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Sample records for dystrophy grmd model

  1. Early transplantation of human immature dental pulp stem cells from baby teeth to golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs: Local or systemic?

    PubMed Central

    Kerkis, Irina; Ambrosio, Carlos E; Kerkis, Alexandre; Martins, Daniele S; Zucconi, Eder; Fonseca, Simone AS; Cabral, Rosa M; Maranduba, Carlos MC; Gaiad, Thais P; Morini, Adriana C; Vieira, Natassia M; Brolio, Marina P; Sant'Anna, Osvaldo A; Miglino, Maria A; Zatz, Mayana

    2008-01-01

    Background The golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs represent the best available animal model for therapeutic trials aiming at the future treatment of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have obtained a rare litter of six GRMD dogs (3 males and 3 females) born from an affected male and a carrier female which were submitted to a therapeutic trial with adult human stem cells to investigate their capacity to engraft into dogs muscles by local as compared to systemic injection without any immunosuppression. Methods Human Immature Dental Pulp Stem Cells (hIDPSC) were transplanted into 4 littermate dogs aged 28 to 40 days by either arterial or muscular injections. Two non-injected dogs were kept as controls. Clinical translation effects were analyzed since immune reactions by blood exams and physical scores capacity of each dog. Samples from biopsies were checked by immunohistochemistry (dystrophin markers) and FISH for human probes. Results and Discussion We analyzed the cells' ability in respect to migrate, engraftment, and myogenic potential, and the expression of human dystrophin in affected muscles. Additionally, the efficiency of single and consecutive early transplantation was compared. Chimeric muscle fibers were detected by immunofluorescence and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) using human antibodies and X and Y DNA probes. No signs of immune rejection were observed and these results suggested that hIDPSC cell transplantation may be done without immunosuppression. We showed that hIDPSC presented significant engraftment in GRMD dog muscles, although human dystrophin expression was modest and limited to several muscle fibers. Better clinical condition was also observed in the dog, which received monthly arterial injections and is still clinically stable at 25 months of age. Conclusion Our data suggested that systemic multiple deliveries seemed more effective than local injections. These findings open important avenues for further

  2. Alteration of cardiac progenitor cell potency in GRMD dogs.

    PubMed

    Cassano, M; Berardi, E; Crippa, S; Toelen, J; Barthelemy, I; Micheletti, R; Chuah, M; Vandendriessche, T; Debyser, Z; Blot, S; Sampaolesi, M

    2012-01-01

    Among the animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dog is considered the best model in terms of size and pathological onset of the disease. As in human patients presenting with DMD or Becker muscular dystrophies (BMD), the GRMD is related to a spontaneous X-linked mutation of dystrophin and is characterized by myocardial lesions. In this respect, GRMD is a useful model to explore cardiac pathogenesis and for the development of therapeutic protocols. To investigate whether cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) isolated from healthy and GRMD dogs may differentiate into myocardial cell types and to test the feasibility of cell therapy for cardiomyopathies in a preclinical model of DMD, CPCs were isolated from cardiac biopsies of healthy and GRMD dogs. Gene profile analysis revealed an active cardiac transcription network in both healthy and GRMD CPCs. However, GRMD CPCs showed impaired self-renewal and cardiac differentiation. Population doubling and telomerase analyses highlighted earlier senescence and proliferation impairment in progenitors isolated from GRMD cardiac biopsies. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that only wt CPCs showed efficient although not terminal cardiac differentiation, consistent with the upregulation of cardiac-specific proteins and microRNAs. Thus, the pathological condition adversely influences the cardiomyogenic differentiation potential of cardiac progenitors. Using PiggyBac transposon technology we marked CPCs for nuclear dsRed expression, providing a stable nonviral gene marking method for in vivo tracing of CPCs. Xenotransplantation experiments in neonatal immunodeficient mice revealed a valuable contribution of CPCs to cardiomyogenesis with homing differences between wt and dystrophic progenitors. These results suggest that cardiac degeneration in dystrophinopathies may account for the progressive exhaustion of local cardiac progenitors and shed light on cardiac stemness in

  3. A computerized MRI biomarker quantification scheme for a canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Vandenborne, Krista; Walter, Glenn; Shiloh-Malawsky, Yael; An, Hongyu; Kornegay, Joe N.; Styner, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a widely used canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Recent studies have shown that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to non-invasively detect consistent changes in both DMD and GRMD. In this paper, we propose a semi-automated system to quantify MRI biomarkers of GRMD. Methods Our system was applied to a database of 45 MRI scans from 8 normal and 10 GRMD dogs in a longitudinal natural history study. We first segmented six proximal pelvic limb muscles using two competing schemes: 1) standard, limited muscle range segmentation and 2) semi-automatic full muscle segmentation. We then performed pre-processing, including: intensity inhomogeneity correction, spatial registration of different image sequences, intensity calibration of T2-weighted (T2w) and T2-weighted fat suppressed (T2fs) images, and calculation of MRI biomarker maps. Finally, for each of the segmented muscles, we automatically measured MRI biomarkers of muscle volume and intensity statistics over MRI biomarker maps, and statistical image texture features. Results The muscle volume and the mean intensities in T2 value, fat, and water maps showed group differences between normal and GRMD dogs. For the statistical texture biomarkers, both the histogram and run-length matrix features showed obvious group differences between normal and GRMD dogs. The full muscle segmentation shows significantly less error and variability in the proposed biomarkers when compared to the standard, limited muscle range segmentation. Conclusion The experimental results demonstrated that this quantification tool can reliably quantify MRI biomarkers in GRMD dogs, suggesting that it would also be useful for quantifying disease progression and measuring therapeutic effect in DMD patients. PMID:23299128

  4. Respiratory dysfunction in unsedated dogs with golden retriever muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    DeVanna, Justin C; Kornegay, Joe N; Bogan, Daniel J; Bogan, Janet R; Dow, Jennifer L; Hawkins, Eleanor C

    2014-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a well-established model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The value of this model would be greatly enhanced with practical tools to monitor progression of respiratory dysfunction during treatment trials. Arterial blood gas analysis, tidal breathing spirometry, and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) were performed to determine if quantifiable abnormalities could be identified in unsedated, untrained, GRMD dogs. Results from 11 dogs with a mild phenotype of GRMD and 11 age-matched carriers were compared. Arterial blood gas analysis was successfully performed in all dogs, spirometry in 21 of 22 (95%) dogs, and RIP in 18 of 20 (90%) dogs. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate concentration were higher in GRMD dogs. Tidal breathing peak expiratory flows were markedly higher in GRMD dogs. Abnormal abdominal motion was present in 7 of 10 (70%) GRMD dogs. Each technique provided objective, quantifiable measures that will be useful for monitoring respiratory function in GRMD dogs during clinical trials while avoiding the influence of sedation on results. Increased expiratory flows and the pattern of abdominal breathing are novel findings, not reported in people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and might be a consequence of hyperinflation. PMID:24295812

  5. RESPIRATORY DYSFUNCTION IN UNSEDATED DOGS WITH GOLDEN RETRIEVER MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    PubMed Central

    DeVanna, Justin C.; Kornegay, Joe N.; Bogan, Daniel J.; Bogan, Janet R.; Dow, Jennifer L.; Hawkins, Eleanor C.

    2013-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a well-established model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The value of this model would be greatly enhanced with practical tools to monitor progression of respiratory dysfunction during treatment trials. Arterial blood gas analysis, tidal breathing spirometry, and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) were performed to determine if quantifiable abnormalities could be identified in unsedated, untrained, GRMD dogs. Results from 11 dogs with a mild phenotype of GRMD and 11 age-matched carriers were compared. Arterial blood gas analysis was successfully performed in all dogs, spirometry in 21 of 22 (95%) dogs, and RIP in 18 of 20 (90%) dogs. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate concentration were higher in GRMD dogs. Tidal breathing peak expiratory flows were markedly higher in GRMD dogs. Abnormal abdominal motion was present in 7 of 10 (70%) GRMD dogs. Each technique provided objective, quantifiable measures that will be useful for monitoring respiratory function in GRMD dogs during clinical trials while avoiding the influence of sedation on results. Increased expiratory flows and the pattern of abdominal breathing are novel findings, not reported in people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and might be a consequence of hyperinflation. PMID:24295812

  6. Muscle satellite cells from GRMD dystrophic dogs are not phenotypically distinguishable from wild type satellite cells in ex vivo culture

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Zachary; Beffa, Lucas R.; Cook, Daniel P.; Cornelison, D.D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a neuromuscular degenerative disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin protein. It is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and cycles of degeneration/regeneration accompanying chronic muscle damage and repair. Canine models of muscular dystrophy, including the dystrophin-deficient golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD), are the most promising animal models for evaluation of potential therapies, however canine-specific molecular tools are limited. In particular, few immune reagents for extracellular epitopes marking canine satellite cells (muscle stem cells) are available. We generated an antibody to the satellite cell marker syndecan-4 that identifies canine satellite cells. We then characterized isolated satellite cells from GRMD muscle and wildtype muscle by several in vitro metrics, and surprisingly found no significant differences between the two populations. We discuss whether accumulated adverse changes in the muscle environment rather than cell-intrinsic defects may be implicated in the eventual failure of satellite cell efficacy in vivo. PMID:21277207

  7. Muscle satellite cells from GRMD dystrophic dogs are not phenotypically distinguishable from wild type satellite cells in ex vivo culture.

    PubMed

    Berg, Zachary; Beffa, Lucas R; Cook, Daniel P; Cornelison, D D W

    2011-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a neuromuscular degenerative disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin protein. It is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and cycles of degeneration/regeneration accompanying chronic muscle damage and repair. Canine models of muscular dystrophy, including the dystrophin-deficient golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD), are the most promising animal models for evaluation of potential therapies, however canine-specific molecular tools are limited. In particular, few immune reagents for extracellular epitopes marking canine satellite cells (muscle stem cells) are available. We generated an antibody to the satellite cell marker syndecan-4 that identifies canine satellite cells. We then characterized isolated satellite cells from GRMD muscle and wildtype muscle by several in vitro metrics, and surprisingly found no significant differences between the two populations. We discuss whether accumulated adverse changes in the muscle environment rather than cell-intrinsic defects may be implicated in the eventual failure of satellite cell efficacy in vivo. PMID:21277207

  8. Canine Models of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Their Use in Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kornegay, Joe N.; Bogan, Janet R.; Bogan, Daniel J.; Childers, Martin K.; Li, Juan; Nghiem, Peter; Detwiler, David A.; Larsen, C. Aaron; Grange, Robert W.; Bhavaraju-Sanka, Ratna K.; Tou, Sandra; Keene, Bruce P.; Howard, James F.; Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Schatzberg, Scott J.; Styner, Martin A.; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Xiao, Xiao; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder in which the loss of dystrophin causes progressive degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. Potential therapies that carry substantial risk, such as gene and cell-based approaches, must first be tested in animal models, notably the mdx mouse and several dystrophin-deficient breeds of dogs, including golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD). Affected dogs have a more severe phenotype, in keeping with that of DMD, so may better predict disease pathogenesis and treatment efficacy. We and others have developed various phenotypic tests to characterize disease progression in the GRMD model. These biomarkers range from measures of strength and joint contractures to magnetic resonance imaging. Some of these tests are routinely used in clinical veterinary practice, while others require specialized equipment and expertise. By comparing serial measurements from treated and untreated groups, one can document improvement or delayed progression of disease. Potential treatments for DMD may be broadly categorized as molecular, cellular, or pharmacologic. The GRMD model has increasingly been used to assess efficacy of a range of these therapies. While some of these studies have largely provided general proof-of-concept for the treatment under study, others have demonstrated efficacy using the biomarkers discussed. Importantly, just as symptoms in DMD vary among patients, GRMD dogs display remarkable phenotypic variation. While confounding statistical analysis in preclinical trials, this variation offers insight regarding the role that modifier genes play in disease pathogenesis. By correlating functional and mRNA profiling results, gene targets for therapy development can be identified. PMID:22218699

  9. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. This disease is modeled by a variety of animal models including several fish models, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially t...

  10. Transplantation of Human Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Non-Immunosuppressed GRMD Dogs is a Safe Procedure.

    PubMed

    Pelatti, M V; Gomes, J P A; Vieira, N M S; Cangussu, E; Landini, V; Andrade, T; Sartori, M; Petrus, L; Zatz, Mayana

    2016-08-01

    The possibility to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a lethal X-linked disorder, through cell therapy with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been widely investigated in different animal models. However, some crucial questions need to be addressed before starting human therapeutic trials, particularly regarding its use for genetic disorders. How safe is the procedure? Are there any side effects following mesenchymal stem cell transplantation? To address these questions for DMD the best model is the golden retriever muscular dystrophy dog (GRMD), which is the closest model to the human condition displaying a much longer lifespan than other models. Here we report the follow-up of 5 GRMD dogs, which were repeatedly transplanted with human adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hASC), derived from different donors. Xenogeneic cell transplantation, which was done without immunosuppression, was well tolerated in all animals with no apparent long-term adverse effect. In the present study, we show that repeated heterologous stem-cell injection is a safe procedure, which is fundamental before starting human clinical trials. PMID:27193781

  11. Preclinical Studies with Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Different Animal Models for Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zucconi, Eder; Vieira, Natassia Moreira; Bueno, Carlos Roberto; Secco, Mariane; Jazedje, Tatiana; Costa Valadares, Marcos; Fussae Suzuki, Miriam; Bartolini, Paolo; Vainzof, Mariz; Zatz, Mayana

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been widely investigated for cell-based therapy studies as an alternative source to bone marrow transplantation. Umbilical cord tissue is a rich source of MSCs with potential to derivate at least muscle, cartilage, fat, and bone cells in vitro. The possibility to replace the defective muscle cells using cell therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of progressive muscular dystrophies (PMDs), independently of the specific gene mutation. Therefore, preclinical studies in different models of muscular dystrophies are of utmost importance. The main objective of the present study is to evaluate if umbilical cord MSCs have the potential to reach and differentiate into muscle cells in vivo in two animal models of PMDs. In order to address this question we injected (1) human umbilical cord tissue (hUCT) MSCs into the caudal vein of SJL mice; (2) hUCT and canine umbilical cord vein (cUCV) MSCs intra-arterially in GRMD dogs. Our results here reported support the safety of the procedure and indicate that the injected cells could engraft in the host muscle in both animal models but could not differentiate into muscle cells. These observations may provide important information aiming future therapy for muscular dystrophies. PMID:21785565

  12. MRI-based quantification of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Kornegay, Joe N.; Styner, Martin A.

    2011-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive and fatal X-linked disease caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has shown potential to provide non-invasive and objective biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and therapeutic effect in DMD. In this paper, we propose a semi-automated scheme to quantify MRI features of golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD), a canine model of DMD. Our method was applied to a natural history data set and a hydrodynamic limb perfusion data set. The scheme is composed of three modules: pre-processing, muscle segmentation, and feature analysis. The pre-processing module includes: calculation of T2 maps, spatial registration of T2 weighted (T2WI) images, T2 weighted fat suppressed (T2FS) images, and T2 maps, and intensity calibration of T2WI and T2FS images. We then manually segment six pelvic limb muscles. For each of the segmented muscles, we finally automatically measure volume and intensity statistics of the T2FS images and T2 maps. For the natural history study, our results showed that four of six muscles in affected dogs had smaller volumes and all had higher mean intensities in T2 maps as compared to normal dogs. For the perfusion study, the muscle volumes and mean intensities in T2FS were increased in the post-perfusion MRI scans as compared to pre-perfusion MRI scans, as predicted. We conclude that our scheme successfully performs quantitative analysis of muscle MRI features of GRMD.

  13. Comparative Genomics of X-linked Muscular Dystrophies: The Golden Retriever Model

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice; Kornegay, Joe N.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease that dramatically decreases the lifespan and abilities of affected young people. The primary molecular cause of the disease is the absence of functional dystrophin protein, which is critical to proper muscle function. Those with DMD vary in disease presentation and dystrophin mutation; the same causal mutation may be associated with drastically different levels of disease severity. Also contributing to this variation are the influences of additional modifying genes and/or changes in functional elements governing such modifiers. This genetic heterogeneity complicates the efficacy of treatment methods and to date medical interventions are limited to treating symptoms. Animal models of DMD have been instrumental in teasing out the intricacies of DMD disease and hold great promise for advancing knowledge of its variable presentation and treatment. This review addresses the utility of comparative genomics in elucidating the complex background behind phenotypic variation in a canine model of DMD, Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD). This knowledge can be exploited in the development of improved, more personalized treatments for DMD patients, such as therapies that can be tailor-matched to the disease course and genomic background of individual patients. PMID:24403852

  14. Animal Models of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Rainer; Banks, Glen B.; Hall, John K.; Muir, Lindsey A.; Ramos, Julian N.; Wicki, Jacqueline; Odom, Guy L.; Konieczny, Patryk; Seto, Jane; Chamberlain, Joel R.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies (MDs) represent a diverse collection of inherited human disorders, which affect to varying degrees skeletal, cardiac, and sometimes smooth muscle (Emery, 20021). To date, more than 50 different genes have been implicated as causing one or more types of MD (Bansal et al., 20032). In many cases, invaluable insights into disease mechanisms, structure and function of gene products, and approaches for therapeutic interventions have benefited from the study of animal models of the different MDs (Arnett et al., 20093). The large number of genes that are associated with MD and the tremendous number of animal models that have been developed preclude a complete discussion of each in the context of this review. However, we summarize here a number of the more commonly used models together with a mixture of different types of gene and MD, which serves to give a general overview of the value of animal models of MD for research and therapeutic development. PMID:22137430

  15. Diaphragm remodeling and compensatory respiratory mechanics in a canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mead, A. F.; Petrov, M.; Malik, A. S.; Mitchell, M. A.; Childers, M. K.; Bogan, J. R.; Seidner, G.; Kornegay, J. N.

    2014-01-01

    Ventilatory insufficiency remains the leading cause of death and late stage morbidity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). To address critical gaps in our knowledge of the pathobiology of respiratory functional decline, we used an integrative approach to study respiratory mechanics in a translational model of DMD. In studies of individual dogs with the Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) mutation, we found evidence of rapidly progressive loss of ventilatory capacity in association with dramatic morphometric remodeling of the diaphragm. Within the first year of life, the mechanics of breathing at rest, and especially during pharmacological stimulation of respiratory control pathways in the carotid bodies, shift such that the primary role of the diaphragm becomes the passive elastic storage of energy transferred from abdominal wall muscles, thereby permitting the expiratory musculature to share in the generation of inspiratory pressure and flow. In the diaphragm, this physiological shift is associated with the loss of sarcomeres in series (∼60%) and an increase in muscle stiffness (∼900%) compared with those of the nondystrophic diaphragm, as studied during perfusion ex vivo. In addition to providing much needed endpoint measures for assessing the efficacy of therapeutics, we expect these findings to be a starting point for a more precise understanding of respiratory failure in DMD. PMID:24408990

  16. Profiles of Steroid Hormones in Canine X-Linked Muscular Dystrophy via Stable Isotope Dilution LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Júnior, Helio A.; Simas, Rosineide C.; Brolio, Marina P.; Ferreira, Christina R.; Perecin, Felipe; Nogueira, Guilherme de P.; Miglino, Maria A.; Martins, Daniele S.; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Ambrósio, Carlos E.

    2015-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) provides the best animal model for characterizing the disease progress of the human disorder, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The purpose of this study was to determine steroid hormone concentration profiles in healthy golden retriever dogs (control group - CtGR) versus GRMD-gene carrier (CaGR) and affected female dogs (AfCR). Therefore, a sensitive and specific analytical method was developed and validated to determine the estradiol, progesterone, cortisol, and testosterone levels in the canine serum by isotope dilution liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To more accurately understand the dynamic nature of the serum steroid profile, the fluctuating levels of these four steroid hormones over the estrous cycle were compared across the three experimental groups using a multivariate statistical analysis. The concentration profiles of estradiol, cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone revealed a characteristic pattern for each studied group at each specific estrous phase. Additionally, several important changes in the serum concentrations of cortisol and estradiol in the CaGR and AfCR groups seem to be correlated with the status and progression of the muscular dystrophy. A comprehensive and quantitative monitoring of steroid profiles throughout the estrous cycle of normal and GRMD dogs were achieved. Significant differences in these profiles were observed between GRMD and healthy animals, most notably for estradiol. These findings contribute to a better understanding of both dog reproduction and the muscular dystrophy pathology. Our data open new venues for hormonal behavior studies in dystrophinopathies and that may affect the quality of life of DMD patients. PMID:26010907

  17. Profiles of Steroid Hormones in Canine X-Linked Muscular Dystrophy via Stable Isotope Dilution LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Martins-Júnior, Helio A; Simas, Rosineide C; Brolio, Marina P; Ferreira, Christina R; Perecin, Felipe; Nogueira, Guilherme de P; Miglino, Maria A; Martins, Daniele S; Eberlin, Marcos N; Ambrósio, Carlos E

    2015-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) provides the best animal model for characterizing the disease progress of the human disorder, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The purpose of this study was to determine steroid hormone concentration profiles in healthy golden retriever dogs (control group - CtGR) versus GRMD-gene carrier (CaGR) and affected female dogs (AfCR). Therefore, a sensitive and specific analytical method was developed and validated to determine the estradiol, progesterone, cortisol, and testosterone levels in the canine serum by isotope dilution liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). To more accurately understand the dynamic nature of the serum steroid profile, the fluctuating levels of these four steroid hormones over the estrous cycle were compared across the three experimental groups using a multivariate statistical analysis. The concentration profiles of estradiol, cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone revealed a characteristic pattern for each studied group at each specific estrous phase. Additionally, several important changes in the serum concentrations of cortisol and estradiol in the CaGR and AfCR groups seem to be correlated with the status and progression of the muscular dystrophy. A comprehensive and quantitative monitoring of steroid profiles throughout the estrous cycle of normal and GRMD dogs were achieved. Significant differences in these profiles were observed between GRMD and healthy animals, most notably for estradiol. These findings contribute to a better understanding of both dog reproduction and the muscular dystrophy pathology. Our data open new venues for hormonal behavior studies in dystrophinopathies and that may affect the quality of life of DMD patients. PMID:26010907

  18. Bortezomib (PS-341) Treatment Decreases Inflammation and Partially Rescues the Expression of the Dystrophin-Glycoprotein Complex in GRMD Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Karla P. C.; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Duarte, Caio N.; Gaiad, Thais P.; Moreira, Dayson F.; Feder, David; Belizario, José E.; Miglino, Maria A.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Ambrosio, Carlos E.

    2013-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a genetic myopathy corresponding to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in humans. Muscle atrophy is known to be associated with degradation of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In the present study, we investigated the effect of bortezomib treatment on the muscle fibers of GRMD dogs. Five GRMD dogs were examined; two were treated (TD- Treated dogs) with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, and three were control dogs (CD). Dogs were treated with bortezomib using the same treatment regimen used for multiple myeloma. Pharmacodynamics were evaluated by measuring the inhibition of 20S proteasome activity in whole blood after treatment and comparing it to that in CD. We performed immunohistochemical studies on muscle biopsy specimens to evaluate the rescue of dystrophin and dystrophin-associated proteins in the muscles of GRMD dogs treated with bortezomib. Skeletal tissue from TD had lower levels of connective tissue deposition and inflammatory cell infiltration than CD as determined by histology, collagen morphometry and ultrastructural analysis. The CD showed higher expression of phospho-NFκB and TGF-β1, suggesting a more pronounced activation of anti-apoptotic factors and inflammatory molecules and greater connective tissue deposition, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that dystrophin was not present in the sarcoplasmic membrane of either group. However, bortezomib-TD showed higher expression of α- and β-dystroglycan, indicating an improved disease histopathology phenotype. Significant inhibition of 20S proteasome activity was observed 1 hour after bortezomib administration in the last cycle when the dose was higher. Proteasome inhibitors may thus improve the appearance of GRMD muscle fibers, lessen connective tissue deposition and reduce the infiltration of inflammatory cells. In addition, proteasome inhibitors may rescue some dystrophin

  19. Zebrafish models for human FKRP muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Genri; Guyon, Jeffrey R; Nakamura, Yukio; Kunkel, Louis M

    2010-02-15

    Various muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan and are known to result from mutations in genes encoding glycosyltransferases. Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) was identified as a homolog of fukutin, the defective protein in Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), that is thought to function as a glycosyltransferase. Mutations in FKRP have been linked to a variety of phenotypes including Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2I and congenital muscular dystrophy 1C (MDC1C). Zebrafish are a useful animal model to reveal the mechanism of these diseases caused by mutations in FKRP gene. Downregulating FKRP expression in zebrafish by two different morpholinos resulted in embryos which had developmental defects similar to those observed in human muscular dystrophies associated with mutations in FKRP. The FKRP morphants showed phenotypes involving alterations in somitic structure and muscle fiber organization, as well as defects in developing eye morphology. Additionally, they were found to have a reduction in alpha-dystroglycan glycosylation and a shortened myofiber length. Moreover, co-injection of fish or human FKRP mRNA along with the morpholino restored normal development, alpha-dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding activity of alpha-dystroglycan in the morphants. Co-injection of the human FKRP mRNA containing causative mutations found in human patients of WWS, MDC1C and LGMD2I could not restore their phenotypes significantly. Interestingly, these morphant fish having human FKRP mutations showed a wide phenotypic range similar to that seen in humans. PMID:19955119

  20. Zebrafish models for human FKRP muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Genri; Guyon, Jeffrey R.; Nakamura, Yukio; Kunkel, Louis M.

    2010-01-01

    Various muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of α-dystroglycan and are known to result from mutations in genes encoding glycosyltransferases. Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) was identified as a homolog of fukutin, the defective protein in Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), that is thought to function as a glycosyltransferase. Mutations in FKRP have been linked to a variety of phenotypes including Walker–Warburg syndrome (WWS), limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2I and congenital muscular dystrophy 1C (MDC1C). Zebrafish are a useful animal model to reveal the mechanism of these diseases caused by mutations in FKRP gene. Downregulating FKRP expression in zebrafish by two different morpholinos resulted in embryos which had developmental defects similar to those observed in human muscular dystrophies associated with mutations in FKRP. The FKRP morphants showed phenotypes involving alterations in somitic structure and muscle fiber organization, as well as defects in developing eye morphology. Additionally, they were found to have a reduction in α-dystroglycan glycosylation and a shortened myofiber length. Moreover, co-injection of fish or human FKRP mRNA along with the morpholino restored normal development, α-dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding activity of α-dystroglycan in the morphants. Co-injection of the human FKRP mRNA containing causative mutations found in human patients of WWS, MDC1C and LGMD2I could not restore their phenotypes significantly. Interestingly, these morphant fish having human FKRP mutations showed a wide phenotypic range similar to that seen in humans. PMID:19955119

  1. Dog models for blinding inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Komáromy, András M

    2015-03-01

    Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials. PMID:25671556

  2. Dog Models for Blinding Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Komáromy, András M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Spontaneous canine models exist for several inherited retinal dystrophies. This review will summarize the models and indicate where they have been used in translational gene therapy trials. The RPE65 gene therapy trials to treat childhood blindness are a good example of how studies in dogs have contributed to therapy development. Outcomes in human clinical trials are compared and contrasted with the result of the preclinical dog trials. PMID:25671556

  3. Porcine Models of Muscular Dystrophy1

    PubMed Central

    Selsby, Joshua T.; Ross, Jason W.; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease. PMID:25991703

  4. Pharmacologic Management of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Target Identification and Preclinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kornegay, Joe N.; Spurney, Christopher F.; Nghiem, Peter P.; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked human disorder in which absence of the protein dystrophin causes degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. For the sake of treatment development, over and above definitive genetic and cell-based therapies, there is considerable interest in drugs that target downstream disease mechanisms. Drug candidates have typically been chosen based on the nature of pathologic lesions and presumed underlying mechanisms and then tested in animal models. Mammalian dystrophinopathies have been characterized in mice (mdx mouse) and dogs (golden retriever muscular dystrophy [GRMD]). Despite promising results in the mdx mouse, some therapies have not shown efficacy in DMD. Although the GRMD model offers a higher hurdle for translation, dogs have primarily been used to test genetic and cellular therapies where there is greater risk. Failed translation of animal studies to DMD raises questions about the propriety of methods and models used to identify drug targets and test efficacy of pharmacologic intervention. The mdx mouse and GRMD dog are genetically homologous to DMD but not necessarily analogous. Subcellular species differences are undoubtedly magnified at the whole-body level in clinical trials. This problem is compounded by disparate cultures in clinical trials and preclinical studies, pointing to a need for greater rigor and transparency in animal experiments. Molecular assays such as mRNA arrays and genome-wide association studies allow identification of genetic drug targets more closely tied to disease pathogenesis. Genes in which polymorphisms have been directly linked to DMD disease progression, as with osteopontin, are particularly attractive targets. PMID:24936034

  5. Jagged 1 Rescues the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Natassia M; Elvers, Ingegerd; Alexander, Matthew S; Moreira, Yuri B; Eran, Alal; Gomes, Juliana P; Marshall, Jamie L; Karlsson, Elinor K; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Kunkel, Louis M; Zatz, Mayana

    2015-11-19

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), caused by mutations at the dystrophin gene, is the most common form of muscular dystrophy. There is no cure for DMD and current therapeutic approaches to restore dystrophin expression are only partially effective. The absence of dystrophin in muscle results in dysregulation of signaling pathways, which could be targets for disease therapy and drug discovery. Previously, we identified two exceptional Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs that are mildly affected, have functional muscle, and normal lifespan despite the complete absence of dystrophin. Now, our data on linkage, whole-genome sequencing, and transcriptome analyses of these dogs compared to severely affected GRMD and control animals reveals that increased expression of Jagged1 gene, a known regulator of the Notch signaling pathway, is a hallmark of the mild phenotype. Functional analyses demonstrate that Jagged1 overexpression ameliorates the dystrophic phenotype, suggesting that Jagged1 may represent a target for DMD therapy in a dystrophin-independent manner. PAPERCLIP. PMID:26582133

  6. Genetic Engineering of Dystroglycan in Animal Models of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sciandra, Francesca; Bigotti, Maria Giulia; Giardina, Bruno; Bozzi, Manuela; Brancaccio, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, dystroglycan (DG) is the central component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), a multimeric protein complex that ensures a strong mechanical link between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. Several muscular dystrophies arise from mutations hitting most of the components of the DGC. Mutations within the DG gene (DAG1) have been recently associated with two forms of muscular dystrophy, one displaying a milder and one a more severe phenotype. This review focuses specifically on the animal (murine and others) model systems that have been developed with the aim of directly engineering DAG1 in order to study the DG function in skeletal muscle as well as in other tissues. In the last years, conditional animal models overcoming the embryonic lethality of the DG knock-out in mouse have been generated and helped clarifying the crucial role of DG in skeletal muscle, while an increasing number of studies on knock-in mice are aimed at understanding the contribution of single amino acids to the stability of DG and to the possible development of muscular dystrophy. PMID:26380289

  7. Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy; Muscular Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Steinert's Disease; Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

  8. Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy in the canine model.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same way as human patients do. Further, the size of a mouse is hundredfolds smaller than a boy, making it impossible to scale-up gene therapy in a mouse model. None of these limitations exist in the canine DMD (cDMD) model. For this reason, cDMD dogs have been considered a highly valuable platform to test experimental DMD gene therapy. Over the last three decades, a variety of gene therapy approaches have been evaluated in cDMD dogs using a number of nonviral and viral vectors. These studies have provided critical insight for the development of an effective gene therapy protocol in human patients. This review discusses the history, current status, and future directions of the DMD gene therapy in the canine model. PMID:25710459

  9. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Therapy in the Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disease caused by dystrophin deficiency. Gene therapy has significantly improved the outcome of dystrophin-deficient mice. Yet, clinical translation has not resulted in the expected benefits in human patients. This translational gap is largely because of the insufficient modeling of DMD in mice. Specifically, mice lacking dystrophin show minimum dystrophic symptoms, and they do not respond to the gene therapy vector in the same way as human patients do. Further, the size of a mouse is hundredfolds smaller than a boy, making it impossible to scale-up gene therapy in a mouse model. None of these limitations exist in the canine DMD (cDMD) model. For this reason, cDMD dogs have been considered a highly valuable platform to test experimental DMD gene therapy. Over the last three decades, a variety of gene therapy approaches have been evaluated in cDMD dogs using a number of nonviral and viral vectors. These studies have provided critical insight for the development of an effective gene therapy protocol in human patients. This review discusses the history, current status, and future directions of the DMD gene therapy in the canine model. PMID:25710459

  10. A Model of Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Marmorstein, Alan D.; Stanton, J. Brett; Yocom, John; Bakall, Benjamin; Schiavone, Marc T.; Wadelius, Claes; Marmorstein, Lihua Y.; Peachey, Neal S.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The VMD2 gene, mutated in Best macular dystrophy (BMD) encodes bestrophin, a 68-kDa basolateral plasma membrane protein expressed in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. BMD is characterized by a depressed light peak (LP) in the electro-oculogram. Bestrophin is thought to be the Cl channel that generates the LP. The goal was to generate an animal model of BMD and to determine the effects of bestrophin overexpression on the RPE-generated components of the ERG. METHODS Bestrophin or bestrophin mutants (W93C or R218C) were overexpressed in the RPE of rats by injection of replication-defective adenovirus. Immunofluorescence microscopy and ERG recordings were used to study subsequent effects. RESULTS Bestrophin was confined to the basolateral plasma membrane of the RPE. Neither wild-type (wt) nor mutant bestrophin affected the a- or b-waves of the ERG. Wt bestrophin, however, increased the c-wave and fast oscillation (FO), but not the LP. In contrast, both mutants had little or no effect on the c-wave and FO, but did reduce LP amplitude. LP amplitudes across a range of stimuli were not altered by wt bestrophin, though the luminance response function was desensitized. LP response functions were unaffected by bestrophin R218C but were significantly altered by bestrophin W93C. CONCLUSIONS A model of BMD was developed in the present study. Because overexpression of wt bestrophin shifted luminance response but did not alter the range of LP response amplitudes, the authors conclude that the rate-limiting step for generating LP amplitude occurs before activation of bestrophin or that bestrophin does not directly generate the LP conductance. PMID:15452084

  11. Analysing regenerative potential in zebrafish models of congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wood, A J; Currie, P D

    2014-11-01

    The congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of muscle disorders. Clinically hypotonia is present from birth, with progressive muscle weakness and wasting through development. For the most part, CMDs can mechanistically be attributed to failure of basement membrane protein laminin-α2 sufficiently binding with correctly glycosylated α-dystroglycan. The majority of CMDs therefore arise as the result of either a deficiency of laminin-α2 (MDC1A) or hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (dystroglycanopathy). Here we consider whether by filling a regenerative medicine niche, the zebrafish model can address the present challenge of delivering novel therapeutic solutions for CMD. In the first instance the readiness and appropriateness of the zebrafish as a model organism for pioneering regenerative medicine therapies in CMD is analysed, in particular for MDC1A and the dystroglycanopathies. Despite the recent rapid progress made in gene editing technology, these approaches have yet to yield any novel zebrafish models of CMD. Currently the most genetically relevant zebrafish models to the field of CMD, have all been created by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis. Once genetically relevant models have been established the zebrafish has several important facets for investigating the mechanistic cause of CMD, including rapid ex vivo development, optical transparency up to the larval stages of development and relative ease in creating transgenic reporter lines. Together, these tools are well suited for use in live-imaging studies such as in vivo modelling of muscle fibre detachment. Secondly, the zebrafish's contribution to progress in effective treatment of CMD was analysed. Two approaches were identified in which zebrafish could potentially contribute to effective therapies. The first hinges on the augmentation of functional redundancy within the system, such as upregulating alternative laminin chains in the candyfloss

  12. Modeling Myotonic Dystrophy 1 in C2C12 Myoblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rui; Dong, Wei; Shen, Xiaopeng; Peng, Xiaoping; Aceves, Angie G; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) is a common form of muscular dystrophy. Although several animal models have been established for DM1, myoblast cell models are still important because they offer an efficient cellular alternative for studying cellular and molecular events. Though C2C12 myoblast cells have been widely used to study myogenesis, resistance to gene transfection, or viral transduction, hinders research in C2C12 cells. Here, we describe an optimized protocol that includes daily maintenance, transfection and transduction procedures to introduce genes into C2C12 myoblasts and the induction of myocyte differentiation. Collectively, these procedures enable best transfection/transduction efficiencies, as well as consistent differentiation outcomes. The protocol described in establishing DM1 myoblast cell models would benefit the study of myotonic dystrophy, as well as other muscular diseases. PMID:27501221

  13. Model organisms in the fight against muscular dystrophy: lessons from drosophila and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Plantié, Emilie; Migocka-Patrzałek, Marta; Daczewska, Małgorzata; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that cause muscle weakness, abnormal contractions and muscle wasting, often leading to premature death. More than 30 types of MD have been described so far; those most thoroughly studied are Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and congenital MDs. Structurally, physiologically and biochemically, MDs affect different types of muscles and cause individual symptoms such that genetic and molecular pathways underlying their pathogenesis thus remain poorly understood. To improve our knowledge of how MD-caused muscle defects arise and to find efficacious therapeutic treatments, different animal models have been generated and applied. Among these, simple non-mammalian Drosophila and zebrafish models have proved most useful. This review discusses how zebrafish and Drosophila MD have helped to identify genetic determinants of MDs and design innovative therapeutic strategies with a special focus on DMD, DM1 and congenital MDs. PMID:25859781

  14. NAD+ Biosynthesis Ameliorates a Zebrafish Model of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Goody, Michelle F.; Kelly, Meghan W.; Reynolds, Christine J.; Khalil, Andre; Crawford, Bryan D.; Henry, Clarissa A.

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are common, currently incurable diseases. A subset of dystrophies result from genetic disruptions in complexes that attach muscle fibers to their surrounding extracellular matrix microenvironment. Cell-matrix adhesions are exquisite sensors of physiological conditions and mediate responses that allow cells to adapt to changing conditions. Thus, one approach towards finding targets for future therapeutic applications is to identify cell adhesion pathways that mediate these dynamic, adaptive responses in vivo. We find that nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, which functions as a small molecule agonist of muscle fiber-extracellular matrix adhesion, corrects dystrophic phenotypes in zebrafish lacking either a primary component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex or integrin alpha7. Exogenous NAD+ or a vitamin precursor to NAD+ reduces muscle fiber degeneration and results in significantly faster escape responses in dystrophic embryos. Overexpression of paxillin, a cell adhesion protein downstream of NAD+ in this novel cell adhesion pathway, reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish with intact integrin receptors but does not improve motility. Activation of this pathway significantly increases organization of laminin, a major component of the extracellular matrix basement membrane. Our results indicate that the primary protective effects of NAD+ result from changes to the basement membrane, as a wild-type basement membrane is sufficient to increase resilience of dystrophic muscle fibers to damage. The surprising result that NAD+ supplementation ameliorates dystrophy in dystrophin-glycoprotein complex– or integrin alpha7–deficient zebrafish suggests the existence of an additional laminin receptor complex that anchors muscle fibers to the basement membrane. We find that integrin alpha6 participates in this pathway, but either integrin alpha7 or the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is required in conjunction with integrin

  15. NAD+ biosynthesis ameliorates a zebrafish model of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Goody, Michelle F; Kelly, Meghan W; Reynolds, Christine J; Khalil, Andre; Crawford, Bryan D; Henry, Clarissa A

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are common, currently incurable diseases. A subset of dystrophies result from genetic disruptions in complexes that attach muscle fibers to their surrounding extracellular matrix microenvironment. Cell-matrix adhesions are exquisite sensors of physiological conditions and mediate responses that allow cells to adapt to changing conditions. Thus, one approach towards finding targets for future therapeutic applications is to identify cell adhesion pathways that mediate these dynamic, adaptive responses in vivo. We find that nicotinamide riboside kinase 2b-mediated NAD+ biosynthesis, which functions as a small molecule agonist of muscle fiber-extracellular matrix adhesion, corrects dystrophic phenotypes in zebrafish lacking either a primary component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex or integrin alpha7. Exogenous NAD+ or a vitamin precursor to NAD+ reduces muscle fiber degeneration and results in significantly faster escape responses in dystrophic embryos. Overexpression of paxillin, a cell adhesion protein downstream of NAD+ in this novel cell adhesion pathway, reduces muscle degeneration in zebrafish with intact integrin receptors but does not improve motility. Activation of this pathway significantly increases organization of laminin, a major component of the extracellular matrix basement membrane. Our results indicate that the primary protective effects of NAD+ result from changes to the basement membrane, as a wild-type basement membrane is sufficient to increase resilience of dystrophic muscle fibers to damage. The surprising result that NAD+ supplementation ameliorates dystrophy in dystrophin-glycoprotein complex- or integrin alpha7-deficient zebrafish suggests the existence of an additional laminin receptor complex that anchors muscle fibers to the basement membrane. We find that integrin alpha6 participates in this pathway, but either integrin alpha7 or the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex is required in conjunction with integrin alpha

  16. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the Mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the diet...

  17. Successful Gene Therapy in the RPGRIP1-deficient Dog: a Large Model of Cone–Rod Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lhériteau, Elsa; Petit, Lolita; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Libeau, Lyse; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Guihal, Caroline; François, Achille; Guyon, Richard; Provost, Nathalie; Lemoine, Françoise; Papal, Samantha; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    For the development of new therapies, proof-of-concept studies in large animal models that share clinical features with their human counterparts represent a pivotal step. For inherited retinal dystrophies primarily involving photoreceptor cells, the efficacy of gene therapy has been demonstrated in canine models of stationary cone dystrophies and progressive rod–cone dystrophies but not in large models of progressive cone–rod dystrophies, another important cause of blindness. To address the last issue, we evaluated gene therapy in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1)-deficient dog, a model exhibiting a severe cone–rod dystrophy similar to that seen in humans. Subretinal injection of AAV5 (n = 5) or AAV8 (n = 2) encoding the canine Rpgrip1 improved photoreceptor survival in transduced areas of treated retinas. Cone function was significantly and stably rescued in all treated eyes (18–72% of those recorded in normal eyes) up to 24 months postinjection. Rod function was also preserved (22–29% of baseline function) in four of the five treated dogs up to 24 months postinjection. No detectable rod function remained in untreated contralateral eyes. More importantly, treatment preserved bright- and dim-light vision. Efficacy of gene therapy in this large animal model of cone–rod dystrophy provides great promise for human treatment. PMID:24091916

  18. Successful gene therapy in the RPGRIP1-deficient dog: a large model of cone-rod dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lhériteau, Elsa; Petit, Lolita; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Libeau, Lyse; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Guihal, Caroline; François, Achille; Guyon, Richard; Provost, Nathalie; Lemoine, Françoise; Papal, Samantha; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2014-02-01

    For the development of new therapies, proof-of-concept studies in large animal models that share clinical features with their human counterparts represent a pivotal step. For inherited retinal dystrophies primarily involving photoreceptor cells, the efficacy of gene therapy has been demonstrated in canine models of stationary cone dystrophies and progressive rod-cone dystrophies but not in large models of progressive cone-rod dystrophies, another important cause of blindness. To address the last issue, we evaluated gene therapy in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1)-deficient dog, a model exhibiting a severe cone-rod dystrophy similar to that seen in humans. Subretinal injection of AAV5 (n = 5) or AAV8 (n = 2) encoding the canine Rpgrip1 improved photoreceptor survival in transduced areas of treated retinas. Cone function was significantly and stably rescued in all treated eyes (18-72% of those recorded in normal eyes) up to 24 months postinjection. Rod function was also preserved (22-29% of baseline function) in four of the five treated dogs up to 24 months postinjection. No detectable rod function remained in untreated contralateral eyes. More importantly, treatment preserved bright- and dim-light vision. Efficacy of gene therapy in this large animal model of cone-rod dystrophy provides great promise for human treatment. PMID:24091916

  19. What do mouse models of muscular dystrophy tell us about the DAPC and its components?

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Charlotte; Morgan, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    There are over 30 mouse models with mutations or inactivations in the dystrophin-associated protein complex. This complex is thought to play a crucial role in the functioning of muscle, as both a shock absorber and signalling centre, although its role in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy is not fully understood. The first mouse model of muscular dystrophy to be identified with a mutation in a component of the dystrophin-associated complex (dystrophin) was the mdx mouse in 1984. Here, we evaluate the key characteristics of the mdx in comparison with other mouse mutants with inactivations in DAPC components, along with key modifiers of the disease phenotype. By discussing the differences between the individual phenotypes, we show that the functioning of the DAPC and consequently its role in the pathogenesis is more complicated than perhaps currently appreciated. PMID:25270874

  20. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dev. Med. Child Neurol. Mar 1995;37(3):260-269. 4. Centers for ... DM1) . The International Myotonic Dystrophy Consortium (IDMC). Neurology. Mar 28 2000;54(6):1218-1221. 5. Harper ...

  1. Muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001190.htm Muscular dystrophy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited disorders that cause ...

  2. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and ... ability to walk. There is no cure for muscular dystrophy. Treatments can help with the symptoms and prevent ...

  3. Muscle wasting in myotonic dystrophies: a model of premature aging

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Aierdi, Alba Judith; Goicoechea, Maria; Aiastui, Ana; Fernández-Torrón, Roberto; Garcia-Puga, Mikel; Matheu, Ander; López de Munain, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 or Steinert’s disease) and type 2 (DM2) are multisystem disorders of genetic origin. Progressive muscular weakness, atrophy and myotonia are the most prominent neuromuscular features of these diseases, while other clinical manifestations such as cardiomyopathy, insulin resistance and cataracts are also common. From a clinical perspective, most DM symptoms are interpreted as a result of an accelerated aging (cataracts, muscular weakness and atrophy, cognitive decline, metabolic dysfunction, etc.), including an increased risk of developing tumors. From this point of view, DM1 could be described as a progeroid syndrome since a notable age-dependent dysfunction of all systems occurs. The underlying molecular disorder in DM1 consists of the existence of a pathological (CTG) triplet expansion in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the Dystrophia Myotonica Protein Kinase (DMPK) gene, whereas (CCTG)n repeats in the first intron of the Cellular Nucleic acid Binding Protein/Zinc Finger Protein 9 (CNBP/ZNF9) gene cause DM2. The expansions are transcribed into (CUG)n and (CCUG)n-containing RNA, respectively, which form secondary structures and sequester RNA-binding proteins, such as the splicing factor muscleblind-like protein (MBNL), forming nuclear aggregates known as foci. Other splicing factors, such as CUGBP, are also disrupted, leading to a spliceopathy of a large number of downstream genes linked to the clinical features of these diseases. Skeletal muscle regeneration relies on muscle progenitor cells, known as satellite cells, which are activated after muscle damage, and which proliferate and differentiate to muscle cells, thus regenerating the damaged tissue. Satellite cell dysfunction seems to be a common feature of both age-dependent muscle degeneration (sarcopenia) and muscle wasting in DM and other muscle degenerative diseases. This review aims to describe the cellular, molecular and macrostructural processes involved in the

  4. Metabolic profiles of dystrophin and utrophin expression in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J L; Sang, E; Evens, T; Davies, K; Clarke, K

    2002-10-23

    Metabolic profiles from (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been used to describe both one and two protein systems in four mouse models related to Duchenne muscular dystrophy using the pattern recognition technique partial least squares. Robust statistical models were built for extracts and intact cardiac tissue, distinguishing mice according to expression of dystrophin. Using metabolic profiles of diaphragm, models were built describing dystrophin and utrophin, a dystrophin related protein, expression. Increased utrophin expression counteracted some of the deficits associated with dystrophic tissue. This suggests the method may be ideal for following treatment regimes such as gene therapy. PMID:12387876

  5. A Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Hot Spot Mutation in Dystrophin-Deficient Cavalier King Charles Spaniels Is Amenable to Exon 51 Skipping

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, Gemma L.; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia; Fernandez-Fuente, Marta; Burke, Margaret M.; Nagel, Nicole; Holder, Angela; Stanley, Rachael; Chandler, Kate; Marks, Stanley L.; Muntoni, Francesco; Shelton, G. Diane; Piercy, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which afflicts 1 in 3500 boys, is one of the most common genetic disorders of children. This fatal degenerative condition is caused by an absence or deficiency of dystrophin in striated muscle. Most affected patients have inherited or spontaneous deletions in the dystrophin gene that disrupt the reading frame resulting in unstable truncated products. For these patients, restoration of the reading frame via antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon skipping is a promising therapeutic approach. The major DMD deletion “hot spot” is found between exons 45 and 53, and skipping exon 51 in particular is predicted to ameliorate the dystrophic phenotype in the greatest number of patients. Currently the mdx mouse is the most widely used animal model of DMD, although its mild phenotype limits its suitability in clinical trials. The Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) model has a severe phenotype, but due to its large size, is expensive to use. Both these models have mutations in regions of the dystrophin gene distant from the commonly mutated DMD “hot spot”. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe the severe phenotype, histopathological findings, and molecular analysis of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with dystrophin-deficient muscular dystrophy (CKCS-MD). The dogs harbour a missense mutation in the 5′ donor splice site of exon 50 that results in deletion of exon 50 in mRNA transcripts and a predicted premature truncation of the translated protein. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated skipping of exon 51 in cultured myoblasts from an affected dog restored the reading frame and protein expression. Conclusions/Significance Given the small size of the breed, the amiable temperament and the nature of the mutation, we propose that CKCS-MD is a valuable new model for clinical trials of antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon skipping and other therapeutic approaches for DMD. PMID:20072625

  6. Engraftment of embryonic stem cell-derived myogenic progenitors in a dominant model of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Darabi, Radbod; Baik, June; Clee, Mark; Kyba, Michael; Tupler, Rossella; Perlingeiro, Rita C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) consist of a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, recessive or dominant, characterized by progressive skeletal muscle weakening. To date, no effective treatment is available. Experimental strategies pursuing muscle regeneration through the transplantation of stem cell preparations have brought hope to patients affected by this disorder. Efficacy has been demonstrated in recessive MD models through contribution of wild-type nuclei to the muscle fiber heterokaryon, however to date, there has been no study investigating the efficacy of a cell therapy in a dominant model of MD. We have recently demonstrated that Pax3-induced embryonic stem (ES) cell- derived myogenic progenitors are able to engraft and improve muscle function in mdx mice, a recessive mouse model for Duchenne MD. To assess whether this therapeutic effect can be extended to a dominant type of muscle disorder, here we transplanted these cells into FRG1 transgenic mice, a dominant model that has been associated with Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Our results show that Pax3-induced ES-derived myogenic progenitors are capable of significant engraftment after intramuscular or systemic transplantation into Frg1 mice. Analyses of contractile parameters revealed functional improvement in treated muscles of male mice, but not females, which are less severely affected. This study is the first to use Frg1 transgenic mice to assess muscle regeneration as well as to support the use of a cell-based therapy for autosomal dominant types of MD. PMID:19682990

  7. Characterization of Dystrophin Deficient Rats: A New Model for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Laurent; Remy, Séverine; Thepenier, Virginie; François, Virginie; Le Guiner, Caroline; Goubin, Helicia; Dutilleul, Maéva; Guigand, Lydie; Toumaniantz, Gilles; De Cian, Anne; Boix, Charlotte; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Cherel, Yan; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio; Huchet, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    A few animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are available, large ones such as pigs or dogs being expensive and difficult to handle. Mdx (X-linked muscular dystrophy) mice only partially mimic the human disease, with limited chronic muscular lesions and muscle weakness. Their small size also imposes limitations on analyses. A rat model could represent a useful alternative since rats are small animals but 10 times bigger than mice and could better reflect the lesions and functional abnormalities observed in DMD patients. Two lines of Dmd mutated-rats (Dmdmdx) were generated using TALENs targeting exon 23. Muscles of animals of both lines showed undetectable levels of dystrophin by western blot and less than 5% of dystrophin positive fibers by immunohistochemistry. At 3 months, limb and diaphragm muscles from Dmdmdx rats displayed severe necrosis and regeneration. At 7 months, these muscles also showed severe fibrosis and some adipose tissue infiltration. Dmdmdx rats showed significant reduction in muscle strength and a decrease in spontaneous motor activity. Furthermore, heart morphology was indicative of dilated cardiomyopathy associated histologically with necrotic and fibrotic changes. Echocardiography showed significant concentric remodeling and alteration of diastolic function. In conclusion, Dmdmdx rats represent a new faithful small animal model of DMD. PMID:25310701

  8. Repetitive magnetic stimulation improves retinal function in a rat model of retinal dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenstreich, Ygal; Tzameret, Adi; Levi, Nir; Kalish, Sapir; Sher, Ifat; Zangen, Avraham; Belkin, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Vision incapacitation and blindness associated with retinal dystrophies affect millions of people worldwide. Retinal degeneration is characterized by photoreceptor cell death and concomitant remodeling of remaining retinal cells. Repetitive Magnetic Stimulation (RMS) is a non-invasive technique that creates alternating magnetic fields by brief electric currents transmitted through an insulated coil. These magnetic field generate action potentials in neurons, and modulate the expression of neurotransmitter receptors, growth factors and transcription factors which mediate plasticity. This technology has been proven effective and safe in various psychiatric disorders. Here we determined the effect of RMS on retinal function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a model for retinal dystrophy. Four week-old RCS and control Spargue Dawley (SD) rats received sham or RMS treatment over the right eye (12 sessions on 4 weeks). RMS treatment at intensity of at 40% of the maximal output of a Rapid2 stimulator significantly increased the electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave responses by up to 6- or 10-fold in the left and right eye respectively, 3-5 weeks following end of treatment. RMS treatment at intensity of 25% of the maximal output did not significant effect b-wave responses following end of treatment with no adverse effect on ERG response or retinal structure of SD rats. Our findings suggest that RMS treatment induces delayed improvement of retinal functions and may induce plasticity in the retinal tissue. Furthermore, this non-invasive treatment may possibly be used in the future as a primary or adjuvant treatment for retinal dystrophy.

  9. Generation of muscular dystrophy model rats with a CRISPR/Cas system.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Fujii, Wataru; Tsuboi, Masaya; Tanihata, Jun; Teramoto, Naomi; Takeuchi, Shiho; Naito, Kunihiko; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked lethal muscle disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene encoding Dystrophin. DMD model animals, such as mdx mice and canine X-linked muscular dystrophy dogs, have been widely utilized in the development of a treatment for DMD. Here, we demonstrate the generation of Dmd-mutated rats using a clustered interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas system, an RNA-based genome engineering technique that is also adaptive to rats. We simultaneously targeted two exons in the rat Dmd gene, which resulted in the absence of Dystrophin expression in the F0 generation. Dmd-mutated rats exhibited a decline in muscle strength, and the emergence of degenerative/regenerative phenotypes in the skeletal muscle, heart, and diaphragm. These mutations were heritable by the next generation, and F1 male rats exhibited similar phenotypes in their skeletal muscles. These model rats should prove to be useful for developing therapeutic methods to treat DMD. PMID:25005781

  10. Modifications to toxic CUG RNAs induce structural stability, rescue mis-splicing in a myotonic dystrophy cell model and reduce toxicity in a myotonic dystrophy zebrafish model

    SciTech Connect

    deLorimier, Elaine; Coonrod, Leslie A.; Copperman, Jeremy; Taber, Alex; Reister, Emily E.; Sharma, Kush; Todd, Peter K.; Guenza, Marina G.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2014-10-10

    In this study, CUG repeat expansions in the 3' UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). As RNA, these repeats elicit toxicity by sequestering splicing proteins, such as MBNL1, into protein–RNA aggregates. Structural studies demonstrate that CUG repeats can form A-form helices, suggesting that repeat secondary structure could be important in pathogenicity. To evaluate this hypothesis, we utilized structure-stabilizing RNA modifications pseudouridine (Ψ) and 2'-O-methylation to determine if stabilization of CUG helical conformations affected toxicity. CUG repeats modified with Ψ or 2'-O-methyl groups exhibited enhanced structural stability and reduced affinity for MBNL1. Molecular dynamics and X-ray crystallography suggest a potential water-bridging mechanism for Ψ-mediated CUG repeat stabilization. Ψ modification of CUG repeats rescued mis-splicing in a DM1 cell model and prevented CUG repeat toxicity in zebrafish embryos. This study indicates that the structure of toxic RNAs has a significant role in controlling the onset of neuromuscular diseases.

  11. Modifications to toxic CUG RNAs induce structural stability, rescue mis-splicing in a myotonic dystrophy cell model and reduce toxicity in a myotonic dystrophy zebrafish model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    deLorimier, Elaine; Coonrod, Leslie A.; Copperman, Jeremy; Taber, Alex; Reister, Emily E.; Sharma, Kush; Todd, Peter K.; Guenza, Marina G.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2014-10-10

    In this study, CUG repeat expansions in the 3' UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). As RNA, these repeats elicit toxicity by sequestering splicing proteins, such as MBNL1, into protein–RNA aggregates. Structural studies demonstrate that CUG repeats can form A-form helices, suggesting that repeat secondary structure could be important in pathogenicity. To evaluate this hypothesis, we utilized structure-stabilizing RNA modifications pseudouridine (Ψ) and 2'-O-methylation to determine if stabilization of CUG helical conformations affected toxicity. CUG repeats modified with Ψ or 2'-O-methyl groups exhibited enhanced structural stability and reduced affinity for MBNL1. Molecular dynamicsmore » and X-ray crystallography suggest a potential water-bridging mechanism for Ψ-mediated CUG repeat stabilization. Ψ modification of CUG repeats rescued mis-splicing in a DM1 cell model and prevented CUG repeat toxicity in zebrafish embryos. This study indicates that the structure of toxic RNAs has a significant role in controlling the onset of neuromuscular diseases.« less

  12. Modifications to toxic CUG RNAs induce structural stability, rescue mis-splicing in a myotonic dystrophy cell model and reduce toxicity in a myotonic dystrophy zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    deLorimier, Elaine; Coonrod, Leslie A; Copperman, Jeremy; Taber, Alex; Reister, Emily E; Sharma, Kush; Todd, Peter K; Guenza, Marina G; Berglund, J Andrew

    2014-11-10

    CUG repeat expansions in the 3' UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). As RNA, these repeats elicit toxicity by sequestering splicing proteins, such as MBNL1, into protein-RNA aggregates. Structural studies demonstrate that CUG repeats can form A-form helices, suggesting that repeat secondary structure could be important in pathogenicity. To evaluate this hypothesis, we utilized structure-stabilizing RNA modifications pseudouridine (Ψ) and 2'-O-methylation to determine if stabilization of CUG helical conformations affected toxicity. CUG repeats modified with Ψ or 2'-O-methyl groups exhibited enhanced structural stability and reduced affinity for MBNL1. Molecular dynamics and X-ray crystallography suggest a potential water-bridging mechanism for Ψ-mediated CUG repeat stabilization. Ψ modification of CUG repeats rescued mis-splicing in a DM1 cell model and prevented CUG repeat toxicity in zebrafish embryos. This study indicates that the structure of toxic RNAs has a significant role in controlling the onset of neuromuscular diseases. PMID:25303993

  13. Modifications to toxic CUG RNAs induce structural stability, rescue mis-splicing in a myotonic dystrophy cell model and reduce toxicity in a myotonic dystrophy zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    deLorimier, Elaine; Coonrod, Leslie A.; Copperman, Jeremy; Taber, Alex; Reister, Emily E.; Sharma, Kush; Todd, Peter K.; Guenza, Marina G.; Berglund, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    CUG repeat expansions in the 3′ UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). As RNA, these repeats elicit toxicity by sequestering splicing proteins, such as MBNL1, into protein–RNA aggregates. Structural studies demonstrate that CUG repeats can form A-form helices, suggesting that repeat secondary structure could be important in pathogenicity. To evaluate this hypothesis, we utilized structure-stabilizing RNA modifications pseudouridine (Ψ) and 2′-O-methylation to determine if stabilization of CUG helical conformations affected toxicity. CUG repeats modified with Ψ or 2′-O-methyl groups exhibited enhanced structural stability and reduced affinity for MBNL1. Molecular dynamics and X-ray crystallography suggest a potential water-bridging mechanism for Ψ-mediated CUG repeat stabilization. Ψ modification of CUG repeats rescued mis-splicing in a DM1 cell model and prevented CUG repeat toxicity in zebrafish embryos. This study indicates that the structure of toxic RNAs has a significant role in controlling the onset of neuromuscular diseases. PMID:25303993

  14. Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes The Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy KidsHealth > For Kids > The Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy ... you know someone who has MD. What Is Muscular Dystrophy? Muscular dystrophy (say: MUS-kyoo-lur DIS-troh- ...

  15. Rapid Cohort Generation and Analysis of Disease Spectrum of Large Animal Model of Cone Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kostic, Corinne; Lillico, Simon Geoffrey; Crippa, Sylvain Vincent; Grandchamp, Nicolas; Pilet, Héloïse; Philippe, Stéphanie; Lu, Zen; King, Tim James; Mallet, Jacques; Sarkis, Chamsy; Arsenijevic, Yvan; Whitelaw, Christopher Bruce Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Large animal models are an important resource for the understanding of human disease and for evaluating the applicability of new therapies to human patients. For many diseases, such as cone dystrophy, research effort is hampered by the lack of such models. Lentiviral transgenesis is a methodology broadly applicable to animals from many different species. When conjugated to the expression of a dominant mutant protein, this technology offers an attractive approach to generate new large animal models in a heterogeneous background. We adopted this strategy to mimic the phenotype diversity encounter in humans and generate a cohort of pigs for cone dystrophy by expressing a dominant mutant allele of the guanylate cyclase 2D (GUCY2D) gene. Sixty percent of the piglets were transgenic, with mutant GUCY2D mRNA detected in the retina of all animals tested. Functional impairment of vision was observed among the transgenic pigs at 3 months of age, with a follow-up at 1 year indicating a subsequent slower progression of phenotype. Abnormal retina morphology, notably among the cone photoreceptor cell population, was observed exclusively amongst the transgenic animals. Of particular note, these transgenic animals were characterized by a range in the severity of the phenotype, reflecting the human clinical situation. We demonstrate that a transgenic approach using lentiviral vectors offers a powerful tool for large animal model development. Not only is the efficiency of transgenesis higher than conventional transgenic methodology but this technique also produces a heterogeneous cohort of transgenic animals that mimics the genetic variation encountered in human patients. PMID:23977029

  16. Corneal dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Klintworth, Gordon K

    2009-01-01

    The term corneal dystrophy embraces a heterogenous group of bilateral genetically determined non-inflammatory corneal diseases that are restricted to the cornea. The designation is imprecise but remains in vogue because of its clinical value. Clinically, the corneal dystrophies can be divided into three groups based on the sole or predominant anatomical location of the abnormalities. Some affect primarily the corneal epithelium and its basement membrane or Bowman layer and the superficial corneal stroma (anterior corneal dystrophies), the corneal stroma (stromal corneal dystrophies), or Descemet membrane and the corneal endothelium (posterior corneal dystrophies). Most corneal dystrophies have no systemic manifestations and present with variable shaped corneal opacities in a clear or cloudy cornea and they affect visual acuity to different degrees. Corneal dystrophies may have a simple autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive Mendelian mode of inheritance. Different corneal dystrophies are caused by mutations in the CHST6, KRT3, KRT12, PIP5K3, SLC4A11, TACSTD2, TGFBI, and UBIAD1 genes. Knowledge about the responsible genetic mutations responsible for these disorders has led to a better understanding of their basic defect and to molecular tests for their precise diagnosis. Genes for other corneal dystrophies have been mapped to specific chromosomal loci, but have not yet been identified. As clinical manifestations widely vary with the different entities, corneal dystrophies should be suspected when corneal transparency is lost or corneal opacities occur spontaneously, particularly in both corneas, and especially in the presence of a positive family history or in the offspring of consanguineous parents. Main differential diagnoses include various causes of monoclonal gammopathy, lecithin-cholesterol-acyltransferase deficiency, Fabry disease, cystinosis, tyrosine transaminase deficiency, systemic lysosomal storage diseases (mucopolysaccharidoses

  17. PKC Theta Ablation Improves Healing in a Mouse Model of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Madaro, Luca; Pelle, Andrea; Nicoletti, Carmine; Crupi, Annunziata; Marrocco, Valeria; Bossi, Gianluca; Soddu, Silvia; Bouché, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a key pathological characteristic of dystrophic muscle lesion formation, limiting muscle regeneration and resulting in fibrotic and fatty tissue replacement of muscle, which exacerbates the wasting process in dystrophic muscles. Limiting immune response is thus one of the therapeutic options to improve healing, as well as to improve the efficacy of gene- or cell-mediated strategies to restore dystrophin expression. Protein kinase C θ (PKCθ) is a member of the PKCs family highly expressed in both immune cells and skeletal muscle; given its crucial role in adaptive, but also innate, immunity, it is being proposed as a valuable pharmacological target for immune disorders. In our study we asked whether targeting PKCθ could represent a valuable approach to efficiently prevent inflammatory response and disease progression in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy. We generated the bi-genetic mouse model mdx/θ−/−, where PKCθ expression is lacking in mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We found that muscle wasting in mdx/θ−/− mice was greatly prevented, while muscle regeneration, maintenance and performance was significantly improved, as compared to mdx mice. This phenotype was associated to reduction in inflammatory infiltrate, pro-inflammatory gene expression and pro-fibrotic markers activity, as compared to mdx mice. Moreover, BM transplantation experiments demonstrated that the phenotype observed was primarily dependent on lack of PKCθ expression in hematopoietic cells. These results demonstrate a hitherto unrecognized role of immune-cell intrinsic PKCθ activity in the development of DMD. Although the immune cell population(s) involved remain unidentified, our findings reveal that PKCθ can be proposed as a new pharmacological target to counteract the disease, as well as to improve the efficacy of gene- or cell- therapy approaches. PMID:22348094

  18. Wnt signaling pathway improves central inhibitory synaptic transmission in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fuenzalida, Marco; Espinoza, Claudia; Pérez, Miguel Ángel; Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Cuitino, Loreto; Brandan, Enrique; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-02-01

    The dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC) that connects the cytoskeleton, plasma membrane and the extracellular matrix has been related to the maintenance and stabilization of channels and synaptic receptors, which are both essential for synaptogenesis and synaptic transmission. The dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) exhibits a significant reduction in hippocampal GABA efficacy, which may underlie the altered synaptic function and abnormal hippocampal long-term plasticity exhibited by mdx mice. Emerging studies have implicated Wnt signaling in the modulation of synaptic efficacy, neuronal plasticity and cognitive function. We report here that the activation of the non-canonical Wnt-5a pathway and Andrographolide, improves hippocampal mdx GABAergic efficacy by increasing the number of inhibitory synapses and GABA(A) receptors or GABA release. These results indicate that Wnt signaling modulates GABA synaptic efficacy and could be a promising novel target for DMD cognitive therapy. PMID:26626079

  19. G-CSF supports long-term muscle regeneration in mouse models of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hayashiji, Nozomi; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Hara, Mie; Ito, Naoki; Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Seki, Tomohisa; Tohyama, Shugo; Kodaira, Masaki; Kunitomi, Akira; Kashimura, Shin; Takei, Makoto; Saito, Yuki; Okata, Shinichiro; Egashira, Toru; Endo, Jin; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a chronic and life-threatening disease that is initially supported by muscle regeneration but eventually shows satellite cell exhaustion and muscular dysfunction. The life-long maintenance of skeletal muscle homoeostasis requires the satellite stem cell pool to be preserved. Asymmetric cell division plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of the satellite cell pool. Here we show that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR) is asymmetrically expressed in activated satellite cells. G-CSF positively affects the satellite cell population during multiple stages of differentiation in ex vivo cultured fibres. G-CSF could be important in developing an effective therapy for DMD based on its potential to modulate the supply of multiple stages of regenerated myocytes. This study shows that the G-CSF-G-CSFR axis is fundamentally important for long-term muscle regeneration, functional maintenance and lifespan extension in mouse models of DMD with varying severities. PMID:25865621

  20. Phenotypic and pathologic evaluation of the myd mouse. A candidate model for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, K.D.; Rapisarda, D.; Bailey, H.L.

