg, Orly

    2016-01-01

    Rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton is controlled by RhoGTPases which are activated by RhoGEFs. We identified homozygosity for Arg204Trp mutation in the Rho guanidine exchange factor (RhoGEF) PLEKHG2 gene in five patients with profound mental retardation, dystonia, postnatal microcephaly, and distinct neuroimaging pattern. The activity of the mutant PLEKHG2 was significantly decreased, both in basal state and when Gβγ- or lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-stimulated. SDF1a-stimulated actin polymerization was significantly impaired in patient cells, and this abnormality was duplicated in control cells when PLEKHG2 expression was downregulated. These results underscore the role of PLEKHG2 in actin polymerization and delineate the clinical and radiological findings in PLEKHG2 deficiency. PMID:26573021

  7. Palliative Sedation and What Constitutes Active Dying: A Case of Severe Progressive Dystonia and Intractable Pain.

    PubMed

    Strand, Jacob J; Feely, Molly A; Kramer, Neha M; Moeschler, Susan M; Swetz, Keith M

    2016-05-01

    We present the case of a 34-year-old woman with Klippel-Feil syndrome who developed progressive generalized dystonia of unclear etiology, resulting in intractable pain despite aggressive medical and surgical interventions. Ultimately, palliative sedation was required to relieve suffering. Herein, we describe ethical considerations including defining sedation, determining prognosis in the setting of an undefined neurodegenerative condition, and use of treatments that concurrently might prolong or alter end-of-life trajectory. We highlight pertinent literature and how it may be applied in challenging and unique clinical situations. Finally, we discuss the need for expert multidisciplinary involvement when implementing palliative sedation and illustrate that procedures and rules need to be interpreted to deliver optimal patient-centered plan of care. PMID:25487783

  8. Ataxia with Parkinsonism and dystonia after intentional inhalation of liquefied petroleum gas.

    PubMed

    Godani, Massimiliano; Canavese, Francesca; Migliorini, Sonia; Sette, Massimo Del

    2015-01-01

    The practice of inhaling liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) to commit suicide is uncommon and almost exclusively a prerogative of the prison population. Numerous cases of sudden deaths caused by intentional propane and/or butane inhalation have been described, but these cases survived and a description of the consequences is very rare. We describe a prisoner who survived after voluntary inhalation of LPG, and who developed ataxia, Parkinsonism, and dystonia. Brain MRI showed bilateral hyperintensity in the basal ganglia and in the cerebellar hemispheres. The clinical evolution and the MRI abnormalities are similar to those described in cases of poisoning by CO where the mechanism of brain injury is related to histotoxic hypoxia. We believe that LPG, considered until now a mixture of gas with low neurotoxic power, may have caused direct toxic damage to the brain, mediated by a mechanism of hypoxia, such as in CO intoxication. PMID:26005350

  9. Delayed cerebritis after bilateral stereotactic implantation of globus pallidus interna electrodes for treatment of dystonia.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Pawel P; Lessig, Stephanie; Nguyen, Andrew D; Barba, David

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is being used to treat an increasing number of movement and psychiatric disorders. However, the risk of infection remains as a problem that can hinder the usefulness of this technology. We report a case of a patient with dystonia who underwent bilateral globus pallidus interna electrode and impulse generator (IPG) placement, developed an infection of his IPG, and later cerebritis. The patient was initially treated with antibiotics and partial hardware removal. Follow-up cranial imaging showed an area concerning for cerebritis around one of the intracranial electrodes. The patient was then treated with complete hardware removal followed by a course of intravenous antibiotics. Four-month follow-up imaging showed resolution of the infection. This case demonstrates the importance of following cranial imaging in DBS patients with delayed infection, continued vigilance for infection in implanted patients and that partial hardware removal may not be successful in the setting of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infections. PMID:23378545

  10. A Rare Cervical Dystonia Mimic in Adults: Congenital Muscular Torticollis (Fibromatosis colli), a Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Uluer, Mehmet C.; Bojovic, Branko

    2016-01-01

    Neglected or undiagnosed congenital muscular torticollis in adults is quite rare, although it is the third most common congenital deformity in the newborn (1). When left untreated at an early age, deficits in lateral and rotational range of motion can occur along with irreversible facial and skeletal deformities that develop over time. Subtle cases can go unnoticed until early adulthood, with predominant fibrotic replacement in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) making physical therapy and chemodenervation mostly ineffective. Surgical intervention, in these cases, can prove effective in alleviating pain, improving function and cosmesis (2). We report an update on a previously reported case, misdiagnosed as cervical dystonia, which had undergone partial myectomy of the anterior belly of the SCM with some relief of symptoms but without total resolution after the correct diagnosis of fibromatosis colli (3). PMID:26869987

  11. A Rare Cervical Dystonia Mimic in Adults: Congenital Muscular Torticollis (Fibromatosis colli), a Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Uluer, Mehmet C; Bojovic, Branko

    2016-01-01

    Neglected or undiagnosed congenital muscular torticollis in adults is quite rare, although it is the third most common congenital deformity in the newborn (1). When left untreated at an early age, deficits in lateral and rotational range of motion can occur along with irreversible facial and skeletal deformities that develop over time. Subtle cases can go unnoticed until early adulthood, with predominant fibrotic replacement in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) making physical therapy and chemodenervation mostly ineffective. Surgical intervention, in these cases, can prove effective in alleviating pain, improving function and cosmesis (2). We report an update on a previously reported case, misdiagnosed as cervical dystonia, which had undergone partial myectomy of the anterior belly of the SCM with some relief of symptoms but without total resolution after the correct diagnosis of fibromatosis colli (3). PMID:26869987

  12. [Psychogenic factors participating in the development of vegetovascular dystonia of the hypertensive type in children].

    PubMed

    Isaev, D N; Efremov, K D

    1983-01-01

    Sixty patients with a prehypertonic condition (aged 7 to 13 years) were studied to assess their clinical-psychological characteristics as well as microsocial psychogenic factors involved. It was established that in 80% of the families studied, despite their apparent "normality and respectability", there were some adverse familial relations which exerted both pathoplastic and pathogenetic influence on the formation of vegetative-vascular dystonia of a hypertonic type. The degree and the range of attending psychosomatic disturbances depend on the severity of the conflict and on the nature (acute or chronic) of a psychotrauma as well as on the child's awareness of the problem. It is important that the elicited characteristics of the concrete mechanisms of the development of psychic traumas should be considered in devising psychotherapeutic method of the prophylaxis and treatment of these patients. PMID:6659792

  13. Dystonia in an Adolescent on Risperidone Following the Discontinuation of Methylphenidate: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Gulen; Yildirim, Veli; Kutuk, Meryem Ozlem; Toros, Fevziye

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with common comorbidities that include oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, anxiety disorder, and affective disorders. Because of these comorbidities, drug combination treatments and drug-drug interactions are becoming increasingly more frequent. The present case report describes an acute dystonic reaction following the abrupt discontinuation of methylphenidate from a drug regimen with risperidone. The patient experienced acute dystonic reactions on three separate occasions when he forgot to take his methylphenidate medication. The present report informs clinicians about the possible side effects, such as dystonia, when psychostimulant and antipsychotic drug combinations are altered and suggests that the abrupt cessation of stimulants may lead to the development of movement disorders. Therefore, appropriate care is necessary when changing the dose of a drug or abruptly discontinuing a drug from a combination of psychostimulants and antipsychotics. PMID:25912546

  14. Impairment of bidirectional synaptic plasticity in the striatum of a mouse model of DYT1 dystonia: role of endogenous acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Martella, Giuseppina; Tassone, Annalisa; Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Platania, Paola; Cuomo, Dario; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Bonsi, Paola; Cacci, Emanuele; Biagioni, Stefano; Usiello, Alessandro; Bernardi, Giorgio; Sharma, Nutan

    2009-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia is a severe form of inherited dystonia, characterized by involuntary twisting movements and abnormal postures. It is linked to a deletion in the dyt1 gene, resulting in a mutated form of the protein torsinA. The penetrance for dystonia is incomplete, but both clinically affected and non-manifesting carriers of the DYT1 mutation exhibit impaired motor learning and evidence of altered motor plasticity. Here, we characterized striatal glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in transgenic mice expressing either the normal human torsinA or its mutant form, in comparison to non-transgenic (NT) control mice. Medium spiny neurons recorded from both NT and normal human torsinA mice exhibited normal long-term depression (LTD), whereas in mutant human torsinA littermates LTD could not be elicited. In addition, although long-term potentiation (LTP) could be induced in all the mice, it was greater in magnitude in mutant human torsinA mice. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) can revert potentiated synapses to resting levels, a phenomenon termed synaptic depotentiation. LFS induced synaptic depotentiation (SD) both in NT and normal human torsinA mice, but not in mutant human torsinA mice. Since anti-cholinergic drugs are an effective medical therapeutic option for the treatment of human dystonia, we reasoned that an excess in endogenous acetylcholine could underlie the synaptic plasticity impairment. Indeed, both LTD and SD were rescued in mutant human torsinA mice either by lowering endogenous acetylcholine levels or by antagonizing muscarinic M1 receptors. The presence of an enhanced acetylcholine tone was confirmed by the observation that acetylcholinesterase activity was significantly increased in the striatum of mutant human torsinA mice, as compared with both normal human torsinA and NT littermates. Moreover, we found similar alterations of synaptic plasticity in muscarinic M2/M4 receptor knockout mice, in which an increased striatal acetylcholine level has been

  15. Impairment of bidirectional synaptic plasticity in the striatum of a mouse model of DYT1 dystonia: role of endogenous acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Martella, Giuseppina; Tassone, Annalisa; Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Platania, Paola; Cuomo, Dario; Viscomi, Maria Teresa; Bonsi, Paola; Cacci, Emanuele; Biagioni, Stefano; Usiello, Alessandro; Bernardi, Giorgio; Sharma, Nutan; Standaert, David G; Pisani, Antonio

    2009-09-01

    DYT1 dystonia is a severe form of inherited dystonia, characterized by involuntary twisting movements and abnormal postures. It is linked to a deletion in the dyt1 gene, resulting in a mutated form of the protein torsinA. The penetrance for dystonia is incomplete, but both clinically affected and non-manifesting carriers of the DYT1 mutation exhibit impaired motor learning and evidence of altered motor plasticity. Here, we characterized striatal glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in transgenic mice expressing either the normal human torsinA or its mutant form, in comparison to non-transgenic (NT) control mice. Medium spiny neurons recorded from both NT and normal human torsinA mice exhibited normal long-term depression (LTD), whereas in mutant human torsinA littermates LTD could not be elicited. In addition, although long-term potentiation (LTP) could be induced in all the mice, it was greater in magnitude in mutant human torsinA mice. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) can revert potentiated synapses to resting levels, a phenomenon termed synaptic depotentiation. LFS induced synaptic depotentiation (SD) both in NT and normal human torsinA mice, but not in mutant human torsinA mice. Since anti-cholinergic drugs are an effective medical therapeutic option for the treatment of human dystonia, we reasoned that an excess in endogenous acetylcholine could underlie the synaptic plasticity impairment. Indeed, both LTD and SD were rescued in mutant human torsinA mice either by lowering endogenous acetylcholine levels or by antagonizing muscarinic M1 receptors. The presence of an enhanced acetylcholine tone was confirmed by the observation that acetylcholinesterase activity was significantly increased in the striatum of mutant human torsinA mice, as compared with both normal human torsinA and NT littermates. Moreover, we found similar alterations of synaptic plasticity in muscarinic M2/M4 receptor knockout mice, in which an increased striatal acetylcholine level has been

  16. Chemical enhancement of torsinA function in cell and animal models of torsion dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Songsong; Hewett, Jeffrey W.; Yokoi, Fumiaki; Lu, Jun; Buckley, Amber Clark; Burdette, Alexander J.; Chen, Pan; Nery, Flavia C.; Li, Yuqing; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Caldwell, Guy A.; Caldwell, Kim A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Movement disorders represent a significant societal burden for which therapeutic options are limited and focused on treating disease symptomality. Early-onset torsion dystonia (EOTD) is one such disorder characterized by sustained and involuntary muscle contractions that frequently cause repetitive movements or abnormal postures. Transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner with reduced penetrance, EOTD is caused in most cases by the deletion of a glutamic acid (ΔE) in the DYT1 (also known as TOR1A) gene product, torsinA. Although some patients respond well to anticholingerics, therapy is primarily limited to either neurosurgery or chemodenervation. As mutant torsinA (ΔE) expression results in decreased torsinA function, therapeutic strategies directed toward enhancement of wild-type (WT) torsinA activity in patients who are heterozygous for mutant DYT1 may restore normal cellular functionality. Here, we report results from the first-ever screen for candidate small molecule therapeutics for EOTD, using multiple activity-based readouts for torsinA function in Caenorhabditis elegans, subsequent validation in human DYT1 patient fibroblasts, and behavioral rescue in a mouse model of DYT1 dystonia. We exploited the nematode to rapidly discern chemical effectors of torsinA and identified two classes of antibiotics, quinolones and aminopenicillins, which enhance WT torsinA activity in two separate in vivo assays. Representative molecules were assayed in EOTD patient fibroblasts for improvements in torsinA-dependent secretory function, which was improved significantly by ampicillin. Furthermore, a behavioral defect associated with an EOTD mouse knock-in model was also rescued following administration of ampicillin. These combined data indicate that specific small molecules that enhance torsinA activity represent a promising new approach toward therapeutic development for EOTD, and potentially for other diseases involving the processing of mutant proteins. PMID

  17. Alteration of Striatal Dopaminergic Neurotransmission in a Mouse Model of DYT11 Myoclonus-Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Yokoi, Fumiaki; Parsons, Dee S.; Standaert, David G.; Li, Yuqing

    2012-01-01

    Background DYT11 myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) syndrome is a neurological movement disorder characterized by myoclonic jerks and dystonic postures or movement that can be alleviated by alcohol. It is caused by mutations in SGCE encoding ε-sarcoglycan (ε-SG); the mouse homolog of this gene is Sgce. Paternally-inherited Sgce heterozygous knockout (Sgce KO) mice exhibit myoclonus, motor impairment and anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, modeling several clinical symptoms observed in DYT11 M-D patients. The behavioral deficits are accompanied by abnormally high levels of dopamine and its metabolites in the striatum of Sgce KO mice. Neuroimaging studies of DYT11 M-D patients show reduced dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) availability, although the possibility of increased endogenous dopamine, and consequently, competitive D2R occupancy cannot be ruled out. Methodology/Principal Findings The protein levels of striatal D2R, dopamine transporter (DAT), and dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) in Sgce KO mice were analyzed by Western blot. The striatal dopamine release after amphetamine injection in Sgce KO mice were analyzed by microdialysis in vivo. The striatal D2R was significantly decreased in Sgce KO mice without altering DAT and D1R. Sgce KO mice also exhibited a significant increase of dopamine release after amphetamine injection in comparison to wild-type (WT) littermates. Conclusion/Significance The results suggest ε-SG may have a role in the regulation of D2R expression. The loss of ε-SG results in decreased striatal D2R, and subsequently leads to increased discharge of dopamine which could contribute to the behavioral impairment observed in DYT11 dystonia patients and in Sgce KO mice. The results suggest that reduction of striatal D2R and enhanced striatal dopamine release may contribute to the pathophysiology of DYT11 M-D patients. PMID:22438980

  18. Cerebellar synaptogenesis is compromised in mouse models of DYT1 dystonia.

    PubMed

    Vanni, Valentina; Puglisi, Francesca; Bonsi, Paola; Ponterio, Giulia; Maltese, Marta; Pisani, Antonio; Mandolesi, Georgia

    2015-09-01

    Early-onset torsion dystonia (DYT1) is an autosomal-dominant movement disorder characterized by sustained muscle contractions and abnormal posturing. It is caused by a three base-pair deletion (ΔGAG) in the gene encoding the AAA(+) protein torsinA, which gives rise to a loss of function mutation responsible of neuronal functional abnormalities. Symptoms typically appear during childhood, suggesting the presence of an early critical period of sensorimotor circuit susceptibility to torsinA dysfunction. Here, we identified in two different DYT1 mouse strains, heterozygous torsinA knockout mice (Tor1a+/-) and human ΔGAG mutant torsinA transgenic mice (hMT), the anatomical abnormalities in the cerebellum, during a critical age for synaptogenesis (postnatal day 14, P14). By means of immunofluorescence, confocal analysis and western blot quantification, we observed a reduced inhibitory input on Purkinje cells (PCs) as well as an unbalanced excitatory innervation; a significant reduction of the parallel fiber (PF) synaptic terminals and an increase of the climbing fiber (CF) inputs. Finally, in support of the in vivo results, we also provide evidence of an impaired PF synaptogenesis in a co-culture system. Of note, these alterations were rescued and in part over-compensated in the adult age in both mouse strains, suggesting that torsinA dysfunction can induce an altered maturation of cerebellar synaptic contacts. Altogether these results indicate that a loss of function of torsinA during cerebellar synaptogenesis induces important developmental alterations, that might contribute to the age-dependent susceptibility to develop dystonia in mutation carriers. PMID:26183317

  19. Diffuse Decreased Gray Matter in Patients with Idiopathic Craniocervical Dystonia: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    PubMed Central

    Piccinin, Camila C.; Piovesana, Luiza G.; Santos, Maria C. A.; Guimarães, Rachel P.; De Campos, Brunno M.; Rezende, Thiago J. R.; Campos, Lidiane S.; Torres, Fabio R.; Amato-Filho, Augusto C.; França, Marcondes C.; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Cendes, Fernando; D’Abreu, Anelyssa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have addressed the role of structures other than the basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of craniocervical dystonia (CCD). Neuroimaging studies have attempted to identify structural abnormalities in CCD but a clear pattern of alteration has not been established. We performed whole-brain evaluation using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to identify patterns of gray matter (GM) changes in CCD. Methods: We compared 27 patients with CCD matched in age and gender to 54 healthy controls. VBM was used to compare GM volumes. We created a two-sample t-test corrected for subjects’ age, and we tested with a level of significance of p < 0.001 and false discovery rate (FDR) correction (p < 0.05). Results: Voxel-based morphometry demonstrated significant reductions of GM using p < 0.001 in the cerebellar vermis IV/V, bilaterally in the superior frontal gyrus, precuneus, anterior cingulate and paracingulate, insular cortex, lingual gyrus, and calcarine fissure; in the left hemisphere in the supplementary motor area, inferior frontal gyrus, inferior parietal gyrus, temporal pole, supramarginal gyrus, rolandic operculum, hippocampus, middle occipital gyrus, cerebellar lobules IV/V, superior, and middle temporal gyri; in the right hemisphere, the middle cingulate and precentral gyrus. Our study did not report any significant result using the FDR correction. We also detected correlations between GM volume and age, disease duration, duration of botulinum toxin treatment, and the Marsden–Fahn dystonia scale scores. Conclusion: We detected large clusters of GM changes chiefly in structures primarily involved in sensorimotor integration, motor planning, visuospatial function, and emotional processing. PMID:25620953

  20. The 'yips' in golf: a continuum between a focal dystonia and choking.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aynsley M; Adler, Charles H; Crews, Debbie; Wharen, Robert E; Laskowski, Edward R; Barnes, Kelly; Valone Bell, Carolyn; Pelz, Dave; Brennan, Ruth D; Smith, Jay; Sorenson, Matthew C; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2003-01-01

    The definition of the 'yips' has evolved over time. It is defined as a motor phenomenon of involuntary movements affecting golfers. In this paper, we have extended the definition to encompass a continuum from the neurologic disorder of dystonia to the psychologic disorder of choking. In many golfers, the pathophysiology of the 'yips' is believed to be an acquired deterioration in the function of motor pathways (e.g. those involving the basal ganglia) which are exacerbated when a threshold of high stress and physiologic arousal is exceeded. In other golfers, the 'yips' seems to result from severe performance anxiety. Physically, the 'yips' is manifested by symptoms of jerks, tremors or freezing in the hands and forearms. These symptoms can result in: (i) a poor quality of golf performance (adds 4.9 strokes per 18 holes); (ii) prompt use of alcohol and beta-blockers; and (iii) contribute to attrition in golf. Golfers with the 'yips' average 75 rounds per year, although many 'yips'-affected golfers decrease their playing time or quit to avoid exposure to this embarrassing problem. While more investigation is needed to determine the cause of the 'yips', this review article summarises and organises the available research. A small study included in this paper describes the 'yips' phenomenon from the subjective experience of 'yips'-affected golfers. The subjective experience (n = 72) provides preliminary support for the hypothesis suggesting that the 'yips' is on a continuum. Based on the subjective definitions of 72 'yips'-affected golfers, the 'yips' was differentiated into type I (dystonia) and type II (choking). A theoretical model provides a guide for future research on golfers with either type I or type II 'yips'. PMID:12477375

  1. Motor cortical hyperexcitability in idiopathic scoliosis: could focal dystonia be a subclinical etiological factor?

    PubMed Central

    Tormos, José María; Barrios, Carlos; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    The aetiology of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) remains unknown; however, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting that the spine deformity could be the expression of a subclinical nervous system disorder. A defective sensory input or an anomalous sensorimotor integration may lead to an abnormal postural tone and therefore the development of a spine deformity. Inhibition of the motor cortico-cortical excitability is abnormal in dystonia. Therefore, the study of cortico-cortical inhibition may shed some insight into the dystonia hypothesis regarding the pathophysiology of IS. Paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to study cortico-cortical inhibition and facilitation in nine adolescents with IS, five teenagers with congenital scoliosis (CS) and eight healthy age-matched controls. The effect of a previous conditioning stimulus (80% intensity of resting motor threshold) on the amplitude of the motor-evoked potential induced by the test stimulus (120% of resting motor threshold) was examined at various interstimulus intervals (ISIs) in both abductor pollicis brevis muscles. The results of healthy adolescents and those with CS showed a marked inhibitory effect of the conditioning stimulus on the response to the test stimulus at interstimulus intervals shorter than 6 ms. These findings do not differ from those reported for normal adults. However, children with IS revealed an abnormally reduced cortico-cortical inhibition at the short ISIs. Cortico-cortical inhibition was practically normal on the side of the scoliotic convexity while it was significantly reduced on the side of the scoliotic concavity. In conclusion, these findings support the hypothesis that a dystonic dysfunction underlies in IS. Asymmetrical cortical hyperexcitability may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IS and represents an objective neurophysiological finding that could be used clinically. PMID:20033462

  2. Negative Dystonia of the Palate: A Novel Entity and Diagnostic Consideration in Hypernasal Speech

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Catherine F.; Simonyan, Kristina; Brin, Mitchell F.; Blitzer, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objective To present the first documented series of patients with negative dystonia (ND) of the palate, including clinical symptoms, functional MRI findings, and management options. Study Design Case series ascertained from clinical research centers that evaluated patients with both hyperkinetic and hypokinetic movement disorders. Methods Between July 1983 and March 2013, data was collected on patient demographics, disease characteristics, functional MRI findings, long-term management options, and outcomes. We sought patients whose clinical examination demonstrated absent palatal movement on speaking, despite normal palatal activity on other activities. Results Five patients (2 males, 3 females) met clinical criteria. All patients presented with hypernasal speech without associated dysphagia. Clinical examination revealed absent palatal movement on speaking despite intact gag reflexes, normal palate elevation on swallowing, and normal cranial nerve examinations. Other cranial and/or limb dystonias were present in four patients (80.0%). Three patients (60.0%) had previously failed oral pharmacologic therapy. Two patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, which demonstrated an overall decrease of cortical and subcortical activation during production of symptomatic syllables and asymptomatic coughing. Management included speech therapy (all patients) and palatal lift (2 patients) with limited improvement. Calcium hydroxyapatite injection (1 patient) into the soft palate and Passavants’ ridge was beneficial. Conclusions This is the first report of ND of the palate. Characteristic findings were task-specific absent palatal movement with speech, despite normal movement on swallowing, coughing, and an intact gag reflex, as well as disorder-specific decreased brain activation on functional MRI. A diagnosis of ND of the palate should be considered for patients who present with hypernasal speech. Level of Evidence 4. PMID:25646795

  3. British Neurotoxin Network recommendations for managing cervical dystonia in patients with a poor response to botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Marion, Marie-Helene; Humberstone, Miles; Grunewald, Richard; Wimalaratna, Sunil

    2016-08-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) injections are an effective treatment for cervical dystonia. Approximately 20% of patients eventually stop BoNT treatment, mostly because of treatment failure. These recommendations review the different therapeutic interventions for optimising the treatment in secondary poor responder patients. Immunoresistance has become less common over the years, but the diagnosis has to be addressed with a frontalis test or an Extensor Digitorum Brevis test. In case of immunoresistance to BoNT-A, we discuss the place the different therapeutic options (BoNT-A holidays, BoNT-B injections, alternative BoNT-A injections, deep brain stimulation). When poor responders are not immunoresistant, they benefit from reviewing (1) injections technique with electromyography or ultrasound guidance, (2) muscles selection and (3) dose of BoNT. In addition, in both scenarios, a holistic approach including drug treatment, retraining and psychological support is valuable in the management of these complex and severe cervical dystonia. PMID:26976927

  4. [State-of-the-art corrective and diagnostic technologies in medical rehabilitation of patients with vegetative vascular dystonia].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, E S; Mukharliamov, F Iu; Razumov, A N; Uianaeva, A I

    2008-01-01

    Including of balneological therapy with the use of the baths Bi-olong in the programs of medical rehabilitation makes possible to improve considerable the state of peripheral haemodynamics, the indices of adaptation and regulation in patients with vegetative vascular dystonia. This fact can be explained with the positive corrective effect of bath Biolong reactant mitophen on cell respiration by the system cytochrome P450 activation. Also it is possible to assume that mitophen leads to decrease imbalance between sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems participating in regulation and adaptation of vascular wall. Use of bath Biolong in the therapy of patient with hypertonic vegetative vascular dystonia ought to consider as an effective, harmless and pathogenetically reasonable method which can be recommended to include in combined rehabilitation. PMID:18376477

  5. Diagnosis and Management of Drooling in Children With Progressive Dystonia: A Case Series of Patients With MEGDEL Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blommaert, Dorian; van Hulst, Karen; Hoogen, Frank J A van den; Erasmus, Corrie E; Wortmann, Saskia B

    2016-09-01

    Drooling is a common problem in children with progressive dystonia. The authors noted a 58% incidence of drooling in 22/38 children with MEGDEL, a rare neurodegenerative cause of dystonia and report on the clinical course of four patients. Drooling of varying severity and subsequent respiratory problems were treated at the authors' multidisciplinary saliva-control outpatient clinic. One patient improved on antireflux medication, the second after medication with drooling as side effect was changed. Two other patients underwent salivary gland surgery, one of whom significantly improved; the other died shortly after surgery. The heterogeneity of the cases presented shows the need for stepwise and personalized treatment. The authors recommend the following: (1) optimize the treatment of the underlying neurological condition and replace medication that stimulates saliva secretion; (2) treat constipation, scoliosis, and gastroesophageal reflux if there is still a risk of chronic aspiration of saliva; (3) perform more intense/invasive treatment (botulinum toxin, salivary gland surgery). PMID:27229007

  6. British Neurotoxin Network recommendations for managing cervical dystonia in patients with a poor response to botulinum toxin

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Marie-Helene; Humberstone, Miles; Grunewald, Richard; Wimalaratna, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) injections are an effective treatment for cervical dystonia. Approximately 20% of patients eventually stop BoNT treatment, mostly because of treatment failure. These recommendations review the different therapeutic interventions for optimising the treatment in secondary poor responder patients. Immunoresistance has become less common over the years, but the diagnosis has to be addressed with a frontalis test or an Extensor Digitorum Brevis test. In case of immunoresistance to BoNT-A, we discuss the place the different therapeutic options (BoNT-A holidays, BoNT-B injections, alternative BoNT-A injections, deep brain stimulation). When poor responders are not immunoresistant, they benefit from reviewing (1) injections technique with electromyography or ultrasound guidance, (2) muscles selection and (3) dose of BoNT. In addition, in both scenarios, a holistic approach including drug treatment, retraining and psychological support is valuable in the management of these complex and severe cervical dystonia. PMID:26976927

  7. Craniocervical dystonia questionnaire (CDQ-24): development and validation of a disease-specific quality of life instrument

    PubMed Central

    Muller, J; Wissel, J; Kemmler, G; Voller, B; Bodner, T; Schneider, A; Wenning, G; Poewe, W

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To develop and test a questionnaire for measuring quality of life in patients with craniocervical dystonia. Methods: A 29-item pool was developed based on semi-structured interviews of patients with cervical dystonia (CD) and blepharospasm (BSP). This preliminary questionnaire was administered to 203 consecutive patients with CD and BSP from Austrian dystonia and botulinum toxin outpatient clinics. For scale generation, a combination of exploratory factor and cluster analysis was applied. This resulted in the 24-item version of the instrument (CDQ-24) based on five subscales: Stigma, Emotional wellbeing, Pain, Activities of daily living, and Social/family life. The validity and reliability of the CDQ-24 was assessed in 231 consecutive patients with CD and BSP different from those examined with the preliminary questionnaire. This second survey included the CDQ-24, a generic QoL instrument (SF-36) and clinical rating scales. Sensitivity to change was analysed in 51 previously untreated (de novo) patients four weeks and one year following the first botulinum toxin treatment. Results: Internal consistency reliability was satisfactory for all subscales, with values of Cronbach's α ranging from 0.77 to 0.89. The CDQ-24 subscales showed moderate to high correlations with those SF-36 subscales measuring similar aspects (Pearson's correlation r = 0.50–0.73; p<0.001, each). Sensitivity to change was confirmed by highly significant improvements of all CDQ-24 subscores in the de novo patients from baseline to four week follow up. One year follow up data revealed a stable improvement. Conclusion: The CDQ-24 is the first fully validated and disease specific questionnaire to evaluate quality of life of patients with cervical dystonia and blepharospasm and we propose its use in clinical trials as well as in daily clinical practice. PMID:15090572

  8. Cerebellum-dependent associative learning deficits in primary dystonia are normalized by rTMS and practice.

    PubMed

    Hoffland, B S; Kassavetis, P; Bologna, M; Teo, J T H; Bhatia, K P; Rothwell, J C; Edwards, M J; van de Warrenburg, B P

    2013-07-01

    Eyeblink classical conditioning (EBCC) is a cerebellum-dependent paradigm of associative motor learning, and abnormal EBCC is a neurophysiological indicator of cerebellar dysfunction. We have previously demonstrated impaired EBCC in patients with primary dystonia, but it remains uncertain if this represents actual cerebellar pathology or reflects a functional cerebellar disruption. We examined this further by: (1) studying acquisition and retention of EBCC in a second session in eight patients with cervical dystonia (CD) who had a first session 7-10 days earlier; and (2) by investigating the potential of continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) over the right cerebellar hemisphere to modify a first-ever EBCC session in 11 patients with CD. EBCC data of eight healthy controls previously studied were used for additional between-group comparisons. We observed an improvement of EBCC in a second session in patients with CD, which is in contrast to patients with proven cerebellar pathology who do not show further improvement of EBCC in additional sessions. We also found that cerebellar cTBS paradoxically normalized EBCC in patients with CD, while we previously showed that it disrupts EBCC in healthy volunteers. Combined, these two experiments are in keeping with a functional and reversible disruption of the cerebellum in dystonia, a phenomenon that is probably secondary to either cerebellar compensation or to cerebellar recruitment in the abnormal sensorimotor network. PMID:23551802

  9. Forebrain deletion of the dystonia protein torsinA causes dystonic-like movements and loss of striatal cholinergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Samuel S; Darr, Katherine; Holley, Sandra M; Cepeda, Carlos; Mabrouk, Omar S; Wong, Jenny-Marie T; LeWitt, Tessa M; Paudel, Reema; Houlden, Henry; Kennedy, Robert T; Levine, Michael S; Dauer, William T

    2015-01-01

    Striatal dysfunction plays an important role in dystonia, but the striatal cell types that contribute to abnormal movements are poorly defined. We demonstrate that conditional deletion of the DYT1 dystonia protein torsinA in embryonic progenitors of forebrain cholinergic and GABAergic neurons causes dystonic-like twisting movements that emerge during juvenile CNS maturation. The onset of these movements coincides with selective degeneration of dorsal striatal large cholinergic interneurons (LCI), and surviving LCI exhibit morphological, electrophysiological, and connectivity abnormalities. Consistent with the importance of this LCI pathology, murine dystonic-like movements are reduced significantly with an antimuscarinic agent used clinically, and we identify cholinergic abnormalities in postmortem striatal tissue from DYT1 dystonia patients. These findings demonstrate that dorsal LCI have a unique requirement for torsinA function during striatal maturation, and link abnormalities of these cells to dystonic-like movements in an overtly symptomatic animal model. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08352.001 PMID:26052670

  10. Modulation of Muscle Tone and Sympathovagal Balance in Cervical Dystonia Using Percutaneous Stimulation of the Auricular Vagus Nerve.

