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Sample records for dystonia musculorum deformans

  1. Fat embolism syndrome in a child with dystonia musculorum deformans

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Ng, Lai Ming; Chow, Wang; To, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy with dystonia musculorum deformans underwent an operation for removal of femoral implants and excision of the prominence at the greater trochanter of the left hip. He was found to have fat embolism syndrome at postoperative day 1 as evidenced by confusion, respiratory symptoms, chest radiograph changes, raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate, thrombocytopenia and fat in the urine and sputum. PMID:22604515

  2. Swimming activity in dystonia musculorum mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, R; Joyal, C C; Cote, C

    1993-07-01

    Dystonia musculorum (dt) mutant mice, characterized by degeneration of spinocerebellar fibers, were evaluated in a visible platform swim test. It was found that dt mutants were slower to reach the platform than normal mice. However, the number of quadrants traversed was not higher in dt mutants. It is concluded that spinocerebellar fibers to the vermis are important in limb control during swimming but not in visuo-motor guidance (navigational skills) of the animal towards a visible goal, at least in regard to the quadrant measure. It is not excluded that a measure tracing their path may find a mild deviation from the goal. PMID:8327590

  3. Early Illustrations of Geste Antagoniste in Cervical and Generalized Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Broussolle, Emmanuel; Laurencin, Chloé; Bernard, Emilien; Thobois, Stéphane; Danaila, Teodor; Krack, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Geste antagoniste, or sensory trick, is a voluntary maneuver that temporarily reduces the severity of dystonic postures or movements. We present a historical review of early reports and illustrations of geste antagoniste. Results In 1894, Brissaud described this phenomenon in Paris in patients with torticollis. He noted that a violent muscular contraction could be reversed by a minor voluntary action. He considered the improvement obtained by what he called “simple mannerisms, childish behaviour or fake pathological movements” was proof of the psychogenic origin of what he named mental torticollis. This concept was supported by photographical illustrations of the patients. The term geste antagoniste was used by Brissaud’s pupils, Meige and Feindel, in their 1902 monograph on movement disorders. Other reports and illustrations of this sign were published in Europe between 1894 and 1906. Although not mentioned explicitly, geste antagoniste was also illustrated in a case report of generalized dystonia in Oppenheim’s 1911 seminal description of dystonia musculorum deformans in Berlin. Discussion Brissaud-Meige’s misinterpretation of the geste antagoniste unfortunately anchored the psychogenic origin of dystonia for decades. In New York, Herz brought dystonia back into the realm of organic neurology in 1944. Thereafter, it was given prominence by other authors, notably Fahn and Marsden in the 1970–1980s. Nowadays, neurologists routinely investigate for geste antagoniste when a dystonic syndrome is suspected, because it provides a further argument in favor of dystonia. The term alleviating maneuver was proposed in 2014 to replace sensory trick or geste antagoniste. This major sign is now part of the motor phenomenology of the 2013 Movement Disorder Society’s classification of dystonia. PMID:26417535

  4. Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jinnah, H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary There has been considerable progress in our understanding of dystonia over the last century. Growing recognition of dystonia has enhanced awareness of its diverse motor phenomenology and brought attention to the importance that nonmotor features may play in this disorder, once considered to be purely motor. Using the latest technologies in human genetics, new genetic links are being discovered at an ever-quickening pace and expanding our knowledge of the disorder's complex pathogenesis. Furthermore, as we gain clearer insight into the pathophysiology of dystonia and an appreciation of the involvement of dysfunction outside the basal ganglia, dystonia has been increasingly viewed as a network disorder. Here we briefly discuss some of the recent noteworthy advances. PMID:26124980

  5. Musician's Dystonias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters & Press Releases Dystonia Dialogue Financials Contact Site Tree Home What is Dystonia? Living With Dystonia Get ... Medical Research Foundation (DMRF) has served the dystonia community since 1976. Join us in our global effort ...

  6. Oromandibular Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletters & Press Releases Dystonia Dialogue Financials Contact Site Tree Home What is Dystonia? Living With Dystonia Get ... Medical Research Foundation (DMRF) has served the dystonia community since 1976. Join us in our global effort ...

  7. Dystonia: phenomenology

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY In 1984, dystonia was defined by an ad hoc committee of the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation as a syndrome of involuntary, sustained muscle contractions affecting one or more sites of the body, frequently causing twisting and repetitive movements, or abnormal postures. In 2011, dystonia remains a purely clinical diagnosis. Primary dystonia includes syndromes in which dystonia is the sole phenotypic manifestation with the exception that tremor can be present as well. Primary dystonias are typically mobile and may show task specificity. Fixed dystonias are often psychogenic or associated with complex regional pain syndrome. Fixed dystonia may also be the terminal consequence of long-standing, inadequately-treated, severe appendicular or cervical dystonia. The vast majority of primary dystonias have their onset in adults. Late-onset, primary, focal dystonia, particularly blepharospasm, may spread to affect other anatomical segments. Patients with focal dystonia may also exhibit spontaneous remissions that last for years. Although sensory tricks are commonly reported by patients with primary dystonia, they have also been described in subjects with secondary dystonia. Another important sensory aspect of dystonia is pain which is relatively common in cervical dystonia but also reported by many patients with masticatory dystonia, hand–forearm dystonia and blepharospasm. In conclusion, “dystonia” can be used to delimit a clinical sign or loosely define a neuropsychiatric sensorimotor syndrome. PMID:22166421

  8. Fluorosis and periostitis deformans as complications of prolonged voriconazole treatment.

    PubMed

    Rad, Babak; Saleem, Mohamed; Grant, Susan; Florkowski, Christopher; Coates, Penelope; Gordon, David; Rankin, Wayne

    2015-09-01

    We describe a case of development of painful periostitis deformans in a 39-year-old woman who was receiving long-term voriconazole treatment for Aspergillus infection as a complication of orthotopic liver transplant. Measurement of fluoride levels strongly supports fluorosis to be the mechanism of the voriconazole-induced periostitis deformans and supports the concept that such measurements might be of use in predicting this complication of long-term voriconazole treatment. PMID:25587196

  9. Musician's Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Frucht, MD in partnership with the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation. MWD established a network of health care practitioners ... DMRF on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. © Dystonia Medical Research Foundation 2012

  10. Musician's dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Jon

    2015-08-01

    Musician's dystonia is a task-specific dystonia that usually affects the embouchure or the most active digits of the most active hand, and therefore differs between instruments. Since it is usually painless and intermittent, the diagnosis is often delayed and it is commonly misdiagnosed as being an overuse disorder or tendon pathology. It arises from pathological brain plasticity: physiological studies suggest that it is an exaggeration of brain changes that are required to achieve advanced musical skills. Its treatment often has limited success; however, musical retraining, botulinum toxin or rehabilitation based on modifying the aberrant plasticity may help. PMID:26023204

  11. Dystonia Medical Research Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Dystonia Research Research News Funding Programs Current Research Dystonia Coalition About DMRF Mission People Dystonia Dialogue Financials For the Media Connect Contact Us Privacy Policy Support Groups Calendar

  12. Dystonia: Physical Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... accompany the dystonia. Under the guidance of a physical therapist and a physician, an individual may learn to ... the dystonia. For information about locating a local physical therapist who specializes in neurological conditions such as dystonia, ...

  13. The Genetics of Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia has been defined as a syndrome of involuntary, sustained muscle contractions affecting one or more sites of the body, frequently causing twisting and repetitive movements or abnormal postures. Dystonia is also a clinical sign that can be the presenting or prominent manifestation of many neurodegenerative and neuro-metabolic disorders. Etiological categories include primary dystonia, secondary dystonia, heredodegenerative diseases with dystonia, and dystonia plus. Primary dystonia includes syndromes in which dystonia is the sole phenotypic manifestation with the exception that tremor can be present as well. Most primary dystonia begins in adults, and approximately 10% of probands report one or more affected family members. Many cases of childhood- and adolescent-onset dystonia are due to mutations in TOR1A and THAP1. Mutations in THAP1 and CIZ1 have been associated with sporadic and familial adult-onset dystonia. Although significant recent progress had been made in defining the genetic basis for most of the dystonia-plus and heredodegenerative diseases with dystonia, a major gap remains in understanding the genetic etiologies for most cases of adult-onset primary dystonia. Common themes in the cellular biology of dystonia include G1/S cell cycle control, monoaminergic neurotransmission, mitochondrial dysfunction, and the neuronal stress response. PMID:22989765

  14. Dystonia: Emotional and Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coping Tips & Strategies Are You Severely Depressed? Dystonia & Depression Dystonia & Anxiety Finding a Mental Health Professional When a Child is Diagnosed Online Support Frequently Asked Questions Faces of Dystonia Emotional & Mental Health Although dystonia is ...

  15. Spondylosis deformans and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (dish) resulting in adjacent segment disease.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Maria; Gonçalves, Rita; Haley, Allison; Wessmann, Annette; Penderis, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Spondylosis deformans and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) are usually incidental findings and in most dogs are either asymptomatic or associated with mild clinical signs. Severe spondylosis deformans and DISH can result in complete bony fusion of consecutive vertebral segments. One of the recognised complications following vertebral fusion in human patients is the development of adjacent segment disease, which is defined as degenerative changes, most commonly degenerative intervertebral disc disease, in the mobile vertebral segment neighboring a region of complete vertebral fusion. A similar syndrome following cervical fusion in dogs has been termed the domino effect. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the hypothesis that vertebral fusion occurring secondary to spondylosis deformans or DISH in dogs would protect fused intervertebral disc spaces from undergoing degeneration, but result in adjacent segment disease at neighbouring unfused intervertebral disc spaces. Eight dogs with clinical signs of thoracolumbar myelopathy, magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracolumbar vertebral column, and spondylosis deformans or DISH producing fusion of > or = 2 consecutive intervertebral disc spaces were evaluated. Vertebral fusion of > or = 2 consecutive intervertebral disc spaces was correlated (P = 0.0017) with adjacent segment disease at the neighbouring unfused intervertebral disc space. Vertebral fusion appeared to protect fused intervertebral disc spaces from undergoing degeneration (P < 0.0001). Adjacent segment disease should be considered in dogs with severe spondylosis deformans or DISH occurring in conjunction with a thoracolumbar myelopathy. PMID:22734148

  16. [A comparative evaluation of the efficacy of magneto- and laser therapy in patients with osteoarthrosis deformans].

    PubMed

    Selivonenko, V G; Syvolap, V D; Porada, L V; Medvedeva, V N; Boev, S S; Morozov, A I; Slin'ko, V G; Berest, S M; Garbuz, L N; Sholokh, S G

    1997-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of efficacy of magneto- and laser therapy was carried out in 82 patients with osteoarthrosis deformans. The magnetic field and laser irradiation dispelled the pain syndrome and synovitis manifestations. It is recommendable that the multiple-modality therapy of patients with osteoarthrosis deformans should involve magneto- and laser therapy (15 to 20 procedures per one course) that improve results of the treatment being received and allow the time of hospitalization to be reduced at an average by 5 bed-days. Laser appeared to be a very effective mode of treatment. No unfavourable side effects were recordable. PMID:9491734

  17. Art and dystonia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J; Slawek, Jaroslaw; Sitek, Emilia J; Martinez Castrillo, Juan Carlos

    2015-09-15

    Dystonia has a recent history in medicine. Focal dystonia was described in the 19th century by classic authors including Gowers, whilst generalized dystonia was described at the turn of the century. However, it is possible to find precise descriptions of dystonia in art, centuries before the medical definition. We have reviewed several pieces of art (sculpture, painting and literature) across the history that might represent descriptions of dystonia, from ancient period to nowadays. In classic times, the first reference to abnormal postures can be tracked back to the new Empire of Egypt (equinus foot), not to mention some recently described examples of dystonia from the Moche sculptures in Peru or Veracruz culture from Mexico. In Middle Ages it is possible to find many examples of sculptures in European cathedrals representing peasants with dramatic, presumably dystonic postures that coexist with amputation of limbs. This unique combination of dystonia and limb amputation probably represents ergotism. The painters Brueghel, Ribera and Velazquez also represented figures with postures likely to be dystonic. Literature is also a source of precise pre-neurological descriptions, especially during the 19th century. In David Copperfield, Dickens depicts characters with generalized dystonia (Uriah Heep), cervical dystonia (Mr. Sharp) and spasmodic dysphonia (Mr Creakle). Finally, even in modern Art (19th and 20th centuries), there are dramatic descriptions of abnormal postures that are likely to be dystonic, such as painful cervical dystonia (Brancusi), cervical dystonia with sensory trick (Modigliani) and upper limb dystonia (Wyspianski). However some postures presented in works of art may simply be a form of artistic expression and only bear unintentional resemblance to the dystonic postures. Art may be a source of neurological information, and that includes primary and secondary dystonia. PMID:26139341

  18. Dystonia: Related and Differential Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... respond, too. What is the difference between a Parkinson's disease patient with dystonia and a dystonia patient with Parkinson's symptoms? Parkinson's disease is a neurological movement disorder ...

  19. Experimental Therapeutics for Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jinnah, H. A.; Hess, Ellen J.

    2008-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological syndrome characterized by excessive involuntary muscle contractions leading to twisting movements and unnatural postures. It has many different clinical manifestations, and many different causes. More than 3 million people worldwide suffer from dystonia, yet there are few broadly effective treatments. In the past decade, progress in research has advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of dystonia to a point where drug discovery efforts are now feasible. There are several strategies that can be used to develop novel therapeutics for dystonia. Existing therapies have only modest efficacy, but may be refined and improved to increase benefits while reducing side effects. Identifying rational targets for drug intervention based on the pathogenesis of dystonia is another strategy. The surge in both basic and clinical research discoveries has provided insights at all levels including etiological, physiological and nosological, to enable such a targeted approach. The empirical approach to drug discovery is complementary to the rational approach whereby compounds are identified using a non-mechanistic strategy. [MD1] With the recent development of multiple animal models of dystonia, it is now possible to develop assays and perform drug screens on vast number of compounds. This multifaceted approach to drug discovery in dystonia will likely provide lead compounds that can then be translated for clinical use. PMID:18394563

  20. Forms of Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the symptoms, and associated features such as additional movement disorders or neurological symptoms, and 2. Cause (which includes ... that includes prominent myoclonus symptoms. Paroxysmal dystonias and dyskinesias : Episodic movement disorders in which abnormal movements occur ...

  1. Table tennis dystonia.

    PubMed

    Le Floch, Anne; Vidailhet, Marie; Flamand-Rouvière, Constance; Grabli, David; Mayer, Jean-Michel; Gonce, Michel; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Roze, Emmanuel

    2010-02-15

    Focal task-specific dystonia (FTSD) occurs exclusively during a specific activity that usually involves a highly skilled movement. Classical FTSD dystonias include writer's cramp and musician's dystonia. Few cases of sport-related dystonia have been reported. We describe the first four cases of FTSD related to table tennis (TT), two involving professional international competitors. We also systematically analyzed the literature for reports of sport-related dystonia including detailed clinical descriptions. We collected a total of 13 cases of sport-related dystonia, including our four TT players. Before onset, all the patients had trained for many years, for a large number of hours per week. Practice time had frequently increased significantly in the year preceding onset. As TT is characterized by highly skilled hand/forearm movements acquired through repetitive exercises, it may carry a higher risk of FTSD than other sports. Intensive training may result in maladaptive responses and overwhelm homeostatic mechanisms that regulate cortical plasticity in vulnerable individuals. Our findings support the importance of environmental risk factors in sport-related FTSD, as also suggested in classical FTSD, and have important implications for clinical practice. PMID:20108363

  2. Task-specific Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Russotto, Diego; Perlmutter, Joel S.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific dystonias are primary focal dystonias characterized by excessive muscle contractions producing abnormal postures during selective motor activities that often involve highly skilled, repetitive movements. Historically these peculiar postures were considered psychogenic but have now been classified as forms of dystonia. Writer’s cramp is the most commonly identified task-specific dystonia and has features typical of this group of disorders. Symptoms may begin with lack of dexterity during performance of a specific motor task with increasingly abnormal posturing of the involved body part as motor activity continues. Initially, the dystonia may manifest only during the performance of the inciting task, but as the condition progresses it may also occur during other activities or even at rest. Neurological exam is usually unremarkable except for the dystonia-related abnormalities. Although the precise pathophysiology remains unclear, increasing evidence suggests reduced inhibition at different levels of the sensorimotor system. Symptomatic treatment options include oral medications, botulinum toxin injections, neurosurgical procedures, and adaptive strategies. Prognosis may vary depending upon body part involved and specific type of task affected. Further research may reveal new insights into the etiology, pathophysiology, natural history, and improved treatment of these conditions. PMID:18990127

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury and Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... various neurological symptoms, often including dystonia and other movement disorders. Symptoms • Symptoms of a TBI can be mild, ... following an injury. Symptoms of dystonia and other movement disorders may be delayed by several months or years ...

  4. Molecular pathways in dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bragg, D. Cristopher; Armata, Ioanna A.; Nery, Flavia C.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Sharma, Nutan

    2011-01-01

    The hereditary dystonias comprise a set of diseases defined by a common constellation of motor deficits. These disorders are most likely associated with different molecular etiologies, many of which have yet to be elucidated. Here we discuss recent advances in three forms of hereditary dystonia, DYT1, DYT6 and DYT16, which share a similar clinical picture: onset in childhood or adolescence, progressive spread of symptoms with generalized involvement of body regions and a steady state affliction without treatment. Unlike DYT1, the genes responsible for DYT6 and DYT16 have only recently been identified, with relatively little information about the function of the encoded proteins. Nevertheless, recent data suggest that these proteins may fit together within interacting pathways involved in dopaminergic signaling, transcriptional regulation, and cellular stress responses. This review focuses on these molecular pathways, highlighting potential common themes among these dystonias which may serve as areas for future research. PMID:21134457

  5. Recent Developments in Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jinnah, H. A.; Teller, Jan K.; Galpern, Wendy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The dystonias are a family of related disorders with many different clinical manifestations and causes. This review summarizes recent developments regarding these disorders, focusing mainly on advances with direct clinical relevance from the past two years. Recent findings The dystonias are generally defined by their clinical characteristics, rather than by their underlying genetic or neuropathological defects. The many varied clinical manifestations and causes contribute to the fact that they are one of the most poorly recognized of all movement disorders. A series of recent publications has addressed these issues offering a revised definition and more logical means for classifying the many subtypes. Our understanding of the genetic and neurobiological mechanisms responsible for different types of dystonias also has grown rapidly, creating new opportunities and challenges for diagnosis and identifying increasing numbers of rare subtypes for which specific treatments are available. Summary Recent advances in describing the clinical phenotypes and determining associated genotypes have pointed to the need for new strategies for diagnosis, classification and treatment of the dystonias. PMID:26110799

  6. Brain Stimulation for Torsion Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Michael D.; Alterman, Ron L.

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is a heterogeneous neurological disorder characterized by abnormal muscle contractions for which standard medical therapy is often inadequate. For such patients, therapeutic brain stimulation is becoming increasingly utilized. Here we review the evidence and effect sizes for treating different types of dystonia with different types of brain stimulation. Strong (level B) evidence supports the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of primary generalized or segmental dystonia, especially DYT-1, as well as for patients with cervical dystonia. Large effect sizes have also been reported for DBS treatment of tardive dystonia, writer’s cramp, cranial dystonia, myoclonus dystonia, and off-state dystonia associated with Parkinson’s disease. Lesser benefit is generally seen in dystonia secondary to structural brain damage. Other brain stimulation techniques including epidural cortical stimulation and noninvasive brain stimulation have been investigated, but generally report smaller effect sizes in a more limited number of patients. Recent advances relevant to patient selection, surgical approach, DBS programming, and mechanism of action are discussed. PMID:25894231

  7. Strategies for treatment of dystonia.

    PubMed

    Dressler, Dirk; Altenmueller, Eckart; Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Bohlega, Saeed; Chana, Pedro; Chung, Tae Mo; Frucht, Steven; Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J; Kaelin, Alain; Kaji, Ryuji; Kanovsky, Petr; Laskawi, Rainer; Micheli, Federico; Orlova, Olga; Relja, Maja; Rosales, Raymond; Slawek, Jaroslaw; Timerbaeva, Sofia; Warner, Thomas T; Saberi, Fereshte Adib

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of dystonias is generally symptomatic. To produce sufficient therapy effects, therefore, frequently a multimodal and interdisciplinary therapeutic approach becomes necessary, combining botulinum toxin therapy, deep brain stimulation, oral antidystonic drugs, adjuvant drugs and rehabilitation therapy including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, re-training, speech therapy, psychotherapy and sociotherapy. This review presents the recommendations of the IAB-Interdisciplinary Working Group for Movement Disorders Special Task Force on Interdisciplinary Treatment of Dystonia. It reviews the different therapeutic modalities and outlines a strategy to adapt them to the dystonia localisation and severity of the individual patient. Hints to emerging and future therapies will be given. PMID:26370676

  8. Symptomatic animal models for dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Bethany K.; Hess, Ellen J.

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic animal models have clinical features consistent with human disorders and are often used to identify the anatomical and physiological processes involved in the expression of symptoms and to experimentally demonstrate causality where it would be infeasible in the patient population. Rodent and primate models of dystonia have identified basal ganglia abnormalities, including alterations in striatal GABAergic and dopaminergic transmission. Symptomatic animal models have also established the critical role of the cerebellum in dystonia, particularly abnormal glutamate signaling and aberrant Purkinje cell activity. Further, experiments suggest that the basal ganglia and cerebellum are nodes in an integrated network that is dysfunctional in dystonia. The knowledge gained from experiments in symptomatic animal models may serve as the foundation for the development of novel therapeutic interventions to treat dystonia. PMID:23893454

  9. Sex prevalence of focal dystonias.

    PubMed Central

    Soland, V L; Bhatia, K P; Marsden, C D

    1996-01-01

    The sex prevalence of idiopathic focal dystonia is reported from a data base review of all patients seen at the National Hospital of Neurology, Queen Square and King's College, London up to 1993. There was a higher prevalence of females to males in all categories of focal dystonia involving the craniocervical region. The female to male ratio for cranial dystonia was 1.92:1 (P < 0.01) and 1.6:1 (P < 0.001) for spasmodic torticollis. On the other hand, twice as many men than women had writer's cramp (M:F = 2.0:1, P < 0.01). At present, there is no clear explanation to account for this differences in the sex prevalence of different types of focal dystonia. PMID:8708656

  10. Genetics in Dystonia: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Tania; Ozelius, Laurie J.

    2013-01-01

    The past year has been extremely successful with regards to the genetics of dystonia with the identification of four new dystonia genes (CIZ1, ANO3, GNAL and TUBB4A). This progress was primarily achieved because of the application of a new technology, next generation DNA sequencing, which allows rapid and comprehensive assessment of patient’s genomes. In addition, a combination of next generation and traditional Sanger sequencing has expanded the phenotypic spectrum associated with some of the dystonia plus (ATP1A3) and paroxysmal loci (PRRT2). This article reviews the newly identified genes and phenotypes and discusses the future applications of next generation sequencing to dystonia research. PMID:24136457

  11. Primary dystonia: molecules and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Lauren M.; Kim, Connie E.; Alagem, Noga; Dauer, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Primary dystonia is characterized by abnormal, involuntary twisting and turning movements that reflect impaired motor system function. The dystonic brain seems normal, in that it contains no overt lesions or evidence of neurodegeneration, but functional brain imaging has uncovered abnormalities involving the cortex, striatum and cerebellum, and diffusion tensor imaging suggests the presence of microstructural defects in white matter tracts of the cerebellothalamocortical circuit. Clinical electrophysiological studies show that the dystonic CNS exhibits hyperactive plasticity—perhaps related to deficient inhibitory neurotransmission—in a range of brain structures, as well as the spinal cord. Dystonia is, therefore, best conceptualized as a motor circuit disorder, rather than an abnormalcy of a particular brain structure. None of the aforementioned abnormalities can be strictly causal, as they are not limited to regions of the CNS subserving clinically affected body parts, and are found in seemingly healthy patients with dystonia-related mutations. The study of dystonia-related genes will, hopefully, help researchers to unravel the chain of events from molecular to cellular to system abnormalities. DYT1 mutations, for example, cause abnormalities within the endoplasmic reticulum–nuclear envelope endomembrane system. Other dystonia-related gene products traffic through the endoplasmic reticulum, suggesting a potential cell biological theme underlying primary dystonia. PMID:19826400

  12. Diagnosis & Treatment of Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jinnah, H. A.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis The dystonias are a group of disorders characterized by excessive involuntary muscle contractions leading to abnormal postures and/or repetitive movements. There are many different clinical manifestations and many different causes. A careful assessment of the clinical manifestations is helpful for identifying syndromic patterns that focus diagnostic testing on potential causes. If a cause can be identified, specific etiology-based treatments may be available. However, in the majority of cases, a specific cause cannot be identified, and treatments are based on symptoms. Treatment options include counseling and education, oral medications, botulinum toxin injections, and several surgical procedures. A substantial reduction in symptoms and improved quality of life can be achieved in the majority of patients by combining these various options. PMID:25432724

  13. Psychiatric comorbidities in dystonia: emerging concepts.

    PubMed

    Zurowski, Mateusz; McDonald, William M; Fox, Susan; Marsh, Laura

    2013-06-15

    Psychiatric disorders are highly prevalent in patients with dystonia and have a profound effect on quality of life. Patients with dystonia frequently meet criteria for anxiety disorders, especially social phobia, and major depressive disorder. Deficits in emotional processing have also been demonstrated in some dystonia populations. Onset of psychiatric disturbances in patients with dystonia often precedes onset of motor symptoms, suggesting that the pathophysiology of dystonia itself contributes to the genesis of psychiatric disturbances. This article examines the hypothesis that mood and anxiety disorders are intrinsic to the neurobiology of dystonia, citing the available literature, which is derived mostly from research on focal isolated dystonias. Limitations of studies are identified, and the role of emotional reactivity, especially in the context of pain secondary to dystonia, is recognized. Available evidence underscores the need to develop dystonia assessment tools that incorporate psychiatric measures. Such tools would allow for a better understanding of the full spectrum of dystonia presentations and facilitate research on the treatment of dystonia as well as the treatment of psychiatric illnesses in the context of dystonia. This article, solicited for a special Movement Disorders issue on novel research findings and emerging concepts in dystonia, addresses the following issues: (1) To what extent are psychiatric disturbances related to the pathophysiology of dystonia? (2) What is the impact of psychiatric disturbances on outcome measures of current assessment tools for dystonia? (3) How do psychiatric comorbidities influence the treatment of dystonia? Answers to these questions will lead to an increased appreciation of psychiatric disorders in dystonia, a better understanding of brain physiology, more nuanced research questions pertaining to this population, better clinical scales that can be used to further patient management and research, and improved

  14. The Environmental Epidemiology of Primary Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Defazio, Giovanni; Gigante, Angelo F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions that cause twisting movements and abnormal postures. Primary dystonia is the most common form and is thought to be a multifactorial condition in which one or more genes combine with environmental factors to reach disease. Methods We reviewed controlled studies on possible environmental risk factors for primary early- and late-onset dystonia. Results Environmental factors associated with primary early-onset dystonia are poorly understood. Early childhood illnesses have been reported to be more frequent in patients with DYT1 dystonia than in subjects carrying the DYT1 mutation that did not manifest dystonia, thus raising the possibility that such exposures precipitate dystonia among DYT1 carriers. Conversely, several environmental factors have been associated with primary adult-onset focal dystonias compared to control subjects. Namely, eye diseases, sore throat, idiopathic scoliosis, and repetitive upper limb motor action seem to be associated with blepharospasm (BSP), laryngeal dystonia (LD), cervical dystonia (CD), and upper limb dystonia, respectively. In addition, an inverse association between coffee drinking and BSP has been observed in both case-unrelated control and family-based case-control studies. Additional evidence supporting a causal link with different forms of primary late-onset dystonia is only available for diseases of the anterior segment of the eye, writing activity, and coffee intake. Conclusion There is reasonable epidemiological evidence that some environmental factors are risk-modifying factors for specific forms of primary adult-onset focal dystonia. PMID:23724359

  15. Carbamazepine-induced dystonia in an adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Shwetank; Gill, Manpreet; Bhasin, Chhavi

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia is sustained muscle contraction, which may be primary or secondary to other causes. Drugs comprise one of the most important causes for the secondary dystonia, the usual mechanism being a dopaminergic blockade. There are very few reports describing dystonia resulting from carbamazepine (CBZ) administration. In this case report, a 16-year-old male with mental retardation and seizure disorder developed dystonia at therapeutic blood levels of CBZ. PMID:27298509

  16. Etiology of musician’s dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, A; Jabusch, H -C.; Altenmüller, E; Hagenah, J; Brüggemann, N; Lohmann, K; Enders, L; Kramer, P L.; Saunders-Pullman, R; Bressman, S B.; Münchau, A; Klein, C

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that there is familial aggregation of dystonia and other movement disorders in relatives of patients with musician’s dystonia (MD) and to identify possible environmental triggers. Methods: The families of 28 index patients with MD (14 with a reported positive family history of focal task-specific dystonia [FTSD] and 14 with no known family history [FH−]) underwent a standardized telephone screening interview using a modified version of the Beth Israel Dystonia Screen. Videotaped neurologic examinations were performed on all participants who screened positive and consensus diagnoses established. All patients were investigated for DYT1 dystonia and suitable families were tested for linkage to DYT7. All family members were administered questionnaires covering potential triggers of FTSD. Results: A diagnosis of dystonia was established in all 28 index patients and in 19/97 examined relatives (MD: n = 8, other FTSD: n = 9, other dystonias: n = 2), 5 of whom were members of FH− families. In 27 of the 47 affected individuals, additional forms of dystonia were seen; other movement disorders were observed in 23 patients. In total, 18 families were multiplex families with two to four affected members. Autosomal dominant inheritance was compatible in at least 12 families. The GAG deletion in DYT1 was absent in all patients. Linkage to DYT7 could be excluded in 1 of the 11 informative families. With respect to potential environmental triggers, there was no significant difference between patients with MD/FTSD compared to unaffected family members. Conclusion: Our results suggest a genetic contribution to musician’s dystonia with phenotypic variability including focal task-specific dystonia. GLOSSARY BIDS = Beth Israel Dystonia Screen; FH+ = reported positive family history of focal task-specific dystonia; FH− = no known family history of focal task-specific dystonia; FTSD = focal task-specific dystonia; MD = musician’s dystonia; WC

  17. Parkinsonism following dystonia in three patients.

    PubMed

    Katchen, M; Duvoisin, R C

    1986-01-01

    Three patients who presented initially with dystonia and subsequently developed typical idiopathic parkinsonism were evaluated. One patient presented with a writer's cramp, one with axial dystonia, and one with Meige syndrome. All three displayed amelioration of their dystonia with progression of their parkinsonism over a period of 2 to 15 years. Treatment with levodopa gave some relief of the parkinsonism symptoms in two patients but exacerbated or reactivated the dystonia. It is suggested that both the dystonia and the parkinsonism represent the changing clinical expression of the same disorder at different times in its evolution. PMID:3504239

  18. Cognitive Flexibility in Primary Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Lange, Florian; Seer, Caroline; Dengler, Reinhard; Dressler, Dirk; Kopp, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    Objectives Although primary dystonia is typically characterized as a movement disorder, it is also associated with cognitive alterations in the domain of executive functioning which may arise from changes in cortico-basal ganglia circuits. Specifically, in comparison to healthy controls, patients with dystonia show deficits in neuropsychological tests of cognitive flexibility. However, it is unclear whether cognitive inflexibility is caused by the pathomechanisms underlying primary dystonia or by confounding factors such as depression or symptom-related distraction.Methods The present study aimed to eliminate these confounds by examining cognitive flexibility in dystonia patients and in patients with similar motor symptoms but without a comparable central pathophysiology. Eighteen patients with primary blepharospasm, a common form of dystonia affecting the muscles around the eyes, and 19 patients with hemifacial spasm, a facial nerve disorder causing similar eyelid spasms, completed a computerized version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (cWCST). The two groups were further compared on tests of global cognitive functioning, psychiatric symptoms, health status, and impulsiveness. Results Blepharospasm patients committed significantly more errors on the cWCST than patients with hemifacial spasm. Group differences were most pronounced with regard to integration errors, a measure of rule-inference processes on the cWCST. Integration errors were also associated with impulsiveness in patients with blepharospasm. Conclusions Primary blepharospasm is related to deficits in cognitive flexibility, even when blepharospasm patients are compared with patients who suffer from motor symptoms of non-dystonic origin. Our results support the possibility that cognitive inflexibility results from the specific pathophysiological processes underlying primary dystonia. (JINS, 2016, 22, 662-670). PMID:27333537

  19. Sertraline induced acute mandibular dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Raveendranathan, Dhanya; Rao, Swaminath Gopala

    2015-01-01

    Specific serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been linked with the occurrence of drug-induced parkinsonism, dystonia, dyskinesia, and akathisia. Here, we describe a patient with a diagnosis of emotionally unstable personality disorder and depression who developed severe mandibular dystonia with sertraline in the absence of concurrent prescription of medications, which have potential action on the dopaminergic system. This case highlights the need for clinicians to be aware of this alarming acute adverse effect with sertraline, which is conventionally considered to be well-tolerated and safe. PMID:26752908

  20. Oscillatory Head Movements in Cervical Dystonia: Dystonia, Tremor, or Both?

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Zee, David S.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical dystonia is characterized by abnormal posturing of the head, often combined with tremor-like oscillatory head movements. The nature and source of these oscillatory head movements is controversial, so they were quantified to delineate their characteristics and develop a hypothetical model for their genesis. A magnetic search coil system was used to measure head movements in 14 subjects with cervical dystonia. Two distinct types of oscillatory head movements were detected for most subjects, even when they were not clinically evident. One type had a relatively large amplitude and jerky irregular pattern, and the other had smaller amplitude with a more regular and sinusoidal pattern. The kinematic properties of these two types of oscillatory head movements were distinct, although both were often combined in the same subject. Both had features suggestive of a defect in a central neural integrator. The combination of different types of oscillatory head movements in cervical dystonia helps to clarify some of the current debates regarding whether they should be considered as manifestations of dystonia or tremor and provides novel insights into their potential pathogenesis. PMID:25879911