    1995-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disease of unknown pathogenesis which is characterized by weakness of the face and shoulder girdle. It is associated with a sensorineural hearing loss which may be subclinical. FSHD has been mapped to the distalmost portion of 4q35, although the gene has not yet been identified. Distal 4q has homology with a region of mouse chromosome 8 to which a mouse mutant, myodystrophy (myd), has been mapped. Muscle from homozygotes for the myd mutation appears dystrophic, showing degenerating and regenerating fibers, inflammatory infiltrates, central nuclei, and variation in fiber size. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials reveal a sensorineural hearing loss in myd homozygotes. Based on the homologous genetic map locations, and the phenotypic syndrome of dystrophic muscle with sensorineural hearing loss, we suggest that myd represents an animal model for the human disease FSHD. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  1. In vivo genome editing improves muscle function in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christopher E; Hakim, Chady H; Ousterout, David G; Thakore, Pratiksha I; Moreb, Eirik A; Castellanos Rivera, Ruth M; Madhavan, Sarina; Pan, Xiufang; Ran, F Ann; Yan, Winston X; Asokan, Aravind; Zhang, Feng; Duan, Dongsheng; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-22

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating disease affecting about 1 out of 5000 male births and caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Genome editing has the potential to restore expression of a modified dystrophin gene from the native locus to modulate disease progression. In this study, adeno-associated virus was used to deliver the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system to the mdx mouse model of DMD to remove the mutated exon 23 from the dystrophin gene. This includes local and systemic delivery to adult mice and systemic delivery to neonatal mice. Exon 23 deletion by CRISPR-Cas9 resulted in expression of the modified dystrophin gene, partial recovery of functional dystrophin protein in skeletal myofibers and cardiac muscle, improvement of muscle biochemistry, and significant enhancement of muscle force. This work establishes CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing as a potential therapy to treat DMD. PMID:26721684

  2. Postnatal genome editing partially restores dystrophin expression in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Long, Chengzu; Amoasii, Leonela; Mireault, Alex A; McAnally, John R; Li, Hui; Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Bhattacharyya, Samadrita; Shelton, John M; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2016-01-22

    CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing holds clinical potential for treating genetic diseases, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. To correct DMD by skipping mutant dystrophin exons in postnatal muscle tissue in vivo, we used adeno-associated virus-9 (AAV9) to deliver gene-editing components to postnatal mdx mice, a model of DMD. Different modes of AAV9 delivery were systematically tested, including intraperitoneal at postnatal day 1 (P1), intramuscular at P12, and retro-orbital at P18. Each of these methods restored dystrophin protein expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle to varying degrees, and expression increased from 3 to 12 weeks after injection. Postnatal gene editing also enhanced skeletal muscle function, as measured by grip strength tests 4 weeks after injection. This method provides a potential means of correcting mutations responsible for DMD and other monogenic disorders after birth. PMID:26721683

  3. Myotonic Dystrophy Family Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy 1; Myotonic Dystrophy 2; Dystrophia Myotonica; Dystrophia Myotonica 1; Dystrophia Myotonica 2; Myotonia Dystrophica; Myotonic Dystrophy, Congenital; Myotonic Myopathy, Proximal; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Proximal Myotonic Myopathy; Steinert Disease; Steinert Myotonic Dystrophy; Steinert's Disease; Myotonia Atrophica

  4. Myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Jozefowicz, R F; Griggs, R C

    1988-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is an autosomal dominant disorder that results in skeletal muscle weakness and wasting, myotonia, and numerous nonmuscular manifestations including frontal balding, cataracts, gonadal dysfunction, cardiac conduction abnormalities, respiratory insufficiency, and hypersomnolence. Although the gene defect in myotonic dystrophy has been mapped to chromosome 19, the exact metabolic abnormalities responsible for this disorder are unknown. Skeletal muscle has been found to be relatively insulin-resistant in myotonic dystrophy, and a decrease in the anabolic action of insulin on skeletal muscle may be related to muscle wasting in this disorder. Laboratory studies, including electromyography, electrocardiography, and muscle biopsy, are helpful in evaluating patients for this disorder, but the clinical aspects and a careful family history remain the mainstays of diagnosis. A number of management strategies preserve function and prevent complications in myotonic dystrophy. PMID:3065594

  5. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be affected. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) affects boys and girls equally, weakening muscles in the shoulders and upper ... weakness and poor muscle tone. Occurring in both girls and boys, it can have different symptoms. It varies in ...

  6. Autonomic, locomotor and cardiac abnormalities in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy: targeting the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Chapleau, Mark W

    2014-04-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? This symposium report summarizes autonomic, cardiac and skeletal muscle abnormalities in sarcoglycan-δ-deficient mice (Sgcd-/-), a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, with emphasis on the roles of autonomic dysregulation and activation of the renin-angiotensin system at a young age. What advances does it highlight? The contributions of the autonomic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin system to the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy are highlighted. Results demonstrate that autonomic dysregulation precedes and predicts later development of cardiac dysfunction in Sgcd-/- mice and that treatment of young Sgcd-/- mice with the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist losartan or with angiotensin-(1-7) abrogates the autonomic dysregulation, attenuates skeletal muscle pathology and increases spontaneous locomotor activity. Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic muscle diseases characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy. Mutations in sarcoglycans and other subunits of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex cause muscular dystrophy and dilated cardiomyopathy in animals and humans. Aberrant autonomic signalling is recognized in a variety of neuromuscular disorders. We hypothesized that activation of the renin-angiotensin system contributes to skeletal muscle and autonomic dysfunction in mice deficient in the sarcoglycan-δ (Sgcd) gene at a young age and that this early autonomic dysfunction contributes to the later development of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and increased mortality. We demonstrated that young Sgcd-/- mice exhibit histopathological features of skeletal muscle dystrophy, decreased locomotor activity and severe autonomic dysregulation, but normal LV function. Autonomic regulation continued to deteriorate in Sgcd-/- mice with age and was accompanied by LV dysfunction and dilated cardiomyopathy at older ages. Autonomic dysregulation at a young age predicted later development of

  7. Therapeutic impact of systemic AAV-mediated RNA interference in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Bisset, Darren R; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa A; Zavaljevski, Maja; Wei, Jessica; Carter, Gregory T; Weiss, Michael D; Chamberlain, Joel R

    2015-09-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) offers a promising therapeutic approach for dominant genetic disorders that involve gain-of-function mechanisms. One candidate disease for RNAi therapy application is myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), which results from toxicity of a mutant mRNA. DM1 is caused by expansion of a CTG repeat in the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene. The expression of DMPK mRNA containing an expanded CUG repeat (CUG(exp)) leads to defects in RNA biogenesis and turnover. We designed miRNA-based RNAi hairpins to target the CUG(exp) mRNA in the human α-skeletal muscle actin long-repeat (HSA(LR)) mouse model of DM1. RNAi expression cassettes were delivered to HSA(LR) mice using recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors injected intravenously as a route to systemic gene therapy. Vector delivery significantly reduced disease pathology in muscles of the HSA(LR) mice, including a reduction in the CUG(exp) mRNA, a reduction in myotonic discharges, a shift toward adult pre-mRNA splicing patterns, reduced myofiber hypertrophy and a decrease in myonuclear foci containing the CUG(exp) mRNA. Significant reversal of hallmarks of DM1 in the rAAV RNAi-treated HSA(LR) mice indicate that defects characteristic of DM1 can be mitigated with a systemic RNAi approach targeting the nuclei of terminally differentiated myofibers. Efficient rAAV-mediated delivery of RNAi has the potential to provide a long-term therapy for DM1 and other dominant muscular dystrophies. PMID:26082468

  8. Animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: from basic mechanisms to gene therapy.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Joe W; Hakim, Chady H; McIntosh, Mark A; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle-wasting disorder. It is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the dystrophin gene. Currently, there is no cure. A highly promising therapeutic strategy is to replace or repair the defective dystrophin gene by gene therapy. Numerous animal models of DMD have been developed over the last 30 years, ranging from invertebrate to large mammalian models. mdx mice are the most commonly employed models in DMD research and have been used to lay the groundwork for DMD gene therapy. After ~30 years of development, the field has reached the stage at which the results in mdx mice can be validated and scaled-up in symptomatic large animals. The canine DMD (cDMD) model will be excellent for these studies. In this article, we review the animal models for DMD, the pros and cons of each model system, and the history and progress of preclinical DMD gene therapy research in the animal models. We also discuss the current and emerging challenges in this field and ways to address these challenges using animal models, in particular cDMD dogs. PMID:25740330

  9. Animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: from basic mechanisms to gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    McGreevy, Joe W.; Hakim, Chady H.; McIntosh, Mark A.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive muscle-wasting disorder. It is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the dystrophin gene. Currently, there is no cure. A highly promising therapeutic strategy is to replace or repair the defective dystrophin gene by gene therapy. Numerous animal models of DMD have been developed over the last 30 years, ranging from invertebrate to large mammalian models. mdx mice are the most commonly employed models in DMD research and have been used to lay the groundwork for DMD gene therapy. After ~30 years of development, the field has reached the stage at which the results in mdx mice can be validated and scaled-up in symptomatic large animals. The canine DMD (cDMD) model will be excellent for these studies. In this article, we review the animal models for DMD, the pros and cons of each model system, and the history and progress of preclinical DMD gene therapy research in the animal models. We also discuss the current and emerging challenges in this field and ways to address these challenges using animal models, in particular cDMD dogs. PMID:25740330

  10. Non-obese diabetic mice rapidly develop dramatic sympathetic neuritic dystrophy: a new experimental model of diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert E; Dorsey, Denise A; Beaudet, Lucie N; Frederick, Kathy E; Parvin, Curtis A; Plurad, Santiago B; Levisetti, Matteo G

    2003-11-01

    To address the pathogenesis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, we have examined the sympathetic nervous system in non-obese diabetic (NOD) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, two models of type 1 diabetes, and the db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes. After only 3 to 5 weeks of diabetes, NOD mice developed markedly swollen axons and dendrites ("neuritic dystrophy") in the prevertebral superior mesenteric and celiac ganglia (SMG-CG), similar to the pathology described in diabetic STZ- and BBW-rat and man. Comparable changes failed to develop in the superior cervical ganglia of the NOD mouse or in the SMG-CG of non-diabetic NOD siblings. STZ-induced diabetic mice develop identical changes, although at a much slower pace and to a lesser degree than NOD mice. NOD-SCID mice, which are genetically identical to NOD mice except for the absence of T and B cells, do not develop diabetes or neuropathology comparable to diabetic NOD mice. However, STZ-treated NOD-SCID mice develop severe neuritic dystrophy, evidence against an exclusively autoimmune pathogenesis for autonomic neuropathy in this model. Chronically diabetic type 2 db/db mice fail to develop neuritic dystrophy, suggesting that hyperglycemia alone may not be the critical and sufficient element. The NOD mouse appears to be a valuable model of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy with unambiguous, rapidly developing neuropathology which corresponds closely to the characteristic pathology of other rodent models and man. PMID:14578206

  11. Identification of muscle necrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy using three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyen, Blake R.; Shavlakadze, Thea; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G.; Grounds, Miranda D.; Sampson, David D.

    2011-07-01

    Three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) was used to image the structure and pathology of skeletal muscle tissue from the treadmill-exercised mdx mouse model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of excised muscle samples were compared with co-registered hematoxylin and eosin-stained and Evans blue dye fluorescence histology. We show, for the first time, structural 3D-OCT images of skeletal muscle dystropathology well correlated with co-located histology. OCT could identify morphological features of interest and necrotic lesions within the muscle tissue samples based on intrinsic optical contrast. These findings demonstrate the utility of 3D-OCT for the evaluation of small-animal skeletal muscle morphology and pathology, particularly for studies of mouse models of muscular dystrophy.

  12. Actinomycin D Specifically Reduces Expanded CUG Repeat RNA in Myotonic Dystrophy Models

    PubMed Central

    Siboni, Ruth B.; Nakamori, Masayuki; Wagner, Stacey D.; Struck, Adam J.; Coonrod, Leslie A.; Harriott, Shanee A.; Cass, Daniel M.; Tanner, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an inherited disease characterized by the inability to relax contracted muscles. Affected individuals carry large CTG expansions that are toxic when transcribed. One possible treatment approach is to reduce or eliminate transcription of CTG repeats. Actinomycin D (ActD) is a potent transcription inhibitor and FDA-approved chemotherapeutic that binds GC-rich DNA with high affinity. Here, we report that ActD decreased CUG transcript levels in a dose-dependent manner in DM1 cell and mouse models at significantly lower concentrations (nanomolar) compared to its use as a general transcription inhibitor or chemotherapeutic. ActD also significantly reversed DM1-associated splicing defects in a DM1 mouse model, and did so within the currently approved human treatment range. RNA-seq analyses showed that low concentrations of ActD did not globally inhibit transcription in a DM1 mouse model. These results indicate that transcription inhibition of CTG expansions is a promising treatment approach for DM1. PMID:26686629

  13. The first exon duplication mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A tool for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Vulin, Adeline; Wein, Nicolas; Simmons, Tabatha R; Rutherford, Andrea M; Findlay, Andrew R; Yurkoski, Jacqueline A; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2015-11-01

    Exon duplication mutations account for up to 11% of all cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and a duplication of exon 2 is the most common duplication in patients. For use as a platform for testing of duplication-specific therapies, we developed a mouse model that carries a Dmd exon 2 duplication. By using homologous recombination we duplicated exon 2 within intron 2 at a location consistent with a human duplication hotspot. mRNA analysis confirms the inclusion of a duplicated exon 2 in mouse muscle. Dystrophin expression is essentially absent by immunofluorescent and immunoblot analysis, although some muscle specimens show very low-level trace dystrophin expression. Phenotypically, the mouse shows similarities to mdx, the standard laboratory model of DMD. In skeletal muscle, areas of necrosis and phagocytosis are seen at 3 weeks, with central nucleation prominent by four weeks, recapitulating the "crisis" period in mdx. Marked diaphragm fibrosis is noted by 6 months, and remains unchanged at 12 months. Our results show that the Dup2 mouse is both pathologically (in degree and distribution) and physiologically similar to mdx. As it recapitulates the most common single exon duplication found in DMD patients, this new model will be a useful tool to assess the potential of duplicated exon skipping. PMID:26365037

  14. Biochemical and Functional Comparisons of mdx and Sgcg−/− Muscular Dystrophy Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Nathan W.; Holley-Cuthrell, Jenan; Gonzalez-Vega, Magdalis; Mull, Aaron J.; Heydemann, Ahlke

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models have provided an essential platform to investigate facets of human diseases, from etiology, diagnosis, and prognosis, to potential treatments. Muscular dystrophy (MD) is the most common human genetic disease occurring in approximately 1 in 2500 births. The mdx mouse, which is dystrophin-deficient, has long been used to model this disease. However, this mouse strain displays a rather mild disease course compared to human patients. The mdx mice have been bred to additional genetically engineered mice to worsen the disease. Alternatively, other genes which cause human MD have been genetically disrupted in mice. We are now comparing disease progression from one of these alternative gene disruptions, the γ-sarcoglycan null mouse Sgcg−/− on the DBA2/J background, to the mdx mouse line. This paper aims to assess the time-course severity of the disease in the mouse models and determine which is best for MD research. The Sgcg−/− mice have a more severe phenotype than the mdx mice. Muscle function was assessed by plethysmography and echocardiography. Histologically the Sgcg−/− mice displayed increased fibrosis and variable fiber size. By quantitative Evan's blue dye uptake and hydroxyproline content two key disease determinants, membrane permeability and fibrosis respectively, were also proven worse in the Sgcg−/− mice. PMID:26064876

  15. Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leo H; Tawil, Rabi

    2016-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a clinically recognizable and relatively common muscular dystrophy. It is inherited mostly as an autosomal dominant disease or in a minority of cases, in a digenic pattern. The disease manifestation is variable and most likely dependent on genetic and epigenetic factors. We review the history, epidemiology, clinical presentation, and genetics of the disease, present the recently elucidated molecular pathogenesis, discuss the pathology and the possible consequence of the inflammation seen in the muscle biopsies, and consider future treatments. PMID:27215221

  16. Early pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy modelled in patient-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Emi; Sakurai, Hidetoshi; Nishino, Tokiko; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Heike, Toshio; Awaya, Tomonari; Fujii, Nobuharu; Manabe, Yasuko; Matsuo, Masafumi; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive and fatal muscle degenerating disease caused by a dystrophin deficiency. Effective suppression of the primary pathology observed in DMD is critical for treatment. Patient-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are a promising tool for drug discovery. Here, we report an in vitro evaluation system for a DMD therapy using hiPSCs that recapitulate the primary pathology and can be used for DMD drug screening. Skeletal myotubes generated from hiPSCs are intact, which allows them to be used to model the initial pathology of DMD in vitro. Induced control and DMD myotubes were morphologically and physiologically comparable. However, electric stimulation of these myotubes for in vitro contraction caused pronounced calcium ion (Ca2+) influx only in DMD myocytes. Restoration of dystrophin by the exon-skipping technique suppressed this Ca2+ overflow and reduced the secretion of creatine kinase (CK) in DMD myotubes. These results suggest that the early pathogenesis of DMD can be effectively modelled in skeletal myotubes induced from patient-derived iPSCs, thereby enabling the development and evaluation of novel drugs. PMID:26290039

  17. The mdx mouse model as a surrogate for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Terence A.

    2014-01-01

    Research into fundamental principles and the testing of therapeutic hypotheses for treatment of human disease is commonly conducted on mouse models of human diseases. Although this is often the only practicable approach, it carries a number of caveats arising from differences between the two species. This article is centred on the example of skeletal muscle disease, in particular muscular dystrophy, to identify some of the principal classes of obstacle to the translation of data from mouse to man. Of these, the difference in scale is one of the most commonly ignored and is of particular interest because it has quite major repercussions for evaluation of some classes of intervention and of assessment criteria while having comparatively little bearing on others. Likewise, interspecies differences and similarities in cell and molecular biological mechanisms underlying development, growth and response to pathological processes should be considered on an individual basis. An awareness of such distinctions is crucial if we are to avoid misjudgement of the likely efficacy in man of results obtained on mouse models. PMID:23551987

  18. Increased autophagy and apoptosis contribute to muscle atrophy in a myotonic dystrophy type 1 Drosophila model

    PubMed Central

    Bargiela, Ariadna; Cerro-Herreros, Estefanía; Fernandez-Costa, Juan M.; Vilchez, Juan J.; Llamusi, Beatriz; Artero, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Muscle mass wasting is one of the most debilitating symptoms of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) disease, ultimately leading to immobility, respiratory defects, dysarthria, dysphagia and death in advanced stages of the disease. In order to study the molecular mechanisms leading to the degenerative loss of adult muscle tissue in DM1, we generated an inducible Drosophila model of expanded CTG trinucleotide repeat toxicity that resembles an adult-onset form of the disease. Heat-shock induced expression of 480 CUG repeats in adult flies resulted in a reduction in the area of the indirect flight muscles. In these model flies, reduction of muscle area was concomitant with increased apoptosis and autophagy. Inhibition of apoptosis or autophagy mediated by the overexpression of DIAP1, mTOR (also known as Tor) or muscleblind, or by RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of autophagy regulatory genes, achieved a rescue of the muscle-loss phenotype. In fact, mTOR overexpression rescued muscle size to a size comparable to that in control flies. These results were validated in skeletal muscle biopsies from DM1 patients in which we found downregulated autophagy and apoptosis repressor genes, and also in DM1 myoblasts where we found increased autophagy. These findings provide new insights into the signaling pathways involved in DM1 disease pathogenesis. PMID:26092529

  19. Fluoxetine prevents dystrophic changes in a zebrafish model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, Trent A.; Horstick, Eric; Hur, Junguk; Jackson, Samuel W.; Davidson, Ann E.; Li, Xingli; Dowling, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common and relentlessly progressive muscle disease. Some interventions have been identified that modestly slow progression and prolong survival, but more meaningful therapies are lacking. The goal of this study is to identify new therapeutic pathways for DMD using a zebrafish model of the disease. To accomplish this, we performed a non-biased drug screen in sapje, a zebrafish line with a recessive nonsense mutation in dystrophin. We identified 6 positive hits (out of 640 total drugs tested) by their ability to prevent abnormal birefringence in sapje. Follow-up analyses demonstrated that fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), provided the most substantial benefit. Morpholino-based experimentation confirmed that modulation of the serotonin pathway alone can prevent the dystrophic phenotype, and transcriptomic analysis revealed changes in calcium homeostasis as a potential mechanism. In all, we demonstrate that monoamine agonists can prevent disease in a vertebrate model of DMD. Given the safe and widespread use of SSRIs in clinical practice, our study identifies an attractive target pathway for therapy development. PMID:24760771

  20. Generation and Characterization of a Murine Model of Bietti Crystalline Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Catherine M.; Nakano, Mariko; Rettie, Allan E.; Kelly, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is a rare, autosomal recessive, progressive, degenerative eye disease caused by mutations in the CYP4V2 gene, for which no treatments are currently available. Cyp4v3 is the murine ortholog to CYP4V2, and to better understand the molecular pathogenesis of this disease we have established a Cyp4v3-null mouse line. Methods. Cyp4v3−/− mice were generated by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Ocular morphologic characteristics were evaluated via fundus imaging, plasma lipid profiling, and histologic analysis via Oil Red O reactivity, hematoxylin and eosin staining, and transmission electron microscopy. Results. The Cyp4v3−/− mouse recapitulates the characteristic features of corneoretinal crystal accumulation and systemic dyslipidemia seen in BCD. The Cyp4v3−/− mice behave normally and are viable and fertile when maintained under specific pathogen-free (SPF) housing conditions. Conclusions. Cyp4v3−/− mice represent a promising preclinical model that may be used to better understand the disease etiology and to evaluate pharmacotherapies for this devastating condition. PMID:25118264

  1. Noninvasive monitoring of therapeutic gene transfer in animal models of muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, M; Poupiot, J; Goyenvalle, A; Perez, N; Garcia, L; Danos, O; Richard, I

    2006-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of degenerative muscle diseases. A subset of them are due to genetic deficiencies in proteins which form the dystrophin-associated complex at the membrane of the myofibers. In this report, we utilized recombinant adeno-associated virus containing a U7 cassette carrying an antisense sequence aimed at inducing exon skipping of the dystrophin gene or containing the alpha-sarcoglycan gene to alleviate the dystrophic phenotype of the mdx and Sgca-null mice, respectively. As these diseases are characterized by cycle of degeneration/regeneration, we postulated that a reporter gene coadministered at the time of the treatment would make it possible to follow the extent of muscle repair. We observed that the murine secreted alkaline phosphatase (muSeAP) level was very much lower in these animal models than in normal mice. Upon treatment of the dystrophic muscle by gene transfer, the level of muSeAP was restored and correlated with the expression of the therapeutic transgene and with the level of muscle improvement. The system described here provides a simple and noninvasive procedure for monitoring the outcome of a therapeutic strategy involving cell survival. PMID:16107863

  2. Ventilatory chemosensory drive is blunted in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD).

    PubMed

    Mosqueira, Matias; Baby, Santhosh M; Lahiri, Sukhamay; Khurana, Tejvir S

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the DMD gene resulting in an absence of dystrophin in neurons and muscle. Respiratory failure is the most common cause of mortality and previous studies have largely concentrated on diaphragmatic muscle necrosis and respiratory failure component. Here, we investigated the integrity of respiratory control mechanisms in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Whole body plethysmograph in parallel with phrenic nerve activity recordings revealed a lower respiratory rate and minute ventilation during normoxia and a blunting of the hypoxic ventilatory reflex in response to mild levels of hypoxia together with a poor performance on a hypoxic stress test in mdx mice. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed low PaO2 and pH and high PaCO2 in mdx mice. To investigate chemosensory respiratory drive, we analyzed the carotid body by molecular and functional means. Dystrophin mRNA and protein was expressed in normal mice carotid bodies however, they are absent in mdx mice. Functional analysis revealed abnormalities in Dejours test and the early component of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex in mdx mice. Together, these results demonstrate a malfunction in the peripheral chemosensory drive that would be predicted to contribute to the respiratory failure in mdx mice. These data suggest that investigating and monitoring peripheral chemosensory drive function may be useful for improving the management of DMD patients with respiratory failure. PMID:23922741

  3. Ventilatory Chemosensory Drive Is Blunted in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueira, Matias; Baby, Santhosh M.; Khurana, Tejvir S.

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the DMD gene resulting in an absence of dystrophin in neurons and muscle. Respiratory failure is the most common cause of mortality and previous studies have largely concentrated on diaphragmatic muscle necrosis and respiratory failure component. Here, we investigated the integrity of respiratory control mechanisms in the mdx mouse model of DMD. Whole body plethysmograph in parallel with phrenic nerve activity recordings revealed a lower respiratory rate and minute ventilation during normoxia and a blunting of the hypoxic ventilatory reflex in response to mild levels of hypoxia together with a poor performance on a hypoxic stress test in mdx mice. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed low PaO2 and pH and high PaCO2 in mdx mice. To investigate chemosensory respiratory drive, we analyzed the carotid body by molecular and functional means. Dystrophin mRNA and protein was expressed in normal mice carotid bodies however, they are absent in mdx mice. Functional analysis revealed abnormalities in Dejours test and the early component of the hypercapnic ventilatory reflex in mdx mice. Together, these results demonstrate a malfunction in the peripheral chemosensory drive that would be predicted to contribute to the respiratory failure in mdx mice. These data suggest that investigating and monitoring peripheral chemosensory drive function may be useful for improving the management of DMD patients with respiratory failure. PMID:23922741

  4. Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy As a Model for Epigenetic Regulation and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Himeda, Charis L.; Jones, Takako I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Aberrant epigenetic regulation is an integral aspect of many diseases and complex disorders. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a progressive myopathy that afflicts individuals of all ages, is caused by disrupted genetic and epigenetic regulation of a macrosatellite repeat. FSHD provides a powerful model to investigate disease-relevant epigenetic modifiers and general mechanisms of epigenetic regulation that govern gene expression. Recent Advances: In the context of a genetically permissive allele, the one aspect of FSHD that is consistent across all known cases is the aberrant epigenetic state of the disease locus. In addition, certain mutations in the chromatin regulator SMCHD1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes hinge-domain protein 1) are sufficient to cause FSHD2 and enhance disease severity in FSHD1. Thus, there are multiple pathways to generate the epigenetic dysregulation required for FSHD. Critical Issues: Why do some individuals with the genetic requirements for FSHD develop disease pathology, while others remain asymptomatic? Similarly, disease progression is highly variable among individuals. What are the relative contributions of genetic background and environmental factors in determining disease manifestation, progression, and severity in FSHD? What is the interplay between epigenetic factors regulating the disease locus and which, if any, are viable therapeutic targets? Future Directions: Epigenetic regulation represents a potentially powerful therapeutic target for FSHD. Determining the epigenetic signatures that are predictive of disease severity and identifying the spectrum of disease modifiers in FSHD are vital to the development of effective therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1463–1482. PMID:25336259

  5. Muscular dystrophy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - muscular dystrophy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on muscular dystrophy : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mdausa.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih. ...

  6. Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Difference How to Get Involved Donate Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) Share print email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy (MMD) What is myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD)? Myotonic ...

  7. Pentamidine rescues contractility and rhythmicity in a Drosophila model of myotonic dystrophy heart dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Mouli; Selma-Soriano, Estela; Magny, Emile; Couso, Juan Pablo; Pérez-Alonso, Manuel; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas; Artero, Ruben; Llamusi, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Up to 80% of individuals with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) will develop cardiac abnormalities at some point during the progression of their disease, the most common of which is heart blockage of varying degrees. Such blockage is characterized by conduction defects and supraventricular and ventricular tachycardia, and carries a high risk of sudden cardiac death. Despite its importance, very few animal model studies have focused on the heart dysfunction in DM1. Here, we describe the characterization of the heart phenotype in a Drosophila model expressing pure expanded CUG repeats under the control of the cardiomyocyte-specific driver GMH5-Gal4. Morphologically, expression of 250 CUG repeats caused abnormalities in the parallel alignment of the spiral myofibrils in dissected fly hearts, as revealed by phalloidin staining. Moreover, combined immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization of Muscleblind and CUG repeats, respectively, confirmed detectable ribonuclear foci and Muscleblind sequestration, characteristic features of DM1, exclusively in flies expressing the expanded CTG repeats. Similarly to what has been reported in humans with DM1, heart-specific expression of toxic RNA resulted in reduced survival, increased arrhythmia, altered diastolic and systolic function, reduced heart tube diameters and reduced contractility in the model flies. As a proof of concept that the fly heart model can be used for in vivo testing of promising therapeutic compounds, we fed flies with pentamidine, a compound previously described to improve DM1 phenotypes. Pentamidine not only released Muscleblind from the CUG RNA repeats and reduced ribonuclear formation in the Drosophila heart, but also rescued heart arrhythmicity and contractility, and improved fly survival in animals expressing 250 CUG repeats. PMID:26515653

  8. Characterization of neuromuscular synapse function abnormalities in multiple Duchenne muscular dystrophy mouse models.

    PubMed

    van der Pijl, Elizabeth M; van Putten, Maaike; Niks, Erik H; Verschuuren, Jan J G M; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Plomp, Jaap J

    2016-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked myopathy caused by dystrophin deficiency. Dystrophin is present intracellularly at the sarcolemma, connecting actin to the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex. Interestingly, it is enriched postsynaptically at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), but its synaptic function is largely unknown. Utrophin, a dystrophin homologue, is also concentrated at the NMJ, and upregulated in DMD. It is possible that the absence of dystrophin at NMJs in DMD causes neuromuscular transmission defects that aggravate muscle weakness. We studied NMJ function in mdx mice (lacking dystrophin) and wild type mice. In addition, mdx/utrn(+/-) and mdx/utrn(-/-) mice (lacking utrophin) were used to investigate influences of utrophin levels. The three Duchenne mouse models showed muscle weakness when comparatively tested in vivo, with mdx/utrn(-/-) mice being weakest. Ex vivo muscle contraction and electrophysiological studies showed a reduced safety factor of neuromuscular transmission in all models. NMJs had ~ 40% smaller miniature endplate potential amplitudes compared with wild type, indicating postsynaptic sensitivity loss for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. However, nerve stimulation-evoked endplate potential amplitudes were unchanged. Consequently, quantal content (i.e. the number of acetylcholine quanta released per nerve impulse) was considerably increased. Such a homeostatic compensatory increase in neurotransmitter release is also found at NMJs in myasthenia gravis, where autoantibodies reduce acetylcholine receptors. However, high-rate nerve stimulation induced exaggerated endplate potential rundown. Study of NMJ morphology showed that fragmentation of acetylcholine receptor clusters occurred in all models, being most severe in mdx/utrn(-/-) mice. Overall, we showed mild 'myasthenia-like' neuromuscular synaptic dysfunction in several Duchenne mouse models, which possibly affects muscle weakness and degeneration. PMID:27037492

  9. Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (dystrophia myotonica, DM) is one of the most common lethal monogenic disorders in populations of European descent. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) was first described over a century ago. DM1 is caused by expansion of a CTG triplet repeat in the 3' non-coding region of DMPK, the gene encoding the DM protein kinase. More recently a second form of the disease, myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) was recognized, which results from repeat expansion in a different gene. The DM2 expansion involves a CCTG repeat in the first intron of Zinc Finger 9 (ZNF9). Both disorders have autosomal dominant inheritance and multisystem features, including myotonic myopathy, cataract, and cardiac conduction disease. Studies suggest that the shared clinical features of DM1 and DM2 involve a novel genetic mechanism in which repetitive RNA exerts a toxic effect. The RNA toxicity stems from the expanded repeat in the transcripts from the mutant DM alleles. This chapter will review the clinical presentation and pathophysiology of DM, and discuss current management and future potential for developing targeted therapies. PMID:25037086

  10. Wasting Mechanisms in Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M.; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ambulance and cardiac and respiratory failure. A number of molecular processes have now been identified which hasten disease progression in human patients and animal models of muscular dystrophy. Accumulating evidence further suggests that aberrant activation of several signaling pathways aggravate pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle. Although replacement of defective gene with wild-type is paramount to cure, management of secondary pathological changes has enormous potential to improving the quality of life and extending lifespan of muscular dystrophy patients. In this article, we have reviewed major cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy. PMID:23669245

  11. Dystropathology increases energy expenditure and protein turnover in the mdx mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Marini, Juan C; Sosa, Horacio A; Castillo, Liliana I; Grounds, Miranda D; Fiorotto, Marta L

    2014-01-01

    The skeletal muscles in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and the mdx mouse model lack functional dystrophin and undergo repeated bouts of necrosis, regeneration, and growth. These processes have a high metabolic cost. However, the consequences for whole body energy and protein metabolism, and on the dietary requirements for these macronutrients at different stages of the disease, are not well-understood. This study used juvenile (4- to 5- wk-old) and adult (12- to 14-wk-old) male dystrophic C57BL/10ScSn-mdx/J and age-matched C57BL/10ScSn/J control male mice to measure total and resting energy expenditure, food intake, spontaneous activity, body composition, whole body protein turnover, and muscle protein synthesis rates. In juvenile mdx mice that have extensive muscle damage, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were higher than in age-matched controls. Adaptations in food intake and decreased activity were insufficient to meet the increased energy and protein needs of juvenile mdx mice and resulted in stunted growth. In (non-growing) adult mdx mice with less severe dystropathology, energy expenditure, muscle protein synthesis, and whole body protein turnover rates were also higher than in age-matched controls. Food intake was sufficient to meet their protein and energy needs, but insufficient to result in fat deposition. These data show that dystropathology impacts the protein and energy needs of mdx mice and that tailored dietary interventions are necessary to redress this imbalance. If not met, the resultant imbalance blunts growth, and may limit the benefits of therapies designed to protect and repair dystrophic muscles. PMID:24586653

  12. Muscleblind, BSF and TBPH are mislocalized in the muscle sarcomere of a Drosophila myotonic dystrophy model.

    PubMed

    Llamusi, Beatriz; Bargiela, Ariadna; Fernandez-Costa, Juan M; Garcia-Lopez, Amparo; Klima, Raffaella; Feiguin, Fabian; Artero, Ruben

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a genetic disease caused by the pathological expansion of a CTG trinucleotide repeat in the 3' UTR of the DMPK gene. In the DMPK transcripts, the CUG expansions sequester RNA-binding proteins into nuclear foci, including transcription factors and alternative splicing regulators such as MBNL1. MBNL1 sequestration has been associated with key features of DM1. However, the basis behind a number of molecular and histological alterations in DM1 remain unclear. To help identify new pathogenic components of the disease, we carried out a genetic screen using a Drosophila model of DM1 that expresses 480 interrupted CTG repeats, i(CTG)480, and a collection of 1215 transgenic RNA interference (RNAi) fly lines. Of the 34 modifiers identified, two RNA-binding proteins, TBPH (homolog of human TAR DNA-binding protein 43 or TDP-43) and BSF (Bicoid stability factor; homolog of human LRPPRC), were of particular interest. These factors modified i(CTG)480 phenotypes in the fly eye and wing, and TBPH silencing also suppressed CTG-induced defects in the flight muscles. In Drosophila flight muscle, TBPH, BSF and the fly ortholog of MBNL1, Muscleblind (Mbl), were detected in sarcomeric bands. Expression of i(CTG)480 resulted in changes in the sarcomeric patterns of these proteins, which could be restored by coexpression with human MBNL1. Epistasis studies showed that Mbl silencing was sufficient to induce a subcellular redistribution of TBPH and BSF proteins in the muscle, which mimicked the effect of i(CTG)480 expression. These results provide the first description of TBPH and BSF as targets of Mbl-mediated CTG toxicity, and they suggest an important role of these proteins in DM1 muscle pathology. PMID:23118342

  13. Chronic hypoxia impairs muscle function in the Drosophila model of Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD).

    PubMed

    Mosqueira, Matias; Willmann, Gabriel; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele; Khurana, Tejvir S

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe progressive myopathy caused by mutations in the DMD gene leading to a deficiency of the dystrophin protein. Due to ongoing muscle necrosis in respiratory muscles late-stage DMD is associated with respiratory insufficiency and chronic hypoxia (CH). To understand the effects of CH on dystrophin-deficient muscle in vivo, we exposed the Drosophila model for DMD (dmDys) to CH during a 16-day ascent to the summit of Mount Denali/McKinley (6194 meters above sea level). Additionally, dmDys and wild type (WT) flies were also exposed to CH in laboratory simulations of high altitude hypoxia. Expression profiling was performed using Affymetrix GeneChips® and validated using qPCR. Hypoxic dmDys differentially expressed 1281 genes, whereas the hypoxic WT flies differentially expressed 56 genes. Interestingly, a number of genes (e.g. heat shock proteins) were discordantly regulated in response to CH between dmDys and WT. We tested the possibility that the disparate molecular responses of dystrophin-deficient tissues to CH could adversely affect muscle by performing functional assays in vivo. Normoxic and CH WT and dmDys flies were challenged with acute hypoxia and time-to-recover determined as well as subjected to climbing tests. Impaired performance was noted for CH-dmDys compared to normoxic dmDys or WT flies (rank order: Normoxic-WT ≈ CH-WT> Normoxic-dmDys> CH-dmDys). These data suggest that dystrophin-deficiency is associated with a disparate, pathological hypoxic stress response(s) and is more sensitive to hypoxia induced muscle dysfunction in vivo. We hypothesize that targeting/correcting the disparate molecular response(s) to hypoxia may offer a novel therapeutic strategy in DMD. PMID:20975992

  14. Chronic Hypoxia Impairs Muscle Function in the Drosophila Model of Duchenne's Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueira, Matias; Willmann, Gabriel; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele; Khurana, Tejvir S.

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe progressive myopathy caused by mutations in the DMD gene leading to a deficiency of the dystrophin protein. Due to ongoing muscle necrosis in respiratory muscles late-stage DMD is associated with respiratory insufficiency and chronic hypoxia (CH). To understand the effects of CH on dystrophin-deficient muscle in vivo, we exposed the Drosophila model for DMD (dmDys) to CH during a 16-day ascent to the summit of Mount Denali/McKinley (6194 meters above sea level). Additionally, dmDys and wild type (WT) flies were also exposed to CH in laboratory simulations of high altitude hypoxia. Expression profiling was performed using Affymetrix GeneChips® and validated using qPCR. Hypoxic dmDys differentially expressed 1281 genes, whereas the hypoxic WT flies differentially expressed 56 genes. Interestingly, a number of genes (e.g. heat shock proteins) were discordantly regulated in response to CH between dmDys and WT. We tested the possibility that the disparate molecular responses of dystrophin-deficient tissues to CH could adversely affect muscle by performing functional assays in vivo. Normoxic and CH WT and dmDys flies were challenged with acute hypoxia and time-to-recover determined as well as subjected to climbing tests. Impaired performance was noted for CH-dmDys compared to normoxic dmDys or WT flies (rank order: Normoxic-WT ≈ CH-WT> Normoxic-dmDys> CH-dmDys). These data suggest that dystrophin-deficiency is associated with a disparate, pathological hypoxic stress response(s) and is more sensitive to hypoxia induced muscle dysfunction in vivo. We hypothesize that targeting/correcting the disparate molecular response(s) to hypoxia may offer a novel therapeutic strategy in DMD. PMID:20975992

  15. The pros and cons of vertebrate animal models for functional and therapeutic research on inherited retinal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Slijkerman, Ralph W N; Song, Fei; Astuti, Galuh D N; Huynen, Martijn A; van Wijk, Erwin; Stieger, Knut; Collin, Rob W J

    2015-09-01

    Over the last decade, huge progress has been made in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD), as well as in the development and implementation of novel therapies, especially in the field of gene therapy. The use of mutant animal models, either naturally occurring or generated by genetic modification, have contributed greatly to our knowledge on IRD. Yet, these mutant animal models do not always mimic the retinal phenotype that is observed in humans with mutations in the orthologous gene, often due to species-specific characteristics of the retina, and/or diverse functions of the gene products in different species. In this manuscript, we compare general and ocular characteristics of a series of widely used vertebrate animal models, i.e. zebrafish, chicken, rodents, cats, dogs, sheep, pigs and monkeys, in terms of genetic architecture and sequence homology, methods to modify genomes, anatomy of the eye, and structural details of the retina. Furthermore, we present an overview of mutant vertebrate animal models that have been used to study or develop treatments for the various genetic subtypes of IRD, and correlate the suitability of these models to the specific characteristics of each animal. Herewith, we provide tools that will help to select the most suitable animal model for specific research questions on IRDs in the future, and thereby assist in an optimal use of animals and resources to further increase our understanding of inherited retinal dystrophies, and develop novel treatments for these disorders. PMID:25936606

  16. Trendelenburg-Like Gait, Instability and Altered Step Patterns in a Mouse Model for Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2i.

    PubMed

    Maricelli, Joseph W; Lu, Qi L; Lin, David C; Rodgers, Buel D

    2016-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2i (LGMD2i) affects thousands of lives with shortened life expectancy mainly due to cardiac and respiratory problems and difficulty with ambulation significantly compromising quality of life. Limited studies have noted impaired gait in patients and animal models of different muscular dystrophies, but not in animal models of LGMD2i. Our goal, therefore, was to quantify gait metrics in the fukutin-related protein P448L mutant (P448L) mouse, a recently developed model for LGMD2i. The Noldus CatWalk XT motion capture system was used to identify multiple gait impairments. An average galloping body speed of 35 cm/s for both P448L and C57BL/6 wild-type mice was maintained to ensure differences in gait were due only to strain physiology. Compared to wild-type mice, P448L mice reach maximum contact 10% faster and have 40% more paw surface area during stance. Additionally, force intensity at the time of maximum paw contact is roughly 2-fold higher in P448L mice. Paw swing time is reduced in P448L mice without changes in stride length as a faster swing speed compensates. Gait instability in P448L mice is indicated by 50% higher instances of 3 and 4 paw stance support and conversely, 2-fold fewer instances of single paw stance support and no instance of zero paw support. This leads to lower variation of normal step patterns used and a higher use of uncommon step patterns. Similar anomalies have also been noted in muscular dystrophy patients due to weakness in the hip abductor muscles, producing a Trendelenburg gait characterized by "waddling" and more pronounced shifts to the stance leg. Thus, gait of P448L mice replicates anomalies commonly seen in LGMD2i patients, which is not only potentially valuable for assessing drug efficacy in restoring movement biomechanics, but also for better understanding them. PMID:27627455

  17. Zebrafish orthologs of human muscular dystrophy genes

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Leta S; Guyon, Jeffrey R; Vogel, Emily D; Beltre, Rosanna; Pusack, Timothy J; Zhou, Yi; Zon, Leonard I; Kunkel, Louis M

    2007-01-01

    Background Human muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders which cause decreased muscle strength and often result in premature death. There is no known cure for muscular dystrophy, nor have all causative genes been identified. Recent work in the small vertebrate zebrafish Danio rerio suggests that mutation or misregulation of zebrafish dystrophy orthologs can also cause muscular degeneration phenotypes in fish. To aid in the identification of new causative genes, this study identifies and maps zebrafish orthologs for all known human muscular dystrophy genes. Results Zebrafish sequence databases were queried for transcripts orthologous to human dystrophy-causing genes, identifying transcripts for 28 out of 29 genes of interest. In addition, the genomic locations of all 29 genes have been found, allowing rapid candidate gene discovery during genetic mapping of zebrafish dystrophy mutants. 19 genes show conservation of syntenic relationships with humans and at least two genes appear to be duplicated in zebrafish. Significant sequence coverage on one or more BAC clone(s) was also identified for 24 of the genes to provide better local sequence information and easy updating of genomic locations as the zebrafish genome assembly continues to evolve. Conclusion This resource supports zebrafish as a dystrophy model, suggesting maintenance of all known dystrophy-associated genes in the zebrafish genome. Coupled with the ability to conduct genetic screens and small molecule screens, zebrafish are thus an attractive model organism for isolating new dystrophy-causing genes/pathways and for use in high-throughput therapeutic discovery. PMID:17374169

  18. Myostatin inhibition by a follistatin-derived peptide ameliorates the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy model mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchida, K

    2008-01-01

    Summary Gene-targeted therapies, such as adeno-associated viral vector (AAV)-mediated gene therapy and cell-mediated therapy using myogenic stem cells, are hopeful molecular strategies for muscular dystrophy. In addition, drug therapies based on the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy patients are desirable. Multidisciplinary approaches to drug design would offer promising therapeutic strategies. Myostatin, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is predominantly produced by skeletal muscle and negatively regulates the growth and differentiation of cells of the skeletal muscle lineage. Myostatin inhibition would increase the skeletal muscle mass and prevent muscle degeneration, regardless of the type of muscular dystrophy. Myostatin inhibitors include myostatin antibodies, myostatin propeptide, follistatin and follistatin-related protein. Although follistatin possesses potent myostatin-inhibiting activity, it works as an efficient inhibitor of activins. Unlike myostatin, activins regulate the growth and differentiation of nearly all cell types, including cells of the gonads, pituitary gland and skeletal muscle. We have developed a myostatin-specific inhibitor derived from follistatin, designated FS I-I. Transgenic mice expressing this myostatin-inhibiting peptide under the control of a skeletal muscle-specific promoter showed increased skeletal muscle mass and strength. mdx mice were crossed with FS I-I transgenic mice and any improvement of the pathological signs was investigated. The resulting mdx/FS I-I mice exhibited increased skeletal muscle mass and reduced cell infiltration in muscles. Muscle strength was also recovered in mdx/FS I-I mice. Our data indicate that myostatin inhibition by this follistatin-derived peptide has therapeutic potential for muscular dystrophy. PMID:19108572

  19. Satellite cell senescence underlies myopathy in a mouse model of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2H.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, Elena; Kramerova, Irina; Spencer, Melissa J

    2012-05-01

    Mutations in the E3 ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif-containing 32 (TRIM32) are responsible for the disease limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2H (LGMD2H). Previously, we generated Trim32 knockout mice (Trim32-/- mice) and showed that they display a myopathic phenotype accompanied by neurogenic features. Here, we used these mice to investigate the muscle-specific defects arising from the absence of TRIM32, which underlie the myopathic phenotype. Using 2 models of induced atrophy, we showed that TRIM32 is dispensable for muscle atrophy. Conversely, TRIM32 was necessary for muscle regrowth after atrophy. Furthermore, TRIM32-deficient primary myoblasts underwent premature senescence and impaired myogenesis due to accumulation of PIAS4, an E3 SUMO ligase and TRIM32 substrate that was previously shown to be associated with senescence. Premature senescence of myoblasts was also observed in vivo in an atrophy/regrowth model. Trim32-/- muscles had substantially fewer activated satellite cells, increased PIAS4 levels, and growth failure compared with wild-type muscles. Moreover, Trim32-/- muscles exhibited features of premature sarcopenia, such as selective type II fast fiber atrophy. These results imply that premature senescence of muscle satellite cells is an underlying pathogenic feature of LGMD2H and reveal what we believe to be a new mechanism of muscular dystrophy associated with reductions in available satellite cells and premature sarcopenia. PMID:22505452

  20. Dystrophin conferral using human endothelium expressing HLA-E in the non-immunosuppressive murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chang-Hao; Miyoshi, Shunichiro; Tsuji, Hiroko; Makino, Hatsune; Kanzaki, Seiichi; Kami, Daisuke; Terai, Masanori; Suzuki, Harumi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2011-01-15

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I (Ib) molecule, which plays an important role in immunosuppression. In this study, we investigated the immunomodulating effect of HLA-E in a xenogeneic system, using human placental artery-derived endothelial (hPAE) cells expressing HLA-E in a mouse model. In vitro cell lysis analysis by primed lymphocytes in combination with siRNA transfection showed that HLA-E is necessary for inhibition of the immune response. Similarly, in vivo cell implantation analysis with siRNA-mediated down-regulation of HLA-E demonstrates that HLA-E is involved in immunosuppression. As hPAE cells efficiently transdifferentiate into myoblasts/myocytes in vitro, we transplanted the cells into mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. hPAE cells conferred dystrophin to myocytes of the 'immunocompetent' mdx mice with extremely high efficiency. These findings suggest that HLA-E-expressing cells with a myogenic potential represent a promising source for cell-based therapy of patients with muscular dystrophy. PMID:20947660

  1. A dual acting compound releasing nitric oxide (NO) and ibuprofen, NCX 320, shows significant therapeutic effects in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sciorati, Clara; Miglietta, Daniela; Buono, Roberta; Pisa, Viviana; Cattaneo, Dario; Azzoni, Emanuele; Brunelli, Silvia; Clementi, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    A resolutive therapy for muscular dystrophies, a heterogeneous group of genetic diseases leading to muscular degeneration and in the severe forms to death, is still lacking. Since inflammation and defects in nitric oxide generation are recognized key pathogenic events in muscular dystrophy, we have analysed the effects of a derivative of ibuprofen, NCX 320, belonging to the class of cyclooxygenase inhibiting nitric oxide donator (CINOD), in the α-sarcoglycan null mice, a severe mouse model of dystrophy. NCX 320 was administered daily in the diet for 8 months starting 1 month from weaning. Muscle functional recovery was evaluated by free wheel and treadmill tests at 8 months. Serum creatine kinase activity, as well as the number of diaphragm inflammatory infiltrates and necrotic fibres, was measured as indexes of skeletal muscle damage. Muscle regeneration was evaluated in diaphragm and tibialis anterior muscles, measuring the numbers of centronucleated fibres and of myogenic precursor cells. NCX 320 mitigated muscle damage, reducing significantly serum creatine kinase activity, the number of necrotic fibres and inflammatory infiltrates. Moreover, NCX 320 stimulated muscle regeneration increasing significantly the number of myogenic precursor cells and regenerating fibres. All these effects concurred in inducing a significant improvement of muscle function, as assessed by both free wheel and treadmill tests. These results describe the properties of a new compound incorporating nitric oxide donation together with anti-inflammatory properties, showing that it is effective in slowing muscle dystrophy progression long term. Of importance, this new compound deserves specific attention for its potential in the therapy of muscular dystrophy given that ibuprofen is well tolerated in paediatric patients and with a profile of safety that makes it suitable for chronic treatment such as the one required in muscular dystrophies. PMID:21609764

  2. B4GALNT2 (GALGT2) Gene Therapy Reduces Skeletal Muscle Pathology in the FKRP P448L Mouse Model of Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2I.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Paul J; Xu, Rui; Martin, Paul T

    2016-09-01

    Overexpression of B4GALNT2 (previously GALGT2) inhibits the development of muscle pathology in mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy 1A, and limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2D. In these models, muscle GALGT2 overexpression induces the glycosylation of α dystroglycan with the cytotoxic T cell glycan and increases the overexpression of dystrophin and laminin α2 surrogates known to inhibit disease. Here, we show that GALGT2 gene therapy significantly reduces muscle pathology in FKRP P448Lneo(-) mice, a model for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. rAAVrh74.MCK.GALGT2-treated FKRP P448Lneo(-) muscles showed reduced levels of centrally nucleated myofibers, reduced variance, increased size of myofiber diameters, reduced myofiber immunoglobulin G uptake, and reduced muscle wasting at 3 and 6 months after treatment. GALGT2 overexpression in FKRP P448Lneo(-) muscles did not cause substantial glycosylation of α dystroglycan with the cytotoxic T cell glycan or increased expression of dystrophin and laminin α2 surrogates in mature skeletal myofibers, but it increased the number of embryonic myosin-positive regenerating myofibers. These data demonstrate that GALGT2 overexpression can reduce the extent of muscle pathology in FKRP mutant muscles, but that it may do so via a mechanism that differs from its ability to induce surrogate gene expression. PMID:27561302

  3. Short Telomeres and Stem Cell Exhaustion Model Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in mdx/mTR Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Alessandra; Mourkioti, Foteini; Tran, Rose; Choi, Jinkuk; Llewellyn, Michael; Kraft, Peggy; Shkreli, Marina; Delp, Scott; Pomerantz, Jason H.; Artandi, Steven E.; Blau, Helen M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), dystrophin mutation leads to progressive lethal skeletal muscle degeneration. For unknown reasons, dystrophin deficiency does not recapitulate DMD in mice (mdx), which have mild skeletal muscle defects and potent regenerative capacity. We postulated that human DMD progression is a consequence of loss of functional muscle stem cells (MuSC) and the mild mouse mdx phenotype results from greater MuSC reserve fueled by longer telomeres. We report that mdx mice lacking the RNA component of telomerase (mdx/mTR) have shortened telomeres in muscle cells and severe muscular dystrophy that progressively worsens with age. Muscle wasting severity parallels a decline in MuSC regenerative capacity, and is ameliorated histologically by transplantation of wild-type MuSC. These data show that DMD progression results in part from a cell-autonomous failure of MuSC to maintain the damage-repair cycle initiated by dystrophin deficiency. The essential role of MuSC function has therapeutic implications for DMD. PMID:21145579

  4. Developmental Defects in a Zebrafish Model for Muscular Dystrophies Associated with the Loss of Fukutin-Related Protein (FKRP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornhill, Paul; Bassett, David; Lochmuller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker

    2008-01-01

    A number of muscular dystrophies are associated with the defective glycosylation of [alpha]-dystroglycan and many are now known to result from mutations in a number of genes encoding putative or known glycosyltransferases. These diseases include severe forms of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) such as Fukuyama type congenital muscular dystrophy…

  5. Towards developing standard operating procedures for pre-clinical testing in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Grounds, Miranda D.; Radley, Hannah G.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; De Luca, Annamaria

    2008-01-01

    This review discusses various issues to consider when developing standard operating procedures for pre-clinical studies in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The review describes and evaluates a wide range of techniques used to measure parameters of muscle pathology in mdx mice and identifies some basic techniques that might comprise standardised approaches for evaluation. While the central aim is to provide a basis for the development of standardised procedures to evaluate efficacy of a drug or a therapeutic strategy, a further aim is to gain insight into pathophysiological mechanisms in order to identify other therapeutic targets. The desired outcome is to enable easier and more rigorous comparison of pre-clinical data from different laboratories around the world, in order to accelerate identification of the best pre-clinical therapies in the mdx mouse that will fast-track translation into effective clinical treatments for DMD. PMID:18499465

  6. Long-term treatment with naproxcinod significantly improves skeletal and cardiac disease phenotype in the mdx mouse model of dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Quinn, James L; Tatem, Kathleen S; Van Der Meulen, Jack H; Yu, Qing; Phadke, Aditi; Miller, Brittany K; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Ongini, Ennio; Miglietta, Daniela; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-06-15

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients and the mouse model of DMD, mdx, dystrophin deficiency causes a decrease and mislocalization of muscle-specific neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), leading to functional impairments. Previous studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO) donation associated with anti-inflammatory action has beneficial effects in dystrophic mouse models. In this study, we have systematically investigated the effects of naproxcinod, an NO-donating naproxen derivative, on the skeletal and cardiac disease phenotype in mdx mice. Four-week-old mdx and C57BL/10 mice were treated with four different concentrations (0, 10, 21 and 41 mg/kg) of naproxcinod and 0.9 mg/kg of prednisolone in their food for 9 months. All mice were subjected to twice-weekly treadmill sessions, and functional and behavioral parameters were measured at 3, 6 and 9 months of treatment. In addition, we evaluated in vitro force contraction, optical imaging of inflammation, echocardiography and blood pressure (BP) at the 9-month endpoint prior to sacrifice. We found that naproxcinod treatment at 21 mg/kg resulted in significant improvement in hindlimb grip strength and a 30% decrease in inflammation in the fore- and hindlimbs of mdx mice. Furthermore, we found significant improvement in heart function, as evidenced by improved fraction shortening, ejection fraction and systolic BP. In addition, the long-term detrimental effects of prednisolone typically seen in mdx skeletal and heart function were not observed at the effective dose of naproxcinod. In conclusion, our results indicate that naproxcinod has significant potential as a safe therapeutic option for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. PMID:24463621

  7. Long-term treatment with naproxcinod significantly improves skeletal and cardiac disease phenotype in the mdx mouse model of dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Quinn, James L; Tatem, Kathleen S; Van Der Meulen, Jack H; Yu, Qing; Phadke, Aditi; Miller, Brittany K; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Ongini, Ennio; Miglietta, Daniela; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients and the mouse model of DMD, mdx, dystrophin deficiency causes a decrease and mislocalization of muscle-specific neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), leading to functional impairments. Previous studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO) donation associated with anti-inflammatory action has beneficial effects in dystrophic mouse models. In this study, we have systematically investigated the effects of naproxcinod, an NO-donating naproxen derivative, on the skeletal and cardiac disease phenotype in mdx mice. Four-week-old mdx and C57BL/10 mice were treated with four different concentrations (0, 10, 21 and 41 mg/kg) of naproxcinod and 0.9 mg/kg of prednisolone in their food for 9 months. All mice were subjected to twice-weekly treadmill sessions, and functional and behavioral parameters were measured at 3, 6 and 9 months of treatment. In addition, we evaluated in vitro force contraction, optical imaging of inflammation, echocardiography and blood pressure (BP) at the 9-month endpoint prior to sacrifice. We found that naproxcinod treatment at 21 mg/kg resulted in significant improvement in hindlimb grip strength and a 30% decrease in inflammation in the fore- and hindlimbs of mdx mice. Furthermore, we found significant improvement in heart function, as evidenced by improved fraction shortening, ejection fraction and systolic BP. In addition, the long-term detrimental effects of prednisolone typically seen in mdx skeletal and heart function were not observed at the effective dose of naproxcinod. In conclusion, our results indicate that naproxcinod has significant potential as a safe therapeutic option for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. PMID:24463621

  8. Treatment with human immunoglobulin G improves the early disease course in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Zschüntzsch, Jana; Zhang, Yaxin; Klinker, Florian; Makosch, Gregor; Klinge, Lars; Malzahn, Dörthe; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Liebetanz, David; Schmidt, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe hereditary myopathy. Standard treatment by glucocorticosteroids is limited because of numerous side effects. The aim of this study was to test immunomodulation by human immunoglobulin G (IgG) as treatment in the experimental mouse model (mdx) of DMD. 2 g/kg human IgG compared to human albumin was injected intraperitoneally in mdx mice at the age of 3 and 7 weeks. Advanced voluntary wheel running parameters were recorded continuously. At the age of 11 weeks, animals were killed so that blood, diaphragm, and lower limb muscles could be removed for quantitative PCR, histological analysis and ex vivo muscle contraction tests. IgG compared to albumin significantly improved the voluntary running performance and reduced muscle fatigability in an ex vivo muscle contraction test. Upon IgG treatment, serum creatine kinase values were diminished and mRNA expression levels of relevant inflammatory markers were reduced in the diaphragm and limb muscles. Macrophage infiltration and myopathic damage were significantly ameliorated in the quadriceps muscle. Collectively, this study demonstrates that, in the early disease course of mdx mice, human IgG improves the running performance and diminishes myopathic damage and inflammation in the muscle. Therefore, IgG may be a promising approach for treatment of DMD. Two monthly intraperitoneal injections of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) improved the early 11-week disease phase of mdx mice. Voluntary running was improved and serum levels of creatine kinase were diminished. In the skeletal muscle, myopathic damage was ameliorated and key inflammatory markers such as mRNA expression of SPP1 and infiltration by macrophages were reduced. The study suggests that IgG could be explored as a potential treatment option for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and that pre-clinical long-term studies should be helpful. PMID:26230042

  9. Fast skeletal myofibers of mdx mouse, model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, express connexin hemichannels that lead to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Cea, Luis A; Puebla, Carlos; Cisterna, Bruno A; Escamilla, Rosalba; Vargas, Aníbal A; Frank, Marina; Martínez-Montero, Paloma; Prior, Carmen; Molano, Jesús; Esteban-Rodríguez, Isabel; Pascual, Ignacio; Gallano, Pía; Lorenzo, Gustavo; Pian, Héctor; Barrio, Luis C; Willecke, Klaus; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscles of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) show numerous alterations including inflammation, apoptosis, and necrosis of myofibers. However, the molecular mechanism that explains these changes remains largely unknown. Here, the involvement of hemichannels formed by connexins (Cx HCs) was evaluated in skeletal muscle of mdx mouse model of DMD. Fast myofibers of mdx mice were found to express three connexins (39, 43 and 45) and high sarcolemma permeability, which was absent in myofibers of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice (deficient in skeletal muscle Cx43/Cx45 expression). These myofibers did not show elevated basal intracellular free Ca(2+) levels, immunoreactivity to phosphorylated p65 (active NF-κB), eNOS and annexin V/active Caspase 3 (marker of apoptosis) but presented dystrophin immunoreactivity. Moreover, muscles of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice exhibited partial decrease of necrotic features (big cells and high creatine kinase levels). Accordingly, these muscles showed similar macrophage infiltration as control mdx muscles. Nonetheless, the hanging test performance of mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice was significantly better than that of control mdx Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice. All three Cxs found in skeletal muscles of mdx mice were also detected in fast myofibers of biopsy specimens from patients with muscular dystrophy. Thus, reduction of Cx expression and/or function of Cx HCs may be potential therapeutic approaches to abrogate myofiber apoptosis in DMD. PMID:26803842

  10. Sternohyoid muscle fatigue properties of dy/dy dystrophic mice, an animal model of merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    van Lunteren, Erik; Moyer, Michelle

    2003-10-01

    Humans with merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy have both sucking problems during infancy and sleep-disordered breathing during childhood. We hypothesized that merosin-deficient pharyngeal muscles fatigue faster than normal muscles. This was tested in vitro using sternohyoid muscle from an animal model of this disease, the dy/dy dystrophic mouse. Isometric twitch contraction and half-relaxation times were similar for dy/dy and normal sternohyoid. However, rate of force loss during repetitive 25-Hz train stimulation was markedly diminished in dystrophic compared with normal sternohyoid muscle. Furthermore, force potentiation, which occurred during the early portion of the fatigue-inducing stimulation, had a longer duration in dystrophic compared with normal muscle (approximately 60 versus 20 s). As a result of these two processes, at the end of 2 min of stimulation, force of dystrophic muscle had decreased by 8 +/- 5% and that of normal muscle by 69 +/- 4% (p < 0.0001). The potassium-channel blocker, 3,4-diaminopyridine, increased force of dy/dy sternohyoid muscle during twitch and 25-Hz contractions by 148 +/- 20% (p < 0.00001) and 109 +/- 18% (p < 0.00002), respectively. During repetitive 25-Hz stimulation, force of 3,4-diaminopyridine-treated dystrophic muscle remained significantly higher than that of untreated muscle, despite the early force potentiation being eliminated and fatigue being accelerated. Thus, merosin deficiency reduces fatigue and prolongs the duration of force potentiation. The latter alterations may partially preserve the integrity of upper airway muscle function, without which the severity of pharyngeal complications (feeding problems, sleep-related respiratory dysfunction) might be even more pronounced in the human merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophies. PMID:12840158

  11. Dystrophin Hot-Spot Mutants Leading to Becker Muscular Dystrophy Insert More Deeply into Membrane Models than the Native Protein.