    PubMed

    Kampusch, Stefan; Kaniusas, Eugenijus; Széles, Jozsef C

    2015-10-01

    Primary cervical dystonia is characterized by abnormal, involuntary, and sustained contractions of cervical muscles. Current ways of treatment focus on alleviating symptomatic muscle activity. Besides pharmacological treatment, in severe cases patients may receive neuromodulative intervention such as deep brain stimulation. However, these (highly invasive) methods have some major drawbacks. For the first time, percutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (pVNS) was applied in a single case of primary cervical dystonia. Auricular vagus nerve stimulation was already shown to modulate the (autonomous) sympathovagal balance of the body and proved to be an effective treatment in acute and chronic pain, epilepsy, as well as major depression. pVNS effects on cervical dystonia may be hypothesized to rely upon: (i) the alteration of sensory input to the brain, which affects structures involved in the genesis of motoric and nonmotoric dystonic symptoms; and (ii) the alteration of the sympathovagal balance with a sustained impact on involuntary movement control, pain, quality of sleep, and general well-being. The presented data provide experimental evidence that pVNS may be a new alternative and minimally invasive treatment in primary cervical dystonia. One female patient (age 50 years) suffering from therapy refractory cervical dystonia was treated with pVNS over 20 months. Significant improvement in muscle pain, dystonic symptoms, and autonomic regulation as well as a subjective improvement in motility, sleep, and mood were achieved. A subjective improvement in pain recorded by visual analog scale ratings (0-10) was observed from 5.42 to 3.92 (medians). Muscle tone of the mainly affected left and right trapezius muscle in supine position was favorably reduced by about 96%. Significant reduction of muscle tone was also achieved in sitting and standing positions of the patient. Habituation to stimulation leading to reduced stimulation efficiency was observed and

  11. Cervical dystonia and pain: characteristics and treatment patterns from CD PROBE (Cervical Dystonia Patient Registry for Observation of OnabotulinumtoxinA Efficacy).

    PubMed

    Charles, P David; Adler, Charles H; Stacy, Mark; Comella, Cynthia; Jankovic, Joseph; Manack Adams, Aubrey; Schwartz, Marc; Brin, Mitchell F

    2014-07-01

    To compare profiles of subjects with and without cervical dystonia (CD)-associated pain, to evaluate the contribution of pain and the motor component of CD on quality of life, and to compare the initial botulinum toxin treatment paradigm between pain groups, baseline data were used from the CD Patient Registry for Observation of OnabotulinumtoxinA Efficacy (CD PROBE), a multicenter, prospective, observational registry designed to capture real-world practices and outcomes for onabotulinumtoxinA CD treatment. Subjects were divided into no/mild pain [Pain Numeric Rating Scale (PNRS) score 0-3] and moderate/severe pain groups (PNRS score 4-10). Descriptive and differential statistics were utilized to compare groups. 1,037 subjects completed the first treatment session, reported baseline botulinum toxin status, and completed baseline PNRS. Those with no/mild pain were significantly older at baseline. Those subjects with moderate/severe pain had higher Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale Severity (17.7 ± 5.1 vs. 16.2 ± 5.6, p < 0.0001) and Disability (12.7 ± 6.1 vs. 7.5 ± 5.6, p < 0.0001). CD subjects with moderate/severe pain received a higher mean dose (177.3 ± 82.9 vs. 158.0 ± 67.1 U, p = 0.0001) of onabotulinumtoxinA and were injected in more muscles (4.1 ± 1.4 vs. 3.7 ± 1.2, p < 0.0001) at initial treatment. CD PROBE clearly demonstrates the frequency of pain in CD and substantiates its importance when determining an optimal treatment paradigm. Future analyses of CD PROBE will further our understanding of the treatment patterns and outcomes related to onabotulinumtoxinA therapy for this disabling condition. PMID:24752807

  12. Sensory trick phenomenon improves motor control in pianists with dystonia: prognostic value of glove-effect.

    PubMed

    Paulig, Jakobine; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Großbach, Michael; Boullet, Laurent; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Musician's dystonia (MD) is a task-specific movement disorder that causes loss of voluntary motor control while playing the instrument. A subgroup of patients displays the so-called sensory trick: alteration of somatosensory input, e.g., by wearing a latex glove, may result in short-term improvement of motor control. In this study, the glove-effect in pianists with MD was quantified and its potential association with MD-severity and outcome after treatment was investigated. Thirty affected pianists were included in the study. Music instrument digital interface-based scale analysis was used for assessment of fine motor control. Therapeutic options included botulinum toxin, pedagogical retraining and anticholinergic medication (trihexyphenidyl). 19% of patients showed significant improvement of fine motor control through wearing a glove. After treatment, outcome was significantly better in patients with a significant pre-treatment sensory trick. We conclude that the sensory trick may have a prognostic value for the outcome after treatment in pianists with MD. PMID:25295014

  13. Eyes on MEGDEL: distinctive basal ganglia involvement in dystonia deafness syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wortmann, Saskia B; van Hasselt, Peter M; Barić, Ivo; Burlina, Alberto; Darin, Niklas; Hörster, Friederike; Coker, Mahmut; Ucar, Sema Kalkan; Krumina, Zita; Naess, Karin; Ngu, Lock H; Pronicka, Ewa; Riordan, Gilian; Santer, Rene; Wassmer, Evangeline; Zschocke, Johannes; Schiff, Manuel; de Meirleir, Linda; Alowain, Mohammed A; Smeitink, Jan A M; Morava, Eva; Kozicz, Tamas; Wevers, Ron A; Wolf, Nicole I; Willemsen, Michel A

    2015-04-01

    Pediatric movement disorders are still a diagnostic challenge, as many patients remain without a (genetic) diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern recognition can lead to the diagnosis. MEGDEL syndrome (3-MethylGlutaconic aciduria, Deafness, Encephalopathy, Leigh-like syndrome MIM #614739) is a clinically and biochemically highly distinctive dystonia deafness syndrome accompanied by 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, severe developmental delay, and progressive spasticity. Mutations are found in SERAC1, encoding a phosphatidylglycerol remodeling enzyme essential for both mitochondrial function and intracellular cholesterol trafficking. Based on the homogenous phenotype, we hypothesized an accordingly characteristic MRI pattern. A total of 43 complete MRI studies of 30 patients were systematically reevaluated. All patients presented a distinctive brain MRI pattern with five characteristic disease stages affecting the basal ganglia, especially the putamen. In stage 1, T2 signal changes of the pallidum are present. In stage 2, swelling of the putamen and caudate nucleus is seen. The dorsal putamen contains an "eye" that shows no signal alteration and (thus) seems to be spared during this stage of the disease. It later increases, reflecting progressive putaminal involvement. This "eye" was found in all patients with MEGDEL syndrome during a specific age range, and has not been reported in other disorders, making it pathognomonic for MEDGEL and allowing diagnosis based on MRI findings. PMID:25642805

  14. Losing dexterity: patterns of impaired coordination of finger movements in musician’s dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Shinichi; Tominaga, Kenta; Miyazaki, Fumio; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Extensive training can bring about highly-skilled action, but may also impair motor dexterity by producing involuntary movements and muscular cramping, as seen in focal dystonia (FD) and tremor. To elucidate the underlying neuroplastic mechanisms of FD, the present study addressed the organization of finger movements during piano performance in pianists suffering from the condition. Principal component (PC) analysis identified three patterns of fundamental joint coordination constituting finger movements in both patients and controls. The first two coordination patterns described less individuated movements between the “dystonic” finger and key-striking fingers for patients compared to controls. The third coordination pattern, representing the individuation of movements between the middle and ring fingers, was evident during a sequence of strikes with these fingers in controls, which was absent in the patients. Consequently, rhythmic variability of keystrokes was more pronounced during this sequence of strikes for the patients. A stepwise multiple-regression analysis further identified greater variability of keystrokes for individuals displaying less individuated movements between the affected and striking fingers. The findings suggest that FD alters dexterous joint coordination so as to lower independent control of finger movements, and thereby degrades fine motor control. PMID:26289433

  15. Immunoresistance in cervical dystonia patients after treatment with abobotulinumtoxinA.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Chandra; Hubble, Jean; Schwab, Joseph; Beffy, Jean-Luc; Picaut, Philippe; Morte, Carles

    2012-07-01

    Formation of antibodies against botulinum toxin type A has been observed following treatment of Cervical Dystonia (CD). We present the immunological findings from two 12-week Phase III prospective, randomized, double-blind, single-dose, placebo-controlled studies (Study 1, n = 116; Study 2, n = 136). Patients in both studies were administered abobotulinumtoxinA 500U or placebo intramuscularly at baseline. Patients could receive up to three or four additional treatments (250-1000U) in an open-label follow-up period. Blood samples were collected at baseline and during treatment to test for antibodies to abobotulinumtoxinA using a radioimmunoprecipitation assay (Study 2 only) and a mouse protection assay. Loss of response was predefined using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) total score at 4 weeks following injection. No subjects in Study 1 and one individual in Study 2 developed neutralizing antibodies (nABs) during the double-blind treatment phase; the individual who developed immunoresistance had received botulinum toxin type A treatment prior to the study and did not respond to treatment. Two subjects demonstrated a change in nAB status during open-label treatment and overall responsiveness was maintained in these patients. In conclusion, the development of immunoresistance was rare and, in the presence of circulating nABs, patients may still gain benefit from intramuscular abobotulinumtoxinA treatment. PMID:22356470

  16. Myoclonus-dystonia and Silver-Russell syndrome resulting from maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, M B; Bytyci Telegrafi, A; Stinnett, V; Umeh, C C; Mari, Z; Dawson, T M; Bodurtha, J; Batista, D A S

    2013-10-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a movement disorder that is often associated with mutations in epsilon-sarcoglycan (SGCE), a maternally imprinted gene at 7q21.3. We report a 24-year-old male with short stature (<5th percentile) and a movement disorder clinically consistent with M-D. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array did not identify significant copy number changes, but revealed three long continuous stretches of homozygosity on chromosome 7 suggestive of uniparental disomy. Parental SNP arrays confirmed that the proband had maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 (mUPD7) with regions of heterodisomy and isodisomy. mUPD7 is the cause of approximately 5-10% of Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS), a disorder characterized by prenatal and postnatal growth retardation. Although SRS was not suspected in our patient, these findings explain his short stature. SGCE methylation testing showed loss of the unmethylated paternal allele. Our findings provide a unifying diagnosis for his short stature and M-D and help to optimize his medication regimen. In conclusion, we show that M-D is a clinical feature that may be associated with SRS due to mUPD7. Individuals with mUPD7 should be monitored for the development of movement disorders. Conversely, individuals with M-D and short stature should be evaluated for SRS. PMID:23237735

  17. Focal dystonia and the Sensory-Motor Integrative Loop for Enacting (SMILE)

    PubMed Central

    Perruchoud, David; Murray, Micah M.; Lefebvre, Jeremie; Ionta, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Performing accurate movements requires preparation, execution, and monitoring mechanisms. The first two are coded by the motor system, the latter by the sensory system. To provide an adaptive neural basis to overt behaviors, motor and sensory information has to be properly integrated in a reciprocal feedback loop. Abnormalities in this sensory-motor loop are involved in movement disorders such as focal dystonia, a hyperkinetic alteration affecting only a specific body part and characterized by sensory and motor deficits in the absence of basic motor impairments. Despite the fundamental impact of sensory-motor integration mechanisms on daily life, the general principles of healthy and pathological anatomic–functional organization of sensory-motor integration remain to be clarified. Based on the available data from experimental psychology, neurophysiology, and neuroimaging, we propose a bio-computational model of sensory-motor integration: the Sensory-Motor Integrative Loop for Enacting (SMILE). Aiming at direct therapeutic implementations and with the final target of implementing novel intervention protocols for motor rehabilitation, our main goal is to provide the information necessary for further validating the SMILE model. By translating neuroscientific hypotheses into empirical investigations and clinically relevant questions, the prediction based on the SMILE model can be further extended to other pathological conditions characterized by impaired sensory-motor integration. PMID:24999327

  18. Novel GCH1 variant in Dopa-responsive dystonia and Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lewthwaite, A.J.; Lambert, T.D.; Rolfe, E.B.; Olgiati, S.; Quadri, M.; Simons, E.J.; Morrison, K.E.; Bonifati, V.; Nicholl, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1) mutations are the commonest cause of Dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD). Clinical phenotypes can be broad, even within a single family. Methods We present clinical, genetic and functional imaging data on a British kindred in which affected subjects display phenotypes ranging from DRD to Parkinson's disease (PD). Twelve family members were studied. Clinical examination, dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging, and molecular genetic analysis of GCH1 and the commonest known familial PD-related genes were performed. Results We have identified a novel missense variant, c.5A > G, p.(Glu2Gly), within the GCH1 gene in affected family members displaying a range of phenotypes. Two affected subjects carrying this variant had abnormal DAT imaging. These two with abnormal DAT imaging had a PD phenotype, while the remaining three subjects with the novel GCH1 variant had normal DAT imaging and a DRD phenotype. Conclusions We propose that this GCH1 variant is pathogenic in this family and these findings suggest that similar mechanisms involving abnormal GTP cyclohydolase I may underlie both PD and DRD. GCH1 genetic testing should be considered in patients with PD and a family history of DRD. PMID:25634433

  19. Speed-accuracy testing on the Apple iPad provides a quantitative test of upper extremity motor performance in children with dystonia.

    PubMed

    Bertucco, Matteo; Sanger, Terence D

    2014-11-01

    The currently available scales for quantitative measurement of the severity of childhood dystonia require human observer ratings and provide poor granularity in the scores for individual limbs. We evaluated the use of new-generation high-quality touchscreens (an iPad) according with the Fitts law, which is a mathematical model that takes into account the relation between movement time and the task accuracy. We compared the abilities of healthy subjects and children with dystonia. The linear relation described by Fitts law held for all the groups. The movement time and the information transmitted were age and severity related. Our results provide evidence for the usability and validity of using Fitts law as a quantitative diagnostic tool in children with dystonia. Furthermore, testing on touchscreen tablets may help to guide the design of user interfaces to maximize the communication rate for children who depend upon assistive communication devices. PMID:23965400

  20. Effects of genetic variations in the dystonia protein torsinA: identification of polymorphism at residue 216 as protein modifier.

    PubMed

    Kock, Norman; Naismith, Teresa V; Boston, Heather E; Ozelius, Laurie J; Corey, David P; Breakefield, Xandra O; Hanson, Phyllis I

    2006-04-15

    Four naturally occurring sequence variations have been found in the coding region of the DYT1 gene encoding torsinA. One of these, a 3 bp (DeltaGAG) deletion, underlies dominantly inherited cases of early-onset torsion dystonia. Others, including a single nucleotide polymorphism that replaces aspartic acid (D) at residue 216 with histidine (H) in 12% of normal alleles and two other rare deletions, have not been clearly associated with disease. To gain insight into how these sequence variations affect torsinA, we used the structure of the related protein ClpB to provide a model of torsinA's AAA+ domain. Motifs important for ATP hydrolysis-sensor 1 and sensor 2-were identified, mutagenized and used to validate predictions of this model. Inspection revealed that the DeltaGAG deletion associated with dystonia removes one residue from an alpha-helix in the C-terminal portion of the AAA+ domain. The resulting distortion in torsinA structure may underlie this mutant's known tendency to produce ER-derived inclusions as well as its proposed loss of function. The D/H polymorphism at residue 216 falls in the N-terminal portion of the AAA+ domain near the sensor 1 motif. Surprisingly, cells expressing torsinA with the polymorphic histidine developed inclusions similar to those associated with DeltaGAG-torsinA, indicating that this change may also affect torsinA structure. Introducing H216 into DeltaGAG-torsinA reduced its tendency to form inclusions, suggesting that the two changes offset each other. Our findings point to a structural basis for the defects associated with the disease-linked DeltaGAG deletion in torsinA. They also suggest possible connections between the allelic polymorphism at residue 216 and the penetrance of DYT1 dystonia, as well as a possible role for this polymorphism in related disease states. PMID:16537570

  1. The impact of stress on motor performance in skilled musicians suffering from focal dystonia: Physiological and psychological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Christos I; Furuya, Shinichi; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2016-05-01

    Recent investigations have suggested that stress can modulate motor function. However, the impact of stress on motor performance of musicians suffering from focal dystonia (FDM) remains unknown. The current study assessed motor performance in 20 FDM patients and 16 healthy musicians (HM) before and under stress. Stress was manipulated using the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Motor performance was evaluated based on analysis of electromyographic (EMG) activity and temporal variability, while electrocardiography (ECG) and the level of free cortisol were used to test for objective alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Finally, the psychological profiles of both groups were analyzed using three psycho-diagnostic standardized questionnaires. Results showed that patients' motor impairments did not change under acute stressful conditions. However, an increase in muscular co-contractions was observed, reflecting a physiological muscular response under stressful conditions. Psycho-diagnostic analysis revealed higher levels of psychological traits related to elevated anxiety, stress and perfectionism in 40% of the patients. Although the motor outcome between those patients and those with an opposing psychological profile did not differ, patients characterized by stressful and perfectionistic personalities had, on average, developed dystonia about ten years earlier than the rest of the patients. The current study suggests that acute stress conditions may not have any direct impact on fine motor control of FDM patients. However psychological traits associated with increased stress, anxiety and perfectionism may have a long-lasting effect on the motor function of affected musicians, by promoting the acceleration or even the triggering of dystonia. PMID:27033741

  2. The intermuscular 3–7 Hz drive is not affected by distal proprioceptive input in myoclonus-dystonia

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, J. N.; Schouten, A. C.; Bour, L. J.; de Vlugt, E.; van Rootselaar, A. F.; van der Helm, F. C. T.

    2010-01-01

    In dystonia, both sensory malfunctioning and an abnormal intermuscular low-frequency drive of 3–7 Hz have been found, although cause and effect are unknown. It is hypothesized that sensory processing is primarily disturbed and induces this drive. Accordingly, experimenter-controlled sensory input should be able to influence the frequency of the drive. In six genetically confirmed myoclonus-dystonia (MD) patients and six matched controls, the low-frequency drive was studied with intermuscular coherence analysis. External perturbations were applied mechanically to the wrist joint in small frequency bands (0–4, 4–8 and 8–12 Hz; ‘angle protocol) and at single frequencies (1, 5, 7 and 9 Hz; ‘torque’ protocol). The low-frequency drive was found in the neck muscles of 4 MD patients. In these patients, its frequency did not shift due to the perturbation. In the torque protocol, the externally applied frequencies could be detected in all controls and in the two patients without the common drive. The common low-frequency drive was not be affected by external perturbations in MD patients. Furthermore, the torque protocol did not induce intermuscular coherences at the applied frequencies in these patients, as was the case in healthy controls and in patients without the drive. This suggests that the dystonic 3–7 Hz drive is caused by a sensory-independent motor drive and sensory malfunctioning in MD might rather be a consequence than a cause of dystonia. PMID:20157700

  3. Botulinum toxin treatment failures in cervical dystonia: causes, management, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Jinnah, H A; Goodmann, Emily; Rosen, Ami R; Evatt, Marian; Freeman, Alan; Factor, Stewart

    2016-06-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is highly effective in the treatment of cervical dystonia (CD), yet a significant proportion of patients report low levels of satisfaction following treatment and fail to follow up for repeated treatments. The goal of this study was to determine the reasons that some patients have unsatisfactory responses. A total of 35 subjects who came to our center requesting alternative treatments due to unsatisfactory responses following BoNT treatment for CD were evaluated. Included were 26 women and 9 men with an average age of 57.1 years (range 25-82 years), and an average duration of illness of 12.5 years (range 1-55 years). Details of unsatisfactory BoNT treatments were methodically collected by a movement specialist using a standardized intake form, including provider subspecialty, product used, the number of satisfactory or unsatisfactory trials, doses given, specific muscles treated, the use of electromyographic guidance, side effects, and tests of resistance. The specialist then provided repeat treatments if indicated, and followed each case until the reasons for unsatisfactory outcomes could be determined. Multiple reasons for unsatisfactory outcomes were found. They included suboptimal BoNT doses, suboptimal muscle targeting, intolerable side effects, complex movement patterns, discordant perceptions, and incorrect diagnoses. Only one patient was functionally resistant to BoNT. Of 32 subjects who received repeat BoNT treatments, 25 (78 %) achieved satisfactory responses after revision of the original treatment plan. These results indicate that the majority of unsatisfactory responses to BoNT treatment of CD were caused by correctible factors and imply a need for improved education regarding optimal treatment methods. PMID:27113604

  4. PET Neuroimaging: Insights on Dystonia and Tourette Syndrome and Potential Applications

    PubMed Central

    Alongi, Pierpaolo; Iaccarino, Leonardo; Perani, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Primary dystonia (pD) is a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric developmental disorder characterized by motor and phonic tics, which could progress to behavioral changes. GTS and obsessive–compulsive disorders are often seen in comorbidity, also suggesting that a possible overlap in the pathophysiological bases of these two conditions. PET techniques are of considerable value in detecting functional and molecular abnormalities in vivo, according to the adopted radioligands. For example, PET is the unique technique that allows in vivo investigation of neurotransmitter systems, providing evidence of changes in GTS or pD. For example, presynaptic and post-synaptic dopaminergic studies with PET have shown alterations compatible with dysfunction or loss of D2-receptors bearing neurons, increased synaptic dopamine levels, or both. Measures of cerebral glucose metabolism with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET (18F-FDG PET) are very sensitive in showing brain functional alterations as well. 18F-FDG PET data have shown metabolic changes within the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical and cerebello-thalamo-cortical networks, revealing possible involvement of brain circuits not limited to basal ganglia in pD and GTS. The aim of this work is to overview PET consistent neuroimaging literature on pD and GTS that has provided functional and molecular knowledge of the underlying neural dysfunction. Furthermore, we suggest potential applications of these techniques in monitoring treatments. PMID:25295029

  5. Association Analysis of NALCN Polymorphisms rs1338041 and rs61973742 in a Chinese Population with Isolated Cervical Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingqing; Yang, Jing; Cao, Bei; Chen, Yongping; Wei, Qianqian; Ou, Ruwei; Song, Wei; Zhao, Bi; Wu, Ying; Shang, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    Background. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) demonstrated a possible association between cervical dystonia (CD) and a sodium leak channel, nonselective (NALCN) gene. However, the association between NALCN and CD was largely unknown in Asian population. The present study was carried out to examine the associations between the two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs1338041 and rs61973742 in the NALCN gene and CD in a Chinese population. Methods. In a cohort of 201 patients with isolated CD, we genotyped the two SNPs rs1338041 and rs61973742 using polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). We also included 289 unrelated, age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs) from the same region. Result. No significant differences were observed in either the genotype distributions or the minor allele frequencies (MAFs) of the two SNPs between the CD patients and the HCs. There were no significant differences between early-onset and late-onset CD patients, between patients with and without a positive family history of dystonia, or between patients with and without tremor or sensory tricks. Conclusion. Lack of association between the SNPs of NALCN and CD suggests that the SNPs of NALCN do not play a role in CD in a Chinese population. PMID:27239368

  6. Dementia with Lewy bodies presenting marked tongue protrusion and bite due to lingual dystonia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Yuji; Kanaya, Yuhei; Kono, Ryuhei; Takeshima, Shinichi; Shimoe, Yutaka; Kuriyama, Masaru

    2016-06-22

    We report the patient of a 53-year-old woman who developed subacute-onset marked tonge protrusion and bite. She was diagnosed as dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) from the clinical features including progressive cognitive decline, visual hallucinations, parkinsonism, and severe insomnia and depression, and the radiological finding of low dopamine transported uptake in basal ganglia by Dat SCAN and low blood circulation in occipital lobe of cerebrum. The patient received 600 mg doses of levodopa for over a year, followed by rotigotine and ropinirole with a rapid increase of dosage. It is believed that these treatments stimulated and sensitized dopamine D1 receptors, thereby inducing lingual dystonia. Furthermore, the patient demonstrated dyspnea and attacks of apnea caused by the closure of bilateral vocal cords due to laryngeal dyskinesia. After initiation of the neuroleptic, olanzapine, for a short duration, the high dose of levodopa overlapped with neuroleptic sensitivity, suggesting DOPA-induced dystonia and dyskinesia. This interaction can sometimes lead to lethal adverse events, and must be considered very important when treating patients with DLB. PMID:27212676

  7. A Mutation of β-Actin That Alters Depolymerization Dynamics Is Associated with Autosomal Dominant Developmental Malformations, Deafness, and Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Procaccio, Vincent; Salazar, Gloria; Ono, Shoichiro; Styers, Melanie L.; Gearing, Marla; Davila, Antonio; Jimenez, Richard; Juncos, Jorge; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Meroni, Germana; Fontanella, Bianca; Sontag, Estelle; Sontag, Jean Marie; Faundez, Victor; Wainer, Bruce H.