  1. Oscillatory head movements in cervical dystonia: Dystonia, tremor, or both?

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Zee, David S; Jinnah, H A

    2015-05-01

    Cervical dystonia is characterized by abnormal posturing of the head, often combined with tremor-like oscillatory head movements. The nature and source of these oscillatory head movements is controversial, so they were quantified to delineate their characteristics and develop a hypothetical model for their genesis. A magnetic search coil system was used to measure head movements in 14 subjects with cervical dystonia. Two distinct types of oscillatory head movements were detected for most subjects, even when they were not clinically evident. One type had a relatively large amplitude and jerky irregular pattern, and the other had smaller amplitude with a more regular and sinusoidal pattern. The kinematic properties of these two types of oscillatory head movements were distinct, although both were often combined in the same subject. Both had features suggestive of a defect in a central neural integrator. The combination of different types of oscillatory head movements in cervical dystonia helps to clarify some of the current debates regarding whether they should be considered as manifestations of dystonia or tremor and provides novel insights into their potential pathogenesis. PMID:25879911

  2. Dystonia rating scales: critique and recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Alberto; Sorbo, Francesca Del; Comella, Cynthia; Jinnah, H.A.; Mink, Jonathan W.; Post, Bart; Vidailhet, Marie; Volkmann, Jens; Warner, Thomas T.; Leentjens, Albert F.G.; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Stebbins, Glenn T.; Goetz, Christopher G.; Schrag, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Background Many rating scales have been applied to the evaluation of dystonia, but only few have been assessed for clinimetric properties. The Movement Disorders Society commissioned this task force to critique existing dystonia rating scales and place them in the clinical and clinimetric context. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted to identify rating scales that have either been validated or used in dystonia. Results Thirty six potential scales were identified. Eight were excluded because they did not meet review criteria, leaving twenty-eight scales that were critiqued and rated by the task force. Seven scales were found to meet criteria to be “recommended”: the Blepharospasm Disability Index is recommended for rating blepharospasm; the Cervical Dystonia Impact Scale and the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale for rating cervical dystonia; the Craniocervical Dystonia Questionnaire for blepharospasm and cervical dystonia; the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) and the Vocal Performance Questionnaire (VPQ) for laryngeal dystonia; and the Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale for rating generalized dystonia. Two “recommended” scales (VHI and VPQ) are generic scales validated on few patients with laryngeal dystonia, whereas the others are disease-specific scales. Twelve scales met criteria for “suggested” and seven scales met criteria for “listed”. All the scales are individually reviewed in the online appendix. Conclusion The task force recommends five specific dystonia scales and suggests to further validate in dystonia two recommended generic voice-disorder scales. Existing scales for oromandibular, arm and task-specific dystonia should be refined and fully assessed. Scales should be developed for body regions where no scales are available, such as lower limbs and trunk. PMID:23893443

  3. Functional Imaging in Hereditary Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Carbon, Maren; Argyelan, Miklos; Eidelberg, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Impaired cortical inhibiton and maladaptive cortical plasticity are functional hallmarks of sporadic focal dystonias. Whether or not these mechanisms translate to generalized dystonias and whether these features reflect state or trait characteristics is a topic of research in hereditary dystonias. Methods We present a series of studies using a multitracer approach with positron emission tomography (PET) and diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) in the DYT1 and the DYT6 genotype. Results In these hereditary dystonias maladaptive motor cortical plasticity was present as a state characteristic. As a trait characteristic neuroplastic changes were also found in secondary motor cortices and in multimodal association regions. Consistent abnormalities of resting regional brain metabolism were additionally found in interconnected elements of cortico-striatal-pallido-thalamocortical (CSPTC) and related cerebellar-thalamo-cortical circuits. Changes in specific subsets of these regions have been found to relate to genotype, phenotype, or both. Thus, a penetrance-related metabolic network was characterized by increases in the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and parietal association areas, associated with relative reductions in the cerebellum, brainstem, and ventral thalamus. By contrast, genotype-specific abnormalities were localized to the basal ganglia, SMA and cerebellum. In both genotypes, the striatal metabolic abnormalities were paralleled by genotype-specific reductions in D2 receptor availability. Moreover, DTI studies disclosed microstructural changes within CSPTC and related cerebellar pathways. These disruptions may represent the main intrinsic abnormality underlying cortical downstream effects, such as increased sensorimotor responsivity. Conclusions These studies are consistent with the view of primary torsion dystonia as a neurodevelopmental circuit disorder involving CSPTC and related cerebellar pathways. PMID:20590810

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE PATIENT WITH ISOLATED OR COMBINED DYSTONIA: AN UPDATE ON DYSTONIA SYNDROMES

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Victor S.C.; Jinnah, H.A.; Bhatia, Kailash; Vidailhet, Marie

    2014-01-01

    The clinical evaluation of a patient with dystonia is a stepwise process, beginning with classification of the phenomenology of the movement disorder(s), then formulation of the dystonia syndrome, which in turn leads to a targeted etiological differential diagnosis. In recent years there have been significant advances in our understanding of the etiological basis of dystonia, aided especially by discoveries in imaging and genetics. In this article, we provide an update on the assessment of a patient with dystonia, including the phenomenology of dystonia and highlighting how to integrate clinical, imaging, blood and neurophysiological investigations in order to formulate a dystonia syndrome. Evolving or emerging dystonia syndromes are reviewed and potential etiologies of these as well as established dystonia syndromes listed in order to guide diagnostic testing. PMID:23893445

  5. Task-specific dystonia: pathophysiology and management.

    PubMed

    Sadnicka, Anna; Kassavetis, Panagiotis; Pareés, Isabel; Meppelink, Anne Marthe; Butler, Katherine; Edwards, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Task-specific dystonia is a form of isolated focal dystonia with the peculiarity of being displayed only during performance of a specific skilled motor task. This distinctive feature makes task-specific dystonia a particularly mysterious and fascinating neurological condition. In this review, we cover phenomenology and its increasingly broad-spectrum risk factors for the disease, critically review pathophysiological theories and evaluate current therapeutic options. We conclude by highlighting the unique features of task-specific dystonia within the wider concept of dystonia. We emphasise the central contribution of environmental risk factors, and propose a model by which these triggers may impact on the motor control of skilled movement. By viewing task-specific dystonia through this new lens which considers the disorder a modifiable disorder of motor control, we are optimistic that research will yield novel therapeutic avenues for this highly motivated group of patients. PMID:26818730

  6. White Matter Microstructure in Idiopathic Craniocervical Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Giordanna L. S.; Guimarães, Rachel P.; Piovesana, Luiza G.; Campos, Brunno M.; Campos, Lidiane S.; Azevedo, Paula C.; Torres, Fabio R.; Amato-Filho, Augusto C.; França, Marcondes C.; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Cendes, Fernando; D’Abreu, Anelyssa

    2015-01-01

    Background Dystonias are hyperkinetic movement disorders characterized by involuntary muscle contractions resulting in abnormal torsional movements and postures. Recent neuroimaging studies in idiopathic craniocervical dystonia (CCD) have uncovered the involvement of multiple areas, including cortical ones. Our goal was to evaluate white matter (WM) microstructure in subjects with CCD using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis. Methods We compared 40 patients with 40 healthy controls. Patients were then divided into subgroups: cervical dystonia, blepharospasm, blepharospasm + oromandibular dystonia, blepharospasm + oromandibular dystonia + cervical dystonia, using tract-based spatial statistics. We performed a region of interest-based analysis and tractography as confirmatory tests. Results There was no significant difference in the mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) between the groups in any analysis. Discussion The lack of DTI changes in CCD suggests that the WM tracts are not primarily affected. PMID:26056610

  7. Intermittent dystonia in Hartnup disease.

    PubMed

    Darras, B T; Ampola, M G; Dietz, W H; Gilmore, H E

    1989-01-01

    A 6-month-old girl developed intermittent dystonic posture of the legs and eczematous dermatitis without ataxia. Qualitative and quantitative urine amino acid testing confirmed the diagnosis of Hartnup disease. Cranial computed tomography, electroencephalogram, electromyogram/nerve conduction study, posterior tibial somatosensory evoked potentials, 24-hour electroencephalographic telemetry, and metrizamide myelogram were normal. Spinal fluid hydroxy-indoleacetic acid concentration was less than or equal to 2 S.D. of normal; oral tryptophan loading (70 mg/kg) resulted in a two-fold rise in cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid concentration. Tryptophan administered alone or with nicotinic acid failed to improve the dystonia; however, trihexyphenidyl (1-2 mg/kg/day) dramatically improved it. Hartnup disease should be considered in children with unexplained dystonia. PMID:2712944

  8. An African-American family with dystonia.

    PubMed

    Puschmann, Andreas; Xiao, Jianfeng; Bastian, Robert W; Searcy, Jill A; LeDoux, Mark S; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2011-08-01

    The genetic cause of late-onset focal and segmental dystonia remains unknown in most individuals. Recently, mutations in Thanatos-associated protein domain containing, apoptosis associated protein 1 (THAP1) have been described in DYT6 dystonia and associated with some cases of familial and sporadic late-onset dystonia in Caucasians. We are not aware of any previous descriptions of familial dystonia in African-Americans or reports of THAP1 mutations in African-Americans. Herein, we characterize an African-American (AA) kindred with late-onset primary dystonia, clinically and genetically. The clinical phenotype included cervical, laryngeal and hand-forearm dystonia. Symptoms were severe and disabling for several family members, whereas others only displayed mild signs. There were no accompanying motor or cognitive signs. In this kindred, age of onset ranged from 45 to 50 years and onset was frequently sudden, with symptoms developing within weeks or months. DYT1 was excluded as the cause of dystonia in this kindred. The entire genomic region of THAP1, including non-coding regions, was sequenced. We identified 13 sequence variants in THAP1, although none co-segregated with dystonia. A novel THAP1 variant (c.-237-3G>T/A) was found in 3/84 AA dystonia patient alleles and 3/212 AA control alleles, but not in 5870 Caucasian alleles. In summary, although previously unreported, familial primary dystonia does occur in African-Americans. Genetic analysis of the entire genomic region of THAP1 revealed a novel variant that was specific for African-Americans. Therefore, genetic testing for dystonia and future studies of candidate genes must take genetic background into consideration. PMID:21601506

  9. An African-American Family with Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Puschmann, Andreas; Xiao, Jianfeng; Bastian, Robert W.; Searcy, Jill A.; LeDoux, Mark S.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.

    2011-01-01

    The genetic cause of late-onset focal and segmental dystonia remains unknown in most individuals. Recently, mutations in Thanatos-associated protein domain containing, apoptosis associated protein 1 (THAP1) have been described in DYT6 dystonia and associated with some cases of familial and sporadic late-onset dystonia in Caucasians. We are not aware of any previous descriptions of familial dystonia in African Americans or reports of THAP1 mutations in African Americans. Herein, we characterize an African-American (AA) kindred with late-onset primary dystonia, clinically and genetically. The clinical phenotype included cervical, laryngeal and hand-forearm dystonia. Symptoms were severe and disabling for several family members, whereas others only displayed mild signs. There were no accompanying motor or cognitive signs. In this kindred, age of onset ranged from 45 to 50 years and onset was frequently sudden, with symptoms developing within weeks or months. DYT1 was excluded as the cause of dystonia in this kindred. The entire genomic region of THAP1, including non-coding regions, was sequenced. We identified 13 sequence variants in THAP1, although none co-segregated with dystonia. A novel THAP1 variant (c.-237-3G>T/A) was found in 3/84 AA dystonia patient alleles and 3/212 AA control alleles, but not in 5,870 Caucasian alleles. In summary, although previously unreported, familial primary dystonia does occur in African Americans. Genetic analysis of the entire genomic region of THAP1 revealed a novel variant that was specific for African Americans. Therefore, genetic testing for dystonia and future studies of candidate genes must take genetic background into consideration. PMID:21601506

  10. Recent Advances in the Genetics of Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianfeng; Vemula, Satya R.

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia, a common and genetically heterogeneous neurological disorder, was recently defined as “a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both.” Via the application of whole-exome sequencing, the genetic landscape of dystonia and closely related movement disorders is becoming exposed. In particular, several “novel” genetic causes have been causally associated with dystonia or dystonia-related disorders over the past 2 years. These genes include PRRT2 (DYT10), CIZ1 (DYT23), ANO3 (DYT24), GNAL (DYT25), and TUBB4A (DYT4). Despite these advances, major gaps remain in identifying the genetic origins for most cases of adult-onset isolated dystonia. Furthermore, model systems are needed to study the biology of PRRT2, CIZ1, ANO3, Gαolf, and TUBB4A in the context of dystonia. This review focuses on these recent additions to the family of dystonia genes, genotype-phenotype correlations, and possible cellular contributions of the encoded proteins to the development of dystonia. PMID:24952478

  11. Nine Years with Munchausen Syndrome: A Case of Psychogenic Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Cakmak, Mirac A.; Sahin, Sevki; Cinar, Nilgun; Tiyekli, Utkan; Karsidag, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    Background Munchausen syndrome presenting with psychogenic dystonia is a rare condition. Phenomenology Shown A psychogenic dystonia case presenting with an acute onset of retrocollis, lower limb dystonia and bizarre gait was diagnosed as Munchausen syndrome. Educational Value Recognizing psychogenic dystonia avoids unnecessary investigations and provides successful treatment.

  12. Primary dystonia misinterpreted as Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Neuwelt, Alexander J.; Nguyen, Tam; Leehey, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Summary Diagnosing dystonia can be challenging and depends on the recognition of subtle clinical signs. Due to clinical heterogeneity, variable age at presentation, and overlapping features with other disorders, dystonia is under-recognized. The presence of dystonic tremor is often a reason for misdiagnosis. We report an illustrative case of a patient with DYT1 dystonia who was originally misdiagnosed with Parkinson disease. Careful physical examination and history-taking can reveal dystonia and prompt appropriate diagnostic studies, which, in turn, can lead to potentially life-changing treatment. Our report illustrates typical challenges in the recognition and diagnosis of dystonia, and serves to increase clinicians' awareness of this disabling, but treatable, condition. PMID:24353921

  13. Reliability and validity of the kinematic dystonia measure for children with upper extremity dystonia.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Anne; Klejman, Sue; Fehlings, Darcy

    2012-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the test-retest reliability and construct validity of the Kinematic Dystonia Measure, a quantitative measure of upper extremity dystonia. To determine the effectiveness of various treatments, reliable and valid measures of dystonia are required. Test-retest reliability of the Kinematic Dystonia Measure using the intraclass correlation coefficient was excellent for the hand-tapping task (0.95) and substantial for the eye-blinking task (0.74). Construct validity testing for the hand-tapping task revealed that Kinematic Dystonia Measure scores correlated with total Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale scores (Pearson r = 0.79, P = .003), affected arm Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale subscores (Pearson r = 0.76, P = .0.007), and negatively correlated with Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test scores (Pearson r = -0.60, P = .05). The Kinematic Dystonia Measure has excellent test-retest reliability and good construct validity using the hand-tapping task. When combined with functional outcome measures, the Kinematic Dystonia Measure can effectively measure dystonia in children. PMID:22535705

  14. [Preliminary results of noncontact temperature measuring using an infrared thermometer on the tarsus pf swine with osteoarthrosis tarsi deformans].

    PubMed

    Sabec, D; Lazar, P

    1990-01-01

    The surface temperature on tarsus of 54 performance tested boars of about 60 kg of Swedish Landrace was measured by means of infra-red thermometer at three measuring points (MP1, MP2 and MP3). MP1 was situated above the tuberculum of os metatarsale III or, as visualised in 21 slaughtered boars, above pathoanatomical alterations of osteoarthrosis tarsi deformans (OATD). MP2 was located directly medially and MP3 laterally from MP1. A clear palpatory symptom was found only with 10 boars, while all 21 slaughtered boars showed different morphological lesions of OATD. The average temperature at MP1 was 35.69 degrees C and was significantly higher (P = .01) than at MP2 (35.34) and MP3 (35.30). The temperature differences between MP1 and MP2 or MP3 were statistically reliable. Boars, who had a clear palpatory symptoms at tuberculum, showed an average temperature at MT1 of 36.27 degrees C, which was higher (P = .0114) than of those with an unclear palpatory symptom (35.64 degrees C). The results show that the temperature differences are the consequence of OATD. PMID:2311530

  15. [Drug-induced dystonia misinterpreted as hysteria].

    PubMed

    Magnusson, A; Opjordsmoen, S; Dietrichs, E

    1996-03-10

    Psychic distress is often expressed in the form of physical pain or disease, but the converse also occurs. Illnesses with an organic aetiology are sometimes misdiagnosed as psychogenic. We describe three patients who developed rare forms of acute drug-induced dystonia when treated with antipsychotic drugs. All three cases were initially misdiagnosed as "hysteria" because the patients had psychiatric illnesses and because the symptoms were bizarre and became worse when the patients became very anxious. Furthermore, if the patients were helped to relax the symptoms disappeared for a moment. One of the patients developed dystonia 24 hours after ingestion of 750 mg tetrabenazine in an attempt at suicide. Another patient who had HIV/AIDS developed severe dystonia after receiving only 2 mg haloperidol by mouth. The clinical presentation, treatment, and possible mechanisms of the pathophysiology of acute drug-induced dystonia are briefly reviewed. PMID:8644096

  16. Structural brain abnormalities in cervical dystonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Idiopathic cervical dystonia is characterized by involuntary spasms, tremors or jerks. It is not restricted to a disturbance in the basal ganglia system because non-conventional voxel-based MRI morphometry (VBM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have detected numerous regional changes in the brains of patients. In this study scans of 24 patients with cervical dystonia and 24 age-and sex-matched controls were analysed using VBM, DTI and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) using a voxel-based approach and a region-of-interest analysis. Results were correlated with UDRS, TWSTRS and disease duration. Results We found structural alterations in the basal ganglia; thalamus; motor cortex; premotor cortex; frontal, temporal and parietal cortices; visual system; cerebellum and brainstem of the patients with dystonia. Conclusions Cervical dystonia is a multisystem disease involving several networks such as the motor, sensory and visual systems. PMID:24131497

  17. Genetics Home Reference: myoclonus-dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... that cause myoclonus-dystonia syndrome impair epsilon-sarcoglycan trafficking to the plasma membrane: modulation by ubiquitination and ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  18. Emerging Common Molecular Pathways for Primary Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S; Dauer, William T; Warner, Thomas T

    2013-01-01

    Background The dystonias are a group of hyperkinetic movement disorders whose principal cause is neuron dysfunction at one or more interconnected nodes of the motor system. The study of genes and proteins which cause familial dystonia provides critical information about the cellular pathways involved in this dysfunction which disrupts the motor pathways at systems level. In recent years study of the increasing number of DYT genes has implicated a number of cell functions which appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of dystonia. Methods Review of literature published in English language publications available on Pubmed relating to the genetics and cellular pathology of dystonia Results and Conclusions Numerous potential pathogenetic mechanisms have been identified. We describe those which fall into three emerging thematic groups: cell cycle and transcriptional regulation in the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope function, and control of synaptic function. PMID:23893453

  19. Intraoperative neurophysiology in deep brain surgery for psychogenic dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie L; Pillai, Ajay S; Lungu, Codrin; Ostrem, Jill; Starr, Philip; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic dystonia is a challenging entity to diagnose and treat because little is known about its pathophysiology. We describe two cases of psychogenic dystonia who underwent deep brain stimulation when thought to have organic dystonia. The intraoperative microelectrode recordings in globus pallidus internus were retrospectively compared with those of five patients with known DYT1 dystonia using spontaneous discharge parameters of rate and bursting, as well as movement-related discharges. Our data suggest that simple intraoperative neurophysiology measures in single subjects do not differentiate psychogenic dystonia from DYT1 dystonia. PMID:26125045

  20. Convergent mechanisms in etiologically-diverse dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Valerie B.; Jinnah, H. A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Dystonia is a neurological disorder associated with twisting motions and abnormal postures, which compromise normal movements and can be both painful and debilitating. It can affect a single body part (focal), several contiguous regions (segmental), or the entire body (generalized), and can arise as a result of numerous causes, both genetic and acquired. Despite the diversity of causes and manifestations, shared clinical features suggest that common mechanisms of pathogenesis may underlie many dystonias. Areas Covered This review identifies shared themes in etiologically-diverse dystonias on several biological levels. At the cellular level, abnormalities in the dopaminergic system, mitochondrial function, and calcium regulation are discussed. At the anatomical level, the roles of the basal ganglia and the cerebellum in dystonia are described. Global central nervous system dysfunction, with regard to aberrant neuronal plasticity, inhibition, and sensorimotor integration is also discussed. Using clinical data and data from animal models, this article seeks to highlight shared pathways that may be critical in understanding mechanisms and identifying novel therapeutic strategies in dystonia. Expert Opinion Identifying shared features of pathogenesis can provide insight into the biological processes that underlie etiologically-diverse dystonias, and can suggest novel targets for therapeutic intervention that may be effective in a broad group of affected individuals. PMID:22136648

  1. Diagnosing dopamine-responsive dystonias.

    PubMed

    Malek, N; Fletcher, N; Newman, E

    2015-10-01

    The clinical spectrum of dopamine-responsive dystonias (DRDs) has expanded over the last decade to comprise several distinct disorders. At the milder end of the clinical spectrum is the autosomal-dominant guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase deficiency syndrome (GTPCH-DRD), and at the more severe end is the much less common autosomal recessive tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency syndrome (TH-DRD), with intermediate forms in between. Understanding the pathophysiology of DRDs can help in their optimal diagnosis and management. These are conditions with the potential to be either underdiagnosed when not considered or overdiagnosed if there is an equivocal L-dopa (levo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) response. In this article, we discuss the clinical phenotypes of these disorders, and we outline how investigations can help in confirming the diagnosis. PMID:26045581

  2. Descriptive Epidemiology of Cervical Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Defazio, Giovanni; Jankovic, Joseph; Giel, Jennifer L.; Papapetropoulos, Spyridon

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical dystonia (CD), the most common form of adult-onset focal dystonia, has a heterogeneous clinical presentation with variable clinical features, leading to difficulties and delays in diagnosis. Owing to the lack of reviews specifically focusing on the frequency of primary CD in the general population, we performed a systematic literature search to examine its prevalence/incidence and analyze methodological differences among studies. Methods We performed a systematic literature search to examine the prevalence data of primary focal CD. Sixteen articles met our methodological criteria. Because the reported prevalence estimates were found to vary widely across studies, we analyzed methodological differences and other factors to determine whether true differences exist in prevalence rates among geographic areas (and by gender and age distributions), as well as to facilitate recommendations for future studies. Results Prevalence estimates ranged from 20–4,100 cases/million. Generally, studies that relied on service-based and record-linkage system data likely underestimated the prevalence of CD, whereas population-based studies suffered from over-ascertainment. The more methodologically robust studies yielded a range of estimates of 28–183 cases/million. Despite the varying prevalence estimates, an approximate 2:1 female:male ratio was consistent among many studies. Three studies estimated incidence, ranging from 8–12 cases/million person-years. Discussion Although several studies have attempted to estimate the prevalence and incidence of CD, there is a need for additional well-designed epidemiological studies on primary CD that include large populations; use defined CD diagnostic criteria; and stratify for factors such as age, gender, and ethnicity. PMID:24255801

  3. Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

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  4. Dystonias

    MedlinePlus

    ... institute on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, National Eye Institute, and Eunice Kennnedy Shriver National Institute on Child Health and Human Development) also support research that may benefit individuals ...

  5. Dystonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... part of the brain that handles messages about muscle contractions. There is no cure. Doctors use medicines, Botox injections, surgery, physical therapy, and other treatments to reduce or eliminate muscle spasms and pain. NIH: National Institute of Neurological ...

  6. Dystonias

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brain Stimulation for Movement Disorders This study uses deep brain stimulation to treat movement disorders. More Information » See All Trials » See a list of all NINDS Disorders Get Web page suited for printing Email this to a ...

  7. Piriformis muscle syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuncewicz, Elzbieta; Gajewska, Ewa; Sobieska, Magdalena; Samborski, Włodzimierz

    2006-01-01

    Sciatica is characterized by radiating pain from the sacro-lumbar region to the buttocks and down to the lower limb. The causes of sciatica usually relate to degenerative changes in the spine and lesions to the intervertebral discs. Secondary symptomatic sciatica may by caused by metastases to the vertebra, tuberculosis of the spine, tumors located inside the vertebral channel, or entrapment of the sciatic nerve in the piriformis muscle. The piriformis syndrome is primarily caused by fall injury, but other causes are possible, including pyomyositis, dystonia musculorum deformans, and fibrosis after deep injections. Secondary causes like irritation of the sacroiliac joint or lump near the sciatic notch have been described. In the general practice the so-called posttraumatic piriformis muscle syndrome is common. The right treatment can be started following a thorough investigation into the cause of symptoms. PMID:17385355

  8. Sensory-motor integration in focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Avanzino, Laura; Tinazzi, Michele; Ionta, Silvio; Fiorio, Mirta

    2015-12-01

    Traditional definitions of focal dystonia point to its motor component, mainly affecting planning and execution of voluntary movements. However, focal dystonia is tightly linked also to sensory dysfunction. Accurate motor control requires an optimal processing of afferent inputs from different sensory systems, in particular visual and somatosensory (e.g., touch and proprioception). Several experimental studies indicate that sensory-motor integration - the process through which sensory information is used to plan, execute, and monitor movements - is impaired in focal dystonia. The neural degenerations associated with these alterations affect not only the basal ganglia-thalamic-frontal cortex loop, but also the parietal cortex and cerebellum. The present review outlines the experimental studies describing impaired sensory-motor integration in focal dystonia, establishes their relationship with changes in specific neural mechanisms, and provides new insight towards the implementation of novel intervention protocols. Based on the reviewed state-of-the-art evidence, the theoretical framework summarized in the present article will not only result in a better understanding of the pathophysiology of dystonia, but it will also lead to the development of new rehabilitation strategies. PMID:26164472

  9. Genetic Issues in the Diagnosis of Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Petrucci, Simona; Valente, Enza Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dystonias are heterogeneous hyperkinetic movement disorders characterized by involuntary muscle contractions which result in twisting and repetitive movements and abnormal postures. Several causative genes have been identified, but their genetic bases still remain elusive. Primary Torsion Dystonias (PTDs), in which dystonia is the only clinical sign, can be inherited in a monogenic fashion, and many genes and loci have been identified for autosomal dominant (DYT1/TOR1A; DYT6/THAP1; DYT4/TUBB4a; DYT7; DYT13; DYT21; DYT23/CIZ1; DYT24/ANO3; DYT25/GNAL) and recessive (DYT2; DYT17) forms. However most sporadic cases, especially those with late-onset, are likely multifactorial, with genetic and environmental factors interplaying to reach a threshold of disease. At present, genetic counseling of dystonia patients remains a difficult task. Recently non-motor clinical findings in dystonias, new highlights in the pathophysiology of the disease, and the availability of high-throughput genome-wide techniques are proving useful tools to better understand the complexity of PTD genetics. We briefly review the genetic basis of the most common forms of hereditary PTDs, and discuss relevant issues related to molecular diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:23596437

  10. Ataxia with Vitamin E Deficiency May Present with Cervical Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Andrew E.; Vargas, Wendy; Pearson, Toni S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED) is an autosomal recessive disorder that usually presents with ataxia, areflexia, and proprioceptive and vibratory sensory loss. Dystonia has been reported rarely. Case Report An 11-year-old female presented with dystonic head tremor and cervical and bilateral arm dystonia. Her 14-year-old older brother had dystonic head tremor and generalized dystonia. One year later, the brother developed dysarthria, limb dysmetria, and gait ataxia. Compound heterozygous mutations in TTPA were detected, confirming the diagnosis of AVED. Discussion AVED may present with dystonia rather than ataxia, and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of progressive dystonia. PMID:27274910

  11. Dystonia Associated with Idiopathic Slow Orthostatic Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Kobylecki, Christopher; Silverdale, Monty A.; Dick, Jeremy P. R.; Kellett, Mark W.; Marshall, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to characterize the clinical and electrophysiological features of patients with slow orthostatic tremor. Case Report The clinical and neurophysiological data of patients referred for lower limb tremor on standing were reviewed. Patients with symptomatic or primary orthostatic tremor were excluded. Eight patients were identified with idiopathic slow 4–8 Hz orthostatic tremor, which was associated with tremor and dystonia in cervical and upper limb musculature. Coherence analysis in two patients showed findings different to those seen in primary orthostatic tremor. Discussion Slow orthostatic tremor may be associated with dystonia and dystonic tremor. PMID:26877891

  12. ANIMAL MODELS OF DYSTONIA: LESSONS FROM A MUTANT RAT

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S.

    2010-01-01

    Dystonia is a motor sign characterized by involuntary muscle contractions which produce abnormal postures. Genetic factors contribute significantly to primary dystonia. In comparison, secondary dystonia can be caused by a wide variety of metabolic, structural, infectious, toxic and inflammatory insults to the nervous system. Although classically ascribed to dysfunction of the basal ganglia, studies of diverse animal models have pointed out that dystonia is a network disorder with important contributions from abnormal olivocerebellar signaling. In particular, work with the dystonic (dt) rat has engendered dramatic paradigm shifts in dystonia research. The dt rat manifests generalized dystonia caused by deficiency of the neuronally-restricted protein caytaxin. Electrophysiological and biochemical studies have shown that defects at the climbing fiber-Purkinje cell synapse in the dt rat lead to abnormal bursting firing patterns in the cerebellar nuclei, which increases linearly with postnatal age. In a general sense, the dt rat has shown the scientific and clinical communities that dystonia can arise from dysfunctional cerebellar cortex. Furthermore, work with the dt rat has provided evidence that dystonia (1) is a neurodevelopmental network disorder and (2) can be driven by abnormal cerebellar output. In large part, work with other animal models has expanded upon studies in the dt rat and shown that primary dystonia is a multi-nodal network disorder associated with defective sensorimotor integration. In addition, experiments in genetically-engineered models have been used to examine the underlying cellular pathologies that drive primary dystonia. PMID:21081162

  13. Dystonia and Paroxysmal Dyskinesias: Under-Recognized Movement Disorders in Domestic Animals? A Comparison with Human Dystonia/Paroxysmal Dyskinesias

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Angelika; Hamann, Melanie; Wissel, Jörg; Volk, Holger A.

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is defined as a neurological syndrome characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting, often repetitive movements, and postures. Paroxysmal dyskinesias are episodic movement disorders encompassing dystonia, chorea, athetosis, and ballism in conscious individuals. Several decades of research have enhanced the understanding of the etiology of human dystonia and dyskinesias that are associated with dystonia, but the pathophysiology remains largely unknown. The spontaneous occurrence of hereditary dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesia is well documented in rodents used as animal models in basic dystonia research. Several hyperkinetic movement disorders, described in dogs, horses and cattle, show similarities to these human movement disorders. Although dystonia is regarded as the third most common movement disorder in humans, it is often misdiagnosed because of the heterogeneity of etiology and clinical presentation. Since these conditions are poorly known in veterinary practice, their prevalence may be underestimated in veterinary medicine. In order to attract attention to these movement disorders, i.e., dystonia and paroxysmal dyskinesias associated with dystonia, and to enhance interest in translational research, this review gives a brief overview of the current literature regarding dystonia/paroxysmal dyskinesia in humans and summarizes similar hereditary movement disorders reported in domestic animals. PMID:26664992

  14. Current and future medical treatment in primary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Delnooz, Cathérine C.S.