    PubMed

    Ameziane-Le Hir, Sarah; Paboeuf, Gilles; Tascon, Christophe; Hubert, Jean-François; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Vié, Véronique; Raguénès-Nicol, Céline

    2016-07-26

    Dystrophin (DYS) is a membrane skeleton protein whose mutations lead to lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy or to the milder Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). One third of BMD "in-frame" exon deletions are located in the region that codes for spectrin-like repeats R16 to R21. We focused on four prevalent mutated proteins deleted in this area (called RΔ45-47, RΔ45-48, RΔ45-49, and RΔ45-51 according to the deleted exon numbers), analyzing protein/membrane interactions. Two of the mutants, RΔ45-48 and RΔ45-51, led to mild pathologies and displayed a similar triple coiled-coil structure as the full-length DYS R16-21, whereas the two others, RΔ45-47 and RΔ45-49, induced more severe pathologies and showed "fractional" structures unrelated to the normal one. To explore lipid packing, small unilamellar liposomes (SUVs) and planar monolayers were used at various initial surface pressures. The dissociation constants determined by microscale thermophoresis (MST) were much higher for the full-length DYS R161-21 than for the mutants; thus the wild type protein has weaker SUV binding. Comparing surface pressures after protein adsorption and analysis of atomic force microscopy images of mixed protein/lipid monolayers revealed that the mutants insert more into the lipid monolayer than the wild type does. In fact, in both models every deletion mutant showed more interactions with membranes than the full-length protein did. This means that mutations in the R16-21 part of dystrophin disturb the protein's molecular behavior as it relates to membranes, regardless of whether the accompanying pathology is mild or severe. PMID:27367833

  12. Multiscale models of skeletal muscle reveal the complex effects of muscular dystrophy on tissue mechanics and damage susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Virgilio, Kelley M.; Martin, Kyle S.; Peirce, Shayn M.; Blemker, Silvia S.

    2015-01-01

    Computational models have been increasingly used to study the tissue-level constitutive properties of muscle microstructure; however, these models were not created to study or incorporate the influence of disease-associated modifications in muscle. The purpose of this paper was to develop a novel multiscale muscle modelling framework to elucidate the relationship between microstructural disease adaptations and modifications in both mechanical properties of muscle and strain in the cell membrane. We used an agent-based model to randomly generate new muscle fibre geometries and mapped them into a finite-element model representing a cross section of a muscle fascicle. The framework enabled us to explore variability in the shape and arrangement of fibres, as well as to incorporate disease-related changes. We applied this method to reveal the trade-offs between mechanical properties and damage susceptibility in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is a fatal genetic disease caused by a lack of the transmembrane protein dystrophin, leading to muscle wasting and death due to cardiac or pulmonary complications. The most prevalent microstructural variations in DMD include: lack of transmembrane proteins, fibrosis, fatty infiltration and variation in fibre cross-sectional area. A parameter analysis of these variations and case study of DMD revealed that the nature of fibrosis and density of transmembrane proteins strongly affected the stiffness of the muscle and susceptibility to membrane damage. PMID:25844152

  13. Identifying variation in models of care for the genomic-based diagnosis of inherited retinal dystrophies in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Eden, M; Payne, K; Jones, C; Wright, S J; Hall, G; McAllister, M; Black, G

    2016-07-01

    PurposeAdvances in genomic technologies are prompting a realignment of diagnostic and management pathways for rare inherited disease. New models of care are being developed as genomic-based diagnostic testing becomes increasingly relevant within more and more aspects of medicine. This study describes current care models for the provision of a genomic-based diagnosis for patients with inherited retinal dystrophy (IRD) in UK clinical practice.MethodsA structured telephone survey, conducted (in 2014) with all 23 UK Regional Genetics Centres and a sample of specialist ophthalmology centres (n=4), was used to describe models of service delivery and current levels of genomic-based diagnostic testing. Quantitative data were summarised using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were summarised using thematic analysis.ResultsOf the 27 centres 10 of them saw IRD patients in 'generic' clinics and 17 centres offered ophthalmic-specific clinics. Extensive regional variation was observed in numbers of patients seen and in how care for the diagnosis and management of IRD was provided.ConclusionsUnderstanding current practice is a necessary first step in the development and evaluation of complex interventions, such as care models for the genomic-based diagnosis of inherited eye conditions. Presented findings here relating to disparities in care provision are potentially linked to previously reported evidence of perceived unmet needs and expectations of IRD service users. This work provides a foundation for the integration of new care models in mainstream medicine. PMID:27080487

  14. Wild-Type Mouse Models to Screen Antisense Oligonucleotides for Exon-Skipping Efficacy in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Limin; Han, Gang; Gu, Ben; Yin, HaiFang

    2014-01-01

    A readily available animal model is essential for rapidly identifying effective treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a devastating neuromuscular disorder caused by the lack of dystrophin protein, which results from frame-disrupting mutations in the DMD gene. Currently, the mdx mouse is the most commonly used model for antisense oligonucleotide (AO)-mediated exon skipping pre-clinical studies, with a mild phenotype. However, the accessibility of mdx mouse colonies particularly in developing countries can constrain research. Therefore in this study we explore the feasibility of using wild-type mice as models to establish exon-skipping efficiency of various DMD AO chemistries and their conjugates. Four different strains of wild-type mice and six different AO chemistries were investigated intramuscularly and the results indicated that the same exon-skipping efficiency was achieved for all tested AOs as that from mdx mice. Notably, levels of exon-skipping obtained in C57BL6 and C3H and mdx mice were most closely matched, followed by ICR and BALB/C mice. Systemic validation revealed that wild-type mice are less responsive to AO-mediated exon skipping than mdx mice. Our study provides evidence for the first time that wild-type mice can be appropriate models for assessing DMD AO exon-skipping efficiency with similar sensitivity to that of mdx mice and this finding can further accelerate the development of effective DMD AOs. PMID:25365558

  15. Wasting mechanisms in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-10-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ambulance and cardiac and respiratory failure. A number of molecular processes have now been identified which hasten disease progression in human patients and animal models of muscular dystrophy. Accumulating evidence further suggests that aberrant activation of several signaling pathways aggravate pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle. Although replacement of defective gene with wild-type is paramount to cure, management of secondary pathological changes has enormous potential to improving the quality of life and extending lifespan of muscular dystrophy patients. In this article, we have reviewed major cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting. PMID:23669245

  16. A Potent Inhibitor of Protein Sequestration by Expanded Triplet (CUG) Repeats that Shows Phenotypic Improvements in a Drosophila Model of Myotonic Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Luu, Long M; Nguyen, Lien; Peng, Shaohong; Lee, JuYeon; Lee, Hyang Yeon; Wong, Chun-Ho; Hergenrother, Paul J; Chan, H Y Edwin; Zimmerman, Steven C

    2016-07-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most common form of adult-onset muscular dystrophy, originating in a CTG repeat expansion in the DMPK gene. The expanded CUG transcript sequesters MBNL1, a key regulator of alternative splicing, leading to the misregulation of numerous pre-mRNAs. We report an RNA-targeted agent as a possible lead compound for the treatment of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) that reveals both the promise and challenges for this type of small-molecule approach. The agent is a potent inhibitor of the MBNL1-rCUG complex with an inhibition constant (Ki ) of 25±8 nm, and is also relatively nontoxic to HeLa cells, able to dissolve nuclear foci, and correct the insulin receptor splicing defect in DM1 model cells. Moreover, treatment with this compound improves two separate disease phenotypes in a Drosophila model of DM1: adult external eye degeneration and larval crawling defect. However, the compound has a relatively low maximum tolerated dose in mice, and its cell uptake may be limited, providing insight into directions for future development. PMID:27245480

  17. A nitrate ester of sedative alkyl alcohol improves muscle function and structure in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guqi; Lu, Qilong

    2013-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has major physiological and cellular effects on muscle growth, repair, and function. In most muscle biopsies from humans with myopathies, sarcolemma-localized neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is either reduced or not detected, particularly in dystrophin-deficient Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Abnormal NO signaling at the sarcolemmal level is integrally involved in the pathogenesis and accounts, at least in part, for the muscle weakness of DMD. Dystrophic muscle fibers exhibit an increased susceptibility to contraction-induced membrane damage. Muscle relaxants function to prevent muscle wasting by decreasing nerve impulses and reducing calcium influx that regulates tensing or tightening of muscle fibers. We have recently developed a new class of nitric esters that combines the pharmacological functions of NO and muscle relaxation. Here, we report the synthesis and properties of the nitric ester (MMPN) of 2-methyl-2-n-propyl-1,3-propanediol (MPP) and its effect in mdx dystrophic mice, a murine model of DMD. MMPN produced significant improvements in biochemical, pathological, and functional phenotypes in the mouse model. The endurance of exercise was extended by 47% in time to exhaustion and 84% in running distance. Serum CK level was decreased by 30%. Additionally, MMPN decreased intracellular free calcium concentration without causing skeletal muscle weakness. No hepatic or renal toxicities were observed during the study. Our investigations unveil a potential new treatment for muscular diseases. PMID:23924275

  18. Galectin-1 Protein Therapy Prevents Pathology and Improves Muscle Function in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Van Ry, Pam M; Wuebbles, Ryan D; Key, Megan; Burkin, Dean J

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, leading to the loss of a critical component of the sarcolemmal dystrophin glycoprotein complex. Galectin-1 is a small 14 kDa protein normally found in skeletal muscle and has been shown to be a modifier of immune response, muscle repair, and apoptosis. Galectin-1 levels are elevated in the muscle of mouse and dog models of DMD. Together, these findings led us to hypothesize that Galectin-1 may serve as a modifier of disease progression in DMD. To test this hypothesis, recombinant mouse Galectin-1 was produced and used to treat myogenic cells and the mdx mouse model of DMD. Here we show that intramuscular and intraperitoneal injections of Galectin-1 into mdx mice prevented pathology and improved muscle function in skeletal muscle. These improvements were a result of enhanced sarcolemmal stability mediated by elevated utrophin and α7β1 integrin protein levels. Together our results demonstrate for the first time that Galectin-1 may serve as an exciting new protein therapeutic for the treatment of DMD. PMID:26050991

  19. Pre-clinical trials in Duchenne dystrophy: what animal models can tell us about potential drug effectiveness.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Annamaria; Pierno, Sabata; Liantonio, Antonella; Conte Camerino, Diana

    2002-10-01

    The symptomatic pharmacological therapy of Duchenne dystrophy is poor, glucocorticoids being the sole compounds showing a certain efficacy, although their use is restricted by serious side effects. Pre-clinical trials of prompt-to-use drugs need reliable animal models of the human disease to predict drug effectiveness in patients. The exercised mdx mouse develops a typical pattern of muscle weakness in vivo, which has already been used as an index on which to evaluate drug effectiveness. We have demonstrated that the macroscopic conductance to chloride ion, an index of degeneration-regeneration events occurring in mdx mouse muscles, is specifically impaired by a chronic exercise protocol and is sensitive to the action of in vivo administered drugs acting either by stimulating regeneration (insulin-like growth factor-1 and steroids) or by counteracting calcium-induced degeneration or inflammation (Taurine and steroids). The monitoring of conductance to chloride ion also allows the evaluation of false positive compounds, effective on mouse strength in vivo but not at muscle level, and the functional correlation with other cellular parameters. PMID:12206808

  20. Abnormal sodium current properties contribute to cardiac electrical and contractile dysfunction in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Algalarrondo, Vincent; Wahbi, Karim; Sebag, Frédéric; Gourdon, Geneviève; Beldjord, Chérif; Azibi, Kamel; Balse, Elise; Coulombe, Alain; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Eymard, Bruno; Duboc, Denis; Hatem, Stéphane N

    2015-04-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common neuromuscular disorder and is associated with cardiac conduction defects. However, the mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias in DM1 are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that abnormalities in the cardiac sodium current (INa) are involved, and used a transgenic mouse model reproducing the expression of triplet expansion observed in DM1 (DMSXL mouse). The injection of the class-I antiarrhythmic agent flecainide induced prominent conduction abnormalities and significantly lowered the radial tissular velocities and strain rate in DMSXL mice compared to WT. These abnormalities were more pronounced in 8-month-old mice than in 3-month-old mice. Ventricular action potentials recorded by standard glass microelectrode technique exhibited a lower maximum upstroke velocity [dV/dt](max) in DMSXL. This decreased [dV/dt](max) was associated with a 1.7 fold faster inactivation of INa in DMSXL myocytes measured by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Finally in the DMSXL mouse, no mutation in the Scn5a gene was detected and neither cardiac fibrosis nor abnormalities of expression of the sodium channel protein were observed. Therefore, alterations in the sodium current markedly contributed to electrical conduction block in DM1. This result should guide pharmaceutical and clinical research toward better therapy for the cardiac arrhythmias associated with DM1. PMID:25613807

  1. Reliable and versatile immortal muscle cell models from healthy and myotonic dystrophy type 1 primary human myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Pantic, Boris; Borgia, Doriana; Giunco, Silvia; Malena, Adriana; Kiyono, Tohru; Salvatori, Sergio; De Rossi, Anita; Giardina, Emiliano; Sangiuolo, Federica; Pegoraro, Elena; Vergani, Lodovica; Botta, Annalisa

    2016-03-01

    Primary human skeletal muscle cells (hSkMCs) are invaluable tools for deciphering the basic molecular mechanisms of muscle-related biological processes and pathological alterations. Nevertheless, their use is quite restricted due to poor availability, short life span and variable purity of the cells during in vitro culture. Here, we evaluate a recently published method of hSkMCs immortalization, relying on ectopic expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1), cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and telomerase (TERT) in myoblasts from healthy donors (n=3) and myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patients (n=2). The efficacy to maintain the myogenic and non-transformed phenotype, as well as the main pathogenetic hallmarks of DM1, has been assessed. Combined expression of the three genes i) maintained the CD56(NCAM)-positive myoblast population and differentiation potential; ii) preserved the non-transformed phenotype and iii) maintained the CTG repeat length, amount of nuclear foci and aberrant alternative splicing in immortal muscle cells. Moreover, immortal hSkMCs displayed attractive additional features such as structural maturation of sarcomeres, persistence of Pax7-positive cells during differentiation and complete disappearance of nuclear foci following (CAG)7 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) treatment. Overall, the CCND1, CDK4 and TERT immortalization yields versatile, reliable and extremely useful human muscle cell models to investigate the basic molecular features of human muscle cell biology, to elucidate the molecular pathogenetic mechanisms and to test new therapeutic approaches for DM1 in vitro. PMID:26905645

  2. Disease course in mdx:utrophin+/− mice: comparison of three mouse models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Abby A; Hebert, Sadie L; Kunz, Matthew D; Ralles, Steven J; McLoon, Linda K

    2015-01-01

    The mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is used to study disease mechanisms and potential treatments, but its pathology is less severe than DMD patients. Other mouse models were developed to more closely mimic the human disease based on knowledge that upregulation of utrophin has a protective effect in mdx muscle. An mdx:utrophin−/− (dko) mouse was created, which had a severe disease phenotype and a shortened life span. An mdx:utrophin+/− mouse was also created, which had an intermediate disease phenotype compared to the mdx and dko mice. To determine the usefulness of mdx:utrophin+/− mice for long-term DMD studies, limb muscle pathology and function were assessed across the life span of wild-type, mdx, mdx:utrophin+/−, and dko mice. Muscle function assessment, specifically grip duration and rotarod performance, demonstrated that mdx:utrophin+/− mice were weaker for a longer time than mdx mice. Mean myofiber area was smaller in mdx:utrophin+/− mice compared to mdx mice at 12 months. Mdx:utrophin+/− mice had a higher percentage of centrally nucleated myofibers compared to mdx mice at 6 and 12 months. Collagen I and IV density was significantly higher in mdx:utrophin+/− muscle compared to mdx at most ages examined. Generally, mdx:utrophin+/− mice showed an intermediate disease phenotype over a longer time course compared to the mdx and dko mice. While they do not genetically mirror human DMD, mdx:utrophin+/− mice may be a more useful animal model than mdx or dko mice for investigating long-term efficacy of potential treatments when fibrosis or muscle function is the focus. PMID:25921779

  3. NIM811, a cyclophilin inhibitor without immunosuppressive activity, is beneficial in collagen VI congenital muscular dystrophy models.

    PubMed

    Zulian, Alessandra; Rizzo, Erika; Schiavone, Marco; Palma, Elena; Tagliavini, Francesca; Blaauw, Bert; Merlini, Luciano; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Braghetta, Paola; Bonaldo, Paolo; Argenton, Francesco; Bernardi, Paolo

    2014-10-15

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD) and Bethlem myopathy (BM) are inherited muscle diseases due to mutations in the genes encoding the extracellular matrix protein collagen (Col) VI. Opening of the cyclosporin A-sensitive mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) is a causative event in disease pathogenesis, and a potential target for therapy. Here, we have tested the effect of N-methyl-4-isoleucine-cyclosporin (NIM811), a non-immunosuppressive cyclophilin inhibitor, in a zebrafish model of ColVI myopathy obtained by deletion of the N-terminal region of the ColVI α1 triple helical domain, a common mutation of UCMD. Treatment with antisense morpholino sequences targeting col6a1 exon 9 at the 1-4 cell stage (within 1 h post fertilization, hpf) caused severe ultrastructural and motor abnormalities as assessed by electron and fluorescence microscopy, birefringence, spontaneous coiling events and touch-evoked responses measured at 24-48 hpf. Structural and functional abnormalities were largely prevented when NIM811--which proved significantly more effective than cyclosporin A--was administered at 21 hpf, while FK506 was ineffective. Beneficial effects of NIM811 were also detected (i) in primary muscle-derived cell cultures from UCMD and BM patients, where the typical mitochondrial alterations and depolarizing response to rotenone and oligomycin were significantly reduced; and (ii) in the Col6a1(-/-) myopathic mouse model, where apoptosis was prevented and muscle strength was increased. Since the PTP of zebrafish shares its key regulatory features with the mammalian pore, our results suggest that early treatment with NIM811 should be tested as a potential therapy for UCMD and BM. PMID:24852368

  4. Treatment with a Nitric Oxide-Donating NSAID Alleviates Functional Muscle Ischemia in the Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Gail D.; Ye, Jianfeng; De Nardi, Claudio; Monopoli, Angela; Ongini, Ennio; Victor, Ronald G.

    2012-01-01

    In patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the standard mdx mouse model of DMD, dystrophin deficiency causes loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ) from the sarcolemma, producing functional ischemia when the muscles are exercised. We asked if functional muscle ischemia would be eliminated and normal blood flow regulation restored by treatment with an exogenous nitric oxide (NO)-donating drug. Beginning at 8 weeks of age, mdx mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with 1% soybean oil alone or in combination with a low (15 mg/kg) or high (45 mg/kg) dose of HCT 1026, a NO-donating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent which has previously been shown to slow disease progression in the mdx model. After 1 month of treatment, vasoconstrictor responses to intra-arterial norepinephrine (NE) were compared in resting and contracting hindlimbs. In untreated mdx mice, the usual effect of muscle contraction to attenuate NE-mediated vasoconstriction was impaired, resulting in functional ischemia: NE evoked similar decreases in femoral blood flow velocity and femoral vascular conductance (FVC) in the contracting compared to resting hindlimbs (ΔFVC contraction/ΔFVC rest = 0.88±0.03). NE-induced functional ischemia was unaffected by low dose HCT 1026 (ΔFVC ratio = 0.92±0.04; P>0.05 vs untreated), but was alleviated by the high dose of the drug (ΔFVC ratio = 0.22±0.03; P<0.05 vs untreated or low dose). The beneficial effect of high dose HCT 1026 was maintained with treatment up to 3 months. The effect of the NO-donating drug HCT 1026 to normalize blood flow regulation in contracting mdx mouse hindlimb muscles suggests a putative novel treatment for DMD. Further translational research is warranted. PMID:23139842

  5. Restoration of Vision in the pde6β-deficient Dog, a Large Animal Model of Rod-cone Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Lolita; Lhériteau, Elsa; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Provost, Nathalie; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Libeau, Lyse; Guihal, Caroline; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    Defects in the β subunit of rod cGMP phosphodiesterase 6 (PDE6β) are associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a childhood blinding disease with early retinal degeneration and vision loss. To date, there is no treatment for this pathology. The aim of this preclinical study was to test recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene addition therapy in the rod-cone dysplasia type 1 (rcd1) dog, a large animal model of naturally occurring PDE6β deficiency that strongly resembles the human pathology. A total of eight rcd1 dogs were injected subretinally with AAV2/5RK.cpde6β (n = 4) or AAV2/8RK.cpde6β (n = 4). In vivo and post-mortem morphological analysis showed a significant preservation of the retinal structure in transduced areas of both AAV2/5RK.cpde6β- and AAV2/8RK.cpde6β-treated retinas. Moreover, substantial rod-derived electroretinography (ERG) signals were recorded as soon as 1 month postinjection (35% of normal eyes) and remained stable for at least 18 months (the duration of the study) in treated eyes. Rod-responses were undetectable in untreated contralateral eyes. Most importantly, dim-light vision was restored in all treated rcd1 dogs. These results demonstrate for the first time that gene therapy effectively restores long-term retinal function and vision in a large animal model of autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy, and provide great promise for human treatment. PMID:22828504

  6. Endothelial Cell Whole Genome Expression Analysis in a Mouse Model of Early-Onset Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Matthaei, Mario; Hu, Jianfei; Meng, Huan; Lackner, Eva-Maria; Eberhart, Charles G.; Qian, Jiang; Hao, Haiping; Jun, Albert S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the endothelial gene expression profile in a Col8a2 Q455K mutant knock-in mouse model of early-onset Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) and identify potential targets that can be correlated to human late-onset FECD. Methods. Diseased or normal endothelial phenotypes were verified in 12-month-old homozygous Col8a2Q455K/Q455K mutant and wild-type mice by clinical confocal microscopy. An endothelial whole genome expression profile was generated by microarray-based analysis. Result validation was performed by real-time PCR. Endothelial COX2 and JUN expression was further studied in human late-onset FECD compared to normal samples. Results. Microarray analysis demonstrated endothelial expression of 24,538 genes (162 up-regulated and 172 down-regulated targets) and identified affected gene ontology terms including Response to Stress, Protein Metabolic Process, Protein Folding, Regulation of Apoptosis, and Transporter Activity. Real-time PCR assessment confirmed increased Cox2 (P = 0.001) and Jun mRNA (P = 0.03) levels in Col8a2Q455K/Q455K mutant compared to wild-type mice. In human FECD samples, real-time PCR demonstrated a statistically significant increase in COX2 mRNA (P < 0.0001) and JUN mRNA (P = 0.002) and tissue microarray analysis showed increased endothelial COX2 (P = 0.02) and JUN protein (P = 0.04). Conclusions. The present study provides the first endothelial whole genome expression analysis in an animal model of FECD and represents a useful resource for future studies of the disease. In particular endothelial COX2 up-regulation warrants further investigation of its role in FECD. PMID:23449721

  7. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  8. Cardiomyopathy in the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy caused by disordered secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Dariusz; Kozlowska, Hanna; Gielecki, Jerzy S.; Rowinski, Jan; Zurada, Anna; Goralczyk, Krzysztof; Bozilow, Wladimir

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic neuromuscular disorder that affects skeletal muscles and cardiac muscle tissue. In some cases, myocardial injury secondary to hypoxia can lead to dilative cardiomyopathy (DCM). A genetic defect in the dystrophin gene may increase the susceptibility of myocardium to hypoxia. Available data suggest that this may be caused by impaired secretion of NO, which is bound with secretion of VEGF-A. Material/Methods Male mice C57BI/10ScSn mdx (animal model of DMD) and healthy mice C57BI/10ScSn were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia in low-pressure chambers. Their hearts were harvested immediately after and 1, 3, 7, and 21 days after exposure to hypoxia. Normobaric mice were used as controls. The expression of VEGF-A in myocardium and cardiac vessel walls was evaluated using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and in situ hybridization. Results VEGF-A expression in myocardium and vessel walls of healthy mice peaked 24 hours after exposure to hypoxia. The expression of VEGF-A in vessel walls was similar in dystrophic and healthy mice; however, VEGF-A expression in the myocardium of dystrophic mice was impaired, peaking around day 7. In the heart, the total level of VEGF depends on VEGF expression in myocardium, not in vessel endothelium, and our research demonstrates that the expression of VEGF is dystrophin-dependent. Conclusions Disordered secretion of VEGF-A in hypoxic myocardium caused the total level of this factor to be impaired in the heart. This factor, which in normal situations protect against hypoxia, promotes the gradual progression of cardiomyopathy. PMID:22037736

  9. Functional and histopathological identification of the respiratory failure in a DMSXL transgenic mouse model of myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Panaite, Petrica-Adrian; Kuntzer, Thierry; Gourdon, Geneviève; Lobrinus, Johannes Alexander; Barakat-Walter, Ibtissam

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute and chronic respiratory failure is one of the major and potentially life-threatening features in individuals with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Despite several clinical demonstrations showing respiratory problems in DM1 patients, the mechanisms are still not completely understood. This study was designed to investigate whether the DMSXL transgenic mouse model for DM1 exhibits respiratory disorders and, if so, to identify the pathological changes underlying these respiratory problems. Using pressure plethysmography, we assessed the breathing function in control mice and DMSXL mice generated after large expansions of the CTG repeat in successive generations of DM1 transgenic mice. Statistical analysis of breathing function measurements revealed a significant decrease in the most relevant respiratory parameters in DMSXL mice, indicating impaired respiratory function. Histological and morphometric analysis showed pathological changes in diaphragmatic muscle of DMSXL mice, characterized by an increase in the percentage of type I muscle fibers, the presence of central nuclei, partial denervation of end-plates (EPs) and a significant reduction in their size, shape complexity and density of acetylcholine receptors, all of which reflect a possible breakdown in communication between the diaphragmatic muscles fibers and the nerve terminals. Diaphragm muscle abnormalities were accompanied by an accumulation of mutant DMPK RNA foci in muscle fiber nuclei. Moreover, in DMSXL mice, the unmyelinated phrenic afferents are significantly lower. Also in these mice, significant neuronopathy was not detected in either cervical phrenic motor neurons or brainstem respiratory neurons. Because EPs are involved in the transmission of action potentials and the unmyelinated phrenic afferents exert a modulating influence on the respiratory drive, the pathological alterations affecting these structures might underlie the respiratory impairment detected in DMSXL mice

  10. Discovery of serum protein biomarkers in the mdx mouse model and cross-species comparison to Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Hathout, Yetrib; Marathi, Ramya L; Rayavarapu, Sree; Zhang, Aiping; Brown, Kristy J; Seol, Haeri; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Cirak, Sebahattin; Bello, Luca; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Partridge, Terry; Hoffman, Eric P; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Mah, Jean K; Henricson, Erik; McDonald, Craig

    2014-12-15

    It is expected that serum protein biomarkers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) will reflect disease pathogenesis, progression and aid future therapy developments. Here, we describe use of quantitative in vivo stable isotope labeling in mammals to accurately compare serum proteomes of wild-type and dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Biomarkers identified in serum from two independent dystrophin-deficient mouse models (mdx-Δ52 and mdx-23) were concordant with those identified in sera samples of DMD patients. Of the 355 mouse sera proteins, 23 were significantly elevated and 4 significantly lower in mdx relative to wild-type mice (P-value < 0.001). Elevated proteins were mostly of muscle origin: including myofibrillar proteins (titin, myosin light chain 1/3, myomesin 3 and filamin-C), glycolytic enzymes (aldolase, phosphoglycerate mutase 2, beta enolase and glycogen phosphorylase), transport proteins (fatty acid-binding protein, myoglobin and somatic cytochrome-C) and others (creatine kinase M, malate dehydrogenase cytosolic, fibrinogen and parvalbumin). Decreased proteins, mostly of extracellular origin, included adiponectin, lumican, plasminogen and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor. Analysis of sera from 1 week to 7 months old mdx mice revealed age-dependent changes in the level of these biomarkers with most biomarkers acutely elevated at 3 weeks of age. Serum analysis of DMD patients, with ages ranging from 4 to 15 years old, confirmed elevation of 20 of the murine biomarkers in DMD, with similar age-related changes. This study provides a panel of biomarkers that reflect muscle activity and pathogenesis and should prove valuable tool to complement natural history studies and to monitor treatment efficacy in future clinical trials. PMID:25027324

  11. Discovery of serum protein biomarkers in the mdx mouse model and cross-species comparison to Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients

    PubMed Central

    Hathout, Yetrib; Marathi, Ramya L.; Rayavarapu, Sree; Zhang, Aiping; Brown, Kristy J.; Seol, Haeri; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Cirak, Sebahattin; Bello, Luca; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Partridge, Terry; Hoffman, Eric P.; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Mah, Jean K.; Henricson, Erik; McDonald, Craig

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that serum protein biomarkers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) will reflect disease pathogenesis, progression and aid future therapy developments. Here, we describe use of quantitative in vivo stable isotope labeling in mammals to accurately compare serum proteomes of wild-type and dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Biomarkers identified in serum from two independent dystrophin-deficient mouse models (mdx-Δ52 and mdx-23) were concordant with those identified in sera samples of DMD patients. Of the 355 mouse sera proteins, 23 were significantly elevated and 4 significantly lower in mdx relative to wild-type mice (P-value < 0.001). Elevated proteins were mostly of muscle origin: including myofibrillar proteins (titin, myosin light chain 1/3, myomesin 3 and filamin-C), glycolytic enzymes (aldolase, phosphoglycerate mutase 2, beta enolase and glycogen phosphorylase), transport proteins (fatty acid-binding protein, myoglobin and somatic cytochrome-C) and others (creatine kinase M, malate dehydrogenase cytosolic, fibrinogen and parvalbumin). Decreased proteins, mostly of extracellular origin, included adiponectin, lumican, plasminogen and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor. Analysis of sera from 1 week to 7 months old mdx mice revealed age-dependent changes in the level of these biomarkers with most biomarkers acutely elevated at 3 weeks of age. Serum analysis of DMD patients, with ages ranging from 4 to 15 years old, confirmed elevation of 20 of the murine biomarkers in DMD, with similar age-related changes. This study provides a panel of biomarkers that reflect muscle activity and pathogenesis and should prove valuable tool to complement natural history studies and to monitor treatment efficacy in future clinical trials. PMID:25027324

  12. Dual AAV therapy ameliorates exercise-induced muscle injury and functional ischemia in murine models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yadong; Yue, Yongping; Li, Liang; Hakim, Chady H.; Zhang, Keqing; Thomas, Gail D.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) membrane delocalization contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by promoting functional muscle ischemia and exacerbating muscle injury during exercise. We have previously shown that supra-physiological expression of nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin restores normal blood flow regulation and prevents functional ischemia in transgenic mdx mice, a DMD model. A critical next issue is whether systemic dual adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy can restore nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin expression and mitigate muscle activity-related functional ischemia and injury. Here, we performed systemic gene transfer in mdx and mdx4cv mice using a pair of dual AAV vectors that expressed a 6 kb nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin gene. Vectors were packaged in tyrosine mutant AAV-9 and co-injected (5 × 1012 viral genome particles/vector/mouse) via the tail vein to 1-month-old dystrophin-null mice. Four months later, we observed 30–50% mini-dystrophin positive myofibers in limb muscles. Treatment ameliorated histopathology, increased muscle force and protected against eccentric contraction-induced injury. Importantly, dual AAV therapy successfully prevented chronic exercise-induced muscle force drop. Doppler hemodynamic assay further showed that therapy attenuated adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle. Our results suggest that partial transduction can still ameliorate nNOS delocalization-associated functional deficiency. Further evaluation of nNOS binding mini-dystrophin dual AAV vectors is warranted in dystrophic dogs and eventually in human patients. PMID:23681067

  13. The Rag2⁻Il2rb⁻Dmd⁻ mouse: a novel dystrophic and immunodeficient model to assess innovating therapeutic strategies for muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Vallese, Denis; Negroni, Elisa; Duguez, Stéphanie; Ferry, Arnaud; Trollet, Capucine; Aamiri, Ahmed; Vosshenrich, Christian A J; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Di Santo, James P; Vitiello, Libero; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Mouly, Vincent

    2013-10-01

    The development of innovative therapeutic strategies for muscular dystrophies, particularly cell-based approaches, is still a developing field. Although positive results have been obtained in animal models, they have rarely been confirmed in patients and resulted in very limited clinical improvements, suggesting some specificity in humans. These findings emphasized the need for an appropriate animal model (i.e., immunodeficient and dystrophic) to investigate in vivo the behavior of transplanted human myogenic stem cells. We report a new model, the Rag2(-)Il2rb(-)Dmd(-) mouse, which lacks T, B, and NK cells, and also carries a mutant Dmd allele that prevents the production of any dystrophin isoform. The dystrophic features of this new model are comparable with those of the classically used mdx mouse, but with the total absence of any revertant dystrophin positive fiber. We show that Rag2(-)Il2rb(-)Dmd(-) mice allow long-term xenografts of human myogenic cells. Altogether, our findings indicate that the Rag2(-)Il2rb(-)Dmd(-) mouse represents an ideal model to gain further insights into the behavior of human myogenic stem cells in a dystrophic context, and can be used to assess innovative therapeutic strategies for muscular dystrophies. PMID:23975040

  14. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of cases, the parents do not carry the gene. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy affects about 5 out of 100,000 people. ... Treatment There is no ... worse. Physical therapy may help maintain muscle strength. Other possible treatments ...

  15. Becker muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and wheelchairs may improve movement and self-care. Genetic counseling may be recommended. Daughters of a man with ... Genetic counseling may be advised if there is a family history of Becker muscular dystrophy.

  16. 100-fold but not 50-fold dystrophin overexpression aggravates electrocardiographic defects in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yongping; Wasala, Nalinda B; Bostick, Brian; Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophin gene replacement holds the promise of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Supraphysiological expression is a concern for all gene therapy studies. In the case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Chamberlain and colleagues found that 50-fold overexpression did not cause deleterious side effect in skeletal muscle. To determine whether excessive dystrophin expression in the heart is safe, we studied two lines of transgenic mdx mice that selectively expressed a therapeutic minidystrophin gene in the heart at 50-fold and 100-fold of the normal levels. In the line with 50-fold overexpression, minidystrophin showed sarcolemmal localization and electrocardiogram abnormalities were corrected. However, in the line with 100-fold overexpression, we not only detected sarcolemmal minidystrophin expression but also observed accumulation of minidystrophin vesicles in the sarcoplasm. Excessive minidystrophin expression did not correct tachycardia, a characteristic feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Importantly, several electrocardiogram parameters (QT interval, QRS duration and the cardiomyopathy index) became worse than that of mdx mice. Our data suggests that the mouse heart can tolerate 50-fold minidystrophin overexpression, but 100-fold overexpression leads to cardiac toxicity. PMID:27419194

  17. 100-fold but not 50-fold dystrophin overexpression aggravates electrocardiographic defects in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yongping; Wasala, Nalinda B; Bostick, Brian; Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Dystrophin gene replacement holds the promise of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Supraphysiological expression is a concern for all gene therapy studies. In the case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Chamberlain and colleagues found that 50-fold overexpression did not cause deleterious side effect in skeletal muscle. To determine whether excessive dystrophin expression in the heart is safe, we studied two lines of transgenic mdx mice that selectively expressed a therapeutic minidystrophin gene in the heart at 50-fold and 100-fold of the normal levels. In the line with 50-fold overexpression, minidystrophin showed sarcolemmal localization and electrocardiogram abnormalities were corrected. However, in the line with 100-fold overexpression, we not only detected sarcolemmal minidystrophin expression but also observed accumulation of minidystrophin vesicles in the sarcoplasm. Excessive minidystrophin expression did not correct tachycardia, a characteristic feature of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Importantly, several electrocardiogram parameters (QT interval, QRS duration and the cardiomyopathy index) became worse than that of mdx mice. Our data suggests that the mouse heart can tolerate 50-fold minidystrophin overexpression, but 100-fold overexpression leads to cardiac toxicity. PMID:27419194

  18. In vivo discovery of a peptide that prevents CUG–RNA hairpin formation and reverses RNA toxicity in myotonic dystrophy models

    PubMed Central

    García-López, Amparo; Llamusí, Beatriz; Orzáez, Mar; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Artero, Ruben D.

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by the expansion of noncoding CTG repeats in the dystrophia myotonica-protein kinase gene. Mutant transcripts form CUG hairpins that sequester RNA-binding factors into nuclear foci, including Muscleblind-like-1 protein (MBNL1), which regulate alternative splicing and gene expression. To identify molecules that target toxic CUG transcripts in vivo, we performed a positional scanning combinatorial peptide library screen using a Drosophila model of DM1. The screen identified a D-amino acid hexapeptide (ABP1) that reduced CUG foci formation and suppressed CUG-induced lethality and muscle degeneration when administered orally. Transgenic expression of natural, L-amino acid ABP1 analogues reduced CUG-induced toxicity in fly eyes and muscles. Furthermore, ABP1 reversed muscle histopathology and splicing misregulation of MBNL1 targets in DM1 model mice. In vitro, ABP1 bound to CUG hairpins and induced a switch to a single-stranded conformation. Our findings demonstrate that ABP1 shows antimyotonic dystrophy activity by targeting the core of CUG toxicity. PMID:21730182

  19. Introduction of a human-specific deletion in mouse Cmah increases disease severity in the mdx model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Kumaran; Yoon, Jung Hae; Xu, Ying; deVries, Sarah; Camboni, Marybeth; Janssen, Paulus M.L.; Varki, Ajit; Martin, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of humans included introduction of an inactivating deletion in the CMAH gene, which eliminated biosynthesis of N-glycolylneuraminic acid from all human cells. Here we show that this human-specific sialylation change contributes to the marked discrepancy in phenotype between the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the human disease. Despite lacking dystrophin protein in almost all muscle cells, mdx mice show slower development, relative to overall lifespan, or reduced severity of a number of clinically relevant disease phenotypes compared to DMD patients. This is especially true for loss of ambulation, cardiac and respiratory muscle weakness, and loss of lifespan, all major phenotypes contributing to DMD morbidity and mortality. All these phenotypes occur at an earlier age or to a greater degree in mdx mice bearing a human-like mutation in the mouse Cmah gene. Altered phenotypes correlate with changes in two mechanisms; reduced strength and expression of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex and increased activation of complement. Activation of complement may be driven by the increased expression of anti-Neu5Gc antibodies in Cmah−/−mdx animals and ultimately by uptake of N-glycolylneuraminic acid, a foreign glycan in humans and Cmah-deficient mice, from dietary sources. Cmah-deficient mdx mice represent a new small animal model for DMD that better approximates the human glycome and its contributions to muscular dystrophy. PMID:20668298

  20. How Is Muscular Dystrophy Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How is muscular dystrophy diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content The first step in diagnosing muscular dystrophy (MD) is a visit with a health care ...

  1. Myofibrillar disruption and RNA-binding protein aggregation in a mouse model of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1D.

    PubMed

    Bengoechea, Rocio; Pittman, Sara K; Tuck, Elizabeth P; True, Heather L; Weihl, Conrad C

    2015-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1D (LGMD1D) is caused by dominantly inherited missense mutations in DNAJB6, an Hsp40 co-chaperone. LGMD1D muscle has rimmed vacuoles and inclusion bodies containing DNAJB6, Z-disc proteins and TDP-43. DNAJB6 is expressed as two isoforms; DNAJB6a and DNAJB6b. Both isoforms contain LGMD1D mutant residues and are expressed in human muscle. To identify which mutant isoform confers disease pathogenesis and generate a mouse model of LGMD1D, we evaluated DNAJB6 expression and localization in skeletal muscle as well as generating DNAJB6 isoform specific expressing transgenic mice. DNAJB6a localized to myonuclei while DNAJB6b was sarcoplasmic. LGMD1D mutations in DNAJB6a or DNAJB6b did not alter this localization in mouse muscle. Transgenic mice expressing the LGMD1D mutant, F93L, in DNAJB6b under a muscle-specific promoter became weak, had early lethality and developed muscle pathology consistent with myopathy after 2 months; whereas mice expressing the same F93L mutation in DNAJB6a or overexpressing DNAJB6a or DNAJB6b wild-type transgenes remained unaffected after 1 year. DNAJB6b localized to the Z-disc and DNAJB6b-F93L expressing mouse muscle had myofibrillar disorganization and desmin inclusions. Consistent with DNAJB6 dysfunction, keratin 8/18, a DNAJB6 client also accumulated in DNAJB6b-F93L expressing mouse muscle. The RNA-binding proteins hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA2/B1 accumulated and co-localized with DNAJB6 at sarcoplasmic stress granules suggesting that these proteins maybe novel DNAJB6b clients. Similarly, hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA2/B1 formed sarcoplasmic aggregates in patients with LGMD1D. Our data support that LGMD1D mutations in DNAJB6 disrupt its sarcoplasmic function suggesting a role for DNAJB6b in Z-disc organization and stress granule kinetics. PMID:26362252

  2. Differential roles of MMP-9 in early and late stages of dystrophic muscles in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Naoko; Miyazaki, Daigo; Yoshizawa, Takahiro; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Shiba, Yuji; Inaba, Yuji; Imamura, Michihiro; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Koike, Kenichi; Nakamura, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    Matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9 is an endopeptidase associated with the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The precise function of MMP-9 in DMD has not been elucidated to date. We investigated the effect of genetic ablation of MMP-9 in the mdx mouse model (mdx/Mmp9(-/-)). At the early disease stage, the muscles of mdx/Mmp9(-/-) mice showed reduced necrosis and neutrophil invasion, accompanied by down-regulation of chemokine MIP-2. In addition, muscle regeneration was enhanced, which coincided with increased macrophage infiltration and upregulation of MCP-1, and resulted in increased muscle strength. The mdx/Mmp9(-/-) mice also displayed accelerated upregulation of osteopontin expression in skeletal muscle at the acute onset phase of dystrophy. However, at a later disease stage, the mice exhibited muscle growth impairment through altered expression of myogenic factors, and increased fibroadipose tissue. These results showed that MMP-9 might have multiple functions during disease progression. Therapy targeting MMP-9 may improve muscle pathology and function at the early disease stage, but continuous inhibition of this protein may result in the accumulation of fibroadipose tissues and reduced muscle strength at the late disease stage. PMID:26170062

  3. Retinal Dystrophy and Optic Nerve Pathology in the Mouse Model of Mucolipidosis IV.

    PubMed

    Grishchuk, Yulia; Stember, Katherine G; Matsunaga, Aya; Olivares, Ana M; Cruz, Nelly M; King, Victoria E; Humphrey, Daniel M; Wang, Shirley L; Muzikansky, Alona; Betensky, Rebecca A; Thoreson, Wallace B; Haider, Neena; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2016-01-01

    Mucolipidosis IV is a debilitating developmental lysosomal storage disorder characterized by severe neuromotor retardation and progressive loss of vision, leading to blindness by the second decade of life. Mucolipidosis IV is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the MCOLN1 gene, which encodes the transient receptor potential channel protein mucolipin-1. Ophthalmic pathology in patients includes corneal haze and progressive retinal and optic nerve atrophy. Herein, we report ocular pathology in Mcoln1(-/-) mouse, a good phenotypic model of the disease. Early, but non-progressive, thinning of the photoreceptor layer, reduced levels of rhodopsin, disrupted rod outer segments, and widespread accumulation of the typical storage inclusion bodies were the major histological findings in the Mcoln1(-/-) retina. Electroretinograms showed significantly decreased functional response (scotopic a- and b-wave amplitudes) in the Mcoln1(-/-) mice. At the ultrastructural level, we observed formation of axonal spheroids and decreased density of axons in the optic nerve of the aged (6-month-old) Mcoln1(-/-) mice, which indicates progressive axonal degeneration. Our data suggest that mucolipin-1 plays a role in postnatal development of photoreceptors and provides a set of outcome measures that can be used for ocular therapy development for mucolipidosis IV. PMID:26608452

  4. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic diseases characterized by progressive degeneration and weakness of skeletal muscle. Since the discovery of the first muscular dystrophy gene encoding dystrophin, a large number of genes have been identified that are involved in various muscle-wasting and neuromuscular disorders. Human genetic studies complemented by animal model systems have substantially contributed to our understanding of the molecular pathomechanisms underlying muscle degeneration. Moreover, these studies have revealed distinct molecular and cellular mechanisms that link genetic mutations to diverse muscle wasting phenotypes. PMID:23671309

  5. Refined localization of myd, a candidate animal model for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, K.A.; Bailey, H.L.; Murray, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    The mouse mutant myd is a candidate model for FSHD on the basis of phenotypic description and the linkage homology we have established between distal human chromosome 4q and the midregion of mouse chromosome 8. The human disease is associated with a deletion in a subtelomeric repeat element at 4q35, but isolation of genes from this region has been difficult to date. The myd gene will be an excellent candidate gene for the human disease. Refined genetic localization of the mutant is a first step in the positional cloning of the gene for myd. We have mapped myd in 128 affected mice (65 confirmed with muscle histology) from an intersubspecific backcross of B6C3Fe-a/a-myd/+ X Mus musculus castaneus (CAST/Ei). Previous work with 38 animals found two recombinants that placed the gene in the 3-6 cM interval between D8Mit30 and D8Mit75, with complete linkage to D8Mit74. New markers and an enlarged panel of affected animals now indicate 2 recombinants with D8Mit74 and complete linkage to D8Mit101. Our results suggest the order of genes and Mit markers is (F11/Kal-3/Clcn-3) - 30 - 101 - 74 - 75 - Ucp. The interval of interest, between D8Mit30 and D8Mit74, is about 1 cM by the current mouse SSLP map generated at MIT. We are currently screening mouse YAC libraries for clones covering this region. There may be a position effect on the FSHD gene by the subtelomeric deletion in its vicinity. If a structurally normal gene is being so affected, it will be difficult to show that is is the FSHD gene. The mouse gene is likely to be affected by a different type of mutation, and could facilitate analysis of candidate human genes.

  6. Mitochondrial alterations and oxidative stress in an acute transient mouse model of muscle degeneration: implications for muscular dystrophy and related muscle pathologies.

    PubMed

    Ramadasan-Nair, Renjini; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Mishra, Sudha; Sunitha, Balaraju; Mythri, Rajeswara Babu; Nalini, Atchayaram; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Harsha, Hindalahalli Chandregowda; Kolthur-Seetharam, Ullas; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) and inflammatory myopathies (IMs) are debilitating skeletal muscle disorders characterized by common pathological events including myodegeneration and inflammation. However, an experimental model representing both muscle pathologies and displaying most of the distinctive markers has not been characterized. We investigated the cardiotoxin (CTX)-mediated transient acute mouse model of muscle degeneration and compared the cardinal features with human MDs and IMs. The CTX model displayed degeneration, apoptosis, inflammation, loss of sarcolemmal complexes, sarcolemmal disruption, and ultrastructural changes characteristic of human MDs and IMs. Cell death caused by CTX involved calcium influx and mitochondrial damage both in murine C2C12 muscle cells and in mice. Mitochondrial proteomic analysis at the initial phase of degeneration in the model detected lowered expression of 80 mitochondrial proteins including subunits of respiratory complexes, ATP machinery, fatty acid metabolism, and Krebs cycle, which further decreased in expression during the peak degenerative phase. The mass spectrometry (MS) data were supported by enzyme assays, Western blot, and histochemistry. The CTX model also displayed markers of oxidative stress and a lowered glutathione reduced/oxidized ratio (GSH/GSSG) similar to MDs, human myopathies, and neurogenic atrophies. MS analysis identified 6 unique oxidized proteins from Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples (n = 6) (versus controls; n = 6), including two mitochondrial proteins. Interestingly, these mitochondrial proteins were down-regulated in the CTX model thereby linking oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that mitochondrial alterations and oxidative damage significantly contribute to CTX-mediated muscle pathology with implications for human muscle diseases. PMID:24220031

  7. Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Eppie M; Kornberg, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, an X-linked disorder, has an incidence of one in 5000 boys and presents in early childhood with proximal muscle weakness. Untreated boys become wheelchair bound by the age of 12 years and die of cardiorespiratory complications in their late teens to early 20s. The use of corticosteroids, non-invasive respiratory support, and active surveillance and management of associated complications have improved ambulation, function, quality of life and life expectancy. The clinical features, investigations and management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy are reviewed, as well as the latest in some of the novel therapies. PMID:25752877

  8. Genetics Home Reference: tibial muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names for This Condition tardive tibial muscular dystrophy TMD Udd distal myopathy Udd-Markesbery muscular dystrophy Udd ... titin may cause more severe tibial muscular dystrophy (TMD). Neuromuscul Disord. 2008 Dec;18(12):922-8. ...

  9. A New Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2I Homozygous for the Common L276I Mutation Mimicking the Mild Phenotype in Humans.

    PubMed

    Krag, Thomas O; Vissing, John

    2015-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I) is caused by mutations in the Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene, leading to inadequate glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, an important protein linking the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton. We created a mouse model of the common FKRP L276I mutation and a hemizygous FKRP L276I knockout model. We studied histopathology and protein expression in the models at different ages and found that homozygous FKRP L276I mice developed a mild progressive myopathy with increased muscle regeneration and fibrosis starting from 1 year of age. This was likely caused by progressive loss of α-dystroglycan-specific glycosylation, which was decreased by 78% at 20 months. The homozygous FKRP knockout was embryonic lethal, but the hemizygous L276I model resembled the homozygous FKRP L276I model at comparable ages. These models emphasize the importance of FKRP in maintaining proper glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. The mild progression in the homozygous FKRP L276I model resembles that in patients with LGMD2I who are homozygous for the L276I mutation. This animal model could, therefore, be relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of and developing a treatment strategy for the human disorder. PMID:26574668

  10. Concordant but Varied Phenotypes among Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patient-Specific Myoblasts Derived using a Human iPSC-Based Model.

    PubMed

    Choi, In Young; Lim, HoTae; Estrellas, Kenneth; Mula, Jyothi; Cohen, Tatiana V; Zhang, Yuanfan; Donnelly, Christopher J; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Kim, Yong Jun; Kim, Hyesoo; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Li, Hongmei Lisa; Hotta, Akitsu; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Maragakis, Nicholas; Wagner, Kathryn R; Lee, Gabsang

    2016-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) remains an intractable genetic disease. Althogh there are several animal models of DMD, there is no human cell model that carries patient-specific DYSTROPHIN mutations. Here, we present a human DMD model using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Our model reveals concordant disease-related phenotypes with patient-dependent variation, which are partially reversed by genetic and pharmacological approaches. Our "chemical-compound-based" strategy successfully directs hiPSCs into expandable myoblasts, which exhibit a myogenic transcriptional program, forming striated contractile myofibers and participating in muscle regeneration in vivo. DMD-hiPSC-derived myoblasts show disease-related phenotypes with patient-to-patient variability, including aberrant expression of inflammation or immune-response genes and collagens, increased BMP/TGFβ signaling, and reduced fusion competence. Furthermore, by genetic correction and pharmacological "dual-SMAD" inhibition, the DMD-hiPSC-derived myoblasts and genetically corrected isogenic myoblasts form "rescued" multi-nucleated myotubes. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate the feasibility of establishing a human "DMD-in-a-dish" model using hiPSC-based disease modeling. PMID:27239027

  11. Cardiac function in muscular dystrophy associates with abdominal muscle pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Brandon B.; Swaggart, Kayleigh A.; Kim, Gene; Watson, Sydeaka; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The muscular dystrophies target muscle groups differentially. In mouse models of muscular dystrophy, notably the mdx model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, the diaphragm muscle shows marked fibrosis and at an earlier age than other muscle groups, more reflective of the histopathology seen in human muscular dystrophy. Methods Using a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, the Sgcg mouse, we compared muscle pathology across different muscle groups and heart. A cohort of nearly 200 Sgcg mice were studied using multiple measures of pathology including echocardiography, Evans blue dye uptake and hydroxyproline content in multiple muscle groups. Spearman rank correlations were determined among echocardiographic and pathological parameters. Findings The abdominal muscles were found to have more fibrosis than other muscle groups, including the diaphragm muscle. The abdominal muscles also had more Evans blue dye uptake than other muscle groups. The amount of diaphragm fibrosis was found to correlate positively with fibrosis in the left ventricle, and abdominal muscle fibrosis correlated with impaired left ventricular function. Fibrosis in the abdominal muscles negatively correlated with fibrosis in the diaphragm and right ventricles. Together these data reflect the recruitment of abdominal muscles as respiratory muscles in muscular dystrophy, a finding consistent with data from human patients. PMID:26029630

  12. Implications for Cardiac Function Following Rescue of the Dystrophic Diaphragm in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Betts, Corinne A; Saleh, Amer F; Carr, Carolyn A; Muses, Sofia; Wells, Kim E; Hammond, Suzan M; Godfrey, Caroline; McClorey, Graham; Woffindale, Caroline; Clarke, Kieran; Wells, Dominic J; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by absence of the integral structural protein, dystrophin, which renders muscle fibres susceptible to injury and degeneration. This ultimately results in cardiorespiratory dysfunction, which is the predominant cause of death in DMD patients, and highlights the importance of therapeutic targeting of the cardiorespiratory system. While there is some evidence to suggest that restoring dystrophin in the diaphragm improves both respiratory and cardiac function, the role of the diaphragm is not well understood. Here using exon skipping oligonucleotides we predominantly restored dystrophin in the diaphragm and assessed cardiac function by MRI. This approach reduced diaphragmatic pathophysiology and markedly improved diaphragm function but did not improve cardiac function or pathophysiology, with or without exercise. Interestingly, exercise resulted in a reduction of dystrophin protein and exon skipping in the diaphragm. This suggests that treatment regimens may require modification in more active patients. In conclusion, whilst the diaphragm is an important respiratory muscle, it is likely that dystrophin needs to be restored in other tissues, including multiple accessory respiratory muscles, and of course the heart itself for appropriate therapeutic outcomes. This supports the requirement of a body-wide therapy to treat DMD. PMID:26113184

  13. Cognitive dysfunction in the dystrophin-deficient mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A reappraisal from sensory to executive processes.

    PubMed

    Chaussenot, Rémi; Edeline, Jean-Marc; Le Bec, Benoit; El Massioui, Nicole; Laroche, Serge; Vaillend, Cyrille

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is associated with language disabilities and deficits in learning and memory, leading to intellectual disability in a patient subpopulation. Recent studies suggest the presence of broader deficits affecting information processing, short-term memory and executive functions. While the absence of the full-length dystrophin (Dp427) is a common feature in all patients, variable mutation profiles may additionally alter distinct dystrophin-gene products encoded by separate promoters. However, the nature of the cognitive dysfunctions specifically associated with the loss of distinct brain dystrophins is unclear. Here we show that the loss of the full-length brain dystrophin in mdx mice does not modify the perception and sensorimotor gating of auditory inputs, as assessed using auditory brainstem recordings and prepulse inhibition of startle reflex. In contrast, both acquisition and long-term retention of cued and trace fear memories were impaired in mdx mice, suggesting alteration in a functional circuit including the amygdala. Spatial learning in the water maze revealed reduced path efficiency, suggesting qualitative alteration in mdx mice learning strategy. However, spatial working memory performance and cognitive flexibility challenged in various behavioral paradigms in water and radial-arm mazes were unimpaired. The full-length brain dystrophin therefore appears to play a role during acquisition of associative learning as well as in general processes involved in memory consolidation, but no overt involvement in working memory and/or executive functions could be demonstrated in spatial learning tasks. PMID:26190833

  14. Prophylactic pamidronate partially protects from glucocorticoid-induced bone loss in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Hee; Chen, Jinghan; Grynpas, Marc D; Mitchell, Jane

    2016-09-01

    Glucocorticoids are extensively used to treat patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy because of their ability to delay muscle damage, prolong ambulation and extend life. However, use of glucocorticoids significantly increases bone loss, fragility and fractures. To determine if antiresorptive bisphosphonates could prevent the effects of glucocorticoids on bone quality, we used dystrophic mdx mice treated with the glucocorticoid prednisone during 8weeks of rapid bone growth from 5 to 13weeks of age and treated some mice with the bisphosphonate pamidronate during the first two weeks of prednisone administration. Prednisone reduced long bone growth, decreased cortical bone thickness and area and decreased the strength of the femurs. Pamidronate treatment protected mice from cortical bone loss but did not increase bone strength. The combination of prednisone and pamidronate inhibited remodeling of metaphyseal trabecular bone with large numbers of trabeculae containing remnants of calcified cartilage. Prednisone improved muscle strength in the mdx mice and decreased serum creatine kinase with evidence of improved muscle histology and these effects were maintained in mice treated with pamidronate. PMID:27373502

  15. Preclinical Studies on Intestinal Administration of Antisense Oligonucleotides as a Model for Oral Delivery for Treatment of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    van Putten, Maaike; Young, Courtney; van den Berg, Sjoerd; Pronk, Amanda; Hulsker, Margriet; Karnaoukh, Tatyana G; Vermue, Rick; van Dijk, Ko Willems; de Kimpe, Sjef; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2014-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) used to reframe dystrophin mRNA transcripts for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients are tested in clinical trials. Here, AONs are administered subcutaneously and intravenously, while the less invasive oral route would be preferred. Oral delivery of encapsulated AONs supplemented with a permeation enhancer, sodium caprate, has been successfully used to target tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression in liver. To test the feasibility of orally delivered AONs for DMD, we applied 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate AONs (with or without sodium caprate supplementation) directly to the intestine of mdx mice and compared pharmacokinetics and -dynamics with intravenous, intraperitoneal, and subcutaneous delivery. Intestinally infused AONs were taken up, but resulted in lower plasma levels compared to other delivery routes, although bioavailability could be largely improved by supplementation of sodium caprate. After intestinal infusion, AON levels in all tissues were lower than for other administration routes, as were the ratios of target versus nontarget organ levels, except for diaphragm and heart where comparable levels and ratios were observed. For each administration route, low levels of exon skipping in triceps was observed 3 hours post-AON administration. These data suggest that oral administration of naked 2′-O-methyl phosphorothioate AONs may be feasible, but only when high AON concentrations are used in combination with sodium caprate. PMID:25405468

  16. Emerging strategies for cell and gene therapy of the muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Lindsey A.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of over 40 disorders that are characterised by muscle weakness and wasting. The most common are Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Becker muscular dystrophy, which result from mutations within the gene encoding dystrophin; myotonic dystrophy type 1, which results from an expanded trinucleotide repeat in the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene; and facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, which is associated with contractions in the subtelomeric region of human chromosome 1. Currently the only treatments involve clinical management of symptoms, although several promising experimental strategies are emerging. These include gene therapy using adeno-associated viral, lentiviral and adenoviral vectors and nonviral vectors, such as plasmid DNA. Exon-skipping and cell-based therapies have also shown promise in the effective treatment and regeneration of dystrophic muscle. The availability of numerous animal models for Duchenne muscular dystrophy has enabled extensive testing of a wide range of therapeutic approaches for this type of disorder. Consequently, we focus here on the therapeutic developments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy as a model of the types of approaches being considered for various types of dystrophy. We discuss the advantages and limitations of each therapeutic strategy, as well as prospects and recent successes in the context of future clinical applications. PMID:19555515

  17. Bi-specific splice-switching PMO oligonucleotides conjugated via a single peptide active in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; McClorey, Graham; Saleh, Amer F; Järver, Peter; Wood, Matthew J A; Gait, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    The potential for therapeutic application of splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) to modulate pre-mRNA splicing is increasingly evident in a number of diseases. However, the primary drawback of this approach is poor cell and in vivo oligonucleotide uptake efficacy. Biological activities can be significantly enhanced through the use of synthetically conjugated cationic cell penetrating peptides (CPPs). Studies to date have focused on the delivery of a single SSO conjugated to a CPP, but here we describe the conjugation of two phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO) SSOs to a single CPP for simultaneous delivery and pre-mRNA targeting of two separate genes, exon 23 of the Dmd gene and exon 5 of the Acvr2b gene, in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Conjugations of PMOs to a single CPP were carried out through an amide bond in one case and through a triazole linkage ('click chemistry') in the other. The most active bi-specific CPP-PMOs demonstrated comparable exon skipping levels for both pre-mRNA targets when compared to individual CPP-PMO conjugates both in cell culture and in vivo in the mdx mouse model. Thus, two SSOs with different target sequences conjugated to a single CPP are biologically effective and potentially suitable for future therapeutic exploitation. PMID:25468897

  18. Phenylbutazone induces expression of MBNL1 and suppresses formation of MBNL1-CUG RNA foci in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guiying; Masuda, Akio; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Kinoshita, Masanobu; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Tohru; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by abnormal expansion of CTG repeats in the 3′ untranslated region of the DMPK gene. Expanded CTG repeats are transcribed into RNA and make an aggregate with a splicing regulator, MBNL1, in the nucleus, which is called the nuclear foci. The nuclear foci sequestrates and downregulates availability of MBNL1. Symptomatic treatments are available for DM1, but no rational therapy is available. In this study, we found that a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), phenylbutazone (PBZ), upregulated the expression of MBNL1 in C2C12 myoblasts as well as in the HSALR mouse model for DM1. In the DM1 mice model, PBZ ameliorated aberrant splicing of Clcn1, Nfix, and Rpn2. PBZ increased expression of skeletal muscle chloride channel, decreased abnormal central nuclei of muscle fibers, and improved wheel-running activity in HSALR mice. We found that the effect of PBZ was conferred by two distinct mechanisms. First, PBZ suppressed methylation of an enhancer region in Mbnl1 intron 1, and enhanced transcription of Mbnl1 mRNA. Second, PBZ attenuated binding of MBNL1 to abnormally expanded CUG repeats in cellulo and in vitro. Our studies suggest that PBZ is a potent therapeutic agent for DM1 that upregulates availability of MBNL1. PMID:27126921

  19. Phenylbutazone induces expression of MBNL1 and suppresses formation of MBNL1-CUG RNA foci in a mouse model of myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guiying; Masuda, Akio; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Kinoshita, Masanobu; Kiyama, Hiroshi; Matsuura, Tohru; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by abnormal expansion of CTG repeats in the 3' untranslated region of the DMPK gene. Expanded CTG repeats are transcribed into RNA and make an aggregate with a splicing regulator, MBNL1, in the nucleus, which is called the nuclear foci. The nuclear foci sequestrates and downregulates availability of MBNL1. Symptomatic treatments are available for DM1, but no rational therapy is available. In this study, we found that a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), phenylbutazone (PBZ), upregulated the expression of MBNL1 in C2C12 myoblasts as well as in the HSA(LR) mouse model for DM1. In the DM1 mice model, PBZ ameliorated aberrant splicing of Clcn1, Nfix, and Rpn2. PBZ increased expression of skeletal muscle chloride channel, decreased abnormal central nuclei of muscle fibers, and improved wheel-running activity in HSA(LR) mice. We found that the effect of PBZ was conferred by two distinct mechanisms. First, PBZ suppressed methylation of an enhancer region in Mbnl1 intron 1, and enhanced transcription of Mbnl1 mRNA. Second, PBZ attenuated binding of MBNL1 to abnormally expanded CUG repeats in cellulo and in vitro. Our studies suggest that PBZ is a potent therapeutic agent for DM1 that upregulates availability of MBNL1. PMID:27126921

  20. Bi-specific splice-switching PMO oligonucleotides conjugated via a single peptide active in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; McClorey, Graham; Saleh, Amer F.; Järver, Peter; Wood, Matthew J.A.; Gait, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for therapeutic application of splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) to modulate pre-mRNA splicing is increasingly evident in a number of diseases. However, the primary drawback of this approach is poor cell and in vivo oligonucleotide uptake efficacy. Biological activities can be significantly enhanced through the use of synthetically conjugated cationic cell penetrating peptides (CPPs). Studies to date have focused on the delivery of a single SSO conjugated to a CPP, but here we describe the conjugation of two phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO) SSOs to a single CPP for simultaneous delivery and pre-mRNA targeting of two separate genes, exon 23 of the Dmd gene and exon 5 of the Acvr2b gene, in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Conjugations of PMOs to a single CPP were carried out through an amide bond in one case and through a triazole linkage (‘click chemistry’) in the other. The most active bi-specific CPP–PMOs demonstrated comparable exon skipping levels for both pre-mRNA targets when compared to individual CPP–PMO conjugates both in cell culture and in vivo in the mdx mouse model. Thus, two SSOs with different target sequences conjugated to a single CPP are biologically effective and potentially suitable for future therapeutic exploitation. PMID:25468897

  1. Paternal transmission of congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Bergoffen, J; Kant, J; Sladky, J; McDonald-McGinn, D; Zackai, E H; Fischbeck, K H

    1994-01-01

    The congenital form of myotonic dystrophy is reported to be almost exclusively, if not exclusively, maternally transmitted. We present a case of congenital myotonic dystrophy which was inherited from a mildly affected father. This family illustrates that the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy can occur without intrauterine or other maternal factors related to the disease. The possibility of paternal transmission of the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy could be considered when counselling myotonic dystrophy patients and their families. Images PMID:7966187

  2. Muscle and heart function restoration in a limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I) mouse model by systemic FKRP gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chunping; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Zhao, Chunxia; Lu, Peijuan; Awano, Hiroyuki; Xiao, Bin; Li, Jianbin; Yuan, Zhenhua; Dai, Yi; Martin, Carrie Bette; Li, Juan; Lu, Qilong; Xiao, Xiao

    2014-11-01

    Mutations in fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene cause a wide spectrum of disease phenotypes including the mild limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I), the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome, and muscle-eye-brain disease. FKRP deficiency results in α-dystroglycan (α-DG) hypoglycosylation in the muscle and heart, which is a biochemical hallmark of dystroglycanopathies. To study gene replacement therapy, we generated and characterized a new mouse model of LGMD2I harboring the human mutation leucine 276 to isoleucine (L276I) in the mouse alleles. The homozygous knock-in mice (L276I(KI)) mimic the classic late onset phenotype of LGMD2I in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Systemic delivery of human FKRP gene by AAV9 vector in the L276I(KI) mice, at either neonatal age or at the age of 9 months, rendered body wide FKRP expression and restored glycosylation of α-DG in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. FKRP gene therapy ameliorated dystrophic pathology and cardiomyopathy such as muscle degeneration, fibrosis, and myofiber membrane leakage, resulting in restoration of muscle and heart contractile functions. Thus, these results demonstrated that the treatment based on FKRP gene replacement was effective. PMID:25048216

  3. Read-through compound 13 restores dystrophin expression and improves muscle function in the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kayali, Refik; Ku, Jin-Mo; Khitrov, Gregory; Jung, Michael E.; Prikhodko, Olga; Bertoni, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Molecules that induce ribosomal read-through of nonsense mutations in mRNA and allow production of a full-length functional protein hold great therapeutic potential for the treatment of many genetic disorders. Two such read-through compounds, RTC13 and RTC14, were recently identified by a luciferase-independent high-throughput screening assay and were shown to have potential therapeutic functions in the treatment of nonsense mutations in the ATM and the dystrophin genes. We have now tested the ability of RTC13 and RTC14 to restore dystrophin expression into skeletal muscles of the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Direct intramuscular injection of compound RTC14 did not result in significant read-through activity in vivo and demonstrated the levels of dystrophin protein similar to those detected using gentamicin. In contrast, significant higher amounts of dystrophin were detected after intramuscular injection of RTC13. When administered systemically, RTC13 was shown to partially restore dystrophin protein in different muscle groups, including diaphragm and heart, and improved muscle function. An increase in muscle strength was detected in all treated animals and was accompanied by a significant decrease in creatine kinase levels. These studies establish the therapeutic potential of RTC13 in vivo and advance this newly identified compound into preclinical application for DMD. PMID:22692682

  4. Systemic Trans-splicing adeno-associated viral delivery efficiently transduces the heart of adult mdx mouse, a model for duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Yue, Yongping; Shin, Jin-Hong; Duan, Dongsheng

    2009-11-01

    Trans-splicing adeno-associated viral (tsAAV) vectors hold great promise for delivering large therapeutic genes. One potential application is in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In this case, it is necessary to transduce whole body muscle. We demonstrated body-wide AAV-9 tsAAV transduction in normal neonatal mice. However, it was not clear whether such an approach would work in diseased mice. In this study we delivered the AAV-9 alkaline phosphatase (AP) tsAAV vector (3 x 10(12) vector genome particles per vector per mouse, tail vein injection) to 2-month-old mdx mice, the most widely used DMD model. Four months later, we observed widespread AP expression in the heart. It reached the same level as we have seen in normal neonatal puppy. Interestingly, myocardial transduction correlated with beta-myosin heavy chain expression but not with LamR, the putative AAV-9 receptor. AP expression was also detected in various skeletal muscles but at levels much lower than in normal newborn mice. Despite the existing inflammatory milieu, we did not see any appreciable increase in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and macrophages in striated muscles after systemic tsAAV infection. In summary, our results have paved the way for tsAAV-mediated gene therapy for Duchenne cardiomyopathy. PMID:19627234

  5. Read-through compound 13 restores dystrophin expression and improves muscle function in the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kayali, Refik; Ku, Jin-Mo; Khitrov, Gregory; Jung, Michael E; Prikhodko, Olga; Bertoni, Carmen

    2012-09-15

    Molecules that induce ribosomal read-through of nonsense mutations in mRNA and allow production of a full-length functional protein hold great therapeutic potential for the treatment of many genetic disorders. Two such read-through compounds, RTC13 and RTC14, were recently identified by a luciferase-independent high-throughput screening assay and were shown to have potential therapeutic functions in the treatment of nonsense mutations in the ATM and the dystrophin genes. We have now tested the ability of RTC13 and RTC14 to restore dystrophin expression into skeletal muscles of the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Direct intramuscular injection of compound RTC14 did not result in significant read-through activity in vivo and demonstrated the levels of dystrophin protein similar to those detected using gentamicin. In contrast, significant higher amounts of dystrophin were detected after intramuscular injection of RTC13. When administered systemically, RTC13 was shown to partially restore dystrophin protein in different muscle groups, including diaphragm and heart, and improved muscle function. An increase in muscle strength was detected in all treated animals and was accompanied by a significant decrease in creatine kinase levels. These studies establish the therapeutic potential of RTC13 in vivo and advance this newly identified compound into preclinical application for DMD. PMID:22692682

  6. Muscle and Heart Function Restoration in a Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I) Mouse Model by Systemic FKRP Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Chunping; Wang, Chi-Hsien; Zhao, Chunxia; Lu, Peijuan; Awano, Hiroyuki; Xiao, Bin; Li, Jianbin; Yuan, Zhenhua; Dai, Yi; Martin, Carrie Bette; Li, Juan; Lu, Qilong; Xiao, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene cause a wide spectrum of disease phenotypes including the mild limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I), the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome, and muscle-eye-brain disease. FKRP deficiency results in α-dystroglycan (α-DG) hypoglycosylation in the muscle and heart, which is a biochemical hallmark of dystroglycanopathies. To study gene replacement therapy, we generated and characterized a new mouse model of LGMD2I harboring the human mutation leucine 276 to isoleucine (L276I) in the mouse alleles. The homozygous knock-in mice (L276IKI) mimic the classic late onset phenotype of LGMD2I in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. Systemic delivery of human FKRP gene by AAV9 vector in the L276IKI mice, at either neonatal age or at the age of 9 months, rendered body wide FKRP expression and restored glycosylation of α-DG in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. FKRP gene therapy ameliorated dystrophic pathology and cardiomyopathy such as muscle degeneration, fibrosis, and myofiber membrane leakage, resulting in restoration of muscle and heart contractile functions. Thus, these results demonstrated that the treatment based on FKRP gene replacement was effective. PMID:25048216

  7. Progressive cone dystrophies.

    PubMed

    François, J; De Rouck, A; De Laey, J J

    1976-01-01

    Patients with progressive generalized cone dystrophy often present nystagmus (or strabism) and complain of photophobia, decrease in visual acuity or disturbances in colour perception. The most classic fundus abnormality is the bull's eye maculopathy or a pallor of the optic disc. Minimal macular changes are sometimes seen, which may progress to a bull's eye type of macular degeneration. The photopic ERG is always very affected, whereas at first the scotopic ERG seems normal. Progressive deterioration of the visual functions is accompanied by increasing fundus lesions and rod involvement, as suggested by the modifications of the dark adaptation curve and the scotopic ERG. However, the progression of typical generalized cone dysfunction is very slow. On the contrary, in some cases of so-called Stargardt's disease with peripheral participation, a very rapid progression has been observed. In such cases a normal ERG does not necessarily mean that the disease will remain localized to the macular area. No definite prognosis can be made on one single ERG. In 3 cases with sector pigmentary retinopathy the photopic ERG was more affected than the scotopic ERG. However, these cases are probably primary cone-rod dystrophies. Although there is no electrophysiological control, our clinical impression is that the evolution, if possible, is very slow. PMID:1066593

  8. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of a mouse model of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy reveals severe muscular atrophy restricted to fast glycolytic fibres.