    2006-01-01

    Actin, one of the major filamentous cytoskeletal molecules, is involved in a variety of cellular functions. Whereas an association between muscle actin mutations and skeletal and cardiac myopathies has been well documented, reports of human disease arising from mutations of nonmuscle actin genes have been rare. We have identified a missense point mutation in the gene coding for β-actin that results in an arginine-to-tryptophan substitution at position 183. The disease phenotype includes developmental midline malformations, sensory hearing loss, and a delayed-onset generalized dystonia syndrome in monozygotic twins. Cellular studies of a lymphoblastoid cell line obtained from an affected patient demonstrated morphological abnormalities of the actin cytoskeleton and altered actin depolymerization dynamics in response to latrunculin A, an actin monomer–sequestering drug. Resistance to latrunculin A was also observed in NIH 3T3 cells expressing the mutant actin. These findings suggest that mutations in nonmuscle actins may be associated with a broad spectrum of developmental malformations and/or neurological abnormalities such as dystonia. PMID:16685646

  8. Association Analysis of NALCN Polymorphisms rs1338041 and rs61973742 in a Chinese Population with Isolated Cervical Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qingqing; Yang, Jing; Cao, Bei; Chen, Yongping; Wei, Qianqian; Ou, Ruwei; Song, Wei; Zhao, Bi; Wu, Ying; Shang, Huifang

    2016-01-01

    Background. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) demonstrated a possible association between cervical dystonia (CD) and a sodium leak channel, nonselective (NALCN) gene. However, the association between NALCN and CD was largely unknown in Asian population. The present study was carried out to examine the associations between the two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs1338041 and rs61973742 in the NALCN gene and CD in a Chinese population. Methods. In a cohort of 201 patients with isolated CD, we genotyped the two SNPs rs1338041 and rs61973742 using polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). We also included 289 unrelated, age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs) from the same region. Result. No significant differences were observed in either the genotype distributions or the minor allele frequencies (MAFs) of the two SNPs between the CD patients and the HCs. There were no significant differences between early-onset and late-onset CD patients, between patients with and without a positive family history of dystonia, or between patients with and without tremor or sensory tricks. Conclusion. Lack of association between the SNPs of NALCN and CD suggests that the SNPs of NALCN do not play a role in CD in a Chinese population. PMID:27239368

  9. Impact of Neu-botulinumtoxinA on the Severity and Quality of Life of Cervical Dystonia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jagota, Priya; Kaewwilai, Lalita; Boonrod, Nonglak; Singmaneesakulchai, Surat; Boonpang, Kamolwan; Sringean, Jirada; Jitkritsadakul, Onanong; Petchrutchatachart, Sitthi

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical dystonia (CD) is a debilitating neurological disorder that may gravely affect a patient’s quality of life (QoL). Botulinum toxin treatment has been approved as a first-line treatment for this condition. This study aims to look at the efficacy and impact on the QoL of neu-botulinumtoxinA, a newer and cheaper botulinum toxin type A, in patients with CD. Methods This is a prospective, open-label, single-arm study. CD patients were recruited and evaluated for severity of CD using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS), and for QoL using the Craniocervical Dystonia Questionnaire (CDQ-24), and the 36-item Short Form Health Survey questionnaire (SF-36) at baseline and 6 weeks after injection. Results Twenty patients were recruited. Significant improvement was shown in part 1 and total TWSTRS score and total CDQ-24 scores. Analysis of individual items of the TWSTRS scale showed significant improvement in rotation, duration of CD, and work ability. Significant improvements in the QoL were also seen in some items of the stigma, emotional wellbeing, and energy/fatigue domains of the CDQ-24 and SF-36 questionnaires. Discussion Neu-botulinumtoxinA is efficacious in treating CD symptoms and improving QoL of patients with CD. A larger, double-blinded study is needed to study the extent of improvements. PMID:27536464

  10. Ablation of D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells generates mice with seizures, dystonia, hyperactivity, and impaired oral behavior

    PubMed Central

    Gantois, Ilse; Fang, Ke; Jiang, Luning; Babovic, Daniela; Lawrence, Andrew J.; Ferreri, Vincenzo; Teper, Yaroslav; Jupp, Bianca; Ziebell, Jenna; Morganti-Kossmann, Cristina M.; O'Brien, Terence J.; Nally, Rachel; Schütz, Günter; Waddington, John; Egan, Gary F.; Drago, John

    2007-01-01

    Huntington's disease is characterized by death of striatal projection neurons. We used a Cre/Lox transgenic approach to generate an animal model in which D1 dopamine receptor (Drd1a)+ cells are progressively ablated in the postnatal brain. Striatal Drd1a, substance P, and dynorphin expression is progressively lost, whereas D2 dopamine receptor (Drd2) and enkephalin expression is up-regulated. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis demonstrated early elevation of the striatal choline/creatine ratio, a finding associated with extensive reactive striatal astrogliosis. Sequential MRI demonstrated a progressive reduction in striatal volume and secondary ventricular enlargement confirmed to be due to loss of striatal cells. Mutant mice had normal gait and rotarod performance but displayed hindlimb dystonia, locomotor hyperactivity, and handling-induced electrographically verified spontaneous seizures. Ethological assessment identified an increase in rearing and impairments in the oral behaviors of sifting and chewing. In line with the limbic seizure profile, cell loss, astrogliosis, microgliosis, and down-regulated dynorphin expression were seen in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. This study specifically implicates Drd1a+ cell loss with tail suspension hindlimb dystonia, hyperactivity, and abnormal oral function. The latter may relate to the speech and swallowing disturbances and the classic sign of tongue-protrusion motor impersistence observed in Huntington's disease. In addition, the findings of this study support the notion that Drd1a and Drd2 are segregated on striatal projection neurons. PMID:17360497

  11. dtorsin, the Drosophila Ortholog of the Early-Onset Dystonia TOR1A (DYT1), Plays a Novel Role in Dopamine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi-Ito, Noriko; Doherty, Olugbenga M.; Moriyama, Hideaki; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Gusella, James F.; O'Donnell, Janis M.; Ito, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    Dystonia represents the third most common movement disorder in humans. At least 15 genetic loci (DYT1-15) have been identified and some of these genes have been cloned. TOR1A (formally DYT1), the gene responsible for the most common primary hereditary dystonia, encodes torsinA, an AAA ATPase family protein. However, the function of torsinA has yet to be fully understood. Here, we have generated and characterized a complete loss-of-function mutant for dtorsin, the only Drosophila ortholog of TOR1A. Null mutation of the X-linked dtorsin was semi-lethal with most male flies dying by the pre-pupal stage and the few surviving adults being sterile and slow moving, with reduced cuticle pigmentation and thin, short bristles. Third instar male larvae exhibited locomotion defects that were rescued by feeding dopamine. Moreover, biochemical analysis revealed that the brains of third instar larvae and adults heterozygous for the loss-of-function dtorsin mutation had significantly reduced dopamine levels. The dtorsin mutant showed a very strong genetic interaction with Pu (Punch: GTP cyclohydrolase), the ortholog of the human gene underlying DYT14 dystonia. Biochemical analyses revealed a severe reduction of GTP cyclohydrolase protein and activity, suggesting that dtorsin plays a novel role in dopamine metabolism as a positive-regulator of GTP cyclohydrolase protein. This dtorsin mutant line will be valuable for understanding this relationship and potentially other novel torsin functions that could play a role in human dystonia. PMID:22022556

  12. A novel locus for autosomal recessive primary torsion dystonia (DYT17) maps to 20p11.22-q13.12.

    PubMed

    Chouery, E; Kfoury, J; Delague, V; Jalkh, N; Bejjani, P; Serre, J L; Mégarbané, A

    2008-10-01

    Primary torsion dystonia is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of movement disorders. Fifteen different types of dystonia have been described to date, of whom 14 loci have been mapped, but only seven genes identified. Several different modes of inheritance have been described, including autosomal dominant transmission with reduced penetrance (12 loci), recessive X-linked (one locus), and autosomal recessive transmission (three loci). In this study, we describe the localization of a novel form of autosomal recessive, primary focal torsion dystonia using a genomewide search in a large consanguineous Lebanese family with three affected individuals. Homozygosity mapping with 382 microsatellite markers was conducted. Linkage analysis and haplotype construction allowed us to identify a novel locus designated as DYT17, within a 20.5-Mb interval on chromosome 20. Of the 270 known genes spread on this interval, 27 candidate genes were tested and excluded as responsible for the disease. Fine mapping by identification of other dystonia families linked to chromosome 20 and sequencing of candidate genes in the refined interval is required in order to identify the causative gene in DYT17. PMID:18688663

  13. Negative allosteric modulation of mGlu5 receptor rescues striatal D2 dopamine receptor dysfunction in rodent models of DYT1 dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sciamanna, G; Ponterio, G; Tassone, A; Maltese, M; Madeo, G; Martella, G; Poli, S; Schirinzi, T; Bonsi, P; Pisani, A

    2014-10-01

    Early onset torsion dystonia (DYT1) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder caused by deletion in TOR1A gene. Evidence suggests that TOR1A mutation produces dystonia through an aberrant neuronal signalling within the striatum, where D2 dopamine receptors (D2R) produce an abnormal excitatory response in cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) in different models of DYT1 dystonia. The excitability of ChIs may be modulated by group I metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes (mGlu1 and 5). We performed electrophysiological and calcium imaging recordings from ChIs of both knock-in mice heterozygous for Δ-torsinA (Tor1a(+/Δgag) mice) and transgenic mice overexpressing human torsinA (hMT1). We demonstrate that the novel negative allosteric modulator (NAM) of metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu) receptor, dipraglurant (ADX48621) counteracts the abnormal membrane responses and calcium rise induced either by the D2R agonist quinpirole or by caged dopamine (NPEC-Dopamine) in both models. These inhibitory effects were mimicked by two other well-characterized mGlu5 receptor antagonists, SIB1757 and MPEP, but not by mGlu1 antagonism. D2R and mGlu5 post-receptor signalling may converge on PI3K/Akt pathway. Interestingly, we found that the abnormal D2R response was prevented by the selective PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, whereas PLC and PKC inhibitors were both ineffective. Currently, no satisfactory pharmacological treatment is available for DYT1 dystonia patients. Our data show that negative modulation of mGlu5 receptors may counteract abnormal D2R responses, normalizing cholinergic cell excitability, by modulating the PI3K/Akt post-receptor pathway, thereby representing a novel potential treatment of DYT1 dystonia. PMID:24951854

  14. Hemodynamic reactions to circulatory stress tests in patients with neurocirculatory dystonia.

    PubMed

    Mäntysaari, M

    1984-01-01

    The hemodynamic reactions of 30 patients with neurocirculatory dystonia (NCD, DaCosta's syndrome) were compared to those of 30 healthy controls during the isometric handgrip test, orthostatic test, Valsalva test and the cold pressor test. The effects of hyperventilation on the ability to hold the breath were studied in both groups using the hyperventilation test. The patients and controls were young men, who were doing their conscript service, and the average age was 20 years in both groups. The diagnosis of NCD was made using the criteria described by Friedman (1947). The patients had several symptoms related to the cardiorespiratory system, the intensity of which varied from time to time and were not closely related to physical effort. In order to exclude organic diseases that could have caused the symptoms the patients were required to have no history of chronic organic diseases. They were also required to have no infectious diseases nor to be convalescents when participating in this study and to have a normal ECG and a normal thorax x-ray. The controls were anamnestically free from chronic diseases. The changes in the blood pressure, heart rate, stroke volume, cardiac index, peripheral vascular resistance and the systolic time intervals during the four tests were measured noninvasively using sphygmomanometry, electro-, phono- and impedance cardiography. The ability to hold the breath after a deep inspiration was similar in the two groups. Immediately after hyperventilation the ability to hold the breath did not improve in the NCD group as much as in the control group. In the orthostatic test the rise in the mean blood pressure was only momentarily greater in the control group than in the NCD group, and the heart rate increased about equally in the two groups. The transthoracic impedance increased significantly more in the controls than in the patients in the head-up position. The alterations in the systolic time intervals immediately after the changes of

  15. Striving for more good days: patient perspectives on botulinum toxin for the treatment of cervical dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Poliziani, Michele; Koch, Marco; Liu, Xierong

    2016-01-01

    Background The recommended reinjection interval for botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) formulations in the treatment of cervical dystonia (CD) is generally ≥12 weeks, though intervals ≥10 weeks are approved for incobotulinumtoxinA in Europe. However, recurring symptoms can occur before the end of this period. Using qualitative research, we sought a greater understanding of disease burden, unmet patient needs, and barriers to treatment. Methods We conducted online semistructured, focus-group discussions, and online forum follow-up discussions among patients with CD, focusing on disease burden, patient needs, injection cycle preferences, and relationships with health care professionals. A subset of patients was also questioned in telephone interviews about individual experiences of CD and BoNT treatment. All participants were UK residents who had received onabotulinumtoxinA or abobotulinumtoxinA for CD for ≥1 year. Results Thirty-one patients (81% female; mean duration of CD 16.4 [range 4–31] years; mean BoNT injection cycle length 12.8 weeks) participated in the online focus-group and forum follow-up discussions. Of these, seven patients participated in telephone interviews. All had recurring symptoms between treatments, which substantially impacted on their work, family, and social life. Symptom severity fluctuated throughout an injection cycle and differed between patients and across injection cycles. Participants’ relationships with health care professionals and treatment satisfaction varied greatly. Many participants wanted longer-lasting and/or more stable symptom relief with shorter and/or more flexible injection intervals, according to individual needs. Lack of health care resources, long journeys to treatment centers, and immunogenicity/side-effect concerns were perceived as the main barriers to more flexible treatment. Conclusion The high burden of recurring primary and secondary symptoms of CD considerably affects patients’ quality of life. Patient

  16. Absence of the Autophagy Adaptor SQSTM1/p62 Causes Childhood-Onset Neurodegeneration with Ataxia, Dystonia, and Gaze Palsy.

    PubMed

    Haack, Tobias B; Ignatius, Erika; Calvo-Garrido, Javier; Iuso, Arcangela; Isohanni, Pirjo; Maffezzini, Camilla; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Suomalainen, Anu; Gorza, Matteo; Kremer, Laura S; Graf, Elisabeth; Hartig, Monika; Berutti, Riccardo; Paucar, Martin; Svenningsson, Per; Stranneheim, Henrik; Brandberg, Göran; Wedell, Anna; Kurian, Manju A; Hayflick, Susan A; Venco, Paola; Tiranti, Valeria; Strom, Tim M; Dichgans, Martin; Horvath, Rita; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Freyer, Christoph; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Senderek, Jan; Wredenberg, Anna; Carroll, Christopher J; Klopstock, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1; also known as p62) encodes a multidomain scaffolding protein involved in various key cellular processes, including the removal of damaged mitochondria by its function as a selective autophagy receptor. Heterozygous variants in SQSTM1 have been associated with Paget disease of the bone and might contribute to neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Using exome sequencing, we identified three different biallelic loss-of-function variants in SQSTM1 in nine affected individuals from four families with a childhood- or adolescence-onset neurodegenerative disorder characterized by gait abnormalities, ataxia, dysarthria, dystonia, vertical gaze palsy, and cognitive decline. We confirmed absence of the SQSTM1/p62 protein in affected individuals' fibroblasts and found evidence of a defect in the early response to mitochondrial depolarization and autophagosome formation. Our findings expand the SQSTM1-associated phenotypic spectrum and lend further support to the concept of disturbed selective autophagy pathways in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27545679

  17. Mutations in SLC39A14 disrupt manganese homeostasis and cause childhood-onset parkinsonism-dystonia.

    PubMed

    Tuschl, Karin; Meyer, Esther; Valdivia, Leonardo E; Zhao, Ningning; Dadswell, Chris; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Hung, Christina Y; Simpson, Michael A; Chong, W K; Jacques, Thomas S; Woltjer, Randy L; Eaton, Simon; Gregory, Allison; Sanford, Lynn; Kara, Eleanna; Houlden, Henry; Cuno, Stephan M; Prokisch, Holger; Valletta, Lorella; Tiranti, Valeria; Younis, Rasha; Maher, Eamonn R; Spencer, John; Straatman-Iwanowska, Ania; Gissen, Paul; Selim, Laila A M; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Coroleu-Lletget, Wifredo; Mohammad, Shekeeb S; Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Dale, Russell C; Thomas, Maya; Rihel, Jason; Bodamer, Olaf A; Enns, Caroline A; Hayflick, Susan J; Clayton, Peter T; Mills, Philippa B; Kurian, Manju A; Wilson, Stephen W

    2016-01-01

    Although manganese is an essential trace metal, little is known about its transport and homeostatic regulation. Here we have identified a cohort of patients with a novel autosomal recessive manganese transporter defect caused by mutations in SLC39A14. Excessive accumulation of manganese in these patients results in rapidly progressive childhood-onset parkinsonism-dystonia with distinctive brain magnetic resonance imaging appearances and neurodegenerative features on post-mortem examination. We show that mutations in SLC39A14 impair manganese transport in vitro and lead to manganese dyshomeostasis and altered locomotor activity in zebrafish with CRISPR-induced slc39a14 null mutations. Chelation with disodium calcium edetate lowers blood manganese levels in patients and can lead to striking clinical improvement. Our results demonstrate that SLC39A14 functions as a pivotal manganese transporter in vertebrates. PMID:27231142

  18. Recessively inherited L-DOPA-responsive dystonia caused by a point mutation (Q381K) in the tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Knappskog, P M; Flatmark, T; Mallet, J; Lüdecke, B; Bartholomé, K

    1995-07-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the conversion of L-tyrosine to L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of dopamine. Recently, we described a point mutation in hTH (Q381K) in a family of two siblings suffering from progressive L-DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD), representing the first reported mutation in this gene. We here describe the cloning, expression and steady-state kinetic properties of the recombinant mutant enzyme. When expressed by a coupled in vitro transcription-translation system and in E. coli, the mutant enzyme represents a kinetic variant form, with a reduced affinity for L-tyrosine. The 'residual activity' of about 15% of the corresponding wild-type hTH (isoform hTH1), at substrate concentrations prevailing in vivo, is compatible with the clinical phenotype of the two Q381K homozygote patients carrying this recessively inherited mutation. PMID:8528210

  19. Han Chinese patients with dopa-responsive dystonia exhibit a low frequency of exonic deletion in the GCH1 gene.

    PubMed

    Shi, W T; Cai, C Y; Li, M S; Ling, C; Li, W D

    2015-01-01

    We identified three novel mutations of the GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) gene in patients with familial dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD), but were unable to identify meaningful sporadic mutations in patients with no obvious family DRD background. To investigate whether GCH1 regional deletions account for the etiology of DRD, we screened for heterozygous exonic deletions in DRD families and in patients with sporadic DRD. Multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed in all members of our DRD cohort and in controls to detect exonic deletions in GCH1, tyrosine hydroxylase, and the epsilon-sarcoglycan-encoding (SGCE) genes. Using these techniques, we detected a GCH1 exon 1 heterozygous deletion in 1 of 10 patients with sporadic DRD. Therefore, we concluded that exonic deletion in the GCH1 gene only accounted for the etiology in a small percentage of patients with sporadic DRD in our Han Chinese cohort. PMID:26400349

  20. Mutations in SLC39A14 disrupt manganese homeostasis and cause childhood-onset parkinsonism–dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Tuschl, Karin; Meyer, Esther; Valdivia, Leonardo E.; Zhao, Ningning; Dadswell, Chris; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Hung, Christina Y.; Simpson, Michael A.; Chong, W. K.; Jacques, Thomas S.; Woltjer, Randy L.; Eaton, Simon; Gregory, Allison; Sanford, Lynn; Kara, Eleanna; Houlden, Henry; Cuno, Stephan M.; Prokisch, Holger; Valletta, Lorella; Tiranti, Valeria; Younis, Rasha; Maher, Eamonn R.; Spencer, John; Straatman-Iwanowska, Ania; Gissen, Paul; Selim, Laila A. M.; Pintos-Morell, Guillem; Coroleu-Lletget, Wifredo; Mohammad, Shekeeb S.; Yoganathan, Sangeetha; Dale, Russell C.; Thomas, Maya; Rihel, Jason; Bodamer, Olaf A.; Enns, Caroline A.; Hayflick, Susan J.; Clayton, Peter T.; Mills, Philippa B.; Kurian, Manju A.; Wilson, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Although manganese is an essential trace metal, little is known about its transport and homeostatic regulation. Here we have identified a cohort of patients with a novel autosomal recessive manganese transporter defect caused by mutations in SLC39A14. Excessive accumulation of manganese in these patients results in rapidly progressive childhood-onset parkinsonism–dystonia with distinctive brain magnetic resonance imaging appearances and neurodegenerative features on post-mortem examination. We show that mutations in SLC39A14 impair manganese transport in vitro and lead to manganese dyshomeostasis and altered locomotor activity in zebrafish with CRISPR-induced slc39a14 null mutations. Chelation with disodium calcium edetate lowers blood manganese levels in patients and can lead to striking clinical improvement. Our results demonstrate that SLC39A14 functions as a pivotal manganese transporter in vertebrates. PMID:27231142

  1. The Cervical Dystonia Impact Profile (CDIP-58): Can a Rasch developed patient reported outcome measure satisfy traditional psychometric criteria?

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Stefan J; Warner, Thomas T; Thompson, Alan J; Bhatia, Kailash P; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Hobart, Jeremy C

    2008-01-01

    Background The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are currently producing guidelines for the scientific adequacy of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) in clinical trials, which will have implications for the selection of scales used in future clinical trials. In this study, we examine how the Cervical Dystonia Impact Profile (CDIP-58), a rigorous Rasch measurement developed neurologic PROM, stands up to traditional psychometric criteria for three reasons: 1) provide traditional psychometric evidence for the CDIP-58 in line with proposed FDA guidelines; 2) enable researchers and clinicians to compare it with existing dystonia PROMs; and 3) help researchers and clinicians bridge the knowledge gap between old and new methods of reliability and validity testing. Methods We evaluated traditional psychometric properties of data quality, scaling assumptions, targeting, reliability and validity in a group of 391 people with CD. The main outcome measures used were the CDIP-58, Medical Outcome Study Short Form-36, the 28-item General Health Questionnaire, and Hospital and Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results A total of 391 people returned completed questionnaires (corrected response rate 87%). Analyses showed: 1) data quality was high (low missing data ≤ 4%, subscale scores could be computed for > 96% of the sample); 2) item groupings passed tests for scaling assumptions; 3) good targeting (except for the Sleep subscale, ceiling effect = 27%); 4) good reliability (Cronbach's alpha ≥ 0.92, test-retest intraclass correlations ≥ 0.83); and 5) validity was supported. Conclusion This study has shown that new psychometric methods can produce a PROM that stands up to traditional criteria and supports the clinical advantages of Rasch analysis. PMID:18684327

  2. GTP cyclohydrolase I and tyrosine hydroxylase gene mutations in familial and sporadic dopa-responsive dystonia patients.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chunyou; Shi, Wentao; Zeng, Zheng; Zhang, Meiyun; Ling, Chao; Chen, Lei; Cai, Chunquan; Zhang, Benshu; Li, Wei-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD) is a rare inherited dystonia that responds very well to levodopa treatment. Genetic mutations of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1) or tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) are disease-causing mutations in DRD. To evaluate the genotype-phenotype correlations and diagnostic values of GCH1 and TH mutation screening in DRD patients, we carried out a combined study of familial and sporadic cases in Chinese Han subjects. We collected 23 subjects, 8 patients with DRD, 5 unaffected family members, and 10 sporadic cases. We used PCR to sequence all exons and splicing sites of the GCH1 and TH genes. Three novel heterozygous GCH1 mutations (Tyr75Cys, Ala98Val, and Ile135Thr) were identified in three DRD pedigrees. We failed to identify any GCH1 or TH mutation in two affected sisters. Three symptom-free male GCH1 mutation carriers were found in two DRD pedigrees. For those DRD siblings that shared the same GCH1 mutation, symptoms and age of onset varied. In 10 sporadic cases, only two heterozygous TH mutations (Ser19Cys and Gly397Arg) were found in two subjects with unknown pathogenicity. No GCH1 and TH mutation was found in 40 unrelated normal Han Chinese controls. GCH1 mutation is the main etiology of familial DRD. Three novel GCH1 mutations were identified in this study. Genetic heterogeneity and incomplete penetrance were quite common in DRD patients, especially in sporadic cases. Genetic screening may help establish the diagnosis of DRD; however, a negative GCH1 and TH mutation test would not exclude the diagnosis. PMID:23762320

  3. Reduced Number of Pigmented Neurons in the Substantia Nigra of Dystonia Patients? Findings from Extensive Neuropathologic, Immunohistochemistry, and Quantitative Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, Diego; Geraci-Erck, Maria; Peng, Hui; Rabin, Marcie L.; Kurlan, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Background Dystonias (Dys) represent the third most common movement disorder after essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson's disease (PD). While some pathogenetic mechanisms and genetic causes of Dys have been identified, little is known about their neuropathologic features. Previous neuropathologic studies have reported generically defined neuronal loss in various cerebral regions of Dys brains, mostly in the basal ganglia (BG), and specifically in the substantia nigra (SN). Enlarged pigmented neurons in the SN of Dys patients with and without specific genetic mutations (e.g., GAG deletions in DYT1 dystonia) have also been described. Whether or not Dys brains are associated with decreased numbers or other morphometric changes of specific neuronal types is unknown and has never been addressed with quantitative methodologies. Methods Quantitative immunohistochemistry protocols were used to estimate neuronal counts and volumes of nigral pigmented neurons in 13 SN of Dys patients and 13 SN of age-matched control subjects (C). Results We observed a significant reduction (∼20%) of pigmented neurons in the SN of Dys compared to C (p<0.01). Neither significant volumetric changes nor evident neurodegenerative signs were observed in the remaining pool of nigral pigmented neurons in Dys brains. These novel quantitative findings were confirmed after exclusion of possible co-occurring SN pathologies including Lewy pathology, tau-neurofibrillary tangles, β-amyloid deposits, ubiquitin (ubiq), and phosphorylated-TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (pTDP43)-positive inclusions. Discussion A reduced number of nigral pigmented neurons in the absence of evident neurodegenerative signs in Dys brains could indicate previously unconsidered pathogenetic mechanisms of Dys such as neurodevelopmental defects in the SN. PMID:26069855

  4. Dimerization of the DYT6 dystonia protein, THAP1, requires residues within the coiled-coil domain.

    PubMed

    Sengel, Cem; Gavarini, Sophie; Sharma, Nutan; Ozelius, Laurie J; Bragg, D Cristopher

    2011-09-01

    Thanatos-associated [THAP] domain-containing apoptosis-associated protein 1 (THAP1) is a DNA-binding protein that has been recently associated with DYT6 dystonia, a hereditary movement disorder involving sustained, involuntary muscle contractions. A large number of dystonia-related mutations have been identified in THAP1 in diverse patient populations worldwide. Previous reports have suggested that THAP1 oligomerizes with itself via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain, raising the possibility that DYT6 mutations in this region might affect this interaction. In this study, we examined the ability of wild-type THAP1 to bind itself and the effects on this interaction of the following disease mutations: C54Y, F81L, ΔF132, T142A, I149T, Q154fs180X, and A166T. The results confirmed that wild-type THAP1 associated with itself and most of the DYT6 mutants tested, except for the Q154fs180X variant, which loses most of the coiled-coil domain because of a frameshift at position 154. However, deletion of C-terminal residues after position 166 produced a truncated variant of THAP1 that was able to bind the wild-type protein. The interaction of THAP1 with itself therefore required residues within a 13-amino acid region (aa 154-166) of the coiled-coil domain. Further inspection of this sequence revealed elements highly consistent with previous descriptions of leucine zippers, which serve as dimerization domains in other transcription factor families. Based on this similarity, a structural model was generated to predict how hydrophobic residues in this region may mediate dimerization. These observations offer additional insight into the role of the coiled-coil domain in THAP1, which may facilitate future analyses of DYT6 mutations in this region. PMID:21752024

  5. Dimerization of the DYT6 dystonia protein, THAP1, requires residues within the coiled-coil domain

    PubMed Central

    Sengel, Cem; Gavarini, Sophie; Sharma, Nutan; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Bragg, D. Cristopher

    2011-01-01

    THAP1 is a DNA binding protein that has been recently associated with DYT6 dystonia, a hereditary movement disorder involving sustained, involuntary muscle contractions. A large number of dystonia-related mutations have been identified in THAP1 in diverse patient populations worldwide. Previous reports have suggested that THAP1 oligomerizes with itself via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain, raising the possibility that DYT6 mutations in this region might affect this interaction. In this study we examined the ability of wild-type THAP1 to bind itself and the effects on this interaction of the following disease mutations: C54Y, F81L, ΔF132, T142A, I149T, Q154fs180X, and A166T. The results confirmed that wild-type THAP1 associated with itself and most of the DYT6 mutants tested, except for the Q154fs180X variant, which loses most of the coiled-coil domain due to a frameshift at position 154. However, deletion of C-terminal residues after position 166 produced a truncated variant of THAP1 that was able to bind the wild-type protein. The interaction of THAP1 with itself therefore required residues within a 13-amino acid region (aa 154–166) of the coiled-coil domain. Further inspection of this sequence revealed elements highly consistent with previous descriptions of leucine zippers, which serve as dimerization domains in other transcription factor families. Based on this similarity, a structural model was generated to predict how hydrophobic residues in this region may mediate dimerization. These observations offer additional insight into the role of the coiled-coil domain in THAP1, which may facilitate future analyses of DYT6 mutations in this region. PMID:21752024

  6. [Diagnosis of autonomic-vascular dystonia in persons who participated in the liquidation of the effects of the Chernobyl AES accident].