    2012-01-01

    Dystonia is a hyperkinetic movement disorder, characterized by involuntary and sustained contractions of opposing muscles causing twisting movements and abnormal postures. It is often a disabling disorder that has a significant impact on physical and psychosocial wellbeing. The medical therapeutic armamentarium used in practice is quite extensive, but for many of these interventions formal proof of efficacy is lacking. Exceptions are the use of botulinum toxin in patients with cervical dystonia, some forms of cranial dystonia (in particular, blepharospasm) and writer’s cramp; deep brain stimulation of the pallidum in generalized and segmental dystonia; and high-dose trihexyphenidyl in young patients with segmental and generalized dystonia. In order to move this field forward, we not only need better trials that examine the effect of current treatment interventions, but also a further understanding of the pathophysiology of dystonia as a first step to design and test new therapies that are targeted at the underlying biologic and neurophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:22783371

  15. Current and emerging strategies for treatment of childhood dystonia.

    PubMed

    Bertucco, Matteo; Sanger, Terence D

    2015-01-01

    Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting and repetitive movements, abnormal postures, or both (Sanger et al, 2003). Dystonia is a devastating neurological condition that prevents the acquisition of normal motor skills during critical periods of development in children. Moreover, it is particularly debilitating in children when dystonia affects the upper extremities such that learning and consolidation of common daily motor actions are impeded. Thus, the treatment and rehabilitation of dystonia is a challenge that continuously requires exploration of novel interventions. This review will initially describe the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of the motor impairments found in childhood dystonia followed by the clinical measurement tools that are available to document the presence and severity of symptoms. Finally, we will discuss the state-of-the-art of therapeutic options for childhood dystonia, with particular emphasis on emergent and innovative strategies. PMID:25835254

  16. Current and emerging strategies for treatment of childhood dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bertucco, Matteo; Sanger, Terence D.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting and repetitive movements, abnormal postures, or both (Sanger et al. 2003). Dystonia is a devastating neurological condition that prevents the acquisition of normal motor skills during critical periods of development in children. Moreover, it is particularly debilitating in children when dystonia affects the upper extremities such that learning and consolidation of common daily motor actions are impeded. Thus, the treatment and rehabilitation of dystonia is a challenge that continuously requires exploration of novel interventions. This review will initially describe the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of the motor impairments found in childhood dystonia followed by the clinical measurement tools that are available to document the presence and severity of symptoms. Finally, we will discuss the state-of-the-art of therapeutic options for childhood dystonia, with particular emphasis on emergent and innovative strategies. PMID:25835254

  17. Dystonia and Cerebellar Degeneration in the Leaner Mouse Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Raike, Robert S.; Hess, Ellen J.; Jinnah, H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar degeneration is traditionally associated with ataxia. Yet, there are examples of both ataxia and dystonia occurring in individuals with cerebellar degeneration. There is also substantial evidence suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction alone may cause dystonia. The types of cerebellar defects that may cause ataxia, dystonia, or both have not been delineated. In the current study, we explored the relationship between cerebellar degeneration and dystonia using the leaner mouse mutant. Leaner mice have severe dystonia that is associated with dysfunctional and degenerating cerebellar Purkinje cells. Whereas the density of Purkinje cells was not significantly reduced in 4 week-old leaner mice, approximately 50% of the neurons were lost by 34 weeks of age. On the other hand, the dystonia and associated functional disability became significantly less severe during this same interval. In other words, dystonia improved as Purkinje cells were lost, suggesting that dysfunctional Purkinje cells, rather than Purkinje cell loss, contribute to the dystonia. These results provide evidence that distorted cerebellar function may cause dystonia and support the concept that different types of cerebellar defects can have different functional consequences. PMID:25791619

  18. Two Task-Specific Dystonias in One Hand

    PubMed Central

    Linssen, Manon; Delnooz, Cathérine; van de Warrenburg, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Background Dystonia is characterized by involuntary muscle contractions that lead to abnormal postures and/or repetitive movements. Task-specific dystonia only manifests during a specific activity. Case report We report a case of a female with writer's cramp who developed a second task-specific hand dystonia (tremor and abnormal posturing of the hand while using a computer mouse) many years after the initial onset. Discussion This observation is in agreement with the concept that task-specific hand dystonia is induced by repetitive, skilled hand movements in those who have an intrinsic vulnerability towards developing “dystonic” motor programs. PMID:23961337

  19. Dystonia and Tremor: The Clinical Syndromes with Isolated Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Alberto; Sorbo, Francesca Del

    2016-01-01

    Background Dystonia and tremor share many commonalities. Isolated tremor is part of the phenomenological spectrum of isolated dystonia and of essential tremor. The occurrence of subtle features of dystonia may allow one to differentiate dystonic tremor from essential tremor. Diagnostic uncertainty is enhanced when no features of dystonia are found in patients with a tremor syndrome, raising the question whether the observed phenomenology is an incomplete form of dystonia. Methods Known forms of syndromes with isolated tremor are reviewed. Diagnostic uncertainties between tremor and dystonia are put into perspective. Results The following isolated tremor syndromes are reviewed: essential tremor, head tremor, voice tremor, jaw tremor, and upper-limb tremor. Their varied phenomenology is analyzed and appraised in the light of a possible relationship with dystonia. Discussion Clinicians making a diagnosis of isolated tremor should remain vigilant for the detection of features of dystonia. This is in keeping with the recent view that isolated tremor may be an incomplete phenomenology of dystonia. PMID:27152246

  20. Motor and Sensory Dysfunction in Musician's Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Florence C F; Frucht, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Musicians' dystonia is a task-specific and painless loss of motor control in a previously well-executed task. It is increasingly recognized in the medical and musical community. Recent advances in neuroimaging, transcranial magnetic stimulation and novel techniques in electroencephalography have shed light on its underlying pathophysiology. To date, a deranged cortical plasticity leading to abnormal sensorimotor integration, combined with reduced inhibition across several levels of the motor pathway are likely mechanisms.This paper reviews the various phenomenology of musician's dystonia across keyboard, string, brass, flute and drum players. Treatment is often challenging. Medical therapies like botulinum toxin injection and rehabilitation method with sensorimotor training offer symptomatic relief and return to baseline performance to some musicians. PMID:23814536

  1. Blepharospasm-oromandibular dystonia syndrome (Brueghel's syndrome). A variant of adult-onset torsion dystonia?

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, C D

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients with the idiopathic blepharospasm-oromandibular dystonia syndrome are described. All presented in adult life, usually in the sixth decade; women were more commonly affected than men. Thirteen had blepharospasm alone, nine had oromandibular dystonia alone, and 17 had both. Torticollis or dystonic writer's camp preceded the syndrome in two patients. Eight other patients developed toritocollis, dystonic posturing of the arms, or involvement of respiratory muscles. No cause or hereditary basis for the illness were discovered. The evidence to indicate that this syndrome is due to an abnormality of extrapyramidal function, and that it is another example of adult-onset focal dystonia akin to spasmodic torticollis and dystonic writer's cramp, is discussed. Images PMID:1011031

  2. Rating Scales for Dystonia in Cerebral Palsy: Reliability and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monbaliu, E.; Ortibus, E.; Roelens, F.; Desloovere, K.; Deklerck, J.; Prinzie, P.; De Cock, P.; Feys, H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This study investigated the reliability and validity of the Barry-Albright Dystonia Scale (BADS), the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Movement Scale (BFMMS), and the Unified Dystonia Rating Scale (UDRS) in patients with bilateral dystonic cerebral palsy (CP). Method: Three raters independently scored videotapes of 10 patients (five males, five females;…

  3. The phenotypic spectrum of dystonia in Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ha, Ainhi D; Parratt, Kaitlyn L; Rendtorff, Nanna D; Lodahl, Marianne; Ng, Karl; Rowe, Dominic B; Sue, Carolyn M; Hayes, Michael W; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth; Fung, Victor S C

    2012-07-01

    Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome (MTS) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by deafness and dystonia. However the phenotypic expression of dystonia has not been systematically defined. We report clinical, neurophysiological, and ophthalmological data on 6 subjects from 3 Australian kindreds, including 2 with novel mutations, together with a systematic review of the literature, in order to define the phenotypic expression of dystonia. Profound hearing impairment in affected males develops by infancy and precedes the development of dystonia, which varies in time of onset from the first to the sixth decades, with a peak in the second and third decades. Dystonia in MTS tends to be focal, segmental, or multifocal in distribution at onset, with a predilection for the upper body, variably involving the head, neck, and upper limbs. The majority of patients have progression or generalization of their dystonia regardless of age of onset. Within our 3 kindreds, we observed relative intrafamilial homogeneity but interfamilial variation. The median time to the development of moderate-severely disabling dystonia in these subjects was 11 years. Associated features included progressive cognitive decline, pyramidal signs, and in 1 patient, gait freezing and postural instability. Optic atrophy and cortical visual impairment were both observed. We report for the first time a female patient who developed multiple disabling neurological complications of MTS. Our findings more clearly define and expand the phenotype of both the dystonia and other neurological features of MTS and have implications for the diagnosis and management of this condition. PMID:22736418

  4. The genetics of dystonia: new twists in an old tale.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Gavin; Bhatia, Kailash P; Wood, Nicholas W

    2013-07-01

    Dystonia is a common movement disorder seen by neurologists in clinic. Genetic forms of the disease are important to recognize clinically and also provide valuable information about possible pathogenic mechanisms within the wider disorder. In the past few years, with the advent of new sequencing technologies, there has been a step change in the pace of discovery in the field of dystonia genetics. In just over a year, four new genes have been shown to cause primary dystonia (CIZ1, ANO3, TUBB4A and GNAL), PRRT2 has been identified as the cause of paroxysmal kinesigenic dystonia and other genes, such as SLC30A10 and ATP1A3, have been linked to more complicated forms of dystonia or new phenotypes. In this review, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding genetic forms of dystonia-related to both new and well-known genes alike-and incorporating genetic, clinical and molecular information. We discuss the mechanistic insights provided by the study of the genetic causes of dystonia and provide a helpful clinical algorithm to aid clinicians in correctly predicting the genetic basis of various forms of dystonia. PMID:23775978

  5. Ritual relieved axial dystonia triggered by gaze-evoked amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Jacome, D E

    1997-11-01

    A woman with chronic posttraumatic axial lateropulsion cervical dystonia ("belly dancer's head") found relief of her spontaneous dystonic spasms by the sequential performance of an elaborate motor ritual. During an episode of left optic papillitis caused by central retinal vein occlusion, gaze-evoked amaurosis of the left eye developed, preceded by achromatopsia, during left lateral gaze. Gaze-evoked amaurosis triggered axial dystonia, which was followed by her unique, stereotyped, dystonia-relieving ritual that simulated a slow dance. Visual symptoms improved progressively in 1 year. Eventually, she was unable to trigger her dystonia by eye movements. Spontaneous dystonia remained otherwise unchanged from before the episode of papillitis and was still relieved by her unique ritual. PMID:9365340

  6. A case of mitochondrial cytopathy with exertion induced dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal dystonias are a group of relatively benign hyperkinetic childhood movement disorders of varied etiology. Mitochondrial diseases are well known to produce persistent dystonias as sequelae, but paroxysmal exertion induced dystonia has been reported in only one case to the best of our knowledge. Two siblings born to consanguineous parents presented with early-onset exertion induced dystonia, which was unresponsive to diphenylhydantoin and carbamazepine. A trial with valproate in one of the siblings turned fatal within 24 h. Based on this clue, the second child was investigated and found to suffer from complex I deficiency with a paternally inherited dominant nuclear DNA mutation, which is responsive to the mitochondrial cocktail. Exertion induced dystonia can be a rare manifestation of complex I deficiency. PMID:26557169

  7. Convergent evidence for abnormal striatal synaptic plasticity in dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, David A.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Poizner, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Dystonia is a functionally disabling movement disorder characterized by abnormal movements and postures. Although substantial recent progress has been made in identifying genetic factors, the pathophysiology of the disease remains a mystery. A provocative suggestion gaining broader acceptance is that some aspect of neural plasticity may be abnormal. There is also evidence that, at least in some forms of dystonia, sensorimotor “use” may be a contributing factor. Most empirical evidence of abnormal plasticity in dystonia comes from measures of sensorimotor cortical organization and physiology. However, the basal ganglia also play a critical role in sensorimotor function. Furthermore, the basal ganglia are prominently implicated in traditional models of dystonia, are the primary targets of stereotactic neurosurgical interventions, and provide a neural substrate for sensorimotor learning influenced by neuromodulators. Our working hypothesis is that abnormal plasticity in the basal ganglia is a critical link between the etiology and pathophysiology of dystonia. In this review we set up the background for this hypothesis by integrating a large body of disparate indirect evidence that dystonia may involve abnormalities in synaptic plasticity in the striatum. After reviewing evidence implicating the striatum in dystonia, we focus on the influence of two neuromodulatory systems: dopamine and acetylcholine. For both of these neuromodulators, we first describe the evidence for abnormalities in dystonia and then the means by which it may influence striatal synaptic plasticity. Collectively, the evidence suggests that many different forms of dystonia may involve abnormal plasticity in the striatum. An improved understanding of these altered plastic processes would help inform our understanding of the pathophysiology of dystonia, and, given the role of the striatum in sensorimotor learning, provide a principled basis for designing therapies aimed at the dynamic processes

  8. Does abnormal interhemispheric inhibition play a role in mirror dystonia?

    PubMed

    Sattler, Virginie; Dickler, Maya; Michaud, Martin; Meunier, Sabine; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion

    2014-05-01

    The presence of mirror dystonia (dystonic movement induced by a specific task performed by the unaffected hand) in the dominant hand of writer's cramp patients when the nondominant hand is moved suggests an abnormal interaction between the 2 hemispheres. In this study we compare the level of interhemispheric inhibition (IHI) in 2 groups of patients with writer's cramp, one with the presence of a mirror dystonia and the other without as well as a control group. The level of bidirectional IHI was measured in wrist muscles with dual-site transcranial magnetic stimulation with a 10-millisecond (short IHI) and a 40-millisecond (long IHI) interstimulus interval during rest and while holding a pen in 9 patients with mirror dystonia 7 without mirror dystonia, and 13 controls. The group of patients without mirror dystonia did not differ from the controls in their IHI level. In contrast, IHI was significantly decreased in the group of patients with mirror dystonia in comparison with the group without mirror dystonia and the controls in both wrist muscles of both the dystonic and unaffected hand whatever the resting or active condition (P = 0.001). The decrease of IHI level in the group of patients with mirror dystonia was negatively correlated with the severity and the duration of the disease: the weaker the level of IHI, the more severe was the disease and the longer its duration. Interhemispheric inhibition disturbances are most likely involved in the occurrence of mirror dystonia. This bilateral deficient inhibition further suggests the involvement of the unaffected hemisphere in the pathophysiology of unilateral dystonia. PMID:24352854

  9. Thalamic Volume Is Reduced in Cervical and Laryngeal Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, Jeff L.; Kuster, John K.; Levenstein, Jacob M.; Makris, Nikos; Multhaupt-Buell, Trisha J.; Sudarsky, Lewis R.; Breiter, Hans C.; Sharma, Nutan; Blood, Anne J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dystonia, a debilitating movement disorder characterized by abnormal fixed positions and/or twisting postures, is associated with dysfunction of motor control networks. While gross brain lesions can produce secondary dystonias, advanced neuroimaging techniques have been required to identify network abnormalities in primary dystonias. Prior neuroimaging studies have provided valuable insights into the pathophysiology of dystonia, but few directly assessed the gross volume of motor control regions, and to our knowledge, none identified abnormalities common to multiple types of idiopathic focal dystonia. Methods We used two gross volumetric segmentation techniques and one voxelwise volumetric technique (voxel based morphometry, VBM) to compare regional volume between matched healthy controls and patients with idiopathic primary focal dystonia (cervical, n = 17, laryngeal, n = 7). We used (1) automated gross volume measures of eight motor control regions using the FreeSurfer analysis package; (2) blinded, anatomist-supervised manual segmentation of the whole thalamus (also gross volume); and (3) voxel based morphometry, which measures local T1-weighted signal intensity and estimates gray matter density or volume at the level of single voxels, for both whole-brain and thalamus. Results Using both automated and manual gross volumetry, we found a significant volume decrease only in the thalamus in two focal dystonias. Decreases in whole-thalamic volume were independent of head and brain size, laterality of symptoms, and duration. VBM measures did not differ between dystonia and control groups in any motor control region. Conclusions Reduced thalamic gross volume, detected in two independent analyses, suggests a common anatomical abnormality in cervical dystonia and spasmodic dysphonia. Defining the structural underpinnings of dystonia may require such complementary approaches. PMID:27171035

  10. Impaired Inhibitory Force Feedback in Fixed Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Mugge, Winfred; Schouten, Alfred C; van Hilten, Jacobus J; van der Helm, Frans C T

    2016-04-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a multifactorial disorder associated with an aberrant host response to tissue injury. About 25% of CRPS patients suffer poorly understood involuntary sustained muscle contractions associated with dysfunctional reflexes that result in abnormal postures (fixed dystonia). A recent modeling study simulated fixed dystonia (FD) caused by aberrant force feedback. The current study aims to validate this hypothesis by experimentally recording the modulation of reflexive force feedback in patients with FD. CRPS patients with and without FD, patients with FD but without CRPS, as well as healthy controls participated in the experiment. Three task instructions and three perturbation characteristics were used to evoke a wide range of responses to force perturbations. During position tasks ("maintain posture"), healthy subjects as well as patients resisted the perturbations, becoming more stiff than when being relaxed (i.e., the relax task). Healthy subjects and CRPS patients without FD were both more compliant during force tasks ("maintain force") than during relax tasks, meaning they actively gave way to the imposed forces. Remarkably, the patients with FD failed to do so. A neuromuscular model was fitted to the experimental data to separate the distinct contributions of position, velocity and force feedback, as well as co-contraction to the motor behavior. The neuromuscular modeling indicated that inhibitory force feedback is deregulated in patients with FD, for both CRPS and non-CRPS patients. From previously published simulation results and the present experimental study, it is concluded that aberrant force feedback plays a role in fixed dystonia. PMID:25955788

  11. The functional neuroimaging correlates of psychogenic versus organic dystonia.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Anette E; Mehta, Arpan R; Bhatia, Kailash P; Brown, Richard J; Frackowiak, Richard S J; Trimble, Michael R; Ward, Nicholas S; Rowe, James B

    2013-03-01

    The neurobiological basis of psychogenic movement disorders remains poorly understood and the management of these conditions difficult. Functional neuroimaging studies have provided some insight into the pathophysiology of disorders implicating particularly the prefrontal cortex, but there are no studies on psychogenic dystonia, and comparisons with findings in organic counterparts are rare. To understand the pathophysiology of these disorders better, we compared the similarities and differences in functional neuroimaging of patients with psychogenic dystonia and genetically determined dystonia, and tested hypotheses on the role of the prefrontal cortex in functional neurological disorders. Patients with psychogenic (n = 6) or organic (n = 5, DYT1 gene mutation positive) dystonia of the right leg, and matched healthy control subjects (n = 6) underwent positron emission tomography of regional cerebral blood flow. Participants were studied during rest, during fixed posturing of the right leg and during paced ankle movements. Continuous surface electromyography and footplate manometry monitored task performance. Averaging regional cerebral blood flow across all tasks, the organic dystonia group showed abnormal increases in the primary motor cortex and thalamus compared with controls, with decreases in the cerebellum. In contrast, the psychogenic dystonia group showed the opposite pattern, with abnormally increased blood flow in the cerebellum and basal ganglia, with decreases in the primary motor cortex. Comparing organic dystonia with psychogenic dystonia revealed significantly greater regional blood flow in the primary motor cortex, whereas psychogenic dystonia was associated with significantly greater blood flow in the cerebellum and basal ganglia (all P < 0.05, family-wise whole-brain corrected). Group × task interactions were also examined. During movement, compared with rest, there was abnormal activation in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex that was

  12. Pallidal deep brain stimulation relieves camptocormia in primary dystonia.

    PubMed

    Hagenacker, Tim; Gerwig, Marcus; Gasser, Thomas; Miller, Dorothea; Kastrup, Oliver; Jokisch, Daniel; Sure, Ulrich; Frings, Markus

    2013-07-01

    Camptocormia, characterised by a forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine may occur in various movement disorders, mainly in Parkinson's disease or in primary dystonia. In severe cases, patients with camptocormia are unable to walk. While treatment options are limited, deep brain stimulation (DBS) with bilateral stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus or globus pallidus internus (GPi) has been proposed as a therapeutic option in refractory cases of Parkinson's disease. Here we present two patients with severe camptocormia as an isolated form of dystonia and as part of generalised dystonia, respectively, which were both treated with bilateral stimulation of the GPi. Symptoms of dystonia were assessed using the Burke-Fahn-Marsden dystonia rating scale (BFM) before and during deep brain stimulation. In both patients there was a significant functional improvement following long-term bilateral GPi stimulation and both patients gained ability to walk. In the first patient with an isolated dystonic camptocormia the BFM motor subscore for the truncal flexion improved by 75 %. The total BFM motor score in the second patient with a camptocormia in generalised dystonia improved by 45 %, while the BFM score for truncal flexion improved by 87 %. In both patients the effect of the bilateral GPi stimulation on camptocormia was substantial, independent of generalisation of dystonia. Therefore, GPi DBS is a possible treatment option for this rare disease. PMID:23483215

  13. The genetics of dystonia: new twists in an old tale

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Gavin; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2013-01-01

    Dystonia is a common movement disorder seen by neurologists in clinic. Genetic forms of the disease are important to recognize clinically and also provide valuable information about possible pathogenic mechanisms within the wider disorder. In the past few years, with the advent of new sequencing technologies, there has been a step change in the pace of discovery in the field of dystonia genetics. In just over a year, four new genes have been shown to cause primary dystonia (CIZ1, ANO3, TUBB4A and GNAL), PRRT2 has been identified as the cause of paroxysmal kinesigenic dystonia and other genes, such as SLC30A10 and ATP1A3, have been linked to more complicated forms of dystonia or new phenotypes. In this review, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding genetic forms of dystonia—related to both new and well-known genes alike—and incorporating genetic, clinical and molecular information. We discuss the mechanistic insights provided by the study of the genetic causes of dystonia and provide a helpful clinical algorithm to aid clinicians in correctly predicting the genetic basis of various forms of dystonia. PMID:23775978

  14. Phenomenology and classification of dystonia: a consensus update

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Alberto; Bhatia, Kailash; Bressman, Susan B.; DeLong, Mahlon R.; Fahn, Stanley; Fung, Victor S.C.; Hallett, Mark; Jankovic, Joseph; Jinnah, H.A.; Klein, Christine; Lang, Anthony E.; Mink, Jonathan W.; Teller, Jan K.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the consensus outcome of an international panel consisting of investigators with years of experience in this field that reviewed the definition and classification of dystonia. Agreement was obtained based on a consensus development methodology during three in-person meetings and manuscript review by mail. Dystonia is defined as a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both. Dystonic movements are typically patterned and twisting, and may be tremulous. Dystonia is often initiated or worsened by voluntary action and associated with overflow muscle activation. Dystonia is classified along two axes: clinical characteristics, including age at onset, body distribution, temporal pattern and associated features (additional movement disorders or neurological features), and etiology, which includes nervous system pathology and inheritance. The clinical characteristics fall into several specific dystonia syndromes that help to guide diagnosis and treatment. We provide here a new general definition of dystonia and propose a new classification. We encourage clinicians and researchers to use these innovative definition and classification and test them in the clinical setting on a variety of patients with dystonia. PMID:23649720

  15. Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in primary cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Katschnig-Winter, Petra; Schwingenschuh, Petra; Davare, Marco; Sadnicka, Anna; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rothwell, John C; Bhatia, Kailash P; Edwards, Mark J

    2014-06-01

    Motor sequence learning and motor adaptation rely on overlapping circuits predominantly involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum. Given the importance of these brain regions to the pathophysiology of primary dystonia, and the previous finding of abnormal motor sequence learning in DYT1 gene carriers, we explored motor sequence learning and motor adaptation in patients with primary cervical dystonia. We recruited 12 patients with cervical dystonia and 11 healthy controls matched for age. Subjects used a joystick to move a cursor from a central starting point to radial targets as fast and accurately as possible. Using this device, we recorded baseline motor performance, motor sequence learning and a visuomotor adaptation task. Patients with cervical dystonia had a significantly higher peak velocity than controls. Baseline performance with random target presentation was otherwise normal. Patients and controls had similar levels of motor sequence learning and motor adaptation. Our patients had significantly higher peak velocity compared to controls, with similar movement times, implying a different performance strategy. The preservation of motor sequence learning in cervical dystonia patients contrasts with the previously observed deficit seen in patients with DYT1 gene mutations, supporting the hypothesis of differing pathophysiology in different forms of primary dystonia. Normal motor adaptation is an interesting finding. With our paradigm we did not find evidence that the previously documented cerebellar abnormalities in cervical dystonia have a behavioral correlate, and thus could be compensatory or reflect "contamination" rather than being directly pathological. PMID:24411324

  16. The treatment of severe dystonia in children and adults.

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, C D; Marion, M H; Quinn, N

    1984-01-01

    Twenty-three children (aged less than 18 years) and 17 adults with severe widespread dystonia were treated with high doses of benzhexol (up to 130 mg daily introduced slowly over many weeks). Children tolerated higher doses (median 30 mg/day) than adults (median 20 mg/day). 52% of the children gained useful benefit, many (43%) without unwanted side effects. Such an approach was less successful in adults; 41% gained benefit, but only 35% had no side effects. Twelve adults with severe axial dystonia, and two children with life-threatening generalised dystonia were treated with a combination of a low constant dose of tetrabenazine to which were added pimozide and benzhexol as necessary. The dose of tetrabenazine was aimed at 75 mg daily; pimozide was increased (6 to 25 mg/day) until the dystonia was relieved or Parkinsonism and other side-effects prevented further increments; if necessary benzhexol (6 to 30 mg/day) then was added to control side-effects and to provide additional benefit. 75% of the adults with severe axial dystonia, and one of the two children with life threatening generalised dystonia gained useful benefit from this regime. It is concluded that high dose benzhexol is the present first treatment of choice for children with severe dystonia, and is worth a try in adults but with less expectation of success. When benzhexol treatment alone fails in adults with severe disabling axial dystonia, or in children with life-threatening generalised dystonia, combined therapy with tetrabenazine, pimozide and benzhexol may give valuable symptomatic relief. PMID:6502174

  17. Posttraumatic focal dystonia of the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Vasileiadis, Georgios I; Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Zoubos, Aristeides B

    2012-06-01

    Focal posttraumatic shoulder dystonia is a rare and not easily identifiable entity. Its true pathophysiologic nature, predisposing factors, and disease course remain debatable.This article describes a rare case of a 40-year-old man with late symptoms of focal shoulder dystonia after peripheral trauma of his left shoulder girdle. The shoulder was indirectly injured from the impact of a fall off his motorbike 3 years earlier. He was referred to the authors' institution because remarkable reduction of arm abduction, muscle spasms, and circumscribed hypertrophy of the trapezius muscle were noted while his head and neck were in neutral position and had a full range of motion. The left shoulder had a fixed elevated posture compared with the contralateral shoulder. A continuous burning pain was localized over the area of the hypertrophied trapezius muscle, radiating to the ipsilateral side of the head and neck. Dystonic movements of the trapezius, rhomboid, and supraspinatus muscles were observed. The abduction of the shoulder was significantly decreased, and any repetitive effort for arm abduction induced an exaggeration of his movement disorder, leading to a more pronounced shoulder elevation.Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging of the left shoulder revealed a suprascapular tendinitis with no other abnormalities. Repeated needle electromyography of the left trapezius muscle and neurography of the accessory nerve on both sides were normal. Injections of botulinum toxin A were effective in the resolution of muscle hypertrophy and abnormal posture. PMID:22691679

  18. The Non-Motor Manifestations of Dystonia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kuyper, Daniel J.; Parra, Veronica; Aerts, Shanae; Okun, Michael S.; Kluger, Benzi M.

    2013-01-01

    Non-motor symptoms are increasingly recognized as important determinants of quality of life and disability in a wide range of movement disorders. There is a limited body of research suggesting that many of these symptoms are also commonly associated with primary and other genetic forms of dystonia. However, the significance, etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of these symptoms remains poorly described. The following is a review of the literature which focuses primarily on the association of these types of dystonia with psychiatric disorders, cognition, sleep, pain, and autonomic symptoms. We will also discuss potential mechanisms and approaches to treatment for non-motor features of dystonia. PMID:21484874

  19. How psychogenic is dystonia? Views from past to present.

    PubMed

    Munts, Alexander G; Koehler, Peter J

    2010-05-01

    In the last few centuries, there has been a constant sway between organic and psychogenic explanations for dystonia. In the current study, we investigate this history, assuming the perspective of a spectrum from organic to psychogenic, between which ideas were moving. We have focussed on (i) primary generalized dystonia, (ii) cervical dystonia, (iii) writer's cramp and (iv) fixed dystonia related to complex regional pain syndrome. We have studied medical texts published since the 19th century and their references. Jean-Martin Charcot advocated the concept of hysteria, disorders in which, besides predisposition, environmental factors were involved in their pathogenesis. Sigmund Freud introduced psychoanalysis as an explanatory therapy for psychic disorders. Previous theories, together with the lack of an organic substrate for dystonia, made a strong case for psychogenic explanations. Consequently, many dystonia patients were told that they suffered from psychological conflicts and were treated for them. However, after the description of new hereditary cases in the 1950s, the limited efficacy of psychotherapy in torsion dystonia, the effects of surgical treatments and the lesion studies in the 1960s, more physicians became convinced of the organic nature. The culminating point was the discovery of the DYT1 gene in 1997. In the meantime, experts had already convinced the neurological community that cervical dystonia and writer's cramp were focal dystonias, i.e. minor forms of generalized dystonia, and therefore organic disorders. In contrast, the pathophysiology of fixed dystonia related to complex regional pain syndrome remained controversial. Knowledge of this history, which played on the border between neurology and psychiatry, is instructive and reflects the difficulty in discriminating between them. Today, new insights from functional imaging and neurophysiological studies again challenge the interpretation of these disorders, while the border between psychogenic

  20. Oral methylphenidate for the treatment of refractory facial dystonias.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Kian; Choe, Christina H; Vagefi, M Reza; Gausas, Roberta E; Eckstein, Lauren A

    2015-01-01

    Oral methylphenidate (Ritalin, Novartis) has been reported to alleviate symptoms of benign essential blepharospasm in an off-label application. This series presents 3 patients with refractory periorbital and facial dystonias, including blepharospasm, apraxia of eyelid opening, and oromandibular dystonia unresponsive to standard treatments who experienced a response to oral methylphenidate therapy. While the mechanisms for facial dystonias have not been elucidated, there is evidence to suggest that they are on the spectrum with Parkinson disease. Given the role of dopamine loss in the pathogenesis of Parkinson, the authors' speculate that methylphenidate may be acting on the pathway directly involved in facial dystonias. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a case of successful treatment of blepharospasm refractory to upper eyelid myectomy with methylphenidate monotherapy. PMID:25951177

  1. [Treatment of autonomic vascular dystonia by combined physiotherapy methods].

    PubMed

    Lobzin, V S; Poliakova, L A; Shiman, A G; Zavodnik, A I

    1989-03-01

    The use of combined physiotherapy methods in 65 patients suffering of vegetative-vascular dystonias resulted in an improvement of the clinical data, normalization or improvement of electroencephalographic, rheovasographic and thermovision indices. PMID:2750110

  2. Dystonia and the Role of Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    Dystonia is a painful, disabling disease whose cause in many cases remains unknown. It has historically been treated with a variety methodologies including baclofen pumps, Botox injection, peripheral denervation, and stereotactic surgery. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is emerging as a viable treatment option for selected patients with dystonia. Results of DBS for dystonia appear to be more consistently superior in patients with primary versus secondary forms of the disorder. Patients with secondary dystonia, due to a variety of causes, may still be candidates for DBS surgery, although the results may not be as consistently good. The procedure is relatively safe with a small likelihood of morbidity and mortality. A randomized trial is needed to determine who are the best patients and when it is best to proceed with surgery. PMID:22084748

  3. Understanding the Anatomy of Dystonia: Determinants of Penetrance and Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Renata P; Niethammer, Martin; Eidelberg, David

    2013-01-01

    The dystonias comprise a group of syndromes characterized by prolonged involuntary muscle contractions resulting in repetitive movements and abnormal postures. Primary dystonia has been associated with over 14 different genotypes, most of which follow an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern with reduced penetrance. Independent of etiology, the disease is characterized by extensive variability in disease phenotype and clinical severity. Recent neuroimaging studies investigating this phenomenon in manifesting and non-manifesting genetic carriers of dystonia have discovered microstructural integrity differences in the cerebello-thalamo-cortical tract in both groups related to disease penetrance. Further study suggests these differences to be specific to subrolandic white matter regions somatotopically related to clinical phenotype. Clinical severity was correlated to the degree of microstructural change. These findings suggest a mechanism for the penetrance and clinical variability observed in dystonia and may represent a novel therapeutic target for patients with refractory limb symptoms. PMID:24114145

  4. Cervical demyelinating lesion presenting with choreoathetoid movements and dystonia.

    PubMed

    de Pasqua, Silvia; Cevoli, Sabina; Calbucci, Fabio; Liguori, Rocco

    2016-09-15

    Pseudoathetosis and dystonia are rare manifestations of spinal cord disease that have been already reported in lesions involving the posterior columns at the cervical level. We report two patients with a cervical demyelinating lesion at C3-C4 level presenting with hand dystonia and pseudoathetoid movements. The movement disorder disappeared after steroid treatment. The cases we described highlight the importance of identifying secondary causes of movement disorders that can be reversible with appropriate therapy. PMID:27538633

  5. DYT1 dystonia increases risk taking in humans.

    PubMed

    Arkadir, David; Radulescu, Angela; Raymond, Deborah; Lubarr, Naomi; Bressman, Susan B; Mazzoni, Pietro; Niv, Yael

    2016-01-01

    It has been difficult to link synaptic modification to overt behavioral changes. Rodent models of DYT1 dystonia, a motor disorder caused by a single gene mutation, demonstrate increased long-term potentiation and decreased long-term depression in corticostriatal synapses. Computationally, such asymmetric learning predicts risk taking in probabilistic tasks. Here we demonstrate abnormal risk taking in DYT1 dystonia patients, which is correlated with disease severity, thereby supporting striatal plasticity in shaping choice behavior in humans. PMID:27249418

  6. [Seasonal changes of secondary immunodeficiency in patients with vascular dystonia].

    PubMed

    Malysheva, O A; Shirinskiĭ, V S

    1998-01-01

    The examination of 60 patients with vascular dystonia (VD) and immunological disorders shows that secondary immunodeficiency is not a stable condition. It is associated with seasons of the year and VD variants. Secondary immunodeficiency is more pronounced in winter. A correlation exists between mixed vegetative vascular dystonia and combined T-lymphocyte secondary immunodeficiency in winter. The findings may help in planning immunotherapy in "critical seasons" for patients with vegetative disorders. PMID:9644934

  7. Genetic and clinical features of primary torsion dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Ozelius, Laurie J.; Bressman, Susan B.