    PubMed

    Trollet, Capucine; Anvar, Seyed Yahya; Venema, Andrea; Hargreaves, Iain P; Foster, Keith; Vignaud, Alban; Ferry, Arnaud; Negroni, Elisa; Hourde, Christophe; Baraibar, Martin A; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Davies, Janet E; Rubinsztein, David C; Heales, Simon J; Mouly, Vincent; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Raz, Vered; Dickson, George

    2010-06-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disorder characterized by ptosis, dysphagia and proximal limb weakness. Autosomal-dominant OPMD is caused by a short (GCG)(8-13) expansions within the first exon of the poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 gene (PABPN1), leading to an expanded polyalanine tract in the mutated protein. Expanded PABPN1 forms insoluble aggregates in the nuclei of skeletal muscle fibres. In order to gain insight into the different physiological processes affected in OPMD muscles, we have used a transgenic mouse model of OPMD (A17.1) and performed transcriptomic studies combined with a detailed phenotypic characterization of this model at three time points. The transcriptomic analysis revealed a massive gene deregulation in the A17.1 mice, among which we identified a significant deregulation of pathways associated with muscle atrophy. Using a mathematical model for progression, we have identified that one-third of the progressive genes were also associated with muscle atrophy. Functional and histological analysis of the skeletal muscle of this mouse model confirmed a severe and progressive muscular atrophy associated with a reduction in muscle strength. Moreover, muscle atrophy in the A17.1 mice was restricted to fast glycolytic fibres, containing a large number of intranuclear inclusions (INIs). The soleus muscle and, in particular, oxidative fibres were spared, even though they contained INIs albeit to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate a fibre-type specificity of muscle atrophy in this OPMD model. This study improves our understanding of the biological pathways modified in OPMD to identify potential biomarkers and new therapeutic targets. PMID:20207626

  9. Clinical Trials in Retinal Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Grob, Seanna R.; Finn, Avni; Papakostas, Thanos D.; Eliott, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Research development is burgeoning for genetic and cellular therapy for retinal dystrophies. These dystrophies are the focus of many research efforts due to the unique biology and accessibility of the eye, the transformative advances in ocular imaging technology that allows for in vivo monitoring, and the potential benefit people would gain from success in the field – the gift of renewed sight. Progress in the field has revealed the immense complexity of retinal dystrophies and the challenges faced by researchers in the development of this technology. This study reviews the current trials and advancements in genetic and cellular therapy in the treatment of retinal dystrophies and also discusses the current and potential future challenges. PMID:26957839

  10. Alternative splicing and muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Ghigna, Claudia; Gabellini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to proteomic diversity and to the control of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. For this reasons, alternative splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human disorders. The aim of this review is to focus on the relevance of alternative splicing for muscle function and muscle disease. We begin by giving a brief overview of alternative splicing, muscle-specific gene expression and muscular dystrophy. Next, to illustrate these concepts we focus on two muscular dystrophy, myotonic muscular dystrophy and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, both associated to disruption of splicing regulation in muscle. PMID:20603608

  11. Fuchs’ corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Eghrari, Allen O; Gottsch, John D

    2010-01-01

    Fuchs’ corneal dystrophy (FCD) is a progressive, hereditary disease of the cornea first described a century ago by the Austrian ophthalmologist Ernst Fuchs. Patients often present in the fifth to sixth decade of life with blurry morning vision that increases in duration as the disease progresses. Primarily a condition of the posterior cornea, characteristic features include the formation of focal excrescences of Descemet membrane termed ‘guttae’, loss of endothelial cell density and end-stage disease manifested by corneal edema and the formation of epithelial bullae. Recent advances in our understanding of the genetic and pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease, as well as the application of new imaging modalities and less invasive surgical procedures, present new opportunities for improved outcomes among patients with FCD. PMID:20625449

  12. Coronary adventitial cells are linked to perivascular cardiac fibrosis via TGFβ1 signaling in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ieronimakis, Nicholas; Hays, Aislinn L.; Janebodin, Kajohnkiart; Mahoney, William M.; Duffield, Jeremy S.; Majesky, Mark W.; Reyes, Morayma

    2013-01-01

    In Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), progressive accumulation of cardiac fibrosis promotes heart failure. While the cellular origins of fibrosis in DMD hearts remain enigmatic, fibrotic tissue conspicuously forms near the coronary adventitia. Therefore, we sought to characterize the role of coronary adventitial cells in the formation of perivascular fibrosis. Utilizing the mdx model of DMD, we have identified a population of Sca1+, PDGFRα+, CD31−, CD45− coronary adventitial cells responsible for perivascular fibrosis. Histopathology of dystrophic hearts revealed Sca1+ cells extend from the adventitia and occupy regions of perivascular fibrosis. The number of Sca1+ adventitial cells increased two-fold in fibrotic mdx hearts vs. age matched wild-type hearts. Moreover, relative to Sca1−, PDGFRα+, CD31−, CD45− cells and endothelial cells, Sca1+ adventitial cells FACS-sorted from mdx hearts expressed the highest level of Collagen1α1 and 3α1, Connective tissue growth factor, and Tgfβr1 transcripts. Surprisingly, mdx endothelial cells expressed the greatest level of the Tgfβ1 ligand. Utilizing Collagen1α1-GFP reporter mice, we confirmed that the majority of Sca1+ adventitial cells expressed type I collagen, an abundant component of cardiac fibrosis, in both wt (71% ±4.1) and mdx (77% ±3.5) hearts. In contrast, GFP+ interstitial fibroblasts were PDGFRα+ but negative for Sca1. Treatment of cultured Collagen1α1-GFP+ adventitial cells with TGFβ1 resulted in increased collagen synthesis, whereas pharmacological inhibition of TGFβR1 signaling reduced the fibrotic response. Therefore, perivascular cardiac fibrosis by coronary adventitial cells may be mediated by TGFβ1 signaling. Our results implicate coronary endothelial cells in mediating cardiac fibrosis via transmural TGFβ signaling, and suggest that the coronary adventitia is a promising target for developing novel anti-fibrotic therapies. PMID:23911435

  13. Genome-wide Mechanosensitive MicroRNA (MechanomiR) Screen Uncovers Dysregulation of Their Regulatory Networks in the mdm Mouse Model of Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Junaith S; Hajira, Ameena; Lopez, Michael A; Boriek, Aladin M

    2015-10-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a heterogeneous group of genetic and neuromuscular disorders, which result in severe loss of motor ability and skeletal muscle mass and function. Aberrant mechanotransduction and dysregulated-microRNA pathways are often associated with the progression of MD. Here, we hypothesized that dysregulation of mechanosensitive microRNAs (mechanomiRs) in dystrophic skeletal muscle plays a major role in the progression of MD. To test our hypothesis, we performed a genome-wide expression profile of anisotropically regulated mechanomiRs and bioinformatically analyzed their target gene networks. We assessed their functional roles in the advancement of MD using diaphragm muscles from mdm (MD with myositis) mice, an animal model of human tibial MD (titinopathy), and their wild-type littermates. We were able to show that ex vivo anisotropic mechanical stretch significantly alters the miRNA expression profile in diaphragm muscles from WT and mdm mice; as a result, some of the genes associated with MDs are dysregulated in mdm mice due to differential regulation of a distinct set of mechanomiRs. Interestingly, we found a contrasting expression pattern of the highly expressed let-7 family mechanomiRs, let-7e-5p and miR-98-5p, and their target genes associated with the extracellular matrix and TGF-β pathways, respectively, between WT and mdm mice. Gain- and loss-of-function analysis of let-7e-5p in myocytes isolated from the diaphragms of WT and mdm mice confirmed Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Col24a1, Col27a1, Itga1, Itga4, Scd1, and Thbs1 as target genes of let-7e-5p. Furthermore, we found that miR-98 negatively regulates myoblast differentiation. Our study therefore introduces additional biological players in the regulation of skeletal muscle structure and myogenesis that may contribute to unexplained disorders of MD. PMID:26272747

  14. Functional and Molecular Effects of Arginine Butyrate and Prednisone on Muscle and Heart in the mdx Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Guerron, Alfredo D.; Rawat, Rashmi; Sali, Arpana; Spurney, Christopher F.; Pistilli, Emidio; Cha, Hee-Jae; Pandey, Gouri S.; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Francia, Dwight; Farajian, Viken; Escolar, Diana M.; Bossi, Laura; Becker, Magali; Zerr, Patricia; de la Porte, Sabine; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Partridge, Terence; Hoffman, Eric P.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2010-01-01

    Background The number of promising therapeutic interventions for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is increasing rapidly. One of the proposed strategies is to use drugs that are known to act by multiple different mechanisms including inducing of homologous fetal form of adult genes, for example utrophin in place of dystrophin. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we have treated mdx mice with arginine butyrate, prednisone, or a combination of arginine butyrate and prednisone for 6 months, beginning at 3 months of age, and have comprehensively evaluated the functional, biochemical, histological, and molecular effects of the treatments in this DMD model. Arginine butyrate treatment improved grip strength and decreased fibrosis in the gastrocnemius muscle, but did not produce significant improvement in muscle and cardiac histology, heart function, behavioral measurements, or serum creatine kinase levels. In contrast, 6 months of chronic continuous prednisone treatment resulted in deterioration in functional, histological, and biochemical measures. Arginine butyrate-treated mice gene expression profiling experiments revealed that several genes that control cell proliferation, growth and differentiation are differentially expressed consistent with its histone deacetylase inhibitory activity when compared to control (saline-treated) mdx mice. Prednisone and combination treated groups showed alterations in the expression of genes that control fibrosis, inflammation, myogenesis and atrophy. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that 6 months treatment with arginine butyrate can produce modest beneficial effects on dystrophic pathology in mdx mice by reducing fibrosis and promoting muscle function while chronic continuous treatment with prednisone showed deleterious effects to skeletal and cardiac muscle. Our results clearly indicate the usefulness of multiple assays systems to monitor both beneficial and toxic effects of drugs with broad range of in vivo

  15. An inhibitor of transforming growth factor beta type I receptor ameliorates muscle atrophy in a mouse model of caveolin 3-deficient muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Yutaka; Okada, Tadashi; Nishimatsu, Shin-Ichiro; Ishizaki, Masatoshi; Suga, Tomohiro; Fujino, Masahiro; Murakami, Tatsufumi; Uchino, Makoto; Tsuchida, Kunihiro; Noji, Sumihare; Hinohara, Atsushi; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Kiyoshi; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2012-08-01

    Skeletal muscle expressing Pro104Leu mutant caveolin 3 (CAV3(P104L)) in mouse becomes atrophied and serves as a model of autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1C. We previously found that caveolin 3-deficient muscles showed activated intramuscular transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signals. However, the cellular mechanism by which loss of caveolin 3 leads to muscle atrophy is unknown. Recently, several small-molecule inhibitors of TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI) kinase have been developed as molecular-targeting drugs for cancer therapy by suppressing intracellular TGF-β1, -β2, and -β3 signaling. Here, we show that a TβRI kinase inhibitor, Ki26894, restores impaired myoblast differentiation in vitro caused by activin, myostatin, and TGF-β1, as well as CAV3(P104L). Oral administration of Ki26894 increased muscle mass and strength in vivo in wild-type mice, and improved muscle atrophy and weakness in the CAV3(P104L) mice. The inhibitor restored the number of satellite cells, the resident stem cells of adult skeletal muscle, with suppression of the increased phosphorylation of Smad2, an effector, and the upregulation of p21 (also known as Cdkn1a), a target gene of the TGF-β family members in muscle. These data indicate that both TGF-β-dependent reduction in satellite cells and impairment of myoblast differentiation contribute to the cellular mechanism underlying caveolin 3-deficient muscle atrophy. TβRI kinase inhibitors could antagonize the activation of intramuscular anti-myogenic TGF-β signals, thereby providing a novel therapeutic rationale for the alternative use of this type of anticancer drug in reversing muscle atrophy in various clinical settings. PMID:22584670

  16. What Are the Treatments for Muscular Dystrophy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for muscular dystrophy? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... available to stop or reverse any form of muscular dystrophy (MD). Instead, certain therapies and medications aim to ...

  17. Amelioration of Muscular Dystrophy by Transgenic Expression of Niemann-Pick C1

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Michelle S.; Adams, Marvin E.; Tesch, Yan

    2009-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and other types of muscular dystrophies are caused by the loss or alteration of different members of the dystrophin protein complex. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which dystrophin-associated protein abnormalities contribute to the onset of muscular dystrophy may identify new therapeutic approaches to these human disorders. By examining gene expression alterations in mouse skeletal muscle lacking α-dystrobrevin (Dtna−/−), we identified a highly significant reduction of the cholesterol trafficking protein, Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1). Mutations in NPC1 cause a progressive neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disorder. Transgenic expression of NPC1 in skeletal muscle ameliorates muscular dystrophy in the Dtna−/− mouse (which has a relatively mild dystrophic phenotype) and in the mdx mouse, a model for DMD. These results identify a new compensatory gene for muscular dystrophy and reveal a potential new therapeutic target for DMD. PMID:18946078

  18. Determinants of the incidence of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an X-linked disorder, is the most common muscular dystrophy with an incidence in boys of about 200 per million births. It presents in early childhood leading to death in early teens. Its relatively high incidence and severity have stimulated many studies from epidemiological to curative. Recent advances in molecular biology have opened up the possibility of carrier identification and potential reduction of the incidence of cases. This paper gives a population genetics model which can be used to predict the reduction in incidence. PMID:26697447

  19. [Reflex sympathetic dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marta; Manuela, Manuela; Cantinho, Guilhermina

    2011-01-01

    Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy is rare in pediatrics. It is a complex regional pain syndrome, of unknown etiology, usually post-traumatic, characterized by dysfunctions of the musculoskeletal, vascular and skin systems: severe persistent pain of a limb, sensory and vascular alterations, associated disability and psychosocial dysfunction. The diagnosis is based in high clinical suspection. In children and adolescents there are aspects that are different from the adult ones. Excessive tests may result in worsening of the clinical symptoms. Bone scintigraphy can help. Pain treatment is difficult, not specific. Physical therapies and relaxation technics give some relief. Depression must be treated. This syndrome includes fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome type I. We present a clinical report of an adolescent girl, referred for pain, cold temperature, pallor and functional disability of an inferior limb, all signals disclosed by a minor trauma. She had been diagnosed depression the year before. The bone scintigraphy was a decisive test. The treatment with gabapentin, C vitamin, physiotherapy and pshycotherapy has been effective. PMID:22713207

  20. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: CRISPR/Cas9 treatment.

    PubMed

    Mendell, Jerry R; Rodino-Klapac, Louise R

    2016-05-01

    A novel approach to gene correction by genome editing shows great promise as a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). CRISPR/Cas9 delivered by adeno-associated virus to a mouse model for DMD demonstrated improvement in function and histology. PMID:26926391

  1. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sacconi, Sabrina; Salviati, Leonardo; Desnuelle, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is characterized by a typical and asymmetric pattern of muscle involvement and disease progression. Two forms of FSHD, FSHD1 and FSHD2, have been identified displaying identical clinical phenotype but different genetic and epigenetic basis. Autosomal dominant FSHD1 (95% of patients) is characterized by chromatin relaxation induced by pathogenic contraction of a macrosatellite repeat called D4Z4 located on the 4q subtelomere (FSHD1 patients harbor 1 to 10 D4Z4 repeated units). Chromatin relaxation is associated with inappropriate expression of DUX4, a retrogene, which in muscles induces apoptosis and inflammation. Consistent with this hypothesis, individuals carrying zero repeat on chromosome 4 do not develop FSHD1. Not all D4Z4 contracted alleles cause FSHD. Distal to the last D4Z4 unit, a polymorphic site with two allelic variants has been identified: 4qA and 4qB. 4qA is in cis with a functional polyadenylation consensus site. Only contractions on 4qA alleles are pathogenic because the DUX4 transcript is polyadenylated and translated into stable protein. FSHD2 is instead a digenic disease. Chromatin relaxation of the D4Z4 locus is caused by heterozygous mutations in the SMCHD1 gene encoding a protein essential for chromatin condensation. These patients also harbor at least one 4qA allele in order to express stable DUX4 transcripts. FSHD1 and FSHD2 may have an additive effect: patients harboring D4Z4 contraction and SMCHD1 mutations display a more severe clinical phenotype than with either defect alone. Knowledge of the complex genetic and epigenetic defects causing these diseases is essential in view of designing novel therapeutic strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. PMID:24882751

  2. Differential Gene Expression Profiling of Dystrophic Dog Muscle after MuStem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Babarit, Candice; Larcher, Thibaut; Dubreil, Laurence; Leroux, Isabelle; Zuber, Céline; Ledevin, Mireille; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Fromes, Yves; Cherel, Yan; Guevel, Laetitia; Rouger, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background Several adult stem cell populations exhibit myogenic regenerative potential, thus representing attractive candidates for therapeutic approaches of neuromuscular diseases such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). We have recently shown that systemic delivery of MuStem cells, skeletal muscle-resident stem cells isolated in healthy dog, generates the remodelling of muscle tissue and gives rise to striking clinical benefits in Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dog. This global effect, which is observed in the clinically relevant DMD animal model, leads us to question here the molecular pathways that are impacted by MuStem cell transplantation. To address this issue, we compare the global gene expression profile between healthy, GRMD and MuStem cell treated GRMD dog muscle, four months after allogenic MuStem cell transplantation. Results In the dystrophic context of the GRMD dog, disease-related deregulation is observed in the case of 282 genes related to various processes such as inflammatory response, regeneration, calcium ion binding, extracellular matrix organization, metabolism and apoptosis regulation. Importantly, we reveal the impact of MuStem cell transplantation on several molecular and cellular pathways based on a selection of 31 genes displaying signals specifically modulated by the treatment. Concomitant with a diffuse dystrophin expression, a histological remodelling and a stabilization of GRMD dog clinical status, we show that cell delivery is associated with an up-regulation of genes reflecting a sustained enhancement of muscle regeneration. We also identify a decreased mRNA expression of a set of genes having metabolic functions associated with lipid homeostasis and energy. Interestingly, ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is highly enhanced in GRMD dog muscle after systemic delivery of MuStem cells. Conclusions Overall, our results provide the first high-throughput characterization of GRMD dog muscle and throw new light on the

  3. Modifying muscular dystrophy through TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Ceco, Ermelinda; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy arises from ongoing muscle degeneration and insufficient regeneration. This imbalance leads to loss of muscle with replacement by scar or fibrosis resulting in muscle weakness and, eventually, loss of muscle function. Human muscular dystrophy is characterized by a wide range of disease severity, even when the same genetic mutation is present. This variability implies that other factors, both genetic and environmental, modify the disease outcome. There has been an ongoing effort to define the genetic and molecular bases that influence muscular dystrophy onset and progression. Modifier genes for muscle disease have been identified through candidate gene approaches as well as genomewide surveys. Multiple lines of experimental evidence have now converged on the TGFβ pathway as a modifier for muscular dystrophy. TGFβ signaling is upregulated in dystrophic muscle as a result of a destabilized plasma membrane and/or altered extracellular matrix. Given the important biological role of the TGFβ pathway, and its role beyond muscle homeostasis, we review modifier genes that alter the TGFβ pathway and approaches to modulate TGFβ activity to ameliorate muscle disease. PMID:23551962

  4. [Treatment progress of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)].

    PubMed

    Smogorzewska, Elzbieta Monika; Weinberg, Kenneth I

    2004-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common lethal disease for which no effective treatment is currently available. There exists a mouse model of the disease in which the usefulness of gene therapy was established. However, no progress towards human application was made due to the lack of a proper method for gene delivery. During the past several years, researchers acquired data which led them to believe that bone marrow stem cells are capable of generating not only blood cells, but also liver, heart, skin, muscle, and other tissue. Although the term "stem cell plasticity" became very popular, other studies have suggested that bone marrow might contain different types of stem cells that can produce non-hematopoietic cells. For example, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) in bone marrow give rise to osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes, and skeletal muscle. Recently, researchers have been able to show that transplanted bone marrow cells can contribute to muscle cells in a human patient who was diagnosed with two genetic diseases: severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The odds of this happening is estimated at one in seven million. The results of studying this patient's medical history were reported by collaborating researchers at Children's Hospital, Los Angeles and Children's Hospital, Boston in an article titled "Long-term persistence of donor nuclei in a Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patient receiving bone marrow transplantation" published in the September 2002 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. This patient was transplanted 15 years ago at Children's Hospital Los Angeles with paternal HLA-haploidentical T cell-depleted bone marrow. He engrafted and became a hematopoietic chimera having T and NK lymphocytes of donor origin. Studies performed on the muscle biopsy from the patient 13 years after transplantation demonstrated that the muscle showed evidence of donor derived nuclei. In addition, analysis of his bone marrow

  5. Disease Rescue and Increased Lifespan in a Model of Cardiomyopathy and Muscular Dystrophy by Combined AAV Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Vitiello, Carmen; Faraso, Stefania; Sorrentino, Nicolina Cristina; Di Salvo, Giovanni; Nusco, Edoardo; Nigro, Gerardo; Cutillo, Luisa; Calabrò, Raffaele; Auricchio, Alberto; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    Background The BIO14.6 hamster is an excellent animal model for inherited cardiomyopathy, because of its lethal and well-documented course, due to a spontaneous deletion of delta-sarcoglycan gene promoter and first exon. The muscle disease is progressive and average lifespan is 11 months, because heart slowly dilates towards heart failure. Methodology/Principal Findings Based on the ability of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors to transduce heart together with skeletal muscle following systemic administration, we delivered human delta-sarcoglycan cDNA into male BIO14.6 hamsters by testing different ages of injection, routes of administration and AAV serotypes. Body-wide restoration of delta-SG expression was associated with functional reconstitution of the sarcoglycan complex and with significant lowering of centralized nuclei and fibrosis in skeletal muscle. Motor ability and cardiac functions were completely rescued. However, BIO14.6 hamsters having less than 70% of fibers recovering sarcoglycan developed cardiomyopathy, even if the total rescued protein was normal. When we used serotype 2/8 in combination with serotype 2/1, lifespan was extended up to 22 months with sustained heart function improvement. Conclusions/Significance Our data support multiple systemic administrations of AAV as a general therapeutic strategy for clinical trials in cardiomyopathies and muscle disorders. PMID:19333401

  6. Dasatinib as a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lipscomb, Leanne; Piggott, Robert W.; Emmerson, Tracy; Winder, Steve J.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of a systemically acting and universal small molecule therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy would be an enormous advance for this condition. Based on evidence gained from studies on mouse genetic models, we have identified tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan as a key event in the aetiology of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Thus, preventing tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan presents itself as a potential therapeutic strategy. Using the dystrophic sapje zebrafish, we have investigated the use of tyrosine kinase and other inhibitors to treat the dystrophic symptoms in this model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dasatinib, a potent and specific Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was found to decrease the levels of β-dystroglycan phosphorylation on tyrosine and to increase the relative levels of non-phosphorylated β-dystroglycan in sapje zebrafish. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment resulted in the improved physical appearance of the sapje zebrafish musculature and increased swimming ability as measured by both duration and distance of swimming of dasatinib-treated fish compared with control animals. These data suggest great promise for pharmacological agents that prevent the phosphorylation of β-dystroglycan on tyrosine and subsequent steps in the degradation pathway as therapeutic targets for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:26604135

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy is a condition that chiefly affects muscles used ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Muscular dystrophies are a group of genetic conditions characterized by ...

  9. Early remodeling of Müller cells in the rd/rd mouse model of retinal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chua, Jacqueline; Nivison-Smith, Lisa; Fletcher, Erica L; Trenholm, Stuart; Awatramani, Gautam B; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2013-08-01

    We studied the anatomical remodeling and gliosis of retinal Müller cells in the rd/rd mouse model of photoreceptor degeneration. A computational calculation of glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity was developed so we could specifically quantify changes in Müller cell anatomy between control mice (C57Bl/6) and the dystrophic strain. We found no change in the number of Müller cell somata between mice strains, indicating no cell proliferation as a function of development and degeneration. The retinal area occupied by the total Müller cell body (soma and processes) was significantly less in the rd/rd mouse retina compared with control mice. When only the outer retina was considered, we found rd/rd Müller cell processes were dramatically reduced during the cone phase of photoreceptor degeneration. However, at older ages an increase in Müller cell processes was seen. Conversely, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression showed a significant increase during cone degeneration followed by a reduction in older ages. Müller cell electrophysiology, particularly K(+) currents and membrane potential, was similar between rd/rd and control Müller cells during cone degeneration. Together, these results show that glial remodeling in the rd/rd retina follows separate phases-an initial conservative glial response involving the loss of Müller cells processes, hyperexpression of GFAP, and preservation of normal electrophysiology followed by an active growth of Müller cell processes, glial seal formation, and attenuation of GFAP expression after complete photoreceptor loss. PMID:23348616

  10. [Gene therapy for inherited retinal dystrophies].

    PubMed

    Côco, Monique; Han, Sang Won; Sallum, Juliana Maria Ferraz

    2009-01-01

    The inherited retinal dystrophies comprise a large number of disorders characterized by a slow and progressive retinal degeneration. They are the result of mutations in genes that express in either the photoreceptor cells or the retinal pigment epithelium. The mode of inheritance can be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X linked recessive, digenic or mitochondrial DNA inherited. At the moment, there is no treatment for these conditions and the patients can expect a progressive loss of vision. Accurate genetic counseling and support for rehabilitation are indicated. Research into the molecular and genetic basis of disease is continually expanding and improving the prospects for rational treatments. In this way, gene therapy, defined as the introduction of exogenous genetic material into human cells for therapeutic purposes, may ultimately offer the greatest treatment for the inherited retinal dystrophies. The eye is an attractive target for gene therapy because of its accessibility, immune privilege and translucent media. A number of retinal diseases affecting the eye have known gene defects. Besides, there is a well characterized animal model for many of these conditions. Proposals for clinical trials of gene therapy for inherited retinal degenerations owing to defects in the gene RPE65, have recently received ethical approval and the obtained preliminary results brought large prospects in the improvement on patient's quality of life. PMID:19820803

  11. siRNA-mediated Allele-specific Silencing of a COL6A3 Mutation in a Cellular Model of Dominant Ullrich Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bolduc, Véronique; Zou, Yaqun; Ko, Dayoung; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2014-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy type Ullrich (UCMD) is a severe disorder of early childhood onset for which currently there is no effective treatment. UCMD commonly is caused by dominant-negative mutations in the genes coding for collagen type VI, a major microfibrillar component of the extracellular matrix surrounding the muscle fibers. To explore RNA interference (RNAi) as a potential therapy for UCMD, we designed a series of small interfering RNA (siRNA) oligos that specifically target the most common mutations resulting in skipping of exon 16 in the COL6A3 gene and tested them in UCMD-derived dermal fibroblasts. Transcript analysis by semiquantitative and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that two of these siRNAs were the most allele-specific, i.e., they efficiently knocked down the expression from the mutant allele, without affecting the normal allele. In HEK293T cells, these siRNAs selectively suppressed protein expression from a reporter construct carrying the mutation, with no or minimal suppression of the wild-type (WT) construct, suggesting that collagen VI protein levels are as also reduced in an allele-specific manner. Furthermore, we found that treating UCMD fibroblasts with these siRNAs considerably improved the quantity and quality of the collagen VI matrix, as assessed by confocal microscopy. Our current study establishes RNAi as a promising molecular approach for treating dominant COL6-related dystrophies. PMID:24518369

  12. Mutations in IMPG1 Cause Vitelliform Macular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Gaël; Meunier, Isabelle; Avila-Fernández, Almudena; Banfi, Sandro; Le Meur, Guylène; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Corton, Marta; Simonelli, Francesca; Brabet, Philippe; Labesse, Gilles; Audo, Isabelle; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Zeitz, Christina; Sahel, José-Alain; Weber, Michel; Dollfus, Hélène; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Allorge, Delphine; De Baere, Elfride; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Kohl, Susanne; Cremers, Frans P.M.; Hollyfield, Joe G.; Sénéchal, Audrey; Hebrard, Maxime; Bocquet, Béatrice; Ayuso García, Carmen; Hamel, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    Vitelliform macular dystrophies (VMD) are inherited retinal dystrophies characterized by yellow, round deposits visible upon fundus examination and encountered in individuals with juvenile Best macular dystrophy (BMD) or adult-onset vitelliform macular dystrophy (AVMD). Although many BMD and some AVMD cases harbor mutations in BEST1 or PRPH2, the underlying genetic cause remains unknown for many affected individuals. In a large family with autosomal-dominant VMD, gene mapping and whole-exome sequencing led to the identification of a c.713T>G (p.Leu238Arg) IMPG1 mutation, which was subsequently found in two other families with autosomal-dominant VMD and the same phenotype. IMPG1 encodes the SPACR protein, a component of the rod and cone photoreceptor extracellular matrix domains. Structural modeling indicates that the p.Leu238Arg substitution destabilizes the conserved SEA1 domain of SPACR. Screening of 144 probands who had various forms of macular dystrophy revealed three other IMPG1 mutations. Two individuals from one family affected by autosomal-recessive VMD were homozygous for the splice-site mutation c.807+1G>T, and two from another family were compound heterozygous for the mutations c.461T>C (p.Leu154Pro) and c.1519C>T (p.Arg507∗). Most cases had a normal or moderately decreased electrooculogram Arden ratio. We conclude that IMPG1 mutations cause both autosomal-dominant and -recessive forms of VMD, thus indicating that impairment of the interphotoreceptor matrix might be a general cause of VMD. PMID:23993198

  13. Hypothesis: neoplasms in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, James E.; Martens, William; Thornton, Charles A.; Moxley, Richard T.; Greene, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is a multi-step process due to an accumulation of genetic mutations in multiple genes in diverse pathways which ultimately lead to loss of control over cell growth. It is well known that inheritance of rare germline mutations in genes involved in tumorigenesis pathways confer high lifetime risk of neoplasia in affected individuals. Furthermore, a substantial number of multiple malformation syndromes include cancer susceptibility in their phenotype. Studies of the mechanisms underlying these inherited syndromes have added to the understanding of both normal development and the pathophysiology of carcinogenesis. Myotonic dystrophy (DM) represents a group of autosomal dominant, multisystemic diseases that share the clinical features of myotonia, muscle weakness, and early-onset cataracts. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) and myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) result from unstable nucleotide repeat expansions in their respective genes. There have been multiple reports of tumors in individuals with DM, most commonly benign calcifying cutaneous tumors known as pilomatricomas. We provide a summary of the tumors reported in DM and a hypothesis for a possible mechanism of tumorigenesis. We hope to stimulate further study into the potential role of DM genes in tumorigenesis, and help define DM pathogenesis, and facilitate developing novel treatment modalities. PMID:19642006

  14. Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy: a polyalanine myopathy.

    PubMed

    Brais, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    It has been 10 years since the identification of the first PABPN1 gene (GCN)(n)/polyalanine mutations responsible for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). These mutations have been found in most cases of OPMD diagnosed in more than 35 countries. Sequence analyses have shown that such mutations have occurred numerous times in human history. Although PABPN1 was found early on to be a component of the classic filamentous intranuclear inclusions (INIs), mRNA and other proteins also have been found to coaggregate in the INIs. It is still unclear if the INIs play a pathologic or a protective role. The generation of numerous cell and animal models of OPMD has led to greater insight into its complex molecular pathophysiology and identified the first candidate therapeutic molecules. This paper reviews basic and clinical research on OPMD, with special emphasis on recent developments in the understanding of its pathophysiology. PMID:19080757

  15. Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophies: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Donghoon

    2010-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are groups of inherited progressive diseases of the muscle caused by mutations of diverse genes related to normal muscle function. Although there is no current effective treatment for these devastating diseases, various molecular strategies have been developed to restore the expressions of the associated defective proteins. In preclinical animal models, both viral and nonviral vectors have been shown to deliver recombinant versions of defective genes. Antisense oligonucleotides have been shown to modify the splicing mechanism of mesenger ribonucleic acid to produce an internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin in an experimental model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In addition, chemicals can induce readthrough of the premature stop codon in nonsense mutations of the dystrophin gene. On the basis of these preclinical data, several experimental clinical trials are underway that aim to demonstrate efficacy in treating these devastating diseases. PMID:20944811

  16. [Duodenal dystrophy: An interdisciplinary problem].

    PubMed

    Vinokurova, L V; Khatkov, I E; Izrailov, R E; Bordin, D S; Dubtsova, E A; Nikolskaya, K A; Agafonov, M A; Andrianov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal dystrophy (DD) is the pathological change in the wall of the duodenum, which is caused by chronic inflammation in its ectopic pancreatic tissue. The most common complications of DD are acute or chronic pancreatitis and impaired duodenal patency, which along with severe pain are an indication for surgical treatment. Pancreaticoduodenal resection is recognized as the operation of choice. The paper describes a clinical case demonstrating the efficiency and safety of minimally invasive (laparoscopic) surgical technologies in this category of patients. Resectional interventions of this volume are also shown to be accompanied by the development of pancreatic insufficiency that necessitates continuous enzyme replacement therapy. PMID:27030187

  17. Arrhythmias in the muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Rajdev, Archana; Groh, William J

    2015-06-01

    In patients with muscular dystrophies, cardiac involvement leading to cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias occurs with variable prevalence, mirroring the phenotypic variability seen among and within the various hereditary myopathies. Knowledge of the incidence of arrhythmias and predictors of sudden death in the various hereditary myopathies can help guide screening and appropriate management of these patients, thereby improving survival. The noncardiac manifestations can lead to delayed recognition of symptoms, affect the decision to implant a prophylactic device, and once a decision is made to proceed with device implant, increase peri-procedural respiratory and anesthesia-related complications. PMID:26002394

  18. Satellite Cells in Muscular Dystrophy - Lost in Polarity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha C; Chevalier, Fabien P; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Recent findings employing the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have revealed that muscle satellite stem cells play a direct role in contributing to disease etiology and progression of DMD, the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy. Lack of dystrophin expression in DMD has critical consequences in satellite cells including an inability to establish cell polarity, abrogation of asymmetric satellite stem-cell divisions, and failure to enter the myogenic program. Thus, muscle wasting in dystrophic mice is not only caused by myofiber fragility but is exacerbated by intrinsic satellite cell dysfunction leading to impaired regeneration. Despite intense research and clinical efforts, there is still no effective cure for DMD. In this review we highlight recent research advances in DMD and discuss the current state of treatment and, importantly, how we can incorporate satellite cell-targeted therapeutic strategies to correct satellite cell dysfunction in DMD. PMID:27161598

  19. Segregation distortion in myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Magee, A C; Hughes, A E

    1998-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant disease which, in the typical pedigree, shows a three generation anticipation cascade. This results in infertility and congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM) with the disappearance of DM in that pedigree. The concept of segregation distortion, where there is preferential transmission of the larger allele at the DM locus, has been put forward to explain partially the maintenance of DM in the population. In a survey of DM in Northern Ireland, 59 pedigrees were ascertained. Sibships where the status of all the members had been identified were examined to determine the transmission of the DM expansion from affected parents to their offspring. Where the transmitting parent was male, 58.3% of the offspring were affected, and in the case of a female transmitting parent, 68.7% were affected. Studies on meiotic drive in DM have shown increased transmission of the larger allele at the DM locus in non-DM heterozygotes for CTGn. This study provides further evidence that the DM expansion tends to be transmitted preferentially. PMID:9863607

  20. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: current cell therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Kawnik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetically determined X-linked disease and the most common, progressive pediatric muscle disorder. For decades, research has been conducted to find an effective therapy. This review presents current therapeutic methods for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, based on scientific articles in English published mainly in the period 2000 to 2014. We used the PubMed database to identify and review the most important studies. An analysis of contemporary studies of stem cell therapy and the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in muscular dystrophy was performed. PMID:26136844

  1. Identification of novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by aptamer-based serum proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Coenen-Stass, Anna M. L.; McClorey, Graham; Manzano, Raquel; Betts, Corinne A.; Blain, Alison; Saleh, Amer F.; Gait, Michael J.; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wood, Matthew J. A.; Roberts, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    There is currently an urgent need for biomarkers that can be used to monitor the efficacy of experimental therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) in clinical trials. Identification of novel protein biomarkers has been limited due to the massive complexity of the serum proteome and the presence of a small number of very highly abundant proteins. Here we have utilised an aptamer-based proteomics approach to profile 1,129 proteins in the serum of wild-type and mdx (dystrophin deficient) mice. The serum levels of 96 proteins were found to be significantly altered (P < 0.001, q < 0.01) in mdx mice. Additionally, systemic treatment with a peptide-antisense oligonucleotide conjugate designed to induce Dmd exon skipping and recover dystrophin protein expression caused many of the differentially abundant serum proteins to be restored towards wild-type levels. Results for five leading candidate protein biomarkers (Pgam1, Tnni3, Camk2b, Cycs and Adamts5) were validated by ELISA in the mouse samples. Furthermore, ADAMTS5 was found to be significantly elevated in human DMD patient serum. This study has identified multiple novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in the serum of the mdx mouse with potential utility in DMD patients. PMID:26594036

  2. Generation of skeletal muscle cells from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells as an in vitro model and for therapy of muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Salani, Sabrina; Donadoni, Chiara; Rizzo, Federica; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness likely associated with exhaustion of muscle regeneration potential. At present, no cures or efficacious treatments are available for these diseases, but cell transplantation could be a potential therapeutic strategy. Transplantation of myoblasts using satellite cells or other myogenic cell populations has been attempted to promote muscle regeneration, based on the hypothesis that the donor cells repopulate the muscle and contribute to its regeneration. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and more recently induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) could generate an unlimited source of differentiated cell types, including myogenic cells. Here we review the literature regarding the generation of myogenic cells considering the main techniques employed to date to elicit efficient differentiation of human and murine ESCs or iPSCs into skeletal muscle. We also critically analyse the possibility of using these cellular populations as an alternative source of myogenic cells for cell therapy of MDs. PMID:22129481

  3. Peptide-based inhibition of NF-κB rescues diaphragm muscle contractile dysfunction in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer M; Kline, William; Canan, Benjamin D; Ricca, Daniel J; Kaspar, Brian; Delfín, Dawn A; DiRienzo, Kelly; Clemens, Paula R; Robbins, Paul D; Baldwin, Albert S; Flood, Pat; Kaumaya, Pravin; Freitas, Michael; Kornegay, Joe N; Mendell, Jerry R; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A; Guttridge, Denis C; Janssen, Paul M L

    2011-01-01

    Deterioration of diaphragm function is one of the prominent factors that contributes to the susceptibility of serious respiratory infections and development of respiratory failure in patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). The NF-κB signaling pathway has been implicated as a contributing factor of dystrophic pathology, making it a potential therapeutic target. Previously, we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB via a small NEMO Binding Domain (NBD) peptide was beneficial for reducing pathological features of mdx mice. Now, we stringently test the effectiveness and clinical potential of NBD by treating mdx mice with various formulations of NBD and use diaphragm function as our primary outcome criteria. We found that administering DMSO-soluble NBD rescued 78% of the contractile deficit between mdx and wild-type (WT) diaphragm. Interestingly, synthesis of a GLP NBD peptide as an acetate salt permitted its solubility in water, but as a negative consequence, also greatly attenuated functional efficacy. However, replacing the acetic acid counterion of the NBD peptide with trifluoroacetic acid retained the peptide's water solubility and significantly restored mdx diaphragm contractile function and improved histopathological indices of disease in both diaphragm and limb muscle. Together, these results support the feasibility of using a mass-produced, water-soluble NBD peptide for clinical use. PMID:21267511

  4. Glucocorticoid Steroid and Alendronate Treatment Alleviates Dystrophic Phenotype with Enhanced Functional Glycosylation of α-Dystroglycan in Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy with FKRPP448L Mutation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Shah, Sapana N; Lu, Peijuan; Richardson, Stephanie M; Bollinger, Lauren E; Blaeser, Anthony; Madden, Kyle L; Sun, Yubo; Luckie, Taylor M; Cox, Michael D; Sparks, Susan; Harper, Amy D; Lu, Qi Long

    2016-06-01

    Fukutin-related protein-muscular dystrophy is characterized by defects in glycosylation of α-dystroglycan with variable clinical phenotypes, most commonly as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. There is no effective therapy available. Glucocorticoid steroids have become the standard treatment for Duchenne and other muscular dystrophies with serious adverse effects, including excessive weight gain, immune suppression, and bone loss. Bisphosphonates have been used to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy for prevention of osteoporosis. Herein, we evaluated prednisolone and alendronate for their therapeutic potential in the FKRPP448L-mutant mouse representing moderate limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. Mice were treated with prednisolone, alendronate, and both in combination for up to 6 months. Prednisolone improved muscle pathology with significant reduction in muscle degeneration, but had no effect on serum creatine kinase levels and muscle strength. Alendronate treatment did not ameliorate muscle degeneration, but demonstrated a limited enhancement on muscle function test. Combined treatment of prednisolone and alendronate provided best improvement in muscle pathology with normalized fiber size distribution and significantly reduced serum creatine kinase levels, but had limited effect on muscle force generation. The use of alendronate significantly mitigated the bone loss. Prednisolone alone and in combination with alendronate enhance functionally glycosylated α-dystroglycan. These results, for the first time, demonstrate the efficacy and feasibility of this alliance treatment of the two drugs for fukutin-related protein-muscular dystrophy. PMID:27109613

  5. Quantitative T2 Combined with Texture Analysis of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Images Identify Different Degrees of Muscle Involvement in Three Mouse Models of Muscle Dystrophy: mdx, Largemyd and mdx/Largemyd

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Bach, Aurea B.; Malheiros, Jackeline; Matot, Béatrice; Martins, Poliana C. M.; Almeida, Camila F.; Caldeira, Waldir; Ribeiro, Alberto F.; Loureiro de Sousa, Paulo; Azzabou, Noura; Tannús, Alberto; Carlier, Pierre G.; Vainzof, Mariz

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been considered a promising non-invasive tool for monitoring therapeutic essays in small size mouse models of muscular dystrophies. Here, we combined MRI (anatomical images and transverse relaxation time constant—T2—measurements) to texture analyses in the study of four mouse strains covering a wide range of dystrophic phenotypes. Two still unexplored mouse models of muscular dystrophies were analyzed: The severely affected Largemyd mouse and the recently generated and worst double mutant mdx/Largemyd mouse, as compared to the mildly affected mdx and normal mice. The results were compared to histopathological findings. MRI showed increased intermuscular fat and higher muscle T2 in the three dystrophic mouse models when compared to the wild-type mice (T2: mdx/Largemyd: 37.6±2.8 ms; mdx: 35.2±4.5 ms; Largemyd: 36.6±4.0 ms; wild-type: 29.1±1.8 ms, p<0.05), in addition to higher muscle T2 in the mdx/Largemyd mice when compared to mdx (p<0.05). The areas with increased muscle T2 in the MRI correlated spatially with the identified histopathological alterations such as necrosis, inflammation, degeneration and regeneration foci. Nevertheless, muscle T2 values were not correlated with the severity of the phenotype in the 3 dystrophic mouse strains, since the severely affected Largemyd showed similar values than both the mild mdx and worst mdx/Largemyd lineages. On the other hand, all studied mouse strains could be unambiguously identified with texture analysis, which reflected the observed differences in the distribution of signals in muscle MRI. Thus, combined T2 intensity maps and texture analysis is a powerful approach for the characterization and differentiation of dystrophic muscles with diverse genotypes and phenotypes. These new findings provide important noninvasive tools in the evaluation of the efficacy of new therapies, and most importantly, can be directly applied in human translational research

  6. Quantitative T2 combined with texture analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance images identify different degrees of muscle involvement in three mouse models of muscle dystrophy: mdx, Largemyd and mdx/Largemyd.

    PubMed

    Martins-Bach, Aurea B; Malheiros, Jackeline; Matot, Béatrice; Martins, Poliana C M; Almeida, Camila F; Caldeira, Waldir; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Loureiro de Sousa, Paulo; Azzabou, Noura; Tannús, Alberto; Carlier, Pierre G; Vainzof, Mariz

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been considered a promising non-invasive tool for monitoring therapeutic essays in small size mouse models of muscular dystrophies. Here, we combined MRI (anatomical images and transverse relaxation time constant-T2-measurements) to texture analyses in the study of four mouse strains covering a wide range of dystrophic phenotypes. Two still unexplored mouse models of muscular dystrophies were analyzed: The severely affected Largemyd mouse and the recently generated and worst double mutant mdx/Largemyd mouse, as compared to the mildly affected mdx and normal mice. The results were compared to histopathological findings. MRI showed increased intermuscular fat and higher muscle T2 in the three dystrophic mouse models when compared to the wild-type mice (T2: mdx/Largemyd: 37.6±2.8 ms; mdx: 35.2±4.5 ms; Largemyd: 36.6±4.0 ms; wild-type: 29.1±1.8 ms, p<0.05), in addition to higher muscle T2 in the mdx/Largemyd mice when compared to mdx (p<0.05). The areas with increased muscle T2 in the MRI correlated spatially with the identified histopathological alterations such as necrosis, inflammation, degeneration and regeneration foci. Nevertheless, muscle T2 values were not correlated with the severity of the phenotype in the 3 dystrophic mouse strains, since the severely affected Largemyd showed similar values than both the mild mdx and worst mdx/Largemyd lineages. On the other hand, all studied mouse strains could be unambiguously identified with texture analysis, which reflected the observed differences in the distribution of signals in muscle MRI. Thus, combined T2 intensity maps and texture analysis is a powerful approach for the characterization and differentiation of dystrophic muscles with diverse genotypes and phenotypes. These new findings provide important noninvasive tools in the evaluation of the efficacy of new therapies, and most importantly, can be directly applied in human translational research. PMID

  7. Chronic Pain in Persons With Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Mark P.; Hoffman, Amy J.; Stoelb, Brenda L.; Abresch, Richard T.; Carter, Gregory T.; McDonald, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the nature and scope of pain in working-aged adults with myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Design Retrospective, cross-sectional survey. Setting Community-based survey. Participants Convenience sample of subjects with MMD and FSHD. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Overall intensity and duration of pain, pain inference, pain sites, pain treatments, and relief provided by pain treatments. Results More subjects with FSHD (82%) than with MMD (64%) reported pain. The most frequently reported pain sites for both diagnostic groups were lower back (66% MMD, 74% FSHD) and legs (60% MMD, 72% FSHD). Significant differences in pain intensity were found between the diagnostic groups in the hands, legs, knees, ankles, and feet, with patients with MMD reporting greater pain intensity at these sites than patients with FSHD. Age was related to the onset of pain (participants reporting pain were younger than those not reporting pain in the FSHD sample), but pain severity was not significantly associated with age in those reporting pain. Respondents with both diagnoses that reported mobility limitations and used assistive devices (eg, wheelchair, cane) reported more pain severity than those with mobility limitations who did not use assistive devices, who, in turn, reported more pain severity than respondents who reported no mobility limitations at all. The treatments that were reported to provide the greatest pain relief were not necessarily those that were the most frequently tried or still used. Conclusions The findings indicate that pain is a more common problem in persons with FSHD than in persons with MMD, although it is common in both populations. In addition, these pain problems are chronic, underscoring the need to identify and provide effective pain treatments for patients with these neuromuscular diseases. PMID:18226657

  8. Molecular Signatures of Membrane Protein Complexes Underlying Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Turk, Rolf; Hsiao, Jordy J; Smits, Melinda M; Ng, Brandon H; Pospisil, Tyler C; Jones, Kayla S; Campbell, Kevin P; Wright, Michael E

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) are responsible for a large number of muscular dystrophies. As such, molecular dissection of the DGC is expected to both reveal pathological mechanisms, and provides a biological framework for validating new DGC components. Establishment of the molecular composition of plasma-membrane protein complexes has been hampered by a lack of suitable biochemical approaches. Here we present an analytical workflow based upon the principles of protein correlation profiling that has enabled us to model the molecular composition of the DGC in mouse skeletal muscle. We also report our analysis of protein complexes in mice harboring mutations in DGC components. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that cell-adhesion pathways were under the transcriptional control of NFκB in DGC mutant mice, which is a finding that is supported by previous studies that showed NFκB-regulated pathways underlie the pathophysiology of DGC-related muscular dystrophies. Moreover, the bioinformatic analyses suggested that inflammatory and compensatory mechanisms were activated in skeletal muscle of DGC mutant mice. Additionally, this proteomic study provides a molecular framework to refine our understanding of the DGC, identification of protein biomarkers of neuromuscular disease, and pharmacological interrogation of the DGC in adult skeletal muscle https://www.mda.org/disease/congenital-muscular-dystrophy/research. PMID:27099343

  9. Physical Therapy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    MedlinePlus

    Physical Therapy & FSHD Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy A Guide for Patients & Physical Therapists Authors: Wendy M. King, P.T., ... expertise and patient preferences. The goals of any physical therapy plan of care are to assist patients to:  ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Bietti crystalline dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... on PubMed Central Mansour AM, Uwaydat SH, Chan CC. Long-term follow-up in Bietti crystalline dystrophy. ... VD, Zhang J, Gesualdo C, Corte MD, Chan CC, Fielding Hejtmancik J, Simonelli F. An atypical form ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and walking. Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy also impairs brain development. People with this condition have a brain abnormality ... cobblestones). These changes in the structure of the brain lead to significantly delayed development of speech and motor skills and moderate to ...

  12. [Muscular Dystrophies Involving the Retinal Function].

    PubMed

    Jägle, H

    2016-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies are rare disorders, with an incidence of approx. 20 in 100 000. Some dystrophies also affect retinal or optic nerve function. In such cases, the ophthalmological findings may be critical for differential diagnosis or patient counseling. For example in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, where the alteration in retinal function seems to reflect cerebral involvement. Other important forms are mitochondrial and metabolic disorders, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome and the Refsum syndrome. Molecular genetic analysis has become a major tool for differential diagnosis, but may be complex and demanding. This article gives an overview of major muscular dystrophies involving retinal function and their genetic origin, in order to guide differential diagnosis. PMID:27011029

  13. Genetics Home Reference: vitelliform macular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... faces. Vitelliform macular dystrophy causes a fatty yellow pigment (lipofuscin) to build up in cells underlying the ... structures in these cells that contain light-sensing pigments. It is unclear why PRPH2 mutations affect only ...

  14. Non-Coding RNAs in Muscle Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Erriquez, Daniela; Perini, Giovanni; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    ncRNAs are the most recently identified class of regulatory RNAs with vital functions in gene expression regulation and cell development. Among the variety of roles they play, their involvement in human diseases has opened new avenues of research towards the discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. Important data come from the field of hereditary muscle dystrophies, like Duchenne muscle dystrophy and Myotonic dystrophies, rare diseases affecting 1 in 7000–15,000 newborns and is characterized by severe to mild muscle weakness associated with cardiac involvement. Novel therapeutic approaches are now ongoing for these diseases, also based on splicing modulation. In this review we provide an overview about ncRNAs and their behavior in muscular dystrophy and explore their links with diagnosis, prognosis and treatments, highlighting the role of regulatory RNAs in these pathologies. PMID:24084719

  15. The Muscular Dystrophies: From Genes to Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Neil C; Bloch, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The genetic basis of many muscular disorders, including many of the more common muscular dystrophies, is now known. Clinically, the recent genetic advances have improved diagnostic capabilities, but they have not yet provided clues about treatment or management. Thanks to better management strategies and therapeutic interventions, however, many patients with a muscular dystrophy are more active and are living longer. Physical therapists, therefore, are more likely to see a patient with a muscular dystrophy, so understanding these muscle disorders and their management is essential. Physical therapy offers the most promise in caring for the majority of patients with these conditions, because it is unlikely that advances in gene therapy will significantly alter their clinical treatment in the near future. This perspective covers some of the basic molecular biological advances together with the clinical manifestations of the muscular dystrophies and the latest approaches to their management. PMID:16305275

  16. Measuring quality of life in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Abresch, Richard T.; Biesecker, Barbara; Conway, Kristin Caspers; Heatwole, Chad; Peay, Holly; Scal, Peter; Strober, Jonathan; Uzark, Karen; Wolff, Jodi; Margolis, Marjorie; Blackwell, Angela; Street, Natalie; Montesanti, Angela; Bolen, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to develop a conceptual model of quality of life (QOL) in muscular dystrophies (MDs) and review existing QOL measures for use in the MD population. Methods: Our model for QOL among individuals with MD was developed based on a modified Delphi process, literature review, and input from patients and patient advocacy organizations. Scales that have been used to measure QOL among patients with MD were identified through a literature review and evaluated using the COSMIN (Consensus-Based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments) checklist. Results: The Comprehensive Model of QOL in MD (CMQM) captures 3 broad domains of QOL (physical, psychological, and social), includes factors influencing self-reported QOL (disease-related factors, support/resources, and expectations/aspirations), and places these concepts within the context of the life course. The literature review identified 15 QOL scales (9 adult and 6 pediatric) that have been applied to patients with MD. Very few studies reported reliability data, and none included data on responsiveness of the measures to change in disease progression, a necessary psychometric property for measures included in treatment and intervention studies. No scales captured all QOL domains identified in the CMQM model. Conclusions: Additional scale development research is needed to enhance assessment of QOL for individuals with MD. Item banking and computerized adaptive assessment would be particularly beneficial by allowing the scale to be tailored to each individual, thereby minimizing respondent burden. PMID:25663223

  17. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy following traumatic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1984-04-01

    Two cases of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the upper extremity of patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injuries are reported. Both patients had very incomplete lesions with early neurological recovery, suggesting an underlying central cord syndrome. Although reflex sympathetic dystrophy is often seen following stroke, it has only rarely been documented in traumatic myelopathy, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pain syndromes in the extremities of paraplegic or quadriplegic patients. PMID:6728500

  18. Flicker fusion thresholds in Best macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Massof, R W; Fleischman, J A; Fine, S L; Yoder, F

    1977-06-01

    Flicker fusion threshold intensities were measured as a function of flicker frequency for patients with Best macular dystrophy having normal or near-normal Snellen visual acuity. These data were found to differ from normal in ways that may be interpreted to be an abnormal elevation of the foveal cone threshold, a loss of cone temporal resolution, or both. The results led to the conclusion that Best macular dystrophy affects the neurosensory retina even when Snellen visual acuity is normal. PMID:869758

  19. Treatment of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy with Denosumab

    PubMed Central

    Lefkowitz, Stanley S.; Lefkowitz, Doris L.; Kethley, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is the 3rd most common form of muscular dystrophy. Effective treatments for any of the muscular dystrophies have yet to be realized. This report describes such a treatment. Case Report: A 66 year old female was diagnosed with osteoporosis. She had been diagnosed with FSHD muscular dystrophy a number of years previously by both genetic and clinical studies. Following a 2 year course with Forteo for osteoporosis, she was given an injection of Denosumab (Prolia) to maintain her bone density. By 24 hours, she exhibited increased strength and a dramatic reduction of her dystrophic symptoms e.g. she could walk unassisted in high heels. She was able to accomplish other things that had not been possible for a number of years. After approximately 5 weeks she gradually lost the newfound strength with a complete loss by about 6 weeks. A second injection of Denosumab resulted in the same effect, i.e. reversal of symptoms and increased functionality. A number of measurements and videos were taken to establish the beneficial effects of Prolia for future studies. This was repeated with a 3rd and 4th injection in order to establish the unequivocal beneficial effects on muscular dystrophy. Conclusions: Further studies will be required to establish Denosumab as a major “front line” treatment for this disease and possibly other muscular dystrophies. PMID:23569491

  20. Arrhythmias in the Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Rajdev, Archana; Groh, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis In patients with muscular dystrophies, cardiac involvement leading to cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias occur with variable prevalence mirroring the phenotypic variability seen among and within the various hereditary myopathies. These patients are at risk for development for bradyarrhythmias and tachyarrhythmias including sudden cardiac death. Knowledge of the incidence of arrhythmias and predictors of sudden death in the various hereditary myopathies can help guide screening and appropriate management of these patients, thereby improving survival. The non-cardiac manifestations can lead to delayed recognition of symptoms (limited mobility and respiratory weakness masking cardiac manifestations), affect decision to implant prophylactic device (quantity vs. quality of life) and once a decision is made to proceed with device implant, increase peri-procedural respiratory and anesthesia-related complications. PMID:26002394

  1. Cardiac involvement in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Khalighi, Koroush; Kodali, Archana; Thapamagar, Suman B.; Walker, Stanley R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an inherited progressive muscle disorder caused by defects in muscle proteins. As the incidence of this condition is low, not many are familiar with the multisystem involvement. At times, cardiac disease may even be the predominant manifestation in the form of arrhythmias, conduction defects, and cardiomyopathies. The progression of the disease can lead to sudden, unpredictable death. Thus, it is important to identify this subgroup and treat accordingly. Objective To identify patients with DM and assess their risk for sudden cardiac death. Methods Nine patients previously diagnosed with muscular dystrophy were evaluated by cardiologists for various reasons, from a general follow-up to cardiac arrest. All of them had electrocardiograms (EKG) and 2-D echocardiograms, and seven of them had further electrophysiological (EP) studies. Results Of the nine patients with DM, eight had EKG evidence of conduction abnormalities ranging from first-degree heart block to complete heart block. Of the seven who had EP studies, five had inducible ventricular tachycardia requiring immediate cardioversion and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implant. Two of them underwent permanent pacemaker placement due to complete heart block and infra-Hissian block. The remaining two patients opted for a conservative approach with yearly EKG monitoring. Conclusion Because one-third of the cardiac deaths in patients with DM are sudden, there is a strong need to identify these patients and intervene in those at high risk. Prophylactic pacemaker placement is recommended even in those with minimal conduction system abnormality. However, the common practice is to identify patients at high risk of conduction abnormalities by EP studies and then provide them with prophylactic invasive strategies. PMID:25656662

  2. Suspected acute myocardial infarction in a dystrophin-deficient dog.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sarah Morar; Coleman, Amanda Erickson; Guo, Lee-Jae; Tou, Sandra; Keene, Bruce W; Kornegay, Joe N

    2016-06-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a model for the genetically homologous human disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Unlike the mildly affected mdx mouse, GRMD recapitulates the severe DMD phenotype. In addition to skeletal muscle involvement, DMD boys develop cardiomyopathy. While the cardiomyopathy of DMD is typically slowly progressive, rare early episodes of acute cardiac decompensation, compatible with myocardial infarction, have been described. We report here a 7-month-old GRMD dog with an apparent analogous episode of myocardial infarction. The dog presented with acute signs of cardiac disease, including tachyarrhythmia, supraventricular premature complexes, and femoral pulse deficits. Serum cardiac biomarkers, cardiac-specific troponin I (cTnI) and N-terminal prohormone of B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), were markedly increased. Echocardiography showed areas of hyperechoic myocardial enhancement, typical of GRMD cardiomyopathy. Left ventricular dyskinesis and elevated cTnI were suggestive of acute myocardial damage/infarction. Over a 3-year period, progression to a severe dilated phenotype was observed. PMID:27105608

  3. Differential diagnosis of Schnyder corneal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jayne S; Khemichian, Arbi J

    2011-01-01

    Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD) is a rare corneal dystrophy characterized by abnormally increased deposition of cholesterol and phospholipids in the cornea leading to progressive vision loss. SCD is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with high penetrance and has been mapped to the UBIAD1 gene on chromosome 1p36.3. Although 2/3 of SCD patients also have systemic hypercholesterolemia, the incidence of hypercholesterolemia is also increased in unaffected members of SCD pedigrees. Consequently, SCD is thought to result from a local metabolic defect in the cornea. The corneal findings in SCD are very predictable depending on the age of the individual, with initial central corneal haze and/or crystals, subsequent appearance of arcus lipoides in the third decade and formation of midperipheral haze in the late fourth decade. Because only 50% of affected patients have corneal crystals, the International Committee for Classification of Corneal Dystrophies recently changed the original name of this dystrophy from Schnyder crystalline corneal dystrophy to Schnyder corneal dystrophy. Diagnosis of affected individuals without crystalline deposits is often delayed and these individuals are frequently misdiagnosed. The differential diagnosis of the SCD patient includes other diseases with crystalline deposits such as cystinosis, tyrosinemia, Bietti crystalline dystrophy, hyperuricemia/gout, multiple myeloma, monoclonal gammopathy, infectious crystalline keratopathy, and Dieffenbachia keratitis. Depositions from drugs such as gold in chrysiasis, chlorpromazine, chloroquine, and clofazamine can also result in corneal deposits and are different from SCD. Diseases of systemic lipid metabolism that cause corneal opacification, such as lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency, fish eye disease and Tangier disease, should also be considered although these are autosomal recessive disorders. PMID:21540632

  4. Antisense mediated exon skipping therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).

    PubMed

    Brolin, Camilla; Shiraishi, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) that result in the absence of essential muscle protein dystrophin. Among many different approaches for DMD treatment, exon skipping, mediated by antisense oligonucleotides, is one of the most promising methods for restoration of dystrophin expression. This approach has been tested extensively targeting different exons in numerous models both in vitro and in vivo. During the past 10 years, there has been a considerable progress by using DMD animal models involving three types of antisense oligonucleotides (2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate (2OME-PS), phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO)) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA). PMID:21686247

  5. Dystrophin insufficiency causes a Becker muscular dystrophy-like phenotype in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a dystrophin deficiency while Becker MD is caused by a dystrophin insufficiency or expression of a partially functional dystrophin protein. Deficiencies in existing mouse and dog models necessitate the development of a novel large animal model. Our pu...