    PubMed

    Torubarov, F S; Nikolaev, M K; Dakhno, D V

    1991-01-01

    The diagnosis of autonomic-vascular dystonia caused by small doses of ionizing radiation can be made only on the basis of the objectivity, completeness, constructive and individual character of data. It gives an opportunity to reflect in the diagnosis cause/effect relationships, to define the main and supplementary factors of a pathological process and to show their interrelationships and interinfluence. It leads to the development of adequate therapeutic-rehabilitation tactics. PMID:1943589

  7. Expanding the phenotype in aminoacylase 1 (ACY1) deficiency: characterization of the molecular defect in a 63-year-old woman with generalized dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sass, Jörn Oliver; Vaithilingam, Jathana; Gemperle-Britschgi, Corinne; Delnooz, Cathérine C S; Kluijtmans, Leo A J; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Wevers, Ron A

    2016-06-01

    Aminoacylase 1 (ACY1) deficiency is an organic aciduria due to mutations in the ACY1 gene. It is considered much underdiagnosed. Most individuals known to be affected by ACY1 deficiency have presented with neurologic symptoms. We report here a cognitively normal 63-year-old woman who around the age of 12 years had developed dystonic symptoms that gradually evolved into generalized dystonia. Extensive investigations, including metabolic diagnostics and diagnostic exome sequencing, were performed to elucidate the cause of dystonia. Findings were only compatible with a diagnosis of ACY1 deficiency: the urinary metabolite pattern with N-acetylated amino acids was characteristic, there was decreased ACY1 activity in immortalized lymphocytes, and two compound heterozygous ACY1 mutations were detected, one well-characterized c.1057C>T (p.Arg353Cys) and the other novel c.325A>G (p.Arg109Gly). Expression analysis in HEK293 cells revealed high residual activity of the enzyme with the latter mutation. However, following co-transfection of cells with stable expression of the c.1057C>T variant with either wild-type ACY1 or the c.325A>G mutant, only the wild-type enhanced ACY1 activity and ACY1 presence in the Western blot, suggesting an inhibiting interference between the two variants. Our report extends the clinical spectrum of ACY1 deficiency to include dystonia and indicates that screening for organic acidurias deserves consideration in patients with unexplained generalized dystonia. PMID:26686503

  8. [Hemodynamic correlation between the reaction of circulatory system on physical activity and exogenic adrenaline in liquidators of Chernobyl accident with neurocirculatory dystonia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, A N; Vereskun, S B

    2007-01-01

    The article presents a correlation analysis between hemodynamic changes occurred after performing submaximum physical activity using bicycle ergometer (physical stress) and intravenous injection of adrenalin (pharmacological stress) in 30 liquidators of Chernobyl accident and who have a neurocirculatory dystonia syndrome. It enables to establish interrelations for a number of maximal values of parameters of hemodynamics which is determined by the same shifts in circulatory system with sympathoadrenal direction during these two kinds of stress influence. PMID:18416159

  9. Self-awareness of motor dysfunction in patients with Huntington's disease in comparison to Parkinson's disease and cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sitek, Emilia J; Sołtan, Witold; Wieczorek, Dariusz; Schinwelski, Michał; Robowski, Piotr; Reilmann, Ralf; Guzińska, Katarzyna; Harciarek, Michał; Krysa, Wioletta; Sławek, Jarosław

    2011-09-01

    Individuals suffering from Huntington's disease (HD) have been shown to present with poor self-awareness of a variety of symptoms. The aim of this study was to better assess the self-awareness of motor symptoms and activities of daily living (ADL) impairment in HD, in comparison to Parkinson's disease (PD) and cervical dystonia (CD). In particular, the anosognosia/anosodiaphoria of involuntary movements has been investigated. Self-awareness was tested in 23 patients with HD by comparing patient and caregiver ratings in reference to clinical control groups (25 PD with dyskinesias, PDdys; 21 PD without dyskinesias, PDndys; and 20 with CD). Patients were assessed neurologically by relevant rating scales. Self-awareness was tested using a scale based on 15 films demonstrating 3 types of motor symptoms (chorea/dyskinesias, parkinsonism, torticollis) as well as the Self-Assessment Parkinson's Disease Disability Scale. General cognitive status, verbal learning, cognitive control, and mood were also analyzed. Our results indicate that self-awareness of choreic movements was affected more severely in HD than in PDdys, despite comparable cognitive status. Patient-proxy agreement on ADL impairment was roughly similar in all clinical groups. The results are discussed in the context of orbitofrontal-limbic pathology as a potential trigger of anosognosia/anosodiaphoria in individuals with HD. PMID:21729402

  10. Towards the classification of DYT6 dystonia mutants in the DNA-binding domain of THAP1

    PubMed Central

    Campagne, Sébastien; Muller, Isabelle; Gervais, Virginie

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor THAP1 (THanatos Associated Protein 1) has emerged recently as the cause of DYT6 primary dystonia, a type of rare, familial and mostly early-onset syndrome that leads to involuntary muscle contractions. Many of the mutations described in the DYT6 patients fall within the sequence-specific DNA-binding domain (THAP domain) of THAP1 and are believed to negatively affect DNA binding. Here, we have used an integrated approach combining spectroscopic (NMR, fluorescence, DSF) and calorimetric (ITC) methods to evaluate the effect of missense mutations, within the THAP domain, on the structure, stability and DNA binding. Our study demonstrates that none of the mutations investigated failed to bind DNA and some of them even bind DNA stronger than the wild-type protein. However, some mutations could alter DNA-binding specificity. Furthermore, the most striking effect is the decrease of stability observed for mutations at positions affecting the zinc coordination, the hydrophobic core or the C-terminal AVPTIF motif, with unfolding temperatures ranging from 46°C for the wild-type to below 37°C for two mutations. These findings suggest that reduction in population of folded protein under physiological conditions could also account for the disease. PMID:22844099

  11. Towards the classification of DYT6 dystonia mutants in the DNA-binding domain of THAP1.

    PubMed

    Campagne, Sébastien; Muller, Isabelle; Milon, Alain; Gervais, Virginie

    2012-10-01

    The transcription factor THAP1 (THanatos Associated Protein 1) has emerged recently as the cause of DYT6 primary dystonia, a type of rare, familial and mostly early-onset syndrome that leads to involuntary muscle contractions. Many of the mutations described in the DYT6 patients fall within the sequence-specific DNA-binding domain (THAP domain) of THAP1 and are believed to negatively affect DNA binding. Here, we have used an integrated approach combining spectroscopic (NMR, fluorescence, DSF) and calorimetric (ITC) methods to evaluate the effect of missense mutations, within the THAP domain, on the structure, stability and DNA binding. Our study demonstrates that none of the mutations investigated failed to bind DNA and some of them even bind DNA stronger than the wild-type protein. However, some mutations could alter DNA-binding specificity. Furthermore, the most striking effect is the decrease of stability observed for mutations at positions affecting the zinc coordination, the hydrophobic core or the C-terminal AVPTIF motif, with unfolding temperatures ranging from 46°C for the wild-type to below 37°C for two mutations. These findings suggest that reduction in population of folded protein under physiological conditions could also account for the disease. PMID:22844099

  12. The curse of motor expertise: Use-dependent focal dystonia as a manifestation of maladaptive changes in body representation.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Shinichi; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    Focal task-specific dystonia (FTSD) impairs not only motor dexterity, but also somatosensory perception involved in well-trained behavioral tasks. Occupations that carry a risk of developing FTSD include musician, writer, painter, surgeon, and golfer, which are characterized by repetitive and precise motor actions over a prolonged period. Behavioral studies have uncovered various undesirable effects of FTSD on sensorimotor functions, such as a loss of independent movement control, unintended muscular co-activation, awkward limb posture, and impairment of fine discrimination of tactile and proprioceptive sensations. Studies using neuroimaging and noninvasive brain stimulation techniques have related such sensorimotor malfunctions to maladaptive neuroplastic changes in the sensorimotor system, including the primary motor and somatosensory areas, premotor area, cerebellum, and basal ganglia. In this review, we summarize recent empirical findings regarding phenomenological and pathophysiological abnormalities associated with the development of FTSD. We particularly focused on maladaptive alterations of body representations underlying the degradation of fine motor control and somatosensory perception in FTSD patients. PMID:26689332

  13. Tardive dyskinesia and tardive dystonia with second-generation antipsychotics in non-elderly schizophrenic patients unexposed to first-generation antipsychotics: a cross-sectional and retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seunghyong; Yoo, Jae Hyun; Kim, Joo Hyun; Choi, Ji Sun; Baek, Ji Hyun; Ha, Kyooseob; Kwon, Jun Soo; Hong, Kyung Sue

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates the clinical nature, prevalence rates, and associated factors of second-generation antipsychotic (SGA)-related tardive dyskinesia and tardive dystonia. To date, these subjects have not been thoroughly investigated.The subjects were 80 non-elderly schizophrenic patients who received SGAs for more than 1 year without any previous exposure to first-generation antipsychotics. Multiple (≥2) direct assessments of movement symptoms were performed. Hospital records longer than 1 recent year describing any observed tardive movement symptoms were reviewed.A current or history of tardive dyskinesia and/or tardive dystonia associated with SGA was identified in 28 (35%) subjects. These patients were being treated with risperidone (n = 15), amisulpride, olanzapine, aripiprazole, ziprasidone, or clozapine at the time of the onset of the movement symptoms. Tardive dyskinesia was mostly in the orolingual area, and the most frequently observed tardive dystonia was torticollis. The median interval between the first exposure to the SGA and the movement syndrome onset was 15 months for tardive dyskinesia and 43 months for tardive dystonia. A history of acute dystonia was significantly associated with tardive dystonia, and comorbid obsessive-compulsive syndrome was related to both tardive movement syndromes.This study indicates that more clinical attention and research efforts are needed regarding SGA-associated tardive movement syndromes, including a larger-scale prevalence assessment. This study is the first to indicate that a comorbid obsessive-compulsive syndrome might be an associated factor of tardive movement syndrome. The association warrants further investigation. PMID:25485636

  14. Establishing the definition and inter-rater reliability of cortical silent period calculation in subjects with focal hand dystonia and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Kimberley, Teresa Jacobson; Borich, Michael R.; Prochaska, Kristina D.; Mundfrom, Shannon L.; Perkins, Ariel E.; Poepping, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a clearly defined manual method for calculating cortical silent period (CSP) length that can be employed successfully and reliably by raters after minimal training in subjects with focal hand dystonia (FHD) and healthy subjects. A secondary purpose was to explore intra-subject variability of the CSP in subjects with FHD vs. healthy subjects. Methods Two raters previously naïve to CSP identification and one experienced rater independently analyzed 170 CSP measurements collected in six subjects with focal hand dystonia (FHD) and nine healthy subjects. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated to quantify inter-rater reliability within the two groups of subjects. The relative variability of CSP in each group was calculated by coefficient of variation (CV). Relative variation between raters within repeated measures of individual subjects was also quantified by CV. Results Reliability measures were as follows: mean of three raters: all subjects: ICC= 0.976; within healthy subjects: ICC=0.965; in subjects with FHD: ICC= 0.956. The median within-subject variability for the healthy group was CV=7.33% and in subjects with FHD: CV= 11.78%. The median variability of calculating individual subject CSP duration between raters was CV=10.23% in subjects with dystonia and CV=10.46% in healthy subjects. Conclusions Manual calculation of CSP results in excellent reliability between raters of varied levels of experience. Healthy subjects display less variability in CSP. Despite greater variability, the CSP in impaired subjects can be reliably calculated across raters. PMID:19686807

  15. Mutant human torsinA, responsible for early-onset dystonia, dominantly suppresses GTPCH expression, dopamine levels and locomotion in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi-Ito, Noriko; Ajjuri, Rami R.; Henderson, Benjamin W.; Doherty, Olugbenga M.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; O'Donnell, Janis M.; Ito, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia represents the third most common movement disorder in humans with over 20 genetic loci identified. TOR1A (DYT1), the gene responsible for the most common primary hereditary dystonia, encodes torsinA, an AAA ATPase family protein. Most cases of DYT1 dystonia are caused by a 3 bp (ΔGAG) deletion that results in the loss of a glutamic acid residue (ΔE302/303) in the carboxyl terminal region of torsinA. This torsinAΔE mutant protein has been speculated to act in a dominant-negative manner to decrease activity of wild type torsinA. Drosophila melanogaster has a single torsin-related gene, dtorsin. Null mutants of dtorsin exhibited locomotion defects in third instar larvae. Levels of dopamine and GTP cyclohydrolase (GTPCH) proteins were severely reduced in dtorsin-null brains. Further, the locomotion defect was rescued by the expression of human torsinA or feeding with dopamine. Here, we demonstrate that human torsinAΔE dominantly inhibited locomotion in larvae and adults when expressed in neurons using a pan-neuronal promoter Elav. Dopamine and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) levels were significantly reduced in larval brains and the expression level of GTPCH protein was severely impaired in adult and larval brains. When human torsinA and torsinAΔE were co-expressed in neurons in dtorsin-null larvae and adults, the locomotion rates and the expression levels of GTPCH protein were severely reduced. These results support the hypothesis that torsinAΔE inhibits wild type torsinA activity. Similarly, neuronal expression of a Drosophila DtorsinΔE equivalent mutation dominantly inhibited larval locomotion and GTPCH protein expression. These results indicate that both torsinAΔE and DtorsinΔE act in a dominant-negative manner. We also demonstrate that Dtorsin regulates GTPCH expression at the post-transcriptional level. This Drosophila model of DYT1 dystonia provides an important tool for studying the differences in the molecular function between the wild type and the

  16. A new treatment for focal dystonias: incobotulinumtoxinA (Xeomin®), a botulinum neurotoxin type A free from complexing proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Shahed, Joohi

    2012-01-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder of uncertain pathogenesis that is characterized by involuntary and inappropriate muscle contractions which cause sustained abnormal postures and movements of multiple or single (focal) body regions. The most common focal dystonias are cervical dystonia (CD) and blepharospasm (BSP). The first-line recommended treatment for CD and BSP is injection with botulinum toxin (BoNT), of which two serotypes are available: BoNT type A (BoNT/A) and BoNT type B (BoNT/B). Conventional BoNT formulations include inactive complexing proteins, which may increase the risk for antigenicity, possibly leading to treatment failure. IncobotulinumtoxinA (Xeomin®; Merz Pharmaceuticals GmbH, Frankfurt, Germany) is a BoNT/A agent that has been recently Food and Drug Administration-approved for the treatment of adults with CD and adults with BSP previously treated with onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox®; Allergen, Inc, Irvine, CA) – a conventional BoNT/A. IncobotulinumtoxinA is the only BoNT product that is free of complexing proteins. The necessity of complexing proteins for the effectiveness of botulinum toxin treatment has been challenged by preclinical and clinical studies with incobotulinumtoxinA. These studies have also suggested that incobotulinumtoxinA is associated with a lower risk for stimulating antibody formation than onabotulinumtoxinA. In phase 3 noninferiority trials, incobotulinumtoxinA demonstrated significant improvements in CD and BSP symptoms in both primary and secondary measures, compared with baseline, and met criteria for noninferiority versus onabotulinumtoxinA. In placebo-controlled trials, incobotulinumtoxinA also significantly improved the symptoms of CD and BSP, with robust outcomes in both primary and secondary measures. The use of incobotulinumtoxinA has been well tolerated in all trials, with an adverse event profile similar to that of onabotulinumtoxinA. Based on these data, incobotulinumtoxinA is a safe and effective BoNT/A for the

  17. Decreased N-TAF1 expression in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism patient-specific neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Naoto; Hendriks, William T.; Dhakal, Jyotsna; Vaine, Christine A.; Liu, Christina; Shin, David; Shin, Kyle; Wakabayashi-Ito, Noriko; Dy, Marisela; Multhaupt-Buell, Trisha; Sharma, Nutan; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Bragg, D. Cristopher

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (XDP) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder involving a progressive loss of striatal medium spiny neurons. The mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are not known, in part because there have been few cellular models available for studying the disease. The XDP haplotype consists of multiple sequence variations in a region of the X chromosome containing TAF1, a large gene with at least 38 exons, and a multiple transcript system (MTS) composed of five unconventional exons. A previous study identified an XDP-specific insertion of a SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA)-type retrotransposon in intron 32 of TAF1, as well as a neural-specific TAF1 isoform, N-TAF1, which showed decreased expression in post-mortem XDP brain compared with control tissue. Here, we generated XDP patient and control fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in order to further probe cellular defects associated with this disease. As initial validation of the model, we compared expression of TAF1 and MTS transcripts in XDP versus control fibroblasts and iPSC-derived neural stem cells (NSCs). Compared with control cells, XDP fibroblasts exhibited decreased expression of TAF1 transcript fragments derived from exons 32-36, a region spanning the SVA insertion site. N-TAF1, which incorporates an alternative exon (exon 34′), was not expressed in fibroblasts, but was detectable in iPSC-differentiated NSCs at levels that were ∼threefold lower in XDP cells than in controls. These results support the previous findings that N-TAF1 expression is impaired in XDP, but additionally indicate that this aberrant transcription might occur in neural cells at relatively early stages of development that precede neurodegeneration. PMID:26769797

  18. Reduced Neck Muscle Strength and Altered Muscle Mechanical Properties in Cervical Dystonia Following Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Mustalampi, Sirpa; Ylinen, Jari; Korniloff, Katariina; Weir, Adam; Häkkinen, Arja

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate changes in the strength and mechanical properties of neck muscles and disability in patients with cervical dystonia (CD) during a 12-week period following botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injections. Methods Eight patients with CD volunteered for this prospective clinical cohort study. Patients had received BoNT injections regularly in neck muscles at three-month intervals for several years. Maximal isometric neck strength was measured by a dynamometer, and the mechanical properties of the splenius capitis were evaluated using two myotonometers. Clinical assessment was performed using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) before and at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after the BoNT injections. Results Mean maximal isometric neck strength at two weeks after the BoNT injections decreased by 28% in extension, 25% in rotation of the affected side and 17% in flexion. At four weeks, muscle stiffness of the affected side decreased by 17% and tension decreased by 6%. At eight weeks, the muscle elasticity on the affected side increased by 12%. At two weeks after the BoNT injections, the TWSTRS-severity and TWSTRS-total scores decreased by 4.3 and 6.4, respectively. The strength, muscle mechanical properties and TWSTRS scores returned to baseline values at 12 weeks. Conclusions Although maximal neck strength and muscle tone decreased after BoNT injections, the disability improved. The changes observed after BoNT injections were temporary and returned to pre-injection levels within twelve weeks. Despite having a possible negative effect on function and decreasing neck strength, the BoNT injections improved the patients reported disability. PMID:26828215

  19. A relationship between bruxism and orofacial-dystonia? A trigeminal electrophysiological approach in a case report of pineal cavernoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In some clinical cases, bruxism may be correlated to central nervous system hyperexcitability, suggesting that bruxism may represent a subclinical form of dystonia. To examine this hypothesis, we performed an electrophysiological evaluation of the excitability of the trigeminal nervous system in a patient affected by pineal cavernoma with pain symptoms in the orofacial region and pronounced bruxism. Methods Electrophysiological studies included bilateral electrical transcranial stimulation of the trigeminal roots, analysis of the jaw jerk reflex, recovery cycle of masseter inhibitory reflex, and a magnetic resonance imaging study of the brain. Results The neuromuscular responses of the left- and right-side bilateral trigeminal motor potentials showed a high degree of symmetry in latency (1.92 ms and 1.96 ms, respectively) and amplitude (11 mV and 11.4 mV, respectively), whereas the jaw jerk reflex amplitude of the right and left masseters was 5.1 mV and 8.9 mV, respectively. The test stimulus for the recovery cycle of masseter inhibitory reflex evoked both silent periods at an interstimulus interval of 150 ms. The duration of the second silent period evoked by the test stimulus was 61 ms and 54 ms on the right and left masseters, respectively, which was greater than that evoked by the conditioning stimulus (39 ms and 35 ms, respectively). Conclusions We found evidence of activation and peripheral sensitization of the nociceptive fibers, the primary and secondary nociceptive neurons in the central nervous system, and the endogenous pain control systems (including both the inhibitory and facilitatory processes), in the tested subject. These data suggest that bruxism and central orofacial pain can coexist, but are two independent symptoms, which may explain why numerous experimental and clinical studies fail to reach unequivocal conclusions. PMID:24165294

  20. Factors influencing response to Botulinum toxin type A in patients with idiopathic cervical dystonia: results from an international observational study

    PubMed Central

    Ehler, Edvard; Zakine, Benjamin; Maisonobe, Pascal; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Real-life data on response to Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) in cervical dystonia (CD) are sparse. An expert group of neurologists was convened with the overall aim of developing a definition of treatment response, which could be applied in a non-interventional study of BoNT-A-treated subjects with CD. Design International, multicentre, prospective, observational study of a single injection cycle of BoNT-A as part of normal clinical practice. Setting 38 centres across Australia, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, The Netherlands, Portugal, Russia and the UK. Participants 404 adult subjects with idiopathic CD. Most subjects were women, aged 41–60 years and had previously received BoNT-A. Outcome measures Patients were classified as responders if they met all the following four criteria: magnitude of effect (≥25% improvement Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale), duration of effect (≥12-week interval between the BoNT-A injection day and subject-reported waning of treatment effect), tolerability (absence of severe related adverse event) and subject's positive Clinical Global Improvement (CGI). Results High rates of response were observed for magnitude of effect (73.6%), tolerability (97.5%) and subject's clinical global improvement (69.8%). The subjective duration of effect criterion was achieved by 49.3% of subjects; 28.6% of subjects achieved the responder definition. Factors most strongly associated with response were age (<40 years; OR 3.9, p<0.05) and absence of baseline head tremor (OR 1.5; not significant). Conclusions Three of four criteria were met by most patients. The proposed multidimensional definition of response appears to be practical for routine practice. Unrealistically high patient expectation and subjectivity may influence the perception of a quick waning of effect, but highlights that this aspect may be a hurdle to response in some patients. Clinical registration number (NCT00833196; ClinicalTrials.gov). PMID

  1. AbobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport) dosing in cervical dystonia: an exploratory analysis of two large open-label extension studies.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Robert A; Truong, Daniel; Hubble, Jean; Coleman, Chandra; Beffy, Jean-Luc; Chang, Stephen; Picaut, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Treatment with botulinum toxin-A is recommended as first-line treatment for cervical dystonia (CD). In clinical practice many factors appear to influence dose adjustment and the retreatment regimen; however, there is little information available in the literature regarding the evolution of dosing over treatment cycles. We report on two similarly designed, long-term, multicenter, open-label extension studies of Dysport for the treatment of CD, which followed 500 U fixed-dose placebo-controlled trials. Both studies specified a fixed 500 U dose for the first open-label treatment cycle, with dose adjustment in subsequent treatment cycles according to the clinical response. These analyses include 218 patients who entered the two studies; doses in the subsequent treatment cycles ranged between 250 and 1,000 U. During open-label treatment, all treatment cycles resulted in improvements in mean Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) total scores. However, increasing the dose of Dysport above the initial 500 U dose was not observed to result in an incremental improvement in response as measured by the TWSTRS. No individual patient characteristic was found to reliably predict the use of higher doses at each treatment cycle. Dysport was generally well tolerated with no major differences in the incidence of adverse events (AEs) observed with different doses. Dysphagia was considered an AE of special interest and dysphagia data from the open-label studies were combined with two Phase II studies. Analysis of this enhanced database indicates that unilateral injections of >150 U into the sternocleidomastoid muscle is associated with a higher dysphagia risk. Thus, limiting the dose in the sternocleidomastoid may help reduce the incidence of dysphagia. PMID:22878514

  2. A mixed treatment comparison to compare the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin treatments for cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Han, Yi; Stevens, Andrea L; Dashtipour, Khashayar; Hauser, Robert A; Mari, Zoltan

    2016-04-01

    A systematic pair-wise comparison of all available botulinum toxin serotype A and B treatments for cervical dystonia (CD) was conducted, as direct head-to-head clinical trial comparisons are lacking. Five botulinum toxin products: Dysport(®) (abobotulinumtoxinA), Botox(®) (onabotulinumtoxinA), Xeomin(®) (incobotulinumtoxinA), Prosigne(®) (Chinese botulinum toxin serotype A) and Myobloc(®) (rimabotulinumtoxinB) have demonstrated efficacy for managing CD. A pair-wise efficacy and safety comparison was performed for all toxins based on literature-reported clinical outcomes. Multi-armed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified for inclusion using a systematic literature review, and assessed for comparability based on patient population and efficacy outcome measures. The Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) was selected as the efficacy outcome measurement for assessment. A mixed treatment comparison (MTC) was conducted using a Bayesian hierarchical model allowing indirect comparison of the interventions. Due to the limitation of available clinical data, this study only investigated the main effect of toxin treatments without explicitly considering potential confounding factors such as gender and formulation differences. There was reasonable agreement between the number of unconstrained data points, residual deviance and pair-wise results. This research suggests that all botulinum toxin serotype A and serotype B treatments were effective compared to placebo in treating CD, with the exception of Prosigne. Based on this MTC analysis, there is no significant efficacy difference between Dysport, Botox, Xeomin and Myobloc at week four post injection. Of the adverse events measured, neither dysphagia nor injection site pain was significantly greater in the treatment or placebo groups. PMID:26914922

  3. Structures of TorsinA and its disease-mutant complexed with an activator reveal the molecular basis for primary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Demircioglu, F Esra; Sosa, Brian A; Ingram, Jessica; Ploegh, Hidde L; Schwartz, Thomas U

    2016-01-01

    The most common cause of early onset primary dystonia, a neuromuscular disease, is a glutamate deletion (ΔE) at position 302/303 of TorsinA, a AAA+ ATPase that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum. While the function of TorsinA remains elusive, the ΔE mutation is known to diminish binding of two TorsinA ATPase activators: lamina-associated protein 1 (LAP1) and its paralog, luminal domain like LAP1 (LULL1). Using a nanobody as a crystallization chaperone, we obtained a 1.4 Å crystal structure of human TorsinA in complex with LULL1. This nanobody likewise stabilized the weakened TorsinAΔE-LULL1 interaction, which enabled us to solve its structure at 1.4 Å also. A comparison of these structures shows, in atomic detail, the subtle differences in activator interactions that separate the healthy from the diseased state. This information may provide a structural platform for drug development, as a small molecule that rescues TorsinAΔE could serve as a cure for primary dystonia. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17983.001 PMID:27490483

  4. Structures of TorsinA and its disease-mutant complexed with an activator reveal the molecular basis for primary dystonia.

    PubMed

    Demircioglu, F Esra; Sosa, Brian A; Ingram, Jessica; Ploegh, Hidde L; Schwartz, Thomas U

    2016-01-01

    The most common cause of early onset primary dystonia, a neuromuscular disease, is a glutamate deletion (ΔE) at position 302/303 of TorsinA, a AAA+ ATPase that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum. While the function of TorsinA remains elusive, the ΔE mutation is known to diminish binding of two TorsinA ATPase activators: lamina-associated protein 1 (LAP1) and its paralog, luminal domain like LAP1 (LULL1). Using a nanobody as a crystallization chaperone, we obtained a 1.4 Å crystal structure of human TorsinA in complex with LULL1. This nanobody likewise stabilized the weakened TorsinAΔE-LULL1 interaction, which enabled us to solve its structure at 1.4 Å also. A comparison of these structures shows, in atomic detail, the subtle differences in activator interactions that separate the healthy from the diseased state. This information may provide a structural platform for drug development, as a small molecule that rescues TorsinAΔE could serve as a cure for primary dystonia. PMID:27490483

  5. The Zebrafish Homologue of the Human DYT1 Dystonia Gene Is Widely Expressed in CNS Neurons but Non-Essential for Early Motor System Development

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Jonathan J.; Torres, Gonzalo E.; Burton, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia is caused by mutation of the TOR1A gene, resulting in the loss of a single glutamic acid residue near the carboxyl terminal of TorsinA. The neuronal functions perturbed by TorsinA[ΔE] are a major unresolved issue in understanding the pathophysiology of dystonia, presenting a critical roadblock to developing effective treatments. We identified and characterized the zebrafish homologue of TOR1A, as a first step towards elucidating the functions of TorsinA in neurons, in vivo, using the genetically-manipulable zebrafish model. The zebrafish genome was found to contain a single alternatively-spliced tor1 gene, derived from a common ancestral locus shared with the dual TOR1A and TOR1B paralogues found in tertrapods. tor1 was expressed ubiquitously during early embryonic development and in multiple adult tissues, including the CNS. The 2.1 kb tor1 mRNA encodes Torsin1, which is 59% identical and 78% homologous to human TorsinA. Torsin1 was expressed as major 45 kDa and minor 47 kDa glycoproteins, within the cytoplasm of neurons and neuropil throughout the CNS. Similar to previous findings relating to human TorsinA, mutations of the ATP hydrolysis domain of Torsin1 resulted in relocalization of the protein in cultured cells from the endoplasmic reticulum to the nuclear envelope. Zebrafish embryos lacking tor1 during early development did not show impaired viability, overt morphological abnormalities, alterations in motor behavior, or developmental defects in the dopaminergic system. Torsin1 is thus non-essential for early development of the motor system, suggesting that important CNS functions may occur later in development, consistent with the critical time window in late childhood when dystonia symptoms usually emerge in DYT1 patients. The similarities between Torsin1 and human TorsinA in domain organization, expression pattern, and cellular localization suggest that the zebrafish will provide a useful model to understand the neuronal functions of Torsins

  6. SUCLA2 Deficiency: A Deafness-Dystonia Syndrome with Distinctive Metabolic Findings (Report of a New Patient and Review of the Literature).

    PubMed

    Maas, Roeltje R; Marina, Adela Della; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Wevers, Ron A; Rodenburg, Richard J; Wortmann, Saskia B

    2016-01-01

    SUCLA2 encodes for a subunit of succinyl-coenzyme A synthase, the enzyme that reversibly synthesises succinyl-coenzyme A and ATP from succinate, coenzyme A and ADP in the Krebs cycle. Disruption of SUCLA2 function can lead to mitochondrial DNA depletion. Patients with a SUCLA2 mutation present with a rare but distinctive deafness-dystonia syndrome. Additionally, they exhibit elevated levels of the characteristic biochemical markers: methylmalonate, C4-dicarboxylic carnitine and lactate are increased in both plasma and urine. Thus far, eight different disease-causing SUCLA2 mutations, of which six missense mutations and two splice site mutations, have been described in the literature. Here, we present the first patient with an intragenic deletion in SUCLA2 and review the patients described in literature. PMID:26409464

  7. LULL1 Retargets TorsinA to the Nuclear Envelope Revealing an Activity That Is Impaired by the DYT1 Dystonia Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Vander Heyden, Abigail B.; Naismith, Teresa V.; Snapp, Erik L.; Hodzic, Didier

    2009-01-01

    TorsinA (TorA) is an AAA+ ATPase in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen that is mutated in early onset DYT1 dystonia. TorA is an essential protein in mice and is thought to function in the nuclear envelope (NE) despite localizing throughout the ER. Here, we report that transient interaction of TorA with the ER membrane protein LULL1 targets TorA to the NE. FRAP and Blue Native PAGE indicate that TorA is a stable, slowly diffusing oligomer in either the absence or presence of LULL1. Increasing LULL1 expression redistributes both wild-type and disease-mutant TorA to the NE, while decreasing LULL1 with shRNAs eliminates intrinsic enrichment of disease-mutant TorA in the NE. When concentrated in the NE, TorA displaces the nuclear membrane proteins Sun2, nesprin-2G, and nesprin-3 while leaving nuclear pores and Sun1 unchanged. Wild-type TorA also induces changes in NE membrane structure. Because SUN proteins interact with nesprins to connect nucleus and cytoskeleton, these effects suggest a new role for TorA in modulating complexes that traverse the NE. Importantly, once concentrated in the NE, disease-mutant TorA displaces Sun2 with reduced efficiency and does not change NE membrane structure. Together, our data suggest that LULL1 regulates the distribution and activity of TorA within the ER and NE lumen and reveal functional defects in the mutant protein responsible for DYT1 dystonia. PMID:19339278

  8. Employees with Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... training to coworkers and supervisors Keyboarding and Mousing: Speech recognition software Large-key keyboards and on-screen keyboard ... PC while seated. JAN suggested the use of speech recognition software, rest breaks as needed, and the use ...