    2011-01-01

    Primary torsion dystonia (PTD) is defined as a syndrome in which dystonia is the only clinical sign (except for tremor), and there is no evidence of neuronal degeneration or an acquired cause by history or routine laboratory assessment. Seven different loci have been recognized for PTD but only two of the genes have been identified. In this review we will described the phenotypes associated with these loci and discuss the responsible gene. PMID:21168499

  8. Basic timing abilities stay intact in patients with musician's dystonia.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, M C; van Vugt, Floris T; Keller, Peter E; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonia is a movement disorder that is characterized by the loss of voluntary motor control in extensively trained movements. Musician's dystonia is a type of task-specific dystonia that is elicited in professional musicians during instrumental playing. The disorder has been associated with deficits in timing. In order to test the hypothesis that basic timing abilities are affected by musician's dystonia, we investigated a group of patients (N = 15) and a matched control group (N = 15) on a battery of sensory and sensorimotor synchronization tasks. Results did not show any deficits in auditory-motor processing for patients relative to controls. Both groups benefited from a pacing sequence that adapted to their timing (in a sensorimotor synchronization task at a stable tempo). In a purely perceptual task, both groups were able to detect a misaligned metronome when it was late rather than early relative to a musical beat. Overall, the results suggest that basic timing abilities stay intact in patients with musician's dystonia. This supports the idea that musician's dystonia is a highly task-specific movement disorder in which patients are mostly impaired in tasks closely related to the demands of actually playing their instrument. PMID:24667273

  9. Basic Timing Abilities Stay Intact in Patients with Musician's Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    van der Steen, M. C.; van Vugt, Floris T.; Keller, Peter E.; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonia is a movement disorder that is characterized by the loss of voluntary motor control in extensively trained movements. Musician's dystonia is a type of task-specific dystonia that is elicited in professional musicians during instrumental playing. The disorder has been associated with deficits in timing. In order to test the hypothesis that basic timing abilities are affected by musician's dystonia, we investigated a group of patients (N = 15) and a matched control group (N = 15) on a battery of sensory and sensorimotor synchronization tasks. Results did not show any deficits in auditory-motor processing for patients relative to controls. Both groups benefited from a pacing sequence that adapted to their timing (in a sensorimotor synchronization task at a stable tempo). In a purely perceptual task, both groups were able to detect a misaligned metronome when it was late rather than early relative to a musical beat. Overall, the results suggest that basic timing abilities stay intact in patients with musician's dystonia. This supports the idea that musician's dystonia is a highly task-specific movement disorder in which patients are mostly impaired in tasks closely related to the demands of actually playing their instrument. PMID:24667273

  10. Deep brain stimulation for dystonia: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mehdorn, Hubertus M

    2016-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has become one of the major therapy options for movement disorders including dystonia. This article should give a review of the current literature from a neurosurgical perspective. Since dystonia is a rare disease, only few studies on larger cohorts have been published, and very few randomized controlled studies are avaialable in the international literature. Our experiences gained treating 134 patients with various types of dystonia, between 1999 and 2015, will serve a guide to interpret the current literature. Symptoms of dystonia are due to a variety of medical conditions. A careful and extensive neurological evaluation is mandatory before medical and surgical treatment options are considered, since the clinical benefits of more aggressive treatment e.g. by DBS depend to a large extent on the etiology of the disease. Diagnostic steps should include also magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and possibly genetic evaluation. Therapy consists of physiotherapy, medical therapy including botulinum toxin injections in focal dystonia and DBS. This neurosurgical therapy is considered a highly effective therapy in well selected patients, which should be discussed, depending on the etiology, early in the patient's career. Patients with primary dystonia will benefit the most from DBS to the ventromediolateral part of the globus pallidus internus (GPi) with acceptable low complication rates; in order to optimize longterm results in these groups of patient, they will require an interdisciplinary individualized approach both pre- and postoperatively as well as longterm care adjusting to their needs. PMID:26977634

  11. Genetic animal models of dystonia: common features and diversities.

    PubMed

    Richter, Franziska; Richter, Angelika

    2014-10-01

    Animal models are pivotal for studies of pathogenesis and treatment of disorders of the central nervous system which in its complexity cannot yet be modeled in vitro or using computer simulations. The choice of a specific model to test novel therapeutic strategies for a human disease should be based on validity of the model for the approach: does the model reflect symptoms, pathogenesis and treatment response present in human patients? In the movement disorder dystonia, prior to the availability of genetically engineered mice, spontaneous mutants were chosen based on expression of dystonic features, including abnormal muscle contraction, movements and postures. Recent discovery of a number of genes and gene products involved in dystonia initiated research on pathogenesis of the disorder, and the creation of novel models based on gene mutations. Here we present a review of current models of dystonia, with a focus on genetic rodent models, which will likely be first choice in the future either for pathophysiological or for preclinical drug testing or both. In order to help selection of a model depending on expression of a specific feature of dystonia, this review is organized by symptoms and current knowledge of pathogenesis of dystonia. We conclude that albeit there is increasing need for research on pathogenesis of the disease and development of improved models, current models do replicate features of dystonia and are useful tools to develop urgently demanded treatment for this debilitating disorder. PMID:25034123

  12. The Most Cited Works in Essential Tremor and Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    King, Nicolas K. K.; Tam, Joseph; Fasano, Alfonso; Lozano, Andres M

    2016-01-01

    Background The study of the most cited works in a particular field gives an indication of the important advances, developments, and discoveries that have had the highest impact in that discipline. Our aim was to identify the most cited works in essential tremor (ET) and dystonia. Methods A bibliometric search was performed using the ISI Web of Science database using selected search terms for ET and dystonia for articles published from 1900 to 2015. The resulting citation counts were analyzed to identify the most cited works, and the studies were categorized. Results Using the criterion of more than 400 citations, there were four citation classics for ET and six for dystonia. The most cited studies were those on pathophysiology followed by medical treatments, clinical classification, genetic studies, surgical treatments, review articles, and epidemiology studies. A comparison of the most cited articles for ET and dystonia showed that there was a divergence, with ET and dystonia having a higher number of epidemiologic and genetic studies, respectively. Whereas the peak period for the number of publications was 2000–2004 for ET, it was 1995–1999 for dystonia. Discussion Given the large number of patients with these disorders, there appears to be an unmet need for further research advances in both areas, but particularly for ET as the most common movement disorder. PMID:27119049

  13. Familial Paroxysmal Exercise-Induced Dystonia: Atypical Presentation of Autosomal Dominant GTP-Cyclohydrolase 1 Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Russell C.; Melchers, Anna; Fung, Victor S. C.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic; Houlden, Henry; Earl, John

    2010-01-01

    Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia (PED) is one of the rarer forms of paroxysmal dyskinesia, and can occur in sporadic or familial forms. We report a family (male index case, mother and maternal grandfather) with autosomal dominant inheritance of paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia. The dystonia began in childhood and was only ever induced…

  14. The syndrome of fixed dystonia: an evaluation of 103 patients.

    PubMed

    Schrag, Anette; Trimble, Michael; Quinn, Niall; Bhatia, Kailash

    2004-10-01

    We describe the clinical features of 103 patients presenting with fixed dystonia and report the prospective assessment and investigation of 41 of them. Most patients were female (84%) and had a young age of onset [mean 29.7 (SD 13.1) years]. A peripheral injury preceded onset in 63% and spread of dystonia to other body regions occurred in 56%. After an average follow-up of 3.3 years (overall disease duration 8.6 years), partial (19%) or complete (8%) remission had occurred in a minority of patients. The fixed postures affected predominantly the limbs (90%), and rarely the neck/shoulder region (6%) or jaw (4%). In the prospectively studied group, pain was present in most patients and was a major complaint in 41%. Twenty percent of patients fulfilled criteria for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). No consistent investigational abnormalities were found and no patient tested (n = 25) had a mutation in the DYT1 gene. Thirty-seven percent of patients fulfilled classification criteria for documented or clinically established psychogenic dystonia; 29% fulfilled DSM-IV (Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition) criteria for somatization disorder, which was diagnosed only after examination of the primary care records in many cases; and 24% fulfilled both sets of criteria. Ten percent of the prospectively studied and 45% of the retrospectively studied patients did not have any evidence of psychogenic dystonia, and detailed investigation failed to reveal an alternative explanation for their clinical presentation. Detailed, semi-structured neuropsychiatric assessments in a subgroup of 26 patients with fixed dystonia and in a control group of 20 patients with classical dystonia revealed dissociative (42 versus 0%, P = 0.001) and affective disorders (85 versus 50%, P = 0.01) significantly more commonly in the fixed dystonia group. Medical and surgical treatment was largely unsuccessful. However, seven patients who underwent multidisciplinary

  15. Treatment of Myoclonus-Dystonia Syndrome with Tetrabenazine

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Angelo Y.; Jinnah, H. A.; Pfeiffer, Ronald F.; Truong, Daniel D.; Nance, Martha A.; LeDoux, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many cases of myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) are due to mutations in SGCE (DYT11). For the majority of patients, myoclonus is relatively more severe than dystonia and can lead to significant functional disability. Deep brain stimulation has been chosen as a treatment option in some patients given that M-D often responds poorly to oral pharmacotherapy. Methods Two siblings with M-D due to the same SGCE deletion mutation were evaluated with the Global Dystonia Rating Scale (GDRS), Fahn-Marsden Rating Scale (FM) and Unified Myoclonus Rating Scale (UMRS) on and off tetrabenazine. Results Both subjects showed marked improvement in myoclonus and mild-to-moderate improvement in dystonia with tetrabenazine. In addition, the response to tetrabenazine has been sustained for years. Conclusions A therapeutic trial of tetrabenazine should be considered in patients with M-D, especially before consideration of deep brain stimulation. An adequately powered multi-center, double-blind study of tetrabenazine will be required to determine the relative contributions of tetrabenazine therapy to myoclonus, dystonia, quality of life, and activities of daily living in patients with M-D. PMID:25406829

  16. Pain Relief in Cervical Dystonia with Botulinum Toxin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ferreira; Cattai, Lígia; Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological disorder characterized by intermittent or sustained muscle contractions that cause abnormal, usually repetitive, movements and postures. Dystonic movements can be tremulous and twisting and often follow a pattern. They are frequently associated with overflow muscle activation and may be triggered or worsened by voluntary action. Most voluntary muscles can be affected and, in the case of the neck muscles, the condition is referred to as cervical dystonia (CD), the most common form of dystonia. The high incidence of pain distinguishes CD from other focal dystonias and contributes significantly to patient disability and low quality of life. Different degrees of pain in the cervical region are reported by more than 60% of patients, and pain intensity is directly related to disease severity. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is currently considered the treatment of choice for CD and can lead to an improvement in pain and dystonic symptoms in up to 90% of patients. The results for BoNT/A and BoNT/B are similar. The complex relationship between pain and dystonia has resulted in a large number of studies and more comprehensive assessments of dystonic patients. When planning the application of BoNT, pain should be a key factor in the choice of muscles and doses. In conclusion, BoNT is highly effective in controlling pain, and its analgesic effect is sustained for a long time in most CD patients. PMID:26110508

  17. Mutations in HPCA Cause Autosomal-Recessive Primary Isolated Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Gavin; Angelova, Plamena R.; Bartolomé-Robledo, Fernando; Ryten, Mina; Trabzuni, Daniah; Stamelou, Maria; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Reports of primary isolated dystonia inherited in an autosomal-recessive (AR) manner, often lumped together as “DYT2 dystonia,” have appeared in the scientific literature for several decades, but no genetic cause has been identified to date. Using a combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a consanguineous kindred affected by AR isolated dystonia, we identified homozygous mutations in HPCA, a gene encoding a neuronal calcium sensor protein found almost exclusively in the brain and at particularly high levels in the striatum, as the cause of disease in this family. Subsequently, compound-heterozygous mutations in HPCA were also identified in a second independent kindred affected by AR isolated dystonia. Functional studies suggest that hippocalcin might play a role in regulating voltage-dependent calcium channels. The identification of mutations in HPCA as a cause of AR primary isolated dystonia paves the way for further studies to assess whether “DYT2 dystonia” is a genetically homogeneous condition or not. PMID:25799108

  18. Mutations in GNAL: A Novel Cause of Craniocervical Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Kishore R.; Lohmann, Katja; Masuho, Ikuo; Miyamoto, Ryosuke; Ferbert, Andreas; Lohnau, Thora; Kasten, Meike; Hagenah, Johann; Brüggemann, Norbert; Graf, Julia; Münchau, Alexander; Kostic, Vladimir S.; Sue, Carolyn M.; Domingo, Aloysius R.; Rosales, Raymond L.; Lee, Lilian V.; Freimann, Karen; Westenberger, Ana; Mukai, Youhei; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Kaji, Ryuji; Klein, Christine; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Schmidt, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Importance Mutations in the GNAL gene have recently been shown to cause primary torsion dystonia. The GNAL-encoded protein (Gαolf) is important for dopamine D1 receptor function and odorant signal transduction. We sequenced all 12 exons of GNAL in 461 patients from Germany, Serbia, and Japan, including 318 patients with dystonia (190 with cervical dystonia), 51 with hyposmia and Parkinson disease, and 92 with tardive dyskinesia or acute dystonic reactions. Observations We identified the following two novel heterozygous putative mutations in GNAL: p.Gly213Ser in a German patient and p.Ala353Thr in a Japanese patient. These variants were predicted to be pathogenic in silico, were absent in ethnically matched control individuals, and impaired Gαolf coupling to D1 receptors in a bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET) assay. Two additional variants appeared to be benign because they behaved like wild-type samples in the BRET assay (p.Ala311Thr) or were detected in ethnically matched controls (p.Thr92Ala). Both patients with likely pathogenic mutations had craniocervical dystonia with onset in the fifth decade of life. No pathogenic mutations were detected in the patients with hyposmia and Parkinson disease, tardive dyskinesias, or acute dystonic reactions. Conclusions and Relevance Mutations in GNAL can cause craniocervical dystonia in different ethnicities. The BRET assay may be a useful tool to support the pathogenicity of identified variants in the GNAL gene. PMID:24535567

  19. Isolated and combined dystonia syndromes - an update on new genes and their phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Balint, B; Bhatia, K P

    2015-04-01

    Recent consensus on the definition, phenomenology and classification of dystonia centres around phenomenology and guides our diagnostic approach for the heterogeneous group of dystonias. Current terminology classifies conditions where dystonia is the sole motor feature (apart from tremor) as 'isolated dystonia', while 'combined dystonia' refers to dystonias with other accompanying movement disorders. This review highlights recent advances in the genetics of some isolated and combined dystonic syndromes. Some genes, such as ANO3, GNAL and CIZ1, have been discovered for isolated dystonia, but they are probably not a common cause of classic cervical dystonia. Conversely, the phenotype associated with TUBB4A mutations expanded from that of isolated dystonia to a syndrome of hypomyelination with atrophy of the basal ganglia and cerebellum (H-ABC syndrome). Similarly, ATP1A3 mutations cause a wide phenotypic spectrum ranging from rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism to alternating hemiplegia of childhood. Other entities entailing dystonia-parkinsonism include dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome (SLC63 mutations); dopa-responsive dystonias; young-onset parkinsonism (PARKIN, PINK1 and DJ-1 mutations); PRKRA mutations; and X-linked TAF1 mutations, which rarely can also manifest in women. Clinical and genetic heterogeneity also characterizes myoclonus-dystonia, which includes not only the classical phenotype associated with epsilon-sarcoglycan mutations but rarely also presentation of ANO3 gene mutations, TITF1 gene mutations typically underlying benign hereditary chorea, and some dopamine synthesis pathway conditions due to GCH1 and TH mutations. Thus, new genes are being recognized for isolated dystonia, and the phenotype of known genes is broadening and now involves different combined dystonia syndromes. PMID:25643588

  20. What is new in tics, dystonia and chorea?

    PubMed

    Macerollo, Antonella; Martino, Davide

    2016-08-01

    Movement disorders comprise hyperkinetic involuntary movements (eg tremor, myoclonus, tics, dystonia and chorea) and hypokinetic (parkinsonism) disorders. Tics are cardinal features of primary tic disorders encompassing Tourette syndrome (TS), but are also found in some neurodegenerative conditions and may be induced by psychoactive substances. The first line treatment for tics is pharmacological (mainly dopamine receptor blockers or alpha-2 adrenergic agonists) and behavioural. Dystonia and chorea syndromes are considerably heterogeneous in aetiology, and age at onset, body distribution of the movement disorder, accompanying neurological motor and non-motor features, and systemic manifestations are all important to reach a correct aetiological diagnosis. While symptomatic pharmacological treatment remains the mainstay of treatment for choreas, deep brain stimulation surgery has a well-defined place in the management of medically refractory dystonia. PMID:27481387

  1. Musicians and Dystonia: Is Sleep Part of the Problem?

    PubMed

    Akamine, R T; Hirotsu, C; Andersen, M L; Tufik, S

    2015-06-01

    We would like to congratulate Lee and Altenmüller for their recent study showing important findings about the characterization of a task-specific dystonia in a young professional percussionist. The authors presented in an elegant way the EMG investigation and treatment approach and the possible differential diagnoses, raising an important question about the need for physicians' awareness of this condition when considering musicians' health. We would like to add a new point of view in order to contribute with this discussion and provide critical thinking for a multidisciplinary approach to this type of dystonia, which may affect many individuals and result in severe compromise of musical technical performance. One factor that could also be potentially associated with the percussion-related dystonia is sleep. PMID:26046619

  2. Dopa-Responsive Dystonia in a Ten-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Venkatesh; Mohammed, Hussain Sadiq; Riyas, Ebrahim; Murugesan, Karuppasamy

    2012-01-01

    Children with recent onset dystonia and gait abnormalities may pose a diagnostic challenge. A ten-year-old, developmentally normal girl, presented with a six-month history of gait abnormality and dystonia. Her complaint worsened as the day progressed. In view of typical diurnal variation of dystonia, a therapeutic challenge with levodopa/carbidopa was given and there was a dramatic response. Hence, a diagnosis of dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD) was made. DRD is an inherited disorder characterized by dystonia with diurnal variation and favorable response to levodopa/carbidopa. The inheritance is usually autosomal dominant, however, in some cases, autosomal-recessive inheritance is also seen. PMID:24479026

  3. DYT1 dystonia increases risk taking in humans

    PubMed Central

    Arkadir, David; Radulescu, Angela; Raymond, Deborah; Lubarr, Naomi; Bressman, Susan B; Mazzoni, Pietro; Niv, Yael

    2016-01-01

    It has been difficult to link synaptic modification to overt behavioral changes. Rodent models of DYT1 dystonia, a motor disorder caused by a single gene mutation, demonstrate increased long-term potentiation and decreased long-term depression in corticostriatal synapses. Computationally, such asymmetric learning predicts risk taking in probabilistic tasks. Here we demonstrate abnormal risk taking in DYT1 dystonia patients, which is correlated with disease severity, thereby supporting striatal plasticity in shaping choice behavior in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14155.001 PMID:27249418

  4. Advances in the genetics of primary torsion dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Enza Maria

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge about the genetics of primary torsion dystonia (PTD) has been progressing at a very slow pace compared with other movement disorders. For many years, only one causative gene was known, DYT1/TOR1A, yet the recent identification of a second PTD causative gene (DYT6/THAP1), the detection of subclinical alterations caused by mutations in PTD genes in some healthy non-penetrant individuals, and functional studies on TOR1A and THAP1 protein products have significantly improved mutation detection, genotype-phenotype correlates, and our understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying the development of dystonia. PMID:20948792

  5. New genetic insights highlight 'old' ideas on motor dysfunction in dystonia.

    PubMed

    Goodchild, Rose E; Grundmann, Kathrin; Pisani, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Primary dystonia is a poorly understood but common movement disorder. Recently, several new primary dystonia genes were identified that provide new insight into dystonia pathogenesis. The GNAL dystonia gene is central for striatal responses to dopamine (DA) and is a component of a molecular pathway already implicated in DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD). Furthermore, this pathway is also dysfunctional and pathogenically linked to mTOR signaling in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID). These new data suggest that striatal DA responses are central to primary dystonia, even when symptoms do not benefit from DA therapies. Here we integrate these new findings with current understanding of striatal microcircuitry and other dystonia-causing insults to develop new ideas on the pathophysiology of this incapacitating movement disorder. PMID:24144882

  6. DRD1 rare variants associated with tardive-like dystonia: a pilot pathway sequencing study in dystonia.

    PubMed

    Groen, Justus L; Ritz, Katja; Warner, Tom T; Baas, Frank; Tijssen, Marina A J

    2014-07-01

    The dystonias are a clinical heterogeneous group with a complex genetic background. To gain more insight in genetic risk factors in dystonia we used a pathway sequence approach in patients with an extreme dystonia phenotype (n = 26). We assessed all coding and non-coding variants in candidate genes in D1-like subclass of dopamine receptor genes (DRD1, DRD5) and the synaptic vesicle pathway linked to torsinA (TOR1A, STON2, SNAPIN, KLC1 and THAP1), spanning 96 Kb. Two rare missense variants in DRD1 were found: c.68G>A(p.Arg23His) in the screening group and c.776C>A(p.Ser259Tyr) in an additional screen of 15 selected dystonia patients. Genetic burden analysis of DRD1 rare variants in patients (4.8%) versus European American controls from ESP (0.72%) reveals an OR 5.35 (95% CI 1.29-23.1). No rare missense SNVs in the synaptic vesicle pathway were found. Sequencing of TOR1A showed variant enrichment in haplotype 2, possibly accountable for contradictive results in previous association studies. Two new rare SNVs were detected in THAP1, including a nonsense mutation (p.Gln167Ter) and a splice site variant (c.72-1G>A). Screening for rare SNV of candidate pathways in a phenotype extreme population appears to be a promising alternative method to identify genetic risk factors in complex disorders like primary torsion dystonia. These findings indicate a role for rare genetic variation in dopamine processing genes in dystonia pathophysiology. PMID:24768614

  7. Delayed awakening in dystonia patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery.

    PubMed

    Trombetta, Carlos; Deogaonkar, Anupa; Deogaonkar, Milind; Ebrahim, Zeyd; Rezai, Ali; Machado, Andre; Farag, Ehab

    2010-07-01

    We aimed to identify the incidence, duration and causes of delayed emergence from anesthesia in patients with dystonia undergoing surgery for deep brain stimulation (DBS) placement. A retrospective review of patients with dystonia who underwent DBS placement was conducted and the following characteristics were noted: age, gender, comorbid conditions, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, anesthetic agents used, amount of initial dose, amount of infusion dose, duration of the infusion and the time needed for emergence. Twenty-four patients underwent 33 DBS procedures for dystonia. Propofol was administered to 21 patients, in 29 of the 33 procedures. Dexmedetomidine was administered to three patients, in four procedures. The average propofol loading dose was 0.7mg/kg, and the infusion rate was 80microg/kg per minute (min), for an average duration of 89min. The average time of emergence was 36min. Only 31% of patients emerged from propofol anesthesia during the expected time frame, 69% of patients had some degree of delayed emergence, and 24% had a significant delay in emergence. Delayed emergence was more common in younger patients due to the higher loading doses these patients received. This study shows a 69% incidence of delayed emergence in dystonia patients undergoing DBS surgery. It also suggests an association between delayed emergence and younger patients who receive higher loading doses. A possible cause of delayed emergence is excessive anesthetic potentiation of the low output pallidal state in dystonia which may depress the pallido-thalamo-cortical circuitry. Delayed emergence could also result from depression of the previously affected ventral pallidal inputs to the septo-hippocampal system that mediates general anesthesia and awareness. Complex neurotransmitter disturbances may also be involved. PMID:20466547

  8. Cortico-pallidal oscillatory connectivity in patients with dystonia.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Wolf-Julian; Jha, Ashwani; Bock, Antje; Huebl, Julius; Horn, Andreas; Schneider, Gerd-Helge; Sander, Tillmann H; Litvak, Vladimir; Kühn, Andrea A

    2015-07-01

    Primary dystonia has been associated with an underlying dysfunction of a wide network of brain regions including the motor cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord. Dystonia can be effectively treated by pallidal deep brain stimulation although the mechanism of this effect is not well understood. Here, we sought to characterize cortico-basal ganglia functional connectivity using a frequency-specific measure of connectivity-coherence. We recorded direct local field potentials from the human pallidum simultaneously with whole head magnetoencephalography to characterize functional connectivity in the cortico-pallidal oscillatory network in nine patients with idiopathic dystonia. Three-dimensional cortico-pallidal coherence images were compared to surrogate images of phase shuffled data across patients to reveal clusters of significant coherence (family-wise error P < 0.01, voxel extent 1000). Three frequency-specific, spatially-distinct cortico-pallidal networks have been identified: a pallido-temporal source of theta band (4-8 Hz) coherence, a pallido-cerebellar source of alpha band (7-13 Hz) coherence and a cortico-pallidal source of beta band (13-30 Hz) coherence over sensorimotor areas. Granger-based directionality analysis revealed directional coupling with the pallidal local field potentials leading in the theta and alpha band and the magnetoencephalographic cortical source leading in the beta band. The degree of pallido-cerebellar coupling showed an inverse correlation with dystonic symptom severity. Our data extend previous findings in patients with Parkinson's disease describing motor cortex-basal ganglia oscillatory connectivity in the beta band to patients with dystonia. Source coherence analysis revealed two additional frequency-specific networks involving the temporal cortex and the cerebellum. Pallido-cerebellar oscillatory connectivity and its association with dystonic symptoms provides further confirmation of cerebellar involvement

  9. Limb Amputations in Fixed Dystonia: A Form of Body Integrity Identity Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Mark J; Alonso-Canovas, Araceli; Schrag, Arnette; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Thompson, Philip D; Bhatia, Kailash

    2011-01-01

    Fixed dystonia is a disabling disorder mainly affecting young women who develop fixed abnormal limb postures and pain after apparently minor peripheral injury. There is continued debate regarding its pathophysiology and management. We report 5 cases of fixed dystonia in patients who sought amputation of the affected limb. We place these cases in the context of previous reports of patients with healthy limbs and patients with chronic regional pain syndrome who have sought amputation. Our cases, combined with recent data regarding disorders of mental rotation in patients with fixed dystonia, as well as previous data regarding body integrity identity disorder and amputations sought by patients with chronic regional pain syndrome, raise the possibility that patients with fixed dystonia might have a deficit in body schema that predisposes them to developing fixed dystonia and drives some to seek amputation. The outcome of amputation in fixed dystonia is invariably unfavorable. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society PMID:21484872

  10. Spatial reorganization of putaminal dopamine D2-like receptors in cranial and hand dystonia.

    PubMed

    Black, Kevin J; Snyder, Abraham Z; Mink, Jonathan W; Tolia, Veeral N; Revilla, Fredy J; Moerlein, Stephen M; Perlmutter, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    The putamen has a somatotopic organization of neurons identified by correspondence of firing rates with selected body part movements, as well as by complex, but organized, differential cortical projections onto putamen. In isolated focal dystonia, whole putaminal binding of dopamine D2-like receptor radioligands is quantitatively decreased, but it has not been known whether selected parts of the putamen are differentially affected depending upon the body part affected by dystonia. The radioligand [(18)F]spiperone binds predominantly to D2-like receptors in striatum. We hypothesized that the spatial location of [(18)F]spiperone binding within the putamen would differ in patients with dystonia limited to the hand versus the face, and we tested that hypothesis using positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. To address statistical and methodological concerns, we chose a straightforward but robust image analysis method. An automated algorithm located the peak location of [(18)F]spiperone binding within the striatum, relative to a brain atlas, in each of 14 patients with cranial dystonia and 8 patients with hand dystonia. The mean (left and right) |x|, y, and z coordinates of peak striatal binding for each patient were compared between groups by t test. The location of peak [(18)F]spiperone binding within the putamen differed significantly between groups (cranial dystonia zdystonia z, p = 0.016). We conclude that in isolated focal dystonia, dopamine D2-like receptors are distributed differently in the putamen depending on the body part manifesting dystonia. PMID:24520350

  11. Direct interaction between causative genes of DYT1 and DYT6 primary dystonia.

    PubMed

    Gavarini, Sophie; Cayrol, Corinne; Fuchs, Tania; Lyons, Natalia; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Girard, Jean-Philippe; Ozelius, Laurie J

    2010-10-01

    Primary dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by sustained muscle contractions and in which dystonia is the only or predominant clinical feature. TOR1A(DYT1) and the transcription factor THAP1(DYT6) are the only genes identified thus far for primary dystonia. Using electromobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), we demonstrate a physical interaction between THAP1 and the TOR1A promoter that is abolished by pathophysiologic mutations. Our findings provide the first evidence that causative genes for primary dystonia intersect in a common pathway and raise the possibility of developing novel therapies targeting this pathway. PMID:20865765

  12. Progressive dystonia symptomatic of juvenile GM2 gangliosidosis.

    PubMed

    Nardocci, N; Bertagnolio, B; Rumi, V; Angelini, L

    1992-01-01

    A 9-year-old boy showed a progressive generalized dystonia, with onset at the age of 4 years, combined with mental deterioration and behavioral disturbances. The values of beta-hexosaminidase activities studied in plasma, leukocytes, and fibroblasts obtained using two different substrates (MUG-NAc and MUG-NAc-6-S) were significantly reduced but higher than in Tay-Sachs disease and similar to those found in the juvenile chronic form of GM2 gangliosidosis. With anticholinergic therapy, for 1.5 years, the dystonic symptoms did not progress and the boy can still care for himself and attend school. The description of another case of the disease, clinically expressed as dystonia, corroborates the existence of a dystonic phenotype of GM2 gangliosidosis. PMID:1532632

  13. Motor and Sensory Dysfunction in Musician’s Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Florence C F; Frucht, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Musicians’ dystonia is a task-specific and painless loss of motor control in a previously well-executed task. It is increasingly recognized in the medical and musical community. Recent advances in neuroimaging, transcranial magnetic stimulation and novel techniques in electroencephalography have shed light on its underlying pathophysiology. To date, a deranged cortical plasticity leading to abnormal sensorimotor integration, combined with reduced inhibition across several levels of the motor pathway are likely mechanisms.This paper reviews the various phenomenology of musician’s dystonia across keyboard, string, brass, flute and drum players. Treatment is often challenging. Medical therapies like botulinum toxin injection and rehabilitation method with sensorimotor training offer symptomatic relief and return to baseline performance to some musicians. PMID:23814536

  14. Clinical spectrum of dopa-responsive dystonia and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woong-Woo; Jeon, Beom Seok

    2014-07-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD) has a classic presentation of childhood or adolescent-onset dystonia, mild parkinsonism, marked diurnal fluctuations, improvement with sleep or rest, and a dramatic and sustained response to low doses of L-dopa without motor fluctuations or dyskinesias. However, there have been many papers on patients with a wide range of features, which report them as DRD mainly because they had dystonic syndromes with L-dopa responsiveness. Many mutations in the dopaminergic system have been found as molecular genetic defects. Therefore, the clinical and genetic spectra of DRD are unclear, which lead to difficulties in diagnostic work-ups and planning treatments. We propose the concept of DRD and DRD-plus to clarify the confusion in this area and to help understand the pathophysiology and clinical features, which will help in guiding diagnostic investigations and planning treatments. We critically reviewed the literature on atypical cases and discussed the limitations of the gene study. PMID:24844652

  15. Dystonia in Ashkenazi Jews: clinical characterization of a founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Bressman, S B; de Leon, D; Kramer, P L; Ozelius, L J; Brin, M F; Greene, P E; Fahn, S; Breakefield, X O; Risch, N J

    1994-11-01

    A gene (DYT1) for idiopathic torsion dystonia maps to chromosome 9q34 in Ashkenazi Jewish families with early onset of symptoms. Further, there is linkage disequilibrium between DYT1 and a particular haplotype of alleles at 9q34 loci in this population. This implies that a large proportion of early-onset idiopathic torsion dystonia in Ashkenazi Jews is due to a founder mutation in DYT1. To characterize the phenotypic range of this mutation, we studied 174 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals affected with idiopathic torsion dystonia. We used GT(n) markers on chromosome 9q34 (D9S62, D9S63, and ASS) and classified individuals as having ("carriers"), not having ("noncarriers"), or being ambiguous with respect to a DYT1-associated haplotype. We assessed clinical features and found marked clinical differences between haplotype carriers and noncarriers. There were 90 carriers, 70 noncarriers, and 14 ambiguous individuals. The mean age at onset of symptoms was significantly lower in carriers than in noncarriers (12.5 +/- 8.2 vs 36.5 +/- 16.4 years). In 94% of carriers, symptoms began in a limb (arm or leg equally); rarely the disorder started in the neck (3.3%) or larynx (2.2%). In contrast, the neck, larynx, and other cranial muscles were the sites of onset in 79% of noncarriers; onset in the arms occurred in 21% and onset in the legs never occurred. Limb onset, leg involvement in the course of disease, and age at onset distinguished haplotype carriers from noncarriers with 90% accuracy. In conclusion, there are clinical differences between Ashkenazi Jewish individuals with idiopathic torsion dystonia who do or do not have a unique DYT1 mutation, as determined by a DYT1-associated haplotype of 9q34 alleles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7979224

  16. Neural correlates of abnormal sensory discrimination in laryngeal dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Termsarasab, Pichet; Ramdhani, Ritesh A.; Battistella, Giovanni; Rubien-Thomas, Estee; Choy, Melissa; Farwell, Ian M.; Velickovic, Miodrag; Blitzer, Andrew; Frucht, Steven J.; Reilly, Richard B.; Hutchinson, Michael; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Simonyan, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant sensory processing plays a fundamental role in the pathophysiology of dystonia; however, its underpinning neural mechanisms in relation to dystonia phenotype and genotype remain unclear. We examined temporal and spatial discrimination thresholds in patients with isolated laryngeal form of dystonia (LD), who exhibited different clinical phenotypes (adductor vs. abductor forms) and potentially different genotypes (sporadic vs. familial forms). We correlated our behavioral findings with the brain gray matter volume and functional activity during resting and symptomatic speech production. We found that temporal but not spatial discrimination was significantly altered across all forms of LD, with higher frequency of abnormalities seen in familial than sporadic patients. Common neural correlates of abnormal temporal discrimination across all forms were found with structural and functional changes in the middle frontal and primary somatosensory cortices. In addition, patients with familial LD had greater cerebellar involvement in processing of altered temporal discrimination, whereas sporadic LD patients had greater recruitment of the putamen and sensorimotor cortex. Based on the clinical phenotype, adductor form-specific correlations between abnormal discrimination and brain changes were found in the frontal cortex, whereas abductor form-specific correlations were observed in the cerebellum and putamen. Our behavioral and neuroimaging findings outline the relationship of abnormal sensory discrimination with the phenotype and genotype of isolated LD, suggesting the presence of potentially divergent pathophysiological pathways underlying different manifestations of this disorder. PMID:26693398

  17. Myoclonus-dystonia syndrome due to tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Cordivari, Carla; Batla, Amit; Wood, Nick W.; Houlden, Henry; Hardy, John; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To present a new family with tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency (THD) that presented with a new phenotype of predominant, levodopa-responsive myoclonus with dystonia due to compound heterozygosity of one previously reported mutation in the promoter region and a novel nonsynonymous mutation in the other allele, thus expanding the clinical and genetic spectrum of this disorder. Methods: We performed detailed clinical examination of the family and electrophysiology to characterize the myoclonus. We performed analysis of the TH gene and in silico prediction of the possible effect of nonsynonymous substitutions on protein structure. Results: Electrophysiology suggested that the myoclonus was of subcortical origin. Genetic analysis of the TH gene revealed compound heterozygosity of a point mutation in the promoter region (c.1-71 C>T) and a novel nonsynonymous substitution in exon 12 (c.1282G>A, p.Gly428Arg). The latter is a novel variant, predicted to have a deleterious effect on the TH protein function and is the first pathogenic TH mutation in patients of African ancestry. Conclusion: We presented a THD family with predominant myoclonus-dystonia and a new genotype. It is important to consider THD in the differential diagnosis of myoclonus-dystonia, because early treatment with levodopa is crucial for these patients. PMID:22815559

  18. Cannabis in the Treatment of Dystonia, Dyskinesias, and Tics.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Barbara S

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has been used for many medicinal purposes, including management of spasms, dystonia, and dyskinesias, with variable success. Its use for tetanus was described in the second century BCE, but the literature continues to include more case reports and surveys of its beneficial effects in managing symptoms of hyperkinetic movement disorders than randomized controlled trials, making evidence-based recommendations difficult. This paper reviews clinical research using various formulations of cannabis (botanical products, oral preparations containing ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and/or cannabidiol) and currently available preparations in the USA (nabilone and dronabinol). This has been expanded from a recent systematic review of cannabis use in several neurologic conditions to include case reports and case series and results of anonymous surveys of patients using cannabis outside of medical settings, with the original evidence classifications marked for those papers that followed research protocols. Despite overlap in some patients, dyskinesias will be treated separately from dystonia and chorea; benefit was not established beyond individual patients for these conditions. Tics, usually due to Tourettes, did respond to cannabis preparations. Side effects reported in the trials will be reviewed but those due to recreational use, including the dystonia that can be secondary to synthetic marijuana preparations, are outside the scope of this paper. PMID:26271953