  6. Enhanced autophagy as a potential mechanism for the improved physiological function by simvastatin in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Nicholas P

    2016-04-01

    Autophagy has recently emerged as an important cellular process for the maintenance of skeletal muscle health and function. Excessive autophagy can trigger muscle catabolism, leading to atrophy. In contrast, reduced autophagic flux is a characteristic of several muscle diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the most common and severe inherited muscle disorder. Recent evidence demonstrates that enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by CYBB/NOX2 impairs autophagy in muscles from the dmd/mdx mouse, a genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Statins decrease CYBB/NOX2 expression and activity and stimulate autophagy in skeletal muscle. Therefore, we treated dmd/mdx mice with simvastatin and showed decreased CYBB/NOX2-mediated oxidative stress and enhanced autophagy induction. This was accompanied by reduced muscle damage, inflammation and fibrosis, and increased muscle force production. Our data suggest that increased autophagy may be a potential mechanism by which simvastatin improves skeletal muscle health and function in muscular dystrophy. PMID:26890413

  7. Overexpression of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein 4 in Muscle Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy through Myostatin and TGFβ.

    PubMed

    Lamar, Kay-Marie; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon B; Gao, Quan Q; Miller, Tamari; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Vo, Andy H; Wren, Lisa; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2016-05-01

    Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs) regulate the extracellular availability of latent TGFβ. LTBP4 was identified as a genetic modifier of muscular dystrophy in mice and humans. An in-frame insertion polymorphism in the murine Ltbp4 gene associates with partial protection against muscular dystrophy. In humans, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in LTBP4 associate with prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To better understand LTBP4 and its role in modifying muscular dystrophy, we created transgenic mice overexpressing the protective murine allele of LTBP4 specifically in mature myofibers using the human skeletal actin promoter. Overexpression of LTBP4 protein was associated with increased muscle mass and proportionally increased strength compared to age-matched controls. In order to assess the effects of LTBP4 in muscular dystrophy, LTBP4 overexpressing mice were bred to mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this model, increased LTBP4 led to greater muscle mass with proportionally increased strength, and decreased fibrosis. The increase in muscle mass and reduction in fibrosis were similar to what occurs when myostatin, a related TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle mass, was deleted in mdx mice. Supporting this, we found that myostatin forms a complex with LTBP4 and that overexpression of LTBP4 led to a decrease in myostatin levels. LTBP4 also interacted with TGFβ and GDF11, a protein highly related to myostatin. These data identify LTBP4 as a multi-TGFβ family ligand binding protein with the capacity to modify muscle disease through overexpression. PMID:27148972

  8. Overexpression of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein 4 in Muscle Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy through Myostatin and TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Brandon B.; Gao, Quan Q.; Hadhazy, Michele; Vo, Andy H.; Wren, Lisa; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs) regulate the extracellular availability of latent TGFβ. LTBP4 was identified as a genetic modifier of muscular dystrophy in mice and humans. An in-frame insertion polymorphism in the murine Ltbp4 gene associates with partial protection against muscular dystrophy. In humans, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in LTBP4 associate with prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To better understand LTBP4 and its role in modifying muscular dystrophy, we created transgenic mice overexpressing the protective murine allele of LTBP4 specifically in mature myofibers using the human skeletal actin promoter. Overexpression of LTBP4 protein was associated with increased muscle mass and proportionally increased strength compared to age-matched controls. In order to assess the effects of LTBP4 in muscular dystrophy, LTBP4 overexpressing mice were bred to mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this model, increased LTBP4 led to greater muscle mass with proportionally increased strength, and decreased fibrosis. The increase in muscle mass and reduction in fibrosis were similar to what occurs when myostatin, a related TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle mass, was deleted in mdx mice. Supporting this, we found that myostatin forms a complex with LTBP4 and that overexpression of LTBP4 led to a decrease in myostatin levels. LTBP4 also interacted with TGFβ and GDF11, a protein highly related to myostatin. These data identify LTBP4 as a multi-TGFβ family ligand binding protein with the capacity to modify muscle disease through overexpression. PMID:27148972

  9. [The heartache of muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Hoogerwaard, E M; Ginjaar, H B; Wilde, A A; Leschot, N J; de Voogt, W G; de Visser, M

    2000-11-11

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy are caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene, located on the short arm of the X chromosome. Three so called dystrophinopathy patients, a women aged 54 and two men aged 23 and 21 years, suffered from a severe dilated cardiomyopathy. Such a cardiomyopathy can develop in both carriers and patients. In addition, it is often more important for prognosis than muscle weakness. For these two reasons it is important to screen both groups for (early) cardiological abnormalities. If these are present, regular follow-up is necessary to start timely therapy. When cardiological investigations yield normal results, it is advised to screen carriers with a five-year interval. Dystrophinopathy patients should be checked every year, because the cardiomyopathy sometimes develops and deteriorates over a short period of time. Patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and with a positive family history for dilated cardiomyopathy, muscle weakness or high serum creatine kinase activity should be screened for a mutation in the dystrophin gene. PMID:11103252

  10. Genetics of Bietti Crystalline Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ng, Danny S C; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Ng, Tsz Kin; Pang, Chi Pui

    2016-01-01

    Bietti crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is an inherited retinal degenerative disease characterized by crystalline deposits in the retina, followed by progressive atrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), choriocapillaris, and photoreceptors. CYP4V2 has been identified as the causative gene for BCD. The CYP4V2 gene belongs to the cytochrome P450 superfamily and encodes for fatty acid ω-hydroxylase of both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. The CYP4V2 protein is localized most abundantly within the endoplasmic reticulum in the RPE and is postulated to play a role in the physiological lipid recycling system between the RPE and photoreceptors to maintain visual function. Electroretinographic assessments have revealed progressive dysfunction of rod and cone photoreceptors in patients with BCD. Several genotypes have been associated with more severe phenotypes based on clinical and electrophysiological findings. With the advent of multimodal imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, and adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, more precise delineation of BCD severity and progression is now possible, allowing for the potential future development of targets for gene therapy. PMID:27228076

  11. Myoglobin in Primary Muscular Disease: I. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: and: II. Muscular Dystrophy of Distal Type

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Herrera, A. E.; Lehmann, H.; Tomlinson, B. E.; Walton, J. N.

    1973-01-01

    Skeletal myoglobin from two cases of muscular dystrophy, one of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and one of muscular dystrophy of distal type, have been examined and no differences from normal human myoglobin were found. The opportunity has been taken to discuss the nature of minor fractions of myoglobin-like material which are found when human skeletal myoglobin is isolated. Those which have been observed in the present study have been artefacts and it was possible to demonstrate that they were due to deamidation of certain glutamine and asparagine residues. Images PMID:4590363

  12. Median Nail Dystrophy Involving the Thumb Nail

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Rahulkrishna; Pilani, Abhishek; Nair, Pragya Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Median canaliform dystrophy of Heller is a rare entity characterized by a midline or a paramedian ridge or split and canal formation in nail plate of one or both the thumb nails. It is an acquired condition resulting from a temporary defect in the matrix that interferes with nail formation. Habitual picking of the nail base may be responsible for some cases. Histopathology classically shows parakeratosis, accumulation of melanin within and between the nail bed keratinocytes. Treatment of median nail dystrophy includes injectable triamcinalone acetonide, topical 0.1% tacrolimus, and tazarotene 0.05%, which is many a times challenging for a dermatologist. Psychiatric opinion should be taken when associated with the depressive, obsessive-compulsive, or impulse-control disorder. We report a case of 19-year-old male diagnosed as median nail dystrophy. PMID:26955129

  13. Other limb-girdle muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Amato, Anthony A

    2011-01-01

    The secondary α-dystroglycanopathies usually present in infancy as congenital muscular dystrophies but may manifest later in childhood or adult life (limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) 2I, LGMD2K, LGMD2M, LGMD2N, and LGMD2O). Patients with telethoninopathy (LGMD2B) may present with mainly proximal or distal lower extremity weakness, and notably the muscle biopsies may demonstrate rimmed vacuoles. LGMD2L is caused by newly described mutations in ANO5 and can sometimes present with distal weakness resembling Miyoshi myopathy. PMID:21496628

  14. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  15. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  16. Genetics Home Reference: facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Padberg GW, Lunt PW, van der Maarel SM. Best practice guidelines on genetic diagnostics of Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: ... Reviewed : August 2014 Published : August 30, 2016 The resources on this site should not be used as a ... of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  17. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview.

    PubMed

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-06-26

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  18. Prevalence of congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Alessandra; Bianco, Flaviana; D'Amico, Adele; Moroni, Isabella; Messina, Sonia; Bruno, Claudio; Pegoraro, Elena; Mora, Marina; Astrea, Guja; Magri, Francesca; Comi, Giacomo P.; Berardinelli, Angela; Moggio, Maurizio; Morandi, Lucia; Pini, Antonella; Petillo, Roberta; Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Minetti, Carlo; Mongini, Tiziana; Ricci, Enzo; Gorni, Ksenija; Battini, Roberta; Villanova, Marcello; Politano, Luisa; Gualandi, Francesca; Ferlini, Alessandra; Muntoni, Francesco; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Bertini, Enrico; Pane, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We provide a nationwide population study of patients with congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy. Methods: Cases were ascertained from the databases in all the tertiary referral centers for pediatric neuromuscular disorders and from all the genetic diagnostic centers in which diagnostic tests for these forms are performed. Results: The study includes 336 patients with a point prevalence of 0.563 per 100,000. Mutations were identified in 220 of the 336 (65.5%). The cohort was subdivided into diagnostic categories based on the most recent classifications on congenital muscular dystrophies. The most common forms were those with α-dystroglycan glycosylation deficiency (40.18%) followed by those with laminin α2 deficiency (24.11%) and collagen VI deficiency (20.24%). The forms of congenital muscular dystrophy related to mutations in SEPN1 and LMNA were less frequent (6.25% and 5.95%, respectively). Conclusions: Our study provides for the first time comprehensive epidemiologic information and point prevalence figures for each of the major diagnostic categories on a large cohort of congenital muscular dystrophies. The study also reflects the diagnostic progress in this field with an accurate classification of the cases according to the most recent gene discoveries. PMID:25653289

  19. Exon Snipping in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kemaladewi, Dwi U; Cohn, Ronald D

    2016-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a life-limiting neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the DMD gene encoding dystrophin. We discuss very recent studies that used CRISPR/Cas9 technology to 'snip out' mutated exons in DMD, restoring the reading frame of the gene. We also present cautionary aspects of translating this exciting technology into clinical practice. PMID:26856237

  20. Nutrition Considerations in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jillian; Samuels, Emily; Mullins, Lucille

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a serious degenerative muscular disease affecting males. Diagnosis usually occurs in childhood and is confirmed through genetic testing and/or muscle biopsy. Accompanying the disease are several nutrition-related concerns: growth, body composition, energy and protein requirements, constipation, swallowing difficulties, bone health, and complementary medicine. This review article addresses the nutrition aspects of DMD. PMID:25977513

  1. Visuospatial Attention Disturbance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares; do Valle, Luiz Eduardo Ribeiro; Resende, Maria Bernadete Dutra; Pinto, Katia Osternack

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive deficits present in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are not yet well characterized. Attention, considered to be the brain mechanism responsible for the selection of sensory stimuli, could be disturbed in DMD, contributing, at least partially, to the observed global cognitive deficit. The aim of this study was to…

  2. Cardiomyopathy in becker muscular dystrophy: Overview

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Rady; Nguyen, My-Le; Mather, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder involving mutations of the dystrophin gene. Cardiac involvement in BMD has been described and cardiomyopathy represents the number one cause of death in these patients. In this paper, the pathophysiology, clinical evaluations and management of cardiomyopathy in patients with BMD will be discussed. PMID:27354892

  3. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: From Diagnosis to Therapy.

    PubMed

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Scotton, Chiara; Passarelli, Chiara; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited neuromuscular disorder due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. It is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting due to the absence of dystrophin protein that causes degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. The molecular diagnostic of DMD involves a deletions/duplications analysis performed by quantitative technique such as microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH), Multiple Ligation Probe Assay MLPA. Since traditional methods for detection of point mutations and other sequence variants require high cost and are time consuming, especially for a large gene like dystrophin, the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has become a useful tool available for clinical diagnosis. The dystrophin gene is large and finely regulated in terms of tissue expression, and RNA processing and editing includes a variety of fine tuned processes. At present, there are no effective treatments and the steroids are the only fully approved drugs used in DMD therapy able to slow disease progression. In the last years, an increasing variety of strategies have been studied as a possible therapeutic approach aimed to restore dystrophin production and to preserve muscle mass, ameliorating the DMD phenotype. RNA is the most studied target for the development of clinical strategies and Antisense Oligonucleotides (AONs) are the most used molecules for RNA modulation. The identification of delivery system to enhance the efficacy and to reduce the toxicity of AON is the main purpose in this area and nanomaterials are a very promising model as DNA/RNA molecules vectors. Dystrophinopathies therefore represent a pivotal field of investigation, which has opened novel avenues in molecular biology, medical genetics and novel therapeutic options. PMID:26457695

  4. Muscular dystrophies due to glycosylation defects.

    PubMed

    Muntoni, Francesco; Torelli, Silvia; Brockington, Martin

    2008-10-01

    In the last few years, muscular dystrophies due to reduced glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (ADG) have emerged as a common group of conditions, now referred to as dystroglycanopathies. Mutations in six genes (POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, Fukutin, FKRP and LARGE) have so far been identified in patients with a dystroglycanopathy. Allelic mutations in each of these genes can result in a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from severe congenital onset with associated structural brain malformations (Walker Warburg syndrome; muscle-eye-brain disease; Fukuyama muscular dystrophy; congenital muscular dystrophy type 1D) to a relatively milder congenital variant with no brain involvement (congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C), and to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2 variants with onset in childhood or adult life (LGMD2I, LGMD2L, and LGMD2N). ADG is a peripheral membrane protein that undergoes multiple and complex glycosylation steps to regulate its ability to effectively interact with extracellular matrix proteins, such as laminin, agrin, and perlecan. Although the precise composition of the glycans present on ADG are not known, it has been demonstrated that the forced overexpression of LARGE, or its paralog LARGE2, is capable of increasing the glycosylation of ADG in normal cells. In addition, its overexpression is capable of restoring dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding properties in primary cell cultures of patients affected by different genetically defined dystroglycanopathy variants. These observations suggest that there could be a role for therapeutic strategies to overcome the glycosylation defect in these conditions via the overexpression of LARGE. PMID:19019316

  5. Na+ Dysregulation Coupled with Ca2+ Entry through NCX1 Promotes Muscular Dystrophy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Adam R.; Millay, Douglas P.; Goonasekera, Sanjeewa A.; Park, Ki Ho; Sargent, Michelle A.; Collins, James; Altamirano, Francisco; Philipson, Kenneth D.; Allen, Paul D.; Ma, Jianjie; López, José Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Unregulated Ca2+ entry is thought to underlie muscular dystrophy. Here, we generated skeletal-muscle-specific transgenic (TG) mice expressing the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger 1 (NCX1) to model its identified augmentation during muscular dystrophy. The NCX1 transgene induced dystrophy-like disease in all hind-limb musculature, as well as exacerbated the muscle disease phenotypes in δ-sarcoglycan (Sgcd−/−), Dysf−/−, and mdx mouse models of muscular dystrophy. Antithetically, muscle-specific deletion of the Slc8a1 (NCX1) gene diminished hind-limb pathology in Sgcd−/− mice. Measured increases in baseline Na+ and Ca2+ in dystrophic muscle fibers of the hind-limb musculature predicts a net Ca2+ influx state due to reverse-mode operation of NCX1, which mediates disease. However, the opposite effect is observed in the diaphragm, where NCX1 overexpression mildly protects from dystrophic disease through a predicted enhancement in forward-mode NCX1 operation that reduces Ca2+ levels. Indeed, Atp1a2+/− (encoding Na+-K+ ATPase α2) mice, which have reduced Na+ clearance rates that would favor NCX1 reverse-mode operation, showed exacerbated disease in the hind limbs of NCX1 TG mice, similar to treatment with the Na+-K+ ATPase inhibitor digoxin. Treatment of Sgcd−/− mice with ranolazine, a broadly acting Na+ channel inhibitor that should increase NCX1 forward-mode operation, reduced muscular pathology. PMID:24662047

  6. Na+ dysregulation coupled with Ca2+ entry through NCX1 promotes muscular dystrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Burr, Adam R; Millay, Douglas P; Goonasekera, Sanjeewa A; Park, Ki Ho; Sargent, Michelle A; Collins, James; Altamirano, Francisco; Philipson, Kenneth D; Allen, Paul D; Ma, Jianjie; López, José Rafael; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2014-06-01

    Unregulated Ca(2+) entry is thought to underlie muscular dystrophy. Here, we generated skeletal-muscle-specific transgenic (TG) mice expressing the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger 1 (NCX1) to model its identified augmentation during muscular dystrophy. The NCX1 transgene induced dystrophy-like disease in all hind-limb musculature, as well as exacerbated the muscle disease phenotypes in δ-sarcoglycan (Sgcd(-/-)), Dysf(-/-), and mdx mouse models of muscular dystrophy. Antithetically, muscle-specific deletion of the Slc8a1 (NCX1) gene diminished hind-limb pathology in Sgcd(-/-) mice. Measured increases in baseline Na(+) and Ca(2+) in dystrophic muscle fibers of the hind-limb musculature predicts a net Ca(2+) influx state due to reverse-mode operation of NCX1, which mediates disease. However, the opposite effect is observed in the diaphragm, where NCX1 overexpression mildly protects from dystrophic disease through a predicted enhancement in forward-mode NCX1 operation that reduces Ca(2+) levels. Indeed, Atp1a2(+/-) (encoding Na(+)-K(+) ATPase α2) mice, which have reduced Na(+) clearance rates that would favor NCX1 reverse-mode operation, showed exacerbated disease in the hind limbs of NCX1 TG mice, similar to treatment with the Na(+)-K(+) ATPase inhibitor digoxin. Treatment of Sgcd(-/-) mice with ranolazine, a broadly acting Na(+) channel inhibitor that should increase NCX1 forward-mode operation, reduced muscular pathology. PMID:24662047

  7. Understanding the impact of genetic testing for inherited retinal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Combs, Ryan; McAllister, Marion; Payne, Katherine; Lowndes, Jo; Devery, Sophie; Webster, Andrew R; Downes, Susan M; Moore, Anthony T; Ramsden, Simon; Black, Graeme; Hall, Georgina

    2013-11-01

    The capability of genetic technologies is expanding rapidly in the field of inherited eye disease. New genetic testing approaches will deliver a step change in the ability to diagnose and extend the possibility of targeted treatments. However, evidence is lacking about the benefits of genetic testing to support service planning. Here, we report qualitative data about retinal dystrophy families' experiences of genetic testing in United Kingdom. The data were part of a wider study examining genetic eye service provision. Twenty interviewees from families in which a causative mutation had been identified by a genetic eye clinic were recruited to the study. Fourteen interviewees had chosen to have a genetic test and five had not; one was uncertain. In-depth telephone interviews were conducted allowing a thorough exploration of interviewees' views and experiences of the benefits of genetic counselling and testing. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Both affected and unaffected interviewees expressed mainly positive views about genetic testing, highlighting benefits such as diagnostic confirmation, risk information, and better preparation for the future. Negative consequences included the burden of knowledge, moral dilemmas around reproduction, and potential impact on insurance. The offer of genetic testing was often taken up, but was felt unnecessary in some cases. Interviewees in the study reported many benefits, suggesting genetic testing should be available to this patient group. The benefits and risks identified will inform future evaluation of models of service delivery. This research was part of a wider study exploring experiences of families with retinal dystrophy. PMID:23403902

  8. Phase 3 Study of Ataluren in Patients With Nonsense Mutation Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-02

    Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne; Muscular Dystrophies; Muscular Disorders, Atrophic; Muscular Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Neuromuscular Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

  9. Cathepsin S Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Muscular Dystrophy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tjondrokoesoemo, Andoria; Schips, Tobias G; Sargent, Michelle A; Vanhoutte, Davy; Kanisicak, Onur; Prasad, Vikram; Lin, Suh-Chin J; Maillet, Marjorie; Molkentin, Jeffery D

    2016-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin. Loss of dystrophin protein compromises the stability of the sarcolemma membrane surrounding each muscle cell fiber, leading to membrane ruptures and leakiness that induces myofiber necrosis, a subsequent inflammatory response, and progressive tissue fibrosis with loss of functional capacity. Cathepsin S (Ctss) is a cysteine protease that is actively secreted in areas of tissue injury and ongoing inflammation, where it participates in extracellular matrix remodeling and healing. Here we show significant induction of Ctss expression and proteolytic activity following acute muscle injury or in muscle from mdx mice, a model of DMD. To examine the functional ramifications associated with greater Ctss expression, the Ctss gene was deleted in the mdx genetic background, resulting in protection from muscular dystrophy pathogenesis that included reduced myofiber turnover and histopathology, reduced fibrosis, and improved running capacity. Mechanistically, deletion of the Ctss gene in the mdx background significantly increased myofiber sarcolemmal membrane stability with greater expression and membrane localization of utrophin, integrins, and β-dystroglycan, which anchor the membrane to the basal lamina and underlying cytoskeletal proteins. Consistent with these results, skeletal muscle-specific transgenic mice overexpressing Ctss showed increased myofiber necrosis, muscle histopathology, and a functional deficit reminiscent of muscular dystrophy. Hence, Ctss induction during muscular dystrophy is a pathologic event that partially underlies disease pathogenesis, and its inhibition might serve as a new therapeutic strategy in DMD. PMID:26966179

  10. SIRT1: A Novel Target for the Treatment of Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, Atsushi; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are inherited myogenic disorders accompanied by progressive skeletal muscle weakness and degeneration. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy and is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. The treatment for DMD is limited to glucocorticoids, which are associated with multiple side effects. Thus, the identification of novel therapeutic targets is urgently needed. SIRT1 is an NAD+-dependent histone/protein deacetylase that plays roles in diverse cellular processes, including stress resistance and cell survival. Studies have shown that SIRT1 activation provides beneficial effects in the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse, a model of DMD. SIRT1 activation leads to the attenuation of oxidative stress and inflammation, a shift from the fast to slow myofiber phenotype, and the suppression of tissue fibrosis. Although further research is needed to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective role of SIRT1 in mdx mice, we propose SIRT1 as a novel therapeutic target for patients with muscular dystrophies. PMID:27073590

  11. Serum Osteopontin as a Novel Biomarker for Muscle Regeneration in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Kimura, En; Nagata, Tetsuya; Okada, Takashi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Tachimori, Hisateru; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Imamura, Michihiro; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2016-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X-linked muscle disorder. We have already reported that osteopontin (OPN), an inflammatory cytokine and myogenic factor, is expressed in the early dystrophic phase in canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan, a dystrophic dog model. To further explore the possibility of OPN as a new biomarker for disease activity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we monitored serum OPN levels in dystrophic and wild-type dogs at different ages and compared the levels to other serum markers, such as serum creatine kinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1. Serum OPN levels in the dystrophic dogs were significantly elevated compared with those in wild-type dogs before and 1 hour after a cesarean section birth and at the age of 3 months. The serum OPN level was significantly correlated with the phenotypic severity of dystrophic dogs at the period corresponding to the onset of muscle weakness, whereas other serum markers including creatine kinase were not. Immunohistologically, OPN was up-regulated in infiltrating macrophages and developmental myosin heavy chain-positive regenerating muscle fibers in the dystrophic dogs, whereas serum OPN was highly elevated. OPN expression was also observed during the synergic muscle regeneration process induced by cardiotoxin injection. In conclusion, OPN is a promising biomarker for muscle regeneration in dystrophic dogs and can be applicable to boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:26963343

  12. Pathogenesis of axonal dystrophy and demyelination in αA-crystallin-expressing transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Van Rijk, AF; Sweers, MAM; Merkx, GFM; Lammens, M; Bloemendal, H

    2003-01-01

    We recently described a transgenic mouse strain overexpressing hamster αA-crystallin, a small heat shock protein, under direction of the hamster vimentin promoter. As a result myelin was degraded and axonal dystrophy in both central nervous system (especially spinal cord) and peripheral nervous system occurred. Homozygous transgenic mice developed hind limb paralysis after 8 weeks of age and displayed progressive loss of myelin and axonal dystrophy in both the central and peripheral nervous system with ongoing age. Pathologically the phenotype resembled, to a certain extent, neuroaxonal dystrophy. The biochemical findings presented in this paper (activity of the enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and transglutamase, myelin protein zero expression levels and blood sugar levels) confirm this pathology and exclude other putative pathologies like Amyothrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy. Consequently, an excessive cytoplasmic accumulation of the transgenic protein or a disturbance of the normal metabolism are considered to cause the observed neuropathology. Therefore, extra-ocular αA-crystallin-expressing transgenic mice may serve as a useful animal model to study neuroaxonal dystrophy. PMID:12801283

  13. Assessment of resveratrol, apocynin and taurine on mechanical-metabolic uncoupling and oxidative stress in a mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy: A comparison with the gold standard, α-methyl prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Capogrosso, Roberta Francesca; Cozzoli, Anna; Mantuano, Paola; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Massari, Ada Maria; Sblendorio, Valeriana Teresa; De Bellis, Michela; Tamma, Roberto; Giustino, Arcangela; Nico, Beatrice; Montagnani, Monica; De Luca, Annamaria

    2016-04-01

    Antioxidants have a great potential as adjuvant therapeutics in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, although systematic comparisons at pre-clinical level are limited. The present study is a head-to-head assessment, in the exercised mdx mouse model of DMD, of natural compounds, resveratrol and apocynin, and of the amino acid taurine, in comparison with the gold standard α-methyl prednisolone (PDN). The rationale was to target the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via disease-related pathways that are worsened by mechanical-metabolic impairment such as inflammation and over-activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX) (taurine and apocynin, respectively) or the failing ROS detoxification mechanisms via sirtuin-1 (SIRT1)-peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) (resveratrol). Resveratrol (100mg/kg i.p. 5days/week), apocynin (38mg/kg/day per os), taurine (1g/kg/day per os), and PDN (1mg/kg i.p., 5days/week) were administered for 4-5 weeks to mdx mice in parallel with a standard protocol of treadmill exercise and the outcome was evaluated with a multidisciplinary approach in vivo and ex vivo on pathology-related end-points and biomarkers of oxidative stress. Resveratrol≥taurine>apocynin enhanced in vivo mouse force similarly to PDN. All the compounds reduced the production of superoxide anion, assessed by dihydroethidium staining, with apocynin being as effective as PDN, and ameliorated electrophysiological biomarkers of oxidative stress. Resveratrol also significantly reduced plasma levels of creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase. Force of isolated muscles was little ameliorated. However, the three compounds improved histopathology of gastrocnemius muscle more than PDN. Taurine>apocynin>PDN significantly decreased activated NF-kB positive myofibers. Thus, compounds targeting NOX-ROS or SIRT1/PGC-1α pathways differently modulate clinically relevant DMD-related endpoints according to their mechanism of action. With the

  14. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Muscular Dystrophy Patients: Efficient Integration-free Reprogramming of Urine Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad Z.; Strande, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Dystrophic cardiomyopathy is a poorly understood consequence of muscular dystrophy. Generating induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) from patients with muscular dystrophy is an invaluable cellular source for in vitro disease model systems and can be used for drug screening studies. Patient-derived urine cells have been used in successful reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem cells in order to model dystrophic cardiomyopathy1. Addressing the safety concerns of integrating vector systems, we present a protocol using a non-integrating Sendai virus vector for transduction of Yamanaka factors into urine cells collected from patients with muscular dystrophy. This protocol generates fully reprogrammed clones within 2–3 weeks. The pluripotent cells are vector-free by passage-13. These dystrophic iPSCs can be differentiated into cardiomyocytes and used either to study disease mechanisms or for drug screening. PMID:25650629

  15. Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD): Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kanitkar, Shubhangi A; Kalyan, Meenakshi; Gaikwad, Anu N; Makadia, Ankit; Shah, Harshad

    2015-01-01

    We report a young male of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with positive family history presented with gradual onset proximal muscle weakness in all four limbs since eight years and thinning of shoulders, arms and thighs. Neurological examination revealed atrophy of both shoulders with wasting of both deltoids thinning of thighs and pseudo hypertrophy of both calves, hypotonia in all four limbs. Gower's sign was positive. Winging of scapula was present. Power was 3/5 at both shoulders, 4/5 at both elbows, 5/5 at both wrists, 3/5 at both hip joints, 3/5 at both knees, 5/5 at both ankles. All deep tendon reflexes and superficial reflexes were present with plantars bilateral flexors. Electromyography (EMG) showed myopathic pattern. He had elevated creatinine phosphokinase levels and muscle biopsy findings consistent with muscular dystrophy. PMID:25738022

  16. Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vedana, Gustavo; Villarreal, Guadalupe; Jun, Albert S

    2016-01-01

    Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) is the most common corneal dystrophy and frequently results in vision loss. Hallmarks of the disease include loss of corneal endothelial cells and formation of excrescences of Descemet’s membrane. Later stages involve all layers of the cornea. Impairment of endothelial barrier and pump function and cell death from oxidative and unfolded protein stress contribute to disease progression. The genetic basis of FECD includes numerous genes and chromosomal loci, although alterations in the transcription factor 4 gene are associated with the majority of cases. Definitive treatment of FECD is corneal transplantation. In this paper, we highlight advances that have been made in understanding FECD’s clinical features, pathophysiology, and genetics. We also discuss recent advances in endothelial keratoplasty and potential future treatments. PMID:26937169

  17. Therapeutics Development in Myotonic Dystrophy Type I

    PubMed Central

    Foff, Erin Pennock; Mahadevan, Mani S.

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM1), the most common adult muscular dystrophy, is a multi-system, autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by an expanded CTG repeat that leads to nuclear retention of a mutant RNA and subsequent RNA toxicity. Significant insights into the molecular mechanisms of RNA toxicity have led to the surprising possibility that treating DM1 is a viable prospect. In this review, we briefly present the clinical picture in DM1, and describe how the research in understanding the pathogenesis of RNA toxicity in DM1 has led to targeted approaches to therapeutic development at various steps in the pathogenesis of the disease. We discuss the promise and current limitations of each with an emphasis on RNA-based therapeutics and small molecules. We conclude with a discussion of the unmet need for clinical tools and outcome measures that are essential prerequisites to proceed in evaluating these potential therapies in clinical trials. PMID:21607985

  18. Caveolae and caveolin-3 in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, F; Razani, B; Lisanti, M P

    2001-10-01

    Caveolae are vesicular invaginations of the plasma membrane, and function as 'message centers' for regulating signal transduction events. Caveolin-3, a muscle-specific caveolin-related protein, is the principal structural protein of caveolar membrane domains in skeletal muscle and in the heart. Several mutations within the coding sequence of the human caveolin-3 gene (located at 3p25) have been identified. Mutations that lead to a loss of approximately 95% of caveolin-3 protein expression are responsible for a novel autosomal dominant form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD-1C) in humans. By contrast, upregulation of the caveolin-3 protein is associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Thus, tight regulation of caveolin-3 appears essential for maintaining normal muscle health and homeostasis. PMID:11597517

  19. Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD): Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kalyan, Meenakshi; Gaikwad, Anu N.; Makadia, Ankit; Shah, Harshad

    2015-01-01

    We report a young male of autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) with positive family history presented with gradual onset proximal muscle weakness in all four limbs since eight years and thinning of shoulders, arms and thighs. Neurological examination revealed atrophy of both shoulders with wasting of both deltoids thinning of thighs and pseudo hypertrophy of both calves, hypotonia in all four limbs. Gower’s sign was positive. Winging of scapula was present. Power was 3/5 at both shoulders, 4/5 at both elbows, 5/5 at both wrists, 3/5 at both hip joints, 3/5 at both knees, 5/5 at both ankles. All deep tendon reflexes and superficial reflexes were present with plantars bilateral flexors. Electromyography (EMG) showed myopathic pattern. He had elevated creatinine phosphokinase levels and muscle biopsy findings consistent with muscular dystrophy. PMID:25738022

  20. Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy: Case Report and Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Joseph; Michaels, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is often cited as the third most common form of muscular dystrophy. Therefore, it should be considered in patients with complaints of progressive weakness. We present the case of a man with facial, truncal, and leg weakness that initially sought medical attention for lower back pain. Electrodiagnostic testing revealed findings in the trapezius, serratus anterior, biceps, triceps, pectoralis major, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles consistent with a myopathic disorder. Subsequent genetic testing identified a FSHD allele size consistent with a FSHD deletion mutation. Therefore, confirming the diagnosis of FSHD. Unfortunately, no effective treatments currently exist for FSHD. However, supportive measures involving physical therapy and the use of orthotics may aid in improving function and mobility. PMID:18815862

  1. In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing Corrects Retinal Dystrophy in the S334ter-3 Rat Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Bakondi, Benjamin; Lv, Wenjian; Lu, Bin; Jones, Melissa K; Tsai, Yuchun; Kim, Kevin J; Levy, Rachelle; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J; Svendsen, Clive N; Wang, Shaomei

    2016-03-01

    Reliable genome editing via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 may provide a means to correct inherited diseases in patients. As proof of principle, we show that CRISPR/Cas9 can be used in vivo to selectively ablate the rhodopsin gene carrying the dominant S334ter mutation (Rho(S334)) in rats that model severe autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A single subretinal injection of guide RNA/Cas9 plasmid in combination with electroporation generated allele-specific disruption of Rho(S334), which prevented retinal degeneration and improved visual function. PMID:26666451

  2. In Vivo CRISPR/Cas9 Gene Editing Corrects Retinal Dystrophy in the S334ter-3 Rat Model of Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Bakondi, Benjamin; Lv, Wenjian; Lu, Bin; Jones, Melissa K; Tsai, Yuchun; Kim, Kevin J; Levy, Rachelle; Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J; Svendsen, Clive N; Wang, Shaomei

    2016-01-01

    Reliable genome editing via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 may provide a means to correct inherited diseases in patients. As proof of principle, we show that CRISPR/Cas9 can be used in vivo to selectively ablate the rhodopsin gene carrying the dominant S334ter mutation (RhoS334) in rats that model severe autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. A single subretinal injection of guide RNA/Cas9 plasmid in combination with electroporation generated allele-specific disruption of RhoS334, which prevented retinal degeneration and improved visual function. PMID:26666451

  3. A case of fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy misdiagnosed as Becker's muscular dystrophy for 20 years.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Vesper Fe Marie Llaneza; Thaisetthawatkul, Pariwat

    2012-03-01

    A 60-year-old man diagnosed clinically with Becker's muscular dystrophy 20 years ago by another physician presented with gradually progressive proximal muscle weakness since teenage years. Family history revealed a strong paternal familial inheritance pattern of similar distribution of weakness-face, forearm flexion, knee extension and foot dorsiflexion. Work-ups revealed B12 deficiency and allele 1 deletion in fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) DNA testing. FSHD is the third most common muscular dystrophy. Clinical diagnosis is made from the distinctive pattern of weakness, autosomal-dominant inheritance, and confirmed by genetic testing. This case strongly demonstrates the importance of a thorough and careful clinical evaluation even in a case with a long standing diagnosis. PMID:21795275

  4. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and its role in the pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy 1.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, Perla; Llagostera, Esther

    2008-11-01

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (DM1) is an autosomal, dominant inherited, neuromuscular disorder. The DM1 mutation consists in the expansion of an unstable CTG-repeat in the 3'-untranslated region of a gene encoding DMPK (myotonic dystrophy protein kinase). Clinical expression of DM1 is variable, presenting a progressive muscular dystrophy that affects distal muscles more than proximal and is associated with the inability to relax muscles appropriately (myotonia), cataracts, cardiac arrhythmia, testicular atrophy and insulin resistance. DMPK is a Ser/Thr protein kinase homologous to the p21-activated kinases MRCK and ROCK/rho-kinase/ROK. The most abundant isoform of DMPK is an 80 kDa protein mainly expressed in smooth, skeletal and cardiac muscles. Decreased DMPK protein levels may contribute to the pathology of DM1, as revealed by gene target studies. Here we review current understanding of the structural, functional and pathophysiological characteristics of DMPK. PMID:18583094

  5. A Nonsense Variant in COL6A1 in Landseer Dogs with Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Frank; Bilzer, Thomas; Brands, Jan; Golini, Lorenzo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Wiedmer, Michaela; Drögemüller, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-12-01

    A novel canine muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs was observed. We had access to five affected dogs from two litters. The clinical signs started at a few weeks of age, and the severe progressive muscle weakness led to euthanasia between 5 and 15 months of age. The pedigrees of the affected dogs suggested a monogenic autosomal-recessive inheritance of the trait. Linkage and homozygosity mapping indicated two potential genome segments for the causative variant on chromosomes 10 and 31 harboring a total of 4.8 Mb of DNA or 0.2% of the canine genome. Using the Illumina sequencing technology, we obtained a whole-genome sequence from one affected Landseer. Variants were called with respect to the dog reference genome and compared with the genetic variants of 170 control dogs from other breeds. The affected Landseer dog was homozygous for a single, private nonsynonymous variant in the critical intervals, a nonsense variant in the COL6A1 gene (Chr31:39,303,964G>T; COL6A1:c.289G>T; p.E97*). Genotypes at this variant showed perfect concordance with the muscular dystrophy phenotype in all five cases and more than 1000 control dogs. Variants in the human COL6A1 gene cause Bethlem myopathy or Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. We therefore conclude that the identified canine COL6A1 variant is most likely causative for the observed muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs. On the basis of the nature of the genetic variant in Landseer dogs and their severe clinical phenotype these dogs represent a model for human Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. PMID:26438297

  6. A Nonsense Variant in COL6A1 in Landseer Dogs with Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Frank; Bilzer, Thomas; Brands, Jan; Golini, Lorenzo; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Wiedmer, Michaela; Drögemüller, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-01-01

    A novel canine muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs was observed. We had access to five affected dogs from two litters. The clinical signs started at a few weeks of age, and the severe progressive muscle weakness led to euthanasia between 5 and 15 months of age. The pedigrees of the affected dogs suggested a monogenic autosomal-recessive inheritance of the trait. Linkage and homozygosity mapping indicated two potential genome segments for the causative variant on chromosomes 10 and 31 harboring a total of 4.8 Mb of DNA or 0.2% of the canine genome. Using the Illumina sequencing technology, we obtained a whole-genome sequence from one affected Landseer. Variants were called with respect to the dog reference genome and compared with the genetic variants of 170 control dogs from other breeds. The affected Landseer dog was homozygous for a single, private nonsynonymous variant in the critical intervals, a nonsense variant in the COL6A1 gene (Chr31:39,303,964G>T; COL6A1:c.289G>T; p.E97*). Genotypes at this variant showed perfect concordance with the muscular dystrophy phenotype in all five cases and more than 1000 control dogs. Variants in the human COL6A1 gene cause Bethlem myopathy or Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. We therefore conclude that the identified canine COL6A1 variant is most likely causative for the observed muscular dystrophy in Landseer dogs. On the basis of the nature of the genetic variant in Landseer dogs and their severe clinical phenotype these dogs represent a model for human Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. PMID:26438297

  7. Mutational spectrum of Korean patients with corneal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chae, H; Kim, M; Kim, Y; Kim, J; Kwon, A; Choi, H; Park, J; Jang, W; Lee, Y S; Park, S H; Kim, M S

    2016-06-01

    Corneal dystrophy typically refers to a group of rare hereditary disorders with a heterogeneous genetic background. A comprehensive molecular genetic analysis was performed to characterize the genetic spectrum of corneal dystrophies in Korean patients. Patients with various corneal dystrophies underwent thorough ophthalmic examination, histopathologic examination, and Sanger sequencing. A total of 120 probands were included, with a mean age of 50 years (SD = 18 years) and 70% were female. A total of 26 mutations in five genes (14 clearly pathogenic and 12 likely pathogenic) were identified in 49 probands (41%). Epithelial-stromal TGFBI dystrophies, macular corneal dystrophy and Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD) showed 100% mutation detection rates, while endothelial corneal dystrophies showed lower detection rates of 3%. Twenty six non-duplicate mutations including eight novel mutations were identified and mutations associated with SCD were identified genetically for the first time in this population. This study provides a comprehensive characterization of the genetic aberrations in Korean patients and also highlights the diagnostic value of molecular genetic analysis in corneal dystrophies. PMID:26748743

  8. Modulation of myoblast fusion by caveolin-3 in dystrophic skeletal muscle cells: implications for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-1C.

    PubMed

    Volonte, Daniela; Peoples, Aaron J; Galbiati, Ferruccio

    2003-10-01

    Caveolae are vesicular invaginations of the plasma membrane. Caveolin-3 is the principal structural component of caveolae in skeletal muscle cells in vivo. We have recently generated caveolin-3 transgenic mice and demonstrated that overexpression of wild-type caveolin-3 in skeletal muscle fibers is sufficient to induce a Duchenne-like muscular dystrophy phenotype. In addition, we have shown that caveolin-3 null mice display mild muscle fiber degeneration and T-tubule system abnormalities. These data are consistent with the mild phenotype observed in Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy-1C (LGMD-1C) in humans, characterized by a approximately 95% reduction of caveolin-3 expression. Thus, caveolin-3 transgenic and null mice represent valid mouse models to study Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and LGMD-1C, respectively, in humans. Here, we derived conditionally immortalized precursor skeletal muscle cells from caveolin-3 transgenic and null mice. We show that overexpression of caveolin-3 inhibits myoblast fusion to multinucleated myotubes and lack of caveolin-3 enhances the fusion process. M-cadherin and microtubules have been proposed to mediate the fusion of myoblasts to myotubes. Interestingly, we show that M-cadherin is downregulated in caveolin-3 transgenic cells and upregulated in caveolin-3 null cells. For the first time, variations of M-cadherin expression have been linked to a muscular dystrophy phenotype. In addition, we demonstrate that microtubules are disorganized in caveolin-3 null myotubes, indicating the importance of the cytoskeleton network in mediating the phenotype observed in these cells. Taken together, these results propose caveolin-3 as a key player in myoblast fusion and suggest that defects of the fusion process may represent additional molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of DMD and LGMD-1C in humans. PMID:14517320

  9. Dental characteristics of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Symons, A L; Townsend, G C; Hughes, T E

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the dental characteristics of 23 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was carried out, based on dental records, oral examinations and dental models. Decreasing muscle function was associated with increased plaque and calculus accumulation, leading to gingival inflammation, but caries experience was low. Disturbances in tooth form, number and eruption of the second premolars were observed in 39% of patients. Anterior and posterior open bites were common, associated with lip incompetence, mouth breathing, macroglossia and tongue thrusting. Maxillary and mandibular arch breadths were significantly larger, on average, in the DMD group than in controls. Rather than a normal parabolic arch form, the dental arches in DMD patients tended to be hyperbolic, with the posterior teeth being displaced buccally, consistent with an imbalance between the lingual and facial musculature. PMID:12613312

  10. Journey into muscular dystrophies caused by abnormal glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Muntoni, Francesco

    2004-09-01

    An increasing number of genes encoding for putative or demonstrated glycosyltransferases are being associated with muscular dystrophies of variable severity, ranging from severe congenital onset and associated structural eye and brain changes, to relatively mild forms with onset into adulthood. Five of these genes (POMT1; POMGnT1; FXRP; Fukutin; LARGE) encode for proteins involved in the glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan and, indeed, abnormal glycosylation of this molecule is a common finding in all the respective conditions (Walker Warburg syndrome; Muscle-Eye-Brain disease; congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C and Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 21; Fukuyama muscular dystrophy; congenital muscular dystrophy type 1D). A 6th gene, GNE, responsible for the hereditary form of inclusion body myositis, encodes for a glycosyltransferase the substrate(s) of which is, however, still unclear. This article provides an overview of the clinical, biochemical and genetic features of this group of disorders. PMID:15605948

  11. Consensus statement on standard of care for congenital muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching H; Bonnemann, Carsten G; Rutkowski, Anne; Sejersen, Thomas; Bellini, Jonathan; Battista, Vanessa; Florence, Julaine M; Schara, Ulrike; Schuler, Pamela M; Wahbi, Karim; Aloysius, Annie; Bash, Robert O; Béroud, Christophe; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Cohn, Ronald D; Connolly, Anne M; Deconinck, Nicolas; Desguerre, Isabelle; Eagle, Michelle; Estournet-Mathiaud, Brigitte; Ferreiro, Ana; Fujak, Albert; Goemans, Nathalie; Iannaccone, Susan T; Jouinot, Patricia; Main, Marion; Melacini, Paola; Mueller-Felber, Wolfgang; Muntoni, Francesco; Nelson, Leslie L; Rahbek, Jes; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Sewry, Caroline; Storhaug, Kari; Simonds, Anita; Tseng, Brian; Vajsar, Jiri; Vianello, Andrea; Zeller, Reinhard

    2010-12-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies are a group of rare neuromuscular disorders with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of congenital muscular dystrophy have enabled better diagnosis. However, medical care for patients with congenital muscular dystrophy remains very diverse. Advances in many areas of medical technology have not been adopted in clinical practice. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy was established to identify current care issues, review literature for evidence-based practice, and achieve consensus on care recommendations in 7 areas: diagnosis, neurology, pulmonology, orthopedics/rehabilitation, gastroenterology/ nutrition/speech/oral care, cardiology, and palliative care. To achieve consensus on the care recommendations, 2 separate online surveys were conducted to poll opinions from experts in the field and from congenital muscular dystrophy families. The final consensus was achieved in a 3-day workshop conducted in Brussels, Belgium, in November 2009. This consensus statement describes the care recommendations from this committee. PMID:21078917

  12. First Identification of a Triple Corneal Dystrophy Association: Keratoconus, Epithelial Basement Membrane Corneal Dystrophy and Fuchs’ Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mazzotta, Cosimo; Traversi, Claudio; Raiskup, Frederik; Rizzo, Caterina Lo; Renieri, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the observation of a triple corneal dystrophy association consisting of keratoconus (KC), epithelial basement membrane corneal dystrophy (EBMCD) and Fuchs’ endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD). Methods A 55-year-old male patient was referred to our cornea service for blurred vision and recurrent foreign body sensation. He reported bilateral recurrent corneal erosions with diurnal visual fluctuations. He underwent corneal biomicroscopy, Scheimpflug tomography, in vivo HRT confocal laser scanning microscopy and genetic testing for TGFBI and ZEB1 mutations using direct DNA sequencing. Results Biomicroscopic examination revealed the presence of subepithelial central and paracentral corneal opacities. The endothelium showed a bilateral flecked appearance, and the posterior corneal curvature suggested a possible concomitant ectatic disorder. Corneal tomography confirmed the presence of a stage II KC in both eyes. In vivo confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed a concomitant bilateral EBMCD with hyperreflective deposits in basal epithelial cells, subbasal Bowman's layer microfolds and ridges with truncated subbasal nerves as pseudodendritic elements. Stromal analysis revealed honeycomb edematous areas, and the endothelium showed a strawberry surface configuration typical of FECD. The genetic analysis resulted negative for TGFBI mutations and positive for a heterozygous mutation in exon 7 of the gene ZEB1. Conclusion This is the first case reported in the literature in which KC, EBMCD and FECD are present in the same patient and associated with ZEB1 gene mutation. The triple association was previously established by means of morphological analysis of the cornea using corneal Scheimpflug tomography and in vivo HRT II confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:25408666

  13. Dynamic thoracoplasty for asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kaddoura, I L; Obeid, M Y; Mroueh, S M; Nasser, A A

    2001-11-01

    The life-saving procedures to expand the chests of infants born with Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy provide a static solution incapable of responding to the growth demands of thriving patients. We describe an instrument that provided a dynamic solution for an infant, where an initial methyl methacrylate midsternotomy spacer placed at 4 months of age was followed at 11 months with recurrence of his difficulties. At 8 months after the second operation the patient was stable and thriving with no recurrence of symptoms. The instrument modifications, limitations, and possible complications are described. PMID:11722089

  14. Exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kole, Ryszard; Krieg, Arthur M

    2015-06-29

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused mostly by internal deletions in the gene for dystrophin, a protein essential for maintaining muscle cell membrane integrity. These deletions abrogate the reading frame and the lack of dystrophin results in progressive muscle deterioration. DMD patients experience progressive loss of ambulation, followed by a need for assisted ventilation, and eventual death in mid-twenties. By the method of exon skipping in dystrophin pre-mRNA the reading frame is restored and the internally deleted but functional dystrophin is produced. Two oligonucleotide drugs that induce desired exon skipping are currently in advanced clinical trials. PMID:25980936

  15. Noncoding RNAs: Emerging Players in Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The fascinating world of noncoding RNAs has recently come to light, thanks to the development of powerful sequencing technologies, revealing a variety of RNA molecules playing important regulatory functions in most, if not all, cellular processes. Many noncoding RNAs have been implicated in regulatory networks that are determinant for skeletal muscle differentiation and disease. In this review, we outline the noncoding RNAs involved in physiological mechanisms of myogenesis and those that appear dysregulated in muscle dystrophies, also discussing their potential use as disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:24729974

  16. [Current status and future prospects of research on Fukuyama muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Toda, Tatsushi

    2015-08-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy(FCMD) is a second common childhood muscular dystrophy in Japan. All FCMD patients have ancestral insertion of the SVA retrotransposal element into fukutin. We show that aberrant mRNA splicing induced by SVA exon-trapping caused FCMD. Introduction of 3 cocktailed antisense oligonucleotides(AONs) targeting around these splice sites prevented pathogenic splicing in FCMD patient cells and model mice, and normalized protein production and functions of Fukutin as well as O-glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. We show the promise of splicing modulation therapy as the first radical clinical treatment for FCMD in the near future. We also show that fukutin is prerequisite to ameliorate muscular dystrophic phenotype by myofiber-selective LARGE expression. Recent advances in FCMD are discussed. PMID:26281700

  17. Dystrophin Gene Replacement and Gene Repair Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in 2016: An Interview.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-03-01

    After years of relentless efforts, gene therapy has now begun to deliver its therapeutic promise in several diseases. A number of gene therapy products have received regulatory approval in Europe and Asia. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited lethal muscle disease. It is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Replacing and/or repairing the mutated dystrophin gene holds great promises to treated DMD at the genetic level. Last several years have evidenced significant developments in preclinical experimentations in murine and canine models of DMD. There has been a strong interest in moving these promising findings to clinical trials. In light of rapid progress in this field, the Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) recently interviewed me on the current status of DMD gene therapy and readiness for clinical trials. Here I summarized the interview with PPMD. PMID:27003751

  18. Progress and prospects of next-generation sequencing testing for inherited retinal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, John (Pei-Wen); Lamey, Tina; McLaren, Terri; Thompson, Jennifer A; Montgomery, Hannah; De Roach, John

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing, also known as massively paralleled sequencing, offers an unprecedented opportunity to study disease mechanisms of inherited retinal dystrophies: a dramatic change from a few years ago. The specific involvement of the retina and the manageable number of genes to sequence make inherited retinal dystrophies an attractive model to study genotype–phenotype correlations. Costs are reducing rapidly and the current overall mutation detection rate of approximately 60% offers real potential for personalized medicine and treatments. This report addresses the challenges ahead, which include: better understanding of the mutation mechanisms of syndromic genes in apparent non-syndromic patients; finding mutations in patients who have tested negative or inconclusive; better variant calling, especially for intronic and synonymous variants; more precise genotype–phenotype correlations and making genetic testing more broadly accessible. PMID:26394700

  19. Immobilization of Dystrophin and Laminin α2-Chain Deficient Zebrafish Larvae In Vivo Prevents the Development of Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Arner, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are often caused by genetic alterations in the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex or its extracellular ligands. These structures are associated with the cell membrane and provide mechanical links between the cytoskeleton and the matrix. Mechanical stress is considered a pathological mechanism and muscle immobilization has been shown to be beneficial in some mouse models of muscular dystrophy. The zebrafish enables novel and less complex models to examine the effects of extended immobilization or muscle relaxation in vivo in different dystrophy models. We have examined effects of immobilization in larvae from two zebrafish strains with muscular dystrophy, the Sapje dystrophin-deficient and the Candyfloss laminin α2-chain-deficient strains. Larvae (4 days post fertilization, dpf) of both mutants have significantly lower active force in vitro, alterations in the muscle structure with gaps between muscle fibers and altered birefringence patterns compared to their normal siblings. Complete immobilization (18 hrs to 4 dpf) was achieved using a small molecular inhibitor of actin-myosin interaction (BTS, 50 μM). This treatment resulted in a significantly weaker active contraction at 4 dpf in both mutated larvae and normal siblings, most likely reflecting a general effect of immobilization on myofibrillogenesis. The immobilization also significantly reduced the structural damage in the mutated strains, showing that muscle activity is an important pathological mechanism. Following one-day washout of BTS, muscle tension partly recovered in the Candyfloss siblings and caused structural damage in these mutants, indicating activity-induced muscle recovery and damage, respectively. PMID:26536238

  20. Immobilization of Dystrophin and Laminin α2-Chain Deficient Zebrafish Larvae In Vivo Prevents the Development of Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei; Arner, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are often caused by genetic alterations in the dystrophin-dystroglycan complex or its extracellular ligands. These structures are associated with the cell membrane and provide mechanical links between the cytoskeleton and the matrix. Mechanical stress is considered a pathological mechanism and muscle immobilization has been shown to be beneficial in some mouse models of muscular dystrophy. The zebrafish enables novel and less complex models to examine the effects of extended immobilization or muscle relaxation in vivo in different dystrophy models. We have examined effects of immobilization in larvae from two zebrafish strains with muscular dystrophy, the Sapje dystrophin-deficient and the Candyfloss laminin α2-chain-deficient strains. Larvae (4 days post fertilization, dpf) of both mutants have significantly lower active force in vitro, alterations in the muscle structure with gaps between muscle fibers and altered birefringence patterns compared to their normal siblings. Complete immobilization (18 hrs to 4 dpf) was achieved using a small molecular inhibitor of actin-myosin interaction (BTS, 50 μM). This treatment resulted in a significantly weaker active contraction at 4 dpf in both mutated larvae and normal siblings, most likely reflecting a general effect of immobilization on myofibrillogenesis. The immobilization also significantly reduced the structural damage in the mutated strains, showing that muscle activity is an important pathological mechanism. Following one-day washout of BTS, muscle tension partly recovered in the Candyfloss siblings and caused structural damage in these mutants, indicating activity-induced muscle recovery and damage, respectively. PMID:26536238

  1. [Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy and related alpha-dystroglycanopathies].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Terumi; Nishino, Ichizo

    2008-10-01

    Alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG) is a glycoprotein that binds to laminin in the basal lamina and helps provide mechanical support. A group of muscular dystrophies are caused by glycosylation defects of alpha-DG and are hence collectively called alpha-dystroglycanopathy (alpha-DGP). Alpha-DGP is clinically characterized by a combination of muscular dystrophies, structural brain anomalies, and ocular involvement. So far, 6 causative genes have been identified: LARGE, POMGNT1, POMT1, POMT2, FKRP, and FKTN. Initially, alpha-DGP was classified under congenital muscular dystrophies; however, the clinical phenotype is now expanded to include a markedly wide spectrum ranging from the most severe, lethal congenital muscular dystrophy with severe brain deformity to the mildest limb girdle muscular dystrophy with minimal muscle weakness. This is exemplified by Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), which is the most prevalent alpha-DGP in Japan, and is caused by mutations in FKTN. FCMD is clinically characterized by a triad of mental retardation, brain deformities, and congenital muscular dystrophy, and a majority of FCMD patients have a homozygous 3-kb retrotransposal insertion in the 3'non-coding region. Typically, they are able to sit but never attain independent ambulation in their lives. Recently, a patient from Turkey harboring homozygous 1-bp insertion reportedly showed a severe brain deformity with hydrocephalus and died 10 days after birth. In contrast, the mildest FKTN phenotype, LGMD2L, was identified in 6 cases from 4 families in Japan. These patients harbored compound heterozygous mutation with 3-kb retrotransposal insertion in the 3'non-coding region and a novel missense mutation in the coding region. Clinically, these patients presented with minimal muscle weakness and dilated cardiomyopathy and had normal intelligence. These data clearly indicate that FKTN mutations can cause a broad spectrum of muscular dystrophies. Therefore, clinicians should always

  2. Memory or amnesia: the dilemma of stem cell therapy in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Muscular dystrophies are monogenetic diseases that are often characterized by the degeneration of both cardiac and skeletal muscle. Gene therapy to correct the mutated gene has shown promise in both animal models and clinical trials; however, current gene delivery strategies are limited to the introduction of the corrected gene into only one tissue. Strategies to target multiple striated muscle types would provide a much-needed improvement for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In this issue of the JCI, Quattrocelli and colleagues demonstrate that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with a myogenic propensity are able to engraft into both cardiac and skeletal muscles. The authors also identified a novel pool of mesodermal iPSC-derived progenitors (MiPs). Moreover, the authors show that these MiPs are amenable to gene correction and can restore function in murine dystrophic models. Together, the results of this study provide an important advance in improving gene delivery to treat patients with muscular dystrophy. PMID:26571391

  3. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 or Steinert's disease.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 (DM1) is the most common worldwide autosomal dominant muscular dystrophy due to polynucleotide [CTG]( n ) triplet expansion located on the 3'UTR of chromosome 19q13.3. A toxic gain-of-function of abnormally stored RNA in the nuclei of affected cells is assumed to be responsible for several clinical features of the disease. It plays a basic role in deregulating RNA binding protein levels and in several mRNA splicing processes of several genes, thus leading to the multisystemic features typical of DM1. In DM1, the musculoskeletal apparatus, heart, brain, eye, endocrine, respiratory and gastroenteric systems are involved with variable levels of severity. DM1 onset can be congenital, juvenile, adult or late. DM1 can be diagnosed on the grounds of clinical presentation (distal muscular atrophy and weakness, grip and percussion myotonia, ptosis, hatchet face, slurred speech, rhinolalia), EMG myotonic pattern, EKG (such as AV-blocks) or routine blood test abnormalities (such as increased CK values or hypogamma-globulinemia) and history of cataract. Its confirmation can come by DNA analysis. At present, only symptomatic therapy is possible and is addressed at correcting hormonal and glycemic balance, removing cataract, preventing respiratory failure and, above all, major cardiac disturbances. Efficacious therapies targeted at the pathogenic mechanism of DM1 are not yet available, while studies that seek to block toxic RNA intranuclear storage with specific molecules are still ongoing. PMID:22411247

  4. Emerging Drugs for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Vinod; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Mendell, Jerry R.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common, severe childhood form of muscular dystrophy. Treatment is limited to glucocorticoids that have the benefit of prolonging ambulation by approximately 2 years and preventing scoliosis. Finding a more satisfactory treatment should focus on maintaining long-term efficacy with a minimal side effect profile. Areas covered Authors discuss different therapeutic strategies that have been used in pre-clinical and clinical settings. Expert opinion Multiple treatment approaches have emerged. Most attractive are molecular-based therapies that can express the missing dystrophin protein (exon skipping or mutation suppression) or a surrogate gene product (utrophin). Other approaches include increasing the strength of muscles (myostatin inhibitors), reducing muscle fibrosis, and decreasing oxidative stress. Additional targets include inhibiting NF-κB to reduce inflammation, or promoting skeletal muscle blood flow and muscle contractility using phosphodiesterase inhibitors or nitric oxide (NO) donors. The potential for each of these treatment strategies to enter clinical trials is a central theme of discussion. The review emphasizes that the goal of treatment should be to find a product at least as good as glucocorticoids with a lower side effect profile or with a significant glucocorticoid sparing effect. PMID:22632414

  5. Cardiac findings in congenital muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Ramaciotti, Claudio; Wang, Ching H; Wahbi, Karim; Rosenthal, David; Duboc, Denis; Melacini, Paola

    2010-09-01

    Cardiac involvement (CI) in congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) has been only rarely investigated so far. By means of a systematic literature search we reviewed the literature about CI in CMD and found that CI is apparently absent in Ullrich CMD or CMD with integrin deficiency and only mild in Bethlem CMD. CI in merosin deficiency includes dilated cardiomyopathy and systolic dysfunction. CI in dystroglycanopathies seems most prevalent among all CMDs and includes dilated cardiomyopathy, systolic dysfunction, and myocardial fibrosis in Fukuyama CMD. Among the nonspecified dystroglycanopathies, CI manifests as dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (CMP) or systolic dysfunction. With CMD type 1C, as well as with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I, up to half of the patients develop dilated cardiomyopathy. In rigid-spine syndrome, predominantly the right heart is affected secondary to thoracic deformity. In patients who carry LMNA mutations, CI may manifest as dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or fatal ventricular arrhythmias. Overall, CI in patients with CMD varies considerably between the different CMD types from absent or mild CI to severe cardiac disease, particularly in merosin deficiency, dystroglycanopathies, and laminopathies. Patients with CMD with CI require regular cardiologic surveillance so that severe, treatable cardiac disease is not overlooked. PMID:20679303

  6. Upper Girdle Imaging in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Iannaccone, Elisabetta; Laschena, Francesco; Ottaviani, Pierfrancesco; Leoncini, Emanuele; Boccia, Stefania; Galluzzi, Giuliana; Pelliccioni, Marco; Masciullo, Marcella; Frusciante, Roberto; Mercuri, Eugenio; Ricci, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    Background In Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), the upper girdle is early involved and often difficult to assess only relying on physical examination. Our aim was to evaluate the pattern and degree of involvement of upper girdle muscles in FSHD compared with other muscle diseases with scapular girdle impairment. Methods We propose an MRI protocol evaluating neck and upper girdle muscles. One hundred-eight consecutive symptomatic FSHD patients and 45 patients affected by muscular dystrophies and myopathies with prominent upper girdle involvement underwent this protocol. Acquired scans were retrospectively analyzed. Results The trapezius (100% of the patients) and serratus anterior (85% of the patients) were the most and earliest affected muscles in FSHD, followed by the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major, whilst spinati and subscapularis (involved in less than 4% of the patients) were consistently spared even in late disease stages. Asymmetry and hyperintensities on short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences were common features, and STIR hyperintensities could also be found in muscles not showing signs of fatty replacement. The overall involvement appears to be disease-specific in FSHD as it significantly differed from that encountered in the other myopathies. Conclusions The detailed knowledge of single muscle involvement provides useful information for correctly evaluating patients' motor function and to set a baseline for natural history studies. Upper girdle imaging can also be used as an additional tool helpful in supporting the diagnosis of FSHD in unclear situations, and may contribute with hints on the currently largely unknown molecular pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:24932477

  7. Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy for Inherited Retinal Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Gerard, Xavier; Garanto, Alejandro; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Collin, Rob W J

    2016-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) are an extremely heterogeneous group of genetic diseases for which currently no effective treatment strategies exist. Over the last decade, significant progress has been made utilizing gene augmentation therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD, although several technical challenges so far prevent a broad clinical application of this approach for other forms of IRD. Many of the mutations leading to these retinal diseases affect pre-mRNA splicing of the mutated genes . Antisense oligonucleotide (AON)-mediated splice modulation appears to be a powerful approach to correct the consequences of such mutations at the pre-mRNA level , as demonstrated by promising results in clinical trials for several inherited disorders like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, hypercholesterolemia and various types of cancer. In this mini-review, we summarize ongoing pre-clinical research on AON-based therapy for a few genetic subtypes of IRD , speculate on other potential therapeutic targets, and discuss the opportunities and challenges that lie ahead to translate splice modulation therapy for retinal disorders to the clinic. PMID:26427454

  8. Developments in gene therapy for muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hartigan-O'Connor, D; Chamberlain, J S

    Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy (MD) presents significant challenges, including the large amount of muscle tissue in the body, the large size of many genes defective in different muscular dystrophies, and the possibility of a host immune response against the therapeutic gene. Overcoming these challenges requires the development and delivery of suitable gene transfer vectors. Encouraging progress has been made in modifying adenovirus (Ad) vectors to reduce immune response and increase capacity. Recently developed gutted Ad vectors can deliver full-length dystrophin cDNA expression vectors to muscle tissue. Using muscle-specific promoters to drive dystrophin expression, a strong immune response has not been observed in mdx mice. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can deliver small genes to muscle without provocation of a significant immune response, which should allow long-term expression of several MD genes. AAV vectors have also been used to deliver sarcoglycan genes to entire muscle groups. These advances and others reviewed here suggest that barriers to gene therapy for MD are surmountable. PMID:10679969

  9. Congenital muscular dystrophy with inflammation: Diagnostic considerations

    PubMed Central

    Konkay, Kaumudi; Kannan, Meena Angamuthu; Lingappa, Lokesh; Uppin, Megha S.; Challa, Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Muscle biopsy features of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) vary from usual dystrophic picture to normal or nonspecific myopathic picture or prominent fibrosis or striking inflammatory infiltrate, which may lead to diagnostic errors. A series of patients of CMD with significant inflammatory infiltrates on muscle biopsy were correlated with laminin α2 deficiency on immunohistochemistry (IHC). Material and Methods: Cryostat sections of muscle biopsies from the patients diagnosed as CMD on clinical and muscle biopsy features from 1996 to 2014 were reviewed with hematoxylin and eosin(H&E), enzyme and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with laminin α2. Muscle biopsies with inflammatory infiltrate were correlated with laminin α2 deficiency. Results: There were 65 patients of CMD, with inflammation on muscle biopsy in 16. IHC with laminin α2 was available in nine patients, of which six showed complete absence along sarcolemma (five presented with floppy infant syndrome and one with delayed motor milestones) and three showed discontinuous, and less intense staining. Conclusions: CMD show variable degrees of inflammation on muscle biopsy. A diagnosis of laminin α2 deficient CMD should be considered in patients of muscular dystrophy with inflammation, in children with hypotonia/delayed motor milestones. PMID:27570388

  10. Diagnostic Odyssey of Patients with Myotonic Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, James E.; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Day, John W.; Luebbe, Elizabeth A.; Martens, William B.; McDermott, Michael P.; Tawil, Rabi; Thornton, Charles A.; Moxley, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    The onset and symptoms of the myotonic dystrophies are diverse, complicating their diagnoses and limiting a comprehensive approach to their clinical care. This report analyzes the diagnostic delay (time from onset of first symptom to diagnosis) in a large sample of myotonic dystrophy (DM) patients enrolled in the US National Registry [679 DM type 1 (DM1) and 135 DM type 2 (DM2) patients]. Age of onset averaged 34.0 ± 14.1 years in DM2 patients compared to 26.1 ± 13.2 years in DM1 (p<0.0001). The most common initial symptom in DM2 patients was leg weakness (32.6%) compared to grip myotonia in DM1 (38.3%). Pain was reported as the first symptom in 11.1% of DM2 and 3.0% of DM1 patients (p<0.0001). Reaching the correct diagnosis in DM2 took 14 years on average (double the time compared to DM1) and a significantly higher percentage of patients underwent extended workup including electromyography, muscle biopsies, and finally genetic testing. DM patients who were index cases experienced similar diagnostic delays to non-index cases of DM. Further evaluation of how to shorten these diagnostic delays and limit their impact on burdens of disease, family planning, and symptom management is needed. PMID:23807151

  11. Benign muscular dystrophy: risk calculation in families with consanguinity.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, G; Müller, C R; Grimm, T

    1989-01-01

    This report concerns two families in which the index patients are sporadic cases of a benign form of muscular dystrophy. In both families the sisters of the patients have married a close relative. The respective risks for a child of these consanguineous marriages being affected with either X linked Becker muscular dystrophy or autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy is calculated using pedigree information, results of serum creatine kinase determinations, and also, in one family, results of DNA typing using RFLPs from the short arm of the X chromosome. PMID:2732990

  12. Birdshot chorioretinopathy in a male patient with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Papavasileiou, Evangelia; Lobo, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of birdshot chorioretinopathy (BSCR) in a patient with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). A 40-year-old male with history of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy with significant facial diplegia and lagophthalmos presents for an evaluation of bilateral choroiditis with vasculitis and optic disc edema. Clinical examination included fundus and autofluorescence photographs, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography. To our knowledge, this patient represents the first reported case of birdshot chorioretinopathy with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Patients with FSHD can present with ocular findings and should be screened with dilated fundus examinations for retinal vascular changes and posterior uveitis. PMID:25861398

  13. Bilateral cloudy cornea: is the usual suspect congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy or stromal dystrophy?