  9. Genetic and biochemical impairment of mitochondrial complex I activity in a family with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and hereditary spastic dystonia

    SciTech Connect

    De Vries, D.D.; Oost, B.A. van; Went, L.N.; Bruyn, G.W.

    1996-04-01

    A rare form of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) that is associated with hereditary spastic dystonia has been studied in a large Dutch family. Neuropathy and ophthalmological lesions were present together in some family members, whereas only one type of abnormality was found in others. mtDNA mutations previously reported in LHON were not present. Sequence analysis of the protein-coding mitochondrial genes revealed two previously unreported mtDNA mutations. A heteroplasmic A{yields}G transition at nucleotide position 11696 in the ND4 gene resulted in the substitution of an isoleucine for valine at amino acid position 312. A second mutation, a homoplasmic T{yields}A transition at nucleotide position 14596 in the ND6 gene, resulted in the substitution of a methionine for the isoleucine at amino acid residue 26. Biochemical analysis of a muscle biopsy revealed a severe complex I deficiency, providing a link between these unique mtDNA mutations and this rare, complex phenotype including Leber optic neuropathy. 80 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. A dystonia-like movement disorder with brain and spinal neuronal defects is caused by mutation of the mouse laminin β1 subunit, Lamb1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi Bessie; Tewari, Ambika; Salameh, Johnny; Arystarkhova, Elena; Hampton, Thomas G; Brashear, Allison; Ozelius, Laurie J; Khodakhah, Kamran; Sweadner, Kathleen J

    2015-01-01

    A new mutant mouse (lamb1t) exhibits intermittent dystonic hindlimb movements and postures when awake, and hyperextension when asleep. Experiments showed co-contraction of opposing muscle groups, and indicated that symptoms depended on the interaction of brain and spinal cord. SNP mapping and exome sequencing identified the dominant causative mutation in the Lamb1 gene. Laminins are extracellular matrix proteins, widely expressed but also known to be important in synapse structure and plasticity. In accordance, awake recording in the cerebellum detected abnormal output from a circuit of two Lamb1-expressing neurons, Purkinje cells and their deep cerebellar nucleus targets, during abnormal postures. We propose that dystonia-like symptoms result from lapses in descending inhibition, exposing excess activity in intrinsic spinal circuits that coordinate muscles. The mouse is a new model for testing how dysfunction in the CNS causes specific abnormal movements and postures. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11102.001 PMID:26705335

  11. A-TWinnipeg: Pathogenesis of rare ATM missense mutation c.6200C>A with decreased protein expression and downstream signaling, early-onset dystonia, cancer, and life-threatening radiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kotoka; Fike, Francesca; Haghayegh, Sara; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Dawson, Angelika J; Dörk, Thilo; Gatti, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    We studied 10 Mennonite patients who carry the c.6200C>A missense mutation (p.A2067D) in the ATM gene, all of whom exhibited a phenotypic variant of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) that is characterized by early-onset dystonia and late-onset mild ataxia, as previously described. This report provides the pathogenetic evidence for this mutation on cellular functions. Several patients have developed cancer and subsequently experienced life-threatening adverse reactions to radiation (radiotoxicity) and/or chemotherapy. As the c.6200C>A mutation is, thus far, unique to the Mennonite population and is always associated with the same haplotype or haplovariant, it was important to rule out any possible confounding DNA variant on the same haplotype. Lymphoblastoid cells derived from Mennonite patients expressed small amounts of ATM protein, which had no autophosphorylation activity at ATM Ser1981, and trace-to-absent transphosphorylation of downstream ATM targets. A-T lymphoblastoid cells stably transfected with ATM cDNA which had been mutated for c.6200C>A did not show a detectable amount of ATM protein. The same stable cell line with mutated ATM cDNA also showed a trace-to-absent transphosphorylation of downstream ATM targets SMC1pSer966 and KAP1pSer824. From these results, we conclude that c.6200A is the disease-causing ATM mutation on this haplotype. The presence of at least trace amounts of ATM kinase activity on some immunoblots may account for the late-onset, mild ataxia of these patients. The cause of the dystonia remains unclear. Because this dystonia-ataxia phenotype is often encountered in the Mennonite population in association with cancer and adverse reactions to chemotherapy, an early diagnosis is important. PMID:25077176

  12. The CACNA1B R1389H variant is not associated with myoclonus-dystonia in a large European multicentric cohort

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccolo E.; R'bibo, Léa; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Batla, Amit; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Pittman, Alan M.; Hardy, John; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Gasser, Thomas; Lohmann, Ebba; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a very rare movement disorder, caused in ∼30–50% of cases by mutations in SGCE. The CACNA1B variant c.4166G>A; (p.R1389H) was recently reported as the likely causative mutation in a single 3-generation Dutch pedigree with five subjects affected by a unique dominant M-D syndrome and cardiac arrhythmias. In an attempt to replicate this finding, we assessed by direct sequencing the frequency of CACNA1B c.4166G>A; (p.R1389H) in a cohort of 520 M-D cases, in which SGCE mutations had been previously excluded. A total of 146 cases (28%) had a positive family history of M-D. The frequency of the variant was also assessed in 489 neurologically healthy controls and in publicly available data sets of genetic variation (1000 Genomes, Exome Variant Server and Exome Aggregation Consortium). The variant was detected in a single sporadic case with M-D, but in none of the 146 probands with familial M-D. Overall, the variant was present at comparable frequencies in M-D cases (1 out of 520; 0.19%) and healthy controls (1 out of 489; 0.2%). A similar frequency of the variant was also reported in all publicly available databases. These results do not support a causal association between the CACNA1B c.4166G>A; (p.R1389H) variant and M-D. PMID:26157024

  13. Botulinum toxin type B vs. type A in toxin-naïve patients with cervical dystonia: Randomized, double-blind, noninferiority trial.

    PubMed

    Pappert, Eric J; Germanson, Terry

    2008-03-15

    The objective of this study was to compare efficacy, safety, and duration of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) and type B (BoNT-B) in toxin-naïve cervical dystonia (CD) subjects. BoNT-naïve CD subjects were randomized to BoNT-A or BoNT-B and evaluated in a double-blind trial at baseline and every 4-weeks following one treatment. The primary measure was the change in Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) from baseline to week 4 post-injection. Secondary measures included change in TWSTRS-subscale scores, pain, global impressions, and duration of response and safety assessments. The study was designed as a noninferiority trial of BoNT-B to BoNT-A. 111 subjects were randomized (55 BoNT-A; 56 BoNT-B). Improvement in TWSTRS-total scores 4 weeks after BoNT-B was noninferior to BoNT-A (adjusted means 11.0 (SE 1.2) and 8.8 (SE 1.2), respectively; per-protocol-population (PPP)). The median duration of effect of BoNT-A and BoNT-B was not different (13.1 vs. 13.7 weeks, respectively; P-value = 0.833; PPP). There were no significant differences in the occurrence of injection site pain and dysphagia. Mild dry mouth was more frequent with BoNT-B but there were no differences for moderate/severe dry mouth. In this study, both BoNT-A and B were shown to be effective and safe for the treatment of toxin-naive CD subjects. PMID:18098274

  14. A multifactorial conceptual model of peripheral neuromusculoskeletal predisposing factors in task-specific focal hand dystonia in musicians: etiologic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Leijnse, J N A L; Hallett, M; Sonneveld, G J

    2015-02-01

    A model is presented showing how peripheral factors may cause a process of movement adaptation that leads to task-specific focal hand dystonia in musicians (FHDM). To acquire a playing technique, the hand must find effective and physiologically sustainable movements within a complex set of functional demands and anatomic, ergonomic, and physiological constraints. In doing so, individually discriminating constraints may become effective, such as limited anatomic independence of finger muscles/tendons, limited joint ranges of motion, or (subclinical) neuromusculoskeletal defects. These factors may, depending on the instrument-specific playing requirements, compromise or exclude functional playing movements. The controller (i.e., the brain) then needs to develop alternative motions to execute the task, which is called compensation. We hypothesize that, if this compensation process does not converge to physiologically sustainable muscle activation patterns that satisfy all constraints, compensation could increase indefinitely under the pressure of practice. Dystonic symptoms would become manifest when overcompensation occurs, resulting in motor patterns that fail in proper task execution. The model presented in this paper only concerns the compensatory processes preceding such overcompensations and does not aim to explain the nature of the dystonic motions themselves. While the model considers normal learning processes in the development of compensations, neurological predispositions could facilitate developing overcompensations or further abnormal motor programs. The model predicts that if peripheral factors are involved, FHDM symptoms would be preceded by long-term gradual changes in playing movements, which could be validated by prospective studies. Furthermore, the model implies that treatment success might be enhanced by addressing the conflict between peripheral factors and playing tasks before decompensating/retraining the affected movements. PMID:25323627

  15. Genetic Analysis of PLA2G6 in 22 Indian Families with Infantile Neuroaxonal Dystrophy, Atypical Late-Onset Neuroaxonal Dystrophy and Dystonia Parkinsonism Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rather, Mohammad Iqbal; Bhat, Vishwanath; Gopinath, Sindhura; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Taly, Arun B.; Sinha, Sanjib; Nagappa, Madhu; Bharath, Rose Dawn; Mahadevan, Anita; Narayanappa, Gayathri; Chickabasaviah, Yasha T.; Kumar, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in PLA2G6 were identified in patients with a spectrum of neurodegenerative conditions, such as infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy (INAD), atypical late-onset neuroaxonal dystrophy (ANAD) and dystonia parkinsonism complex (DPC). However, there is no report on the genetic analysis of families with members affected with INAD, ANAD and DPC from India. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to perform genetic analysis of 22 Indian families with INAD, ANAD and DPC. DNA sequence analysis of the entire coding region of PLA2G6 identified 13 different mutations, including five novel ones (p.Leu224Pro, p.Asp283Asn, p.Arg329Cys, p.Leu491Phe, and p.Arg649His), in 12/22 (54.55%) families with INAD and ANAD. Interestingly, one patient with INAD was homozygous for two different mutations, p.Leu491Phe and p.Ala516Val, and thus harboured four mutant alleles. With these mutations, the total number of mutations in this gene reaches 129. The absence of mutations in 10/22 (45.45%) families suggests that the mutations could be in deep intronic or promoter regions of this gene or these families could have mutations in a yet to be identified gene. The present study increases the mutation landscape of PLA2G6. The present finding will be useful for genetic diagnosis, carrier detection and genetic counselling to families included in this study and other families with similar disease condition. PMID:27196560

  16. Two novel mutations of the GTP cyclohydrolase 1 gene and genotype-phenotype correlation in Chinese Dopa-responsive dystonia patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lihua; Zhou, Huayong; Hu, Fayun; Xu, Yanming

    2013-07-01

    The most common form of Dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD) is caused by heterozygous mutations in the GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH1) gene. We screened two unrelated, DRD-symptomatic Chinese Han individuals, for GCH1 gene mutations by direct sequencing. As the clinical manifestations of DRD are highly variable, we also explored the association between genotype and phenotype in all Chinese DRD patients reported so far in the literature, comprising 62 DRD-affected patients from 36 Chinese families. Two novel missense mutations (T94M, L145F) and a novel variant (c. 453+6 G>T) were identified in our two new patients. None of these variants was detected in 200 healthy controls. On the basis of this and other reports, heterozygous mutations were detected in 90.3% of Chinese Han subjects with DRD. Seeming the age of onset for males and females, the mean age was 13 years older in males than in females (P=0.006). Different mutation types did not show any significant differences in age of onset, gender composition, initial symptoms, or the L-dopa dose that abolished the symptoms. Among DRD patients lacking missense or exon-intron boundary mutations, 68.4% were found to possess a large deletion in GCH1, which were detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Most GCH1 mutations were found to cluster in two regions of the coding sequence, suggesting the probable existence of mutation hotspot for the first time. The genotype-phenotype correlation described here may improve our understanding of DRD in Chinese individuals. PMID:23211702

  17. Determining Whether a Definitive Causal Relationship Exists Between Aripiprazole and Tardive Dyskinesia and/or Dystonia in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder: Part 1.

    PubMed

    Preskorn, Sheldon; Flynn, Alexandra; Macaluso, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    This series of columns has 2 main goals: (1) to explain the use of class warnings by the US Food and Drug Administration and (2) to increase clinicians' awareness of movement disorders that may occur in patients being treated with antipsychotic medications and why it is appropriate and good practice to refrain from immediately assuming the diagnosis is tardive dyskinesia/dystonia (TD). This first column in the series will focus on the second goal, which will then serve as a case example for the first goal. Clinicians should refrain from jumping to a diagnosis of TD because a host of other causes need to be ruled out first before inferring iatrogenic causation. The causal relationship between chronic treatment with dopamine antagonists and TD is based on pharmacoepidemiology (ie, the prevalence of such movement disorders is higher in individuals receiving chronic treatment with such agents than in a control group). There is nothing pathognomonic about movement disorders, nor is there any test that can currently prove a drug caused a movement disorder in a specific individual. Another goal of this series is to describe the types of research that would be needed to establish whether a specific agent has a meaningful risk of causing TD. In this first column of the series, we present the case of a patient who developed orofacial dyskinesia while being treated with aripiprazole. In this case, the movement disorder was prematurely called TD, which led to a malpractice lawsuit. This case highlights a number of key questions clinicians are likely to encounter in day-to-day practice. We then review data concerning the historical background, incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for 2 movement disorders, TD and spontaneous dyskinesia. Subsequent columns in this series will review: (1) unique aspects of the psychopharmacology of aripiprazole, (2) the limited and inconsistent data in the literature concerning the causal relationship between aripiprazole and TD, (3) the use of

  18. [The autonomic regulation of the cardiovascular system in subjects with the autonomic dystonia syndrome subjected to ionizing radiation exposure as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl Atomic Electric Power Station].

    PubMed

    Niagu, A I; Zazimko, R N

    1995-01-01

    180 males in the age of 21-50, all the participants of Chernobyl accident consequences liquidation were examined. In all individuals vegetative dystonia (VD) syndrome was diagnosed (total radiation doses 0.1-1.0 Grey according to D. Erwin method). It was established that VD syndrome differed in these persons by pronounced stages of disorders manifestation as well as by polymorphism of vegetative disturbances. These findings testify central and peripheral vegetative nervous system parts involvement. In 40.2% of cases in individuals which were examined in rest and in 56.2% after dosed physical loading the functional disorders of vegetative cardiovascular system regulation of vagal type mainly (76.5%) were revealed. Clear correlation was not observed between vegetative disorders and radiation dose value. The estimation of contribution of each of the possible pathogenic factors (exactly stressogenic, radioactive and others) in vegetative disturbances development is not possible now. PMID:8533503

  19. Determining Whether a Definitive Causal Relationship Exists Between Aripiprazole and Tardive Dyskinesia and/or Dystonia in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder, Part 3: Clinical Trial Data.

    PubMed

    Preskorn, Sheldon H; Macaluso, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    This series of columns has 3 main goals: (1) to explain class warnings as used by the United States Food and Drug Administration, (2) to increase awareness of movement disorders that may occur in patients treated with antipsychotic medications, and (3) to understand why clinicians should refrain from immediately assuming a diagnosis of tardive dyskinesia/dystonia (TD) in patients who develop abnormal movements during treatment with antipsychotics. The first column in the series presented a patient who developed abnormal movements while being treated with aripiprazole as an augmentation strategy for major depressive disorder (MDD) and reviewed data concerning the historical background, incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for tardive and spontaneous dyskinesias, the clinical presentations of which closely resemble each other. The second column in the series reviewed the unique mechanism of action of aripiprazole and preclinical studies and an early-phase human translational study that suggest a low, if not absent, risk of TD with aripiprazole. This column reviews clinical trial data to assess whether those data support the conclusion that aripiprazole has a low to absent risk of causing TD when used as an augmentation strategy to treat MDD. To date, no randomized, placebo-controlled trials have established a definitive link between exposure to aripiprazole and TD in patients with MDD. One long-term, open-label, safety trial examined aripiprazole as an augmentation strategy in individuals with MDD and found a rare occurrence (4/987, 0.4%, the confidence interval of which overlaps with zero) of an adverse event termed TD. In all 4 cases, the observed movements resolved within weeks of aripiprazole discontinuation, suggesting that they were either amenable to treatment or represented an acute syndrome rather than TD. No cases of TD were reported in the registration trials for the MDD indication for aripiprazole. These data were presented in a pooled analysis of

  20. Determining Whether a Definitive Causal Relationship Exists Between Aripiprazole and Tardive Dyskinesia and/or Dystonia in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder, Part 4: Case Report Data.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Matthew; Flynn, Alexandra; Preskorn, Sheldon

    2016-05-01

    This series of columns has 3 main goals: (1) to explain class warnings as used by the United States Food and Drug Administration, (2) to increase awareness of movement disorders that may occur in patients treated with antipsychotic medications, and (3) to understand why clinicians should refrain from immediately assuming a diagnosis of tardive dyskinesia/dystonia (TD) in patients who develop abnormal movements during treatment with antipsychotics. The first column in the series presented a patient who developed abnormal movements while being treated with aripiprazole as an augmentation strategy for major depressive disorder and reviewed data concerning the historical background, incidence, prevalence, and risk factors for tardive and spontaneous dyskinesias, the clinical presentations of which closely resemble each other. The second column in the series reviewed the unique mechanism of action of aripiprazole and reviewed preclinical studies and an early-phase human translational study that suggest a low, if not absent, risk of TD with aripiprazole. The third column in this series reviewed the registration trial data for aripiprazole across all of its indications and found a raw incidence of TD ranging from 0.004 (4 out of 987) in long-term studies of the drug as an augmentation strategy for major depressive disorder to 0.0016 (19 out of 11,897) based on all short-term (ie, weeks to <6 mo) and long-term (6 mo to 1 y) studies combined. This fourth column in the series reviews the "real-world" data on aripiprazole and assesses whether these data also support the conclusion that aripiprazole has a low to absent risk of causing TD. The "real-world" data consist of case reports from the medical literature and the United States Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS). We found 37 cases in the medical literature reporting what was termed TD in association with aripiprazole treatment as well as 27 case reports suggesting improvement in

  1. Genetics Home Reference: dystonia 6

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  2. Cytoskeletal Linker Protein Dystonin Is Not Critical to Terminal Oligodendrocyte Differentiation or CNS Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Sawyer R.; Gibeault, Sabrina; De Repentigny, Yves; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte differentiation and central nervous system myelination require massive reorganization of the oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton. Loss of specific actin- and tubulin-organizing factors can lead to impaired morphological and/or molecular differentiation of oligodendrocytes, resulting in a subsequent loss of myelination. Dystonin is a cytoskeletal linker protein with both actin- and tubulin-binding domains. Loss of function of this protein results in a sensory neuropathy called Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy VI in humans and dystonia musculorum in mice. This disease presents with severe ataxia, dystonic muscle and is ultimately fatal early in life. While loss of the neuronal isoforms of dystonin primarily leads to sensory neuron degeneration, it has also been shown that peripheral myelination is compromised due to intrinsic Schwann cell differentiation abnormalities. The role of this cytoskeletal linker in oligodendrocytes, however, remains unclear. We sought to determine the effects of the loss of neuronal dystonin on oligodendrocyte differentiation and central myelination. To address this, primary oligodendrocytes were isolated from a severe model of dystonia musculorum, Dstdt-27J, and assessed for morphological and molecular differentiation capacity. No defects could be discerned in the differentiation of Dstdt-27J oligodendrocytes relative to oligodendrocytes from wild-type littermates. Survival was also compared between Dstdt-27J and wild-type oligodendrocytes, revealing no significant difference. Using a recently developed migration assay, we further analysed the ability of primary oligodendrocyte progenitor cell motility, and found that Dstdt-27J oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were able to migrate normally. Finally, in vivo analysis of oligodendrocyte myelination was done in phenotype-stage optic nerve, cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The density of myelinated axons and g-ratios of Dstdt-27J optic nerves was normal, as was myelin basic

  3. An open-label cohort study of the improvement of quality of life and pain in de novo cervical dystonia patients after injections with 500 U botulinum toxin A (Dysport)

    PubMed Central

    Hefter, H; Benecke, R; Erbguth, F; Jost, W; Reichel, G; Wissel, J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives It remains to be determined whether the benefits of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) on cervical dystonia (CD) motor symptoms extend to improvements in patient's quality of life (QoL). This analysis of a large, multicentre study was conducted with the aim of investigating changes in QoL and functioning among de novo patients receiving 500 U BoNT-A (abobotulinumtoxinA; Dysport) for the treatment of the two most frequent forms of CD, predominantly torticollis and laterocollis. Design A prospective, open-label study of Dysport (500 U; Ipsen Biopharm Ltd) administered according to a defined intramuscular injection algorithm. Setting German and Austrian outpatient clinics. Participants 516 male and female patients (aged ≥18 years) with de novo CD. The majority of patients had torticollis (78.1%). 35 patients had concomitant depression (MedDRA-defined). Main outcome measures Change from baseline to weeks 4 and 12 in Craniocervical Dystonia Questionnaire (CDQ-24) total and subscale scores, patient diary items (‘day-to-day capacities and activities’, ‘pain’ and ‘duration of pain’) and global assessment of pain. Results Significant improvements were observed in CDQ-24 total and subscale scores at week 4 and were sustained up to week 12 (p<0.001). Changes in CDQ-24 scores did not significantly differ between the torticollis and laterocollis groups or between patients with or without depression. There were also significant reductions in patient diary item scores for activities of daily living, pain and pain duration at weeks 4 and 12 (p<0.001). Pain relief (less or no pain) was reported by 66% and 74.1% of patients at weeks 4 and 12, respectively. Changes in pain parameters demonstrated a positive relationship with change in Tsui score. Conclusions After standardised open-label treatment with Dysport 500 U, improvements in QoL and pain intensity up to 12 weeks in patients with CD were observed. PMID:23604344

  4. [THE INFLUENCE OF A COMBINATION OF MODERN DRUGS NUCLEINAT AND ALFAGIN ON THE CONCENTRATION OF CIRCULATING IMMUNE COMPLEXES AND THEIR MOLECULAR COMPOSITION IN THE SERUM OF PATIENTS WITH IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME ON THE BACKGROUND OF NEUROCIRCULATORY DYSTONIA IN COMPLEX MEDICAL REHABILITATION].

    PubMed

    Krivulya, I G; Teryshin, V A; Sotskaya, Y A

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the combination nucleinat and alfagin in a complex of medical rehabilitation at the level of circulating immune complexes (CIC) in serum of patients and their molecular composition with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), against neurocirculatory dystonia (NeD). It is established that the combination of nucleinat and alfagin in medical rehabilitation of patients with this comorbid disorders contributes to the normalization of the total concentration of the CEC and their molecular composition, which indicates the validity of the application of the pathogenesis combinations of drugs in complex medical rehabilitation of patients with lBS against NCD. PMID:27491155

  5. The BiP molecular chaperone plays multiple roles during the biogenesis of torsinA, an AAA+ ATPase associated with the neurological disease early-onset torsion dystonia.

    PubMed

    Zacchi, Lucía F; Wu, Hui-Chuan; Bell, Samantha L; Millen, Linda; Paton, Adrienne W; Paton, James C; Thomas, Philip J; Zolkiewski, Michal; Brodsky, Jeffrey L

    2014-05-01

    Early-onset torsion dystonia (EOTD) is a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary and sustained muscle contractions that can lead to paralysis and abnormal posture. EOTD is associated with the deletion of a glutamate (ΔE) in torsinA, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident AAA(+) ATPase. To date, the effect of ΔE on torsinA and the reason that this mutation results in EOTD are unclear. Moreover, there are no specific therapeutic options to treat EOTD. To define the underlying biochemical defects associated with torsinAΔE and to uncover factors that might be targeted to offset defects associated with torsinAΔE, we developed a yeast torsinA expression system and tested the roles of ER chaperones in mediating the folding and stability of torsinA and torsinAΔE. We discovered that the ER lumenal Hsp70, BiP, an associated Hsp40, Scj1, and a nucleotide exchange factor, Lhs1, stabilize torsinA and torsinAΔE. BiP also maintained torsinA and torsinAΔE solubility. Mutations predicted to compromise specific torsinA functional motifs showed a synthetic interaction with the ΔE mutation and destabilized torsinAΔE, suggesting that the ΔE mutation predisposes torsinA to defects in the presence of secondary insults. In this case, BiP was required for torsinAΔE degradation, consistent with data that specific chaperones exhibit either pro-degradative or pro-folding activities. Finally, using two independent approaches, we established that BiP stabilizes torsinA and torsinAΔE in mammalian cells. Together, these data define BiP as the first identified torsinA chaperone, and treatments that modulate BiP might improve symptoms associated with EOTD. PMID:24627482

  6. Determining Whether a Definitive Causal Relationship Exists Between Aripiprazole and Tardive Dyskinesia and/or Dystonia in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder, Part 2: Preclinical and Early Phase Human Proof of Concept Studies.

    PubMed

    Macaluso, Matthew; Flynn, Alexandra; Preskorn, Sheldon

    2016-01-01

    This series of columns has 3 main goals: (1) to explain class warnings as used by the United States Food and Drug Administration, (2) to increase awareness of movement disorders that may occur in patients treated with antipsychotic medications, and (3) to understand why clinicians should refrain from immediately assuming a diagnosis of tardive dyskinesia/dystonia (TD) in patients treated with antipsychotics. The first column in this series began with the case of a 76-year-old man with major depressive disorder who developed orofacial dyskinesias while being treated with aripiprazole as an antidepressant augmentation strategy. It was alleged that a higher than intended dose of aripiprazole (ie, 20 mg/d for 2 wk followed by 10 mg/d for 4 wk instead of the intended dose of 2 mg/d) was the cause of the dyskinetic movements in this man, and the authors were asked to review the case and give their opinion. The principal basis for this theory of causation was the class warning about TD in the package insert for aripiprazole. The rationale for concluding aripiprazole caused TD in the 76-year-old man led to this series of columns about aripiprazole, its potential--if any--to cause TD, and the presence of a class warning about TD in its package insert. The central point is to illustrate why class warnings exist and their implications for practice. The first column in this series focused on the historical background, incidence, prevalence, risk factors, and clinical presentations of tardive and spontaneous dyskinesias and concluded with a discussion of diagnostic considerations explaining why clinicians should avoid making a diagnosis of TD until a thorough differential diagnosis has been considered. This second column in the series reviews the pharmacology of aripiprazole and the preclinical and phase I translational human studies that suggest aripiprazole should have a low to nonexistent risk of causing TD compared with other antipsychotics. The third column in the series

  7. [Effect of a complex treatment, including glutargin and erbisol on the blood plasma content of protein P53, apoptotic markers of type II, activity of caspases and the level of sCD 117 in patients with autonomic-vascular dystonia].

    PubMed

    Krychun, I I

    2008-01-01

    It has been established that the blood content of protein P53 diminishes by 27%, the blood level of sTRAIL increases by 22%, sCD 117 increases by 44% in patients with vegeto-vascular dystonia of the hypertonic type that is accompanied by an increase of the activity of caspases-1 however the activity of caspases-3 and - 8 as well as the blood content of TNF-alpha do not change. Multimodality therapy using glutargin does not influence on the level of the blood plasma TNF-alpha and the activity of caspases-1,-3,-8, normalizes the blood content of sTRAIL and sCD 117, however does not change the plasma concentration of protein P53 which remains lower by 35% than the control indices. In patients with vegeto-vascular dystonia of the hypotonic type the concentration of blood plasma protein P53, TNF-alpha and sTRAIL and the activity of caspases-1,-3,-8 correspond to the control values against a background of an almost twofold increase of the plasma sCD 117 level. The use of erbisol in a complex of therapeutic agents does not change the activity of caspases-l,-3,-8 and does not influence on the blood content of protein p53, TNF-alpha and sTRAIL and diminishes the plasma level of sCD 117 up to control values. A considerable elevation of the blood content of type II apoptotic factors is characteristic of the mixed type of vegeto-vascular dystonia: the level of protein p53 increases 2,4 times, TNF-alpha - 1,9 times, sTRAIL - 2,3 times that is accompanied by an increased activity of caspase-1 - 4,1 times, caspase-3 - 3,3 times, caspase-8 - 3,8 times and an increase of the plasma concentration of sCD 117 - 3,5 times. The use of erbisol and glutargin in multimodality therapy normalizes the plasma concentration of TNF-alpha and diminishes the blood content of protein P53 by 33% and sTRAIL - by 42% which, nevertheless remains higher than the control value by 58% and 36% respectively. The combined effects of glutargin and erbisol in patients of this group are characterized by a

  8. Genetics Home Reference: dopa-responsive dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the first of three steps in the production of a molecule called tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). The SPR ... is involved in the last step of tetrahydrobiopterin production. Tetrahydrobiopterin helps process several protein building blocks ( amino ...