  19. Writer’s cramp: is focal dystonia the best explanation?

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Michael H

    2013-01-01

    Often considered no more than an historical curiosity, writer’s cramp remains an important disability in the workplace and the mechanism, which has puzzled the best medical minds for generations, remains contentious. A remarkable range of hypotheses has been put forward to try and explain a disability which periodically reached epidemic and economically worrying levels, but in the end medical opinion has accepted the explanation put forward by neurologists Sheehy and Marsden in 1983 that this was caused by a form of focal dystonia. However, the majority of the historical descriptions of writer’s cramp do not fit the classical parameters of focal dystonia and are more accurately described as a progressive forearm muscle fatigue. Today’s keyboard operators continue to complain of symptoms identical to their clerical forebears demonstrating that this is a problem which has evolved but not disappeared; this has the paradoxical advantage that modern research techniques enable this complaint to be revisited. The result shows that two varieties of writer’s cramp have always existed and while focal dystonia remains a valid explanation for a minority of cases, the much more common fatigue-based complaint is better explained by chronic compartment syndrome of the forearm. PMID:23885297

  20. Review: genetics and neuropathology of primary pure dystonia.

    PubMed

    Paudel, R; Hardy, J; Revesz, T; Holton, J L; Houlden, H

    2012-10-01

    Neuropathology has been the key to understanding the aetiology of many neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal degeneration and cerebellar ataxias. Dystonia shares many clinical features with these conditions but research in general, has been unrewarding in providing information on disease processes. Neuropathological studies are few in number and only limited morphological abnormalities have been described. In the genetic literature, dystonia loci are represented as DYT and are assigned ascending numerals chronologically as they are identified. This review will concentrate on the neuropathology of primary pure dystonia, focusing on DYT1 and DYT6 and the correlation between clinical and genetic findings. Research in this area is incomplete and confounded by the rarity of post mortem brain tissue. However, recent findings, indicating a direct interaction between the torsinA (TOR1A) gene responsible for DYT1 and the thanatos-associated domain-containing apoptosis-associated protein 1 (THAP1) gene responsible for DYT6, have important implications in understanding these two entities and also for other members of this group of disorders. PMID:22897341

  1. Domperidone-induced dystonia: a rare and troublesome complication

    PubMed Central

    Dhakal, Om Prakash; Dhakal, Mona; Bhandari, Dhurba

    2014-01-01

    Domperidone is a commonly prescribed antiemetic drug but its side effects are rarely seen. Extrapyramidal side effects are a very rare complication of the drug occurring in 1/10 000 population. They usually occur in infants and very young children due to a poorly developed blood–brain barrier. We report a case of acute dystonia in a 13-year-old boy induced by domperidone. The boy was treated for viral fever and was started on domperidone 30 mg/day, sustained release form (0.7 mg/kg/day), for persistent vomiting along with other supportive treatment. On the fourth day of treatment, although the fever and vomiting subsided, the child developed oromandibular dystonia despite giving the drug in the recommended dose. Fortunately, drug-induced dystonias are a reversible condition and the child improved in 7–8 days after discontinuation of the drug. There was no recurrence at 1 month follow-up. Usually, dystonic reactions do not threaten life but are troublesome and life altering, so judicious use of the drug is advised. PMID:24973343

  2. Central Motor Conduction Studies and Diagnostic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Children with Severe Primary and Secondary Dystonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Verity; Mills, Kerry; Siddiqui, Ata; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Dystonia in childhood has many causes. Imaging may suggest corticospinal tract dysfunction with or without coexistent basal ganglia damage. There are very few published neurophysiological studies on children with dystonia; one previous study has focused on primary dystonia. We investigated central motor conduction in 62 children (34 males, 28…

  3. The non-motor syndrome of primary dystonia: clinical and pathophysiological implications

    PubMed Central

    Stamelou, Maria; Edwards, Mark J.; Hallett, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Dystonia is typically considered a movement disorder characterized by motor manifestations, primarily involuntary muscle contractions causing twisting movements and abnormal postures. However, growing evidence indicates an important non-motor component to primary dystonia, including abnormalities in sensory and perceptual functions, as well as neuropsychiatric, cognitive and sleep domains. Here, we review this evidence and discuss its clinical and pathophysiological implications. PMID:21933808

  4. Striatal cholinergic dysfunction as a unifying theme in the pathophysiology of dystonia.

    PubMed

    Eskow Jaunarajs, K L; Bonsi, P; Chesselet, M F; Standaert, D G; Pisani, A

    2015-04-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder of both genetic and non-genetic causes, which typically results in twisted posturing due to abnormal muscle contraction. Evidence from dystonia patients and animal models of dystonia indicate a crucial role for the striatal cholinergic system in the pathophysiology of dystonia. In this review, we focus on striatal circuitry and the centrality of the acetylcholine system in the function of the basal ganglia in the control of voluntary movement and ultimately clinical manifestation of movement disorders. We consider the impact of cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) on dopamine-acetylcholine interactions and examine new evidence for impairment of ChIs in dysfunction of the motor systems producing dystonic movements, particularly in animal models. We have observed paradoxical excitation of ChIs in the presence of dopamine D2 receptor agonists and impairment of striatal synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of DYT1 dystonia, which are improved by administration of recently developed M1 receptor antagonists. These findings have been confirmed across multiple animal models of DYT1 dystonia and may represent a common endophenotype by which to investigate dystonia induced by other types of genetic and non-genetic causes and to investigate the potential effectiveness of pharmacotherapeutics and other strategies to improve dystonia. PMID:25697043

  5. Temporal profile of improvement of tardive dystonia after globus pallidus deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Mewes, Klaus; DeLong, Mahlon R.; Gross, Robert E.; Triche, Shirley D.; Jinnah, H.A.; Boulis, Nicholas; Willie, Jon T.; Freeman, Alan; Alexander, Garrett E.; Aia, Pratibha; Butefisch, Cathrine M.; Esper, Christine D.; Factor, Stewart A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Several case reports and small series have indicated that tardive dystonia is responsive to globus pallidus deep brain stimulation. Whether different subtypes or distributions of tardive dystonia are associated with different outcomes remains unknown. Methods We assessed the outcomes and temporal profile of improvement of eight tardive dystonia patients who underwent globus pallidus deep brain stimulation over the past six years through record review. Due to the retrospective nature of this study, it was not blinded or placebo controlled. Results: Consistent with previous studies, deep brain stimulation improved the overall the Burkee–Fahn–Marsden motor scores by 85.1 ± 13.5%. The distributions with best responses in descending order were upper face, lower face, larynx/pharynx, limbs, trunk, and neck. Patients with prominent cervical dystonia demonstrated improvement in the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale but improvements took several months. In four patients the effects of deep brain stimulation on improvement in Burke Fahn Marsden score was rapid, while in four cases there was partial rapid response of neck and trunk dystonia followed by was gradual resolution of residual symptoms over 48 months. Conclusion Our retrospective analysis shows excellent resolution of tardive dystonia after globus pallidus deep brain stimulation. We found instantaneous response, except with neck and trunk dystonia where partial recovery was followed by further resolution at slower rate. Such outcome is encouraging for using deep brain stimulation in treatment of tardive dystonia. PMID:25465373

  6. Exhaustive Analysis of BH4 and Dopamine Biosynthesis Genes in Patients with Dopa-Responsive Dystonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clot, Fabienne; Grabli, David; Cazeneuve, Cecile; Roze, Emmanuel; Castelnau, Pierre; Chabrol, Brigitte; Landrieu, Pierre; Nguyen, Karine; Ponsot, Gerard; Abada, Myriem; Doummar, Diane; Damier, Philippe; Gil, Roger; Thobois, Stephane; Ward, Alana J.; Hutchinson, Michael; Toutain, Annick; Picard, Fabienne; Camuzat, Agnes; Fedirko, Estelle; San, Chankannira; Bouteiller, Delphine; LeGuern, Eric; Durr, Alexandra; Vidailhet, Marie; Brice, Alexis

    2009-01-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia is a childhood-onset dystonic disorder, characterized by a dramatic response to low dose of L-Dopa. Dopa-responsive dystonia is mostly caused by autosomal dominant mutations in the "GCH1" gene (GTP cyclohydrolase1) and more rarely by autosomal recessive mutations in the "TH" (tyrosine hydroxylase) or "SPR" (sepiapterin…

  7. Update on Deep Brain Stimulation for Dyskinesia and Dystonia: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    TODA, Hiroki; SAIKI, Hidemoto; NISHIDA, Namiko; IWASAKI, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been an established surgical treatment option for dyskinesia from Parkinson disease and for dystonia. The present article deals with the timing of surgical intervention, selecting an appropriate target, and minimizing adverse effects. We provide an overview of current evidences and issues for dyskinesia and dystonia as well as emerging DBS technology. PMID:27053331

  8. Striatal cholinergic dysfunction as a unifying theme in the pathophysiology of dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Jaunarajs, K.L. Eskow; Bonsi, P.; Chesselet, M.F.; Standaert, D.G.; Pisani, A.

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder of both genetic and non-genetic causes, which typically results in twisted posturing due to abnormal muscle contraction. Evidence from dystonia patients and animal models of dystonia indicate a crucial role for the striatal cholinergic system in the pathophysiology of dystonia. In this review, we focus on striatal circuitry and the centrality of the acetylcholine system in the function of the basal ganglia in the control of voluntary movement and ultimately clinical manifestion of movement disorders. We consider the impact of cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) on dopamine-acetylcholine interactions and examine new evidence for impairment of ChIs in dysfunction of the motor systems producing dystonic movements, particularly in animal models. We have observed paradoxical excitation of ChIs in the presence of dopamine D2 receptor agonists and impairment of striatal synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of DYT1 dystonia, which are improved by administration of recently developed M1 receptor antagonists. These findings have been confirmed across multiple animal models of DYT1 dystonia and may represent a common endophenotype by which to investigate dystonia induced by other types of genetic and non-genetic causes and to investigate the potential effectiveness of pharmacotherapeutics and other strategies to improve dystonia. PMID:25697043

  9. A rare sequence variant in intron 1 of THAP1 is associated with primary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Satya R; Xiao, Jianfeng; Zhao, Yu; Bastian, Robert W; Perlmutter, Joel S; Racette, Brad A; Paniello, Randal C; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Uitti, Ryan J; Van Gerpen, Jay A; Hedera, Peter; Truong, Daniel D; Blitzer, Andrew; Rudzińska, Monika; Momčilović, Dragana; Jinnah, Hyder A; Frei, Karen; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; LeDoux, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Although coding variants in THAP1 have been causally associated with primary dystonia, the contribution of noncoding variants remains uncertain. Herein, we examine a previously identified Intron 1 variant (c.71+9C>A, rs200209986). Among 1672 subjects with mainly adult-onset primary dystonia, 12 harbored the variant in contrast to 1/1574 controls (P < 0.01). Dystonia classification included cervical dystonia (N = 3), laryngeal dystonia (adductor subtype, N = 3), jaw-opening oromandibular dystonia (N = 1), blepharospasm (N = 2), and unclassified (N = 3). Age of dystonia onset ranged from 25 to 69 years (mean = 54 years). In comparison to controls with no identified THAP1 sequence variants, the c.71+9C>A variant was associated with an elevated ratio of Isoform 1 (NM_018105) to Isoform 2 (NM_199003) in leukocytes. In silico and minigene analyses indicated that c.71+9C>A alters THAP1 splicing. Lymphoblastoid cells harboring the c.71+9C>A variant showed extensive apoptosis with relatively fewer cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Differentially expressed genes from lymphoblastoid cells revealed that the c.71+9C>A variant exerts effects on DNA synthesis, cell growth and proliferation, cell survival, and cytotoxicity. In aggregate, these data indicate that THAP1 c.71+9C>A is a risk factor for adult-onset primary dystonia. PMID:24936516

  10. Update on Deep Brain Stimulation for Dyskinesia and Dystonia: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Toda, Hiroki; Saiki, Hidemoto; Nishida, Namiko; Iwasaki, Koichi

    2016-05-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been an established surgical treatment option for dyskinesia from Parkinson disease and for dystonia. The present article deals with the timing of surgical intervention, selecting an appropriate target, and minimizing adverse effects. We provide an overview of current evidences and issues for dyskinesia and dystonia as well as emerging DBS technology. PMID:27053331

  11. A rare sequence variant in intron 1 of THAP1 is associated with primary dystonia.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Satya R; Xiao, Jianfeng; Zhao, Yu; Bastian, Robert W; Perlmutter, Joel S; Racette, Brad A; Paniello, Randal C; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Uitti, Ryan J; Van Gerpen, Jay A; Hedera, Peter; Truong, Daniel D; Blitzer, Andrew; Rudzińska, Monika; Momčilović, Dragana; Jinnah, Hyder A; Frei, Karen; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; LeDoux, Mark S

    2014-05-01

    Although coding variants in THAP1 have been causally associated with primary dystonia, the contribution of noncoding variants remains uncertain. Herein, we examine a previously identified Intron 1 variant (c.71+9C>A, rs200209986). Among 1672 subjects with mainly adult-onset primary dystonia, 12 harbored the variant in contrast to 1/1574 controls (P < 0.01). Dystonia classification included cervical dystonia (N = 3), laryngeal dystonia (adductor subtype, N = 3), jaw-opening oromandibular dystonia (N = 1), blepharospasm (N = 2), and unclassified (N = 3). Age of dystonia onset ranged from 25 to 69 years (mean = 54 years). In comparison to controls with no identified THAP1 sequence variants, the c.71+9C>A variant was associated with an elevated ratio of Isoform 1 (NM_018105) to Isoform 2 (NM_199003) in leukocytes. In silico and minigene analyses indicated that c.71+9C>A alters THAP1 splicing. Lymphoblastoid cells harboring the c.71+9C>A variant showed extensive apoptosis with relatively fewer cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Differentially expressed genes from lymphoblastoid cells revealed that the c.71+9C>A variant exerts effects on DNA synthesis, cell growth and proliferation, cell survival, and cytotoxicity. In aggregate, these data indicate that THAP1 c.71+9C>A is a risk factor for adult-onset primary dystonia. PMID:24936516

  12. Globus pallidus deep brain stimulation for adult-onset axial dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Mewes, Klaus; Jinnah, H.A.; DeLong, Mahlon R.; Gross, Robert E.; Triche, Shirley; Freeman, Alan; Factor, Stewart A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Generalized dystonia, both primary and secondary forms, and axial dystonias such as tardive dystonia, and idiopathic cervical dystonia are responsive to globus pallidus interna (GPi) DBS. There is a paucity of investigations probing the impact of DBS on adult-onset axial dystonia. We assessed the efficacy of GPi DBS in four patients with rare adult-onset axial dystonia. Methods Primary outcome measure was improvement in the motor component of the Burke-Fahn-Marsden (BFM) rating scale. Secondary outcome measures were quality of life as determined by the SF-36 questionnaire, time to achieve best possible benefit and DBS parameters that accounted for the best response. In patients with prominent concomitant cervical dystonia we also used the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS). Results GPi DBS improved BFM scores by 87.63 ± 11.46%. Improvement in total severity scale of TWSTRS was 71.5 ± 12.7%. Quality of life also remarkably improved as evidenced by 109.38 ± 82.97 and 7.05 ± 21.48% percent change in psychometrically-based physical component summary (PCS), and a mental component summary (MCS) score respectively. Conclusions GPi DBS is a very effective treatment for adult-onset axial dystonia. Considering its refractoriness to medical therapy and significant impact on quality of life DBS should be considered for this disorder. PMID:25260969

  13. Patient considerations in the treatment of cervical dystonia: focus on botulinum toxin type A

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Reversa R; Pagan, Fernando L

    2015-01-01

    Cervical dystonia is the most common form of focal dystonia characterized by involuntary muscle contractions causing abnormal movements and posturing of the head and neck and is associated with significant pain. Botulinum toxin is considered first-line therapy in the treatment of pain and abnormal head posturing associated with cervical dystonia. There are currently three botulinum toxin type A neurotoxins and one botulinum type B neurotoxin commercially available and US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) labeled for the treatment of cervical dystonia. This review will focus on the efficacy, safety, and therapeutic use of botulinum type A neurotoxins in the treatment of cervical dystonia. We conclude with a discussion of factors influencing toxin selection including therapeutic effect, duration of effect, side effect profile, cost, and physician preference. PMID:26082621

  14. Myoclonus-dystonia: An under-recognized entity - Report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Jain, Puneet; Sharma, Suvasini; van Ruissen, Fred; Aneja, Satinder

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary myoclonus-dystonia (DYT 11) is caused by the epsilon-sarcoglycan (SGCE) mutation. The clinical details and investigations of cases diagnosed with myoclonus-dystonia were reviewed. We describe 5 patients (3 families) with myoclonus-dystonia diagnosed at our center. Majority of the patients had the classical phenotype with few atypical features (adult-onset disease and onset in lower limbs). Four patients carried a mutant variant in the SGCE-gene. A diagnosis of myoclonus-dystonia should be considered in cognitively normal patients with early-onset myoclonus (that may occur both at rest and/or action) with or without dystonia and with or without psychiatric-disturbances. PMID:27625242

  15. Oromandibular dystonia in yemeni patients with khat chewing: a response to botulinum toxin treatment.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Hatem S; El-Tamawy, Mohamed S; Mohieldin, Nevin; Edrees, Mohammed; Bohlega, Saeed

    2014-04-22

    Khat-(Catha edulis)related oromandibular dystonia is a difficult-to-treat subset of movement disorders that involve masticatory muscles with diverse and incapacitating manifestations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Botulinum toxin-type A therapy in khat chewer Yemeni patients with oromandibular dystonia. This prospective study included 18 khat-chewers Yemeni patients with refractory oromandibular dystonia, who were subjected to Botulinum toxin-A injection and followed up for 3 months thereafter. Primary efficacy outcome was the global impression scale, and secondary outcome measure was the Unified Dystonia Rating Scale. Patients showed improvement of both efficacy measures, maximum satisfactory responses were detected at the forth week after injection. No major adverse events were detected. Botulinum toxin-A is considered an effective and safe treatment option for refractory oromandibular dystonia in khat-chewers. PMID:24987506

  16. The Subthalamic Nucleus in Primary Dystonia: Single-Unit Discharge Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Schrock, Lauren E.; Ostrem, Jill L.; Turner, Robert S.; Shimamoto, Shoichi A.

    2009-01-01

    Most models of dystonia pathophysiology predict alterations of activity in the basal ganglia thalamocortical motor circuit. The globus pallidus interna (GPi) shows bursting and oscillatory neuronal discharge in both human dystonia and in animal models, but it is not clear which intrinsic basal ganglia pathways are implicated in this abnormal output. The subthalamic nucleus (STN) receives prominent excitatory input directly from cortical areas implicated in dystonia pathogenesis and inhibitory input from the external globus pallidus. The goal of this study was to elucidate the role of the STN in dystonia by analyzing STN neuronal discharge in patients with idiopathic dystonia. Data were collected in awake patients undergoing microelectrode recording for implantation of STN deep brain stimulation electrodes. We recorded 62 STN neurons in 9 patients with primary dystonia. As a comparison group, we recorded 143 STN neurons in 20 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Single-unit activity was discriminated off-line by principal component analysis and evaluated with respect to discharge rate, bursting, and oscillatory activity. The mean STN discharge rate in dystonia patients was 26.3 Hz (SD 13.6), which was lower than that in the PD patients (35.6 Hz, SD 15.2), but higher than published values for subjects without basal ganglia dysfunction. Oscillatory activity was found in both disorders, with a higher proportion of units oscillating in the beta range in PD. Bursting discharge was a prominent feature of both dystonia and PD, whereas sensory receptive fields were expanded in PD compared with dystonia. The STN firing characteristics, in conjunction with those previously published for GPi, suggest that bursting and oscillatory discharge in basal ganglia output may be transmitted via pathways involving the STN and provide a pathophysiologic rationale for STN as a surgical target in dystonia. PMID:19846625

  17. Novel Dystonia Genes: Clues on Disease Mechanisms and the Complexities of High-Throughput Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Aloysius; Erro, Roberto; Lohmann, Katja

    2016-04-01

    Dystonia is a genetically heterogenous disease and a prototype disorder where next-generation sequencing has facilitated the identification of new pathogenic genes. This includes the first two genes linked to recessively inherited isolated dystonia, that is, HPCA (hippocalcin) and COL6A3 (collagen VI alpha 3). These genes are proposed to underlie cases of the so-called DYT2-like dystonia, while also reiterating two distinct pathways in dystonia pathogenesis. First, deficiency in HPCA function is thought to alter calcium homeostasis, a mechanism that has previously been forwarded for CACNA1A and ANO3. The novel myoclonus-dystonia genes KCTD17 and CACNA1B also implicate abnormal calcium signaling in dystonia. Second, the phenotype in COL6A3-loss-of-function zebrafish models argues for a neurodevelopmental defect, which has previously been suggested as a possible biological mechanism for THAP1, TOR1A, and TAF1 based on expression data. The newly reported myoclonus-dystonia gene, RELN, plays also a role in the formation of brain structures. Defects in neurodevelopment likewise seem to be a recurrent scheme underpinning mainly complex dystonias, for example those attributable to biallelic mutations in GCH1, TH, SPR, or to heterozygous TUBB4A mutations. To date, it remains unclear whether dystonia is a common phenotypic outcome of diverse underlying disease mechanisms, or whether the different genetic causes converge in a single pathway. Importantly, the relevance of pathways highlighted by novel dystonia genes identified by high-throughput sequencing depends on the confirmation of mutation pathogenicity in subsequent genetic and functional studies. However, independent, careful validation of genetic findings lags behind publications of newly identified genes. We conclude with a discussion on the characteristics of true-positive reports. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26991507

  18. Paroxysmal Autonomic Instability with Dystonia after Pneumococcal Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Safadieh, Layal; Sharara-Chami, Rana; Dabbagh, Omar

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of bacterial meningitis, frequently resulting in severe neurological impairment. A seven-month-old child presenting with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis developed right basal ganglia and hypothalamic infarctions. Daily episodes of agitation, hypertension, tachycardia, diaphoresis, hyperthermia, and decerebrate posturing were observed. The diagnosis of paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia was established. The patient responded to clonidine, baclofen, and benzodiazepines. Although this entity has been reported in association with traumatic brain injury, and as a sequel to some nervous system infections, this is the first case, to our knowledge, associated with pneumococcal meningoencephalitis. PMID:23093976

  19. Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia after pneumococcal meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Safadieh, Layal; Sharara-Chami, Rana; Dabbagh, Omar

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of bacterial meningitis, frequently resulting in severe neurological impairment. A seven-month-old child presenting with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis developed right basal ganglia and hypothalamic infarctions. Daily episodes of agitation, hypertension, tachycardia, diaphoresis, hyperthermia, and decerebrate posturing were observed. The diagnosis of paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia was established. The patient responded to clonidine, baclofen, and benzodiazepines. Although this entity has been reported in association with traumatic brain injury, and as a sequel to some nervous system infections, this is the first case, to our knowledge, associated with pneumococcal meningoencephalitis. PMID:23093976

  20. Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) syndrome following cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Dheeraj; Singla, Deepak; Singh, Jasveer; Jindal, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) appears to be a unique syndrome following brain injury. It can echo many life-threatening conditions, making its early recognition and management a challenge for intensivists. A delay in early recognition and subsequent management may result in increased morbidity, which is preventable in affected patients. Herein, we report the case of a patient who was diagnosed with PAID syndrome following prolonged cardiac arrest, and discuss the pathophysiology, clinical presentation and management of this rare and under-recognised clinical entity. PMID:25189311

  1. Proprioceptive Dysfunction in Focal Dystonia: From Experimental Evidence to Rehabilitation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Avanzino, Laura; Fiorio, Mirta

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia has historically been considered a disorder of the basal ganglia, mainly affecting planning and execution of voluntary movements. This notion comes from the observation that most lesions responsible for secondary dystonia involve the basal ganglia. However, what emerges from recent research is that dystonia is linked to the dysfunction of a complex neural network that comprises basal ganglia–thalamic–frontal cortex, but also the inferior parietal cortex and the cerebellum. While dystonia is clearly a motor problem, it turned out that sensory aspects are also fundamental, especially those related to proprioception. We outline experimental evidence for proprioceptive dysfunction in focal dystonia from intrinsic sensory abnormalities to impaired sensorimotor integration, which is the process by which sensory information is used to plan and execute volitional movements. Particularly, we will focus on proprioceptive aspects of dystonia, including: (i) processing of vibratory input, (ii) temporal discrimination of two passive movements, (iii) multimodal integration of visual-tactile and proprioceptive inputs, and (iv) motor control in the absence of visual feedback. We suggest that these investigations contribute not only to a better understanding of dystonia pathophysiology, but also to develop rehabilitation strategies aimed at facilitating the processing of proprioceptive input. PMID:25538612

  2. Normal motor adaptation in cervical dystonia: a fundamental cerebellar computation is intact.

    PubMed

    Sadnicka, Anna; Patani, Bansi; Saifee, Tabish A; Kassavetis, Panagiotis; Pareés, Isabel; Korlipara, Prasad; Bhatia, Kailash P; Rothwell, John C; Galea, Joseph M; Edwards, Mark J

    2014-10-01

    The potential role of the cerebellum in the pathophysiology of dystonia has become a focus of recent research. However, direct evidence for a cerebellar contribution in humans with dystonia is difficult to obtain. We examined motor adaptation, a test of cerebellar function, in 20 subjects with primary cervical dystonia and an equal number of aged matched controls. Adaptation to both visuomotor (distorting visual feedback by 30°) and forcefield (applying a velocity-dependent force) conditions were tested. Our hypothesis was that cerebellar abnormalities observed in dystonia research would translate into deficits of cerebellar adaptation. We also examined the relationship between adaptation and dystonic head tremor as many primary tremor models implicate the cerebellothalamocortical network which is specifically tested by this motor paradigm. Rates of adaptation (learning) in cervical dystonia were identical to healthy controls in both visuomotor and forcefield tasks. Furthermore, the ability to adapt was not clearly related to clinical features of dystonic head tremor. We have shown that a key motor control function of the cerebellum is intact in the most common form of primary dystonia. These results have important implications for current anatomical models of the pathophysiology of dystonia. It is important to attempt to progress from general statements that implicate the cerebellum to a more specific evidence-based model. The role of the cerebellum in this enigmatic disease perhaps remains to be proven. PMID:24872202

  3. Spatial Reorganization of Putaminal Dopamine D2-Like Receptors in Cranial and Hand Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Black, Kevin J.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Mink, Jonathan W.; Tolia, Veeral N.; Revilla, Fredy J.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Perlmutter, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    The putamen has a somatotopic organization of neurons identified by correspondence of firing rates with selected body part movements, as well as by complex, but organized, differential cortical projections onto putamen. In isolated focal dystonia, whole putaminal binding of dopamine D2-like receptor radioligands is quantitatively decreased, but it has not been known whether selected parts of the putamen are differentially affected depending upon the body part affected by dystonia. The radioligand [18F]spiperone binds predominantly to D2-like receptors in striatum. We hypothesized that the spatial location of [18F]spiperone binding within the putamen would differ in patients with dystonia limited to the hand versus the face, and we tested that hypothesis using positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. To address statistical and methodological concerns, we chose a straightforward but robust image analysis method. An automated algorithm located the peak location of [18F]spiperone binding within the striatum, relative to a brain atlas, in each of 14 patients with cranial dystonia and 8 patients with hand dystonia. The mean (left and right) |x|, y, and z coordinates of peak striatal binding for each patient were compared between groups by t test. The location of peak [18F]spiperone binding within the putamen differed significantly between groups (cranial dystonia zdystonia z, p = 0.016). We conclude that in isolated focal dystonia, dopamine D2-like receptors are distributed differently in the putamen depending on the body part manifesting dystonia. PMID:24520350

  4. The clinical spectrum of laryngeal dystonia includes dystonic cough: observations of a large series.

    PubMed

    Payne, Susannah; Tisch, Stephen; Cole, Ian; Brake, Helen; Rough, Judy; Darveniza, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Laryngeal dystonia is a movement disorder of the muscles within the larynx, which most commonly manifests as spasmodic dysphonia (SD). Rarer reported manifestations include dystonic respiratory stridor and dyscoordinate breathing. Laryngeal dystonia has been treated successfully with botulinum neurotoxin (BTX) injections since 1984. We reviewed prospectively collected data in a consecutive series of 193 patients with laryngeal dystonia who were seen at St. Vincent's Hospital between 1991 and 2011. Patient data were analyzed in Excel, R, and Prism. Laryngeal dystonia manifested as SD (92.7%), stridor (11.9%), dystonic cough (6.2%), dyscoordinate breathing (4.1%), paroxysmal hiccups (1.6%), and paroxysmal sneezing (1.6%). There were more women (68.4%) than men (31.6%), and the average age at onset was 47 years. A positive family history of dystonia was present in 16.1% of patients. A higher incidence of extra-laryngeal dystonia (ie, torticollis and blepharospasm) and concurrent manifestations of laryngeal dystonia were present in patients with dystonic cough, dyscoordinate breathing, paroxysmal sneezing, and hiccups than in other patients (P = 0.003 and P < 0.0001, respectively). The average starting dose of BTX decreased from 2.3 to 0.5 units between 1991 and 2011. The median treatment rating was excellent across all subgroups. Patients with adductor SD, stridor, extra-laryngeal dystonia and male patients had relatively better treatment outcomes. Technical failures were rare (1.1%). Dysphonia secondary to vocal cord paresis followed 38.7% of treatments. Laryngeal dystonia manifests predominantly as SD, but other manifestations include stridor, dyscoordinate breathing, paroxysmal cough, hiccups, and sneezing. BTX injections are very effective across all subgroups. Severe adverse events are rare. PMID:24753288

  5. Noninvasive Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease and Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Allan D.; Fregni, Felipe; Simon, David K.; Deblieck, Choi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    Summary Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are promising noninvasive cortical stimulation methods for adjunctive treatment of movement disorders. They avoid surgical risks and provide theoretical advantages of specific neural circuit neuromodulation. Neuromodulatory effects depend on extrinsic stimulation factors (cortical target, frequency, intensity, duration, number of sessions), intrinsic patient factors (disease process, individual variability and symptoms, state of medication treatment), and outcome measures. Most studies to date have shown beneficial effects of rTMS or tDCS on clinical symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and support the notion of spatial specificity to the effects on motor and non-motor symptoms. However, stimulation parameters have varied widely and some studies are poorly controlled. Studies of rTMS or tDCS in dystonia have provided abundant data on physiology, but few on clinical effects. Multiple mechanisms likely contribute to the clinical effects of rTMS and tDCS in movement disorders, including normalization of cortical excitability, rebalancing of distributed neural network activity, and induction of dopamine release. However, it remains unclear how to individually adjust rTMS or tDCS factors for the most beneficial effects on symptoms of PD or dystonia. Nonetheless the noninvasive nature, minimal side effects, positive effects in preliminary clinical studies, and increasing evidence for rational mechanisms make rTMS and tDCS attractive for ongoing investigation. PMID:18394576

  6. Dopa-responsive dystonia--clinical and genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Wijemanne, Subhashie; Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    Dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD) encompasses a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders that typically manifest as limb-onset, diurnally fluctuating dystonia and exhibit a robust and sustained response to levodopa treatment. Autosomal dominant GTP cyclohydrolase 1 deficiency, also known as Segawa disease, is the most common and best-characterized condition that manifests as DRD, but a similar presentation can be seen with genetic abnormalities that lead to deficiencies in tyrosine hydroxylase, sepiapterin reductase or other enzymes that are involved in the biosynthesis of dopamine. In rare cases, DRD can result from conditions that do not affect the biosynthesis of dopamine; single case reports have shown that DRD can be a manifestation of hereditary spastic paraplegia type 11, spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 and ataxia telangiectasia. This heterogeneity of conditions that underlie DRD frequently leads to misdiagnosis, which delays the appropriate treatment with levodopa. Correct diagnosis at an early stage requires use of the appropriate diagnostic tests, which include a levodopa trial, genetic testing (including whole-exome sequencing), cerebrospinal fluid neurotransmitter analysis, the phenylalanine loading test, and enzyme activity measurements. The selection of tests for use depends on the clinical presentation and level of complexity. This Review presents the common and rarer causes of DRD and their clinical features, and considers the most appropriate approaches to ensure early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26100751

  7. Acute Dystonia Following a Switch in Treatment from Atomoxetine to Low-dose Aripiprazole.

    PubMed

    Başay, Ömer; Basay, Burge Kabukcu; Öztürk, Önder; Yüncü, Zeki

    2016-05-31

    The present report describes the cases of a 17-year-old male patient and a 13-year-old female patient who developed acute dystonia following the administration of low-dose aripiprazole (5 mg/day) after the cessation of atomoxetine treatment. Although aripiprazole-induced dystonia has been previously reported in the literature, it is rare, and most of these cases were associated with doses higher than 5 mg/day. Furthermore, both of the patients in the present study discontinued atomoxetine prior to the initiation of aripiprazole treatment; thus, this report also discussed the possible mechanisms underlying the manifestation of dystonia from the perspective of neurotransmitter activity. PMID:27121436

  8. Acute Dystonia Following a Switch in Treatment from Atomoxetine to Low-dose Aripiprazole

    PubMed Central

    Başay, Ömer; Basay, Burge Kabukcu; Öztürk, Önder; Yüncü, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    The present report describes the cases of a 17-year-old male patient and a 13-year-old female patient who developed acute dystonia following the administration of low-dose aripiprazole (5 mg/day) after the cessation of atomoxetine treatment. Although aripiprazole-induced dystonia has been previously reported in the literature, it is rare, and most of these cases were associated with doses higher than 5 mg/day. Furthermore, both of the patients in the present study discontinued atomoxetine prior to the initiation of aripiprazole treatment; thus, this report also discussed the possible mechanisms underlying the manifestation of dystonia from the perspective of neurotransmitter activity. PMID:27121436

  9. A novel gene mutation in PANK2 in a patient with severe jaw-opening dystonia.

    PubMed

    Yapici, Zuhal; Akcakaya, Nihan Hande; Tekturk, Pinar; Iseri, Sibel Aylin Ugur; Ozbek, Ugur