    PubMed

    Acar, Banu Torun; Bozkurt, Kansu Tahir; Duman, Erkan; Acar, Suphi

    2016-01-01

    We provide the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up period of a patient with cloudy cornea in both eyes from birth. A 4-year-old girl presented with blurring in both eyes. Penetrating keratoplasty (PK) was performed with the preliminary diagnosis of congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy in June 2012. According to the pathology report for extracted host tissue, the Descemet's membrane (DM) and endothelium were healthy and diagnosis was reported to be congenital hereditary stromal dystrophy. Deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty was performed on the left eye. The DM was transparent at follow-up. Cornea transplantation is the only choice to provide visual rehabilitation in children with congenital cloudy cornea. However, it is known that the prognosis of traditional PK in the paediatric age group is not good. Therefore, when using alternative keratoplasty (deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty, Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty) options, pathological examination of the host tissue should be made. PMID:27107055

  14. Biallelic Mutations in the Autophagy Regulator DRAM2 Cause Retinal Dystrophy with Early Macular Involvement

    PubMed Central

    El-Asrag, Mohammed E.; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; McKibbin, Martin; Plagnol, Vincent; Sheridan, Eamonn; Waseem, Naushin; Abdelhamed, Zakia; McKeefry, Declan; Van Schil, Kristof; Poulter, James A.; Black, Graeme; Hall, Georgina; Ingram, Stuart; Gillespie, Rachel; Ramsden, Simon; Manson, Forbes; Hardcastle, Alison; Michaelides, Michel; Cheetham, Michael; Arno, Gavin; Thomas, Niclas; Bhattacharya, Shomi; Moore, Tony; Nemeth, Andrea; Downes, Susan; Lise, Stefano; Lord, Emma; Johnson, Colin A.; Carr, Ian M.; Leroy, Bart P.; De Baere, Elfride; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Webster, Andrew R.; Toomes, Carmel; Ali, Manir

    2015-01-01

    Retinal dystrophies are an overlapping group of genetically heterogeneous conditions resulting from mutations in more than 250 genes. Here we describe five families affected by an adult-onset retinal dystrophy with early macular involvement and associated central visual loss in the third or fourth decade of life. Affected individuals were found to harbor disease-causing variants in DRAM2 (DNA-damage regulated autophagy modulator protein 2). Homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing in a large, consanguineous British family of Pakistani origin revealed a homozygous frameshift variant (c.140delG [p.Gly47Valfs∗3]) in nine affected family members. Sanger sequencing of DRAM2 in 322 unrelated probands with retinal dystrophy revealed one European subject with compound heterozygous DRAM2 changes (c.494G>A [p.Trp165∗] and c.131G>A [p.Ser44Asn]). Inspection of previously generated exome sequencing data in unsolved retinal dystrophy cases identified a homozygous variant in an individual of Indian origin (c.64_66del [p.Ala22del]). Independently, a gene-based case-control association study was conducted via an exome sequencing dataset of 18 phenotypically similar case subjects and 1,917 control subjects. Using a recessive model and a binomial test for rare, presumed biallelic, variants, we found DRAM2 to be the most statistically enriched gene; one subject was a homozygote (c.362A>T [p.His121Leu]) and another a compound heterozygote (c.79T>C [p.Tyr27His] and c.217_225del [p.Val73_Tyr75del]). DRAM2 encodes a transmembrane lysosomal protein thought to play a role in the initiation of autophagy. Immunohistochemical analysis showed DRAM2 localization to photoreceptor inner segments and to the apical surface of retinal pigment epithelial cells where it might be involved in the process of photoreceptor renewal and recycling to preserve visual function. PMID:25983245

  15. Biallelic mutations in the autophagy regulator DRAM2 cause retinal dystrophy with early macular involvement.

    PubMed

    El-Asrag, Mohammed E; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; McKibbin, Martin; Plagnol, Vincent; Sheridan, Eamonn; Waseem, Naushin; Abdelhamed, Zakia; McKeefry, Declan; Van Schil, Kristof; Poulter, James A; Johnson, Colin A; Carr, Ian M; Leroy, Bart P; De Baere, Elfride; Inglehearn, Chris F; Webster, Andrew R; Toomes, Carmel; Ali, Manir

    2015-06-01

    Retinal dystrophies are an overlapping group of genetically heterogeneous conditions resulting from mutations in more than 250 genes. Here we describe five families affected by an adult-onset retinal dystrophy with early macular involvement and associated central visual loss in the third or fourth decade of life. Affected individuals were found to harbor disease-causing variants in DRAM2 (DNA-damage regulated autophagy modulator protein 2). Homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing in a large, consanguineous British family of Pakistani origin revealed a homozygous frameshift variant (c.140delG [p.Gly47Valfs(∗)3]) in nine affected family members. Sanger sequencing of DRAM2 in 322 unrelated probands with retinal dystrophy revealed one European subject with compound heterozygous DRAM2 changes (c.494G>A [p.Trp165(∗)] and c.131G>A [p.Ser44Asn]). Inspection of previously generated exome sequencing data in unsolved retinal dystrophy cases identified a homozygous variant in an individual of Indian origin (c.64_66del [p.Ala22del]). Independently, a gene-based case-control association study was conducted via an exome sequencing dataset of 18 phenotypically similar case subjects and 1,917 control subjects. Using a recessive model and a binomial test for rare, presumed biallelic, variants, we found DRAM2 to be the most statistically enriched gene; one subject was a homozygote (c.362A>T [p.His121Leu]) and another a compound heterozygote (c.79T>C [p.Tyr27His] and c.217_225del [p.Val73_Tyr75del]). DRAM2 encodes a transmembrane lysosomal protein thought to play a role in the initiation of autophagy. Immunohistochemical analysis showed DRAM2 localization to photoreceptor inner segments and to the apical surface of retinal pigment epithelial cells where it might be involved in the process of photoreceptor renewal and recycling to preserve visual function. PMID:25983245

  16. Therapeutic possibilities in the autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate

    2008-10-01

    Fourteen years ago, the first disease-causing mutation in a form of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy was reported. Since then the number of genes has been extended to at least 14 and the phenotypic spectrum has been broadened. The generation of mouse models helped to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease and also served to study therapeutic possibilities. All autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies are rare diseases, which is one reason why there have been so very few controlled clinical trials. Other reasons are insufficient natural history data and the lack of standardized assessment criteria and validated outcome measures. Currently, therapeutic possibilities are mainly restricted to symptomatic treatment and the treatment of disease complications. On the other hand, new efforts in translational research and the development of molecular therapeutic approaches suggest that more promising clinical trials will be carried out in autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy in the next several years. PMID:19019315

  17. Rapamycin nanoparticles target defective autophagy in muscular dystrophy to enhance both strength and cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Bibee, Kristin P.; Cheng, Ya-Jian; Ching, James K.; Marsh, Jon N.; Li, Allison J.; Keeling, Richard M.; Connolly, Anne M.; Golumbek, Paul T.; Myerson, Jacob W.; Hu, Grace; Chen, Junjie; Shannon, William D.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Weihl, Conrad C.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy in boys progresses rapidly to severe impairment of muscle function and death in the second or third decade of life. Current supportive therapy with corticosteroids results in a modest increase in strength as a consequence of a general reduction in inflammation, albeit with potential untoward long-term side effects and ultimate failure of the agent to maintain strength. Here, we demonstrate that alternative approaches that rescue defective autophagy in mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, with the use of rapamycin-loaded nanoparticles induce a reproducible increase in both skeletal muscle strength and cardiac contractile performance that is not achievable with conventional oral rapamycin, even in pharmacological doses. This increase in physical performance occurs in both young and adult mice, and, surprisingly, even in aged wild-type mice, which sets the stage for consideration of systemic therapies to facilitate improved cell function by autophagic disposal of toxic byproducts of cell death and regeneration.—Bibee, K. P., Cheng, Y.-J., Ching, J. K., Marsh, J. N., Li, A. J., Keeling, R. M., Connolly, A. M., Golumbek, P. T., Myerson, J. W., Hu, G., Chen, J., Shannon, W. D., Lanza, G. M., Weihl, C. C., Wickline, S. A. Rapamycin nanoparticles target defective autophagy in muscular dystrophy to enhance both strength and cardiac function. PMID:24500923

  18. Regulatory T cells suppress muscle inflammation and injury in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Villalta, S. Armando; Rosenthal, Wendy; Martinez, Leonel; Kaur, Amanjot; Sparwasser, Tim; Tidball, James G.; Margeta, Marta; Spencer, Melissa J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that regulatory T cells (Tregs) modulate muscle injury and inflammation in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although Tregs were largely absent in the muscle of wildtype mice and normal human muscle, they were present in necrotic lesions, displayed an activated phenotype and showed increased expression of interleukin (IL)-10 in dystrophic muscle from mdx mice. Depletion of Tregs exacerbated muscle injury and the severity of muscle inflammation, which was characterized by an enhanced interferon-gamma (IFNγ) response and activation of M1 macrophages. To test the therapeutic value of targeting Tregs in muscular dystrophy, we treated mdx mice with IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes (IL-2c), and found that Tregs and IL-10 concentrations were increased in muscle, resulting in reduced expression of cyclooygenase-2 and decreased myofiber injury. These findings suggest that Tregs modulate the progression of muscular dystrophy by suppressing type 1 inflammation in muscle associated with muscle fiber injury, and highlight the potential of Treg-modulating agents as therapeutics for DMD. PMID:25320234

  19. Muscular dystrophy associated with alpha-dystroglycan deficiency in Sphynx and Devon Rex cats.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul T; Shelton, G Diane; Dickinson, Peter J; Sturges, Beverly K; Xu, Rui; LeCouteur, Richard A; Guo, Ling T; Grahn, Robert A; Lo, Harriet P; North, Kathryn N; Malik, Richard; Engvall, Eva; Lyons, Leslie A

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies have identified a number of forms of muscular dystrophy, termed dystroglycanopathies, which are associated with loss of natively glycosylated alpha-dystroglycan. Here we identify a new animal model for this class of disorders in Sphynx and Devon Rex cats. Affected cats displayed a slowly progressive myopathy with clinical and histologic hallmarks of muscular dystrophy including skeletal muscle weakness with no involvement of peripheral nerves or CNS. Skeletal muscles had myopathic features and reduced expression of alpha-dystroglycan, while beta-dystroglycan, sarcoglycans, and dystrophin were expressed at normal levels. In the Sphynx cat, analysis of laminin and lectin binding capacity demonstrated no loss in overall glycosylation or ligand binding for the alpha-dystroglycan protein, only a loss of protein expression. A reduction in laminin-alpha2 expression in the basal lamina surrounding skeletal myofibers was also observed. Sequence analysis of translated regions of the feline dystroglycan gene (DAG1) in affected cats did not identify a causative mutation, and levels of DAG1 mRNA determined by real-time QRT-PCR did not differ significantly from normal controls. Reduction in the levels of glycosylated alpha-dystroglycan by immunoblot was also identified in an affected Devon Rex cat. These data suggest that muscular dystrophy in Sphynx and Devon Rex cats results from a deficiency in alpha-dystroglycan protein expression, and as such may represent a new type of dystroglycanopathy where expression, but not glycosylation, is affected. PMID:18990577

  20. Genome- and Cell-Based Strategies in Therapy of Muscular Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Saada, Y Bou; Dib, Carla; Lipinski, M; Vassetzky, Y S

    2016-07-01

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic disorders characterized by progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass. Depending on the muscular dystrophy, the muscle weakness varies in degree of severity. The majority of myopathies are due to genetic events leading to a loss of function of key genes involved in muscle function. Although there is until now no curative treatment to stop the progression of most myopathies, a significant number of experimental gene- and cell-based strategies and approaches have been and are being tested in vitro and in animal models, aiming to restore gene function. Genome editing using programmable endonucleases is a powerful tool for modifying target genome sequences and has been extensively used over the last decade to correct in vitro genetic defects of many single-gene diseases. By inducing double-strand breaks (DSBs), the engineered endonucleases specifically target chosen sequences. These DSBs are spontaneously repaired either by homologous recombination in the presence of a sequence template, or by nonhomologous-end joining error prone repair. In this review, we highlight recent developments and challenges for genome-editing based strategies that hold great promise for muscular dystrophies and regenerative medicine. PMID:27449614

  1. Genetics Home Reference: limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy , accounting for about 30 percent of cases. Dysferlinopathy, also ... be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic Conditions Diagnosis & Management These resources address the diagnosis or management of ...

  2. An integrated approach in a case of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Muscle fatigue, weakness and atrophy are basilar clinical features that accompany facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) the third most common muscular dystrophy. No therapy is available for FSHD. Case presentation We describe the effects of 6mo exercise therapy and nutritional supplementation in a 43-year-old woman severely affected by FSHD. Conclusion A mixed exercise program combined with nutritional supplementation can be safely used with beneficial effects in selected patients with FSHD. PMID:24886582

  3. The genetics of Fuchs′ corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Iliff, Benjamin W; Riazuddin, S Amer; Gottsch, John D

    2013-01-01

    Fuchs′ corneal dystrophy (FCD) is a common late-onset genetic disorder of the corneal endothelium. It causes loss of endothelial cell density and excrescences in the Descemet membrane, eventually progressing to corneal edema, necessitating corneal transplantation. The genetic basis of FCD is complex and heterogeneous, demonstrating variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance. To date, three causal genes, ZEB1, SLC4A11 and LOXHD1, have been identified, representing a small proportion of the total genetic load of FCD. An additional four loci have been localized, including a region on chromosome 18 that is potentially responsible for a large proportion of all FCD cases. The elucidation of the causal genes underlying these loci will begin to clarify the pathogenesis of FCD and pave the way for the emergence of nonsurgical treatments. PMID:23585771

  4. Neuromuscular function in limb girdle dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Belanger, A Y; McComas, A J

    1985-01-01

    The contractile properties of ankle dorsiflexor and plantarflexor muscles in 20 patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy have been compared with those in matched controls. Twitch and voluntary torques were significantly smaller in the patient population and in nine patients it was impossible to record a twitch from tibialis anterior, a dorsiflexor muscle studied in detail. The disease process evidently ran a more rapid course in tibialis anterior than in plantarflexor muscles and this susceptibility was related to some aspect of the muscle other than its fibre type composition. Surviving fibres in dorsiflexor and plantarflexor muscles did not reveal evidence of excitation-contraction uncoupling; they exhibited normal post-activation potentiation and fatigue properties. Some patients were initially incapable of exciting their motor units maximally during voluntary contractions. A finding of possible pathogenetic significance was that one patient, with prominent calves, developed exceptionally large voluntary torque in his plantarflexor muscles. PMID:4087001

  5. Congenital Muscular Dystrophies: A Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Bertini, Enrico; D'Amico, Adele; Gualandi, Francesca; Petrini, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders with onset at birth or in infancy in which the muscle biopsy is compatible with a dystrophic myopathy. In the past 10 years, knowledge of neuromuscular disorders has dramatically increased, particularly with the exponential boost of disclosing the genetic background of CMDs. This review will highlight the clinical description of the most important forms of CMD, paying particular attention to the main keys for diagnostic approach. The diagnosis of CMDs requires the concurrence of expertise in multiple specialties (neurology, morphology, genetics, neuroradiology) available in a few centers worldwide that have achieved sufficient experience with the different CMD subtypes. Currently, molecular diagnosis is of paramount importance not only for phenotype-genotype correlations, genetic and prenatal counseling, and prognosis and aspects of management, but also concerning the imminent availability of clinical trials and treatments. PMID:22172424

  6. [MD-NET--muscular dystrophy network].

    PubMed

    Lochmüller, H; Straub, V

    2007-12-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) constitute a group of inherited disorders characterized by progressive weakness of skeletal and sometimes cardiac muscle. MD are rare disorders affecting approximately 26,000 to 40,000 people in Germany based on a pre valence of 1:2000 to 1:3000 (estimate of the Association Française contre les Myopathies, AFM) and a population of 80 million people residing in Germany. More than 30 forms of MD are recognized today caused by different genetic defects. Based on the symptoms of an individual patient the underlying genetic defect cannot be determined, since all MD have the following in common: Muscle fibers are destroyed and become replaced by fatty and fibrous tissue. Various forms of MD are caused by defects of proteins residing in the sarcolemma, the cell membrane of muscle fibers. Other forms are caused by defects of proteins that are associated to the nucleus, to the sarcomer or the cytoplasm. Moreover, there are numerous forms where the exact molecular defect is unknown to date. Even though the underlying defect is known for many MD, the pathogenic process that leads to the decay of musculature is poorly understood. At present, MD cannot be cured. MD are treated by physiotherapy, surgery and medication that may delay progression. Symptomatic therapy such as cardiac pace makers may be life-saving and improve quality of life in many patients. For optimizing research into the MD, a network, the muscular dystrophy network or MD-NET, was initiated and has been supported by the German ministry of education and research (BMBF) since 2003. PMID:18026885

  7. Experimental Treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gets Boost from Existing Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2013 March 2013 (historical) Experimental Treatment for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gets Boost from Existing Medication A readily available ... effects of a promising experimental treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), according to research partially funded by the ...

  8. NIH study shows increased risk for two types of myotonic muscular dystrophy

    Cancer.gov

    Adults with a form of muscular dystrophy called myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) may be at increased risk of developing cancer, according to a study by investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health.

  9. Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapy: Lost in translation?

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    A milestone of molecular medicine is the identification of dystrophin gene mutation as the cause of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Over the last 2 decades, major advances in dystrophin biology and gene delivery technology have created an opportunity to treat DMD with gene therapy. Remarkable success has been achieved in treating dystrophic mice. Several gene therapy strategies, including plasmid transfer, exon skipping, and adeno-associated virus-mediated microdystrophin therapy, have entered clinical trials. However, therapeutic benefit has not been realized in DMD patients. Bridging the gap between mice and humans is no doubt the most pressing issue facing DMD gene therapy now. In contrast to mice, dystrophin-deficient dogs are genetically and phenotypically similar to human patients. Preliminary gene therapy studies in the canine model may offer critical insights that cannot be obtained from murine studies. It is clear that the canine DMD model may represent an important link between mice and humans. Unfortunately, our current knowledge of dystrophic dogs is limited, and the full picture of disease progression remains to be clearly defined. We also lack rigorous outcome measures (such as in situ force measurement) to monitor therapeutic efficacy in dystrophic dogs. Undoubtedly, maintaining a dystrophic dog colony is technically demanding, and the cost of dog studies cannot be underestimated. A carefully coordinated effort from the entire DMD community is needed to make the best use of the precious dog resource. Successful DMD gene therapy may depend on valid translational studies in dystrophin-deficient dogs. PMID:21691429

  10. Mouse fukutin deletion impairs dystroglycan processing and recapitulates muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Beedle, Aaron M.; Turner, Amy J.; Saito, Yoshiaki; Lueck, John D.; Foltz, Steven J.; Fortunato, Marisa J.; Nienaber, Patricia M.; Campbell, Kevin P.

    2012-01-01

    Dystroglycan is a transmembrane glycoprotein that links the extracellular basement membrane to cytoplasmic dystrophin. Disruption of the extensive carbohydrate structure normally present on α-dystroglycan causes an array of congenital and limb girdle muscular dystrophies known as dystroglycanopathies. The essential role of dystroglycan in development has hampered elucidation of the mechanisms underlying dystroglycanopathies. Here, we developed a dystroglycanopathy mouse model using inducible or muscle-specific promoters to conditionally disrupt fukutin (Fktn), a gene required for dystroglycan processing. In conditional Fktn-KO mice, we observed a near absence of functionally glycosylated dystroglycan within 18 days of gene deletion. Twenty-week-old KO mice showed clear dystrophic histopathology and a defect in glycosylation near the dystroglycan O-mannose phosphate, whether onset of Fktn excision driven by muscle-specific promoters occurred at E8 or E17. However, the earlier gene deletion resulted in more severe phenotypes, with a faster onset of damage and weakness, reduced weight and viability, and regenerating fibers of smaller size. The dependence of phenotype severity on the developmental timing of muscle Fktn deletion supports a role for dystroglycan in muscle development or differentiation. Moreover, given that this conditional Fktn-KO mouse allows the generation of tissue- and timing-specific defects in dystroglycan glycosylation, avoids embryonic lethality, and produces a phenotype resembling patient pathology, it is a promising new model for the study of secondary dystroglycanopathy. PMID:22922256

  11. Ex vivo gene editing of the dystrophin gene in muscle stem cells mediated by peptide nucleic acid single stranded oligodeoxynucleotides induces stable expression of dystrophin in a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nik-Ahd, Farnoosh; Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which result in the complete absence of dystrophin protein throughout the body. Gene correction strategies hold promise to treating DMD. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated the ability of peptide nucleic acid single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (PNA-ssODNs) to permanently correct single-point mutations at the genomic level. In this study, we show that PNA-ssODNs can target and correct muscle satellite cells (SCs), a population of stem cells capable of self-renewing and differentiating into muscle fibers. When transplanted into skeletal muscles, SCs transfected with correcting PNA-ssODNs were able to engraft and to restore dystrophin expression. The number of dystrophin-positive fibers was shown to significantly increase over time. Expression was confirmed to be the result of the activation of a subpopulation of SCs that had undergone repair as demonstrated by immunofluorescence analyses of engrafted muscles using antibodies specific to full-length dystrophin transcripts and by genomic DNA analysis of dystrophin-positive fibers. Furthermore, the increase in dystrophin expression detected over time resulted in a significant improvement in muscle morphology. The ability of transplanted cells to return into quiescence and to activate upon demand was confirmed in all engrafted muscles following injury. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using gene editing strategies to target and correct SCs and further establish the therapeutic potential of this approach to permanently restore dystrophin expression into muscle of DMD patients. PMID:24753122

  12. Vascular-targeted therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common muscular dystrophy and an X-linked recessive, progressive muscle wasting disease caused by the absence of a functional dystrophin protein. Dystrophin has a structural role as a cytoskeletal stabilization protein and protects cells against contraction-induced damage. Dystrophin also serves a signaling role through mechanotransduction of forces and localization of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), which produces nitric oxide (NO) to facilitate vasorelaxation. In DMD, the signaling defects produce inadequate tissue perfusion caused by functional ischemia due to a diminished ability to respond to shear stress induced endothelium-dependent dilation. Additionally, the structural defects seen in DMD render myocytes with an increased susceptibility to mechanical stress. The combination of both defects is necessary to generate myocyte damage, which induces successive rounds of myofiber degeneration and regeneration, loss of calcium homeostasis, chronic inflammatory response, fibrosis, and myonecrosis. In individuals with DMD, these processes inevitably cause loss of ambulation shortly after the first decade and an abbreviated life with death in the third or fourth decade due to cardio-respiratory anomalies. There is no known cure for DMD, and although the culpable gene has been identified for more than twenty years, research on treatments has produced few clinically relevant results. Several recent studies on novel DMD therapeutics are vascular targeted and focused on attenuating the inherent functional ischemia. One approach improves vasorelaxation capacity through pharmaceutical inhibition of either phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). Another approach increases the density of the underlying vascular network by inducing angiogenesis, and this has been accomplished through either direct delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or by downregulating the VEGF decoy

  13. FHL1 Reduces Dystrophy in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing FSHD Muscular Dystrophy Region Gene 1 (FRG1)

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Sandra J.; McGrath, Meagan J.; Sriratana, Absorn; Gehrig, Stefan M.; Lynch, Gordon S.; D’Arcy, Colleen E.; Price, John T.; McLean, Catriona A.; Tupler, Rossella; Mitchell, Christina A.

    2015-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1. PMID:25695429

  14. Compound loss of muscleblind-like function in myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuang-Yung; Li, Moyi; Manchanda, Mini; Batra, Ranjan; Charizanis, Konstantinos; Mohan, Apoorva; Warren, Sonisha A; Chamberlain, Christopher M; Finn, Dustin; Hong, Hannah; Ashraf, Hassan; Kasahara, Hideko; Ranum, Laura P W; Swanson, Maurice S

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is a multi-systemic disease that impacts cardiac and skeletal muscle as well as the central nervous system (CNS). DM is unusual because it is an RNA-mediated disorder due to the expression of toxic microsatellite expansion RNAs that alter the activities of RNA processing factors, including the muscleblind-like (MBNL) proteins. While these mutant RNAs inhibit MBNL1 splicing activity in heart and skeletal muscles, Mbnl1 knockout mice fail to recapitulate the full-range of DM symptoms in these tissues. Here, we generate mouse Mbnl compound knockouts to test the hypothesis that Mbnl2 functionally compensates for Mbnl1 loss. Although Mbnl1−/−; Mbnl2−/− double knockouts (DKOs) are embryonic lethal, Mbnl1−/−; Mbnl2+/− mice are viable but develop cardinal features of DM muscle disease including reduced lifespan, heart conduction block, severe myotonia and progressive skeletal muscle weakness. Mbnl2 protein levels are elevated in Mbnl1−/− knockouts where Mbnl2 targets Mbnl1-regulated exons. These findings support the hypothesis that compound loss of MBNL function is a critical event in DM pathogenesis and provide novel mouse models to investigate additional pathways disrupted in this RNA-mediated disease. PMID:24293317

  15. Therapeutic Approaches for Dominant Muscle Diseases: Highlight on Myotonic Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Klein, A F; Dastidar, S; Furling, D; Chuah, M K

    2015-01-01

    Myotonic Dystrophy (DM), one of the most common neuromuscular disorders in adults, comprises two genetically distinct forms triggered by unstable expanded repeats in non-coding regions. The most common DM1 is caused by expanded CTG repeats in the 3'UTR of the DMPK gene, whereas DM2 is due to large expanded CCTG repeats in the first intron of the CNBP gene. Both mutations induce a pathogenic RNA gain-of-function mechanism. Mutant RNAs containing CUG or CCUG expanded repeats, which are retained in the nuclei as aggregates alter activities of alternative splicing regulators such as MBNL proteins and CELF1. As a consequence, alternative splicing misregulations of several pre-mRNAs are associated with DM clinical symptoms. Currently, there is no available cure for this dominant neuromuscular disease. Nevertheless, promising therapeutic strategies have been developed in the last decade. Preclinical progress in DM research prompted the first DM1 clinical trial based on antisense oligonucleotides promoting a RNase-H-mediated degradation of the expanded CUG transcripts. The ongoing Phase 1/2a clinical trial will hopefully give further insights into the quest to find a bona fide cure for DM1. In this review, we will provide an overview of the different strategies that were developed to neutralize the RNA toxicity in DM1. Different approaches including antisense oligonucleotide technologies, gene therapies or small molecules have been tested and validated in cellular and animal models. Remaining challenges and additional avenues to explore will be discussed. PMID:26122101

  16. Progress toward gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hartigan-O'Connor, D; Chamberlain, J S

    1999-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common lethal disease for which no effective treatment is available. The lethal consequences of DMD are caused by absence of a structural protein, called dystrophin, from skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. The usefulness of gene replacement as therapy for this disease has been established in transgenic mouse models. Unfortunately, progress toward therapy for human patients has been limited by the characteristics of currently available viral vectors and by lack of a suitable technique for delivery of such vectors to a large mass of muscle cells. Successful gene therapy of DMD will require a vector that can carry most of the dystrophin coding sequence, that can be cheaply produce in large quantities, that can be delivered to a large mass of muscle cells, and that provides stable expression of dystrophin after delivery. We and others have worked to develop such a vector through modification of adenoviruses (Ad). Here we review the characteristics of conventional Ad vectors and new helper-dependent, or gutted, Ad vectors. Gutted Ad vectors contain cis-acting DNA sequences necessary for viral replication and packaging, but are deleted, or gutted, for all viral coding sequences. We found that gutted vectors efficiently delivered full-length dystrophin to the skeletal muscles of dystrophic (mdx) mice. Dystrophic muscles injected with these vectors expressed dystrophin for at least four months post-injection, which was the longest time point tested. These data suggest that gutted vectors will allow delivery and long-term expression of dystrophin. PMID:12194388

  17. Targeting nuclear RNA for in vivo correction of myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Thurman M; Leger, Andrew J; Pandey, Sanjay K; MacLeod, A Robert; Nakamori, Masayuki; Cheng, Seng H; Wentworth, Bruce M; Bennett, C Frank; Thornton, Charles A

    2012-08-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) hold promise for gene-specific knockdown in diseases that involve RNA or protein gain-of-function effects. In the hereditary degenerative disease myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), transcripts from the mutant allele contain an expanded CUG repeat and are retained in the nucleus. The mutant RNA exerts a toxic gain-of-function effect, making it an appropriate target for therapeutic ASOs. However, despite improvements in ASO chemistry and design, systemic use of ASOs is limited because uptake in many tissues, including skeletal and cardiac muscle, is not sufficient to silence target messenger RNAs. Here we show that nuclear-retained transcripts containing expanded CUG (CUG(exp)) repeats are unusually sensitive to antisense silencing. In a transgenic mouse model of DM1, systemic administration of ASOs caused a rapid knockdown of CUG(exp) RNA in skeletal muscle, correcting the physiological, histopathologic and transcriptomic features of the disease. The effect was sustained for up to 1 year after treatment was discontinued. Systemically administered ASOs were also effective for muscle knockdown of Malat1, a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that is retained in the nucleus. These results provide a general strategy to correct RNA gain-of-function effects and to modulate the expression of expanded repeats, lncRNAs and other transcripts with prolonged nuclear residence. PMID:22859208

  18. [When do you implant a pacemaker in myotonic dystrophy?].

    PubMed

    Babuty, Dominique; Lallemand, Bénédicte; Laurent, Valérie; Clémenty, Nicolas; Pierre, Bertrand; Fauchier, Laurent; Raynaud, Martine; Pellieux, Sybille

    2011-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy is the most frequent adult form of hereditary muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation on the DMPK gene. Myotonic dystrophy leads to multiple systemic complications related to weakness, respiratory failure, cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac conduction disturbances. Age of death is earlier in myotonic dystrophy patients than in general population with a high frequency of sudden death. Several mechanisms are involved in sudden death: atrio-ventricular block, severe ventricular arrhythmias or non-cardiac mechanism. The high degree of atrio-ventricular block is a well-recognized indication of pacemaker implantation but the prophylactic implantation of pacemaker should be considered to prevent sudden death in asymptomatic myotonic dystrophy patients. A careful clinical evaluation needs to be done for the identification of patients at high risk of sudden death. The resting ECG and SA ECG are non-invasive tools useful to select the patients who need an electrophysiologic study. In presence of prolonged HV interval more than or equal to 70 ms one can discuss the implantation of a prophylactic pacemaker. The choice of an implantable cardiac defibrillator is preferred in presence of spontaneous ventricular tachycardia or an alteration of the left ventricular ejection fraction. PMID:21549556

  19. Skin features in myotonic dystrophy type 1: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Campanati, A; Giannoni, M; Buratti, L; Cagnetti, C; Giuliodori, K; Ganzetti, G; Silvestrini, M; Provinciali, L; Offidani, A

    2015-05-01

    Poor data regarding skin involvement in Myotonic Dystrophy, also named Dystrophia Myotonica type 1, have been reported. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and types of skin disorders in adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. Fifty-five patients and one hundred age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were referred to a trained dermatologist for a complete skin examination to check for potential cutaneous hallmarks of disease. No difference in prevalence of preneoplastic, neoplastic, and cutaneous lesions was detected between the two groups. Among morphofunctional, proliferative and inflammatory lesions, focal hyperhidrosis (p < 0.0001), follicular hyperkeratosis (p = 0.0003), early androgenic alopecia (p = 0.01), nail pitting (p = 0.003), pedunculus fibromas (p = 0. 01), twisted hair (p = 0.01), seborrheic dermatitis (p = 0.02), macules of hyperpigmentation (p = 0.03) were significantly more frequent in patients compared with controls. In patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 significant differences according to sex were found for: early androgenic alopecia, twisted hair and seborrheic dermatitis, whose prevalence was higher in males (p < 0.0001). Our preliminary results seem to rule out an increased prevalence of pre-neoplastic, and neoplastic skin lesions in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. On the other hand, an increased prevalence of morphofunctional, inflammatory, and proliferative diseases involving adnexal structures seems to characterize adult patients with Myotonic Dystrophy type 1. PMID:25813338

  20. A novel proteotoxic stress associated mechanism for macular corneal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Szalai, Eszter; Smedowski, Adrian; Hegyi, Zoltán; Kivinen, Niko; Viiri, Johanna; Wowra, Bogumil; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Módis, László; Berta, András; Wylegala, Edward; Felszeghy, Szabolcs

    2015-08-01

    Macular corneal dystrophy is a rare autosomal recessive eye disease affecting primarily the corneal stroma. Abnormal accumulation of proteoglycan aggregates has been observed intra- and extracellularly in the stromal layer. In addition to the stromal keratocytes and corneal lamellae, deposits are also present in the basal epithelial cells, endothelial cells and Descemet's membrane. Misfolding of proteins has a tendency to gather into aggregating deposits. We studied interaction of molecular chaperones and proteasomal clearance in macular dystrophy human samples and in human corneal HCE-2 epithelial cells. Seven cases of macular corneal dystrophy and four normal corneal buttons collected during corneal transplantation were examined for their expression patterns of heat shock protein 70, ubiquitin protein conjugates and SQSTM1/p62. In response to proteasome inhibition the same proteins were analyzed by western blotting. Slit-lamp examination, in vivo confocal cornea microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used for morphological analyses. Heat shock protein 70, ubiquitin protein conjugates and SQSTM1/p62 were upregulated in both the basal corneal epithelial cells and the stromal keratocytes in macular corneal dystrophy samples that coincided with an increased expression of the same molecules under proteasome inhibition in the HCE-2 cells in vitro. We propose a novel regulatory mechanism that connects the molecular chaperone and proteasomal clearance system in the pathogenesis of macular corneal dystrophy. PMID:25597745

  1. Neurocognitive Profiles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Gene Mutation Site

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Civati, Federica; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Magri, Francesca; Del Bo, Roberto; Guglieri, Michela; Molteni, Massimo; Turconi, Anna Carla; Bresolin, Nereo

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nonprogressive cognitive impairment is recognized as a common feature in a substantial proportion of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To investigate the possible role of mutations along the dystrophin gene affecting different brain dystrophin isoforms and specific cognitive profiles, 42 school-age children affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, subdivided according to sites of mutations along the dystrophin gene, underwent a battery of tests tapping a wide range of intellectual, linguistic, and neuropsychologic functions. Full-scale intelligence quotient was approximately 1 S.D. below the population average in the whole group of dystrophic children. Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the distal portion of the dystrophin gene (involving the 140-kDa brain protein isoform, called Dp140) were generally more severely affected and expressed different patterns of strengths and impairments, compared with patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the proximal portion of the dystrophin gene (not involving Dp140). Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and distal mutations demonstrated specific impairments in visuospatial functions and visual memory (which seemed intact in proximally mutated patients) and greater impairment in syntactic processing. PMID:22000308

  2. [Specific features of Becker Muscular Dystrophy patients and female carriers of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Magot, A; Mercier, S; Péréon, Y

    2015-12-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) was first described in 1955 and linked to the DMD gene in 1987. Compared to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), clinical onset of BMD usually occurs after the age of 12 and wheelchair is required after the age of 16. BMD is characterized by generalized weakness first affecting limb girdle muscles, hypertrophy of the calves and cardiomyopathy in males. Some patients have only mild symptoms such as cramps or elevated serum creatine kinases (SCK) throughout all their lives. SCK levels are usually elevated. Muscle biopsy (immunohistochemistry or immunoblotting) shows a dystrophic pattern with abnormal dystrophin staining. Diagnosis is confirmed by DMD gene sequencing. Deletions or duplications of one or several exons are identified in the majority of cases. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended for the care management of these patients with a particular attention to the cardiomyopathy, which is typically responsible for death but can be prevented by specific treatment. X-linked dilated cardiomyopathies linked to DMD gene are a phenotypic continuum of BMD. Some female carriers of DMD mutations exhibit clinical symptoms of variable severity, often milder and beginning later than in males. The cardiomyopathy is the most frequent feature that should be especially monitored in these patients. Genetic counselling should be systematically proposed. PMID:26773584

  3. Experienced fatigue in facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy, and HMSN-I

    PubMed Central

    Kalkman, J; Schillings, M; van der Werf, S P; Padberg, G; Zwarts, M; van Engelen, B G M; Bleijenberg, G

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of severe fatigue and its relation to functional impairment in daily life in patients with relatively common types of neuromuscular disorders. Methods: 598 patients with a neuromuscular disease were studied (139 with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, 322 with adult onset myotonic dystrophy, and 137 with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type I). Fatigue severity was assessed with Checklist Individual Strength (CIS-fatigue). Functional impairments in daily life were measured with the short form 36 item health questionnaire (SF-36). Results: The three different neuromuscular patient groups were of similar age and sex. Severe experienced fatigue was reported by 61–74% of the patients. Severely fatigued patients had more problems with physical functioning, social functioning, mental health, bodily pain, and general health perception. There were some differences between the three disorders in the effects of fatigue. Conclusions: Severe fatigue is reported by the majority of patients with relatively common types of neuromuscular disorders. Because experienced fatigue severity is associated with the severity of various functional impairments in daily life, it is a clinically and socially relevant problem in this group of patients. PMID:16170086

  4. Clinicopathologic findings in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Small, Kent W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To correlate the clinical and histopathologic features of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD). Methods Two eyes were obtained postmortem from a patient with BVMD. The patient’s clinical information was reviewed. Series sections of the globes were performed and sequentially stained with hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid-Schiff or Masson trichrome. A section of the left macula was submitted for electron microscopic processing. Histopathologic findings were reconstructed in a scaled two-dimensional map and compared with fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. Results The macular lesion of the right eye was identified as a well-demarcated region with pigment, elevated submacular yellow material and subretinal fluid. This corresponded histopathologically to a well-circumscribed area of RPE hyperplasia, accumulation of lipofuscin in the RPE, deposition of granular material in the photoreceptors, macrophages and drusen. The left eye displayed a 1 disc diameter chorioretinal scar with surrounding shallow fluid and submacular pigment. This corresponded to RPE changes and a fibrocellular proliferation in the choriocapillaris. Conclusion Histopathologic mapping revealed retinal edema, RPE abnormalities, drusen and a chorioretinal scar in BVMD that correlated with the fundus, FFA, FAF and OCT findings. PMID:21136072

  5. Autophagy in granular corneal dystrophy type 2.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung-Il; Kim, Eung Kweon

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative process that is essential for cellular homeostasis and metabolic stress adaptation. Defective autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases including granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2). GCD2 is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by substitution of histidine for arginine at codon 124 (R124H) in the transforming growth factor β-induced gene (TGFBI) on chromosome 5q31. Transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBIp) is degraded by autophagy, but mutant-TGFBIp accumulates in autophagosomes and/or lysosomes, despite significant activation of basal autophagy, in GCD2 corneal fibroblasts. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy induces cell death of GCD2 corneal fibroblasts through active caspase-3. As there is currently no pharmacological treatment for GCD2, development of novel therapies is required. A potential strategy for preventing cytoplasmic accumulation of mutant-TGFBIp in GCD2 corneal fibroblasts is to enhance mutant-TGFBIp degradation. This could be achieved by activation of the autophagic pathway. Here, we will consider the role and the potential therapeutic benefits of autophagy in GCD2, with focus on TGFBIp degradation, in light of the recently established role of autophagy in protein degradation. PMID:26386150

  6. Optimizing Bone Health in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Jason L.; Bowden, Sasigarn A.; Mahan, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, with eventual loss of ambulation and premature death. The approved therapy with corticosteroids improves muscle strength, prolongs ambulation, and maintains pulmonary function. However, the osteoporotic impact of chronic corticosteroid use further impairs the underlying reduced bone mass seen in DMD, leading to increased fragility fractures of long bones and vertebrae. These serious sequelae adversely affect quality of life and can impact survival. The current clinical issues relating to bone health and bone health screening methods in DMD are presented in this review. Diagnostic studies, including biochemical markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), as well as spinal imaging using densitometric lateral spinal imaging, and treatment to optimize bone health in patients with DMD are discussed. Treatment with bisphosphonates offers a method to increase bone mass in these children; oral and intravenous bisphosphonates have been used successfully although treatment is typically reserved for children with fractures and/or bone pain with low bone mass by DXA. PMID:26124831

  7. Paternal transmission of congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    de Die-Smulders, C E; Smeets, H J; Loots, W; Anten, H B; Mirandolle, J F; Geraedts, J P; Höweler, C J

    1997-01-01

    We report a rare case of paternally transmitted congenital myotonic dystrophy (DM). The proband is a 23 year old, mentally retarded male who suffers severe muscular weakness. He presented with respiratory and feeding difficulties at birth. His two sibs suffer from childhood onset DM. Their late father had the adult type of DM, with onset around 30 years. Only six other cases of paternal transmission of congenital DM have been reported recently. We review the sex related effects on transmission of congenital DM. Decreased fertility of males with adult onset DM and contraction of the repeat upon male transmission contribute to the almost absent occurrence of paternal transmission of congenital DM. Also the fathers of the reported congenitally affected children showed, on average, shorter CTG repeat lengths and hence less severe clinical symptoms than the mothers of children with congenital DM. We conclude that paternal transmission of congenital DM is rare and preferentially occurs with onset of DM past 30 years in the father. Images PMID:9391889

  8. Molecular Bases of Corneal Endothelial Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Schmedt, Thore; Silva, Mariana Mazzini; Ziaei, Alireza; Jurkunas, Ula

    2011-01-01

    The phrase “corneal endothelial dystrophies” embraces a group of bilateral corneal conditions that are characterized by a non-inflammatory and progressive degradation of corneal endothelium. Corneal endothelial cells exhibit a high pump site density and, along with barrier function, are responsible for maintaining the cornea in its natural state of relative dehydration. Gradual loss of endothelial cells leads to an insufficient water outflow, resulting in corneal edema and loss of vision. Since the pathologic mechanisms remain largely unknown, the only current treatment option is surgical transplantation when vision is severely impaired. In the past decade, important steps have been taken to understand how endothelial degeneration progresses on the molecular level. Studies of affected multigenerational families and sporadic cases identified genes and chromosomal loci, and revealed either Mendelian or complex disorder inheritance patterns. Mutations have been detected in genes that carry important structural, metabolic, cytoprotective, and regulatory functions in corneal endothelium. In addition to genetic predisposition, environmental factors like oxidative stress were found to be involved in the pathogenesis of endotheliopathies. This review summarizes and crosslinks the recent progress on deciphering the molecular bases of corneal endothelial dystrophies. PMID:21855542

  9. Congenital muscular dystrophy: from muscle to brain.

    PubMed

    Falsaperla, Raffaele; Praticò, Andrea D; Ruggieri, Martino; Parano, Enrico; Rizzo, Renata; Corsello, Giovanni; Vitaliti, Giovanna; Pavone, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are a wide group of muscular disorders that manifest with very early onset of muscular weakness, sometime associated to severe brain involvement.The histologic pattern of muscle anomalies is typical of dystrophic lesions but quite variable depending on the different stages and on the severity of the disorder.Recent classification of CMDs have been reported most of which based on the combination of clinical, biochemical, molecular and genetic findings, but genotype/phenotype correlation are in constant progression due to more diffuse utilization of the molecular analysis.In this article, the Authors report on CMDs belonging to the group of dystroglycanopathies and in particular on the most severe forms represented by the Fukuyama CMD, Muscle-Eye-Brain disease and Walker Walburg syndrome.Clinical diagnosis of infantile hypotonia is particularly difficult considering the different etiologic factors causing the lesions, the difficulty in localizing the involved CNS area (central vs. peripheral) and the limited role of the diagnostic procedures at this early age.The diagnostic evaluation is not easy mainly in differentiating the various types of CMDs, and represents a challenge for the neonatologists and pediatricians. Suggestions are reported on the way to reach a correct diagnosis with the appropriate use of the diagnostic means. PMID:27576556

  10. Molecular analysis of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, M.; Maynard, J.; Osborn, M.

    1994-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness. The disease locus maps to 4q35 and is associated with a de novo DNA rearrangement, detected by a probe p13E-11 (D4F104S1) which maps proximal to the disease locus. An informative distal flanking marker for this condition is still required. Using p13E-11, we have analyzed 35 FSHD families in which the disease is apparently associated with a new mutation. Twenty three of these cases were found to have a smaller rearranged DNA fragment which was not present in either of the parents. Pulsed-field gel analysis of 5 of these families also revealed evidence of DNA deletion. During the course of this study, we identified one case with a DNA rearrangement which was also present in the unaffected mother, but at very low intensity. This finding has been confirmed by pulsed-field gel analysis, and indicates that the mother is probably a gonosomal mosaic. In order to saturate the FSHD region with new DNA markers, a laser microdissection and microcloning technique was used to construct a genomic library from the distal end of chromosome 4. Of the 72 microclones analyzed, 42 mapped into the relevant 4q35 region. 4 sequences were conserved and may be considered potential candidate genes for FSHD. The microclones mapping to 4q35 are under study to identify additional polymorphic markers for the FSHD region.

  11. Gene Therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Julian; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a relatively common inherited disorder caused by defective expression of the protein dystrophin. The most direct approach to treating this disease would be to restore dystrophin production in muscle. Recent progress has greatly increased the prospects for successful gene therapy of DMD, and here we summarize the most promising developments. Areas Covered Gene transfer using vectors derived from adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as a promising method to restore dystrophin production in muscles bodywide, and represents a treatment option applicable to all DMD patients. Using information gleaned from PubMed searches of the literature, attendance at scientific conferences and results from our own lab, we provide an overview of the potential for gene therapy of DMD using AAV vectors including a summary of promising developments and issues that need to be resolved prior to large-scale therapeutic implementation. Expert Opinion Of the many approaches being pursued to treat DMD and BMD, gene therapy based on AAV-mediated delivery of microdystrophin is the most direct and promising method to treat the cause of the disorder. The major challenges to this approach are ensuring that microdystrophin can be delivered safely and efficiently without eliciting an immune response. PMID:26594599

  12. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy: consequences of chromatin relaxation

    PubMed Central

    van der Maarel, Silvère M.; Miller, Daniel G.; Tawil, Rabi; Filippova, Galina N.; Tapscott, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review In recent years we have seen remarkable progress in our understanding of the disease mechanism underlying facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of our current understanding of the disease mechanism and to discuss the observations supporting the possibility of a developmental defect in this disorder. Recent findings In the majority of cases FSHD is caused by contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array (FSHD1). This results in local chromatin relaxation and stable expression of the DUX4 retrogene in skeletal muscle, but only when a polymorphic DUX4 polyadenylation signal is present. In some cases (FSHD2), D4Z4 chromatin relaxation and stable DUX4 expression occurs in the absence of D4Z4 array contraction. DUX4 is a germline transcription factor and its expression in skeletal muscle leads to activation of early stem cell and germline programs and transcriptional activation of retroelements. Summary Recent studies have provided a plausible disease mechanism for FSHD where FSHD results from inappropriate expression of the germline transcription factor DUX4. The genes regulated by DUX4 suggest several mechanisms of muscle damage, and provide potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets that should be investigated in future studies. PMID:22892954

  13. The Molecular Basis of Muscular Dystrophy in the mdx Mouse: A Point Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicinski, Piotr; Geng, Yan; Ryder-Cook, Allan S.; Barnard, Eric A.; Darlison, Mark G.; Barnard, Pene J.

    1989-06-01

    The mdx mouse is an X-linked myopathic mutant, an animal model for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In both mouse and man the mutations lie within the dystrophin gene, but the phenotypic differences of the disease in the two species confer much interest on the molecular basis of the mdx mutation. The complementary DNA for mouse dystrophin has been cloned, and the sequence has been used in the polymerase chain reaction to amplify normal and mdx dystrophin transcripts in the area of the mdx mutation. Sequence analysis of the amplification products showed that the mdx mouse has a single base substitution within an exon, which causes premature termination of the polypeptide chain.

  14. Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophy: Moving the Field Forward

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zaidy, Samiah; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Mendell, Jerry R

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy for the muscular dystrophies has evolved as a promising treatment for this progressive group of disorders. While corticosteroids and/or supportive treatments remain standard of care for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), loss of ambulation, respiratory failure and compromised cardiac function is the inevitable outcome. Recent developments in genetically mediated therapies have allowed for personalized treatments that strategically target individual muscular dystrophy subtypes based on disease pathomechanism and phenotype. In this review, we highlight therapeutic progress with emphasis on evolving pre-clinical data and our own experience in completed clinical trials, and others currently underway. We also discuss the lessons we have learned along the way and the strategies developed to overcome limitations and obstacles in this field. PMID:25439576

  15. Dark adaptation in patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Baca, W; Fishman, G A; Alexander, K R; Glenn, A M

    1994-01-01

    Psychophysical dark adaptation studies were performed in six patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) using a Goldmann-Weekers dark adaptometer. Prebleach thresholds were determined before obtaining a postbleach full recovery curve. Unlike patients with Stargardt macular dystrophy, all patients with BVMD showed a normal time to reach their baseline dark adapted thresholds after bleaching of their rod visual pigment when tested in clinically normal appearing retina. Although a lipofuscin material accumulates within retinal pigment epithelial cells in patients with either Best or Stargardt dystrophy, functional findings pertaining to recovery of rod dark adaptation thresholds as well as electro-oculogram light peak to dark trough ratios are different in these two disorders. PMID:8060924

  16. Dark adaptation in patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Baca, W; Fishman, G A; Alexander, K R; Glenn, A M

    1994-06-01

    Psychophysical dark adaptation studies were performed in six patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) using a Goldmann-Weekers dark adaptometer. Prebleach thresholds were determined before obtaining a postbleach full recovery curve. Unlike patients with Stargardt macular dystrophy, all patients with BVMD showed a normal time to reach their baseline dark adapted thresholds after bleaching of their rod visual pigment when tested in clinically normal appearing retina. Although a lipofuscin material accumulates within retinal pigment epithelial cells in patients with either Best or Stargardt dystrophy, functional findings pertaining to recovery of rod dark adaptation thresholds as well as electro-oculogram light peak to dark trough ratios are different in these two disorders. PMID:8060924

  17. Immobility reduces muscle fiber necrosis in dystrophin deficient muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Ikezawa, M; Nomura, K; Ito, K; Ozasa, S; Ueno, H; Yoshioka, K; Yano, S; Yamashita, T; Matuskura, M; Miike, T

    2006-08-01

    Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy is a progressive muscle disease, which is caused by the abnormality of dystrophin. Spina bifida is characterized by paralysis of the feet, with most of the upper extremities not being affected. We report here on the first case of Becker muscular dystrophy coinciding with spina bifida. The muscle biopsy specimens of the patient showed dystrophic changes in upper extremities, but clearly less in lower extremities. The results show that the restriction of excessive exercise is important for dystrophin deficiency disease. PMID:16516424

  18. Dupuytren's Contracture Cosegregation with Limb-Girdle Muscle Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lace, Baiba; Inashkina, Inna; Micule, Ieva; Vasiljeva, Inta; Naudina, Maruta Solvita; Jankevics, Eriks

    2013-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMDs) is a heterogeneous group of muscular dystrophies that mostly affect the pelvic and shoulder girdle muscle groups. We report here a case of neuromuscular disease associated with Dupuytren's contracture, which has never been described before as cosegregating with an autosomal dominant type of inheritance. Dupuytren's contracture is a common disease, especially in Northern Europe. Comorbid conditions associated with Dupuytren's contracture are repetitive trauma to the hands, diabetes, and seizures, but it has never before been associated with neuromuscular disease. We hypothesize that patients may harbor mutations in genes with functions related to neuromuscular disease and Dupuytren's contracture development. PMID:24024053

  19. Analysis of meiotic segregation, using single-sperm typing: meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus.

    PubMed Central

    Leeflang, E. P.; McPeek, M. S.; Arnheim, N.

    1996-01-01

    Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus has recently been suggested as being responsible for maintaining the frequency, in the human population, of DM chromosomes capable of expansion to the disease state. In order to test this hypothesis, we have studied samples of single sperm from three individuals heterozygous at the DM locus, each with one allele larger and one allele smaller than 19 CTG repeats. To guard against the possible problem of differential PCR amplification rates based on the lengths of the alleles, the sperm were also typed at another closely linked marker whose allele size was unrelated to the allele size at the DM locus. Using statistical models specifically designed to study single-sperm segregation data, we find no evidence of meiotic segregation distortion. The upper limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval for the estimate of the common segregation probability for the three donors is at or below .515 for all models considered, and no statistically significant difference from .5 is detected in any of the models. This suggests that any greater amount of segregation distortion at the myotonic dystrophy locus must result from events following sperm ejaculation. The mathematical models developed make it possible to study segregation distortion with high resolution by using sperm-typing data from any locus. PMID:8808606

  20. Analysis of meiotic segregation, using single-sperm typing: Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Leeflang, E.P.; Arnheim, N.; McPeek, M.S.