  9. Temporal Expectation in Focal Hand Dystonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avanzino, Laura; Martino, Davide; Martino, Isadora; Pelosin, Elisa; Vicario, Carmelo M.; Bove, Marco; Defazio, Gianni; Abbruzzese, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Patients with writer's cramp present sensory and representational abnormalities relevant to motor control, such as impairment in the temporal discrimination between tactile stimuli and in pure motor imagery tasks, like the mental rotation of corporeal and inanimate objects. However, only limited information is available on the ability of patients…

  10. Dystonin/Bpag1 is a necessary endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope protein in sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Kevin G.; Kothary, Rashmi

    2008-09-10

    Dystonin/Bpag1 proteins are cytoskeletal linkers whose loss of function in mice results in a hereditary sensory neuropathy with a progressive loss of limb coordination starting in the second week of life. These mice, named dystonia musculorum (dt), succumb to the disease and die of unknown causes prior to sexual maturity. Previous evidence indicated that cytoskeletal defects in the axon are a primary cause of dt neurodegeneration. However, more recent data suggests that other factors may be equally important contributors to the disease process. In the present study, we demonstrate perikaryal defects in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons at stages preceding the onset of loss of limb coordination in dt mice. Abnormalities include alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone protein expression, indicative of an ER stress response. Dystonin in sensory neurons localized in association with the ER and nuclear envelope (NE). A fusion protein ofthe dystonin-a2 isoform, which harbors an N-terminal transmembrane domain, associated with and reorganized the ER in cell culture. This isoform also interacts with the NE protein nesprin-3{alpha}, but not nesprin-3{beta}. Defects in dt mice, as demonstrated here, may ultimately result in pathogenesis involving ER dysfunction and contribute significantly to the dt phenotype.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: deafness-dystonia-optic neuronopathy syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually develop a gradual decline in thinking and reasoning abilities (dementia) in their forties. The lifespan of ... Bäzner H, Krauss JK, Hennerici MG, Bauer MF. Clinical and molecular findings in a patient with a ...

  12. Respiratory Dynamics and Speech Intelligibility in Speakers with Generalized Dystonia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBlance, Gary R.; Rutherford, David R.

    1991-01-01

    This study compared respiratory function during quiet breathing and monologue, in six adult dystonic subjects and a control group of four neurologically intact adults. Dystonic subjects showed a faster breathing rate, less rhythmic breathing pattern, decreased lung volume, and apnea-like periods. Decreased speech intelligibility was related to…

  13. Dystonia with MPH/Risperidone Combined Therapy for ADHD.

    PubMed

    Millichap, J Gordon; Yee, Michelle M

    2016-01-01

    Investigators from Child Neurology and Pediatrics, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, report extrapyramidal symptoms in a 13-year-old boy with a psychiatric history of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, ADHD, and autism, responsive to combination risperidone, oxcarbazepine, and MPH. PMID:27004141

  14. Genetics Home Reference: task-specific focal dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: hypermanganesemia with dystonia, polycythemia, and cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: rapid-onset dystonia parkinsonism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: early-onset primary dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, USA HONCode ...

  19. Axonopathy in the Central Nervous System Is the Hallmark of Mice with a Novel Intragenic Null Mutation of Dystonin.

    PubMed

    Seehusen, Frauke; Kiel, Kirsten; Jottini, Stefano; Wohlsein, Peter; Habierski, Andre; Seibel, Katharina; Vogel, Tanja; Urlaub, Henning; Kollmar, Martin; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Teichmann, Ulrike

    2016-09-01

    Dystonia musculorum is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the dystonin gene. It has been described in mice and humans where it is called hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy. Mutated mice show severe movement disorders and die at the age of 3-4 weeks. This study describes the discovery and molecular, clinical, as well as pathological characterization of a new spontaneously occurring mutation in the dystonin gene in C57BL/6N mice. The mutation represents a 40-kb intragenic deletion allele of the dystonin gene on chromosome 1 with exactly defined deletion borders. It was demonstrated by Western blot, mass spectrometry, and immunohistology that mice with a homozygous mutation were entirely devoid of the dystonin protein. Pathomorphological lesions were restricted to the brain stem and spinal cord and consisted of swollen, argyrophilic axons and dilated myelin sheaths in the white matter and, less frequently, total chromatolysis of neurons in the gray matter. Axonal damage was detected by amyloid precursor protein and nonphosphorylated neurofilament immunohistology. Axonopathy in the central nervous system (CNS) represents the hallmark of this disease. Mice with the dystonin mutation also showed suppurative inflammation in the respiratory tract, presumably due to brain stem lesion-associated food aspiration, whereas skeletal muscles showed no pathomorphological changes. This study describes a novel mutation in the dystonin gene in mice leading to axonopathy in the CNS. In further studies, this model may provide new insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases and may elucidate the complex interactions of dystonin with various other cellular proteins especially in the CNS. PMID:27401753

  20. Writer's Cramp

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters & Press Releases Dystonia Dialogue Financials Contact Site Tree Home What is Dystonia? Living With Dystonia Get ... Medical Research Foundation (DMRF) has served the dystonia community since 1976. Join us in our global effort ...

  1. Paroxysmal Dyskinesias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters & Press Releases Dystonia Dialogue Financials Contact Site Tree Home What is Dystonia? Living With Dystonia Get ... Medical Research Foundation (DMRF) has served the dystonia community since 1976. Join us in our global effort ...

  2. Extrapyramidal Motor Dysfunction and Resultant Orofacial Dystonia Post-Cocaine Abuse: A Clinical Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMicken, Betty L.; Ostergren, Jennifer A.; Vento-Wilson, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    This case study investigated the consequences of cocaine use and resultant extrapyramidal motor dysfunction. The study focused on a female client, post-long-term drug abuse with concomitant untreated head trauma, experiencing extraneous motor movements of the lips, tongue, jaw, and upper and lower extremities. The goals of this study were to (a)…

  3. Dystonia as acute adverse reaction to cough suppressant in a 3-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Polizzi, A; Incorpora, G; Ruggieri, M

    2001-01-01

    Cough suppressant preparations containing mixtures of dextromethorphan or codeine with antihistamines, decongestants (sympathomimetic), expectorants and antipyretics with either sedative or anticholinergic activity have been associated with dystonic reactions in children. We report on a 3-year-old girl who presented with episodic stiffness and abnormal posturing with rigidity after arbitrary maternal administration of a mixture of methylcodeine and extract from Hedera plant. PMID:11587381

  4. `Pugnatron'-like reaction in a patient with familial dystonia: torque induced motion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, E. Geoffrey

    1974-01-01

    A patient is described who suffered from an unusual extrapyramidal syndrome involving both legs and one arm. In the affected parts there was an extreme degree of rigidity. Measurements have been made of the motion that occurred as a result of applying force to the left foot. The torque was provided by a printed motor. The effect of a maintained plantar flexing force was anomalous for the foot moved to a dorsiflexed position. A model illustrating possible principles of feedback control—the Pugnatron—is described. Images PMID:4836750

  5. Asynchronous blepharospasm, facial and cervical dystonia, and bilateral asynchronous hemifacial spasm.

    PubMed

    Katz, Bradley J; Burroughs, John R; Anderson, Richard L; Bownds, Shannon; McCann, John D

    2007-01-15

    We present a patient with a facial movement disorder that has characteristics of both blepharospasm and bilateral asynchronous hemifacial spasm. Because of the increased incidence of blepharospasm in patients with hemifacial spasm, our patient's clinical presentation is probably not a chance occurrence, but rather a manifestation of some predisposition for these two movement disorders. This unusual constellation of signs and symptoms challenges the current diagnostic criteria and suggests that some of these facial movement disorders may lie on a spectrum, rather than represent distinct entities. PMID:17133455

  6. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile Paget disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... juvenile Paget disease: Genetic Testing Registry: Hyperphosphatasemia with bone disease These resources from MedlinePlus offer information about the ... familial osteoectasia hyperostosis corticalis deformans juvenilis hyperphosphatasemia ... idiopathic idiopathic hyperphosphatasia JPD juvenile Paget's ...

  7. Treatment of ADCY5-Associated Dystonia, Chorea, and Hyperkinetic Disorders With Deep Brain Stimulation: A Multicenter Case Series.

    PubMed

    Dy, Marisela E; Chang, Florence C F; Jesus, Sol De; Anselm, Irina; Mahant, Neil; Zeilman, Pamela; Rodan, Lance H; Foote, Kelly D; Tan, Wen-Hann; Eskandar, Emad; Sharma, Nutan; Okun, Michael S; Fung, Victor S C; Waugh, Jeff L

    2016-07-01

    ADCY5 mutations have been reported as a cause of early onset hyperkinetic movements associated with delayed motor milestones, hypotonia, and exacerbation during sleep. The movement disorder may be continuous or episodic, and can vary considerably in severity within families and in individuals. The authors report a case series of 3 patients with ADCY5 mutations treated with deep brain stimulation after unsuccessful medication trials. All had extensive imaging, metabolic, and genetic testing prior to confirmation of their ADCY5 mutation. Two of the patients had the c.1252C>T; p.R418W mutation, while the youngest and most severely affected had a de novo c.2080_2088del; p.K694_M696 mutation. All had variable and incomplete, but positive responses to deep brain stimulation. The authors conclude that deep brain stimulation may provide benefit in ADCY5-related movement disorders. Long-term efficacy remains to be confirmed by longitudinal observation. ADCY5 should be considered in the differential diagnosis of early onset hyperkinetic movement disorders, and may respond to deep brain stimulation. PMID:27052971

  8. Mutations in the gene encoding peroxisomal sterol carrier protein X (SCPx) cause leukencephalopathy with dystonia and motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ferdinandusse, S; Kostopoulos, P; Denis, S; Rusch, H; Overmars, H; Dillmann, U; Reith, W; Haas, D; Wanders, R J A; Duran, M; Marziniak, M

    2006-06-01

    In this report, we describe the first known patient with a deficiency of sterol carrier protein X (SCPx), a peroxisomal enzyme with thiolase activity, which is required for the breakdown of branched-chain fatty acids. The patient presented with torticollis and dystonic head tremor as well as slight cerebellar signs with intention tremor, nystagmus, hyposmia, and azoospermia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed leukencephalopathy and involvement of the thalamus and pons. Metabolite analyses of plasma revealed an accumulation of the branched-chain fatty acid pristanic acid, and abnormal bile alcohol glucuronides were excreted in urine. In cultured skin fibroblasts, the thiolytic activity of SCPx was deficient, and no SCPx protein could be detected by western blotting. Mutation analysis revealed a homozygous 1-nucleotide insertion, 545_546insA, leading to a frameshift and premature stop codon (I184fsX7). PMID:16685654

  9. Acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 4 gene: physical mapping, genomic organisation, and evaluation as a candidate for paroxysmal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Gründer, S; Geisler, H S; Rainier, S; Fink, J K

    2001-09-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are protongated Na(+) channels. They have been implicated with synaptic transmission, pain perception as well as mechanoperception. ASIC4 is the most recent member of this gene family. It shows expression throughout the central nervous system with strongest expression in pituitary gland. ASIC4 is inactive by itself and its function is unknown. Mutations in ion channel subunits, which are homologues of ASICs lead to neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans. It has, therefore, been speculated that similar mutations in ASICs may be responsible for neurodegeneration in humans. Here, we show that ASIC4 maps to the long arm of chromosome 2 in close proximity to the locus for paroxysmal dystonic choreoathetosis (PDC), a movement disorder with unknown cause. Ion channel genes have been shown to cause several other paroxysmal neurologic disorders and are important candidate genes for PDC. We established the genomic organisation of the ASIC4 gene and screened a PDC pedigree for mutations in the coding region. Although we identified three polymorphisms in the Cterminal part of the ASIC4 protein, these were not present in each affected subject in the PDC kindred we analysed. Therefore, although the ASIC4 gene is physically mapped to the PDC locus, our data indicates that ASIC4 gene mutation is not the cause of PDC. It remains to be established if mutations in ASIC4 or other ASIC subunits may cause neurological disorders. PMID:11571555

  10. [Was Beethoven's deafness caused by Paget's disease? Report of findings and study of skull fragments of Ludwig van Beethoven].

    PubMed

    Jesserer, H; Bankl, H

    1986-10-01

    Paget's disease of bone (osteitis deformans) has been repeatedly named as a possible cause for Ludwig van Beethoven's deafness. In 1985 a descendent of Franz Romeo Seligmann (a Viennese medical historian who in 1863 had studied Beethoven's mortal remains on the occasion of their relocation) presented to us three bone fragments allegedly from Beethoven's cranium. They represented fragments of the left parietal bone and the occiputum. It was possible to prove nearly with certainty that these bone fragments actually are Beethoven's. They did not show signs of Paget's disease of bone. It must therefore be concluded that Beethoven's deafness was not caused by Paget's osteitis deformans. PMID:3540490

  11. [Role of pneumotachography in the diagnosis and assessment of treatment effectiveness in bronchial dystonia in respiratory tract diseases of dust etiology].

    PubMed

    Levitskaia, V L

    1988-01-01

    Flow-volume values and their changes in response to salbutamol and methacin inhalations were studied with the help of a pneumotachograph in 69 patients with anthracosilicosis stage I, and in 70 patients with chronic dust bronchitis stages I and II. Pneumotachography was shown to extend diagnostic potentialities in the detection of ventilation insufficiency in patients with dust pulmonary pathology, making it possible to determine not only a degree but also a site of obstructive disorders. Disorders of the sympathetic and parasympathetic bronchial innervation and associated biochemical mechanisms were important in the mechanism of bronchospasm development. Pneumotachography was recommended in combination with bronchospasmolytic drugs of sympathomimetic and cholinolytic action for elucidation of the mechanism of disorders of the bronchial tone, a choice of adequate therapy and assessment of its efficacy. PMID:3133805

  12. Noxious electrical stimulation of the pelvic floor and vagina induces transient voiding dysfunction in a rabbit survival model of pelvic floor dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Spettel, Sara; Schuler, Catherine; Levin, Robert M.; Dubin, Andrew H.; De, Elise J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Existing data supports a relationship between pelvic floor dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms. We developed a survival model of pelvic floor dysfunction in the rabbit and evaluated cystometric (CMG), electromyographic (EMG) and ambulatory voiding behavior. Materials and Methods Twelve female adult virgin rabbits were housed in metabolic cages to record voiding and defecation. Anesthetized CMG/EMG was performed before and after treatment animals (n=9) received bilateral tetanizing needle stimulation to the pubococcygeous (PC) muscle and controls (n=3) sham needle placement. After 7 days all animals were subjected to tetanizing transvaginal stimulation and CMG/EMG. After 5 days a final CMG/EMG was performed. Results Of rabbits that underwent needle stimulation 7 of 9 (78%) demonstrated dysfunctional CMG micturition contractions versus 6 of 12 (50%) after transvaginal stimulation. Needle stimulation of the PC musculature resulted in significant changes in: basal CMG pressure, precontraction pressure change, contraction pressure, interval between contractions and postvoid residual; with time to 3rd contraction increased from 38 to 53 minutes (p=0.008 vs. prestimulation). Vaginal noxious stimulation resulted in significant changes in: basal CMG pressure and interval between contractions; with time to 3rd contraction increased from 37 to 46 minutes (p=0.008 vs. prestimulation). Changes in cage parameters were primarily seen after direct needle stimulation. Conclusions In a majority of animals, tetanizing electrical stimulation of the rabbit pelvic floor resulted in voiding changes suggestive of pelvic floor dysfunction as characterized by a larger bladder capacity, longer interval between contractions and prolonged contraction duration. PMID:26682025

  13. Medical Marijuana in Certain Neurological Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome • Cervical dystonia (abnormal neck movements) • Seizures in epilepsy Of the studies examined here, only two looked ... caused by levodopa. HD, Tourette Syndrome, Cervical Dystonia, Epilepsy There is not enough evidence* to show whether ...

  14. [Experience in treating lesions of the gastroduodenal and hepatobiliary systems in patients with rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Svintsitskiĭ, A S; Revenok, E N; Fursova, N Ia; Musienko, L P; Kukharenko, A N

    1989-01-01

    Based on an analysis of the frequency, character and efficacy of treatment of lesions of the digestive organs in 210 patients with most spread rheumatic diseases (rheumatism, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis deformans) the authors propose a complex of measures for the treatment and prophylaxis of these lesions. Dietotherapy, physiotherapy and drug treatment of gastroduodenal and hepatobiliary disorders are described in detail. PMID:2785730

  15. An update on the use of botulinum toxin therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mills, Reversa; Bahroo, Laxman; Pagan, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) has gained widespread use in a variety of neurological conditions. Parkinson's disease is a complex neurodegenerative disorder manifested by motor and non-motor symptoms that can cause significant disability. BoNT has been used to effectively treat a variety of symptoms related to Parkinson's disease. This review will examine the current therapeutic indications of BoNT use in the following disorders related to Parkinson's disease: cervical dystonia, blepharospasm and lid apraxia, focal hand dystonia, foot dystonia, laryngeal dystonia, oromandibular dystonia, camptocormia, hand and jaw tremor, sialorrhea, hyperhidrosis, dysphagia, constipation, and overactive bladder. PMID:25407133

  16. Treatment of Wilson's disease motor complications with deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hedera, Peter

    2014-05-01

    A considerable proportion of patients with Wilson's disease (WD) experience neurologic symptoms that are functionally disabling. The most common neurologic problems in advanced WD include dystonia and tremor. Medically refractory idiopathic dystonia and essential tremor (ET) have been successfully treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS), functional surgical therapy targeting the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi), or the ventral intermediate (Vim) thalamic nucleus. Even though the pathophysiology of tremor is different in WD and ET, available experience supports DBS targeting the Vim for WD patients. Dystonia associated with WD is classified as secondary dystonia and GPi stimulation has yielded mixed results in these patients. The presence of structural changes in the basal ganglia may limit the therapeutic success of DBS for WD dystonia compared with idiopathic dystonia. In spite of these limitations, DBS in WD may be an effective approach to treat medically refractory residual neurologic symptoms in carefully selected patients. PMID:24547944

  17. Meige Syndrome: What’s in a Name?

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    Frequently, blepharospasm is associated with involuntary movements of the platysma, lower face and masticatory muscles. Similarly, masticatory dystonia may occur in isolation or in combination with dystonia of other cranial and cervical muscles. The non-possessive and possessive forms of Meige and Brueghel syndromes have been variably and imprecisely ascribed to various anatomical variations of craniocervical dystonia. Herein, the origin of eponymic terms as applied to craniocervical dystonia is reviewed as support for proposed elimination of these eponyms from clinical usage. Although the term “segmental craniocervical dystonia” more accurately captures the combination of blepharospasm and dystonia of other head and neck muscles, delineation of craniocervical subphenotypes is essential for etiological/genetic and treatment studies. To conclude, the clinical features, epidemiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic management of segmental craniocervical dystonia are examined with a particular focus on “blepharospasm-plus” subphenotypes. PMID:19457699

  18. [Cervical myelopathy after low grade distortion of the cervical spine. Possible association with pre-existing spondylosis of the cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Aurich, M; Hofmann, G O; Gras, F M

    2015-04-01

    A patient with spondylosis deformans of the cervical spine with no neurological deficits developed rapidly progressive tetraparesis 1 day after a whiplash injury due to a car accident (rear end collision), although initially there were no clinical symptoms. Surgical decompression and spondylodesis led to relief of the neurological deficits. This case demonstrates that even a low grade whiplash injury (grade 1) can cause severe neurological symptoms later and that a degenerative disease of the spine is a predisposing factor. PMID:25336350

  19. Corticobasal Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... dystonia (abnormal muscle postures). Other symptoms such as cognitive and visual-spatial impairments, apraxia (loss of the ability to make familiar, purposeful movements), hesitant and halting ...

  20. [Comparative characteristic of blood vessels filling, venous drainage and venous congestion in patients with autonomic vascular dystonia and arterial hypertention who have suffered from Chernobyl accident (according to the data of rheoencephalography and rheovasculagraphy)].

    PubMed

    Vereskun, S B

    2004-01-01

    Reliable differences in venous drainage and venous congestion and blood vessels filling of cerebral hemispheres in patients with vegetovascular dystonic and arterial hypertention who have suffered from Chernobyl accident have been detected by means of impedance tetrapolar plethysmography (rheoanalyzer PA5-01). PMID:15724601

  1. The Phenotypic Spectrum of DYT24 Due to ANO3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Stamelou, Maria; Charlesworth, Gavin; Cordivari, Carla; Schneider, Susanne A; Kägi, Georg; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Batla, Amit; Houlden, Henry; Wood, Nicholas W; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2014-01-01

    Genes causing primary dystonia are rare. Recently, pathogenic mutations in the anoctamin 3 gene (ANO3) have been identified to cause autosomal dominant craniocervical dystonia and have been assigned to the dystonia locus dystonia-24 (DYT24). Here, we expand on the phenotypic spectrum of DYT24 and provide demonstrative videos. Moreover, tremor recordings were performed, and back-averaged electroencephalography, sensory evoked potentials, and C-reflex studies were carried out in two individuals who carried two different mutations in ANO3. Ten patients from three families are described. The age at onset ranged from early childhood to the forties. Cervical dystonia was the most common site of onset followed by laryngeal dystonia. The characteristic feature in all affected individuals was the presence of tremor, which contrasts DYT24 from the typical DYT6 phenotype. Tremor was the sole initial manifestation in some individuals with ANO3 mutations, leading to misdiagnosis as essential tremor. Electrophysiology in two patients with two different mutations showed co-contraction of antagonist muscles, confirming dystonia, and a 6-Hz arm tremor at rest, which increased in amplitude during action. In one of the studied patients, clinically superimposed myoclonus was observed. The duration of the myoclonus was in the range of 250 msec at about 3 Hz, which is more consistent with subcortical myoclonus. In summary, ANO3 causes a varied phenotype of young-onset or adult-onset craniocervical dystonia with tremor and/or myoclonic jerks. Patients with familial cervical dystonia who also have myoclonus-dystonia as well as patients with prominent tremor and mild dystonia should be tested for ANO3 mutations. © 2014 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society PMID:24442708

  2. Altered sensorimotor activation patterns in idiopathic dystonia—an activation likelihood estimation meta‐analysis of functional brain imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Damian M.; Haagensen, Brian N.; Lorentzen, Anne K.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Siebner, Hartwig R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dystonia is characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements or postures. Functional neuroimaging studies have yielded abnormal task‐related sensorimotor activation in dystonia, but the results appear to be rather variable across studies. Further, study size was usually small including different types of dystonia. Here we performed an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta‐analysis of functional neuroimaging studies in patients with primary dystonia to test for convergence of dystonia‐related alterations in task‐related activity across studies. Activation likelihood estimates were based on previously reported regional maxima of task‐related increases or decreases in dystonia patients compared to healthy controls. The meta‐analyses encompassed data from 179 patients with dystonia reported in 18 functional neuroimaging studies using a range of sensorimotor tasks. Patients with dystonia showed bilateral increases in task‐related activation in the parietal operculum and ventral postcentral gyrus as well as right middle temporal gyrus. Decreases in task‐related activation converged in left supplementary motor area and left postcentral gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus and dorsal midbrain. Apart from the midbrain cluster, all between‐group differences in task‐related activity were retrieved in a sub‐analysis including only the 14 studies on patients with focal dystonia. For focal dystonia, an additional cluster of increased sensorimotor activation emerged in the caudal cingulate motor zone. The results show that dystonia is consistently associated with abnormal somatosensory processing in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex along with abnormal sensorimotor activation of mesial premotor and right lateral temporal cortex. Hum Brain Mapp 37:547–557, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26549606

  3. Acquired hemidystonia in childhood: a clinical and neuroradiological study of thirteen patients.

    PubMed

    Nardocci, N; Zorzi, G; Grisoli, M; Rumi, V; Broggi, G; Angelini, L

    1996-09-01

    A retrospective study of 13 patients (4 males/9 females) with acquired hemidystonia in childhood is reported. The mean age of onset of hemidystonia was 6.4 years (range 1-13.4 years); the mean duration of dystonia at the time of last follow-up was 11.4 years (range 3.6-23 years). Hemidystonia was caused by ischemic infarction in 9 patients and was attributed to perinatal trauma in 1; in 4 of the 9 patients with stroke and in the remaining 3 patients laboratory investigations were suggestive of primary antiphospholipid syndrome. Eleven of the 13 patients had delayed onset of dystonia: between 1 month and 8.9 years (mean 3.4 years). Ten patients had neuroradiological evidence of contralateral basal ganglia damage. A history of hemiparesis and evidence of striatal damage on CT or MRI were important risk factors for the development of dystonia. Response to medical treatment (trihexyphenidyl dose as high as 40 mg daily) in 5 patients was disappointing; 4 of the 5 patients who underwent functional stereotaxic operations were improved, but dystonia was still present at the end of the follow-up. Our study provides additional evidence that lesions of the striatum may induce dystonia, supporting the theory of striatopallido-thalamic disconnection. Furthermore, our results indicate that the occurrence of delayed dystonia must be considered in the diagnostic approach to childhood-onset dystonia. PMID:8888043

  4. DYT6 in Brazil: Genetic Assessment and Clinical Characteristics of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Carlos Henrique F.; Camargos, Sarah Teixeira; Raskin, Salmo; Cardoso, Francisco Eduardo C.; Teive, Hélio Afonso G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Several genes associated with dystonia have been identified. A mutation in one of these, THAP1 (DYT6), is linked to isolated dystonia. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of THAP1 gene mutations and the clinical characteristics of patients with these mutations in a clinical population in Brazil. Methods Seventy-four patients presenting with dystonia involving the cervical muscles and without mutations in the TOR1A (DYT1) gene or any other movement disorders were recruited at a movement disorders clinic between June 2008 and June 2009. All the patients underwent clinical examination and were screened for mutations of the THAP1 gene. Results Three patients had the novel p.Gln97Ter THAP1 nonsense mutation in heterozygosis. One of them had no family history of dystonia. Symptoms in this patient first appeared in his right arm, and the condition progressed to the generalized form. The other two patients belonged to the same family (cousins). Symptoms in the first patient started in her right arm at the age of 18 years and the condition progressed to the segmental form. The second patient, who carried the p.Arg169Gln missense mutation, developed dystonia in her left arm at the age of 6 years. The condition progressed to generalized dystonia. Discussion We conclude that THAP1 mutations are also a cause, albeit uncommon, of segmental and generalized dystonia in the Brazilian population. PMID:24757586

  5. Fibro-osseous Lesions of the Jaw: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Yadavalli, Guruprasad

    2011-01-01

    Fibro-osseous lesions of the maxillofacial bones comprise a diverse group of pathologic conditions that include developmental lesions, reactive or dysplastic diseases, and neoplasms. The concept of fibro-osseous lesions has evolved over the last several decades and now includes two major entities: fibrous dysplasia and ossifying fibroma. The less common lesions include florid osseous dysplasia, periapical dysplasia, focal sclerosing osteomyelitis, proliferative periostitis of Garre, and osteitis deformans. We report two cases, the first, a craniofacial polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, and the second, a juvenile ossifying fibroma of maxilla. PMID:21977383

  6. Fibro-osseous Lesions of the Jaw: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Yadavalli, Guruprasad

    2011-01-01

    Fibro-osseous lesions of the maxillofacial bones comprise a diverse group of pathologic conditions that include developmental lesions, reactive or dysplastic diseases, and neoplasms. The concept of fibro-osseous lesions has evolved over the last several decades and now includes two major entities: fibrous dysplasia and ossifying fibroma. The less common lesions include florid osseous dysplasia, periapical dysplasia, focal sclerosing osteomyelitis, proliferative periostitis of Garre, and osteitis deformans. We report two cases, the first, a craniofacial polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, and the second, a juvenile ossifying fibroma of maxilla. PMID:21977383

  7. Fungal remains in Pleistocene ground squirrel dung from Yukon Territory, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirozynski, Kris A.; Carter, Adrian; Day, Richard G.

    1984-11-01

    Fungi in dung of the Arctic ground squirrel ( Spermophilus parryii) collected near Dominion Creek, Yukon Territory, Canada, have a radiocarbon age of 12,200 ± 100 yr B.P. Most of the fungal remains are assignable to modern taxa, and most of these are either widespread saprobes or nonspecific coprophiles. However, specimens identified as Chaetomium simile and Thecaphora deformans represent fungi that may be more characteristic of rodent dung than that of other animals, inviting consideration of dung fungi as a potential source of paleontological data.

  8. [Sudden deafness and the craniocervical transition].

    PubMed

    Hörmann, K; Weh, L; Fritz, W; Borner, U

    1989-08-01

    Morphological alterations of the cranio-cervical junction as a basilar impression, a ponticulus posterior, an atlas assimilation, an intervertebral narrowing, and spondylosis deformans were found radiologically. There was no difference to a healthy population. This means there are no correlations between static morphological changes of the craniocervical junction and sudden deafness. However, there was a statistically significant reduced mobility in the upper cervical spine in patients suffering from sudden deafness. Especially very high standard deviations in the atlanto-occipital and the atlanto-dental joint are interpreted as hypermobile as well hypomobile atlas joints. These results indicate a correlation between sudden deafness and functional pathology of the craniocervical junction. PMID:2789574

  9. [An endoapparatus for restoration of hip joint].

    PubMed

    Lapinskaia, V S; Gatiatulin, R R; Trubnikov, V I; Velichko, M V; Froliakin, T V; Kovalenko, A E; Froliakina, L A

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of prolonging the anatomic and functional longevity of joints in young patients with coxarthrosis deformans under conditions of long-term unloading using a submersible distraction device is considered. A submersible endoapparatus for restoration of hip joint is described. Its functional capabilities as an unloading device were corroborated by experimental testing. Clinical examples illustrated with X-ray photographs demonstrate the possibility of long-term unloading of the injured joint and postponement of endoprosthesis replacement in young patients by 20-25 years. It is suggested to use the developed method for organ-sparing surgery in young working-age patients. PMID:18688939

  10. [The clinical characteristics of the early stages of occupational fluorosis under the combined and joint action of production factors].