    2016-09-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is a rare neurodegenerative condition. Major clinical features include progressive dystonia, pigmentary retinopathy, spasticity, and cognitive decline. The typical MRI sign of the disease, known as "eye-of-the-tiger", is what makes differential diagnosis possible. We here describe a 16-year-old male patient with PKAN presenting with severe and sustained jaw-opening dystonia which may be due to heterogeneous etiologies showing poor response to treatment. Herein, long-term follow-up and genetic results of a PKAN case who experienced severe jaw-opening dystonia are presented and discussed. PMID:27185474

  10. Refractory Case of Paroxysmal Autonomic Instability With Dystonia Syndrome Secondary to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kern, John; Bodek, Daniel; Niazi, Osama Tariq; Maher, James

    2016-02-01

    Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) is a syndrome commonly related to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and rarely to anoxia associated with symptoms of dystonia, tachycardia, tachypnea, and diaphoresis. This is a case of a 20-year-old man who was stabbed in the heart. He underwent surgical repair of a ventricular septal defect and mitral valve replacement. Postoperatively, he developed dystonia with tachycardia and tachypnea consistent with PAID syndrome, secondary to prolonged hypoxia. Traditionally, this poorly understood syndrome is treated with morphine, clonazepam, and nonselective β-blockers. Second-line medications commonly used are baclofen, dantrolene, and gabapentin, which are aimed at the dystonia itself. In this case, both first- and second-line agents were ineffective. A 72-hour dexmedetomidine infusion resulted in complete resolution of symptoms. This is the first case of anoxia-induced PAID syndrome to be effectively treated with dexmedetomidine, which was previously used in a case induced by TBI. PMID:26867852

  11. Cranial dystonia, blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm: clinical features and treatment, including the use of botulinum toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, S P; Lang, A E

    1988-01-01

    Blepharospasm, the most frequent feature of cranial dystonia, and hemifacial spasm are two involuntary movement disorders that affect facial muscles. The cause of blepharospasm and other forms of cranial dystonia is not known. Hemifacial spasm is usually due to compression of the seventh cranial nerve at its exit from the brain stem. Cranial dystonia may result in severe disability. Hemifacial spasm tends to be much less disabling but may cause considerable distress and embarrassment. Patients affected with these disorders are often mistakenly considered to have psychiatric problems. Although the two disorders are quite distinct pathophysiologically, therapy with botulinum toxin has proven very effective in both. We review the clinical features, proposed pathophysiologic features, differential diagnosis and treatment, including the use of botulinum toxin, of cranial dystonia and hemifacial spasm. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3052771

  12. Japanese familial case of myoclonus-dystonia syndrome with a splicing mutation in SGCE.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takahito; Takano, Kyoko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Osaka, Hitoshi

    2015-04-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia syndrome (MDS) is a rare autosomal-dominant movement disorder characterized by brief, frequently alcohol-responsive myoclonic jerks that begin in childhood or early adolescence, caused by mutations in the ε-sarcoglycan gene (SGCE). The patient was a 6-year-old boy. At 2 years 8 months, he had abnormal movement when he ran due to dystonia of his left leg. At 3 years 5 months, he exhibited dystonia and myoclonic movement of his arms when eating. Myoclonus was likely to develop when he felt anxiety or exhaustion. Genomic DNA showed a heterozygous mutation in SGCE (c.109 + 1 G > T). His father and uncle with the same mutation also experienced milder dystonia or myoclonic movements. SGCE mutation can cause a broad range of clinical symptoms between and within families. We should consider MDS as a differential diagnosis for patients with paroxysmal walking abnormalities and/or myoclonic movements. PMID:25868953

  13. Musicians' social representations of health and illness: a qualitative case study about focal dystonia.

    PubMed

    Zosso, Amélie; Schoeb, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    Musicians are artists who use the entire body when playing their instruments. Since over-practicing may lead to physical problems, musicians might encounter focal dystonia, a hand's motor disorder. The cause seems to be the brain's confusion between afferent and efferent information transfer provoking a disharmony with the instrument. Although focal dystonia may have serious consequences for a musician's career, it is unclear how musicians perceive this trouble. This case study describes two musicians with focal dystonia. Qualitative research was used to study their social representations of health and illness. The results show the central role of the hand during music playing, the passion for music and the understanding for focal dystonia as "brain panic". Therapists should account for those specific features inherent to this population in order to better help them in their quest for art through music. Giving a voice to musicians may improve their quality of care. PMID:22246303

  14. Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Internal Globus Pallidus Deep Brain Stimulation for Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Ran; Lee, Jae Meen; Ehm, Gwanhee; Yang, Hui-Jun; Song, In Ho; Lim, Yong Hoon; Kim, Mi-Ryoung; Kim, Keyoung Ran; Lee, Woong-Woo; Kim, Young Eun; Hwang, Jae Ha; Shin, Chae Won; Park, Hyeyoung; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Cheolyoung; Kim, Dong Gyu; Jeon, Beom Seok; Paek, Sun Ha

    2016-01-01

    Background GPi (Internal globus pallidus) DBS (deep brain stimulation) is recognized as a safe, reliable, reversible and adjustable treatment in patients with medically refractory dystonia. Objectives This report describes the long-term clinical outcome of 36 patients implanted with GPi DBS at the Neurosurgery Department of Seoul National University Hospital. Methods Nine patients with a known genetic cause, 12 patients with acquired dystonia, and 15 patients with isolated dystonia without a known genetic cause were included. When categorized by phenomenology, 29 patients had generalized, 5 patients had segmental, and 2 patients had multifocal dystonia. Patients were assessed preoperatively and at defined follow-up examinations postoperatively, using the Burke-Fahn-Marsden dystonia rating scale (BFMDRS) for movement and functional disability assessment. The mean follow-up duration was 47 months (range, 12–84) Results The mean movement scores significantly decreased from 44.88 points preoperatively to 26.45 points at 60-month follow up (N = 19, P = 0.006). The mean disability score was also decreased over time, from 11.54 points preoperatively to 8.26 points at 60-month follow up, despite no statistical significance (N = 19, P = 0.073). When analyzed the movement and disability improvement rates at 12-month follow up point, no significant difference was noted according to etiology, disease duration, age at surgery, age of onset, and phenomenology. However, the patients with DYT-1 dystonia and isolated dystonia without a known genetic cause showed marked improvement. Conclusions GPi DBS is a safe and efficient therapeutic method for treatment of dystonia patients to improve both movement and disability. However, this study has some limitations caused by the retrospective design with small sample size in a single-center. PMID:26745717

  15. Meta-analytical and electrophysiological evidence for executive dysfunction in primary dystonia.

    PubMed

    Lange, Florian; Seer, Caroline; Salchow, Carolin; Dengler, Reinhard; Dressler, Dirk; Kopp, Bruno

    2016-09-01

    Impaired motor control in primary dystonia has been linked to cortico-basal ganglia alterations that may also give rise to changes in executive functioning. However, no conclusive evidence for executive dysfunction in patients with primary dystonia has been reported yet. We conducted a meta-analysis of the relationship between primary dystonia and performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), an established test of executive functioning. Its results revealed a significant effect of medium size, indicating that primary dystonia is associated with moderate performance deficits on the WCST. Building on this finding, we conducted an event-related potential (ERP) study to elucidate the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying executive dysfunction in primary dystonia. Eighteen patients with blepharospasm, a common form of primary focal dystonia, and 34 healthy matched controls completed a computerized version of the WCST. We specifically compared indicators of two distinct components of executive functioning: set shifting and rule inference. On a behavioral level, blepharospasm patients seemed to have particular difficulty integrating information to infer the correct task rule. In addition, P3a amplitude (as an electrophysiological marker of rule-inference processes) was selectively attenuated in blepharospasm patients. Executive dysfunction in blepharospasm can thus rather be attributed to a rule-inference deficit, whereas set-shifting abilities appear to be relatively unaffected by the disease. Moreover, P3a amplitude attenuation was related to disease duration, indicating that this ERP might serve as a neural indicator of disease progression and executive dysfunction in primary dystonia. These results demonstrate for the first time that pathophysiological alterations in primary dystonia might affect cortical activation for executive functioning. PMID:27376933

  16. Acute dystonia in a young schizophrenic patient associated with ingestion of a cloperastine containing cough syrup.

    PubMed

    Linazasoro, G; Garmendia, M T; Lizaso, X

    2000-01-01

    Acute dystonic reactions are usually observed after exposure to drugs with antidopaminergic actions. We report on one patient with acute dystonia associated with ingestion of a cloperastine containing syrup, who suffered from schizophrenia but had been neuroleptic-free for 6months. Cloperastine has antihistaminic properties. We suggest that antihistaminic agents may induce acute dystonia by altering the balance between dopamine and acetylcholine in the striatum. PMID:18591150

  17. Syndrome of fixed dystonia in adolescents--short term outcome in 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Anirban; López-Casas, Jesús; Poo, Pilar; Colomer, Jaume; Galvan, Marta; Lingappa, Lokesh; Short, Clare; Jardine, Philip E; Fernández-Alvarez, Emilio

    2009-09-01

    We describe the clinical features, investigations and outcome of 4 adolescents aged 13, 16, 17 and 19 years, with fixed dystonia. The diagnosis was made within 6 months of the onset of symptoms. One patient had an identifiable traumatic precipitant. All the affected extremities had pain, sudomotor and vascular changes which were consistent with complex regional pain syndrome. The extremities affected by dystonia were the foot and the hand. The dystonia spread to affect other extremities in one patient. One patient had hemifacial spasm. Examination of the central and peripheral nervous system and allied investigations failed to reveal an organic cause. Common genetic causes for dystonia were excluded. The response to physical treatments for the affected extremities, such as Botulinum Toxin and surgery was poor. In all our cases there were significant psychological and psychiatric factors. Three patients fully met the criteria for psychogenic dystonia and responded well to psychological intervention. Fixed dystonia in adolescents is an uncommon disorder of unknown aetiology, usually presenting in girls, which can be very disabling and difficult to treat. The affected parts of the body are usually painful and show vascular changes. The condition is allied to CRPS. Treatment with multidisciplinary approach including psychological measures and physiotherapy is more likely to be successful and may prevent unnecessary physical measures. PMID:18996036

  18. Dystonia and tremor following exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Klawans, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-seven railroad workers who were exposed to polychlorinated phenols, including dioxin (TCDD), during 1979 while cleaning up the chemical spillage following damage to a tank car filled with these chemicals were followed medically for the subsequent 6 years. Two committed suicide. The initial neurological complaints included a sense of fatigue and muscle aching, both of which have been reported in other individuals following dioxin exposure. On detailed neurological examination in December, 1985, 24 of 45 had dystonic writer's cramp and/or other action dystonias of the hands. None of the involved individuals had a family history of dystonia, and all 24 dated the onset of the dystonia to the first 2 to 3 years subsequent to their toxic exposure. The dystonias varied in severity but were usually mild. No other types of dystonic involvement were recognized. Thirty-five of the 45 individuals also manifested postural and terminal intention tremor which resembled benign essential tremor. None of the involved individuals had a family history of tremor, and all 35 of those affected dated the onset of the tremor to some time subsequent to their toxic exposure. Forty-three of 45 patients had histories and findings suggestive of peripheral neuropathy. This is the first report relating any type of dystonia to prior dioxin exposure and the first report relating action dystonia, such as dystonic writer's cramp, and postural/terminal intention tremor, to toxic exposure of any type.

  19. An interesting case of metabolic dystonia: L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Padma; Viswanathan, V; Chellathurai, Amarnath; Panigrahi, Debasis

    2014-01-01

    L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (L-2-HGA), a neurometabolic disorder caused by mutations in the L-2 hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (L-2-HGDH) gene, presents with psychomotor retardation, cerebellar ataxia, extrapyramidal symptoms, macrocephaly and seizures. Characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings include subcortical cerebral white matter abnormalities with T2 hyperintensities of the dentate nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen and caudate nucleus. The diagnosis can be confirmed by elevated urinary L-2 hydroxyglutaric acid and mutational analysis of the L-2-HGDH gene. We report two siblings with dystonia diagnosed by classical neuroimaging findings with elevated urinary 2 hydroxyglutaric acid. Riboflavin therapy has shown promising results in a subset of cases, thus highlighting the importance of making the diagnosis in these patients. PMID:24753671

  20. An interesting case of metabolic dystonia: L-2 hydroxyglutaric aciduria

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Padma; Viswanathan, V.; Chellathurai, Amarnath; Panigrahi, Debasis

    2014-01-01

    L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (L-2-HGA), a neurometabolic disorder caused by mutations in the L-2 hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (L-2-HGDH) gene, presents with psychomotor retardation, cerebellar ataxia, extrapyramidal symptoms, macrocephaly and seizures. Characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings include subcortical cerebral white matter abnormalities with T2 hyperintensities of the dentate nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen and caudate nucleus. The diagnosis can be confirmed by elevated urinary L-2 hydroxyglutaric acid and mutational analysis of the L-2-HGDH gene. We report two siblings with dystonia diagnosed by classical neuroimaging findings with elevated urinary 2 hydroxyglutaric acid. Riboflavin therapy has shown promising results in a subset of cases, thus highlighting the importance of making the diagnosis in these patients. PMID:24753671

  1. Sonographic Alteration of Basal Ganglia in Different Forms of Primary Focal Dystonia: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Ying-Chun; Sheng, Yu-Jing; Chen, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Cai-Shan; Ma, Qi; Chen, Han-Bing; Yu, Li-Fang; Mao, Cheng-Jie; Xiong, Kang-Ping; Luo, Wei-Feng; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Few studies have addressed whether abnormalities in the lenticular nucleus (LN) are characteristic transcranial sonography (TCS) echo features in patients with primary dystonia. This study aimed to explore alterations in the basal ganglia in different forms of primary focal dystonia. Methods: cross-sectional observational study was performed between December 2013 and December 2014 in 80 patients with different forms of primary focal dystonia and 55 neurologically normal control subjects. TCS was performed in patients and control subjects. Multiple comparisons of multiple rates were used to compare LN hyperechogenicity ratios between control and patient groups. Results: Thirteen individuals were excluded due to poor temporal bone windows, and two subjects were excluded due to disagreement in evaluation by sonologists. Totally, 70 patients (cervical dystonia, n = 30; blepharospasm, n = 30; oromandibular dystonia, n = 10) and 50 normal controls were included in the final analysis. LN hyperechogenicity was observed in 51% (36/70) of patients with primary focal dystonia, compared with 12% (6/50) of controls (P < 0.001). Substantia nigra hyperechogenicity did not differ between the two groups. LN hyperechogenicity was observed in 73% (22/30) of patients with cervical dystonia, a greater prevalence than in patients with blepharospasm (33%, 10/30, P = 0.002) and oromandibular dystonia (40%, 4/10, P = 0.126). LN hyperechogenicity was more frequently observed in patients with cervical dystonia compared with controls (73% vs. 12%, P < 0.001); however, no significant difference was detected in patients with blepharospasm (33% vs. 12%, P = 0.021) or oromandibular dystonia (40% vs. 12%, P = 0.088). Conclusions: LN hyperechogenicity is more frequently observed in patients with primary focal dystonia than in controls. It does not appear to be a characteristic TCS echo feature in patients with blepharospasm or oromandibular dystonia. PMID:27064039

  2. An osteoporotic fracture mimicking cervical dystonia in idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Caroline; Ronan, Lindsay; Sheridan, Ray; Pearce, Vaughan

    2013-09-01

    We report on a case of a 65-year-old (CD) woman who sustained an atraumatic neck fracture. A combination of Parkinson's disease with motor fluctuations, chronic cervical dystonia and osteoporosis provided the basis for this interesting diagnosis. Mrs CD had progressed to complex phase idiopathic Parkinson's disease within 13 years of diagnosis. During this time she remained independent, only using a wheelchair when her motor fluctuations were bad. In 2011, she developed a sudden onset of neck spasm and occipital neuralgia, initially attributed to severe spasmodic cervical dystonia. Despite a titration regime of analgesics and weaning off of her Parkinson's disease medications, the pain persisted. An X-ray of her cervical spine showed degenerative discopathies from C4 to C7. Mrs CD underwent a trial of Botox injections to no avail and she was admitted acutely under the spinal team after an MRI of her spine showed abnormal oedema of the odontoid peg. Subsequent CT diagnosed a type II fracture of the odontoid peg on the background of severe osteoporotic bone (spinal T score -3.4 on subsequent DEXA scan) and she underwent a successful occipital cervical fusion of C1-C6. What makes this case interesting is the fact that this lady's profound powerful neck movements on a background of osteoporosis led to fracture of her neck. Post-operatively, she admitted to non-adherence to her bisphosphonates, prioritising levodopa in the morning with food rather than taking her alendronate on an empty stomach. She is now pain free and receives annual zolendronate infusions. PMID:23672934

  3. [Psychogenic hand dystonia and hereditary polyneuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. A contribution to etiology of dystonias].

    PubMed

    Strenge, H; Speidel, H; Albert, E; Helbig, B

    1996-01-01

    We report on a case of a female who had developed a fixed flexion contracture of the 4th and 5th fingers of the right hand which was painless and at-rest right in the beginning at the age of 19. By means of neurographical examinations a hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies was established in her and her mother, which had clinically manifested with symptoms of the ulnar nerve at the affected hand. The dystonic symptoms did not show any progression within ten years follow-up. A remarkable feature of the course was the twice repeated occurrence of short, sudden and complete remissions immediately following invasive diagnostic procedures. The thorough discussion of differential diagnostic aspects and the analysis of the familiar situation and psychodynamics of the patient resulted in the diagnosis of a psychogenic hand dystonia. PMID:8850092

  4. Clinical and genetic features of cervical dystonia in a large multicenter cohort

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Satya R.; Xiao, Jianfeng; Thompson, Misty M.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Wright, Laura J.; Jinnah, H.A.; Rosen, Ami R.; Hedera, Peter; Comella, Cynthia L.; Weissbach, Anne; Junker, Johanna; Jankovic, Joseph; Barbano, Richard L.; Reich, Stephen G.; Rodriguez, Ramon L.; Berman, Brian D.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Severt, Lawrence; Agarwal, Pinky; Stover, Natividad P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the clinical and genetic features of cervical dystonia (CD). Methods: Participants enrolled in the Dystonia Coalition biorepository (NCT01373424) with initial manifestation as CD were included in this study (n = 1,000). Data intake included demographics, family history, and the Global Dystonia Rating Scale. Participants were screened for sequence variants (SVs) in GNAL, THAP1, and Exon 5 of TOR1A. Results: The majority of participants were Caucasian (95%) and female (75%). The mean age at onset and disease duration were 45.5 ± 13.6 and 14.6 ± 11.8 years, respectively. At the time of assessment, 68.5% had involvement limited to the neck, shoulder(s), and proximal arm(s), whereas 47.4% had dystonia limited to the neck. The remaining 31.5% of the individuals exhibited more extensive anatomical spread. A head tremor was noted in 62% of the patients. Head tremor and laryngeal dystonia were more common in females. Psychiatric comorbidities, mainly depression and anxiety, were reported by 32% of the participants and were more common in females. Family histories of dystonia, parkinsonian disorder, and tremor were present in 14%, 11%, and 29% of the patients, respectively. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic SVs in THAP1, TOR1A, and GNAL were identified in 8 participants (0.8%). Two individuals harbored novel missense SVs in Exon 5 of TOR1A. Synonymous and noncoding SVs in THAP1 and GNAL were identified in 4% of the cohort. Conclusions: Head tremor, laryngeal dystonia, and psychiatric comorbidities are more common in female participants with CD. Coding and noncoding variants in GNAL, THAP1, and TOR1A make small contributions to the pathogenesis of CD. PMID:27123488

  5. Altered sensorimotor activation patterns in idiopathic dystonia-an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional brain imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Løkkegaard, Annemette; Herz, Damian M; Haagensen, Brian N; Lorentzen, Anne K; Eickhoff, Simon B; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2016-02-01

    Dystonia is characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements or postures. Functional neuroimaging studies have yielded abnormal task-related sensorimotor activation in dystonia, but the results appear to be rather variable across studies. Further, study size was usually small including different types of dystonia. Here we performed an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies in patients with primary dystonia to test for convergence of dystonia-related alterations in task-related activity across studies. Activation likelihood estimates were based on previously reported regional maxima of task-related increases or decreases in dystonia patients compared to healthy controls. The meta-analyses encompassed data from 179 patients with dystonia reported in 18 functional neuroimaging studies using a range of sensorimotor tasks. Patients with dystonia showed bilateral increases in task-related activation in the parietal operculum and ventral postcentral gyrus as well as right middle temporal gyrus. Decreases in task-related activation converged in left supplementary motor area and left postcentral gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus and dorsal midbrain. Apart from the midbrain cluster, all between-group differences in task-related activity were retrieved in a sub-analysis including only the 14 studies on patients with focal dystonia. For focal dystonia, an additional cluster of increased sensorimotor activation emerged in the caudal cingulate motor zone. The results show that dystonia is consistently associated with abnormal somatosensory processing in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex along with abnormal sensorimotor activation of mesial premotor and right lateral temporal cortex. Hum Brain Mapp 37:547-557, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26549606

  6. Mouse model of rare TOR1A variant found in sporadic focal dystonia impairs domains affected in DYT1 dystonia patients and animal models.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Srishti L; Qiu, Sunny; Caffall, Zachary F; Wan, Yehong; Pan, Yuanji; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Wetsel, William C; Badea, Alexandra; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Calakos, Nicole

    2016-09-01

    Rare de novo mutations in genes associated with inherited Mendelian disorders are potential contributors to sporadic disease. DYT1 dystonia is an autosomal dominant, early-onset, generalized dystonia associated with an in-frame, trinucleotide deletion (n. delGAG, p. ΔE 302/303) in the Tor1a gene. Here we examine the significance of a rare missense variant in the Tor1a gene (c. 613T>A, p. F205I), previously identified in a patient with sporadic late-onset focal dystonia, by modeling it in mice. Homozygous F205I mice have motor impairment, reduced steady-state levels of TorsinA, altered corticostriatal synaptic plasticity, and prominent brain imaging abnormalities in areas associated with motor function. Thus, the F205I variant causes abnormalities in domains affected in people and/or mouse models with the DYT1 Tor1a mutation (ΔE). Our findings establish the pathological significance of the F205I Tor1a variant and provide a model with both etiological and phenotypic relevance to further investigate dystonia mechanisms. PMID:27168150

  7. A new knock-in mouse model of l-DOPA-responsive dystonia.

    PubMed

    Rose, Samuel J; Yu, Xin Y; Heinzer, Ann K; Harrast, Porter; Fan, Xueliang; Raike, Robert S; Thompson, Valerie B; Pare, Jean-Francois; Weinshenker, David; Smith, Yoland; Jinnah, Hyder A; Hess, Ellen J

    2015-10-01

    Abnormal dopamine neurotransmission is associated with many different genetic and acquired dystonic disorders. For instance, mutations in genes critical for the synthesis of dopamine, including GCH1 and TH cause l-DOPA-responsive dystonia. Despite evidence that implicates abnormal dopamine neurotransmission in dystonia, the precise nature of the pre- and postsynaptic defects that result in dystonia are not known. To better understand these defects, we generated a knock-in mouse model of l-DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD) mice that recapitulates the human p.381Q>K TH mutation (c.1141C>A). Mice homozygous for this mutation displayed the core features of the human disorder, including reduced TH activity, dystonia that worsened throughout the course of the active phase, and improvement in the dystonia in response to both l-DOPA and trihexyphenidyl. Although the gross anatomy of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons was normal in DRD mice, the microstructure of striatal synapses was affected whereby the ratio of axo-spinous to axo-dendritic corticostriatal synaptic contacts was reduced. Microinjection of l-DOPA directly into the striatum ameliorated the dystonic movements but cerebellar microinjections of l-DOPA had no effect. Surprisingly, the striatal dopamine concentration was reduced to ∼1% of normal, a concentration more typically associated with akinesia, suggesting that (mal)adaptive postsynaptic responses may also play a role in the development of dystonia. Administration of D1- or D2-like dopamine receptor agonists to enhance dopamine signalling reduced the dystonic movements, whereas administration of D1- or D2-like dopamine receptor antagonists to further reduce dopamine signalling worsened the dystonia, suggesting that both receptors mediate the abnormal movements. Further, D1-dopamine receptors were supersensitive; adenylate cyclase activity, locomotor activity and stereotypy were exaggerated in DRD mice in response to the D1-dopamine receptor agonist SKF

  8. Focal hand dystonia in musicians: phenomenology, etiology, and psychological trigger factors.

    PubMed

    Altenmüller, Eckart; Jabusch, Hans-Christian

    2009-01-01

    NARRATIVE REVIEW: Musician's dystonia is a task-specific movement disorder, which manifests itself as a loss of voluntary motor control in extensively trained movements. In many cases, the disorder terminates the careers of affected musicians. Approximately 1% of all professional musicians are affected. In the past, focal dystonia (FD) was classified as a psychological disorder. Over time, the problem was classified as a neurological problem. Although the specific pathophysiology of the disorder is still unclear, it appears the etiology is multifactorial. While there may be a family history, neurophysiological, physical, and environmental factors, trauma and stress contribute to the phenotypic development of FD. This manuscript analyzes the evidence supporting the potential contribution of the emotional brain systems in the etiology of focal hand dystonia in musicians. In addition, the psychological findings from a large descriptive study comparing healthy musicians, musicians with dystonia, and musicians with chronic pain. Information about psychogenic characteristics might be used to modify intervention strategies and music instruction to reduce the incidence of musician's dystonia. PMID:19278826

  9. Utilization and perceived effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine in patients with dystonia.

    PubMed

    Junker, Judith; Oberwittler, Christoph; Jackson, Didi; Berger, Klaus

    2004-02-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing worldwide, especially by patients with chronic diseases. To date, no data are available about utilization and perceived effectiveness of CAM in patients with dystonia. A questionnaire survey on utilization and costs of CAM was completed by 180 members of the German Dystonia Society, a patient advocate group. In total, 131 dystonia patients (73%) were current or former users of CAM, 55 patients used CAM in addition to botulinum toxin A injections, and 86 patients had experience with three or more CAM methods. The options used most widely were acupuncture (56%), relaxation techniques (44%), homeopathy (27%), and massages (26%). Among users of specific CAM methods, breathing therapy, Feldenkrais, massages, and relaxation techniques were perceived as most effective. On average, patients spent 1,513 Euro on CAM without reimbursement. There was no correlation between costs and perceived effectiveness of different methods. In line with other studies on chronically ill patients, our results show that dystonia patients frequently utilize CAM methods, often in addition to conventional treatment. There is a growing need to evaluate scientifically the effect of CAM methods on symptom severity and quality of life in dystonia, to prevent utilization of costly and ineffective CAM treatments. PMID:14978670

  10. Cervical dystonia: a disorder of the midbrain network for covert attentional orienting.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Michael; Isa, Tadashi; Molloy, Anna; Kimmich, Okka; Williams, Laura; Molloy, Fiona; Moore, Helena; Healy, Daniel G; Lynch, Tim; Walsh, Cathal; Butler, John; Reilly, Richard B; Walsh, Richard; O'Riordan, Sean

    2014-01-01

    While the pathogenesis of cervical dystonia remains unknown, recent animal and clinical experimental studies have indicated its probable mechanisms. Abnormal temporal discrimination is a mediational endophenotype of cervical dystonia and informs new concepts of disease pathogenesis. Our hypothesis is that both abnormal temporal discrimination and cervical dystonia are due to a disorder of the midbrain network for covert attentional orienting caused by reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibition, resulting, in turn, from as yet undetermined, genetic mutations. Such disinhibition is (a) subclinically manifested by abnormal temporal discrimination due to prolonged duration firing of the visual sensory neurons in the superficial laminae of the superior colliculus and (b) clinically manifested by cervical dystonia due to disinhibited burst activity of the cephalomotor neurons of the intermediate and deep laminae of the superior colliculus. Abnormal temporal discrimination in unaffected first-degree relatives of patients with cervical dystonia represents a subclinical manifestation of defective GABA activity both within the superior colliculus and from the substantia nigra pars reticulata. A number of experiments are required to prove or disprove this hypothesis. PMID:24803911

  11. Aggregation of Actin and Cofilin in Identical Twins with Juvenile-Onset Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Gearing, Marla; Juncos, Jorge L.; Procaccio, Vincent; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Marino-Rodriguez, Elaine M.; Gyure, Kymberly A.; Ono, Shoichiro; Santoianni, Robert; Krawiecki, Nicolas S.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Wainer, Bruce H.

    2005-01-01

    The neuropathology of the primary dystonias is not well understood. We examined brains from identical twins with DYT1-negative, dopa-unresponsive dystonia. The twins exhibited mild developmental delays until age 12 years when they began developing rapidly progressive generalized dystonia. Genetic, metabolic, and imaging studies ruled out known causes of dystonia. Cognition was subnormal but stable until the last few years. Death occurred at ages 21 and 22 years. The brains were macroscopically unremarkable. Microscopic examination showed unusual glial fibrillary acidic protein–immunoreactive astrocytes in multiple regions and iron accumulation in pallidal and nigral neurons. However, the most striking findings were 1) eosinophilic, rod-like cytoplasmic inclusions in neocortical and thalamic neurons that were actin depolymerizing factor/cofilin-immunoreactive but only rarely actin-positive; and 2) abundant eosinophilic spherical structures in the striatum that were strongly actin- and actin depolymerizing factor/cofilin-positive. Electron microscopy suggested that these structures represent degenerating neurons and processes; the accumulating filaments had the same dimensions as actin microfilaments. To our knowledge, aggregation of actin has not been reported previously as the predominant feature in any neurodegenerative disease. Thus, our findings may shed light on a novel neuropathological change associated with dystonia that may represent a new degenerative mechanism involving actin, a ubiquitous constituent of the cytoskeletal system. PMID:12325076

  12. Screening of GABA(A)-receptor gene mutations in primary dystonia.

    PubMed

    Shang, H; Lang, D; Burgunder, J-M; Kaelin-Lang, A

    2007-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that GABA-ergic neurotransmission plays a role in the pathogenesis of primary dystonia in humans. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that mutations in the GABRA1, GABRB3, and GABRG2 genes encoding the alpha1, beta3, and gamma subunits of the GABA(A) receptor are involved in familial primary dystonia. All exons and exon-intron boundaries of the above genes were amplified by PCR from genomic DNA in 28 patients who had primary dystonia and a positive family history but had no mutation in any other genes known to be involved in primary dystonia. The PCR products were analyzed by single strand conformation polymorphism followed by sequencing of variant conformers compared with normal controls (n = 54). We found no mutations in these genes. We did, however, find a new polymorphism, 559 + 80G>A in intron 5 of GABRA1, and we also confirmed several that were previously reported, including 315C>T in exon 3 and 588C>T in exon 5 of GABRG2, but there were no significant differences between controls and patients in the allele and genotype frequencies of these polymorphisms. In conclusion, mutations of GABRA1, GABRB3, and GABRG2 appear not to play a major role in the development of familial primary dystonia. PMID:17880575

  13. Effects of two weeks of cerebellar theta burst stimulation in cervical dystonia patients.

    PubMed

    Koch, Giacomo; Porcacchia, Paolo; Ponzo, Viviana; Carrillo, Fatima; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Brusa, Livia; Desiato, Maria Teresa; Arciprete, Flavio; Di Lorenzo, Francesco; Pisani, Antonio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Palomar, Francisco J; Mir, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia is generally regarded as a disorder of the basal ganglia and their efferent connections to the thalamus and brainstem, but an important role of cerebellar-thalamo-cortical (CTC) circuits in the pathophysiology of dystonia has been invoked. Here in a sham controlled trial, we tested the effects of two-weeks of cerebellar continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) in a sample of cervical dystonia (CD) patients. Clinical evaluations were performed by administering the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) and the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS). We used TMS to measure the inhibitory connectivity between the cerebellum and the contralateral motor cortex (cerebellar brain inhibition [CBI]), and the excitability of the contralateral primary motor cortex assessing intracortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF) and cortical silent period (CSP). Paired associative stimulation (PAS) was tested to evaluate the level and the topographical specificity of cortical plasticity, which is abnormally enhanced and non-focal in CD patients. Two weeks of cerebellar stimulation resulted in a small but significant clinical improvement as measured by the TWSTRS of approximately 15%. Cerebellar stimulation modified the CBI circuits and reduced the heterotopic PAS potentiation, leading to a normal pattern of topographic specific induced plasticity. These data provide novel evidence CTC circuits could be a potential target to partially control some dystonic symptoms in patients with cervical dystonia. PMID:24881805

  14. Explicit Agency in Patients with Cervical Dystonia: Altered Recognition of Temporal Discrepancies between Motor Actions and Their Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Cécile; Roze, Emmanuel; Grabli, David; Mayer, Jean-Michel; Degos, Bertrand; Vidailhet, Marie; Worbe, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Background Abnormalities in the cognitive processing of movement have been demonstrated in patients with dystonia. The sense of agency, which is the experience of initiating and controlling one’s own actions, has never before been studied in these patients. Objectives We investigated whether the sense of agency is altered in patients with cervical dystonia. Methods We used an explicit metacognitive agency task in which participants had to catch targets with a cursor by moving a computer’s mouse. The task included several conditions in which the control over the cursor could be disrupted by adding a spatial or a temporal discrepancy between the mouse and the cursor’s movements. Participants had to acknowledge these discrepancies and reflect them in metacognitive judgements of agency. Results Twenty cervical dystonia patients and 20 matched controls were included in the study. Despite performing equally well as the matched controls, cervical dystonia patients did not fully recognize alterations of agency when a temporal lag was added between their movement and the visual feedback. Moreover, they relied predominantly on their perceived performance to provide judgements of agency and less on their objective degree of controls. There was no correlation between agency scores and clinical severity of dystonia measured by the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale. Conclusion We demonstrated an abnormal processing of agency in cervical dystonia patients, even for motor actions not affected by dystonia. The exact contribution of abnormal agency to dystonia pathophysiology remains to be clarified. PMID:27575487