    1996-10-01

    Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus has recently been suggested as being responsible for maintaining the frequency, in the human population, of DM chromosomes capable of expansion to the disease state. In order to test this hypothesis, we have studied samples of single sperm from three individuals heterozygous at the DM locus, each with one allele larger and one allele smaller than 19 CTG repeats. To guard against the possible problem of differential PCR amplification rates based on the lengths of the alleles, the sperm were also typed at another closely linked marker whose allele size was unrelated to the allele size at the DM locus. Using statistical models specifically designed to study single-sperm segregation data, we find no evidence of meiotic segregation distortion. The upper limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval for the estimate of the common segregation probability for the three donors is at or below .515 for all models considered, and no statistically significant difference from .5 is detected in any of the models. This suggests that any greater amount of segregation distortion at the myotonic dystrophy locus must result from events following sperm ejaculation. The mathematical models developed make it possible to study segregation distortion with high resolution by using sperm-typing data from any locus. 26 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  1. Correlation of Utrophin Levels with the Dystrophin Protein Complex and Muscle Fibre Regeneration in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Janghra, Narinder; Morgan, Jennifer E.; Sewry, Caroline A.; Wilson, Francis X.; Davies, Kay E.; Muntoni, Francesco; Tinsley, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe and currently incurable progressive neuromuscular condition, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that result in the inability to produce dystrophin. Lack of dystrophin leads to loss of muscle fibres and a reduction in muscle mass and function. There is evidence from dystrophin-deficient mouse models that increasing levels of utrophin at the muscle fibre sarcolemma by genetic or pharmacological means significantly reduces the muscular dystrophy pathology. In order to determine the efficacy of utrophin modulators in clinical trials, it is necessary to accurately measure utrophin levels and other biomarkers on a fibre by fibre basis within a biopsy section. Our aim was to develop robust and reproducible staining and imaging protocols to quantify sarcolemmal utrophin levels, sarcolemmal dystrophin complex members and numbers of regenerating fibres within a biopsy section. We quantified sarcolemmal utrophin in mature and regenerating fibres and the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres, in muscle biopsies from Duchenne, the milder Becker muscular dystrophy and controls. Fluorescent immunostaining followed by image analysis was performed to quantify utrophin intensity and β-dystrogylcan and ɣ –sarcoglycan intensity at the sarcolemma. Antibodies to fetal and developmental myosins were used to identify regenerating muscle fibres allowing the accurate calculation of percentage regeneration fibres in the biopsy. Our results indicate that muscle biopsies from Becker muscular dystrophy patients have fewer numbers of regenerating fibres and reduced utrophin intensity compared to muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Of particular interest, we show for the first time that the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres within the muscle biopsy correlate with the clinical severity of Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients from whom the biopsy was taken. The ongoing development of these tools to quantify

  2. Correlation of Utrophin Levels with the Dystrophin Protein Complex and Muscle Fibre Regeneration in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Janghra, Narinder; Morgan, Jennifer E; Sewry, Caroline A; Wilson, Francis X; Davies, Kay E; Muntoni, Francesco; Tinsley, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe and currently incurable progressive neuromuscular condition, caused by mutations in the DMD gene that result in the inability to produce dystrophin. Lack of dystrophin leads to loss of muscle fibres and a reduction in muscle mass and function. There is evidence from dystrophin-deficient mouse models that increasing levels of utrophin at the muscle fibre sarcolemma by genetic or pharmacological means significantly reduces the muscular dystrophy pathology. In order to determine the efficacy of utrophin modulators in clinical trials, it is necessary to accurately measure utrophin levels and other biomarkers on a fibre by fibre basis within a biopsy section. Our aim was to develop robust and reproducible staining and imaging protocols to quantify sarcolemmal utrophin levels, sarcolemmal dystrophin complex members and numbers of regenerating fibres within a biopsy section. We quantified sarcolemmal utrophin in mature and regenerating fibres and the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres, in muscle biopsies from Duchenne, the milder Becker muscular dystrophy and controls. Fluorescent immunostaining followed by image analysis was performed to quantify utrophin intensity and β-dystrogylcan and ɣ -sarcoglycan intensity at the sarcolemma. Antibodies to fetal and developmental myosins were used to identify regenerating muscle fibres allowing the accurate calculation of percentage regeneration fibres in the biopsy. Our results indicate that muscle biopsies from Becker muscular dystrophy patients have fewer numbers of regenerating fibres and reduced utrophin intensity compared to muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Of particular interest, we show for the first time that the percentage of regenerating muscle fibres within the muscle biopsy correlate with the clinical severity of Becker and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients from whom the biopsy was taken. The ongoing development of these tools to quantify

  3. Gastrointestinal manifestations in myotonic muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Biagi, Sonia; Stasi, Cristina; Costa, Francesco; Mumolo, Maria Gloria; Ricchiuti, Angelo; Marchi, Santino

    2006-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is characterized by myotonic phenomena and progressive muscular weakness. Involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is frequent and may occur at any level. The clinical manifestations have previously been attributed to motility disorders caused by smooth muscle damage, but histologic evidence of alterations has been scarce and conflicting. A neural factor has also been hypothesized. In the upper digestive tract, dysphagia, heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia are the most common complaints, while in the lower tract, abdominal pain, bloating and changes in bowel habits are often reported. Digestive symptoms may be the first sign of dystrophic disease and may precede the musculo-skeletal features. The impairment of gastrointestinal function may be sometimes so gradual that the patients adapt to it with little awareness of symptoms. In such cases routine endoscopic and ultrasonographic evaluations are not sufficient and targeted techniques (electrogastrography, manometry, electromyography, functional ultrasonography, scintigraphy, etc.) are needed. There is a low correlation between the degree of skeletal muscle involvement and the presence and severity of gastrointestinal disturbances whereas a positive correlation with the duration of the skeletal muscle disease has been reported. The drugs recommended for treating the gastrointestinal complaints such as prokinetic, anti-dyspeptic drugs and laxatives, are mainly aimed at correcting the motility disorders. Gastrointestinal involvement in MD remains a complex and intriguing condition since many important problems are still unsolved. Further studies concentrating on genetic aspects, early diagnostic techniques and the development of new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve our management of the gastrointestinal manifestations of MD. PMID:16609987

  4. Sudomotor function in sympathetic reflex dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Birklein, F; Sittl, R; Spitzer, A; Claus, D; Neundörfer, B; Handwerker, H O

    1997-01-01

    Sudomotor functions were studied in 27 patients suffering from reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) according to the criteria established by Bonica (18 women, 9 men; mean age 50 +/- 12.3 years; median duration of disease 8 weeks, range 2-468 weeks). To measure local sweating rates, two small chambers (5 cm2) were affixed to corresponding areas of hairy skin on the affected and unaffected limbs. Dry nitrogen gas was passed through the chambers (270 ml/min) and evaporation was recorded at both devices with hygrometers. Thermoregulatory sweating (TST) was induced by raising body temperature (intake of 0.5 1 hot tea and infra-red irradiation). Local sweating was also induced through an axon reflex (QSART) by transcutaneous iontophoretic application of carbachol (5 min, 1 mA). In addition, skin temperature was measured on the affected and unaffected side by infra-red thermography. Mean skin temperature was significantly higher on the affected side (P < 0.003). In spite of the temperature differences, there was no difference in basal sweating on the affected and unaffected side. However, both methods of sudomotor stimulation lead to significantly greater sweating responses on the affected compared to the unaffected side (TST: P < 0.05, QSART: P < 0.004). Latency to onset of sweating was significantly shorter on the affected side under both test conditions (P < 0.04 and P < 0.003, respectively). Sweat responses were not correlated to absolute skin temperature but were probably related to the increased blood flow on the affected side. Our findings imply a differential disturbance of vasomotor and sudomotor mechanisms in affected skin. Whereas vasoconstrictor activity is apparently lowered, sudomotor output is either unaltered or may even be enhanced. PMID:9060012

  5. Neuropsychological profile of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Anna Roshini; Rajeswaran, Jamuna; Nalini, Atchayaram

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited myogenic disorder characterized by progressive muscle wasting. DMD is a fatal X-linked recessive disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 3,500 male live births. This disease has long been associated with intellectual impairment. Research has shown that boys with DMD have variable intellectual performance, indicating the presence of specific cognitive deficits. The aim of the study was to use a battery of intelligence, learning, and memory tests to identify a neuropsychological profile in boys with DMD. A total of 22 boys diagnosed with DMD in the age range of 6 to 10 years old were evaluated using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition, Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and the Memory for Designs Test. The data were interpreted using means, standard deviations, percentages, and percentiles. Normative data were also used for further interpretation. The results showed that boys with DMD had a significantly lower IQ (88.5). Verbal IQ (86.59) was found to be lower than Performance IQ (92.64). There was evidence of impaired performance on the Processing Speed, Freedom From Distractibility, and Verbal Comprehension Indexes. Specific deficits in information processing, complex attention, immediate verbal memory span, verbal working memory, verbal comprehension, vocabulary, visuoconstruction ability, and verbal learning and encoding were observed. However, perceptional organization, general fund of information, abstract reasoning, visual discrimination and acuity, visual learning and memory, and verbal memory were adequate. The neuropsychological findings support the hypothesis that these children have specific cognitive deficits as opposed to a global intellectual deficit. PMID:24279481

  6. The burden of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Landfeldt, Erik; Lindgren, Peter; Bell, Christopher F.; Schmitt, Claude; Guglieri, Michela; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to estimate the total cost of illness and economic burden of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods: Patients with DMD from Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, and United States were identified through Translational Research in Europe–Assessment & Treatment of Neuromuscular Diseases registries and invited to complete a questionnaire online together with a caregiver. Data on health care use, quality of life, work status, informal care, and household expenses were collected to estimate costs of DMD from the perspective of society and caregiver households. Results: A total of 770 patients (173 German, 122 Italian, 191 from the United Kingdom, and 284 from the United States) completed the questionnaire. Mean per-patient annual direct cost of illness was estimated at between $23,920 and $54,270 (2012 international dollars), 7 to 16 times higher than the mean per-capita health expenditure in these countries. Indirect and informal care costs were substantial, each constituting between 18% and 43% of total costs. The total societal burden was estimated at between $80,120 and $120,910 per patient and annum, and increased markedly with disease progression. The corresponding household burden was estimated at between $58,440 and $71,900. Conclusions: We show that DMD is associated with a substantial economic burden. Our results underscore the many different costs accompanying a rare condition such as DMD and the considerable economic burden carried by affected families. Our description of the previously unknown economic context of a rare disease serves as important intelligence input to health policy evaluations of intervention programs and novel therapies, financial support schemes for patients and their families, and the design of future cost studies. PMID:24991029

  7. Evaluation of 2'-Deoxy-2'-fluoro Antisense Oligonucleotides for Exon Skipping in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Jirka, Silvana M G; Tanganyika-de Winter, Christa L; Boertje-van der Meulen, Joke W; van Putten, Maaike; Hiller, Monika; Vermue, Rick; de Visser, Peter C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscle wasting disorder typically caused by frame-shifting mutations in the DMD gene. Restoration of the reading frame would allow the production of a shorter but partly functional dystrophin protein as seen in Becker muscular dystrophy patients. This can be achieved with antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that induce skipping of specific exons during pre-mRNA splicing. Different chemical modifications have been developed to improve AON properties. The 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro (2F) RNA modification is attractive for exon skipping due to its ability to recruit ILF2/3 proteins to the 2F/pre-mRNA duplex, which resulted in enhanced exon skipping in spinal muscular atrophy models. In this study, we examined the effect of two different 2'-substituted AONs (2'-F phosphorothioate (2FPS) and 2'-O-Me phosphorothioate (2OMePS)) on exon skipping in DMD cell and animal models. In human cell cultures, 2FPS AONs showed higher exon skipping levels than their isosequential 2OMePS counterparts. Interestingly, in the mdx mouse model, 2FPS was less efficient than 2OMePS and suggested safety issues as evidenced by increased spleen size and weight loss. Our results do not support a clinical application for 2FPS AON. PMID:26623937

  8. Fnip1 regulates skeletal muscle fiber type specification, fatigue resistance, and susceptibility to muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Nicholas L.; Banks, Glen B.; Tsang, Mark; Margineantu, Daciana; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Chan, Jacky; Torres, Michelle; Liggitt, H. Denny; Hirenallur-S, Dinesh K.; Hockenbery, David M.; Raftery, Daniel; Iritani, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscle is broadly characterized by the presence of two distinct categories of muscle fibers called type I “red” slow twitch and type II “white” fast twitch, which display marked differences in contraction strength, metabolic strategies, and susceptibility to fatigue. The relative representation of each fiber type can have major influences on susceptibility to obesity, diabetes, and muscular dystrophies. However, the molecular factors controlling fiber type specification remain incompletely defined. In this study, we describe the control of fiber type specification and susceptibility to metabolic disease by folliculin interacting protein-1 (Fnip1). Using Fnip1 null mice, we found that loss of Fnip1 increased the representation of type I fibers characterized by increased myoglobin, slow twitch markers [myosin heavy chain 7 (MyH7), succinate dehydrogenase, troponin I 1, troponin C1, troponin T1], capillary density, and mitochondria number. Cultured Fnip1-null muscle fibers had higher oxidative capacity, and isolated Fnip1-null skeletal muscles were more resistant to postcontraction fatigue relative to WT skeletal muscles. Biochemical analyses revealed increased activation of the metabolic sensor AMP kinase (AMPK), and increased expression of the AMPK-target and transcriptional coactivator PGC1α in Fnip1 null skeletal muscle. Genetic disruption of PGC1α rescued normal levels of type I fiber markers MyH7 and myoglobin in Fnip1-null mice. Remarkably, loss of Fnip1 profoundly mitigated muscle damage in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These results indicate that Fnip1 controls skeletal muscle fiber type specification and warrant further study to determine whether inhibition of Fnip1 has therapeutic potential in muscular dystrophy diseases. PMID:25548157

  9. High-fat diet induced adiposity and insulin resistance in mice lacking the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Llagostera, Esther; Carmona, Mari Carmen; Vicente, Meritxell; Escorihuela, Rosa María; Kaliman, Perla

    2009-06-18

    Myotonic dystrophy 1 (MD1) is caused by a CTG expansion in the 3'-unstranslated region of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) gene. MD1 patients frequently present insulin resistance and increased visceral adiposity. We examined whether DMPK deficiency is a genetic risk factor for high-fat diet-induced adiposity and insulin resistance using the DMPK knockout mouse model. We found that high-fat fed DMPK knockout mice had significantly increased body weights, hypertrophic adipocytes and whole-body insulin resistance compared with wild-type mice. This nutrient-genome interaction should be considered by physicians given the cardiometabolic risks and sedentary lifestyle associated with MD1 patients. PMID:19482024

  10. Dysphagia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Assessed by Validated Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Sally K.; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive muscular weakness and death, most typically from respiratory complications. Dysphagia is common in DMD; however, the most appropriate swallowing assessments have not been universally agreed and the symptoms of dysphagia remain under-reported. Aims: To investigate symptoms of…

  11. Phonological Awareness Skills in Young Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waring, Phoebe; Woodyatt, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Substantial research has detailed the reading deficits experienced by children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although phonological awareness (PA) is vital in reading development, little is known about PA in the DMD population. This pilot study describes the PA abilities of a group of five young children with DMD, comparing the results…

  12. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockade for the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbers, G. M.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Rijken, R. A. J.; Kerkkamp, H. E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a neurogenic pain syndrome characterized by pain, vasomotor and dystrophic changes, and often motor impairments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brachial plexus blockade with local anaesthetic drugs as a treatment for this condition. Three patients responded well; three did not. (DB)

  13. Muscle Weakness and Speech in Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, Amy T.; Palmer, Phyllis M.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We documented speech and voice characteristics associated with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Although it is a rare disease, OPMD offers the opportunity to study the impact of myopathic weakness on speech production in the absence of neurologic deficits in a relatively homogeneous group of speakers. Methods: Twelve individuals…

  14. Advances in genetic therapeutic strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Guiraud, Simon; Chen, Huijia; Burns, David T.

    2015-01-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? This review highlights recent progress in genetically based therapies targeting the primary defect of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. What advances does it highlight? Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying Duchenne muscular dystrophy, leading to the development of genetic therapies. These include manipulation of the expression of the gene or related genes, the splicing of the gene and its translation, and replacement of the gene using viral approaches. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X‐linked disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. In the absence of the dystrophin protein, the link between the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix is destroyed, and this severely compromises the strength, flexibility and stability of muscle fibres. The devastating consequence is progressive muscle wasting and premature death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. There is currently no cure, and despite exhaustive palliative care, patients are restricted to a wheelchair by the age of 12 years and usually succumb to cardiac or respiratory complications in their late 20s. This review provides an update on the current genetically based therapies and clinical trials that target or compensate for the primary defect of this disease. These include dystrophin gene‐replacement strategies, genetic modification techniques to restore dystrophin expression, and modulation of the dystrophin homologue, utrophin, as a surrogate to re‐establish muscle function. PMID:26140505

  15. Neurotrophins, cytokines, oxidative parameters and funcionality in Progressive Muscular Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Comim, Clarissa M; Mathia, Gisiane B; Hoepers, Andreza; Tuon, Lisiane; Kapczinski, Flávio; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Quevedo, João; Rosa, Maria I

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the levels of brain derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cytokines and oxidative parameters in serum and tried to correlate them with the age and functionality of patients with Progressive Muscle Dystrophies (PMD). The patients were separated into six groups (case and controls pared by age and gender), as follows: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD); Steinert Myotonic Dystrophy (SMD); and Limb-girdle Muscular Dystrophy type-2A (LGMD2A). DMD patients (± 17.9 years old) had a decrease of functionality, an increase in the IL-1β and TNF-α levels and a decrease of IL-10 levels and superoxide dismutase activity in serum. SMD patients (± 25.8 years old) had a decrease of BDNF and IL-10 levels and superoxide dismutase activity and an increase of IL-1β levels in serum. LGMD2A patients (± 27.7 years old) had an decrease only in serum levels of IL-10. This research showed the first evidence of BDNF involvement in the SMD patients and a possible unbalance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels, along with decreased superoxide dismutase activity in serum of DMD and SMD patients. PMID:25910175

  16. Poor Facial Affect Recognition among Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, V. J.; Fee, R. J.; De Vivo, D. C.; Goldstein, E.

    2007-01-01

    Children with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy (MD) have delayed language and poor social skills and some meet criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder, yet they are identified by molecular, rather than behavioral, characteristics. To determine whether comprehension of facial affect is compromised in boys with MD, children were given a…

  17. Phosphorylation of intact erythrocytes in human muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Nigro, M.

    1986-04-01

    The uptake of exogenous /sup 32/Pi into the membrane proteins of intact erythrocytes was measured in 8 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. No abnormalities were noted after autoradiographic analysis. This contrasts with earlier results obtained when isolated membranes were phosphorylated with gamma-(/sup 32/P)ATP, and suggests a possible reinterpretation of those experiments.

  18. Occupational Potential in a Population with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schkade, Janette K.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-five males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were tested to assess their potential for occupational activity. Tests measured possible sensory deficits, strength, endurance, and fatigue in response to sustained fine motor activity. Results indicate that, within limitations, persons with this diagnosis can engage in activity leading to skill…

  19. The Child with Muscular Dystrophy in School. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schock, Nancy C.

    Practical information on children with muscular dystrophy is intended to help parents and teachers facilitate their inclusion in mainstreamed classrooms. Major topics addressed include the following: transportation arrangements; providing full information to the teacher regarding the child's specific abilities and physical limitations;…

  20. Swallow Characteristics in Patients with Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Phyllis M.; Neel, Amy T.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This prospective investigation evaluates oral weakness and its impact on swallow function, weight, and quality of life in patients with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Method: Intraoral pressure, swallow pressure, and endurance were measured using an Iowa Oral Performance Instrument in participants with OPMD and matched…

  1. The Assessment of Intelligence in Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mearig, Judith S.

    1979-01-01

    Challenges assumptions and research procedures leading to the position that below-average intellectual potential is an integral part of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A study of 58 boys (ages 5 to 18) from urban, suburban, and rural settings indicated IQ range of 59 to 131 and no evidence of significant verbal deficit (reported in earlier studies).…

  2. Psychiatric and Cognitive Phenotype of Childhood Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douniol, Marie; Jacquette, Aurelia; Cohen, David; Bodeau, Nicolas; Rachidi, Linda; Angeard, Nathalie; Cuisset, Jean-Marie; Vallee, Louis; Eymard, Bruno; Plaza, Monique; Heron, Delphine; Guile, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the psychiatric and cognitive phenotype in young individuals with the childhood form of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Method: Twenty-eight individuals (15 females, 13 males) with childhood DM1 (mean age 17y, SD 4.6, range 7-24y) were assessed using standardized instruments and cognitive testing of general intelligence,…

  3. Asynchronous remodeling is a driver of failed regeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Dadgar, Sherry; Wang, Zuyi; Johnston, Helen; Kesari, Akanchha; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Chen, Yi-Wen; Hill, D Ashley; Partridge, Terence A; Giri, Mamta; Freishtat, Robert J; Nazarian, Javad; Xuan, Jianhua; Wang, Yue; Hoffman, Eric P

    2014-10-13

    We sought to determine the mechanisms underlying failure of muscle regeneration that is observed in dystrophic muscle through hypothesis generation using muscle profiling data (human dystrophy and murine regeneration). We found that transforming growth factor β-centered networks strongly associated with pathological fibrosis and failed regeneration were also induced during normal regeneration but at distinct time points. We hypothesized that asynchronously regenerating microenvironments are an underlying driver of fibrosis and failed regeneration. We validated this hypothesis using an experimental model of focal asynchronous bouts of muscle regeneration in wild-type (WT) mice. A chronic inflammatory state and reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity are observed in bouts separated by 4 d, whereas a chronic profibrotic state was seen in bouts separated by 10 d. Treatment of asynchronously remodeling WT muscle with either prednisone or VBP15 mitigated the molecular phenotype. Our asynchronous regeneration model for pathological fibrosis and muscle wasting in the muscular dystrophies is likely generalizable to tissue failure in chronic inflammatory states in other regenerative tissues. PMID:25313409

  4. Reengineering a transmembrane protein to treat muscular dystrophy using exon skipping.

    PubMed

    Gao, Quan Q; Wyatt, Eugene; Goldstein, Jeff A; LoPresti, Peter; Castillo, Lisa M; Gazda, Alec; Petrossian, Natalie; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Barefield, David Y; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Bönnemann, Carsten; Wolf, Matthew; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2015-11-01

    Exon skipping uses antisense oligonucleotides as a treatment for genetic diseases. The antisense oligonucleotides used for exon skipping are designed to bypass premature stop codons in the target RNA and restore reading frame disruption. Exon skipping is currently being tested in humans with dystrophin gene mutations who have Duchenne muscular dystrophy. For Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the rationale for exon skipping derived from observations in patients with naturally occurring dystrophin gene mutations that generated internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin proteins. We have now expanded the potential for exon skipping by testing whether an internal, in-frame truncation of a transmembrane protein γ-sarcoglycan is functional. We generated an internally truncated γ-sarcoglycan protein that we have termed Mini-Gamma by deleting a large portion of the extracellular domain. Mini-Gamma provided functional and pathological benefits to correct the loss of γ-sarcoglycan in a Drosophila model, in heterologous cell expression studies, and in transgenic mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan. We generated a cellular model of human muscle disease and showed that multiple exon skipping could be induced in RNA that encodes a mutant human γ-sarcoglycan. Since Mini-Gamma represents removal of 4 of the 7 coding exons in γ-sarcoglycan, this approach provides a viable strategy to treat the majority of patients with γ-sarcoglycan gene mutations. PMID:26457733

  5. Asynchronous remodeling is a driver of failed regeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Dadgar, Sherry; Wang, Zuyi; Johnston, Helen; Kesari, Akanchha; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Chen, Yi-Wen; Hill, D. Ashley; Partridge, Terence A.; Giri, Mamta; Freishtat, Robert J.; Nazarian, Javad; Xuan, Jianhua; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine the mechanisms underlying failure of muscle regeneration that is observed in dystrophic muscle through hypothesis generation using muscle profiling data (human dystrophy and murine regeneration). We found that transforming growth factor β–centered networks strongly associated with pathological fibrosis and failed regeneration were also induced during normal regeneration but at distinct time points. We hypothesized that asynchronously regenerating microenvironments are an underlying driver of fibrosis and failed regeneration. We validated this hypothesis using an experimental model of focal asynchronous bouts of muscle regeneration in wild-type (WT) mice. A chronic inflammatory state and reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity are observed in bouts separated by 4 d, whereas a chronic profibrotic state was seen in bouts separated by 10 d. Treatment of asynchronously remodeling WT muscle with either prednisone or VBP15 mitigated the molecular phenotype. Our asynchronous regeneration model for pathological fibrosis and muscle wasting in the muscular dystrophies is likely generalizable to tissue failure in chronic inflammatory states in other regenerative tissues. PMID:25313409

  6. Cardiac Niche Influences the Direct Reprogramming of Canine Fibroblasts into Cardiomyocyte-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Palazzolo, Giacomo; Quattrocelli, Mattia; Toelen, Jaan; Dominici, Roberto; Tettamenti, Guido; Barthelemy, Inès; Blot, Stephane; Gijsbers, Rik; Cassano, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by mutation of dystrophin gene and primarily affect skeletal and cardiac muscles. Cardiac involvement in dystrophic GRMD dogs has been demonstrated by electrocardiographic studies with the onset of a progressive cardiomyopathy similar to the cardiac disease in DMD patients. In this respect, GRMD is a useful model to explore cardiac and skeletal muscle pathogenesis and for developing new therapeutic protocols. Here we describe a protocol to convert GRMD canine fibroblasts isolated from heart and skin into induced cardiac-like myocytes (ciCLMs). We used a mix of transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, TBX5, and MEF2C), known to be able to differentiate mouse and human somatic cells into ciCLMs. Exogenous gene expression was obtained using four lentiviral vectors carrying transcription factor genes and different resistance genes. Our data demonstrate a direct switch from fibroblast into ciCLMs with no activation of early cardiac genes. ciCLMs were unable to contract spontaneously, suggesting, differently from mouse and human cells, an incomplete differentiation process. However, when transplanted in neonatal hearts of SCID/Beige mice, ciCLMs participate in cardiac myogenesis. PMID:26681949

  7. Cardiac Niche Influences the Direct Reprogramming of Canine Fibroblasts into Cardiomyocyte-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Palazzolo, Giacomo; Quattrocelli, Mattia; Toelen, Jaan; Dominici, Roberto; Anastasia, Luigi; Tettamenti, Guido; Barthelemy, Inès; Blot, Stephane; Gijsbers, Rik; Cassano, Marco; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2016-01-01

    The Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by mutation of dystrophin gene and primarily affect skeletal and cardiac muscles. Cardiac involvement in dystrophic GRMD dogs has been demonstrated by electrocardiographic studies with the onset of a progressive cardiomyopathy similar to the cardiac disease in DMD patients. In this respect, GRMD is a useful model to explore cardiac and skeletal muscle pathogenesis and for developing new therapeutic protocols. Here we describe a protocol to convert GRMD canine fibroblasts isolated from heart and skin into induced cardiac-like myocytes (ciCLMs). We used a mix of transcription factors (GATA4, HAND2, TBX5, and MEF2C), known to be able to differentiate mouse and human somatic cells into ciCLMs. Exogenous gene expression was obtained using four lentiviral vectors carrying transcription factor genes and different resistance genes. Our data demonstrate a direct switch from fibroblast into ciCLMs with no activation of early cardiac genes. ciCLMs were unable to contract spontaneously, suggesting, differently from mouse and human cells, an incomplete differentiation process. However, when transplanted in neonatal hearts of SCID/Beige mice, ciCLMs participate in cardiac myogenesis. PMID:26681949

  8. Glycosylation defects: a new mechanism for muscular dystrophy?

    PubMed

    Grewal, Prabhjit K; Hewitt, Jane E

    2003-10-15

    Recently, post-translational modification of proteins has been defined as a new area of focus for muscular dystrophy research by the identification of a group of disease genes that encode known or putative glycosylation enzymes. Walker-Warburg Syndrome (WWS) and muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB) are caused by mutations in two genes involved in O-mannosylation, POMT1 and POMGnT1, respectively. Fukuyama muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is due to mutations in fukutin, a putative phospholigand transferase. Congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C and limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I are allelic, both being due to mutations in the gene-encoding fukutin-related protein (FKRP). Finally, the causative gene in the myodystrophy (myd) mouse is a putative bifunctional glycosyltransferase (Large). WWS, MEB, FCMD and the myd mouse are also associated with neuronal migration abnormalities (often type II lissencephaly) and ocular or retinal defects. A deficiency in post-translational modification of alpha-dystroglycan is a common feature of all these muscular dystrophies and is thought to involve O-glycosylation pathways. This abnormally modified alpha-dystroglycan is deficient in binding to extracellular matrix ligands, including laminin and agrin. Selective deletion of dystroglycan in the central nervous system (CNS) produces brain abnormalities with striking similarities to WWS, MEB, FCMD and the myd mouse. Thus, impaired dystroglycan function is strongly implicated in these diseases. However, it is unlikely that these five glycosylation enzymes only have a role in glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan and it is important that other protein targets are identified. PMID:12925572

  9. Nanolipodendrosome-loaded glatiramer acetate and myogenic differentiation 1 as augmentation therapeutic strategy approaches in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Ehsan; Zakeri, Saba; Keyhanvar, Peyman; Bagheri, Meisam; Mahjoubi, Parvin; Asadian, Mahtab; Omoomi, Nogol; Dehqanian, Mohammad; Ghalandarlaki, Negar; Darvishmohammadi, Tahmineh; Farjadian, Fatemeh; Golvajoee, Mohammad Sadegh; Afzal, Shadi; Ghaffari, Maryam; Cohan, Reza Ahangari; Gravand, Amin; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2013-01-01

    Backgrond Muscular dystrophies consist of a number of juvenile and adult forms of complex disorders which generally cause weakness or efficiency defects affecting skeletal muscles or, in some kinds, other types of tissues in all parts of the body are vastly affected. In previous studies, it was observed that along with muscular dystrophy, immune inflammation was caused by inflammatory cells invasion – like T lymphocyte markers (CD8+/CD4+). Inflammatory processes play a major part in muscular fibrosis in muscular dystrophy patients. Additionally, a significant decrease in amounts of two myogenic recovery factors (myogenic differentation 1 [MyoD] and myogenin) in animal models was observed. The drug glatiramer acetate causes anti-inflammatory cytokines to increase and T helper (Th) cells to induce, in an as yet unknown mechanism. MyoD recovery activity in muscular cells justifies using it alongside this drug. Methods In this study, a nanolipodendrosome carrier as a drug delivery system was designed. The purpose of the system was to maximize the delivery and efficiency of the two drug factors, MyoD and myogenin, and introduce them as novel therapeutic agents in muscular dystrophy phenotypic mice. The generation of new muscular cells was analyzed in SW1 mice. Then, immune system changes and probable side effects after injecting the nanodrug formulations were investigated. Results The loaded lipodendrimer nanocarrier with the candidate drug, in comparison with the nandrolone control drug, caused a significant increase in muscular mass, a reduction in CD4+/CD8+ inflammation markers, and no significant toxicity was observed. The results support the hypothesis that the nanolipodendrimer containing the two candidate drugs will probably be an efficient means to ameliorate muscular degeneration, and warrants further investigation. PMID:23966782

  10. Sarcospan integration into laminin-binding adhesion complexes that ameliorate muscular dystrophy requires utrophin and α7 integrin

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jamie L.; Oh, Jennifer; Chou, Eric; Lee, Joy A.; Holmberg, Johan; Burkin, Dean J.; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that result in loss of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex, a laminin receptor that connects the myofiber to its surrounding extracellular matrix. Utrophin, a dystrophin ortholog that is normally localized to the neuromuscular junction, is naturally upregulated in DMD muscle, which partially compensates for the loss of dystrophin. Transgenic overexpression of utrophin causes broad sarcolemma localization of utrophin, restoration of laminin binding and amelioration of disease in the mdx mouse model of DMD. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of sarcospan, a dystrophin- and utrophin-binding protein, ameliorates mdx muscular dystrophy. Sarcospan boosts levels of utrophin to therapeutic levels at the sarcolemma, where attachment to laminin is restored. However, understanding the compensatory mechanism is complicated by concomitant upregulation of α7β1 integrin, which also binds laminin. Similar to the effects of utrophin, transgenic overexpression of α7 integrin prevents DMD disease in mice and is accompanied by increased abundance of utrophin around the extra-synaptic sarcolemma. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying sarcospan ‘rescue’ of muscular dystrophy, we created double-knockout mice to test the contributions of utrophin or α7 integrin. We show that sarcospan-mediated amelioration of muscular dystrophy in DMD mice is dependent on the presence of both utrophin and α7β1 integrin, even when they are individually expressed at therapeutic levels. Furthermore, we found that association of sarcospan into laminin-binding complexes is dependent on utrophin and α7β1 integrin. PMID:25504048

  11. Lysosomal proteolysis inhibition selectively disrupts axonal transport of degradative organelles and causes an Alzheimer’s-like axonal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sooyeon; Sato, Yutaka; Nixon, Ralph A.

    2012-01-01

    In the hallmark neuritic dystrophy of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), autophagic vacuoles containing incompletely digested proteins selectively accumulate in focal axonal swellings, reflecting defects in both axonal transport and autophagy. Here, we investigated the possibility that impaired lysosomal proteolysis could be a basis for both defects leading to neuritic dystrophy. In living primary mouse cortical neurons expressing fluorescence-tagged markers, LC3-positive autophagosomes forming in axons rapidly acquired the endo-lysosomal markers, Rab7 and LAMP1, and underwent exclusive retrograde movement. Proteolytic clearance of these transported autophagic vacuoles was initiated upon fusion with bi-directionally moving lysosomes that increase in number at more proximal axon levels and in the perikaryon. Disrupting lysosomal proteolysis by either inhibiting cathepsins directly or by suppressing lysosomal acidification slowed the axonal transport of autolysosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes and caused their selective accumulation within dystrophic axonal swellings. Mitochondria and other organelles lacking cathepsins moved normally under these conditions, indicating that the general functioning of the axonal transport system was preserved. Dystrophic swellings induced by lysosomal proteolysis inhibition resembled in composition those in several mouse models of AD and also acquired other AD-like features, including immunopositivity for ubiquitin, APP, and neurofilament protein hyperphosphorylation. Restoration of lysosomal proteolysis reversed the affected movements of proteolytic Rab7 vesicles, which in turn, largely cleared autophagic substrates and reversed the axonal dystrophy. These studies identify the AD-associated defects in neuronal lysosomal proteolysis as a possible basis for the selective transport abnormalities and highly characteristic pattern of neuritic dystrophy associated with AD. PMID:21613495

  12. Muscle ERRγ mitigates Duchenne muscular dystrophy via metabolic and angiogenic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Matsakas, Antonios; Yadav, Vikas; Lorca, Sabina; Narkar, Vihang

    2013-10-01

    Treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by replacing mutant dystrophin or restoring dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DAG) has been clinically challenging. Instead, identifying and targeting muscle pathways deregulated in DMD will provide new therapeutic avenues. We report that the expression of nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor-γ (ERRγ), and its metabolic and angiogenic targets are down-regulated (50-85%) in skeletal muscles of mdx mice (DMD model) vs. wild-type mice. Corelatively, oxidative myofibers, muscle vasculature, and exercise tolerance (33%) are decreased in mdx vs. wild-type mice. Overexpressing ERRγ selectively in the dystrophic muscles of the mdx mice restored metabolic and angiogenic gene expression compared with control mdx mice. Further, ERRγ enhanced muscle oxidative myofibers, vasculature, and blood flow (by 33-66%) and improved exercise tolerance (by 75%) in the dystrophic mice. Restoring muscle ERRγ pathway ameliorated muscle damage and also prevented DMD hallmarks of postexercise muscle damage, hypoxia, and fatigue in mdx mice. Notably, ERRγ did not restore sarcolemmal DAG complex, which is thus dispensable for antidystrophic effects of ERRγ. In summary, ERRγ-dependent metabolic and angiogenic gene program is defective in DMD, and we demonstrate that its restoration is a potential strategy for treating muscular dystrophy. PMID:23781095

  13. Therapeutic Potential of Proteasome Inhibition in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Gazzerro, Elisabetta; Assereto, Stefania; Bonetto, Andrea; Sotgia, Federica; Scarfì, Sonia; Pistorio, Angela; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Cilli, Michele; Bruno, Claudio; Zara, Federico; Lisanti, Michael P.; Minetti, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and its milder allelic variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), result from mutations of the dystrophin gene and lead to progressive muscle deterioration. Enhanced activation of proteasomal degradation underlies critical steps in the pathogenesis of the DMD/BMD dystrophic process. Previously, we demonstrated that treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 rescues the cell membrane localization of dystrophin and the dystrophin glycoprotein complex in mdx mice, a natural genetic mouse model of DMD. The current work aims to thoroughly define the therapeutic potential in dystrophinopathies of Velcade, a drug that selectively blocks the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Velcade is particularly intriguing since it has been approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Therefore, its side effects in humans have been explored. Velcade effects were analyzed through two independent methodological approaches. First, we administered the drug systemically in mdx mice over a 2-week period. In this system, Velcade restores the membrane expression of dystrophin and dystrophin glycoprotein complex members and improves the dystrophic phenotype. In a second approach, we treated with the compound explants from muscle biopsies of DMD or BMD patients. We show that the inhibition of the proteasome pathway up-regulates dystrophin, α-sarcoglycan, and β-dystroglycan protein levels in explants from BMD patients, whereas it increases the proteins of the dystrophin glycoprotein complex in DMD cases. PMID:20304949

  14. Ageing and muscular dystrophy differentially affect murine pharyngeal muscles in a region-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E; Luo, Qingwei; Ho, Justin; Vest, Katherine E; Sokoloff, Alan J; Pavlath, Grace K

    2014-01-01

    The inability to swallow, or dysphagia, is a debilitating and life-threatening condition that arises with ageing or disease. Dysphagia results from neurological or muscular impairment of one or more pharyngeal muscles, which function together to ensure proper swallowing and prevent the aspiration of food or liquid into the lungs. Little is known about the effects of age or disease on pharyngeal muscles as a group. Here we show ageing affected pharyngeal muscle growth and atrophy in wild-type mice depending on the particular muscle analysed. Furthermore, wild-type mice also developed dysphagia with ageing. Additionally, we studied pharyngeal muscles in a mouse model for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy, a dysphagic disease caused by a polyalanine expansion in the RNA binding protein, PABPN1. We examined pharyngeal muscles of mice overexpressing either wild-type A10 or mutant A17 PABPN1. Overexpression of mutant A17 PABPN1 differentially affected growth of the palatopharyngeus muscle dependent on its location within the pharynx. Interestingly, overexpression of wild-type A10 PABPN1 was protective against age-related muscle atrophy in the laryngopharynx and prevented the development of age-related dysphagia. These results demonstrate that pharyngeal muscles are differentially affected by both ageing and muscular dystrophy in a region-dependent manner. These studies lay important groundwork for understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate pharyngeal muscle growth and atrophy, which may lead to novel therapies for individuals with dysphagia. PMID:25326455

  15. RNA toxicity in myotonic muscular dystrophy induces NKX2-5 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yadava, Ramesh S; Frenzel-McCardell, Carla D; Yu, Qing; Srinivasan, Varadamurthy; Tucker, Amy L; Puymirat, Jack; Thornton, Charles A; Prall, Owen W; Harvey, Richard P; Mahadevan, Mani S

    2010-01-01

    Myotonic muscular dystrophy (DM1) is the most common inherited neuromuscular disorder in adults and is considered the first example of a disease caused by RNA toxicity. Using a reversible transgenic mouse model of RNA toxicity in DM1, we provide evidence that DM1 is associated with induced NKX2-5 expression. Transgene expression resulted in cardiac conduction defects, increased expression of the cardiac-specific transcription factor NKX2-5 and profound disturbances in connexin 40 and connexin 43. Notably, overexpression of the DMPK 3′ UTR mRNA in mouse skeletal muscle also induced transcriptional activation of Nkx2-5 and its targets. In human muscles, these changes were specific to DM1 and were not present in other muscular dystrophies. The effects on NKX2-5 and its downstream targets were reversed by silencing toxic RNA expression. Furthermore, using Nkx2-5+/− mice, we show that NKX2-5 is the first genetic modifier of DM1-associated RNA toxicity in the heart. PMID:18084293

  16. Deficiency of merosin in dystrophic dy mouse homologue of congenital muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Sunada, Y.; Campbell, K.P.; Bernier, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Merosin (laminin M chain) is the predominant laminin isoform in the basal lamina of striated muscle and peripheral nerve and is a native ligand for {alpha}-dystroglycan, a novel laminin receptor. Merosin is linked to the subsarcolemmal actin cytoskeleton via the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), which plays an important role for maintenance of normal muscle function. We have mapped the mouse merosin gene, Lamm, to the region containing the dystrophia muscularis (dy) locus on chromosome 10. This suggested the possibility that a mutation in the merosin gene could be responsible for the dy mouse, an animal model for autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy, and prompted us to test this hypothesis. We analyzed the status of merosin expression in dy mouse by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. In dy mouse skeletal and cardiac muscle and peripheral nerve, merosin was reduced greater than 90% as compared to control mice. However, the expression of laminin B1/B2 chains and collagen type IV was smaller to that in control mice. These findings strongly suggest that merosin deficiency may be the primary defect in the dy mouse. Furthermore, we have identified two patients afflicted with congenital muscular dystrophy with merosin deficiency, providing the basis for future studies of molecular pathogenesis and gene therapy.

  17. Where do we stand in trial readiness for autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies?

    PubMed

    Straub, Volker; Bertoli, Marta

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2) are a group of genetically heterogeneous diseases that are typically characterised by progressive weakness and wasting of the shoulder and pelvic girdle muscles. Many of the more than 20 different conditions show overlapping clinical features with other forms of muscular dystrophy, congenital, myofibrillar or even distal myopathies and also with acquired muscle diseases. Although individually extremely rare, all types of LGMD2 together form an important differential diagnostic group among neuromuscular diseases. Despite improved diagnostics and pathomechanistic insight, a curative therapy is currently lacking for any of these diseases. Medical care consists of the symptomatic treatment of complications, aiming to improve life expectancy and quality of life. Besides well characterised pre-clinical tools like animal models and cell culture assays, the determinants of successful drug development programmes for rare diseases include a good understanding of the phenotype and natural history of the disease, the existence of clinically relevant outcome measures, guidance on care standards, up to date patient registries, and, ideally, biomarkers that can help assess disease severity or drug response. Strong patient organisations driving research and successful partnerships between academia, advocacy, industry and regulatory authorities can also help accelerate the elaboration of clinical trials. All these determinants constitute aspects of translational research efforts and influence patient access to therapies. Here we review the current status of determinants of successful drug development programmes for LGMD2, and the challenges of translating promising therapeutic strategies into effective and accessible treatments for patients. PMID:26810373

  18. SPP1 genotype is a determinant of disease severity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pegoraro, E.; Hoffman, E.P.; Piva, L.; Gavassini, B.F.; Cagnin, S.; Ermani, M.; Bello, L.; Soraru, G.; Pacchioni, B.; Bonifati, M.D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Angelini, C.; Kesari, A.; Lee, I.; Gordish-Dressman, H.; Devaney, J.M.; McDonald, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common single-gene lethal disorder. Substantial patient–patient variability in disease onset and progression and response to glucocorticoids is seen, suggesting genetic or environmental modifiers. Methods: Two DMD cohorts were used as test and validation groups to define genetic modifiers: a Padova longitudinal cohort (n = 106) and the Cooperative International Neuromuscular Research Group (CINRG) cross-sectional natural history cohort (n = 156). Single nucleotide polymorphisms to be genotyped were selected from mRNA profiling in patients with severe vs mild DMD, and genome-wide association studies in metabolism and polymorphisms influencing muscle phenotypes in normal volunteers were studied. Results: Effects on both disease progression and response to glucocorticoids were observed with polymorphism rs28357094 in the gene promoter of SPP1 (osteopontin). The G allele (dominant model; 35% of subjects) was associated with more rapid progression (Padova cohort log rank p = 0.003), and 12%–19% less grip strength (CINRG cohort p = 0.0003). Conclusions: Osteopontin genotype is a genetic modifier of disease severity in Duchenne dystrophy. Inclusion of genotype data as a covariate or in inclusion criteria in DMD clinical trials would reduce intersubject variance, and increase sensitivity of the trials, particularly in older subjects. PMID:21178099

  19. Mechanisms of disease: congenital muscular dystrophies-glycosylation takes center stage.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul T

    2006-04-01

    Recent studies have defined a group of muscular dystrophies, now termed the dystroglycanopathies, as novel disorders of glycosylation. These conditions include Walker-Warburg syndrome, muscle-eye-brain disease, Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy types 1C and 1D, and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I. Although clinical findings can be highly variable, dystroglycanopathies are all characterized by cortical malformations and ocular defects at the more severe end of the clinical spectrum, in addition to muscular dystrophy. All of these disorders are defined by the underglycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan. Defective glycosylation of dystroglycan severs the link between this important cell adhesion molecule and the extracellular matrix, thereby contributing to cellular pathology. Recent experiments indicate that glycosylation might not only define forms of muscular dystrophy but also provide an avenue to the development of therapies for these disorders. PMID:16932553

  20. Possible influences on the expression of X chromosome-linked dystrophin abnormalities by heterozygosity for autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, A H; Neumann, P E; Arahata, K; Arikawa, E; Nonaka, I; Anderson, M S; Kunkel, L M

    1992-01-01

    Abnormalities of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein of muscle and nerve, are generally considered specific for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. However, several patients have recently been identified with dystrophin deficiency who, before dystrophin testing, were considered to have Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) on the basis of clinical findings. Epidemiologic data suggest that only 1/3500 males with autosomal recessive FCMD should have abnormal dystrophin. To explain the observation of 3/23 FCMD males with abnormal dystrophin, we propose that dystrophin and the FCMD gene product interact and that the earlier onset and greater severity of these patients' phenotype (relative to Duchenne muscular dystrophy) are due to their being heterozygous for the FCMD mutation in addition to being hemizygous for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genotype that is predicted to occur in 1/175,000 Japanese males. This model may help explain the genetic basis for some of the clinical and pathological variability seen among patients with FCMD, and it has potential implications for understanding the inheritance of other autosomal recessive disorders in general. For example, sex ratios for rare autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in proteins that interact with X chromosome-linked gene products may display predictable deviation from 1:1. Images PMID:1731332

  1. Possible influences on the expression of X chromosome-linked dystrophin abnormalities by heterozygosity for autosomal recessive Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Beggs, A.H.; Neumann, P.E.; Anderson, M.S.; Kunkel, L.M. ); Arahata, Kiichi; Arikawa, Eri; Nonaka, Ikuya )

    1992-01-15

    Abnormalities of dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein of muscle and nerve, are generally considered specific for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. However, several patients have recently been identified with dystrophin deficiency who, before dystrophin testing, were considered to have Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) on the basis of clinical findings. Epidemiologic data suggest that only 1/3,500 males with autosomal recessive FCMD should have abnormal dystrophin. To explain the observation of 3/23 FCMD males with abnormal dystrophin, the authors propose that dystrophin and the FCMD gene product interact and that the earlier onset and greater severity of these patients' phenotype (relative to Duchenne muscular dystrophy) are due to their being heterozygous for the FCMD mutation in addition to being hemizygous for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a genotype that is predicted to occur in 1/175,000 Japanese males. This model may help explain the genetic basis for some of the clinical and pathological variability seen among patients with FCMD, and it has potential implications for understanding the inheritance of other autosomal recessive disorders in general. For example, sex ratios for rare autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations in proteins that interact with X chromosome-linked gene products may display predictable deviation from 1:1.

  2. Molecular genetics of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD).

    PubMed

    Fisher, J; Upadhyaya, M

    1997-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD; MIM 158900), is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder. The disease is characterized by the weakness of the muscles of the face, upper-arm and shoulder girdle. The gene for FSHD has been mapped to 4q35 (FSHD1A) and is closely linked to D4F1O4S1, which detects two highly polymorphic loci (located at 4q35 and 10q26), with restriction enzyme EcoRI. The polymorphic EcoRI fragment detected with D4F1O4S1 is composed almost entirely of D4Z4 (3.3 kb) tandem repeats. In FSHD patients a deletion of the integral number of D4Z4 repeats generates a fragment which is usually smaller than 35 kb, whereas in normal controls, the size usually ranges from 50 to 300 kb. These 'small' EcoRI fragments segregate with FSHD in families but appear as de novo deletions in the majority of sporadic cases. Each 3.3 kb repeat contains two homeobox domains neither of which has yet been proven to encode a protein. D4Z4 is located adjacent to the 4q telomere and cross hybridizes to several different regions of the genome. Although D4Z4 probably does not encode a protein with any direct association to FSHD, a clear correlation has been shown between the deletion size at this locus and the age at onset of the disease in FSHD patients. In approximately 5-10% of FSHD families the disease locus is unlinked to 4q35 (locus designated FSHD1B), however, none of the non 4q35 loci for FSHD have yet been chromosomally located. Thus so far, only one gene, FRG1 (FSHD region gene 1) has been identified from the FSHD candidate region on 4q35. The apparent low level of expressed sequences from within this region, the integral deletions of D4Z4 repeats observed in FSHD patients and the close proximity of these repeats to the 4q telomere, all suggest that the disease may be the result of position effect variegation. To date, the molecular diagnosis of FSHD with D4F104S1 has been most secure in those families which are linked to other 4q35 markers. Recent studies

  3. Improving highly accelerated fat fraction measurements for clinical trials in muscular dystrophy: origin and quantitative effect of R2* changes.

    PubMed

    Loughran, Thomas; Higgins, David M; McCallum, Michelle; Coombs, Anna; Straub, Volker; Hollingsworth, Kieren G

    2015-05-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of R2* modeling in conventional and accelerated measurements of skeletal muscle fat fraction in control subjects and patients with muscular dystrophy. Materials and Methods Eight patients with Becker muscular dystrophy and eight matched control subjects were recruited with approval from the Newcastle and North Tyneside 2 Research Ethics Committee and with written consent. Chemical-shift images with six widely spaced echo times (in 3.5-msec increments) were acquired to correlate R2* and muscle fat fraction. The effect of incorporating or neglecting R2* modeling on fat fraction magnitude and variance was evaluated in a typical three-echo protocol (with 0.78-msec increments). Accelerated acquisitions with this protocol with 3.65×, 4.94×, and 6.42× undersampling were reconstructed by using combined compressed sensing and parallel imaging and fat fraction maps produced with R2* modeling. Results Muscle R2* at 3.0 T (33-125 sec(-1)) depended on the morphology of fat replacement, the highest values occurring with the greatest interdigitation of fat. The inclusion of R2* modeling removed bias, which was greatest at low fat fraction, but did not increase variance. The 95% limits of agreement of the accelerated acquisitions were tight and not degraded by R2* modeling (1.65%, 1.95%, and 2.22% for 3.65×, 4.94×, and 6.42× acceleration, respectively). Conclusion Incorporating R2* modeling prevents systematic errors in muscle fat fraction by up to 3.5% without loss of precision and should be incorporated into all muscular dystrophy studies. Fat fraction measurements can be accelerated fivefold by using combined compressed sensing and parallel imaging, modeling for R2* without loss of fidelity. PMID:25575118

  4. GCAP1 mutations associated with autosomal dominant cone dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the heterogeneity of autosomal dominant cone and cone-rod dystrophies (adCD, and adCORD, respectively). As one of the best characterized adCD genes, we focus on the GUCA1A gene encoding guanylate cyclase activating protein 1 (GCAP1), a protein carrying three high affinity Ca2+ binding motifs (EF hands). GCAP1 senses changes in cytoplasmic free [Ca2+] and communicates these changes to GC1, by either inhibiting it (at high free [Ca2+]), or stimulating it (at low free [Ca2+]). A number of missense mutations altering the structure and Ca2+ affinity of EF hands have been discovered. These mutations are associated with a gain of function, producing dominant cone and cone rod dystrophy phenotypes. In this article we review these mutations and describe the consequences of specific mutations on GCAP1 structure and GC stimulation. PMID:20238026

  5. [Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: description of a case with skin lesions].

    PubMed

    Vergara, Aránzazu; Isarría, María J; Prado Sánchez-Caminero, María; Guerra, Aurora

    2005-10-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy or algodystrophy is a poorly defined syndrome in which the patient develops pain disproportionate to the cause. It is included among the complex regional pain syndromes. The symptoms are triggered by some type of trauma, at times trivial, and consist of burning pain, edema, changes in skin color, alterations in vascularization, temperature changes, hyperhidrosis and skin disorders, which primarily consist of atrophic changes. Other less frequent cutaneous manifestations have been described in patients with this syndrome. These include papules, blisters, inflammatory lesions and reticulated hyperpigmentation. We discuss the case of a patient with reflex sympathetic dystrophy who presented with superficial ulcers on the affected limb, which mimicked dermatitis artefacta. PMID:16476289

  6. Does modafinil enhance activity of patients with myotonic dystrophy?

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, G.J.; van Dijk, J.G.

    2007-01-01

    We performed a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study in 13 patients with myotonic dystrophy to address the question whether modafinil, known to improve hypersomnolence in myotonic dystrophy, may improve levels of activity as well. We used the Epworth Sleepiness Scale as a measure of hypersomnolence and a structured interview of the patient and the partner or housemate as a measure of activity. We additionally used a restricted form of the RAND-36 to relate a possible improvement of activity to perceived general health. We confirmed earlier positive findings of modafinil regarding reduced somnolence (p = 0.015), but no significant effects were seen regarding activity levels (p = 0.2 for patients’ self-reports and 0.5 for partners’ reports). PMID:17285226

  7. Bilateral choroidal excavation in best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Parodi, Maurizio Battaglia; Zucchiatti, Ilaria; Fasce, Francesco; Bandello, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Focal choroidal excavation (FCE) has recently been described as one or more localized areas of choroidal excavation on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The authors describe a case of bilateral FCE in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD). SD-OCT revealed FCE in both eyes characterized by interruption of the internal segment-outer segment junction and the presence of subretinal hyporeflective space. This is the first report describing bilateral FCE in a distinct macular disorder and specifically with VMD. Future investigations are warranted to ascertain the involvement of other macular dystrophies with atrophic evolution and the impact of FCE on the clinical course. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2014;45:e8-e10.]. PMID:24512759

  8. [Optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence in Best macular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Chebil, A; Charfi, H; Largueche, L; El Matri, L

    2016-06-01

    Best vitelliform macular dystrophy is the second most frequent hereditary maculopathy, with bilateral involvement and juvenile onset. It is clinically characterized by bilateral deposits of lipofuscin-like autofluorescent material in the subretinal space, with a typical phenotypic manifestation taking the form of a vitelliform macular lesion evolving gradually into more advanced stages. The purpose of our study was to describe fundus autofluorescence patterns and OCT findings in three patients (6 eyes) with several stages of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become the first imaging technique to order when confronted with a hereditary maculopathy suggesting Best disease. Fundus autofluorescence combined with OCT allow for better diagnosis and management, which are necessary for any genetic analysis. PMID:27206620

  9. Identification of the gene responsible for Best macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Petrukhin, K; Koisti, M J; Bakall, B; Li, W; Xie, G; Marknell, T; Sandgren, O; Forsman, K; Holmgren, G; Andreasson, S; Vujic, M; Bergen, A A; McGarty-Dugan, V; Figueroa, D; Austin, C P; Metzker, M L; Caskey, C T; Wadelius, C

    1998-07-01

    Best macular dystrophy (BMD), also known as vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2; OMIM 153700), is an autosomal dominant form of macular degeneration characterized by an abnormal accumulation of lipofuscin within and beneath the retinal pigment epithelium cells. In pursuit of the disease gene, we limited the minimum genetic region by recombination breakpoint analysis and mapped to this region a novel retina-specific gene (VMD2). Genetic mapping data, identification of five independent disease-specific mutations and expression studies provide evidence that mutations within the candidate gene are a cause of BMD. The 3' UTR of the candidate gene contains a region of antisense complementarity to the 3' UTR of the ferritin heavy-chain gene (FTH1), indicating the possibility of antisense interaction between VMD2 and FTH1 transcripts. PMID:9662395

  10. Bestrophin gene mutations in patients with Best vitelliform macular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, G M; Kakuk, L E; Griesinger, I B; Simpson, S A; Nowak, N J; Small, K W; Maumenee, I H; Rosenfeld, P J; Sieving, P A; Shows, T B; Ayyagari, R

    1999-05-15

    Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2) is an autosomal dominant dystrophy with a juvenile age of onset. Mutations in the Bestrophin gene were shown in patients affected with VMD2. In a mutation study, we made three new and interesting observations. First, we identified possible mutation hotspots within the gene, suggesting that particular regions of the protein have greater functional significance than others. Second, we described a 2-bp deletion in a part of the gene where mutations have not previously been reported; this mutation causes a frameshift and subsequent premature termination of the protein. Finally, we have evidence that some mutations are associated with variable expression of the disease, suggesting the involvement of other factors or genes in the disease phenotype. PMID:10331951

  11. The importance of genetic diagnosis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ginjaar, Ieke B; Bushby, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy are caused by mutations in the dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. Large deletions and duplications are most common, but small mutations have been found as well. Having a correct diagnosis is important for family planning and providing proper care to patients according to published guidelines. With mutation-specific therapies under development for DMD, a correct diagnosis is now also important for assessing whether patients are eligible for treatments. This review discusses different mutations causing DMD, diagnostic techniques available for making a genetic diagnosis for children suspected of DMD and the importance of having a specific genetic diagnosis in the context of emerging genetic therapies for DMD. PMID:26754139

  12. The importance of genetic diagnosis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ginjaar, Ieke B; Bushby, Kate

    2016-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy are caused by mutations in the dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. Large deletions and duplications are most common, but small mutations have been found as well. Having a correct diagnosis is important for family planning and providing proper care to patients according to published guidelines. With mutation-specific therapies under development for DMD, a correct diagnosis is now also important for assessing whether patients are eligible for treatments. This review discusses different mutations causing DMD, diagnostic techniques available for making a genetic diagnosis for children suspected of DMD and the importance of having a specific genetic diagnosis in the context of emerging genetic therapies for DMD. PMID:26754139

  13. Cell transplantation and gene therapy in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J E; Partridge, T A

    1992-09-01

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD), which affects 1/3500 live male births, involves a progressive degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle, leading to early death. The protein dystrophin is lacking in DMD and present, but defective, in the allelic, less severe, Becker muscular dystrophy and is also missing in the mdx mouse. Experiments on the mdx mouse have suggested two possible therapies for these myopathies. Implantation of normal muscle precursor cells (mpc) into mdx skeletal muscle leads to the conversion of dystrophin-negative fibres to -positive, with consequent improvement in muscle histology. Direct injection of dystrophin cDNA into skeletal or cardiac muscle also gives rise to dystrophin-positive fibres. Although both appear promising, there are a number of questions to be answered and refinements to be made before either technique could be considered possible as treatments for myopathies in man. PMID:1365921

  14. [DIAGNOSTIC VARIATIONS OF X-LINKED MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY WITH CONTRACTURES].

    PubMed

    Kvirkvelia, N; Shakarishvili, R; Gugutsidze, D; Khizanishvili, N

    2015-01-01

    Case report with review describes X-linked muscular dystrophy with contractures in 28 years old man and his cousin. The disease revealed itself in an early stage (age 5-10), the process was progressing with apparent tendons retraction and contraction, limited movement in the areas of the neck and back of spine, atrophy of shoulder and pelvic yard and back muscles. Intellect was intact. Cardyomyopathy was exhibited. CK was normal. EMG showed classic myopathic features. Muscle biopsy showed different caliber groups of muscle fibers, growth of endo-perimesial connective tissue. Clinical manifestations together with electrophysiological and histological data suggest consistency with Rotthauwe-Mortier-Bayer X-linked muscular dystrophy. PMID:26177134

  15. Bimaxillary Osteotomy for Jaw Deformity With Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takako; Ohba, Seigo; Fujimura, Yuji; Asahina, Izumi

    2016-05-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a subtype of muscular dystrophies which reduces the muscle strength, especially the regions of scapular, shoulder, and upper arms, progressively. According to progressive muscle weakness in FSHD, postoperative stability of patient with FSHD after orthognathic surgery is not reliably acquired same as healthy subjects. A 32-year-old woman with FSHD underwent orthodontic and orthognathic surgical treatment due to jaw deformity. She has been followed up more than 3 years after surgery and acquired skeletal stability. This patient is the first report that showed long-term skeletal stability after orthognathic surgery in patient with FSHD. This patient report suggests that it is possible to apply orthognathic surgical treatment to patients with FSHD. PMID:27054436

  16. [Clinicopathological study of a case of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Moreno Martínez, J M; Martín Araguz, A; García de la Rocha, M L; Masjuán Vallejo, J; Barón Rubio, M; Ginel Feito, M D

    1991-01-01

    One case of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy is reported, in a 75 year old white male with manifest family history of palpebral ptosis. He displayed bilateral ptosis and dysphagia. Diagnosis was carried out after clinical, electrical and bioptic procedures. Data obtained have been discussed with previous reports in the literature. It was necessary to perform a cricopharyngeal myotomy to overcome the malnutrition secondary to his swallowing problem. PMID:1804038

  17. Best Macular Dystrophy in a Nigerian: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    S. Oluleye, Tunji

    2012-01-01

    Best macular dystrophy is reported to be rare in Africans. It is a hereditary disease that starts in childhood and progresses through some stages before visual symptoms occur. This case report presents a 43-year-old Nigerian with the disease and stresses the importance of regular eye exams of patients and relatives to detect changes such as choroidal neovascular membrane amenable to treatment. PMID:22740832

  18. Best macular dystrophy in a nigerian: a case report.

    PubMed

    S Oluleye, Tunji

    2012-05-01

    Best macular dystrophy is reported to be rare in Africans. It is a hereditary disease that starts in childhood and progresses through some stages before visual symptoms occur. This case report presents a 43-year-old Nigerian with the disease and stresses the importance of regular eye exams of patients and relatives to detect changes such as choroidal neovascular membrane amenable to treatment. PMID:22740832

  19. Revised genetic classification of Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Magri, F; Brajkovic, S; Govoni, A; Brusa, R; Comi, G P

    2014-10-10

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are a heterogeneous group of inherited progressive muscle disorders affecting predominantly the shoulder and pelvic girdle muscles. They present both with autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive patterns of inheritance. Recent development, including results from Next Generation Sequencing technology, expanded the number of recognised forms. Therefore a revised genetic classification that takes into account the novel entities is needed, allowing clinicians and researchers to refer to a common nomenclature for diagnostic and research purposes. PMID:25323878

  20. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the hands: clinical and scintigraphic criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, L.E.; Mackinnon, S.E.

    1984-08-01

    In an attempt to establish specific scintigraphic criteria for the reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) as defined by a group of specialized hand surgeons, 145 consecutive patients, 23 of whom had clinical RSD, underwent three phase radionuclide bone scanning (TPBS). Specific patterns for positive radionuclide angiogram, blood pool, and delayed images were established. The delayed images were sensitive (96%), specific (97%), and had a valuable negative predictive value (99%). It was concluded that TPBS could provide an objective marker for RSD.

  1. Cognitive and Neurobehavioral Profile in Boys With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Rudaina; Smile, Sharon; Yoon, Grace; Dupuis, Annie; Mosleh, Maureen; Snider, Andrea; McAdam, Laura

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive neuromuscular condition that has a high rate of cognitive and learning disabilities as well as neurobehavioral disorders, some of which have been associated with disruption of dystrophin isoforms. Retrospective cohort of 59 boys investigated the cognitive and neurobehavioral profile of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Full-scale IQ of < 70 was seen in 27%; learning disability in 44%, intellectual disability in 19%; attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in 32%; autism spectrum disorders in 15%; and anxiety in 27%. Mutations affecting Dp260 isoform and 5'untranslated region of Dp140 were observed in 60% with learning disability, 50% intellectual disability, 77% with autism spectrum disorders, and 94% with anxiety. No statistically significant correlation was noted between comorbidities and dystrophin isoforms; however, there is a trend of cumulative loss of dystrophin isoforms with declining full-scale IQ. Enhanced psychology testing to include both cognitive and neurobehavioral disorders is recommended for all individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:25660133

  2. The quality of life in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Gholamreza; Heidari, Morteza; Azizi Malamiri, Reza; Ashrafi, Mahmoud Reza; Mohammadi, Mahmoud; Shervin Badv, Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Ahmad; Salehi, Soodeh; Shahrokhi, Amin; Qorbani, Mostafa; Fathi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a study to evaluate the quality of life in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy aged 8-18 years, compared with that in matched healthy controls. A total of 85 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy aged 8-18 years and 136 age, sex and living place matched healthy controls were included in this study. Patients and one of their parents separately completed the 27-item Persian version of KIDSCREEN questionnaire (child and adolescent version and parent version). From the children's perspective, the quality of life in patients was found to be lower in two subclasses: "physical activities and health" (p < 0.001) and "friends" (p = 0.005). Parental estimation of their sick child's quality of life was significantly lower than children's own assessment in two subclasses: "physical activities and health" (p < 0.001) and "general mood and feelings" (p < 0.001). Our results indicate that boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy have quite a satisfactory quality of life. A happier and more hopeful life can be promoted through increasing social support and improving the parental knowledge regarding their child's more positive life perspective. PMID:27234309

  3. Differential isoform expression and selective muscle involvement in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Huovinen, Sanna; Penttilä, Sini; Somervuo, Panu; Keto, Joni; Auvinen, Petri; Vihola, Anna; Huovinen, Sami; Pelin, Katarina; Raheem, Olayinka; Salenius, Juha; Suominen, Tiina; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne

    2015-10-01

    Despite the expression of the mutated gene in all muscles, selective muscles are involved in genetic muscular dystrophies. Different muscular dystrophies show characteristic patterns of fatty degenerative changes by muscle imaging, even to the extent that the patterns have been used for diagnostic purposes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms explaining the selective involvement of muscles are not known. To test the hypothesis that different muscles may express variable amounts of different isoforms of muscle genes, we applied a custom-designed exon microarray containing probes for 57 muscle-specific genes to assay the transcriptional profiles in sets of human adult lower limb skeletal muscles. Quantitative real-time PCR and whole transcriptome sequencing were used to further analyze the results. Our results demonstrate significant variations in isoform and gene expression levels in anatomically different muscles. Comparison of the known patterns of selective involvement of certain muscles in two autosomal dominant titinopathies and one autosomal dominant myosinopathy, with the isoform and gene expression results, shows a correlation between the specific muscles involved and significant differences in the level of expression of the affected gene and exons in these same muscles compared with some other selected muscles. Our results suggest that differential expression levels of muscle genes and isoforms are one determinant in the selectivity of muscle involvement in muscular dystrophies. PMID:26269091

  4. Myotonic dystrophy: molecular windows on a complex etiology.

    PubMed Central

    Korade-Mirnics, Z; Babitzke, P; Hoffman, E

    1998-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common form of adult onset muscular dystrophy, with an incidence of approximately 1 in 8500 adults. DM is caused by an expanded number of trinucleotide repeats in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (DM protein kinase, DMPK). Although a large number of transgenic animals have been generated with different gene constructions and knock-outs, none of them faithfully recapitulates the multisystemic and often severe phenotype seen in human patients. The transgenic data suggest that myotonic dystrophy is not caused simply by a biochemical deficiency or abnormality in the DM kinase gene product. Emerging studies suggest that two novel pathogenetic mechanisms may play a role in the disease: the expanded repeats appear to cause haploinsufficiency of a neighboring homeobox gene and also abnormal DMPK RNA appears to have a detrimental effect on RNA homeostasis. The complex, multisystemic phenotype may reflect an underlying multifaceted molecular pathophysiology: the facial dysmorphology may be due to pattern defects caused by haploinsufficiency of the homeobox gene, while the muscle disease and endocrine abnormalities may be due to both altered RNA metabolism and deficiency of the cAMP DMPK protein. PMID:9490778

  5. Cardiac involvement in Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Markousis-Mavrogenis, George; Papavasiliou, Antigoni; Kolovou, Genovefa

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) are X-linked muscular diseases responsible for over 80% of all muscular dystrophies. Cardiac disease is a common manifestation, not necessarily related to the degree of skeletal myopathy; it may be the predominant manifestation with or without any other evidence of muscular disease. Death is usually due to ventricular dysfunction, heart block or malignant arrhythmias. Not only DMD/BMD patients, but also female carriers may present cardiac involvement. Clinically overt heart failure in dystrophinopathies may be delayed or absent, due to relative physical inactivity. The commonest electrocardiographic findings include conduction defects, arrhythmias (supraventricular or ventricular), hypertrophy and evidence of myocardial necrosis. Echocardiography can assess a marked variability of left ventricular dysfunction, independently of age of onset or mutation groups. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has documented a pattern of epicardial fibrosis in both dystrophinopathies’ patients and carriers that can be observed even if overt muscular disease is absent. Recently, new CMR techniques, such as postcontrast myocardial T1 mapping, have been used in Duchenne muscular dystrophy to detect diffuse myocardial fibrosis. A combined approach using clinical assessment and CMR evaluation may motivate early cardioprotective treatment in both patients and asymptomatic carriers and delay the development of serious cardiac complications. PMID:26225202

  6. Degeneration of neuromuscular junction in age and dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Rüdiger; Khan, Muzamil Majid; Labeit, Siegfried; Deschenes, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Functional denervation is a hallmark of aging sarcopenia as well as of muscular dystrophy. It is thought to be a major factor reducing skeletal muscle mass, particularly in the case of sarcopenia. Neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) serve as the interface between the nervous and skeletal muscular systems, and thus they may receive pathophysiological input of both pre- and post-synaptic origin. Consequently, NMJs are good indicators of motor health on a systemic level. Indeed, upon sarcopenia and dystrophy, NMJs morphologically deteriorate and exhibit altered characteristics of primary signaling molecules, such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and agrin. Since a remarkable reversibility of these changes can be observed by exercise, there is significant interest in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic deterioration upon aging and dystrophy and how synapses are reset by the aforementioned treatments. Here, we review the literature that describes the phenomena observed at the NMJ in sarcopenic and dystrophic muscle as well as to how these alterations can be reversed and to what extent. In a second part, the current information about molecular machineries underlying these processes is reported. PMID:24904412

  7. Degeneration of Neuromuscular Junction in Age and Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rudolf, Rüdiger; Khan, Muzamil Majid; Labeit, Siegfried; Deschenes, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Functional denervation is a hallmark of aging sarcopenia as well as of muscular dystrophy. It is thought to be a major factor reducing skeletal muscle mass, particularly in the case of sarcopenia. Neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) serve as the interface between the nervous and skeletal muscular systems, and thus they may receive pathophysiological input of both pre- and post-synaptic origin. Consequently, NMJs are good indicators of motor health on a systemic level. Indeed, upon sarcopenia and dystrophy, NMJs morphologically deteriorate and exhibit altered characteristics of primary signaling molecules, such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and agrin. Since a remarkable reversibility of these changes can be observed by exercise, there is significant interest in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic deterioration upon aging and dystrophy and how synapses are reset by the aforementioned treatments. Here, we review the literature that describes the phenomena observed at the NMJ in sarcopenic and dystrophic muscle as well as to how these alterations can be reversed and to what extent. In a second part, the current information about molecular machineries underlying these processes is reported. PMID:24904412

  8. Immunohistochemical Characterization of Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Statland, Jeffrey M; Odrzywolski, Karen J; Shah, Bharati; Henderson, Don; Fricke, Alex F.; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Tapscott, Stephen J; Tawil, Rabi

    2015-01-01

    Background Posited pathological mechanisms in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD) include activation in somatic tissue of normally silenced genes, increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, and induction of apoptosis. Objective To determine the histopathological changes in FSHD muscle biopsies and compare to possible pathological mechanisms of disease. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study on quadriceps muscle biopsies from 32 genetically confirmed FSHD participants, compared to healthy volunteers and myotonic dystrophy type 1 as disease controls. Biopsies were divided into groups to evaluate apoptosis rates, capillary density, myonuclear and satellite cell counts. Results Apoptosis rates were increased in FSHD (n=10, 0.74%) compared to myotonic dystrophy type 1 (n=10, 0.14%, P=0.003) and healthy volunteers (n=14, 0.13%, P=0.002). Apoptosis was higher in FSHD patients with the smallest residual D4Z4 fragments. Capillary density was decreased in FSHD1 (n=10, 316 capillaries/mm2) compared to healthy volunteers (n=15, 448 capillaries/mm2, P=0.001). No differences were seen in myonuclear or satellite cell counts. Conclusions Preliminary evidence for increased apoptosis rates and reduced capillary density may reflect histopathological correlates of disease activity in FSHD. The molecular-pathological correlates to these changes warrants further investigation. PMID:26345300

  9. The effect of myotonic dystrophy transcript levels and location on muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastroyiannopoulos, Nikolaos P.; Chrysanthou, Elina; Kyriakides, Tassos C.; Uney, James B.; Mahadevan, Mani S.; Phylactou, Leonidas A.