    PubMed

    Semennikova, T K; Zhovtiak, E P; Likhacheva, E I; Kolmogortseva, V M; Kraeva, S L; Shcherbakov, S V

    1992-01-01

    Over 1000 workers of hydrofluoric and cryolite enterprises and electrolysis shops of aluminium enterprises were examined. Subjects exposed to soluble hydrofluorides presented in the early stage of chronic intoxication with a variety of syndromes, that was characteristic of intoxication with poisons of general toxic action with involvement of hepatobiliary, digestive, circulatory and autonomic nervous systems. Combined exposure to fluoric compounds, heating microclimate and electromagnetic fields results in a graver involvement of the circulatory and autonomic nervous systems. Clinical and experimental data show, that osteoarthrosis deformans of the major joints (primarily elbow joint) must be regarded as one of the symptoms of fluorosis, when other intoxication signs are present. PMID:1427324

  11. Cannabidiol

    MedlinePlus

    ... cannabidiol. People take cannabidiol by mouth for anxiety, bipolar disorder, a muscle disorder called dystonia, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, ... and quality of life in patients with MS.Bipolar disorder. Early reports suggest that taking cannabidiol daily does ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: MEGDEL syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene SERAC1 impair mitochondrial function and intracellular cholesterol trafficking and cause dystonia and deafness. Nat Genet. 2012 ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  13. OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Botox® Cosmetic ... OnabotulinumtoxinA injection (Botox, Botox Cosmetic) is used to treat a number of conditions.OnabotulinumtoxinA injection (Botox) is used to relieve the symptoms of cervical dystonia ( ...

  14. Progressive supranuclear palsy

    MedlinePlus

    Dementia-nuchal dystonia; Richardson-Steele-Olszewski syndrome; Palsy - progressive supranuclear ... Progressive supranuclear palsy is a condition that causes symptoms similar to those of Parkinson disease . It involves damage to many cells ...

  15. Torticollis (wry neck) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Torticollis is a form of dystonia (prolonged muscle contractions) in which the neck muscles, particularly the sternocleidomastoid muscle, contract involuntarily causing the head to turn. Torticollis may occur without known cause (idiopathic), ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: McLeod neuroacanthocytosis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... face and throat, which can cause grimacing and vocal tics (such as grunting and clicking noises). Dystonia ... less prevalent. The absence of Kx antigen and reduction of Kell antigen is known as the "McLeod ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: familial paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... involve slow, prolonged muscle contractions (dystonia); small, fast, "dance-like" motions (chorea); writhing movements of the limbs ( ... it is thought to be involved in the development and function of the brain. Studies suggest that ...

  18. Symptoms and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Diagnosed - Resources for Families Frequently Asked Questions Faces of Dystonia Get Involved Donate Stay Connected Special Events Calendar Promote Awareness Join a Support Group Become a Legislative Advocate Participate in Research Research Research Overview 101 Research News Accomplishments In ...

  19. IncobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... injection is used to relieve the symptoms of cervical dystonia (spasmodic torticollis; uncontrollable tightening of the neck ... is injected into a muscle, it blocks the nerve signals that cause uncontrollable tightening and movements of ...

  20. OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... dystonia (spasmodic torticollis; uncontrollable tightening of the neck muscles that may cause neck pain and abnormal head ... older; relieve the symptoms of strabismus (an eye muscle problem that causes the eye to turn inward ...

  1. IncobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... dystonia (spasmodic torticollis; uncontrollable tightening of the neck muscles that may cause neck pain and abnormal head ... adults and blepharospasm (uncontrollable tightening of the eyelid muscles that may cause blinking, squinting, and abnormal eyelid ...

  2. [Movement disorders in David Copperfield].

    PubMed

    Garćia Ruiz, P J; Gulliksen, L L

    1999-01-01

    Charles Dickens' novels are a source of vivid neurological descriptions. Besides Pickwickian syndrome, many other neurological descriptions can be found in Dickens' novels. David Copperfield contains several characters with movement disorders including generalized dystonia (Mr. Uriah Heep), restless legs syndrome (the waiter), cervical dystonia (Mr. Sharp) and spasmodic dysphonia (Mr. Creakle). These neurological descriptions an probably based on the observation of actual patients. PMID:10570623

  3. Deep Brain Stimulation for Tremor Associated with Underlying Ataxia Syndromes: A Case Series and Discussion of Issues

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Genko; Thompson, Amanda; Foote, Kelly D.; Limotai, Natlada; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; Maling, Nicholas; Malaty, Irene A.; Rodriguez, Ramon L.; Subramony, Sankarasubramoney H.; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Okun, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been utilized to treat various symptoms in patients suffering from movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, and essential tremor. Though ataxia syndromes have not been formally or frequently addressed with DBS, there are patients with ataxia and associated medication refractory tremor or dystonia who may potentially benefit from therapy. Methods A retrospective database review was performed, searching for cases of ataxia where tremor and/or dystonia were addressed by utilizing DBS at the University of Florida Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration between 2008 and 2011. Five patients were found who had DBS implantation to address either medication refractory tremor or dystonia. The patient's underlying diagnoses included spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), fragile X associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), a case of idiopathic ataxia (ataxia not otherwise specified [NOS]), spinocerebellar ataxia type 17 (SCA17), and a senataxin mutation (SETX). Results DBS improved medication refractory tremor in the SCA2 and the ataxia NOS patients. The outcome for the FXTAS patient was poor. DBS improved dystonia in the SCA17 and SETX patients, although dystonia did not improve in the lower extremities of the SCA17 patient. All patients reported a transient gait dysfunction postoperatively, and there were no reports of improvement in ataxia-related symptoms. Discussion DBS may be an option to treat tremor, inclusive of dystonic tremor in patients with underlying ataxia; however, gait and other symptoms may possibly be worsened. PMID:25120941

  4. Intrathecal morphine therapy in the management of status dystonicus in neurodegeneration brain iron accumulation type 1.

    PubMed

    Lopez, William Omar Contreras; Kluge Schroeder, Humberto; Santana Neville, Iuri; Jacobsen Teixeira, Manoel; Costa Barbosa, Danilo; Assumpçao de Mônaco, Bernardo; Talamoni Fonoff, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation type 1 (NBIA-1) is a rare disorder characterized by progressive extrapyramidal dysfunction and dementia. NBIA-1 encompasses typical iron brain accumulation, mostly in the globus pallidus with secondary dementia, spasticity, rigidity, dystonia, and choreoathetosis. Treatment remains mostly symptomatic and is challenging. We present the case of a 14-year-old boy diagnosed with NBIA-1, presenting intractable progressive generalized dystonia leading to unresponsive status dystonicus (SD). The patient received a SynchroMed II (model 8637) programmable system pump (Medtronic®, Inc.) implant with an Ascenda intrathecal catheter for intrathecal morphine therapy (IMT). The initial dose of morphine was 1.0 mg/day. Overall, we observed no complications with IMT treatment and important improvement of the patient's motor function with stabilization of his incapacitating dystonia and his quality of life. On the Global Dystonia Severity Rating Scale, he presented 52% improvement, 30% improvement on the Unified Dystonia Rating Scale, and 38% improvement on the Fahn-Marsden Rating Scale after 10 months, when the dose was 1.7 mg/day. IMT should be considered as a potential palliative treatment in the management of intractable dystonia and SD secondary to NBIA-1. PMID:25896138

  5. Enhanced inhibitory neurotransmission in the cerebellar cortex of Atp1a3-deficient heterozygous mice

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Keiko; Satake, Shin'Ichiro; Onaka, Tatsushi; Sugimoto, Hiroki; Takeda, Naoki; Imoto, Keiji; Kawakami, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Dystonia is characterized by excessive involuntary and prolonged simultaneous contractions of both agonist and antagonist muscles. Although the basal ganglia have long been proposed as the primary region, recent studies indicated that the cerebellum also plays a key role in the expression of dystonia. One hereditary form of dystonia, rapid-onset dystonia with parkinsonism (RDP), is caused by loss of function mutations of the gene for the Na pump α3 subunit (ATP1A3). Little information is available on the affected brain regions and mechanism for dystonia by the mutations in RDP. The Na pump is composed of α and β subunits and maintains ionic gradients of Na+ and K+ across the cell membrane. The gradients are utilized for neurotransmitter reuptake and their alteration modulates neural excitability. To provide insight into the molecular aetiology of RDP, we generated and analysed knockout heterozygous mice (Atp1a3+/−). Atp1a3+/− showed increased symptoms of dystonia that is induced by kainate injection into the cerebellar vermis. Atp1a3 mRNA was highly expressed in Purkinje cells and molecular-layer interneurons, and its product was concentrated at Purkinje cell soma, the site of abundant vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid transporter (VGAT) signal, suggesting the presynaptic localization of the α3 subunit in the inhibitory synapse. Electrophysiological studies showed that the inhibitory neurotransmission at molecular-layer interneuron–Purkinje cell synapses was enhanced in Atp1a3+/− cerebellar cortex, and that the enhancement originated via a presynaptic mechanism. Our results shed light on the role of Atp1a3 in the inhibitory synapse, and potential involvement of inhibitory synaptic dysfunction for the pathophysiology of dystonia. PMID:23652595

  6. How to assess motor impairment in writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Zeuner, Kirsten E; Peller, Martin; Knutzen, Arne; Holler, Iris; Münchau, Alexander; Hallett, Mark; Deuschl, Günther; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2007-06-15

    Writer's cramp is a task-specific hand dystonia affecting handwriting. Clinical scores such as the Arm Dystonia Disability Scale (ADDS) or Writer's Cramp Rating Scale (WCRS) as well as kinematic analysis of handwriting movements have been used to assess functional impairment in affected patients. In 21 patients with writer's cramp and healthy controls, we analyzed the kinematics of writing and cyclic drawing movements. We rated the severity of dystonia using the ADDS and WCRS and correlated the clinical scores with movement kinematics. Mean stroke frequency was significantly reduced in dystonic patients. Drawing movements showed more frequently a decrease in stroke frequency than handwriting movements. During circle drawing, mean vertical peak velocity was more variable in patients relative to controls, indicating an impaired ability to reproduce the same kinematic pattern over time. An increase in vertical writing pressure was only observed during handwriting but not during circle drawing and may reflect a compensatory effort to stabilize the pencil. Kinematic measures and individual ADDS and WCRS scores did not correlate with each other. The lack of correlation is not surprising as ADDS, WCRS, and kinematic analysis probe different aspects of motor impairment. The ADDS characterizes how dystonia affects a set of fine manual tasks, whereas the WCRS scores the manifestation of dystonia during handwriting. Therefore, the clinical scores and kinematic analysis of handwriting provide complementary insights into motor impairment. Future studies need to address which combination of clinical scores and kinematic measures are most appropriate to quantify impairment in writer's cramp. PMID:17230462

  7. Earlier onset of motor deficits in mice with double mutations in Dyt1 and Sgce

    PubMed Central

    Yokoi, Fumiaki; Yang, Guang; Li, JinDong; DeAndrade, Mark P.; Zhou, Tong; Li, Yuqing

    2010-01-01

    DYT1 early-onset generalized torsion dystonia is an inherited movement disorder caused by mutations in DYT1 coding for torsinA with ∼30% penetrance. Most of the DYT1 dystonia patients exhibit symptoms during childhood and adolescence. On the other hand, DYT1 mutation carriers without symptoms during these periods mostly do not exhibit symptoms later in their life. Little is known about what controls the timing of the onset, a critical issue for DYT1 mutation carriers. DYT11 myoclonus-dystonia is caused by mutations in SGCE coding for ε-sarcoglycan. Two dystonia patients from a single family with double mutations in DYT1 and SGCE exhibited more severe symptoms. A recent study suggested that torsinA contributes to the quality control of ε-sarcoglycan. Here, we derived mice carrying mutations in both Dyt1 and Sgce and found that these double mutant mice showed earlier onset of motor deficits in beam-walking test. A novel monoclonal antibody against mouse ε-sarcoglycan was developed by using Sgce knock-out mice to avoid the immune tolerance. Western blot analysis suggested that functional deficits of torsinA and ε-sarcoglycan may independently cause motor deficits. Examining additional mutations in other dystonia genes may be beneficial to predict the onset in DYT1 mutation carriers. PMID:20627944

  8. TorsinA hypofunction causes abnormal twisting movements and sensorimotor circuit neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chun-Chi; Tanabe, Lauren M.; Jou, Stephanie; Chi, Frank; Dauer, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Lack of a preclinical model of primary dystonia that exhibits dystonic-like twisting movements has stymied identification of the cellular and molecular underpinnings of the disease. The classical familial form of primary dystonia is caused by the DYT1 (ΔE) mutation in TOR1A, which encodes torsinA, AAA+ ATPase resident in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticular/nuclear envelope. Here, we found that conditional deletion of Tor1a in the CNS (nestin-Cre Tor1aflox/–) or isolated CNS expression of DYT1 mutant torsinA (nestin-Cre Tor1aflox/ΔE) causes striking abnormal twisting movements. These animals developed perinuclear accumulation of ubiquitin and the E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1 in discrete sensorimotor regions, followed by neurodegeneration that was substantially milder in nestin-Cre Tor1aflox/ΔE compared with nestin-Cre Tor1aflox/– animals. Similar to the neurodevelopmental onset of DYT1 dystonia in humans, the behavioral and histopathological abnormalities emerged and became fixed during CNS maturation in the murine models. Our results establish a genetic model of primary dystonia that is overtly symptomatic, and link torsinA hypofunction to neurodegeneration and abnormal twisting movements. These findings provide a cellular and molecular framework for how impaired torsinA function selectively disrupts neural circuits and raise the possibility that discrete foci of neurodegeneration may contribute to the pathogenesis of DYT1 dystonia. PMID:24937429

  9. Primary and secondary dystonic syndromes: an update

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Gavin; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review The dystonias are a common but complex group of disorders that show considerable variation in cause and clinical presentation. The purpose of this review is to highlight the most important discoveries and insights from across the field over the period of the past 18 months. Recent findings Five new genes for primary dystonia (PRRT2, CIZ1, ANO3, TUBB4A and GNAL) have made their appearance in the literature. New subtypes of neuronal brain iron accumulation have been delineated and linked to mutations in C19orf12 and WDR45, while a new treatable form of dystonia with brain manganese deposition related to mutations in SLC30A10 has been described. At the same time, the phenotypes of other forms of dystonic syndromes have been expanded or linked together. Finally, there has been increasing recognition of both the extramotor phenotype in dystonia and the part played by the cerebellum in its pathophysiology. Summary Recently, there has been unprecedented change in the scientific landscape with respect to the cause of various dystonic syndromes that is likely to make a direct impact on clinical practice in the near future. Understanding the genetic cause of these syndromes and the often wide phenotypic variation in their presentations will improve diagnosis and treatment. With time, these discoveries may also lead to much-needed progress in elucidating the underlying pathophysiology of dystonia. PMID:23757263

  10. [Pathogenesis of atherosclerosis: an update on the three main theories].

    PubMed

    Capron, L

    1989-12-30

    The causes and mechanisms of atherosclerosis remain incompletely understood. Almost all the present investigations are still connected with one of the main three historical theories of atherosclerosis: 1) the incrustation theory, as developed by von Rokitansky, has now led to the many studies on the roles of thrombosis and platelets; 2) the irritation theory, as opposed to the preceding one by Virchow and his school, is reviving through the rediscovery that leukocytes are present in the plaques, and that atherosclerosis (Virchow's endarteritis chronica deformans sive nodosa) has the features of a chronic inflammatory reaction; 3) the lipid infiltration theory, as initiated by the experiments of Anitschkov and Chalatov in rabbits fed a cholesterol enriched diet, motivates the huge mass of studies devoted to plasma lipids and their cellular metabolism. This article provides a brief update on each of these three complementary approaches of atherosclerosis. PMID:2698116

  11. Spondylitic changes in long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas) stranded on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA, between 1982 and 2000.

    PubMed

    Sweeny, Melinda M; Price, Janet M; Jones, Gwilym S; French, Thomas W; Early, Greg A; Moore, Michael J

    2005-10-01

    The primary bone pathology diagnoses recognized in cetacea are osteomyelitis and spondylosis deformans. In this study, we determined the prevalence, type, and severity of vertebral pathology in 52 pilot whales, a mass stranding species that stranded on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, between 1982 and 2000. Eleven whales (21%) had hyperostosis and ossification of tendon insertion points on and between vertebrae, chevron bones, and costovertebral joints, with multiple fused blocks of vertebrae. These lesions are typical of a group of interrelated diseases described in humans as spondyloarthropathies, specifically ankylosing spondylitis, which has not been fully described in cetacea. In severe cases, ankylosing spondylitis in humans can inhibit mobility. If the lesions described here negatively affect the overall health of the whale, these lesions may be a contributing factor in stranding of this highly sociable species. PMID:16456160

  12. ["Plica disease" (synovial folds) of the knee-joint: arthroscopic and histological findings, with suggestions for treatment (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Klein, W; Schulitz, K P; Huth, F

    1979-09-01

    A mediopatellar plica (synovial fold) of the knee-joint may develop without recognisable cause in adolescents or young adults, predominantly females. It leads to pain on pressure over the medial knee compartment, sudden or "springing" intraarticular movements and pseudolocking of the joint. Similar plicae occur after traumatic joint contusion, with meniscus disease, or more rarely with arthrosis deformans. Histologically they are characterized by band-like fibrosed evaginations of the synovial membrane and of the synovial fat and connective tissue into the joint spaces. The following therapeutic suggestions, based on the personal experience of 15 cases, are made in the knowledge that significant inflammatory or proliferative arthritic changes can be excluded: the plica can be cut through under arthroscopy; chondromalacial defects, directly or indirectly caused by plical rubbing, of the medial femoral condyle and the medial patella can be removed, also under arthroscopic control, with an electric razor. Arthrotomy is no longer needed in most cases. PMID:477536

  13. [Sudden hearing loss and the cranio-cervical junction].

    PubMed

    Bernal Sprekelsen, M; Hörmann, K; Weh, L

    1990-01-01

    Morphological alterations of the craniocervical junction as basilar impressions, a ponticulus posterior, an atlas assimilation, an intervertebral narrowing and spondylosis deformans, were found radiologically in patients with sudden hearing loss. There were no radiological differences to a healthy population. No relationship could be established between static morphological changes of the craniocervical junction of the upper cervical spine and the sudden hearing loss. However, there was a statistically significant reduction of the mobility in the upper cervical spine in patients suffering from sudden hearing loss. Very high standard deviations in the atlanto-occipital and the atlanto-odontoid joints are interpreted as hyper- as well as hypomobile joints. These results indicate a possible correlation between sudden hearing loss and a functional pathology of the craniocervical junction. PMID:2221307

  14. Tetrabenazine-induced oculogyric crisis - a rare complication in the treatment of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Janik, Piotr; Figura, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Tetrabenazine is used in the treatment of chorea, tardive dyskinesia, tics, and dystonia. It rarely causes acute eyeball dystonia and the description of this complication in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is limited. We provide a description of an acute oculogyric crisis caused by tetrabenazine in a patient with severe tics. The patient had never developed acute dystonic reactions, although he was previously exposed to numerous dopamine receptor-blocking agents. After 8 days of therapy with tetrabenazine at a dose of 62.5 mg daily, the patient developed involuntary movement of the eyeballs. Withdrawal of tetrabenazine caused resolution of all symptoms after a week. The purpose of this description is to draw attention to the potential of tetrabenazine to induce acute oculogyric crisis as well as the difficulty of differentiating drug-induced dystonia from dystonic tics in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. PMID:26955276

  15. Tetrabenazine-induced oculogyric crisis – a rare complication in the treatment of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Janik, Piotr; Figura, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Tetrabenazine is used in the treatment of chorea, tardive dyskinesia, tics, and dystonia. It rarely causes acute eyeball dystonia and the description of this complication in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is limited. We provide a description of an acute oculogyric crisis caused by tetrabenazine in a patient with severe tics. The patient had never developed acute dystonic reactions, although he was previously exposed to numerous dopamine receptor-blocking agents. After 8 days of therapy with tetrabenazine at a dose of 62.5 mg daily, the patient developed involuntary movement of the eyeballs. Withdrawal of tetrabenazine caused resolution of all symptoms after a week. The purpose of this description is to draw attention to the potential of tetrabenazine to induce acute oculogyric crisis as well as the difficulty of differentiating drug-induced dystonia from dystonic tics in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. PMID:26955276

  16. Botulinum Toxin in Secondarily Nonresponsive Patients with Spasmodic Dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Mor, Niv; Tang, Christopher; Blitzer, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Chemodenervation with botulinum toxin (BoNT) has been effective and well tolerated for all types of dystonia for >30 years. We reviewed outcomes of our patients treated with BoNT serotype A (BoNT-A) for spasmodic dysphonia (SD) who became secondarily nonresponsive. We found that 8 of 1400 patients became nonresponsive to BoNT-A (0.57%), which is lower than the secondary nonresponse rate in other dystonias. After a cessation period, 4 of our patients resumed BoNT-A injections, and recurrence of immunoresistance was not seen in any of them. When compared with patients with other dystonias, patients with SD receive extremely low doses of BoNT. Small antigen challenge may explain the lower rate of immunoresistance and long-lasting efficacy after BoNT-A is restarted among secondary nonresponsive patients with SD. PMID:27143711

  17. Use of botulinum toxin type A in the management of patients with neurological disorders: a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Smania, Nicola; Colosimo, Carlo; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita; Sandrini, Giorgio; Picelli, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Summary The aim of this survey was to provide an overview of important issues relating to therapeutic strategies based on botulinum toxin type A injection for the treatment of patients with neurological disorders. Two hundred and ten physicians from neurology and neurorehabilitation units in Italian hospitals answered a questionnaire exploring some clinical aspects of the use of botulinum toxin type A in patients with spasticity/dystonia. 66% of the physicians treated patients with dystonia, 80% treated adults with spasticity, and 35% treated children with cerebral palsy. Palpation with no instrumental guidance was the injection technique most commonly used for treating patients with dystonia, spasticity and cerebral palsy; 57% of the physicians evaluated patients instrumentally before toxin injection, while 45% assessed post-injection improvements by instrumental means; 78% of the physicians prescribed (when appropriate) rehabilitation procedures after toxin injection. Our results seem to show that the routine use of botulinum toxin in clinics is far from standardized. PMID:24598392

  18. The behavioural and motor consequences of focal lesions of the basal ganglia in man.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, K P; Marsden, C D

    1994-08-01

    The behavioural and movement disorders reported in 240 patients described in the literature with lesions affecting the caudate nucleus, putamen and the globus pallidus (lentiform nucleus) have been analysed. Reports were classified into two groups: small or isolated lesions involving the said nuclei alone; and large lesions with additional involvement of the adjacent internal capsule and/or periventricular white matter. Amongst the 240 cases, dystonia was the most frequent movement disorder recorded (36%); chorea (8%) and parkinsonism (6%) or dystonia-parkinsonism (3%) were uncommon. The commonest behavioural disturbance was the syndrome of abulia (apathy with loss of initiative and of spontaneous thought and emotional responses) (13%); disinhibition was rare (4%). Confusion usually was associated with intracerebral haemorrhage and depression was a relatively non-specific finding. Aphasia was extremely rare with lesions confined to these basal ganglia structures. Lesions of the caudate nucleus rarely caused motor disorders but were more likely to cause behavioural problems. Chorea has been described in only 6% of those with caudate lesions, and dystonia in only 9%. The most significant behavioural disturbance described in 28% of those with caudate lesions was the syndrome of abulia, sometimes alternating with disinhibition (11%). Lesions of the lentiform nuclei rarely caused abulia (10%) and did not produce disinhibition, but they commonly caused dystonia (49%), particularly when the putamen was involved (63%). Bilateral lesions of the lentiform nuclei, either of the globus pallidus or of the putamen, caused parkinsonism (19%) or dystonia-parkinsonism (6%) infrequently. The prominence of the behavioural disturbance of abulia with caudate lesions emphasizes the more complex cognitive role of this basal ganglia structure. The frequent occurrence of dystonia and less commonly of parkinsonism with lentiform lesions emphasize the motor roles of putamen and globus

  19. Deficits in Limb Praxis in Patients With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Rounis, Elisabeth; Banca, Paula; Voon, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    There is recent evidence of deficits in praxis in patients with primary dystonia. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been linked to disorders of higher-order motor function, such as dystonia. However, no clear mechanism underlying such a relationship has been found. This pilot study aimed to identify whether patients with OCD might also show deficits in praxis. Patients with OCD were compared with healthy volunteers on a meaningless gesture imitation task. Patients showed significantly lower scores in this task. Further studies are needed to elucidate the nature of patients' deficits in praxis. This might reveal similar mechanisms underlying OCD and some types of movement disorders. PMID:26792099

  20. Dementia with Lewy bodies in Meige Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ho Yin; Yu, Chi Shing

    2012-01-01

    Meige syndrome is a rare form of segmental dystonia characterized by blepharospasm and oromandibular dystonia. A few case reports of Meige syndrome have been associated with Lewy body pathologies, and the syndrome was also proposed for inclusion in the spectrum of Lewy body disease. We report a case of an elderly gentleman with a history of Meige syndrome for more than 10 years who developed dementia with Lewy bodies. Updated clinical and pathological evidence of linkages between these two conditions is also presented. PMID:22984651

  1. Hallervorden–Spatz Syndrome with Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Gothwal, Sunil; Nayan, Swati

    2016-01-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is a disorder characterized by dystonia, parkinsonism, and iron accumulation in the brain. The disease is caused by mutations in gene encoding pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) and patients have pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. We present an 8-year-old boy with progressive muscle dystonia, neuroregression, frequent fall and multiple injury marks of different stages. Seizures are rare with PANK2. This child had seizure onset at 4 years of age and seizure free on valproate and levetricetam. The CT scan showed tiger eye appearance and mutations on PANK2 gene. PMID:27303611

  2. Hallervorden-Spatz Syndrome with Seizures.

    PubMed

    Gothwal, Sunil; Nayan, Swati

    2016-04-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is a disorder characterized by dystonia, parkinsonism, and iron accumulation in the brain. The disease is caused by mutations in gene encoding pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) and patients have pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. We present an 8-year-old boy with progressive muscle dystonia, neuroregression, frequent fall and multiple injury marks of different stages. Seizures are rare with PANK2. This child had seizure onset at 4 years of age and seizure free on valproate and levetricetam. The CT scan showed tiger eye appearance and mutations on PANK2 gene. PMID:27303611

  3. Case-Control Study of Writer's Cramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roze, E.; Soumare, A.; Pironneau, I.; Sangla, S.; de Cock, V. Cochen; Teixeira, A.; Astorquiza, A.; Bonnet, C.; Bleton, J. P.; Vidailhet, M.; Elbaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonias are thought to be due to a combination of individual vulnerability and environmental factors. There are no case-control studies of risk factors for writer's cramp. We undertook a case-control study of 104 consecutive patients and matched controls to identify risk factors for the condition. We collected detailed data…

  4. Pseudodystonic Posture Secondary to Klippel–Feil Syndrome and Diastematomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Vicchi, Martin; Da Prat, Gustavo; Gatto, Emilia Mabel

    2015-01-01

    Background Dystonic postures possess a great number of differential diagnoses. Phenomenology Shown We describe a pseudodystonic posture in a 61-year-old woman with skeletal and extra-skeletal abnormalities. Educational Value Klippel–Feil syndrome represents an unusual cause of pseudodystonic posture to be considered in the differential diagnosis of dystonia. PMID:27352284

  5. [Segawa disease].

    PubMed

    Segawa, Masaya

    2008-01-01

    The first report of Segawa disease was a report of two girls, cousin each other, with dystonic posture, under the title of "Hereditary progressive basal ganglia disorder" in 1971. After accumulation of cases with an adult case, I confirmed this disease does not transform to Parkinson's disease in adulthood and published with a nomenclature of "Hereditary progressive dystonia with marked diurnal fluctuation" in 1976. Polysomnographical examination for evaluating the sleep effects and correlation of the natural course to the age variation of the tyrosine hydroxylase activities in the striatum, these speculated this is a particular disorder caused by non-progressive decrement of the tyrosine hydroxylase at the terminal of the nigrostriatal dopamine neuron. This was supported by PET studies in early 1990's. Evaluation of pteridine metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid revealed partial decrement of the GTP cyclohydrolase I as the cause of this disease and induced the discovery of the causative gene. After the discovery of the gene, an autopsied case with dopa-responsive dystonia was confirmed as Segawa disease and the neuropathological and histochemical findings confirmed the hypothesis. Furthermore, these showed rather selective involvement the D1-direct pathways in the disease. However, it was also clarified existence of two types, one, classic type, postural dystonia and the other action dystonia with vigorous dystonic movements besides dystonic posture, which, is postulated to be caused by the dopamine neuron innervating to the subthalamic nucleus with D1 neuron. Existence of these two phenotypes also provides phenotypical variation of Segawa disease. PMID:18232327

  6. Acoustic Variations in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia as a Function of Speech Task.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapienza, Christine M.; Walton, Suzanne; Murry, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    Acoustic phonatory events were identified in 14 women diagnosed with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD), a focal laryngeal dystonia that disturbs phonatory function, and compared with those of 14 age-matched women with no vocal dysfunction. Findings indicated ADSD subjects produced more aberrant acoustic events than controls during tasks of…

  7. Benign Essential Blepharospasm

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Benign Essential Blepharospasm Research Foundation 637 North 7th Street Suite 102 P.O. ... 832-0788 Fax: 409-832-0890 Dystonia Medical Research Foundation 1 East Wacker Drive Suite 2810 Chicago, IL ...