  15. Why are voluntary head movements in cervical dystonia slow?

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Wong, Aaron; Zee, David S.; Jinnah, H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rapid head movements associated with a change in fixation (head saccades) have been reported to be slow in cervical dystonia (CD). Such slowing is typically measured as an increase in time to complete a movement. The mechanisms responsible for this slowing are poorly understood. Methods We measured head saccades in 11 CD patients and 11 healthy subjects using a magnetic search coil technique. Results Head saccades in CD took longer to reach a desired target location. This longer duration was due to multiple pauses in the trajectory of the head movement. The head velocity of each segment of the (interrupted) head movement was appropriate for the desired total movement amplitude. The head velocity was, however, higher for the amplitude of the individual interrupted movements. These results suggest that brain programs the proper head movement amplitude, but the movement is interrupted by pathological pauses. Conclusion Voluntary head saccades have a longer duration in CD due to frequent pauses. The frequent pauses reflect pathological interruptions of normally programmed intended head movement. PMID:25818535

  16. Neuroimaging characteristics of patients with focal hand dystonia.

    PubMed

    Hinkley, Leighton B N; Webster, Rebecca L; Byl, Nancy N; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2009-01-01

    NARRATIVE REVIEW: Advances in structural and functional imaging have provided both scientists and clinicians with information about the neural mechanisms underlying focal hand dystonia (FHd), a motor disorder associated with aberrant posturing and patterns of muscle contraction specific to movements of the hand. Consistent with the hypothesis that FHd is the result of reorganization in cortical fields, studies in neuroimaging have confirmed alterations in the topography and response properties of somatosensory and motor areas of the brain. Noninvasive stimulation of these regions also demonstrates that FHd may be due to reductions in inhibition between competing sensory and motor representations. Compromises in neuroanatomical structure, such as white matter density and gray matter volume, have also been identified through neuroimaging methods. These advances in neuroimaging have provided clinicians with an expanded understanding of the changes in the brain that contribute to FHd. These findings should provide a foundation for the development of retraining paradigms focused on reversing overlapping sensory representations and interactions between brain regions in patients with FHd. Continued collaborations between health professionals who treat FHd and research scientists who examine the brain using neuroimaging tools are imperative for answering difficult questions about patients with specific movement disorders. PMID:19217255

  17. The costs and benefits of deep brain stimulation surgery for patients with dystonia: an initial exploration.

    PubMed

    Yianni, John; Green, Alexander L; McIntosh, Emma; Bittar, Richard G; Joint, Carol; Scott, Richard; Gregory, Ralph; Bain, Peter G; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2005-07-01

    Objectives.  To perform a preliminary cost-utility and cost-benefit of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the treatment of dystonia, Materials and Methods.  We conducted a prospective study of 26 patients undergoing DBS for the treatment of dystonia. We performed a cost-utility analysis using the Euroquol (EQ-5D) questionnaire. A cost-benefit analysis used the willingness-to-pay principle and costs of treatment were calculated retrospectively in order to calculate the cost-benefit. Results.  We found that the EQ-5D score improved from 29 to 76.2 points after surgery, an incremental utility of 0.47. There was an overall gain of 0.94 quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) with a cost of £33,980 per QALY. Conclusions.  DBS for dystonia, while an expensive treatment, compares favorably to therapies that are commonly used for other conditions. PMID:22151484

  18. Clinical and Neurophysiological Improvement of SGCE Myoclonus-Dystonia with GPi Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kurtis, Monica M; San Luciano, Marta; Yu, Qiping; Goodman, Robert R; Ford, Blair; Raymond, Deborah; Pullman, Seth

    2009-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is characterized by early onset myoclonus and dystonia. It is thought to be subcortical in origin. Response to oral medications may be incomplete, such that deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery to the globus pallidum interna (GPi) or ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (VIM) may be considered. The optimal site is not known. The physiology and surgical response for a 63 year-old woman who underwent GPi DBS for M-D with onset at age 2 and related to a mutation in the epsilon-sarcoglycan gene (SGCE) is described. She showed excellent clinical and neurophysiological improvement of both myoclonus and dystonia, suggesting that modulation by DBS is effective even after long disease duration and only partial response to oral medications. PMID:19896264

  19. Precise Muscle Selection Using Dynamic Polyelectromyography for Treatment of Post-stroke Dystonia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia has a wide range of causes, but treatment of dystonia is limited to minimizing the symptoms as there is yet no successful treatment for its cause. One of the optimal treatment methods for dystonia is chemodenervation using botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A), alcohol injection, etc., but its success depends on how precisely the dystonic muscle is selected. Here, we reported a successful experience in a 49-year-old post-stroke female patient who showed paroxysmal repetitive contractions involving the right leg, which may be of dystonic nature. BTX-A and alcohol were injected into the muscles which were identified by dynamic polyelectromyography. After injection, the dystonic muscle spasm, cramping pain, and the range of motion of the affected lower limb improved markedly, and she was able to walk independently indoors. In such a case, dynamic polyelectromyography may be a useful method for selecting the dominant dystonic muscles. PMID:27446795

  20. Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation in children with dystonia: a sham-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Young, Scott J; Bertucco, Matteo; Sanger, Terence D

    2014-02-01

    Increased motor cortex excitability is a common finding in dystonia, and transcranial direct current stimulation can reduce motor cortex excitability. In an earlier study, we found that cathodal direct-current stimulation decreased motor overflow for some children with dystonia. To investigate this observation further, we performed a sham-controlled, double-blind, crossover study of 14 children with dystonia. We found a significant reduction in overflow following real stimulation, when participants performed the experimental task with the hand contralateral to the cathode. While these results suggest that cathodal stimulation may help some children to reduce involuntary overflow, the size of the effect is small. Further research will need to investigate ways to increase the magnitude of the effect of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation. PMID:23760989

  1. Eligibility Criteria for Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease, Tremor, and Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Munhoz, Renato P; Picillo, Marina; Fox, Susan H; Bruno, Veronica; Panisset, Michel; Honey, Christopher R; Fasano, Alfonso

    2016-07-01

    In this review, the available evidence to guide clinicians regarding eligibility for deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the main conditions in which these forms of therapy are generally indicated-Parkinson's disease (PD), tremor, and dystonia-is presented. In general, the literature shows that DBS is effective for PD, essential tremor, and idiopathic dystonia. In these cases, key points in patient selection must include the level of disability and inability to manage symptoms using the best available medical therapy. Results are, however, still not optimal when dealing with other aetiologies, such as secondary tremors and symptomatic dystonia. Also, in PD, issues such as age and neuropsychiatric profile are still debatable parameters. Overall, currently available literature is able to guide physicians on basic aspects of patient selection and indications for DBS; however, a few points are still debatable and controversial. These issues should be refined and clarified in future studies. PMID:27139127

  2. Subthalamic local field potentials in Parkinson's disease and isolated dystonia: An evaluation of potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Doris D; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Qasim, Salman E; Miller, Andrew M; Ostrem, Jill L; Galifianakis, Nicholas B; San Luciano, Marta; Starr, Philip A

    2016-05-01

    Local field potentials (LFP) recorded from the subthalamic nucleus in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) demonstrate prominent oscillations in the beta (13-30Hz) frequency range, and reduction of beta band spectral power by levodopa and deep brain stimulation (DBS) is correlated with motor symptom improvement. Several features of beta activity have been theorized to be specific biomarkers of the parkinsonian state, though these have rarely been studied in non-parkinsonian conditions. To compare resting state LFP features in PD and isolated dystonia and evaluate disease-specific biomarkers, we recorded subthalamic LFPs from 28 akinetic-rigid PD and 12 isolated dystonia patients during awake DBS implantation. Spectral power and phase-amplitude coupling characteristics were analyzed. In 26/28 PD and 11/12 isolated dystonia patients, the LFP power spectrum had a peak in the beta frequency range, with similar amplitudes between groups. Resting state power did not differ between groups in the theta (5-8Hz), alpha (8-12Hz), beta (13-30Hz), broadband gamma (50-200Hz), or high frequency oscillation (HFO, 250-350Hz) bands. Analysis of phase-amplitude coupling between low frequency phase and HFO amplitude revealed significant interactions in 19/28 PD and 6/12 dystonia recordings without significant differences in maximal coupling or preferred phase. Two features of subthalamic LFPs that have been proposed as specific parkinsonian biomarkers, beta power and coupling of beta phase to HFO amplitude, were also present in isolated dystonia, including focal dystonias. This casts doubt on the utility of these metrics as disease-specific diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:26884091

  3. Long-term neuropsychiatric outcomes after pallidal stimulation in primary and secondary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Meoni, Sara; Zurowski, Mateusz; Lozano, Andres M.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Poon, Yu-Yan; Fallis, Melanie; Voon, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate changes in the diagnosis of Axis I psychiatric disorders in patients with primary and secondary dystonia after deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus internus (GPi). Methods: Structured Clinical Interviews for the DSM-IV, Axis I psychiatric disorders, were prospectively performed before and after surgery. Diagnoses were made based on DSM-IV criteria. Psychiatric disorders were grouped into 5 categories: mood, anxiety, addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorders, and psychosis. Patients could be stratified to more than one category. Rates for unchanged diagnoses, diagnoses in remission, and new-onset diagnoses after surgery for each category were calculated. Results: Fifty-seven patients with primary and secondary dystonia were included. Mean ± SD age at surgery and dystonia duration at time of surgery was 50.6 ± 13.8 and 19.0 ± 13.2 years, respectively. Preoperatively, 37 Axis I diagnoses were made in 25 patients, 43.8% of those presenting with at least 1 Axis I diagnosis (mostly mood and anxiety disorders). Mean ± SD duration of psychiatric follow-up was 24.4 ± 19.6 months. Overall, after surgery no significant changes (p = 0.16) were found in Axis I diagnoses (23 patients, 40.3%): 27 (73%) unchanged, 10 (27%) in complete remission, and 4 (12.9%) new-onset diagnoses. Conclusions: Our results support the overall psychiatric stability of patients with primary and secondary dystonia treated with GPi DBS. However, considering the high psychiatric morbidity in the dystonia population, psychiatric assessments before and after surgery are strongly recommended. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that GPi DBS does not change Axis I psychiatric diagnoses in patients with primary and secondary dystonia. PMID:26156506

  4. Genomewide association study in cervical dystonia demonstrates possible association with sodium leak channel

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Kin Y; Schneider, Susanne A; Trabzuni, Daniah; Stamelou, Maria; Edwards, Mark; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Silverdale, Monty; Hardy, John; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2014-01-01

    Dystonia is a common movement disorder. A number of monogenic causes have been identified. However, the majority of dystonia cases are not explained by single gene defects. Cervical dystonia is one of the commonest forms without genetic causes identified. This pilot study aimed to identify large effect-size risk loci in cervical dystonia. A genomewide association study (GWAS) was performed. British resident cervical dystonia patients of European descent were genotyped using the Illumina-610-Quad. Comparison was made with controls of European descent from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium using logistic regression algorithm from PLINK. SNPs not genotyped by the array were imputed with 1000 Genomes Project data using the MaCH algorithm and minimac. Postimputation analysis was done with the mach2dat algorithm using a logistic regression model. After quality control measures, 212 cases were compared with 5173 controls. No single SNP passed the genomewide significant level of 5 × 10−8 in the analysis of genotyped SNP in PLINK. Postimputation, there were 5 clusters of SNPs that had P value <5 × 10−6, and the best cluster of SNPs was found near exon 1 of NALCN, (sodium leak channel) with P = 9.76 × 10−7. Several potential regions were found in the GWAS and imputation analysis. The lowest P value was found in NALCN. Dysfunction of this ion channel is a plausible cause for dystonia. Further replication in another cohort is needed to confirm this finding. We make this data publicly available to encourage further analyses of this disorder. PMID:24227479

  5. [Thermography in healthy subjects and in the syndrome of vegetative-vascular dystonia].

    PubMed

    Solov'eva, A D; Kolosova, O A; Loseva, M M; Mindlina, G E; Ginzburg, L I

    1985-01-01

    The effectiveness and information content of thermography were studied in 20 normal subjects and 40 patients with vegetative vascular dystonia. There were some individuals in the control group who had "thermal amputation" and who also had some specific features of psychovegetative nature. Patients with vegetative vascular dystonia, apart from the syndrome of "thermoamputation" observed in a great number of cases, particularly in neurotic patients, had other types of skin temperature distribution as well. Thus, patients with hypothalamic insufficiency presented with hyperthermia of the distal portions of the extremities and asymmetry. PMID:4024817

  6. Acute Dystonia in a Patient with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Maillis, Antonis; Maltezou, Maria; Tsiori, Sofia; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C.

    2015-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (di George syndrome) is one of the most prevalent genetic disorders. The clinical features of the syndrome are distinct facial appearance, velopharyngeal insufficiency, conotruncal heart disease, parathyroid and immune dysfunction; however, little is known about possible neurodegenerative diseases. We describe the case of an 18-year old patient suffering from 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Since adolescence, he presented with behavioral disorders, recommended treatment with 2 mg aloperidin and he presented cervical dystonia and emergence of torticollis and trunk dystonia. Antipsychotic medications either accelerate or reveal dystonic symptoms. PMID:26605035

  7. Brain Metabolic Changes of Cervical Dystonia with Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 1 after Botulinum Toxin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Akio; Takeda, Atsushi; Sugeno, Naoto; Miura, Emiko; Kato, Kazuhiro; Hasegawa, Takafumi; Baba, Toru; Konno, Masatoshi; Oshima, Ryuji; Watanuki, Shoichi; Hiraoka, Kotaro; Tashiro, Manabu; Aoki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We occasionally observe long-term remission of cervical dystonia after several botulinum toxin treatments. However, botulinum toxin transiently acts on neuromuscular junctions. We herein report that a cervical dystonia patient with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 could have long-term remission as a result of the depression of hypermetabolism in the bilateral putamen and primary sensorimotor cortex after botulinum toxin therapy. We suggest that botulinum toxin impacts the central nervous system, causing prolonged improvement through the normalization of basal ganglia circuits in addition to its effects at neuromuscular junctions. PMID:27432104

  8. Asymmetric pallidal neuronal activity in patients with cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Moll, Christian K E; Galindo-Leon, Edgar; Sharott, Andrew; Gulberti, Alessandro; Buhmann, Carsten; Koeppen, Johannes A; Biermann, Maxine; Bäumer, Tobias; Zittel, Simone; Westphal, Manfred; Gerloff, Christian; Hamel, Wolfgang; Münchau, Alexander; Engel, Andreas K

    2014-01-01

    The origin of asymmetric clinical manifestation of symptoms in patients suffering from cervical dystonia (CD) is hitherto poorly understood. Dysregulated neuronal activity in the basal ganglia has been suggested to have a role in the pathophysiology of CD. Here, we re-assessed the question to what extent relative changes occur in the direct vs. indirect basal ganglia pathway in CD, whether these circuit changes are lateralized, and how these alterations relate to CD symptoms. To this end, we recorded ongoing single cell and local field potential (LFP) activity from the external (GPe) and internal pallidal segment (GPi) of 13 CD patients undergoing microelectrode-guided stereotactic surgery for deep brain stimulation in the GPi. We compared pallidal recordings from CD patients operated under local anaesthesia (LA) with those obtained in CD patients operated under general anaesthesia (GA). In awake patients, mean GPe discharge rate (52 Hz) was lower than that of GPi (72 Hz). Mean GPi discharge ipsilateral to the side of head turning was higher than contralateral and correlated with torticollis symptom severity. Lateralized differences were absent at the level of the GPe and in recordings from patients operated under GA. Furthermore, in the GPi of CD patients there was a subpopulation of theta-oscillatory cells with unique bursting characteristics. Power and coherence of GPe- and GPi-LFPs were dominated by a theta peak and also exhibited band-specific interhemispheric differences. Strong cross-frequency coupling of low-gamma amplitude to theta phase was a feature of pallidal LFPs recorded under LA, but not GA. These results indicate that CD is associated with an asymmetric pallidal outflow. Based on the finding of symmetric neuronal discharges in the GPe, we propose that an imbalanced interhemispheric direct pathway gain may be involved in CD pathophysiology. PMID:24574981

  9. Recessive Mutations in the α3 (VI) Collagen Gene COL6A3 Cause Early-Onset Isolated Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Zech, Michael; Lam, Daniel D.; Francescatto, Ludmila; Schormair, Barbara; Salminen, Aaro V.; Jochim, Angela; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Lochmüller, Hanns; Strom, Tim M.; Haslinger, Bernhard; Katsanis, Nicholas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    Isolated dystonia is a disorder characterized by involuntary twisting postures arising from sustained muscle contractions. Although autosomal-dominant mutations in TOR1A, THAP1, and GNAL have been found in some cases, the molecular mechanisms underlying isolated dystonia are largely unknown. In addition, although emphasis has been placed on dominant isolated dystonia, the disorder is also transmitted as a recessive trait, for which no mutations have been defined. Using whole-exome sequencing in a recessive isolated dystonia-affected kindred, we identified disease-segregating compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3, a collagen VI gene associated previously with muscular dystrophy. Genetic screening of a further 367 isolated dystonia subjects revealed two additional recessive pedigrees harboring compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3. Strikingly, all affected individuals had at least one pathogenic allele in exon 41, including an exon-skipping mutation that induced an in-frame deletion. We tested the hypothesis that disruption of this exon is pathognomonic for isolated dystonia by inducing a series of in-frame deletions in zebrafish embryos. Consistent with our human genetics data, suppression of the exon 41 ortholog caused deficits in axonal outgrowth, whereas suppression of other exons phenocopied collagen deposition mutants. All recessive mutation carriers demonstrated early-onset segmental isolated dystonia without muscular disease. Finally, we show that Col6a3 is expressed in neurons, with relevant mRNA levels detectable throughout the adult mouse brain. Taken together, our data indicate that loss-of-function mutations affecting a specific region of COL6A3 cause recessive isolated dystonia with underlying neurodevelopmental deficits and highlight the brain extracellular matrix as a contributor to dystonia pathogenesis. PMID:26004199

  10. Recessive mutations in the α3 (VI) collagen gene COL6A3 cause early-onset isolated dystonia.

    PubMed

    Zech, Michael; Lam, Daniel D; Francescatto, Ludmila; Schormair, Barbara; Salminen, Aaro V; Jochim, Angela; Wieland, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Peters, Annette; Gieger, Christian; Lochmüller, Hanns; Strom, Tim M; Haslinger, Bernhard; Katsanis, Nicholas; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2015-06-01

    Isolated dystonia is a disorder characterized by involuntary twisting postures arising from sustained muscle contractions. Although autosomal-dominant mutations in TOR1A, THAP1, and GNAL have been found in some cases, the molecular mechanisms underlying isolated dystonia are largely unknown. In addition, although emphasis has been placed on dominant isolated dystonia, the disorder is also transmitted as a recessive trait, for which no mutations have been defined. Using whole-exome sequencing in a recessive isolated dystonia-affected kindred, we identified disease-segregating compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3, a collagen VI gene associated previously with muscular dystrophy. Genetic screening of a further 367 isolated dystonia subjects revealed two additional recessive pedigrees harboring compound heterozygous mutations in COL6A3. Strikingly, all affected individuals had at least one pathogenic allele in exon 41, including an exon-skipping mutation that induced an in-frame deletion. We tested the hypothesis that disruption of this exon is pathognomonic for isolated dystonia by inducing a series of in-frame deletions in zebrafish embryos. Consistent with our human genetics data, suppression of the exon 41 ortholog caused deficits in axonal outgrowth, whereas suppression of other exons phenocopied collagen deposition mutants. All recessive mutation carriers demonstrated early-onset segmental isolated dystonia without muscular disease. Finally, we show that Col6a3 is expressed in neurons, with relevant mRNA levels detectable throughout the adult mouse brain. Taken together, our data indicate that loss-of-function mutations affecting a specific region of COL6A3 cause recessive isolated dystonia with underlying neurodevelopmental deficits and highlight the brain extracellular matrix as a contributor to dystonia pathogenesis. PMID:26004199

  11. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation to the cerebellum improves handwriting and cyclic drawing kinematics in focal hand dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bradnam, Lynley V.; Graetz, Lynton J.; McDonnell, Michelle N.; Ridding, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the cerebellum has a role in the pathophysiology of primary focal hand dystonia and might provide an intervention target for non-invasive brain stimulation to improve function of the affected hand. The primary objective of this study was to determine if cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) improves handwriting and cyclic drawing kinematics in people with hand dystonia, by reducing cerebellar-brain inhibition (CBI) evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Eight people with dystonia (5 writer’s dystonia, 3 musician’s dystonia) and eight age-matched controls completed the study and underwent cerebellar anodal, cathodal and sham tDCS in separate sessions. Dystonia severity was assessed using the Writer’s Cramp Rating Scale (WRCS) and the Arm Dystonia Disability Scale (ADDS). The kinematic measures that differentiated the groups were; mean stroke frequency during handwriting and fast cyclic drawing and average pen pressure during light cyclic drawing. TMS measures of cortical excitability were no different between people with FHD and controls. There was a moderate, negative relationship between TMS-evoked CBI at baseline and the WRCS in dystonia. Anodal cerebellar tDCS reduced handwriting mean stroke frequency and average pen pressure, and increased speed and reduced pen pressure during fast cyclic drawing. Kinematic measures were not associated with a decrease in CBI within an individual. In conclusion, cerebellar anodal tDCS appeared to improve kinematics of handwriting and circle drawing tasks; but the underlying neurophysiological mechanism remains uncertain. A study in a larger homogeneous population is needed to further investigate the possible therapeutic benefit of cerebellar tDCS in dystonia. PMID:26042019

  12. Multitarget Multiscale Simulation for Pharmacological Treatment of Dystonia in Motor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Neymotin, Samuel A.; Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Lakatos, Peter; Sanger, Terence D.; Lytton, William W.

    2016-01-01

    A large number of physiomic pathologies can produce hyperexcitability in cortex. Depending on severity, cortical hyperexcitability may manifest clinically as a hyperkinetic movement disorder or as epilpesy. We focus here on dystonia, a movement disorder that produces involuntary muscle contractions and involves pathology in multiple brain areas including basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, and sensory and motor cortices. Most research in dystonia has focused on basal ganglia, while much pharmacological treatment is provided directly at muscles to prevent contraction. Motor cortex is another potential target for therapy that exhibits pathological dynamics in dystonia, including heightened activity and altered beta oscillations. We developed a multiscale model of primary motor cortex, ranging from molecular, up to cellular, and network levels, containing 1715 compartmental model neurons with multiple ion channels and intracellular molecular dynamics. We wired the model based on electrophysiological data obtained from mouse motor cortex circuit mapping experiments. We used the model to reproduce patterns of heightened activity seen in dystonia by applying independent random variations in parameters to identify pathological parameter sets. These models demonstrated degeneracy, meaning that there were many ways of obtaining the pathological syndrome. There was no single parameter alteration which would consistently distinguish pathological from physiological dynamics. At higher dimensions in parameter space, we were able to use support vector machines to distinguish the two patterns in different regions of space and thereby trace multitarget routes from dystonic to physiological dynamics. These results suggest the use of in silico models for discovery of multitarget drug cocktails. PMID:27378922

  13. Mutations in ANO3 Cause Dominant Craniocervical Dystonia: Ion Channel Implicated in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Gavin; Plagnol, Vincent; Holmström, Kira M.; Bras, Jose; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Preza, Elisavet; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Ryten, Mina; Schneider, Susanne A.; Stamelou, Maria; Trabzuni, Daniah; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we combined linkage analysis with whole-exome sequencing of two individuals to identify candidate causal variants in a moderately-sized UK kindred exhibiting autosomal-dominant inheritance of craniocervical dystonia. Subsequent screening of these candidate causal variants in a large number of familial and sporadic cases of cervical dystonia led to the identification of a total of six putatively pathogenic mutations in ANO3, a gene encoding a predicted Ca2+-gated chloride channel that we show to be highly expressed in the striatum. Functional studies using Ca2+ imaging in case and control fibroblasts demonstrated clear abnormalities in endoplasmic-reticulum-dependent Ca2+ signaling. We conclude that mutations in ANO3 are a cause of autosomal-dominant craniocervical dystonia. The locus DYT23 has been reserved as a synonym for this gene. The implication of an ion channel in the pathogenesis of dystonia provides insights into an alternative mechanism that opens fresh avenues for further research. PMID:23200863

  14. Abnormal surround inhibition does not affect asymptomatic limbs in people with cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Laura; Kiernan, Dovin; Kiss, Zelma H T; Suchowersky, Oksana; Welsh, Timothy N

    2015-09-14

    Surround inhibition is a neural mechanism hypothesized to facilitate goal-directed action by disinhibiting agonist muscle activity while simultaneously inhibiting antagonist and other uninvolved muscle activity. The present study was designed to investigate if abnormalities in surround inhibition are found in asymptomatic body parts (the hand) of people with focal cervical dystonia (neck). Participants with (n=7) and without (n=17) cervical dystonia completed a protocol in which they abducted their index finger while EMG was recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (agonist) and abductor digiti minimi (uninvolved) muscles. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered over the primary motor cortex at intervals ranging from 0 to 950+ms after the onset of agonist muscle activity. Motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes from both muscles were compared. In control participants, MEPs from the uninvolved muscle were significantly lower than agonist MEPs at intervals from 0 to 480ms. Similarly, in the hands of participants with cervical dystonia - the asymptomatic body part - MEPs from the uninvolved muscle were significantly lower than agonist MEPs from 0 to 175ms. These findings suggest that surround inhibition in people with focal dystonia may be intact in asymptomatic hands. In other words, abnormalities in surround inhibition may be restricted to the dystonic limb. PMID:26219986

  15. Dystonia an unusual presentation in pediatric moyamoya disease: Imaging findings of a case.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Sudhir; Jhobta, Anupam; Sood, Ram Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebrovascular disease characterized by idiopathic occlusion of bilateral internal carotid arteries and the development of characteristic leptomeningeal collateral vessels along anterior or posterior circulation. We present an unusual case of MMD presenting with generalized dystonia as the predominant manifestation. PMID:27606018

  16. Pallidal stimulation for primary generalised dystonia: effect on cognition, mood and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi, Marjan; Torkamani, Mariam; Beigi, Mazda; Wilkinson, Leonora; Page, Donna; Madeley, Laura; Bhatia, Kailash; Hariz, Marwan; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Ruge, Diane; Tisch, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of pallidal deep brain stimulation (GPi-DBS) in dystonia on cognition, mood, and quality of life and also assessed if DYT1 gene status influenced cognitive outcome following GPi-DBS. Fourteen patients with primary generalized dystonia (PGD) were assessed, measuring their estimated premorbid and current IQ, memory for words and faces, and working memory, language, executive function, and sustained attention, one month before and one year or more after surgery. Changes in mood and behaviour and quality of life were also assessed. There was a significant improvement of dystonia with GPi-DBS (69 % improvement in Burke-Fahn-Marsden score, p < 0.0001). Performance on five cognitive tests either improved or declined at post-surgical follow-up. Calculation of a reliable change index suggested that deterioration in sustained attention on the PASAT was the only reliable change (worse after surgery) in cognition with GPi-DBS. DYT1 gene status did not influence cognitive outcome following GPi-DBS. Depression, anxiety and apathy were not significantly altered, and ratings of health status on the EQ5D remained unchanged. In our sample, GPi-DBS was only associated with an isolated deficit on a test of sustained attention, confirming that GPi-DBS in PGD is clinically effective and safe, without adverse effects on the main domains of cognitive function. The dissociation between GPi-DBS improving dystonia, but not having a significant positive impact on the patients' QoL, warrants further investigation. PMID:24178706

  17. Apparent G syndrome presenting as neck and upper limb dystonia and severe gastroesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Williams, C A; Frias, J L

    1987-10-01

    We have studied a 3-month-old boy with severe gastroesophageal reflux, feeding difficulties, neck and upper limb dystonia, abnormal ears, normal genitalia, and anatomically apparently normal larynx and trachea. Initially diagnosed as suffering from Sandifer "syndrome," he was treated with a gastrostomy and Nissen fundoplication. However, his characteristic facial appearance subsequently led to the diagnosis of G syndrome. PMID:3425612

  18. Improvement of Isolated Myoclonus Phenotype in Myoclonus Dystonia after Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ramdhani, Ritesh A.; Frucht, Steven J.; Behnegar, Anousheh; Kopell, Brian H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Myoclonus–dystonia is a condition that manifests predominantly as myoclonic jerks with focal dystonia. It is genetically heterogeneous with most mutations in the epsilon sarcoglycan gene (SGCE). In medically refractory cases, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to provide marked sustainable clinical improvement, especially in SGCE-positive patients. We present two patients with myoclonus–dystonia (one SGCE positive and the other SGCE negative) who have the isolated myoclonus phenotype and had DBS leads implanted in the bilateral globus pallidus internus (GPi). Methods We review their longitudinal Unified Myoclonus Rating Scale scores along with their DBS programming parameters and compare them with published cases in the literature. Results Both patients demonstrated complete amelioration of all aspects of myoclonus within 6–12 months after surgery. The patient with the SGCE-negative mutation responded just as well as the patient who was SGCE positive. High-frequency stimulation (130 Hz) with amplitudes greater than 2.5 V provided therapeutic benefit. Discussion This case series demonstrates that high frequency GPi-DBS is effective in treating isolated myoclonus in myoclonus–dystonia, regardless of the presence of SGCE mutation. PMID:26989574

  19. Therapeutic immobilisation for small guitar player’s dystonia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Waissman, Flavia; Pereira, João Santos; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M

    2009-01-01

    The development of focal hand dystonia through repetitive tasks is a result of degradation of cortical somatosensory representation due to repetitive fast stimuli sufficient to alter the sensory-motor stimulus, harming the motor control. A sensory-motor training program can modify this disorder. A behavioural intervention focusing on movement could help reduce or eliminate these conditions. PMID:21686815

  20. Multitarget Multiscale Simulation for Pharmacological Treatment of Dystonia in Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Neymotin, Samuel A; Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Lakatos, Peter; Sanger, Terence D; Lytton, William W

    2016-01-01

    A large number of physiomic pathologies can produce hyperexcitability in cortex. Depending on severity, cortical hyperexcitability may manifest clinically as a hyperkinetic movement disorder or as epilpesy. We focus here on dystonia, a movement disorder that produces involuntary muscle contractions and involves pathology in multiple brain areas including basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, and sensory and motor cortices. Most research in dystonia has focused on basal ganglia, while much pharmacological treatment is provided directly at muscles to prevent contraction. Motor cortex is another potential target for therapy that exhibits pathological dynamics in dystonia, including heightened activity and altered beta oscillations. We developed a multiscale model of primary motor cortex, ranging from molecular, up to cellular, and network levels, containing 1715 compartmental model neurons with multiple ion channels and intracellular molecular dynamics. We wired the model based on electrophysiological data obtained from mouse motor cortex circuit mapping experiments. We used the model to reproduce patterns of heightened activity seen in dystonia by applying independent random variations in parameters to identify pathological parameter sets. These models demonstrated degeneracy, meaning that there were many ways of obtaining the pathological syndrome. There was no single parameter alteration which would consistently distinguish pathological from physiological dynamics. At higher dimensions in parameter space, we were able to use support vector machines to distinguish the two patterns in different regions of space and thereby trace multitarget routes from dystonic to physiological dynamics. These results suggest the use of in silico models for discovery of multitarget drug cocktails. PMID:27378922

  1. Screening for dopa-responsive dystonia in patients with Scans Without Evidence of Dopaminergic Deficiency (SWEDD).

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Anna; Carducci, Claudia; Carducci, Carla; Peluso, Silvio; Lieto, Maria; Mazzella, Andrea; Saccà, Francesco; Brescia Morra, Vincenzo; Pappatà, Sabina; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; De Michele, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    The clinical diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease (PD) is not supported by Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) using dopamine transporter radioligand in 4-15 % of patients. It has been hypothesized that this phenomenon, named "Scans Without Evidence of Dopaminergic Deficiency" (SWEDD), may be an adult-onset dystonia. We investigated the hypothesis that these patients might be affected by Dopa-Responsive Dystonia (DRD). We enrolled eleven unrelated patients (8 F and 3 M) with clinical parkinsonism and normal [(123)I]FP-CIT SPECT. The GTP-cyclohydrolase1 (GCH1) gene was sequenced in all patients; urine biopterin and neopterin analysis was carried out in nine and oral phenylalanine (Phe) loading in seven. Neurological examination showed bradykinesia and resting/postural tremor in all patients, and rigidity in ten, suggesting a clinical diagnosis of PD. We detected mild dystonic signs in eight cases. In particular, five of them presented cranial dyskinesias. No mutation of the GCH1 gene was found. The results of the urine biopterin and neopterin analysis and the oral Phe loading did not reveal biochemical abnormalities suggestive of reduced GCH1 activity. We confirm that some clinical features, namely the presence of focal or segmental dystonia, suggest an adult-onset dystonia in SWEDD cases. However, we exclude DRD caused by GCH1 gene mutations in the present series. PMID:25182701

  2. A Patient With Focal Dystonia That Occurred Secondary to a Peripheral Neurogenic Tumor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minho; Lee, Jong Ha; Yun, Dong Hwan; Chon, Jinmann; Han, Yoo Jin

    2015-01-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions. Patients with dystonia may experience uncontrollable twisting, repetitive movements, or abnormal posture. A 55-year-old man presented with an involuntary left forearm supination, which he had experienced for five years. There was no history of antecedent trauma to the wrist or elbow. Although conventional therapeutic modalities had been performed, the symptoms persisted. When he visited our hospital, electromyography was performed. Reduced conduction velocity was evident at the elbow-axilla segment of the left median nerve. We suspected that there was a problem on the median nerve between the elbow and the axilla. For this reason, we performed an ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging study. A spindle-shaped soft tissue mass was observed at the left median nerve that suggested the possibility of neurofibroma. Dystonia caused by traumatic or compressive peripheral nerve injury has often been reported, but focal dystonia due to a neurogenic tumor is extremely rare. Here, we report our case with a review of the literature. PMID:26361606

  3. Dystonia an unusual presentation in pediatric moyamoya disease: Imaging findings of a case

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Suresh; Sharma, Sudhir; Jhobta, Anupam; Sood, Ram Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebrovascular disease characterized by idiopathic occlusion of bilateral internal carotid arteries and the development of characteristic leptomeningeal collateral vessels along anterior or posterior circulation. We present an unusual case of MMD presenting with generalized dystonia as the predominant manifestation. PMID:27606018

  4. Accumulation of rare variants in the arylsulfatase G (ARSG) gene in task-specific dystonia.

    PubMed

    Nibbeling, Esther; Schaake, Susen; Tijssen, Marina A; Weissbach, Anne; Groen, Justus L; Altenmüller, Eckart; Verbeek, Dineke S; Lohmann, Katja