  8. A Mutation Affecting the Sodium/Proton Exchanger, "SLC9A6," Causes Mental Retardation with Tau Deposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbern, James Y.; Neumann, Manuela; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Feldman, Gerald; Norris, Joy W.; Friez, Michael J.; Schwartz, Charles E.; Stevenson, Roger; Sima, Anders A. F.

    2010-01-01

    We have studied a family with severe mental retardation characterized by the virtual absence of speech, autism spectrum disorder, epilepsy, late-onset ataxia, weakness and dystonia. Post-mortem examination of two males revealed widespread neuronal loss, with the most striking finding being neuronal and glial tau deposition in a pattern reminiscent…

  9. Psychiatric and Cognitive Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Nassery, Adam; Palmese, Christina A; Sarva, Harini; Groves, Mark; Miravite, Joan; Kopell, Brian Harris

    2016-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is effective for Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia, and essential tremor (ET). While motor benefits are well documented, cognitive and psychiatric side effects from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus interna (GPi) DBS for PD are increasingly recognized. Underlying disease, medications, microlesions, and post-surgical stimulation likely all contribute to non-motor symptoms (NMS). PMID:27539167

  10. [Parkinson's disease associated with a mutation in the PARK2 gene].

    PubMed

    Kaasinen, Valtteri; Hietala, Marja; Kuoppamäki, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    The most common cause of monogenic hereditary Parkinson's disease is a mutation in the PARK2 gene. Early onset, slow progression, dystonia, and good response to levodopa are typical of the disease phenotype. Finnish PARK2 patients have not been described previously. We describe two patients, in whom pathogenic mutations in the PARK2 gene were the cause of parkinsonism. PMID:26245049

  11. Lesch-Nyhan Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barabas, Gabor, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This special edition explores the serious genetic disorder, Lesch-Nyhan Disease (LND), which is characterized by severe dystonia, spasticity, speech impairment, renal disease, varying degrees of cognitive deficit, and, especially, compulsive self-injury. The information provided is based on experience at the Matheny School and Hospital (New…

  12. [State of the autonomic nervous system after induced abortion in the lst trimester].

    PubMed

    Bakuleva, L P; Gatina, G A; Kuz'mina, T I; Solov'eva, A D

    1990-04-01

    The autonomic nervous system has been examined in 271 patients with a history of first-trimester induced abortion. It was ascertained that induced abortion affected the autonomic nervous system, thus impairing adaptive potentials and entailing the onset or aggravation of preexisting autonomic vascular dystonia. PMID:2378404

  13. Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy: Benefits and Complications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdolsek, Helena Aniansson; Olesch, Christine; Antolovich, Giuliana; Reddihough, Dinah

    2011-01-01

    Background: Spasticity and dystonia in children with cerebral palsy has been treated with intrathecal baclofen therapy (ITB) at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia (RCH) since 1999. Methods: The records of children having received or still receiving ITB during the period September 1999 until August 2005 were studied to evaluate…

  14. [Central hemodynamics in young and middle-aged patients with the initial manifestations of cerebral circulatory failure].

    PubMed

    Rudenko, A E; Korzhenevskiĭ, L V

    1990-07-01

    The authors studied the indices of general hemodynamics in 53 patients with initial manifestations of cerebro-circulatory insufficiency of young and middle age. Young patients suffering of cerebral atherosclerosis and vegetative-vascular dystonia showed a hyperkinetic type of hemodynamics while the middle-aged with atherosclerosis showed the hypokinetic type evidencing abnormal function of autoregulatory mechanisms. PMID:2238601

  15. [The physiological problems of biofeedback control by the heart rate].

    PubMed

    Sidorov, Iu A; Vasilevskiĭ, N N

    1994-02-01

    The data on voluntary regulation of the heart rate in humans is given in respect to individual-typological differences of adaptive abilities, ecological specifics of ambient environment and labour, health condition (neuroses, vegetative-vascular dystonias etc.). A major role of training of the rhythmic regulatory processes for the biological feedback control, is corroborated. PMID:7522776

  16. [Effects of different methods of physical therapy on the course of autonomic dysfunction syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kalinina, O V; Efimova, E G

    2006-01-01

    A comparative randomized controlled trial was made of efficacy of vegetative disorders correction with drugs and physiotherapeutic factors. A total of 120 patients with vegetative vascular dystonia entered this trial. Its results demonstrated that addition of physiotherapy to the rehabilitation complex allows differential functional changes in the autonomic nervous system. This can be used for optimization of rehabilitation programs. PMID:16752738

  17. Identification and functional analysis of novel THAP1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Katja; Uflacker, Nils; Erogullari, Alev; Lohnau, Thora; Winkler, Susen; Dendorfer, Andreas; Schneider, Susanne A; Osmanovic, Alma; Svetel, Marina; Ferbert, Andreas; Zittel, Simone; Kühn, Andrea A; Schmidt, Alexander; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münchau, Alexander; Kamm, Christoph; Wittstock, Matthias; Kupsch, Andreas; Moro, Elena; Volkmann, Jens; Kostic, Vladimir; Kaiser, Frank J; Klein, Christine; Brüggemann, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in THAP1 have been associated with dystonia 6 (DYT6). THAP1 encodes a transcription factor that represses the expression of DYT1. To further evaluate the mutational spectrum of THAP1 and its associated phenotype, we sequenced THAP1 in 567 patients with focal (n = 461), segmental (n = 68), or generalized dystonia (n = 38). We identified 10 novel variants, including six missense substitutions within the DNA-binding Thanatos-associated protein domain (Arg13His, Lys16Glu, His23Pro, Lys24Glu, Pro26Leu, Ile80Val), a 1bp-deletion downstream of the nuclear localization signal (Asp191Thrfs*9), and three alterations in the untranslated regions. The effect of the missense variants was assessed using prediction tools and luciferase reporter gene assays. This indicated the Ile80Val substitution as a benign variant. The subcellular localization of Asp191Thrfs*9 suggests a disturbed nuclear import for this mutation. Thus, we consider six of the 10 novel variants as pathogenic mutations accounting for a mutation frequency of 1.1%. Mutation carriers presented mainly with early onset dystonia (<12 years in five of six patients). Symptoms started in an arm or neck and spread to become generalized in three patients or segmental in two patients. Speech was affected in four mutation carriers. In conclusion, THAP1 mutations are rare in unselected dystonia patients and functional analysis is necessary to distinguish between benign variants and pathogenic mutations. PMID:21847143

  18. Identification and functional analysis of novel THAP1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Katja; Uflacker, Nils; Erogullari, Alev; Lohnau, Thora; Winkler, Susen; Dendorfer, Andreas; Schneider, Susanne A; Osmanovic, Alma; Svetel, Marina; Ferbert, Andreas; Zittel, Simone; Kühn, Andrea A; Schmidt, Alexander; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münchau, Alexander; Kamm, Christoph; Wittstock, Matthias; Kupsch, Andreas; Moro, Elena; Volkmann, Jens; Kostic, Vladimir; Kaiser, Frank J; Klein, Christine; Brüggemann, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in THAP1 have been associated with dystonia 6 (DYT6). THAP1 encodes a transcription factor that represses the expression of DYT1. To further evaluate the mutational spectrum of THAP1 and its associated phenotype, we sequenced THAP1 in 567 patients with focal (n=461), segmental (n=68), or generalized dystonia (n=38). We identified 10 novel variants, including six missense substitutions within the DNA-binding Thanatos-associated protein domain (Arg13His, Lys16Glu, His23Pro, Lys24Glu, Pro26Leu, Ile80Val), a 1bp-deletion downstream of the nuclear localization signal (Asp191Thrfs*9), and three alterations in the untranslated regions. The effect of the missense variants was assessed using prediction tools and luciferase reporter gene assays. This indicated the Ile80Val substitution as a benign variant. The subcellular localization of Asp191Thrfs*9 suggests a disturbed nuclear import for this mutation. Thus, we consider six of the 10 novel variants as pathogenic mutations accounting for a mutation frequency of 1.1%. Mutation carriers presented mainly with early onset dystonia (<12 years in five of six patients). Symptoms started in an arm or neck and spread to become generalized in three patients or segmental in two patients. Speech was affected in four mutation carriers. In conclusion, THAP1 mutations are rare in unselected dystonia patients and functional analysis is necessary to distinguish between benign variants and pathogenic mutations. PMID:21847143

  19. Critical reappraisal of DBS targeting for movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Giusy; Della Torre, Attilio; Chirchiglia, Domenico; Volpentesta, Giorgio; Lavano, Angelo

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used as a surgical treatment of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia and essential tremor. Fundamental understanding of DBS effects on the pathological neural circuitry remains insufficient. In 2002 DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and the globus pallidus internus (GPi) was approved for use in patients with PD. Next year, DBS of Gpi and STN for dystonia received a Humanitarian Device exemption from the FDA. The commonly targets for DBS are subthalamic nucleus (STN) or globus pallidus internus (GPi) for Parkinson's disease, Gpi for dystonia and ventro-intermediate (VIM) nucleus of the thalamus for essential tremor. However, VIM DBS cannot sufficiently improve akinesia and rigidity. Pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is currently investigated as potential target to improve gait and posture. It is determined that DBS sometimes influences not only motor functions but also the cognitive and affective functions of patients. In this article we review the present state of DBS for movement disorders, appropriate indications, practical effects and stimulation-induced adverse events established in previous studies. We discuss target selection and the effect of DBS on motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, dystonia and essential tremor. PMID:27015393

  20. Cognitive Functioning in Children with Pantothenate-Kinase-Associated Neurodegeneration Undergoing Deep Brain Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Rachel; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To examine the cognitive functioning of young people with pantothenate-kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) after pallidal deep brain stimulation (DBS). PKAN is characterized by progressive generalized dystonia and has historically been associated with cognitive decline. With growing evidence that DBS can improve motor function in…

  1. Role for Torsin in Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Teleman, Aurelio A

    2016-08-01

    DYT1 dystonia is a neurological disease that causes involuntary twisting movements, often caused by dysfunction of the TorsinA gene. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Grillet et al. (2016) use Drosophila to discover that TorsinA regulates lipid metabolism, opening up future directions of research into the causes of this disease. PMID:27505412

  2. Attenuated Variants of Lesch-Nyhan Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jinnah, H. A.; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J.; Visser, Jasper E.; Schretlen, David J.; Verdu, Alfonso; Larovere, Laura E.; Chen, Chung-Jen; Cossu, Antonello; Wu, Chien-Hui; Sampat, Radhika; Chang, Shun-Jen; de Kremer, Raquel Dodelson; Nyhan, William; Harris, James C.; Reich, Stephen G.; Puig, Juan G.

    2010-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a neurogenetic disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. The classic form of the disease is described by a characteristic syndrome that includes overproduction of uric acid, severe generalized dystonia, cognitive disability and self-injurious behaviour. In addition to the…

  3. Preserved dichotomy but highly irregular and burst discharge in the basal ganglia in alert dystonic rats at rest.

    PubMed

    Kumbhare, Deepak; Chaniary, Kunal D; Baron, Mark S

    2015-10-22

    Despite its prevalence, the underlying pathophysiology of dystonia remains poorly understood. Using our novel tri-component classification algorithm, extracellular neuronal activity in the globus pallidus (GP), STN, and the entopeduncular nucleus (EP) was characterized in 34 normal and 25 jaundiced dystonic Gunn rats with their heads restrained while at rest. In normal rats, neurons in each nucleus were similarly characterized by two physiologically distinct types: regular tonic with moderate discharge frequencies (mean rates in GP, STN and EP ranging from 35-41 spikes/s) or irregular at slower frequencies (17-20 spikes/s), with a paucity of burst activity. In dystonic rats, these nuclei were also characterized by two distinct principal neuronal patterns. However, in marked difference, in the dystonic rats, neurons were primarily slow and highly irregular (12-15 spikes/s) or burst predominant (14-17 spikes/s), with maintained modest differences between nuclei. In GP and EP, with increasing severity of dystonia, burstiness was moderately further increased, irregularity mildly further increased, and discharge rates mildly further reduced. In contrast, these features did not appreciably change in STN with worsening dystonia. Findings of a lack of bursting in GP, STN and EP in normal rats in an alert resting state and prominent bursting in dystonic Gunn rats suggest that cortical or other external drive is normally required for bursting in these nuclei and that spontaneous bursting, as seen in dystonia and Parkinson's disease, is reflective of an underlying pathophysiological state. Moreover, the extent of burstiness appears to most closely correlate with the severity of the dystonia. PMID:26210616

  4. Atlas-based functional radiosurgery: Early results

    SciTech Connect

    Stancanello, J.; Romanelli, P.; Pantelis, E.; Sebastiano, F.; Modugno, N.

    2009-02-15

    Functional disorders of the brain, such as dystonia and neuropathic pain, may respond poorly to medical therapy. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) and the centromedian nucleus of the thalamus (CMN) may alleviate dystonia and neuropathic pain, respectively. A noninvasive alternative to DBS is radiosurgical ablation [internal pallidotomy (IP) and medial thalamotomy (MT)]. The main technical limitation of radiosurgery is that targets are selected only on the basis of MRI anatomy, without electrophysiological confirmation. This means that, to be feasible, image-based targeting must be highly accurate and reproducible. Here, we report on the feasibility of an atlas-based approach to targeting for functional radiosurgery. In this method, masks of the GPi, CMN, and medio-dorsal nucleus were nonrigidly registered to patients' T1-weighted MRI (T1w-MRI) and superimposed on patients' T2-weighted MRI (T2w-MRI). Radiosurgical targets were identified on the T2w-MRI registered to the planning CT by an expert functional neurosurgeon. To assess its feasibility, two patients were treated with the CyberKnife using this method of targeting; a patient with dystonia received an IP (120 Gy prescribed to the 65% isodose) and a patient with neuropathic pain received a MT (120 Gy to the 77% isodose). Six months after treatment, T2w-MRIs and contrast-enhanced T1w-MRIs showed edematous regions around the lesions; target placements were reevaluated by DW-MRIs. At 12 months post-treatment steroids for radiation-induced edema and medications for dystonia and neuropathic pain were suppressed. Both patients experienced significant relief from pain and dystonia-related problems. Fifteen months after treatment edema had disappeared. Thus, this work shows promising feasibility of atlas-based functional radiosurgery to improve patient condition. Further investigations are indicated for optimizing treatment dose.

  5. Disease-specific longevity of impulse generators in deep brain stimulation and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    van Riesen, Christoph; Tsironis, Georg; Gruber, Doreen; Klostermann, Fabian; Krause, Patricia; Schneider, Gerd Helge; Kupsch, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) represents an established and internationally approved therapy for movement disorders. In the present retrospective analysis, we evaluated disease-specific longevity of dual channel impulse generators (IPG) used in different movement disorders. We correlated the battery lifetime with electrical stimulation settings, "total electrical energy delivered" (TEED), stimulation modi (monopolar, double monopolar and bipolar) and targets. Specifically, we reviewed the longevity and stimulation settings of 464 IPGs implanted between 1996 until 2011 in a single university center. Disease entities comprised Parkinson's disease (PD, n = 257), dystonia (n = 130) and essential tremor (ET, n = 50). Further subanalyses aimed at assessing differential longevity in different subtypes of PD and dystonia. The main finding relates to longer IPG longevity in ET (thalamic DBS) and PD (subthalamic DBS) vs. dystonia (pallidal DBS; 71.9 ± 6.7 vs. 51.5 ± 2.3 vs. 37 ± 2 months). In PD the tremor-dominant type was associated with a significant shorter battery survival than in the akinetic-rigid type without tremor or the "balanced" type with tremor, bradykinesia and rigidity (38.8 ± 3.9 vs. 53.6 ± 3.4 vs. 58.8 ± 4.1 months), while there were no significant differences in longevity between the subtypes of dystonia. Frequency, amplitude, pulse widths and TEED correlated inversely with battery lifetime. Pallidal DBS in dystonia is associated with a shorter lifetime of IPGs than subthalamic or thalamic DBS for PD or ET. The present results may contribute to the rapidly evolving refinement of DBS devices. Future studies that assess energy consumption both in patients with and without IPG replacement could help to avoid potential underestimation of longevity of IPGs. PMID:27198700

  6. Two Siblings with Adolescent/Adult Onset Niemann-Pick Disease Type C in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Yun; Lee, Hyung Jin; Kim, Seong Hwan; Jeong, Young Jin; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-Sung; Cheon, Sang-Myung; Kim, Jae Woo

    2016-07-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C (NP-C), is caused by NPC1 or NPC2 gene mutations. Progressive neurological, psychiatric, and visceral symptoms are characteristic. Here, we present cases of a brother (Case 1) and sister (Case 2) in their mid-20s with gait disturbance and psychosis. For the Case 1, neurological examination revealed dystonia, ataxia, vertical supranuclear-gaze palsy (VSGP), and global cognitive impairment. Case 2 showed milder, but similar symptoms, with cortical atrophy. Abdominal computed tomography showed hepatosplenomegaly in both cases. NPC1 gene sequencing revealed compound heterozygote for exon 9 (c.1552C>T [R518W]) and exon 18 (c.2780C>T [A927V]). Filipin-staining tests were also positive. When a young patient with ataxia or dystonia shows VSGP, NP-C should be considered. PMID:27366019

  7. Glutaric aciduria type 1 as a cause of dystonic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Sarar; Hamad, Muddathir H.; Hassan, Hamdy H.; Salih, Mustafa A.

    2015-01-01

    Glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA1) is an inherited inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency of the enzyme glutaryl Co-A dehydrogenase (GCDH). Here, we report a 14-month-old Saudi boy with GA1 who presented with severe dystonia and was mis-diagnosed as cerebral palsy (CP). He presented to our institute with encephalopathy following an episode of gastroenteritis. His physical examination showed dystonia and spastic quadriplegia. His investigations revealed elevated both urinary 3-hydroxy glutaric acid, and serum glutarylcarnitine. The DNA analysis confirmed homozygosity for a mutation in the GCDH-coding gene (c.482G>A;p.R161Q). This case alerts pediatricians to consider GA1 as a differential diagnosis of children presenting with dystonic CP. PMID:26593172

  8. C19orf12 mutation leads to Karak pallido-pyramidal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kruer, Michael C.; Salih, Mustafa A.; Mooney, Catherine; Alzahrani, Jawahir; Elmalik, Salah A.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Khan, Arif O.; Paudel, Reema; Houlden, Henry; Azzedine, Hamid; Alkuraya, Fowzan

    2015-01-01

    Pallido-pyramidal syndromes combine dystonia with or without parkinsonism and spasticity as part of a mixed neurodegenerative disorder. Several causative genes have been shown to lead to pallido-pyramidal syndromes, including FBXO7, ATP13A2, PLA2G6, PRKN and SPG11. In particular, mutations in PLA2G6 have been identified in patients with Karak syndrome, a neurodegenerative disorder that features ataxia, dystonia-parkinsonism, dementia and spasticity with neuroradiologic evidence of cerebellar atrophy and/or brain iron deposition. Some patients with phenotypic Karak syndrome do not have demonstrable mutations in PLA2G6. Using homozygosity mapping and direct sequencing in a multiplex consanguineous Saudi Arabian family with Karak syndrome, we identified a homozygous p.G53R mutation in C19orf12. Our findings expand the phenotypic spectrum associated with C19orf12 mutations. PMID:24361204

  9. A dystonic syndrome associated with anti-basal ganglia antibodies.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M J; Dale, R C; Church, A J; Giovannoni, G; Bhatia, K P

    2004-06-01

    Anti-basal ganglia antibodies (ABGA) have been associated with movement disorders (usually tics and chorea) and psychiatric disturbance in children. This report describes five adult and adolescent patients (one male, four females; mean age of onset, 16 years (range, 13-35)) who presented subacutely with a clinical syndrome dominated by dystonia and had ABGA binding to antigens of similar molecular weights to those seen in Sydenham's chorea. Three patients had a clear history of respiratory infection before the onset of their symptoms. Three patients received immunosuppressive treatment, with three showing a notable reduction in symptoms. It is hypothesised that dystonia in adults or adolescents may be part of the clinical spectrum of the post-infectious syndrome associated with ABGA. PMID:15146015

  10. Movement disorders in multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Raja; Jankovic, Joseph

    2013-05-15

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system characterized by dissemination of the lesions in time and space. While tremor is frequently seen in patients with multiple sclerosis, other movement disorders such as parkinsonism, dystonia, chorea, ballism, paroxysmal dystonia, paroxysmal chorea, myoclonus, tourettism, restless leg syndrome and hemifacial spasm are less frequently reported. In this systematic review of the literature, we describe the different movement disorders reported in patients with multiple sclerosis and attempt to characterize their relation with the underlying demyelinating process. We also summarize the reports of movement disorders described in other demyelinating diseases such as neuromyelitis optica, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and central pontine myelinolysis. PMID:23522528

  11. Torsins Are Essential Regulators of Cellular Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grillet, Micheline; Dominguez Gonzalez, Beatriz; Sicart, Adria; Pöttler, Maria; Cascalho, Ana; Billion, Karolien; Hernandez Diaz, Sergio; Swerts, Jef; Naismith, Teresa V; Gounko, Natalia V; Verstreken, Patrik; Hanson, Phyllis I; Goodchild, Rose E

    2016-08-01

    Torsins are developmentally essential AAA+ proteins, and mutation of human torsinA causes the neurological disease DYT1 dystonia. They localize in the ER membranes, but their cellular function remains unclear. We now show that dTorsin is required in Drosophila adipose tissue, where it suppresses triglyceride levels, promotes cell growth, and elevates membrane lipid content. We also see that human torsinA at the inner nuclear membrane is associated with membrane expansion and elevated cellular lipid content. Furthermore, the key lipid metabolizing enzyme, lipin, is mislocalized in dTorsin-KO cells, and dTorsin increases levels of the lipin substrate, phosphatidate, and reduces the product, diacylglycerol. Finally, genetic suppression of dLipin rescues dTorsin-KO defects, including adipose cell size, animal growth, and survival. These findings identify that torsins are essential regulators of cellular lipid metabolism and implicate disturbed lipid biology in childhood-onset DYT1 dystonia. PMID:27453503

  12. Functional (psychogenic) movement disorders - Clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Functional or psychogenic movement disorders are common and disabling, and sometime difficult to diagnose. The history and physical exam can give positive features that will support the diagnosis, which should not be based solely on exclusion. Some clues in the history are sudden onset, intermittent time course, variability of manifestation over time, childhood trauma, history of other somatic symptom and secondary gain. Anxiety and depression are common, but not necessarily more than the general population. On examination, distraction and suggestibility may be present. There are specific signs that should be looked for with different types of movements. For example, with tremor, change in frequency over time and entrainment are common features. With myoclonus, the movements might be complex in type with long latencies to stimulus induced jerks. Gait disorders show good balance despite claims to the contrary. Functional dystonia still remains a challenging diagnosis in many circumstances, although fixed dystonia is one sign more likely to be functional. PMID:26365778

  13. [Deep brain stimulation for movement disorders: indications, results and complications].

    PubMed

    Fleury, Vanessa; Vingerhoets, François; Horvath, Judit; Pollak, Pierre; Burkhard, Pierre

    2015-04-29

    Movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD), essential tremor (ET) and dystonia can benefit from deep brain stimulation (DBS). DBS is considered when symptoms are disabling despite optimal medical therapy. Contraindications include dementia, uncontrolled psychiatric disease and/or comorbid conditions with potential for evolution. Targets are the subthalamic nucleus for PD, the ventral intermediate nucleus for ET and the globus pallidus internus for dystonia. The beneficial effet of DBS has been well documented for symptom control. Optimal target localization of the electrodes reduces the occurrence of side-effects. Stimulation-induced adverse effects can usually be abolished by turning the stimulation off, changing the active contact or other stimulation parameters. PMID:26062221

  14. Self-Mutilation in Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Raj, Pawan; Issac, Thomas Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is the term applied to a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting in iron deposition in the basal ganglia. Well-known phenotypic features are progressive regression with extra pyramidal involvement and a variable course. A 10-year-old child born to consanguineous parents presented with progressive generalized opisthotonic dystonia, retrocollis, oromandibular dyskinesias, apraxia for swallowing, optic atrophy and severe self-mutilation of lips. MR imaging showed brain iron accumulation. Other causes of self-mutilation were excluded. Early infantile onset, ophisthotonic dystonia with oromandibular dyskinesias and characteristic MR images are suggestive of NBIA. There is only one case reported in the literature of self-mutilation in this condition. PMID:26120159

  15. Acquisition and reacquisition of motor coordination in musicians.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Shinichi; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-03-01

    Precise control of movement timing plays a key role in musical performance. This motor skill requires coordination across multiple joints and muscles, which is acquired through extensive musical training from childhood. However, extensive training has a potential risk of causing neurological disorders that impair fine motor control, such as task-specific tremor and focal dystonia. Recent technological advances in measurement and analysis of biological data, as well as noninvasive manipulation of neuronal activities, have promoted the understanding of computational and neurophysiological mechanisms underlying acquisition, loss, and reacquisition of dexterous movements through musical practice and rehabilitation. This paper aims to provide an overview of the behavioral and neurophysiological basis of motor virtuosity and disorder in musicians, representative extremes of human motor skill. We also report novel evidence of effects of noninvasive neurorehabilitation that combined transcranial direct-current stimulation and motor rehabilitation over multiple days on musician's dystonia, which offers a promising therapeutic means. PMID:25773625

  16. Development of an intraoral device for social inclusion of a physically disabled patient.

    PubMed

    de Mesquita-Guimarães, Késsia Suênia Fidelis; Ferreira, Danielly Cunha Araújo; da Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra; Díaz-Serrano, Kranya Victoria; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino; Mantovani, Carolina Paes Torres; De Rossi, Andiara

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the use of an intraoral assistive technology for a patient with idiopathic generalized muscular dystonia, presenting temporomandibular disorder and severe anterior tooth mobility and diastema. A multidisciplinary team developed an intraoral device to provide typing and painting functions, and promote relaxation of masticatory muscles without compromising the teeth and supporting tissue structures. The occlusal splint associated with the device promoted muscle relaxation and relief of the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction, in this case with generalized muscle dystonia, allowing typing and painting with her mouth without causing tooth mobility or occlusal alteration. This intraoral device has low cost, easy adaptation and was efficient in TMD symptoms. Furthermore, the patient returned to her rehabilitation allowing performance of her duties without compromising dental structures, facilitating the social and the digital inclusion. PMID:26578336

  17. CADASIL presenting with a movement disorder: a clinical study of a Chilean kindred.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Marcelo; Dichgans, Martin; Slachevsky, Andrea; Urbina, Francisco; Mena, Ismael; Venegas, Pablo; Galvez, Marcelo

    2006-07-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a hereditary vascular disease that usually begins with migraine, followed by repeated strokes and progressive dementia. We describe an unusual clinical presentation of this condition in members of a Chilean family with an established NOTCH3 mutation. We report early clinical, neuropsychological, transcranial ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebral blood flow, and skin biopsy findings on these patients. Of the patients, 2 presented with facial dystonia, 1 of whom had abnormal single photon emission computed tomography and transcranial ultrasound studies after normal brain MRI scans. Our report emphasizes that CADASIL must be considered in the study of patients with secondary dystonia. PMID:16538621

  18. Two Siblings with Adolescent/Adult Onset Niemann-Pick Disease Type C in Korea

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Niemann–Pick disease, type C (NP-C), is caused by NPC1 or NPC2 gene mutations. Progressive neurological, psychiatric, and visceral symptoms are characteristic. Here, we present cases of a brother (Case 1) and sister (Case 2) in their mid-20s with gait disturbance and psychosis. For the Case 1, neurological examination revealed dystonia, ataxia, vertical supranuclear-gaze palsy (VSGP), and global cognitive impairment. Case 2 showed milder, but similar symptoms, with cortical atrophy. Abdominal computed tomography showed hepatosplenomegaly in both cases. NPC1 gene sequencing revealed compound heterozygote for exon 9 (c.1552C>T [R518W]) and exon 18 (c.2780C>T [A927V]). Filipin-staining tests were also positive. When a young patient with ataxia or dystonia shows VSGP, NP-C should be considered. PMID:27366019

  19. Development of future indications for BOTOX.

    PubMed

    Brin, Mitchell F

    2009-10-01

    Since the late 1970s, local injections of BoNT have provided clinical benefit for patients with inappropriately contracting muscles with or without pain or sensory disturbance. Marketing authorization for some BoNTs, depending on country, include core indications of dystonia (blepharospasm and cervical dystonia), large muscle spastic disorders (not yet approved in the United States, e.g., adult post-stroke spasticity and equinus foot deformity), hyperhidrosis and aesthetic. Subsequent development has extended to selected conditions characterized by recurrent or chronic pain (migraine headache), and urologic indications (neurogenic/idiopathic overactive bladder; prostate hyperplasia), with multiple additional opportunities available. Portfolio management requires a careful individual opportunity assessment of scientific and technical aspects (basic science foundation, potential to treat unmet medical need, product-specific risk in specific populations, therapeutic margin/safety profile, and probability of successful registration pathway). This article describes ongoing development targets for BOTOX. PMID:19470342

  20. Thermography in mass screening investigations of industrial workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehter, A. I.; Ginsburg, L. I.; Traktinsky, A. G.

    1993-11-01

    The role of thermography in screening, directed to diagnose breast diseases, chronic tonsillitis, neurocirculatory dystonia, gall bladder dyskinesia, sinusitis, and to detect the character of influence of harmful factors on workers organisms is studied. The investigations demonstrate a possibility of a successful utilization of thermography in mass prophylactive examinations in order to diagnose these diseases, but the problem of breast tumors diagnostics demands the following investigations.