    2015-05-01

    Musician's dystonia and writer's cramp are examples of task-specific dystonia. Recently, the arylsulfatase G (ARSG) locus was suggested to be associated with musician's dystonia and writer's cramp by a genome-wide association study. To test for the presence of causal variants, the entire coding region and exon-intron boundaries of ARSG were sequenced in DNA samples from 158 musician's dystonia patients which were collected at the University of Music, Drama, and Media (Hanover, Germany), and 72 patients with writer's cramp which were recruited at the Academic Medical Centers in Amsterdam and Groningen, the Netherlands. The frequency of variants within ARSG was compared to publically available data at the exome variant server (EVS) from the NHLBI GO Exome Sequencing Project. We identified 11 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the patients including eight non-synonymous substitutions. All variants have previously been reported at EVS including two SNVs with a reported minor allele frequency <1%. One rare missense variant, rs61999318 (p.I493T), was significantly enriched in the group of writer's cramp patients compared to European Americans in EVS database (p = 0.0013). In patients with writer's cramp, there was an overall enrichment for rare, protein-changing variants compared to controls (p < 0.01). In conclusion, we did not detect any conclusive mutation in ARSG. However, we showed an association with rs61999318 in patients with writer's cramp that contributed to an overall enrichment for rare, protein-changing variants in these patients. Thus, our data provide further support for a role of ARSG variants in task-specific dystonia, especially writer's cramp. PMID:25825126

  5. Genotype-phenotype correlations in THAP1 dystonia: molecular foundations and description of new cases

    PubMed Central

    LeDoux, Mark S.; Xiao, Jianfeng; Rudzińska, Monika; Bastian, Robert W.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Van Gerpen, Jay A.; Puschmann, Andreas; Momčilović, Dragana; Vemula, Satya R.; Zhao, Yu

    2012-01-01

    An extensive variety of THAP1 sequence variants have been associated with focal, segmental and generalized dystonia with age of onset ranging from 3 to over 60 years. In previous work, we screened 1,114 subjects with mainly adult-onset primary dystonia (Neurology 2010;74:229-238) and identified 6 missense mutations in THAP1. For this report, we screened 750 additional subjects for mutations in coding regions of THAP1 and interrogated all published descriptions of THAP1 phenotypes (gender, age of onset, anatomical distribution of dystonia, family history and site of onset) to explore the possibility of THAP1 genotype-phenotype correlations and facilitate a deeper understanding of THAP1 pathobiology. We identified 5 additional missense mutations in THAP1 (p.A7D, p.K16E, p.S21C, p.R29Q, and p.I80V). Three of these variants are associated with appendicular tremors, which were an isolated or presenting sign in some of the affected subjects. Abductor laryngeal dystonia and mild blepharospasm can be manifestations of THAP1 mutations in some individuals. Overall, mean age of onset for THAP1 dystonia is 16.8 years and the most common sites of onset are the arm and neck, and the most frequently affected anatomical site is the neck. In addition, over half of patients exhibit either cranial or laryngeal involvement. Protein truncating mutations and missense mutations within the THAP domain of THAP1 tend to manifest at an earlier age and exhibit more extensive anatomical distributions than mutations localized to other regions of THAP1. PMID:22377579

  6. Abnormalities of motor function, transcription and cerebellar structure in mouse models of THAP1 dystonia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Marta; Perez-Garcia, Georgina; Ortiz-Virumbrales, Maitane; Méneret, Aurelie; Morant, Andrika; Kottwitz, Jessica; Fuchs, Tania; Bonet, Justine; Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro; Hof, Patrick R; Ozelius, Laurie J; Ehrlich, Michelle E

    2015-12-20

    DYT6 dystonia is caused by mutations in THAP1 [Thanatos-associated (THAP) domain-containing apoptosis-associated protein] and is autosomal dominant and partially penetrant. Like other genetic primary dystonias, DYT6 patients have no characteristic neuropathology, and mechanisms by which mutations in THAP1 cause dystonia are unknown. Thap1 is a zinc-finger transcription factor, and most pathogenic THAP1 mutations are missense and are located in the DNA-binding domain. There are also nonsense mutations, which act as the equivalent of a null allele because they result in the generation of small mRNA species that are likely rapidly degraded via nonsense-mediated decay. The function of Thap1 in neurons is unknown, but there is a unique, neuronal 50-kDa Thap1 species, and Thap1 levels are auto-regulated on the mRNA level. Herein, we present the first characterization of two mouse models of DYT6, including a pathogenic knockin mutation, C54Y and a null mutation. Alterations in motor behaviors, transcription and brain structure are demonstrated. The projection neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei are especially altered. Abnormalities vary according to genotype, sex, age and/or brain region, but importantly, overlap with those of other dystonia mouse models. These data highlight the similarities and differences in age- and cell-specific effects of a Thap1 mutation, indicating that the pathophysiology of THAP1 mutations should be assayed at multiple ages and neuronal types and support the notion of final common pathways in the pathophysiology of dystonia arising from disparate mutations. PMID:26376866

  7. Sensory representation abnormalities that parallel focal hand dystonia in a primate model

    PubMed Central

    Blake, David T.; Byl, Nancy N.; Cheung, Steven; Bedenbaugh, Purvis; Nagarajan, Srikantan; Lamb, Michelle; Merzenich, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In our hypothesis of focal dystonia, attended repetitive behaviors generate aberrant sensory representations. Those aberrant representations interfere with motor control. Abnormal motor control strengthens sensory abnormalities. The positive feedback loop reinforces the dystonic condition. Previous studies of primates with focal hand dystonia have demonstrated multi-digit or hairy-glabrous responses at single sites in area 3b, receptive fields that average ten times larger than normal, and high receptive field overlap as a function of horizontal distance. In this study, we strengthen and elaborate these findings. One animal was implanted with an array of micro-electrodes that spanned the border between the face and digits. After the animal developed hand dystonia, responses in the initial hand representation increasingly responded to low threshold stimulation of the face in a columnar substitution. The hand-face border that is normally sharp became patchy and smeared over one millimeter of cortex within six weeks. Two more trained animals developed a focal hand dystonia variable in severity across the hand. Receptive field size, presence of multi-digit or hairy-glabrous receptive fields, and columnar overlap covaried with the animal’s ability to use specific digits. A fourth animal performed the same behaviors without developing dystonia. Many of its physiological measures were similar to the dystonic animals, but receptive field overlap functions were minimally abnormal, and no sites shared response properties that are normally segregated such as hairy-glabrous combined fields, or multi-digit fields. Thalamic mapping demonstrated proportionate levels of abnormality in thalamic representations as was found in cortical representations. PMID:12590836

  8. Biochemical and cellular analysis of human variants of the DYT1 dystonia protein, torsinA

    PubMed Central

    Hettich, Jasmin; Ryan, Scott D.; Norberto de Souza, Osmar; Timmers, Luís Fernando Saraiva Macedo; Tsai, Shelun; Atai, Nadia A.; da Hora, Cintia C.; Zhang, Xuan; Kothary, Rashmi; Snapp, Erik; Ericsson, Maria; Grundmann, Kathrin; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Nery, Flávia C.

    2014-01-01

    Early-onset dystonia is associated with the deletion of one of a pair of glutamic acid residues (c.904_906delGAG/c.907_909delGAG; p.Glu302del/Glu303del; ΔE 302/303) near the carboxyl-terminus of torsinA, a member of the AAA+ protein family that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen and nuclear envelope (NE). This deletion commonly underlies early-onset DYT1 dystonia. While the role of the disease-causing mutation, torsinAΔE, has been established through genetic association studies, it is much less clear whether other rare human variants of torsinA are pathogenic. Two missense variations have been described in single patients; R288Q (c.863G>A; p.Arg288Gln; R288Q) identified in a patient with onset of severe generalized dystonia and myoclonus since infancy, and F205I (c.613T>A, p.Phe205Ile; F205I) in a psychiatric patient with late-onset focal dystonia. In this study, we have undertaken a series of analyses comparing the biochemical and cellular effects of these rare variants to torsinAΔE and wild-type (wt) torsinA in order to reveal whether there are common dysfunctional features. The results revealed that the variants, R288Q and F205I, are more similar in their properties to torsinAΔE protein than to torsinAwt. These findings provide functional evidence for the potential pathogenic nature of these rare sequence variants in the TOR1A gene, thus implicating these pathologies in the development of dystonia. PMID:24930953

  9. Botulinum toxin assessment, intervention and aftercare for cervical dystonia and other causes of hypertonia of the neck: international consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Novak, I; Campbell, L; Boyce, M; Fung, V S C

    2010-08-01

    Dystonia in the neck region can be safely and effectively reduced with injections of Botulinum neurotoxin-A and B. People with idiopathic cervical dystonia have been studied the most. Benefits following injection include increased range of movement at the neck for head turning, decreased pain, and increased functional capacity (Class I evidence, level A recommendation). The evidence for efficacy and safety in patients with secondary dystonia in the neck is unclear based on the lack of rigorous research conducted in this heterogeneous population (level U recommendation). Psychometrically sound assessments and outcome measures exist to guide decision-making (Class I evidence, level A recommendation). Much less is known about the effectiveness of therapy to augment the effects of the injection (Class IV, level U recommendation). More research is needed to answer questions about safety and efficacy in secondary spastic neck dystonia, effective adjunctive therapy, dosing and favourable injection techniques. PMID:20633181

  10. Screening of GNAL variants in Brazilian patients with isolated dystonia reveals a novel mutation with partial loss of function.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Camila Oliveira; Masuho, Ikuo; da Silva-Júnior, Francisco Pereira; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Silva, Sonia Maria Cesar Azevedo; Borges, Vanderci; Ferraz, Henrique Ballalai; Rocha, Maria Sheila Guimarães; Limongi, João Carlos Papaterra; Martemyanov, Kirill A; de Carvalho Aguiar, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    GNAL was identified as a cause of dystonia in patients from North America, Europe and Asia. In this study, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of GNAL variants in Brazilian patients with dystonia. Ninety-one patients with isolated idiopathic dystonia, negative for THAP1 and TOR1A mutations, were screened for GNAL variants by Sanger sequencing. Functional characterization of the Gαolf protein variant was performed using the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assay. A novel heterozygous nonsynonymous variant (p. F133L) was identified in a patient with cervical and laryngeal dystonia since the third decade of life, with no family history. This variant was not identified in healthy Brazilian controls and was not described in 63,000 exomas of the ExAC database. The F133L mutant exhibited significantly elevated levels of basal BRET and severely diminished amplitude of response elicited by dopamine, that both indicate substantial functional impairment of Gαolf in transducing receptor signals, which could be involved in dystonia pathophysiology. GNAL mutations are not a common cause of dystonia in the Brazilian population and have a lower prevalence than THAP1 and TOR1A mutations. We present a novel variant that results in partial Gαolf loss of function. PMID:26810727

  11. Patterns of Cortical Synchronization in Isolated Dystonia Compared With Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miocinovic, Svjetlana; de Hemptinne, Coralie; Qasim, Salman; Ostrem, Jill L.; Starr, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Isolated dystonia and Parkinson disease (PD) are disorders of the basal gangliothalamocortical network. They have largely distinct clinical profiles, but both disorders respond to deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the same subcortical targets using similar stimulation paradigms, suggesting pathophysiologic overlap. We hypothesized that, similar to PD, isolated dystonia is associated with elevated cortical neuronal synchronization. OBJECTIVE To investigate the electrophysiologic characteristics of the sensorimotor cortex arm-related area using a temporary subdural electrode strip in patients with isolated dystonia and PD undergoing DBS implantation in the awake state. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS An observational study recruited patients scheduled for DBS at the University of California, San Francisco and the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Data were collected from May 1, 2008, through April 1, 2015. Findings are reported for 22 patients with isolated cervical or segmental dystonia (8 with [DYST-ARM] and 14 without [DYST] arm symptoms] and 14 patients with akinetic rigid PD. Data were analyzed from November 1, 2014, through May 1, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cortical local field potentials, power spectral density, and phase-amplitude coupling (PAC). RESULTS Among our 3 groups that together included 36 patients, cortical PAC was present in primary motor and premotor arm-related areas for all groups, but the DYST group was less likely to exhibit increased PAC (P = .008). Similar to what has been shown for patients with PD, subthalamic DBS reversibly decreased PAC in a subset of patients with dystonia who were studied before and during intraoperative test stimulation (n = 4). At rest, broadband gamma (50–200 Hz) power in the primary motor cortex was greater in the DYST-ARM and PD groups compared with the DYST group, whereas alpha (8–13 Hz) and beta (13–30 Hz) power was comparable in all 3 groups. During movement, the DYST

  12. Aberrant Purkinje cell activity is the cause of dystonia in a shRNA-based mouse model of Rapid Onset Dystonia-Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Fremont, Rachel; Tewari, Ambika; Khodakhah, Kamran

    2015-10-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the α3 isoform of the sodium pump are responsible for Rapid Onset Dystonia-Parkinsonism (RDP). A pharmacologic model of RDP replicates the most salient features of RDP, and implicates both the cerebellum and basal ganglia in the disorder; dystonia is associated with aberrant cerebellar output, and the parkinsonism-like features are attributable to the basal ganglia. The pharmacologic agent used to generate the model, ouabain, is selective for sodium pumps. However, close to the infusion sites in vivo it likely affects all sodium pump isoforms. Therefore, it remains to be established whether selective loss of α3-containing sodium pumps replicates the pharmacologic model. Moreover, while the pharmacologic model suggested that aberrant firing of Purkinje cells was the main cause of abnormal cerebellar output, it did not allow the scrutiny of this hypothesis. To address these questions RNA interference using small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) delivered via adeno-associated viruses (AAV) was used to specifically knockdown α3-containing sodium pumps in different regions of the adult mouse brain. Knockdown of the α3-containing sodium pumps mimicked both the behavioral and electrophysiological changes seen in the pharmacologic model of RDP, recapitulating key aspects of the human disorder. Further, we found that knockdown of the α3 isoform altered the intrinsic pacemaking of Purkinje cells, but not the neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei. Therefore, acute knockdown of proteins associated with inherited dystonias may be a good strategy for developing phenotypic genetic mouse models where traditional transgenic models have failed to produce symptomatic mice. PMID:26093171

  13. Differences in globus pallidus neuronal firing rates and patterns relate to different disease biology in children with dystonia

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, V M; Valentin, A; Rey, H G; Lumsden, D E; Elze, M C; Selway, R; Alarcon, G; Lin, J-P

    2016-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology underlying different types of dystonia is not yet understood. We report microelectrode data from the globus pallidus interna (GPi) and globus pallidus externa (GPe) in children undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) for dystonia and investigate whether GPi and GPe firing rates differ between dystonia types. Methods Single pass microelectrode data were obtained to guide electrode position in 44 children (3.3–18.1 years, median 10.7) with the following dystonia types: 14 primary, 22 secondary Static and 8 progressive secondary to neuronal brain iron accumulation (NBIA). Preoperative stereotactic MRI determined coordinates for the GPi target. Digitised spike trains were analysed offline, blind to clinical data. Electrode placement was confirmed by a postoperative stereotactic CT scan. Findings We identified 263 GPi and 87 GPe cells. Both GPi and GPe firing frequencies differed significantly with dystonia aetiology. The median GPi firing frequency was higher in the primary group than in the secondary static group (13.5 Hz vs 9.6 Hz; p=0.002) and higher in the NBIA group than in either the primary (25 Hz vs 13.5 Hz; p=0.006) or the secondary static group (25 Hz vs 9.6 Hz; p=0.00004). The median GPe firing frequency was higher in the NBIA group than in the secondary static group (15.9 Hz vs 7 Hz; p=0.013). The NBIA group also showed a higher proportion of regularly firing GPi cells compared with the other groups (p<0.001). A higher proportion of regular GPi cells was also seen in patients with fixed/tonic dystonia compared with a phasic/dynamic dystonia phenotype (p<0.001). The GPi firing frequency showed a positive correlation with 1-year outcome from DBS measured by improvement in the Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS-m) score (p=0.030). This association was stronger for the non-progressive patients (p=0.006). Interpretation Pallidal firing rates and patterns differ significantly with dystonia aetiology

  14. Influence of development and aging on brain biopterin: implications for dopa-responsive dystonia onset.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Y; Kish, S J

    1998-08-01

    Reduction of biopterin (BP) due to a mutation in the GTP-cyclohydrolase I gene causes hereditary progressive dystonia/dopa-responsive dystonia (HPD/DRD). To determine whether an age-related BP decline may contribute to HPD/DRD onset (from 1 to 13 years of age), we measured brain BP levels in 57 normal subjects ranging in age from 1 day to 92 years. Putaminal BP showed a significant increase in postnatal period, reaching a plateau at 1 to 13 years of age, and a decrease in adulthood. The HPD/DRD onset in childhood is unlikely to be caused by a brain BP decline during the first decade of life, but that in adulthood could be related to the age-dependent decrease. PMID:9710058

  15. Task-specific hand dystonia: can too much plasticity be bad for you?

    PubMed

    Quartarone, Angelo; Siebner, Hartwig R; Rothwell, J C

    2006-04-01

    Patients with occupational hand dystonias have task-specific involuntary co-contraction and overflow of activity to inappropriate muscles. This interferes with highly skilled movements such as handwriting (writer's cramp) or playing a musical instrument (musician's cramp). Transcranial stimulation methods that probe mechanisms of synaptic plasticity in the motor cortex show an abnormal modifiability of sensorimotor circuits in patients with writer's cramp, probably because homeostatic control of the range of modification is deficient. We argue that during skilled motor practice, this leads to an excessive tendency to form associations between sensory inputs and motor outputs (abnormal potentiation) and to a failure to weaken already existing associations (deficient depotentiation). Deficient homeostatic control might be an important mechanism that triggers maladaptive reorganization and produces symptoms of occupational hand dystonias. PMID:16519953

  16. Intraventricular versus Intrathecal Baclofen for SecondaryDystonia: A Comparison of Complications

    PubMed Central

    Rocque, Brandon G.; Albright, A. Leland

    2012-01-01

    Background Intrathecal baclofen (ITB) is an effective treatment for secondary dystonia. However, in many patients with dystonia, placement of an intrathecal catheter is difficult due to anatomic anomalies or spinal fusion. Intraventricular baclofen (IVB) has been shown to be an effective alternate route for drug delivery in a small series of patients. Objective To present the largest series of IVB cases to date, and compare the complication rate to that of a concurrent cohort of ITB cases. Methods The senior author’s series of IVB cases were reviewed. All contemporaneous cases of ITB for dystonia were reviewed as a control group. Data were collected by retrospective medical records review. Results Thirty IVB patients and 33 ITB patients were identified. Mean follow up was 15 and 16 months, respectively. IVB patients were younger, more commonly underweight, and had more severe dystonia, though no difference between groups was significant. Eleven patients (37%) experienced complications in the IVB group, and 16 (48%) in the ITB group. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed an odds ratio of 0.67 (95% CI 0.30–1.48, p=0.31) in favor of IVB. Adjusting for age and underweight status yielded an odds ratio of 0.64 (95% CI 0.29–1.42, p=0.27) in favor of IVB. There were 7 catheter or leak-related complications in the ITB group and 2 in the IVB group (p=0.15). Conclusion Intraventricular baclofen is as safe as intrathecal baclofen. There may be a lower risk of catheter or leak-related complications with IVB, though this study was too small to show significance. PMID:22555626

  17. Dopamine Receptor and Gα(olf) Expression in DYT1 Dystonia Mouse Models during Postnatal Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; McCarthy, Deirdre M.; Sharma, Nutan; Bhide, Pradeep G.

    2015-01-01

    Background DYT1 dystonia is a heritable, early-onset generalized movement disorder caused by a GAG deletion (ΔGAG) in the DYT1 gene. Neuroimaging studies and studies using mouse models suggest that DYT1 dystonia is associated with dopamine imbalance. However, whether dopamine imbalance is key to DYT1 or other forms of dystonia continues to be debated. Methodology/Principal Findings We used Dyt1 knock out (Dyt1 KO), Dyt1 ΔGAG knock-in (Dyt1 KI), and transgenic mice carrying one copy of the human DYT1 wild type allele (DYT1 hWT) or human ΔGAG mutant allele (DYT1 hMT). D1R, D2R, and Gα(olf) protein expression was analyzed by western blot in the frontal cortex, caudate-putamen and ventral midbrain in young adult (postnatal day 60; P60) male mice from all four lines; and in the frontal cortex and caudate putamen in juvenile (postnatal day 14; P14) male mice from the Dyt1 KI and KO lines. Dopamine receptor and Gα(olf) protein expression were significantly decreased in multiple brain regions of Dyt1 KI and Dyt1 KO mice and not significantly altered in the DYT1 hMT or DYT1 hWT mice at P60. The only significant change at P14 was a decrease in D1R expression in the caudate-putamen of the Dyt1 KO mice. Conclusion/Significance We found significant decreases in key proteins in the dopaminergic system in multiple brain regions of Dyt1 KO and Dyt1 KI mouse lines at P60. Deletion of one copy of the Dyt1 gene (KO mice) produced the most pronounced effects. These data offer evidence that impaired dopamine receptor signaling may be an early and significant contributor to DYT1 dystonia pathophysiology. PMID:25860259

  18. A missense mutation in KCTD17 causes autosomal dominant myoclonus-dystonia.

    PubMed

    Mencacci, Niccolo E; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H R; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M P; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P; Wood, Nicholas W

    2015-06-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%-50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  19. Self-awareness of executive dysfunction in Huntington's disease: comparison with Parkinson's disease and cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sitek, Emilia J; Sołtan, Witold; Wieczorek, Dariusz; Schinwelski, Michał; Robowski, Piotr; Harciarek, Michał; Guzińska, Katarzyna; Sławek, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed self-awareness of executive deficits in patients with Huntington's disease (HD) in comparison to patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and with cervical dystonia (CD). Eighty-nine patient-proxy pairs participated in the study (23 with HD, 25 with advanced PD, 21 with mild PD and 20 with CD). Executive function was assessed with the Stroop test and the Dysexecutive Questionnaire. Insight into executive impairment in HD is mildly affected, when compared to PD and CD. PMID:23331288

  20. A Missense Mutation in KCTD17 Causes Autosomal Dominant Myoclonus-Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M.P.; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R.; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C.; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M.; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%–50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  1. A commentary on the utility of a new L-DOPA-responsive dystonia mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Samuel J.; Hess, Ellen J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a recent issue of Brain, we reported on the generation and characterization of a mouse model of the rare disease L-DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD). Here, we discuss the utility of these mice for understanding broader disease processes and treatment strategies. Using specific experimental designs that either work “forward” from genetic etiology or “backward” from the symptomatic presentation, we discuss how our data and future work can be used to understand broader themes. PMID:27141408

  2. A commentary on the utility of a new L-DOPA-responsive dystonia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rose, Samuel J; Hess, Ellen J

    2016-01-01

    In a recent issue of Brain, we reported on the generation and characterization of a mouse model of the rare disease L-DOPA-responsive dystonia (DRD). Here, we discuss the utility of these mice for understanding broader disease processes and treatment strategies. Using specific experimental designs that either work "forward" from genetic etiology or "backward" from the symptomatic presentation, we discuss how our data and future work can be used to understand broader themes. PMID:27141408

  3. Cholinergic dysregulation produced by selective inactivation of the dystonia-associated protein TorsinA

    PubMed Central

    Sciamanna, Giuseppe; Hollis, Robert; Ball, Chelsea; Martella, Giuseppina; Tassone, Annalisa; Marshall, Andrea; Parsons, Dee; Li, Xinru; Yokoi, Fumiaki; Zhang, Lin; Li, Yuqing; Pisani, Antonio; Standaert, David G.

    2012-01-01

    DYT1 dystonia, a common and severe primary dystonia, is caused by a 3-bp deletion in TOR1A which encodes torsinA, a protein found in the endoplasmic reticulum. Several cellular functions are altered by the mutant protein, but at a systems level the link between these and the symptoms of the disease is unclear. The most effective known therapy for DYT1 dystonia is use of anticholinergic drugs. Previous studies have revealed that in mice, transgenic expression of human mutant torsinA under a non-selective promoter leads to abnormal function of striatal cholinergic neurons. To investigate what pathological role torsinA plays in cholinergic neurons, we created a mouse model in which the Dyt1 gene, the mouse homolog of TOR1A, is selectively deleted in cholinergic neurons (ChKO animals). These animals do not have overt dystonia, but do have subtle motor abnormalities. There is no change in the number or size of striatal cholinergic cells or striatal acetylcholine content, uptake, synthesis, or release in ChKO mice. There are, however, striking functional abnormalities of striatal cholinergic cells, with paradoxical excitation in response to D2 receptor activation and loss of muscarinic M2/M4 receptor inhibitory function. These effects are specific for cholinergic interneurons, as recordings from nigral dopaminergic neurons revealed normal responses. Amphetamine stimulated dopamine release was also unaltered. These results demonstrate a cell-autonomous effect of Dyt1 deletion on striatal cholinergic function. Therapies directed at modifying the function of cholinergic neurons may prove useful in the treatment of the human disorder. PMID:22579992

  4. Relevance of sonography for botulinum toxin treatment of cervical dystonia: an expert statement.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Axel; Bäumer, Tobias; Fietzek, Urban; Heitmann, Susanne; Walter, Uwe; Jost, Wolfgang H

    2015-10-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT A) is the first-line treatment for cervical dystonia. However, although BoNT A has a favorable safety profile and is effective in the majority of patients, in some cases the treatment outcome is disappointing or side effects occur when higher doses are used. It is likely that in such cases either the target muscles were not injected accurately or unintended weakness of non-target muscles occurred. It has been demonstrated in clinical trials for spastic movement disorders that sonography-guided BoNT A injections could improve treatment outcome. As the published evidence for a benefit of sonography-guided BoNT injection in patients with cervical dystonia is scarce, it is the aim of this review to discuss the relevance of sonography in this indication and provide a statement from clinical experts for its use. The clear advantage of sonography-guided injections is non-invasive, real-time visualization of the targeted muscle, thus improving the precision of injections and potentially the treatment outcomes as well as avoiding adverse effects. Other imaging techniques are of limited value due to high costs, radiation exposure or non-availability in clinical routine. In the hands of a trained injector, sonography is a quick and non-invasive imaging technique. Novel treatment concepts of cervical dystonia considering the differential contributions of distinct cranial and cervical muscles can reliably be implemented only by use of imaging-guided injection protocols. PMID:25547861

  5. Pallidal stimulation in dystonia: effects on cognition, mood, and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Hälbig, T D; Gruber, D; Kopp, U A; Schneider, G-H; Trottenberg, T; Kupsch, A

    2005-12-01

    Bilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the globus pallidus internus (GPi) alleviates symptoms in patients with dystonia but its effects on cognition, neuropsychiatric status, and quality of life have not been examined. This is a case series report of 15 consecutive patients with different forms of dystonia who underwent bilateral implantation of DBS electrodes in the GPi. The patients were evaluated preoperatively and after 3-12 months of DBS with tests of cognition (Mattis Dementia Rating Scale, Stroop Test, Trail Making Test, Phonemic and Category Word Fluency, Digit Span, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Tonic and Phasic Alertness), neuropsychiatric status (Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories, Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale, Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale), quality of life, and motor functions. GPi DBS significantly improved dystonic symptoms, functional abilities, and quality of life allowing for a significant reduction of antidystonic medications. No deterioration was observed in cognitive scores and neuropsychiatric measures. The present case series report thus provides preliminary evidence for the safety of GPi DBS regarding cognitive and neuropsychiatric functions in patients with dystonia. PMID:16291900

  6. Mutations in the Autoregulatory Domain of β-Tubulin 4a Cause Hereditary Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Hersheson, Joshua; Mencacci, Niccolo E; Davis, Mary; MacDonald, Nicola; Trabzuni, Daniah; Ryten, Mina; Pittman, Alan; Paudel, Reema; Kara, Eleanna; Fawcett, Katherine; Plagnol, Vincent; Bhatia, Kailash P; Medlar, Alan J; Stanescu, Horia C; Hardy, John; Kleta, Robert; Wood, Nicholas W; Houlden, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Dystonia type 4 (DYT4) was first described in a large family from Heacham in Norfolk with an autosomal dominantly inherited whispering dysphonia, generalized dystonia, and a characteristic hobby horse ataxic gait. We carried out a genetic linkage analysis in the extended DYT4 family that spanned 7 generations from England and Australia, revealing a single LOD score peak of 6.33 on chromosome 19p13.12-13. Exome sequencing in 2 cousins identified a single cosegregating mutation (p.R2G) in the β-tubulin 4a (TUBB4a) gene that was absent in a large number of controls. The mutation is highly conserved in the β-tubulin autoregulatory MREI (methionine–arginine–glutamic acid–isoleucine) domain, highly expressed in the central nervous system, and extensive in vitro work has previously demonstrated that substitutions at residue 2, specifically R2G, disrupt the autoregulatory capability of the wild-type β-tubulin peptide, affirming the role of the cytoskeleton in dystonia pathogenesis. PMID:23424103

  7. Modulation of the basal ganglia dopaminergic system in a transgenic mouse exhibiting dystonia-like features

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulou, D.; Armata, I. A.; Mitsacos, A.; Shashidharan, P.; Giompres, P.

    2011-01-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary excessive muscle activity and abnormal postures. There are data supporting the hypothesis that basal ganglia dysfunction, and specifically dopaminergic system dysfunction, plays a role in dystonia. In the present study, we used hyperkinetic transgenic mice generated as a model of DYT1 dystonia and compared the basal ganglia dopaminergic system between transgenic mice exhibiting hyperkinesia (affected) transgenic mice not showing movement abnormalities (unaffected), and non-transgenic littermates A decrease in the density of striatal D2 binding sites, measured by [3H]raclopride binding, and D2 mRNA expression in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) was revealed in affected an unaffected transgenic mice when compared with non-transgenic. No difference in D1 receptor binding and DAT binding, measured by [3H]SCH23390 and [3H]WIN35428 binding, respectively, was found in striatum of transgenic animals. In SNpc, increased levels of DAT binding sites were observed in affected and unaffected animals compared to non-transgenic, whereas no change in DAT mRNA expression was found. Our results show selective neurochemical changes in the basal ganglia dopaminergic system, suggesting a possible involvement in the pathophysiology of dystonialike motor hyperactivity. PMID:21136125

  8. Dysregulation of striatal dopamine release in a mouse model of dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Li; Patel, Jyoti C.; Walker, Ruth H.; Shashidharan, Pullanipally; Rice, Margaret E.

    2010-01-01

    Dystonia is a neurological disorder characterized by involuntary movements. We examined striatal dopamine function in hyperactive transgenic mice generated as a model of dystonia. Evoked extracellular dopamine concentration was monitored with carbon-fiber microelectrodes and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in striatal slices from non-transgenic mice, transgenic mice with a positive motor phenotype, and phenotype-negative transgenic littermates. Peak single-pulse evoked dopamine concentration was significantly lower in phenotype-positive mice than in non-transgenic or phenotype-negative mice, but indistinguishable between non-transgenic and phenotype-negative mice. Phenotype-positive mice also had higher functional D2 dopamine autoreceptor sensitivity than non-transgenic mice, which would be consistent with lower extracellular dopamine concentration in vivo. Multiple-pulse (phasic) stimulation (5 pulses, 10-100 Hz) revealed an enhanced frequency dependence of evoked dopamine release in phenotype-positive versus non-transgenic or phenotype-negative mice, which was exacerbated when extracellular Ca2+ concentration was lowered. Enhanced sensitivity to phasic stimulation in phenotype-positive mice was reminiscent of the pattern seen with antagonism of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Consistent with a role for altered cholinergic regulation, the difference in phasic responsiveness among groups was lost when nicotinic receptors were blocked by mecamylamine. Together, these data implicate compromised dopamine release regulation, possibly from cholinergic dysfunction, in the motor symptoms of this dystonia model. PMID:20626557

  9. Failure of cathodal direct current stimulation to improve fine motor control in musician's dystonia.

    PubMed

    Buttkus, Franziska; Weidenmüller, Matthias; Schneider, Sabine; Jabusch, Hans-Christian; Nitsche, Michael A; Paulus, Walter; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2010-02-15

    Musician's dystonia (MD) is a task-specific movement disorder with a loss of voluntary motor control in highly trained movements. Defective inhibition on different levels of the central nervous system is involved in its pathophysiology. Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (ctDCS) diminishes excitability of the motor cortex and improves performance in overlearned tasks in healthy subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ctDCS improves fine motor control in MD. Professional guitarists (n = 10) with MD played exercises before, directly after ctDCS, and 60 min after ctDCS. ctDCS (2 mA, 20 min) was applied on the primary motor cortex contralateral to the affected hand. Guitar exercises were video-documented and symptoms were evaluated by three independent experts. No beneficial effect of ctDCS on fine motor control was found for the entire group. However, motor control of one guitarist improved after stimulation. This patient suffered from arm dystonia, whereas the other guitarists suffered from hand dystonia. PMID:20063390

  10. The effectiveness of physiotherapy for cervical dystonia: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Joke; Van der Velden, Kevin; Meirte, Jill; Van Daele, Ulrike; Truijen, Steven; Cras, Patrick; Mercelis, Rudy; De Hertogh, Willem

    2014-10-01

    Cervical dystonia is a form of adult-onset, focal dystonia characterized by involuntary contractions of the neck muscles, leading to a disabling, abnormal head posture. CD has a great impact on the activities of daily living (ADL) and quality of life. Currently, the most widely used and recommended first line treatment is botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) injections. Physiotherapy is a potentially useful adjuvant, but little is known about its effectiveness. Consequently, our objective was to investigate the effectiveness of physiotherapy alone or as an adjuvant treatment to BoNT/A injections in cervical dystonia (CD) by means of a systematic literature review. Two online databases, PubMed and Web of Science, were searched for articles describing the effectiveness of physiotherapy treatment for CD. After screening, based on predefined in- and exclusion criteria, 16 studies were retained. Their methodological quality was assessed according to Cochrane guidelines. The methodological quality of most studies was low. Examples of shortcomings are small sample sizes, lack of randomization or blinding, and diversity in therapeutic techniques and outcome measures. Only seven studies were clinical trials; the remaining were either case reports or case series. The reported physiotherapy treatments included EMG biofeedback training, muscular elongation, postural exercises and electrotherapy. Improvements in head position, pain, cervical range of motion, quality of life and ADL have been reported, which is promising. Cautious interpretation on the effectiveness of physiotherapy as an adjuvant therapy is required. Before firm conclusions can be drawn, additional high quality trials are needed. PMID:24413637