    2008-12-12

    In myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1), nuclear retention of mutant DMPK transcripts compromises muscle cell differentiation. Although several reports have identified molecular defects in myogenesis, it remains still unclear how exactly the retention of the mutant transcripts induces this defect. We have recently created a novel cellular model in which the mutant DMPK 3' UTR transcripts were released to the cytoplasm of myoblasts by using the WPRE genetic element. As a result, muscle cell differentiation was repaired. In this paper, this cellular model was further exploited to investigate the effect of the levels and location of the mutant transcripts on muscle differentiation. Results show that the levels of these transcripts were proportional to the inhibition of both the initial fusion of myoblasts and the maturity of myotubes. Moreover, the cytoplasmic export of the mutant RNAs to the cytoplasm caused less inhibition only in the initial fusion of myoblasts.

  10. Amelioration of laminin-alpha2-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy by somatic gene transfer of miniagrin.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chunping; Li, Jianbin; Zhu, Tong; Draviam, Romesh; Watkins, Simon; Ye, Xiaojing; Chen, Chunlian; Li, Juan; Xiao, Xiao

    2005-08-23

    Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is characterized by severe muscle wasting, premature death in early childhood, and lack of effective treatment. Most of the CMD cases are caused by genetic mutations of laminin-alpha2, which is essential for the structural integrity of muscle extracellular matrix. Here, we report that somatic gene delivery of a structurally unrelated protein, a miniature version of agrin, functionally compensates for laminin-alpha2 deficiency in the murine models of CMD. Adeno-associated virus-mediated overexpression of miniagrin restored the structural integrity of myofiber basal lamina, inhibited interstitial fibrosis, and ameliorated dystrophic pathology. Furthermore, systemic gene delivery of miniagrin into multiple vital muscles significantly improved whole body growth and motility and quadrupled the lifespan (50% survival) of the dystrophic mice. Thus, our study demonstrated the efficacy of somatic gene therapy in a mouse model of CMD. PMID:16103356

  11. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Miskew Nichols, Bailey; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J A; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  12. Multi-exon Skipping Using Cocktail Antisense Oligonucleotides in the Canine X-linked Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Lee, Joshua J.A.; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic diseases worldwide, caused by mutations in the dystrophin (DMD) gene. Exon skipping employs short DNA/RNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) that restore the reading frame and produce shorter but functional proteins. However, exon skipping therapy faces two major hurdles: limited applicability (up to only 13% of patients can be treated with a single AON drug), and uncertain function of truncated proteins. These issues were addressed with a cocktail AON approach. While approximately 70% of DMD patients can be treated by single exon skipping (all exons combined), one could potentially treat more than 90% of DMD patients if multiple exon skipping using cocktail antisense drugs can be realized. The canine X-linked muscular dystrophy (CXMD) dog model, whose phenotype is more similar to human DMD patients, was used to test the systemic efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8. The CXMD dog model harbors a splice site mutation in intron 6, leading to a lack of exon 7 in dystrophin mRNA. To restore the reading frame in CXMD requires multi-exon skipping of exons 6 and 8; therefore, CXMD is a good middle-sized animal model for testing the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping. In the current study, a cocktail of antisense morpholinos targeting exon 6 and exon 8 was designed and it restored dystrophin expression in body-wide skeletal muscles. Methods for transfection/injection of cocktail oligos and evaluation of the efficacy and safety of multi-exon skipping in the CXMD dog model are presented. PMID:27285612

  13. A canine minidystrophin is functional and therapeutic in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Li, J; Qiao, C; Chen, C; Hu, P; Zhu, X; Zhou, L; Bogan, J; Kornegay, J; Xiao, X

    2008-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common and lethal genetic muscle disorder lacking a curative treatment. We wish to use the dystrophin-deficient golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dog, a canine model of DMD, to investigate adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated minidystrophin gene therapy. The dog model is useful in evaluating vector dose requirement and immunological consequences owing to its large size and outbred nature. In this study, we have cloned and constructed a canine minidystrophin gene vector. Owing to limited availability of the GRMD dogs, here we first examined the functions and therapeutic effects of the canine minidystrophin in the mdx mouse model. We observed efficient minigene expression without cellular immune responses in mdx mice after AAV1-cMinidys vector intramuscular injection. We also observed restoration of the missing dystrophin-associated protein complex (DPC) onto the sarcolemma, including sarcoglycans and dystrobrevin, and a partial restoration of alpha-syntrophin and neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). In addition, minidystrophin treatment ameliorated dystrophic pathology, such as fibrosis and myofiber central nucleation (CN). CN remained minimal (<2%) after AAV injection in the neonatal mdx mice and was reduced from more than 75% to about 25% after AAV injection in adult mdx mice. Finally, in vivo cell membrane leakage test with Evans blue dye showed that the canine minidystrophin could effectively protect the myofiber plasma membrane integrity. Our results, thus, demonstrated the functionality and therapeutic potential of the canine minidystrophin and paved its way for further testing in the GRMD dog model. PMID:18432277

  14. Keratin 12 missense mutation induces the unfolded protein response and apoptosis in Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Edwin H.A.; Courtney, David G.; Atkinson, Sarah D.; Moore, Johnny E.; Mairs, Laura; Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Schiroli, Davide; Maurizi, Eleonora; Cole, Christian; Hickerson, Robyn P.; James, John; Murgatroyd, Helen; Smith, Frances J.D.; MacEwen, Carrie; Enghild, Jan J.; Nesbit, M. Andrew; Leslie Pedrioli, Deena M.; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Moore, C.B. Tara

    2016-01-01

    Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy (MECD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by dominant-negative mutations within the KRT3 or KRT12 genes, which encode the cytoskeletal protein keratins K3 and K12, respectively. To investigate the pathomechanism of this disease, we generated and phenotypically characterized a novel knock-in humanized mouse model carrying the severe, MECD-associated, K12-Leu132Pro mutation. Although no overt changes in corneal opacity were detected by slit-lamp examination, the corneas of homozygous mutant mice exhibited histological and ultrastructural epithelial cell fragility phenotypes. An altered keratin expression profile was observed in the cornea of mutant mice, confirmed by western blot, RNA-seq and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Mass spectrometry (MS) and immunohistochemistry demonstrated a similarly altered keratin profile in corneal tissue from a K12-Leu132Pro MECD patient. The K12-Leu132Pro mutation results in cytoplasmic keratin aggregates. RNA-seq analysis revealed increased chaperone gene expression, and apoptotic unfolded protein response (UPR) markers, CHOP and Caspase 12, were also increased in the MECD mice. Corneal epithelial cell apoptosis was increased 17-fold in the mutant cornea, compared with the wild-type (P < 0.001). This elevation of UPR marker expression was also observed in the human MECD cornea. This is the first reporting of a mouse model for MECD that recapitulates the human disease and is a valuable resource in understanding the pathomechanism of the disease. Although the most severe phenotype is observed in the homozygous mice, this model will still provide a test-bed for therapies not only for corneal dystrophies but also for other keratinopathies caused by similar mutations. PMID:26758872

  15. Myotonic dystrophy as a cause of colonic pseudoobstruction: not just another constipated child

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Andrea M; Johnston, Jennifer H; Gleason, Wallace A; Rhoads, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Muscular dystrophy has been traditionally associated with common gastrointestinal symptoms such as reflux, constipation, and dysphasia. In myotonic dystrophy, there are rare reports of chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPOS). We herein present a case of CIPOS requiring colectomy and with good results. PMID:26185641

  16. Meeting the Assistive Technology Needs of Students with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kathryn Wolff; Mezei, Peter J.; Avant, Mary Jane Thompson

    2009-01-01

    Students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have a degenerative disease that requires ongoing changes in assistive technology (AT). The AT team needs to be knowledgeable about the disease and its progression in order to meet these students' changing needs in a timely manner. The unique needs of students with Duchenne muscular dystrophy in…

  17. Warming up Improves Speech Production in Patients with Adult Onset Myotonic Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Swart, B.J.M.; van Engelen, B.G.M.; Maassen, B.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation was conducted to study whether warming up decreases myotonia (muscle stiffness) during speech production or causes adverse effects due to fatigue or exhaustion caused by intensive speech activity in patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy. Thirty patients with adult onset myotonic dystrophy (MD) and ten healthy controls…

  18. Scalpel or Straitjacket: CRISPR/Cas9 Approaches for Muscular Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Himeda, Charis L; Jones, Takako I; Jones, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    Versatility of CRISPR/Cas9-based platforms makes them promising tools for the correction of diverse genetic/epigenetic disorders. Here we contrast the use of these genome editing tools in two myopathies with very different molecular origins: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a monogenetic disease, and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, an epigenetic disorder with unique therapeutic challenges. PMID:26917062

  19. Musculoskeletal simulation can help explain selective muscle degeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Blemker, Silvia S

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease that occurs due to the deficiency of the dystrophin protein. Although dystrophin is deficient in all muscles, it is unclear why degeneration progresses differently across muscles in DMD. We hypothesized that each muscle undergoes a different degree of eccentric contraction during gait, which could contribute to the selective degeneration in lower limb muscle, as indicated by various amounts of fatty infiltration. By comparing eccentric contractions quantified from a previous multibody dynamic musculoskeletal gait simulation and fat fractions quantified in a recent imaging study, our preliminary analyses show a strong correlation between eccentric contractions during gait and lower limb muscle fat fractions, supporting our hypothesis. This knowledge is critical for developing safe exercise regimens for the DMD population. This study also provides supportive evidence for using multiscale modeling and simulation of the musculoskeletal system in future DMD research. PMID:25704785

  20. Progress on gene therapy, cell therapy, and pharmacological strategies toward the treatment of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Harish, Pradeep; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George; Bachtarzi, Houria

    2015-05-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a muscle-specific, late-onset degenerative disorder whereby muscles of the eyes (causing ptosis), throat (leading to dysphagia), and limbs (causing proximal limb weakness) are mostly affected. The disease is characterized by a mutation in the poly(A)-binding protein nuclear-1 (PABPN1) gene, resulting in a short GCG expansion in the polyalanine tract of PABPN1 protein. Accumulation of filamentous intranuclear inclusions in affected skeletal muscle cells constitutes the pathological hallmark of OPMD. This review highlights the current translational research advances in the treatment of OPMD. In vitro and in vivo disease models are described. Conventional and experimental therapeutic approaches are discussed with emphasis on novel molecular therapies including the use of intrabodies, gene therapy, and myoblast transfer therapy. PMID:25860803

  1. Regenerative pharmacology in the treatment of genetic diseases: The paradigm of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mozzetta, Chiara; Minetti, Giulia; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    Current evidence supports the therapeutic potential of pharmacological interventions that counter the progression of genetic disorders by promoting regeneration of the affected organs or tissues. The rationale behind this concept lies on the evidence that targeting key events downstream of the genetic defect can compensate, at least partially, the pathological consequence of the related disease. In this regard, the beneficial effect exerted on animal models of muscular dystrophy by pharmacological strategies that enhance muscle regeneration provides an interesting paradigm. In this review, we describe and discuss the potential targets of pharmacological strategies that promote regeneration of dystrophic muscles and alleviate the consequence of the primary genetic defect. Regenerative pharmacology provides an immediate and suitable therapeutic opportunity to slow down the decline of muscles in the present generation of dystrophic patients, with the perspective to hold them in conditions such that they could benefit of future, more definitive, therapies. PMID:18804548

  2. Segmental myofiber necrosis in myotonic dystrophy - An immunoperoxidase study of immunoglobulins in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Silver, M. M.; Banerjee, D.; Hudson, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Because serum immunoglobulin G levels are low in patients with myotonic dystrophy, it was hypothesized that it might be catabolized within abnormal muscle fibers. Accordingly, immunohistochemical stains for immunoglobulins were performed on muscle sections derived at biopsy or autopsy from patients with myotonic dystrophy, other forms of muscular dystrophy, nondystrophic muscle disease, or normal muscle. Positive staining for immunoglobulins was found only in necrotic segments of myofibers (in 7 of 19 dystrophic and 6 of 27 nondystrophic subjects), and it is believed that the staining was due to nonspecific diffusion. However, staining reactions distinguished between incipient necrosis and artifactual contraction bands and allowed us to study segmental myofiber necrosis, comparing its frequency in the various muscle diseases. Segmental myofiber necrosis was present in 4 of 16 cases of myotonic dystrophy. The relevance of this finding to the clinical and morphologic features of myotonic dystrophy is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:6351629

  3. [Calpain-3 gene defect causing limb gird muscular dystrophy in a Hungarian family].

    PubMed

    Horváth, Rita; Walter, Maggie C; Lochmüller, Hanns; Hübner, Angela; Karcagi, Veronika; Pikó, Henriett; Timár, László; Komoly, Sámuel

    2005-01-20

    Limb gird muscular dystrophies (LGMD2) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary diseases with autosomal recessive trait, characterized by progressive atrophy and weakness predominantly in the proximal limb muscles. The authors present clinical, histological, immunohistochemical and immunoblot results of two sisters suffering from so far unclassified autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy. Haplotype analysis for genes possibly involved in autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophies was performed in the genetically informative family. All of the results pointed to a molecular genetic defect of the calpain-3 (CAPN3) gene. Direct sequencing of the CAPN3 gene revealed compound heterozygous state for two mutations previously described in association with limb girdle muscular dystrophy, proving pathogenicity. The authors would like to emphasize the importance of the above described combined strategy in diagnosing limb girdle muscular dystrophies. PMID:15884399

  4. Sparing of Extraocular Muscle in Aging and Muscular Dystrophies: A Myogenic Precursor Cell Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kallestad, Kristen M.; Hebert, Sadie L.; McDonald, Abby A; Daniel, Mark L.; Cu, Sharon R.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2011-01-01

    The extraocular muscles (EOM) are spared from pathology in aging and many forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, this sparing remains an enigma. The EOM have a distinct embryonic lineage compared to somite-derived muscles, and we have shown that they continuously remodel throughout life, maintaining a population of activated satellite cells even in aging. This data suggested the hypothesis that there is a population of myogenic precursor cells (mpcs) in EOM that is different from those in limb, with either elevated numbers of stem cells and/or mpcs with superior proliferative capacity compared to mpcs in limb. Using flow cytometry, EOM and limb muscle mononuclear cells were compared, and a number of differences were seen. Using two different cell isolation methods, EOM have significantly more mpcs per mg muscle than limb skeletal muscle. One specific subpopulation significantly increased in EOM compared to limb was positive for CD34 and negative for Sca-1, M-cadherin, CD31, and CD45. We named these the EOMCD34 cells. Similar percentages of EOMCD34 cells were present in both newborn EOM and limb muscle. In addition, they were retained in aged EOM, whereas the population decreased significantly in adult limb muscle and were extremely scarce in aged limb muscle. Most importantly, the percentage of EOMCD34 cells were elevated in the EOM from both the mdx and the mdx/utrophin−/− (DKO) mouse models of DMD and extremely scarce in the limb muscles of these mice. In vitro, the EOMCD34 cells had myogenic potential, forming myotubes in differentiation media. After determining a media better able to induce proliferation in these cells, a fusion index was calculated. The cells isolated from EOM had a 40% higher fusion index compared to the same cells isolated from limb muscle. The EOMCD34 cells were resistant to both oxidative stress and mechanical injury. These data support our hypothesis that the EOM may be spared in aging and in muscular dystrophies due to a

  5. Sparing of extraocular muscle in aging and muscular dystrophies: A myogenic precursor cell hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kallestad, Kristen M.; Hebert, Sadie L.; McDonald, Abby A.; Daniel, Mark L.; Cu, Sharon R.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2011-04-01

    The extraocular muscles (EOM) are spared from pathology in aging and many forms of muscular dystrophy. Despite many studies, this sparing remains an enigma. The EOM have a distinct embryonic lineage compared to somite-derived muscles, and we have shown that they continuously remodel throughout life, maintaining a population of activated satellite cells even in aging. These data suggested the hypothesis that there is a population of myogenic precursor cells (mpcs) in EOM that is different from those in limb, with either elevated numbers of stem cells and/or mpcs with superior proliferative capacity compared to mpcs in limb. Using flow cytometry, EOM and limb muscle mononuclear cells were compared, and a number of differences were seen. Using two different cell isolation methods, EOM have significantly more mpcs per mg muscle than limb skeletal muscle. One specific subpopulation significantly increased in EOM compared to limb was positive for CD34 and negative for Sca-1, M-cadherin, CD31, and CD45. We named these the EOMCD34 cells. Similar percentages of EOMCD34 cells were present in both newborn EOM and limb muscle. They were retained in aged EOM, whereas the population decreased significantly in adult limb muscle and were extremely scarce in aged limb muscle. Most importantly, the percentage of EOMCD34 cells was elevated in the EOM from both the mdx and the mdx/utrophin{sup -/-} (DKO) mouse models of DMD and extremely scarce in the limb muscles of these mice. In vitro, the EOMCD34 cells had myogenic potential, forming myotubes in differentiation media. After determining a media better able to induce proliferation in these cells, a fusion index was calculated. The cells isolated from EOM had a 40% higher fusion index compared to the same cells isolated from limb muscle. The EOMCD34 cells were resistant to both oxidative stress and mechanical injury. These data support our hypothesis that the EOM may be spared in aging and in muscular dystrophies due to a

  6. [Hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase inhibitors for the treatment of duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Kamauchi, Shinya; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2011-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe X-linked muscle disease, characterized by progressive skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which encodes for the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. DMD is one of the most common types of muscular dystrophies, affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 boys. There is no complete cure for this disease. Clinical trials for gene transfer therapy as a treatment for DMD have been performed but mainly in animal models. Hematopoietic prostaglandin (PG) D synthase (H-PGDS) was found to be induced in grouped necrotic muscle fibers of DMD patients and animal models, mdx mice, and DMD dogs. We found an orally active H-PGDS inhibitor (HQL-79) and determined the 3D structure of the inhibitor-human H-PGDS complex by X-ray crystallography. Oral administration of HQL-79 markedly suppressed prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) production, reduced necrotic muscle volume, and improved muscle strength in mdx dystrophic mice. Based on the high-resolution 3D structures of the inhibitor-H-PGDS complex, we designed alternative H-PGDS inhibitors, which were 100- to 3000-times more potent than HQL-79, as assessed by in vitro and in vivo analyses. We used these novel inhibitors for the treatment of DMD dogs and confirmed that oral administration of these inhibitors prevented skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness by decreasing PGD2 production. These results indicate that PGD2, synthesized by H-PGDS, is involved in the expansion of muscle necrosis in DMD. Thus, inhibition of H-PGDS by using inhibitors is a novel therapy for DMD. PMID:22068479

  7. New aspects on patients affected by dysferlin deficient muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, Lars; Aboumousa, Ahmed; Eagle, Michelle; Hudson, Judith; Sarkozy, Anna; Vita, Gianluca; Charlton, Richard; Roberts, Mark; Straub, Volker; Barresi, Rita; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the dysferlin gene lead to limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, Miyoshi myopathy and distal anterior compartment myopathy. A cohort of 36 patients affected by dysferlinopathy is described, in the first UK study of clinical, genetic, pathological and biochemical data. The diagnosis was established by reduction of dysferlin in the muscle biopsy and subsequent mutational analysis of the dysferlin gene. Seventeen mutations were novel; the majority of mutations were small deletions/insertions, and no mutational hotspots were identified. Sixty-one per cent of patients (22 patients) initially presented with limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, 31% (11 patients) with a Miyoshi phenotype, one patient with proximodistal mode of onset, one patient with muscle stiffness after exercise and one patient as a symptomatic carrier. A wider range of age of onset was noted than previously reported, with 25% of patients having first symptoms before the age of 13 years. Independent of the initial mode of presentation, in our cohort of patients the gastrocnemius muscle was the most severely affected muscle leading to an inability to stand on tiptoes, and lower limbs were affected more severely than upper limbs. As previous anecdotal evidence on patients affected by dysferlinopathy suggests good muscle prowess before onset of symptoms, we also investigated pre-symptomatic fitness levels of the patients. Fifty-three per cent of the patients were very active and sporty before the onset of symptoms which makes the clinical course of dysferlinopathy unusual within the different forms of muscular dystrophy and provides a challenge to understanding the underlying pathomechanisms in this disease. PMID:19528035

  8. Motor unit reorganization in progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Szmidt-Sałkowska, Elżbieta; Gaweł, Małgorzata; Lipowska, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze motor unit reorganization in different types of progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies. The study population consisted of patients with genetically verified progressive muscular dystrophies: Duchenne (DMD) (n=54), Becker (BMD) (n=30), facio-scapulo-humeral (FSHD) (n=37), and Emery-Dreifuss (E-DD) (n=26). Patients with probable limb-girdle dystrophy (L-GD) (n=58) and congenital myopathies (n=35) were also included in the study. Quantitative EMG recordings were obtained from 469 muscles. Muscle activity at rest and during slight voluntary and maximal muscle contraction was analyzed. The motor unit activity potential (MUAP) duration, amplitude, area, size index (SI), polyphasicity, and the presence of "outliers" were evaluated. Diminished values of MUAP parameters and decreased maximal amplitude of maximal muscle contraction were recorded most frequently in DMD and mainly in the biceps brachii muscles. SI was the most frequently changed EMG parameter. "Outliers" with amplitude below the normal range were recorded more frequently then a decreased mean MUAP amplitude (what could indicate a very high sensitivity of this EMG parameter). Pathological interference pattern was recorded in 34.7% of biceps brachii and in 21.2% of rectus femoris muscles. In FSHD, decreased MUAP duration and SI and pathological interference pattern with low amplitude were recorded most frequently in the tibial anterior and deltoid muscles. The presence of potentials with reduced parameters is a result of decreasing motor unit area (reduced number and size of muscle fibers), while high amplitude potentials recorded in BMD and E-DD could indicate a slow and mild course of disease and muscle regeneration. PMID:26188938

  9. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: an enigmatic improvement with spinal manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotto, James

    2000-01-01

    Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) or complex regional pain syndrome, is an extremely painful and disabling condition commonly seen following trauma. Its early recognition and treatment is most critical for a favorable prognosis. Although its diagnosis and treatments vary, neuroblockade is the treatment of choice. Very little has been reported in the literature in regards to manipulation as an early treatment modality to improve joint mobility and reduce pain and future disability. This case report reviews one case presentation of RSD where dramatic results followed cervical spine manipulation.

  10. Focal Choroidal Excavation in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Mohammad Riazi; Esfahani, Hamid Riazi; Mahmoudi, Alireza; Johari, Mohammad Karim; Hemati, Karim

    2015-05-01

    Focal choroidal excavation (FCE) was first reported as a choroidal posteriorly excavated zone without any scleral change. Choroidal excavation also divided into conforming and nonconforming type. Numerous reports demonstrated association between FCE and other disease such as choroidal neovascularization and central serous choroidoretinopathy. Here, we report a rare case of FCE in a patient with Best disease. The patient was diagnosed by spectoral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). To the best of our knowledge, our patient is the second report of choroidal excavation in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. PMID:26155505

  11. Focal Choroidal Excavation in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Mohammad Riazi; Esfahani, Hamid Riazi; Mahmoudi, Alireza; Johari, Mohammad Karim

    2015-01-01

    Focal choroidal excavation (FCE) was first reported as a choroidal posteriorly excavated zone without any scleral change. Choroidal excavation also divided into conforming and nonconforming type. Numerous reports demonstrated association between FCE and other disease such as choroidal neovascularization and central serous choroidoretinopathy. Here, we report a rare case of FCE in a patient with Best disease. The patient was diagnosed by spectoral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). To the best of our knowledge, our patient is the second report of choroidal excavation in Best vitelliform macular dystrophy. PMID:26155505

  12. Negative expansion of the myotonic dystrophy unstable sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Abeliovich, D; Lerer, I; Pashut-Lavon, I; Shmueli, E; Raas-Rothschild, A; Frydman, M

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed the unstable fragment of the myotonic dystrophy (DM) gene in a pregnancy at 50% risk for DM. The affected father in this family had a 3.0-kb expansion of the DM unstable region. The fetus inherited the mutated gene, but with an expansion of 0.5 kb. This case represented a counseling problem in light of the absence of data concerning "negative expansion." Analysis of the DM gene in 17 families with 72 affected individuals revealed four more cases of negative expansions, all of them in paternal transmissions. The possible significance of this finding is discussed. Images Figure 2 PMID:8503449

  13. Bone scintigraphy in the reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kozin, F.; Soin, J.S.; Ryan, L.M.; Carrera, G.F.; Wortmann, R.L.

    1981-02-01

    Sixty-four consecutive patients were studied for possible reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS). They were divided into five groups, based upon specific clinical criteria, and the radiographic and scintigraphic findings in each group were examined. Osteoporosis was the most common radiographic abnormality. Scintigraphic abnormalities were noted in 60% of RSDS patients but in only 7% of the others. These findings included increased blood flow and enhanced periarticular radionuclide activity in the affected extremity. The scan may reflect an active, potentially reversible disorder of local blood flow in RSDS. Furthermore, the scintigraphic patterns may be useful in the diagnosis and in predicting which patients are likely to respond to systemic steroid therapy.

  14. Complications of sodium hydroxide chemical matrixectomy: nail dystrophy, allodynia, hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Bostancı, Seher; Koçyiğit, Pelin; Güngör, Hilayda Karakök; Parlak, Nehir

    2014-11-01

    Ingrown toenails are seen most commonly in young adults, and they can seriously affect daily life. Partial nail avulsion with chemical matrixectomy, generally by using either sodium hydroxide or phenol, is one of the most effective treatment methods. Known complications of phenol matrixectomy are unpredictable tissue damage, prolonged postoperative drainage, increased secondary infection rates, periostitis, and poor cosmetic results. To our knowledge, there have been no reports about the complications related to sodium hydroxide matrixectomy. Herein, we describe three patients who developed nail dystrophy, allodynia, and hyperalgesia after sodium hydroxide matrixectomy. PMID:25514278

  15. Familial amyloidosis with cranial neuropathy and corneal lattice dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Boysen, G; Galassi, G; Kamieniecka, Z; Schlaeger, J; Trojaborg, W

    1979-01-01

    Five siblings of a Danish family with slowly progressive involvement of the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves beginning at the age of 55-65 years were examined. All had asymptomatic corneal lattice dystrophy. Clinical and electrophysiological investigations also showed evidence of slight neurogenic involvement of the limbs. Conduction velocity along sensory nerves was normal but amplitude of sensory potentials was severely reduced suggesting an axonal affection which was confirmed by sural nerve biopsy. The neuropathy was secondary to amyloidosis revealed by skin and sural nerve biopsies. Images PMID:228009

  16. Cell and gene therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J E

    1994-02-01

    Experiments in mice have supported the idea of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by implanting normal muscle precursor cells into dystrophin-deficient muscles. However, similar experiments on DMD patients have had little success. Gene therapy for DMD, by introducing dystrophin constructs via retroviral or adenoviral vectors, has been shown to be possible in the mouse, but the efficiency and safety aspects of this technique will have to be carefully examined before similar experiments can be attempted in man. Direct injection of dystrophin cDNA constructs into mdx muscles has given rise to very low levels of dystrophin and this may be a possibility for the treatment of heart muscle. PMID:7514447

  17. [Dystrophy and necrosis following radiotherapy for maxillary cancer (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bertoin, P; Dutou, L; Lacroze, M; Bailly, C

    1979-01-01

    About 10% of patients developed severe sequelae following radiotherapy, which had been associated with surgical treatment, even though they were, or appeared to be cured. Complications affected the skin and soft tissues (causing skin retraction, loss of substance, and sometimes trismus) and bone (necrosis required surgical treatment, and when there was associated cutaneous dystrophy, resulted in exposure of the bone and severe functional and esthetic problems). A critical study of the radiotherapeutic techniques used suggests that the dose given should be reduced, the fields modified, and Cobalt used in preference to electrons in most cases. PMID:288159

  18. Corticosteroid Treatment Impact on Spinal Deformity in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sanzarello, Ilaria; Merlini, Luciano; Traina, Francesco; Rosa, Michele Attilio; Faldini, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease with loss of ambulation at around 9-10 years of age, followed, if untreated, by development of scoliosis, respiratory insufficiency, and death in the second decade of life. This review highlights the natural history of the disease, in particular, with regard to the development of the spinal deformity and how this complication has been modified by surgical interventions and overall by corticosteroid treatment. The beneficial effect of corticosteroids may have also an impact on the clinical trial design of the new emerging causative therapies.

  19. Serum proteomic profiling reveals fragments of MYOM3 as potential biomarkers for monitoring the outcome of therapeutic interventions in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Rouillon, Jérémy; Poupiot, Jérôme; Zocevic, Aleksandar; Amor, Fatima; Léger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Wong, Brenda; Pinilla, Robin; Cosette, Jérémie; Coenen-Stass, Anna M L; Mcclorey, Graham; Roberts, Thomas C; Wood, Matthew J A; Servais, Laurent; Udd, Bjarne; Voit, Thomas; Richard, Isabelle; Svinartchouk, Fedor

    2015-09-01

    Therapy-responsive biomarkers are an important and unmet need in the muscular dystrophy field where new treatments are currently in clinical trials. By using a comprehensive high-resolution mass spectrometry approach and western blot validation, we found that two fragments of the myofibrillar structural protein myomesin-3 (MYOM3) are abnormally present in sera of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D (LGMD2D) and their respective animal models. Levels of MYOM3 fragments were assayed in therapeutic model systems: (1) restoration of dystrophin expression by antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon-skipping in mdx mice and (2) stable restoration of α-sarcoglycan expression in KO-SGCA mice by systemic injection of a viral vector. Following administration of the therapeutic agents MYOM3 was restored toward wild-type levels. In the LGMD model, where different doses of vector were used, MYOM3 restoration was dose-dependent. MYOM3 fragments showed lower inter-individual variability compared with the commonly used creatine kinase assay, and correlated better with the restoration of the dystrophin-associated protein complex and muscle force. These data suggest that the MYOM3 fragments hold promise for minimally invasive assessment of experimental therapies for DMD and other neuromuscular disorders. PMID:26060189

  20. Serum proteomic profiling reveals fragments of MYOM3 as potential biomarkers for monitoring the outcome of therapeutic interventions in muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Rouillon, Jérémy; Poupiot, Jérôme; Zocevic, Aleksandar; Amor, Fatima; Léger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Wong, Brenda; Pinilla, Robin; Cosette, Jérémie; Coenen-Stass, Anna M.L.; Mcclorey, Graham; Roberts, Thomas C.; Wood, Matthew J.A.; Servais, Laurent; Udd, Bjarne; Voit, Thomas; Richard, Isabelle; Svinartchouk, Fedor

    2015-01-01

    Therapy-responsive biomarkers are an important and unmet need in the muscular dystrophy field where new treatments are currently in clinical trials. By using a comprehensive high-resolution mass spectrometry approach and western blot validation, we found that two fragments of the myofibrillar structural protein myomesin-3 (MYOM3) are abnormally present in sera of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D (LGMD2D) and their respective animal models. Levels of MYOM3 fragments were assayed in therapeutic model systems: (1) restoration of dystrophin expression by antisense oligonucleotide-mediated exon-skipping in mdx mice and (2) stable restoration of α-sarcoglycan expression in KO-SGCA mice by systemic injection of a viral vector. Following administration of the therapeutic agents MYOM3 was restored toward wild-type levels. In the LGMD model, where different doses of vector were used, MYOM3 restoration was dose-dependent. MYOM3 fragments showed lower inter-individual variability compared with the commonly used creatine kinase assay, and correlated better with the restoration of the dystrophin-associated protein complex and muscle force. These data suggest that the MYOM3 fragments hold promise for minimally invasive assessment of experimental therapies for DMD and other neuromuscular disorders. PMID:26060189

  1. Emerging gene editing strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy targeting stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bertoni, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The progressive loss of muscle mass characteristic of many muscular dystrophies impairs the efficacy of most of the gene and molecular therapies currently being pursued for the treatment of those disorders. It is becoming increasingly evident that a therapeutic application, to be effective, needs to target not only mature myofibers, but also muscle progenitors cells or muscle stem cells able to form new muscle tissue and to restore myofibers lost as the result of the diseases or during normal homeostasis so as to guarantee effective and lost lasting effects. Correction of the genetic defect using oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) or engineered nucleases holds great potential for the treatment of many of the musculoskeletal disorders. The encouraging results obtained by studying in vitro systems and model organisms have set the groundwork for what is likely to become an emerging field in the area of molecular and regenerative medicine. Furthermore, the ability to isolate and expand from patients various types of muscle progenitor cells capable of committing to the myogenic lineage provides the opportunity to establish cell lines that can be used for transplantation following ex vivo manipulation and expansion. The purpose of this article is to provide a perspective on approaches aimed at correcting the genetic defect using gene editing strategies and currently under development for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most sever of the neuromuscular disorders. Emphasis will be placed on describing the potential of using the patient own stem cell as source of transplantation and the challenges that gene editing technologies face in the field of regenerative biology. PMID:24795643

  2. The ubiquitin ligase tripartite-motif-protein 32 is induced in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Assereto, Stefania; Piccirillo, Rosanna; Baratto, Serena; Scudieri, Paolo; Fiorillo, Chiara; Massacesi, Manuela; Traverso, Monica; Galietta, Luis J; Bruno, Claudio; Minetti, Carlo; Zara, Federico; Gazzerro, Elisabetta

    2016-08-01

    Activation of the proteasome pathway is one of the secondary processes of cell damage, which ultimately lead to muscle degeneration and necrosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In mdx mice, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib up-regulates the membrane expression of members of the dystrophin complex and reduces the inflammatory reaction. However, chronic inhibition of the 26S proteasome may be toxic, as indicated by the systemic side-effects caused by this drug. Therefore, we sought to determine the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway that are specifically activated in human dystrophin-deficient muscles. The analysis of a cohort of patients with genetically determined DMD or Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) unveiled a selective up-regulation of the ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif-containing protein 32 (TRIM32). The induction of TRIM32 was due to a transcriptional effect and it correlated with disease severity in BMD patients. In contrast, atrogin1 and muscle RING-finger protein-1 (MuRF-1), which are strongly increased in distinct types of muscular atrophy, were not affected by the DMD dystrophic process. Knock-out models showed that TRIM32 is involved in ubiquitination of muscle cytoskeletal proteins as well as of protein inhibitor of activated STAT protein gamma (Piasγ) and N-myc downstream-regulated gene, two inhibitors of satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. Accordingly, we showed that in DMD/BMD muscle tissue, TRIM32 induction was more pronounced in regenerating myofibers rather than in necrotic muscle cells, thus pointing out a role of this protein in the regulation of human myoblast cell fate. This finding highlights TRIM32 as a possible therapeutic target to favor skeletal muscle regeneration in DMD patients. PMID:27295345

  3. Oxidative damage in muscular dystrophy correlates with the severity of the pathology: role of glutathione metabolism.

    PubMed

    Renjini, R; Gayathri, N; Nalini, A; Srinivas Bharath, M M

    2012-04-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), sarcoglycanopathy (Sgpy) and dysferlinopathy (Dysfy) are recessive genetic neuromuscular diseases that display muscle degeneration. Although these MDs have comparable endpoints of muscle pathology, the onset, severity and the course of these diseases are diverse. Different mechanisms downstream of genetic mutations might underlie the disparity in these pathologies. We surmised that oxidative damage and altered antioxidant function might contribute to these differences. The oxidant and antioxidant markers in the muscle biopsies from patients with DMD (n = 15), Sgpy (n = 15) and Dysfy (n = 15) were compared to controls (n = 10). Protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation was evident in all MDs and correlated with the severity of pathology, with DMD, the most severe dystrophic condition showing maximum damage, followed by Sgpy and Dysfy. Oxidative damage in DMD and Sgpy was attributed to the depletion of glutathione (GSH) and lowered antioxidant activities while loss of GSH peroxidase and GSH-S-transferase activities was observed in Dysfy. Lower GSH level in DMD was due to lowered activity of gamma-glutamyl cysteine ligase, the rate limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis. Similar analysis in cardiotoxin (CTX) mouse model of MD showed that the dystrophic muscle pathology correlated with GSH depletion and lipid peroxidation. Depletion of GSH prior to CTX exposure in C2C12 myoblasts exacerbated oxidative damage and myotoxicity. We deduce that the pro and anti-oxidant mechanisms could be correlated to the severity of MD and might influence the dystrophic pathology to a different extent in various MDs. On a therapeutic note, this could help in evolving novel therapies that offer myoprotection in MD. PMID:22219131

  4. The role of proteases in excitation-contraction coupling failure in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mázala, Davi A G; Grange, Robert W; Chin, Eva R

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most frequent types of muscular dystrophy. Alterations in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) handling are thought to contribute to the disease severity in DMD, possibly due to the activation of Ca(2+)-activated proteases. The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) to determine whether prolonged excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling disruption following repeated contractions is greater in animals lacking both dystrophin and utrophin (mdx/Utr(-/-)) compared with mice lacking only dystrophin (mdx); and 2) to assess whether protease inhibition can prevent E-C coupling failure following repeated tetani in these dystrophic mouse models. Excitation-contraction coupling was assessed using Fura-2 ratio, as an index of intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration, in response to electrical stimulation of single muscle fibers from the flexor digitorum brevis muscle. Resting Fura-2 ratio was higher in dystrophic compared with control (Con) fibers, but peak Fura-2 ratios during stimulation were similar in dystrophic and Con fibers. One hour after a series of repeated tetani, peak Fura-2 ratios were reduced by 30 ± 5.6%, 23 ± 2%, and 36 ± 3.1% in mdx, mdx/Utr(+/-), and mdx/Utr(-/-), respectively, with the greatest reduction in mdx/Utr(-/-) fibers (P < 0.05). Protease inhibition attenuated this decrease in peak Fura-2 ratio. These data indicate that E-C coupling impairment after repeated contractions is greatest in fibers lacking both dystrophin and utrophin and that prevention of protease activation can mitigate the prolonged E-C coupling impairment. These data further suggest that acute protease inhibition may be useful in reducing muscle weakness in DMD. PMID:25298424

  5. Cardiac involvement in myotonic muscular dystrophy (Steinert's disease): a prospective study of 25 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Perloff, J.K.; Stevenson, W.G.; Roberts, N.K.; Cabeen, W.; Weiss, J.

    1984-11-01

    The presence, degree and frequency of disorders of cardiac conduction and rhythm and of regional or global myocardial dystrophy or myotonia have not previously been studied prospectively and systematically in the same population of patients with myotonic dystrophy. Accordingly, 25 adults with classic Steinert's disease underwent electrocardiography, 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiography, vectorcardiography, chest x-rays, echocardiography, electrophysiologic studies, and technetium-99m angiography. Clinically important cardiac manifestations of myotonic dystrophy reside in specialized tissues rather than in myocardium. Involvement is relatively specific, primarily assigned to the His-Purkinje system. The cardiac muscle disorder takes the form of dystrophy rather than myotonia, and is not selective, appearing with approximately equal distribution in all 4 chambers. Myocardial dystrophy seldom results in clinically overt ventricular failure, but may be responsible for atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. Since myotonic dystrophy is genetically transmitted, a primary biochemical defect has been proposed with complete expression of the gene toward striated muscle tissue, whether skeletal or cardiac. Specialized cardiac tissue and myocardium have close, if not identical, embryologic origins, so it is not surprising that the genetic marker affects both. Cardiac involvement is therefore an integral part of myotonic dystrophy, targeting particularly the infranodal conduction system, to a lesser extent the sinus node, and still less specifically, the myocardium.

  6. Enhanced Muscular Dystrophy from Loss of Dysferlin Is Accompanied by Impaired Annexin A6 Translocation after Sarcolemmal Disruption.

    PubMed

    Demonbreun, Alexis R; Allen, Madison V; Warner, James L; Barefield, David Y; Krishnan, Swathi; Swanson, Kaitlin E; Earley, Judy U; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2016-06-01

    Dysferlin is a membrane-associated protein implicated in membrane resealing; loss of dysferlin leads to muscular dystrophy. We examined the same loss-of-function Dysf mutation in two different mouse strains, 129T2/SvEmsJ (Dysf(129)) and C57BL/6J (Dysf(B6)). Although there are many genetic differences between these two strains, we focused on polymorphisms in Anxa6 because these variants were previously associated with modifying a pathologically distinct form of muscular dystrophy and increased the production of a truncated annexin A6 protein. Dysferlin deficiency in the C57BL/6J background was associated with increased Evan's Blue dye uptake into muscle and increased serum creatine kinase compared to the 129T2/SvEmsJ background. In the C57BL/6J background, dysferlin loss was associated with enhanced pathologic severity, characterized by decreased mean fiber cross-sectional area, increased internalized nuclei, and increased fibrosis, compared to that in Dysf(129) mice. Macrophage infiltrate was also increased in Dysf(B6) muscle. High-resolution imaging of live myofibers demonstrated that fibers from Dysf(B6) mice displayed reduced translocation of full-length annexin A6 to the site of laser-induced sarcolemmal disruption compared to Dysf(129) myofibers, and impaired translocation of annexin A6 associated with impaired resealing of the sarcolemma. These results provide one mechanism by which the C57BL/6J background intensifies dysferlinopathy, giving rise to a more severe form of muscular dystrophy in the Dysf(B6) mouse model through increased membrane leak and inflammation. PMID:27070822

  7. Distal mdx muscle groups exhibiting up-regulation of utrophin and rescue of dystrophin-associated glycoproteins exemplify a protected phenotype in muscular dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Paul; Culligan, Kevin; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2002-02-01

    Unique unaffected skeletal muscle fibres, unlike necrotic torso and limb muscles, may pave the way for a more detailed understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of inherited neuromuscular disorders and help to develop new treatment strategies for muscular dystrophies. The sparing of extraocular muscle in Duchenne muscular dystrophy is mostly attributed to the special protective properties of extremely fast-twitching small-diameter fibres, but here we show that distal muscles also represent a particular phenotype that is more resistant to necrosis. Immunoblot analysis of membranes isolated from the well established dystrophic animal model mdx shows that, in contrast to dystrophic limb muscles, the toe musculature exhibits an up-regulation of the autosomal dystrophin homologue utrophin and a concomitant rescue of dystrophin-associated glycoproteins. Thus distal mdx muscle groups provide a cellular system that naturally avoids myofibre degeneration which might be useful in the search for naturally occurring compensatory mechanisms in inherited skeletal muscle diseases.

  8. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy subtypes: First-reported cohort from northeastern China

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Omar Abdulmonem; Jiang, Xinmei; Zhang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    The relative frequencies of different subtypes of limb-girdle muscular dystrophies vary widely among different populations. We estimated the percentage of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy subtypes in Chinese people based on 68 patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy from the Myology Clinic, Neurology Department, First Hospital of Jilin University, China. A diagnosis of calpainopathy was made in 12 cases (17%), and dysferlin deficiency in 10 cases (15%). Two biopsies revealed α-sarcoglycan deficiency (3%), and two others revealed a lack of caveolin-3 (3%). A diagnosis of unclassified limb-girdle muscular dystrophy was made in the remaining patients (62%). The appearances of calpain 3- and dysferlin-deficient biopsies were similar, though rimmed vacuoles were unique to dysferlinopathy, while inflammatory infiltrates were present in both these limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D biopsies. Macrophages were detected in seven dysferlinopathy biopsies. The results of this study suggest that the distribution of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy subtypes in the Han Chinese population is similar to that reported in the West. The less necrotic, regenerating and inflammatory appearance of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, but with more lobulated fibers, supports the idea that calpainopathy is a less active, but more chronic disease than dysferlinopathy. Unusual features indicated an extended limb-girdle muscular dystrophy disease spectrum. The use of acid phosphatase stain should be considered in suspected dysferlinopathies. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to define the relative proportions of the various forms of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy in China, based on protein testing. PMID:25206500

  9. [Central Nervous Involvement in Patients with Fukuyama Congenital Muscular Dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Keiko

    2016-02-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), the second most common muscular dystrophy in the Japanese population, is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the fukutin (FKTN) gene. The main features of FCMD are a combination of infantile-onset hypotonia, generalized muscle weakness, eye abnormalities and central nervous system involvement with mental retardation and seizures associated with cortical migration defects. The FKTN gene product is thought to be necessary for maintaining migrating neurons in an immature state during migration, and for supporting migration via α-dystroglycan in the central nervous system. Typical magnetic resonance imaging findings in FCMD patients are cobblestone lissencephaly and cerebellar cystic lesions. White matter abnormalities with hyperintensity on T(2)-weighted images are seen especially in younger patients and those with severe phenotypes. Most FCMD patients are mentally retarded and the level is moderate to severe, with IQs ranging from 30 to 50. In our recent study, 62% of patients developed seizures. Among them, 71% had only febrile seizures, 6% had afebrile seizures from the onset, and 22% developed afebrile seizures following febrile seizures. Most patients had seizures that were controllable with just 1 type of antiepileptic drug, but 18% had intractable seizures that must be treated with 3 medications. PMID:26873231

  10. A personal overview of causalgia and other reflex dystrophies.

    PubMed Central

    Shumacker, H B

    1985-01-01

    This is a personal assessment of true major causalgia and the other reflex dystrophies, related but distinctly separate entities. The clinical picture of causalgia differs only in minor respects from that described by Mitchell over 120 years ago. Its management has, however, been clarified, largely through the extensive experiences of World War II. It is readily recognized and can be treated effectively by sympathetic blocks or sympathectomy together with active exercise. The other reflex dystrophies are far less understood. They appear to have a similar pattern in their early phase and to respond well to a program of exercise and control of edema--a regimen which, because of pain and paresis, cannot be carried out without sympathetic blocks or occasionally sympathectomy. When not recognized early and treated properly, the sympatomatology usually changes dramatically and treatment differs. Often control of edema and active use of the affected part are all that is necessary. Sometimes, in addition to these measures, sympathetic blocks or sympathectomy is required. Guidelines found useful in management are outlined. Puzzling features are discussed. PMID:3977427

  11. Depression in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1: clinical and neuronal correlates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study was designed to investigate the prevalence and correlates of depression in Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Methods Thirty-one patients with DM1 and 47 subjects in a clinical contrast group, consisting of other neuromuscular disorders, including Spinal muscular atrophy, Limb girdle muscle atrophy and Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, completed Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). We aimed to establish whether different factors associated with DM1 correlated with ratings in the BDI. Results Signs of a clinical depression were prevalent in 32% of the patients with DM1, which was comparable with ratings in the clinical contrast group. The depressive condition was mild to moderate in both groups. In DM1, a longer duration of clinical symptoms was associated with lower scores on the BDI and higher educational levels were correlated with higher scores on depression. We also found a negative association with brain white matter lesions. Conclusions Findings indicate significantly more DM1 patients than normative collectives showing signs of a clinical depression. The depressive condition is however mild to moderate and data indicate that the need for intervention is at hand preferentially early during the disease process. PMID:20482818

  12. Nitric oxide synthase deficiency and the pathophysiology of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tidball, James G; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The secondary loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) that occurs in dystrophic muscle is the basis of numerous, complex and interacting features of the dystrophic pathology that affect not only muscle itself, but also influence the interaction of muscle with other tissues. Many mechanisms through which nNOS deficiency contributes to misregulation of muscle development, blood flow, fatigue, inflammation and fibrosis in dystrophic muscle have been identified, suggesting that normalization in NO production could greatly attenuate diverse aspects of the pathology of muscular dystrophy through multiple regulatory pathways. However, the relative importance of the loss of nNOS from the sarcolemma versus the importance of loss of total nNOS from dystrophic muscle remains unknown. Although most current evidence indicates that nNOS localization at the sarcolemma is not required to achieve NO-mediated reductions of pathology in muscular dystrophy, the question remains open concerning whether membrane localization would provide a more efficient rescue from features of the dystrophic phenotype. PMID:25194047

  13. Pathways Implicated in Tadalafil Amelioration of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    De Arcangelis, Valeria; Strimpakos, Georgios; Gabanella, Francesca; Corbi, Nicoletta; Luvisetto, Siro; Magrelli, Armando; Onori, Annalisa; Passananti, Claudio; Pisani, Cinzia; Rome, Sophie; Severini, Cinzia; Naro, Fabio; Mattei, Elisabetta; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Monaco, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic approaches for Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy (DMD and BMD), the most common X-linked muscle degenerative disease, have been proposed. So far, the only one showing a clear beneficial effect is the use of corticosteroids. Recent evidence indicates an improvement of dystrophic cardiac and skeletal muscles in the presence of sustained cGMP levels secondary to a blocking of their degradation by phosphodiesterase five (PDE5). Due to these data, we performed a study to investigate the effect of the specific PDE5 inhibitor, tadalafil, on dystrophic skeletal muscle function. Chronic pharmacological treatment with tadalafil has been carried out in mdx mice. Behavioral and physiological tests, as well as histological and biochemical analyses, confirmed the efficacy of the therapy. We then performed a microarray-based genomic analysis to assess the pattern of gene expression in muscle samples obtained from the different cohorts of animals treated with tadalafil. This scrutiny allowed us to identify several classes of modulated genes. Our results show that PDE5 inhibition can ameliorate dystrophy by acting at different levels. Tadalafil can lead to (1) increased lipid metabolism; (2) a switch towards slow oxidative fibers driven by the up-regulation of PGC-1α; (3) an increased protein synthesis efficiency; (4) a better actin network organization at Z-disk. PMID:26097015

  14. Dystrophin in frameshift deletion patients with Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, S.B.; Ray, P.N.; Worton, R.G.; Sherratt, T.G.; Heckmatt, J.Z.; Dubowitz, V.; Strong, P.N.; Miller, G. ); Shokeir, M. )

    1992-09-01

    In a previous study the authors identified 14 cases with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or its milder variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), with a deletion of exons 3-7, a deletion that would be expected to shift the translational reading frame of the mRNA and give a severe phenotype. They have examined dystrophin and its mRNA from muscle biopsies of seven cases with either mild or intermediate phenotypes. In all cases they detected slightly lower-molecular-weight dystrophin in 12%-15% abundance relative to the normal. By sequencing amplified mRNA they have found that exon 2 is spliced to exon 8, a splice that produces a frameshifted mRNA, and have found no evidence for alternate splicing that might be involved in restoration of dystrophin mRNA reading frame in the patients with a mild phenotype. Other transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms such as cryptic promoter, ribosomal frameshifting, and reinitiation are suggested that might play some role in restoring the reading frame. 34 refs., 5 figs. 1 tab.

  15. A personal overview of causalgia and other reflex dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Shumacker, H B

    1985-03-01

    This is a personal assessment of true major causalgia and the other reflex dystrophies, related but distinctly separate entities. The clinical picture of causalgia differs only in minor respects from that described by Mitchell over 120 years ago. Its management has, however, been clarified, largely through the extensive experiences of World War II. It is readily recognized and can be treated effectively by sympathetic blocks or sympathectomy together with active exercise. The other reflex dystrophies are far less understood. They appear to have a similar pattern in their early phase and to respond well to a program of exercise and control of edema--a regimen which, because of pain and paresis, cannot be carried out without sympathetic blocks or occasionally sympathectomy. When not recognized early and treated properly, the sympatomatology usually changes dramatically and treatment differs. Often control of edema and active use of the affected part are all that is necessary. Sometimes, in addition to these measures, sympathetic blocks or sympathectomy is required. Guidelines found useful in management are outlined. Puzzling features are discussed. PMID:3977427

  16. Congenital myotonic dystrophy: molecular diagnosis and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Hojo, K; Yamagata, H; Moji, H; Fujita, T; Miki, T; Fujimura, M; Kidoguchi, K

    1995-05-01

    Recently, an unstable DNA fragment specific to myotonic dystrophy (MyD) was discovered. In affected individuals, a DNA fragment is found that is larger than in normal siblings. Our objectives were to show whether the results of DNA analysis agree with the disease severity and prognosis in congenital myotonic dystrophy (CMyD) by DNA analysis. We investigated three pregnancies (two studied retrospectively) in three families. We genotyped the family members with the Southern blots and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. In one case a prenatal diagnosis was carried out using chorionic villus sampling. This report also presents the three cases of affected mothers and CMyD babies with their growth courses. We clarify four main problems in CMyD, namely, respiratory distress, delayed motor development, feeding difficulty, and delayed mental development. The allele size in the range of 10 to 13 kb tended to be present as the adult form of MyD, and 14 to 15 kb as the CMyD. The three CMyD cases whose alleles size in the range of 14 to 15 kb showed various forms of disease and prognosis. We reached the following conclusions: the disease severity and prognosis in babies with CMyD did not correlate with the result of DNA analysis. The DNA analysis is a useful test for prenatal diagnosis. However, it is impossible to predict the disease severity and prognosis in babies with CMyD. PMID:7612095

  17. Congenital Muscular Dystrophy and Generalized Epilepsy Caused by GMPPB Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Alya R.; Couthouis, Julien; Sakamuri, Sarada; Siskind, Carly; Vogel, Hannes; Day, John W.; Gitler, Aaron D.

    2014-01-01

    The alpha-dystroglycanopathies are genetically heterogeneous muscular dystrophies that result from hypoglycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (α-DG). Alpha-dystroglycan is an essential link between the extracellular matrix and the muscle fiber sarcolemma, and proper glycosylation is critical for its ability to bind to ligands in the extracellular matrix. We sought to identify the genetic basis of alpha-dystroglycanopathy in a family wherein the affected individuals presented with congenital muscular dystrophy, brain abnormalities and generalized epilepsy. We performed whole exome sequencing and identified compound heterozygous GMPPB mutations in the affected children. GMPPB is an enzyme in the glycosylation pathway, and GMPPB mutation were recently linked to eight cases of alpha-dystroglycanopathy with a range of symptoms. We identified a novel mutation in GMPPB (p.I219T) as well as a previously published mutation (p.R287Q). Thus, our work further confirms a role for GMPPB defects in alpha-dystroglycanopathy, and suggests that glycosylation may play a role in the neuronal membrane channels or networks involved in the physiology of generalized epilepsy syndromes. PMID:24780531

  18. Symptom Burden in Persons with Myotonic and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amanda E.; McMullen, Kara; Jensen, Mark P.; Carter, Gregory T.; Molton, Ivan R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study examines the prevalence of pain, fatigue, imbalance, memory impairment and vision loss in persons with myotonic and facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, and their association with functioning. Design A survey (n=170) included measures of severity (0–10 scales) and course of these symptoms, as well as measures of social integration, home competency, mental health and productive activity. Descriptive and regression analyses examined the associations between symptoms and functioning. Results Fatigue (91%), imbalance (82%) and pain (77%) were most commonly reported. The most severe symptom was fatigue (mean severity 5.14 ± 2.81), followed by imbalance (4.95 ± 3.25). Symptoms were most likely to stay the same or worsen since onset. Controlling for potential medical and demographic confounds, symptoms were associated with 17% of the mental health variance, 10% of home competency, 10% of social integration, 16% of productive activity for DM1 and 12% of productive activity for FSHD. Conclusions Pain, fatigue and imbalance are common in persons with muscular dystrophy. Interventions may be useful to mitigate their impact on functioning. Further research should examine these relationships to guide clinical practices. PMID:24247759

  19. Dexmedetomidine and fentanyl combination for procedural sedation in a case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Ashish; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Singh, Amarjit; Kapoor, Vinod

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, an X-linked disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, is the most common muscular dystrophy among children leading to death before the end of third decade. Anesthesia in such patients pose a great challenge due to various complications associated with it. The dreaded metabolic and clinical complications occur due to various inhalational anesthetics and succinylcholine in this subset of patients. We are reporting a child with diagnosed Duchenne muscular dystrophy who underwent excision of dentigerous cyst in oral cavity under procedural sedation with combination of dexmedetomidine and fentanyl and thus administration of general anesthesia was avoided. PMID:25885395

  20. A Rare Case Report of Neurodegenerative Disease: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in Two Male Siblings.

    PubMed

    Suneja, B; Suneja, E S; Adlakha, V K; Chandna, P

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an recessive X-linked mediated, musculoskeletal disorder that affects only males. It is the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy where there is failure to manufacture dystrophin. Clinically, it is characterized by progressive muscle wasting eventually leading to premature death. This case report describes the genetic, oral and systemic findings in two cases of DMD in male siblings. How to cite this article: Suneja B, Suneja ES, Adlakha VK, Chandna P. A Rare Case Report of Neurodegenerative Disease: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in Two Male Siblings. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):163-165. PMID:26379389

  1. A Rare Case Report of Neurodegenerative Disease: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in Two Male Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Suneja, B; Suneja, ES; Chandna, P

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an recessive X-linked mediated, musculoskeletal disorder that affects only males. It is the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy where there is failure to manufacture dystrophin. Clinically, it is characterized by progressive muscle wasting eventually leading to premature death. This case report describes the genetic, oral and systemic findings in two cases of DMD in male siblings. How to cite this article: Suneja B, Suneja ES, Adlakha VK, Chandna P. A Rare Case Report of Neurodegenerative Disease: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in Two Male Siblings. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):163-165. PMID:26379389

  2. The Intriguing Regulators of Muscle Mass in Sarcopenia and Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Kunihiro; Aoi, Wataru; Yamaguchi, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the biology of muscle have led to new interest in the pharmacological treatment of muscle wasting. Loss of muscle mass and increased intramuscular fibrosis occur in both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. Several regulators (mammalian target of rapamycin, serum response factor, atrogin-1, myostatin, etc.) seem to modulate protein synthesis and degradation or transcription of muscle-specific genes during both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. This review provides an overview of the adaptive changes in several regulators of muscle mass in both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. PMID:25221510

  3. Nitric oxide release combined with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory activity prevents muscular dystrophy pathology and enhances stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brunelli, Silvia; Sciorati, Clara; D'Antona, Giuseppe; Innocenzi, Anna; Covarello, Diego; Galvez, Beatriz G.; Perrotta, Cristiana; Monopoli, Angela; Sanvito, Francesca; Bottinelli, Roberto; Ongini, Ennio; Cossu, Giulio; Clementi, Emilio

    2007-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a relatively common disease that affects skeletal muscle, leading to progressive paralysis and death. There is currently no resolutive therapy. We have developed a treatment in which we combined the effects of nitric oxide with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory activity by using HCT 1026, a nitric oxide-releasing derivative of flurbiprofen. Here, we report the results of long-term (1-year) oral treatment with HCT 1026 of two murine models for limb girdle and Duchenne muscular dystrophies (α-sarcoglycan-null and mdx mice). In both models, HCT 1026 significantly ameliorated the morphological, biochemical, and functional phenotype in the absence of secondary effects, efficiently slowing down disease progression. HCT 1026 acted by reducing inflammation, preventing muscle damage, and preserving the number and function of satellite cells. HCT 1026 was significantly more effective than the corticosteroid prednisolone, which was analyzed in parallel. As an additional beneficial effect, HCT 1026 enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of arterially delivered donor stem cells, by increasing 4-fold their ability to migrate and reconstitute muscle fibers. The therapeutic strategy we propose is not selective for a subset of mutations; it provides ground for immediate clinical experimentation with HCT 1026 alone, which is approved for use in humans; and it sets the stage for combined therapies with donor or autologous, genetically corrected stem cells. PMID:17182743

  4. Interplay of IKK/NF-κB signaling in macrophages and myofibers promotes muscle degeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Acharyya, Swarnali; Villalta, S. Armando; Bakkar, Nadine; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Janssen, Paul M.L.; Carathers, Micheal; Li, Zhi-Wei; Beg, Amer A.; Ghosh, Sankar; Sahenk, Zarife; Weinstein, Michael; Gardner, Katherine L.; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A.; Karin, Michael; Tidball, James G.; Baldwin, Albert S.; Guttridge, Denis C.

    2007-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal X-linked disorder associated with dystrophin deficiency that results in chronic inflammation and severe skeletal muscle degeneration. In DMD mouse models and patients, we find that IκB kinase/NF-κB (IKK/NF-κB) signaling is persistently elevated in immune cells and regenerative muscle fibers. Ablation of 1 allele of the p65 subunit of NF-κB was sufficient to improve pathology in mdx mice, a model of DMD. In addition, conditional deletion of IKKβ in mdx mice elucidated that NF-κB functions in activated macrophages to promote inflammation and muscle necrosis and in skeletal muscle fibers to limit regeneration through the inhibition of muscle progenitor cells. Furthermore, specific pharmacological inhibition of IKK resulted in improved pathology and muscle function in mdx mice. Collectively, these results underscore the critical role of NF-κB in the progression of muscular dystrophy and suggest the IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway as a potential therapeutic target for DMD. PMID:17380205

  5. Angiogenesis as a novel therapeutic strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy through decreased ischemia and increased satellite cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Asakura, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common hereditary muscular dystrophy caused by mutation in dystrophin, and there is no curative therapy. Dystrophin is a protein which forms the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC) at the sarcolemma linking the muscle cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. When dystrophin is absent, muscle fibers become vulnerable to mechanical stretch. In addition to this, accumulating evidence indicates DMD muscle having vascular abnormalities and that the muscles are under an ischemic condition. More recent studies demonstrate decreased vascular densities and impaired angiogenesis in the muscles of murine model of DMD. Therefore, generation of new vasculature can be considered a potentially effective strategy for DMD therapy. The pro-angiogenic approaches also seem to be pro-myogenic and could induce muscle regeneration capacity through expansion of the satellite cell juxtavascular niche in the mouse model. Here, we will focus on angiogenesis, reviewing the background, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF receptor-pathway, effect, and concerns of this strategy in DMD. PMID:24600399

  6. Genetic evidence in the mouse solidifies the calcium hypothesis of myofiber death in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Burr, A R; Molkentin, J D

    2015-09-01

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of degenerative muscle disorders characterized by progressive muscle wasting and often premature death. Although the primary defect underlying most forms of MD typically results from a loss of sarcolemmal integrity, the secondary molecular mechanisms leading to muscle degeneration and myofiber necrosis is debated. One hypothesis suggests that elevated or dysregulated cytosolic calcium is the common transducing event, resulting in myofiber necrosis in MD. Previous measurements of resting calcium levels in myofibers from dystrophic animal models or humans produced equivocal results. However, recent studies in genetically altered mouse models have largely solidified the calcium hypothesis of MD, such that models with artificially elevated calcium in skeletal muscle manifest fulminant dystrophic-like disease, whereas models with enhanced calcium clearance or inhibited calcium influx are resistant to myofiber death and MD. Here, we will review the field and the recent cadre of data from genetically altered mouse models, which we propose have collectively mostly proven the hypothesis that calcium is the primary effector of myofiber necrosis in MD. This new consensus on calcium should guide future selection of drugs to be evaluated in clinical trials as well as gene therapy-based approaches. PMID:26088163

  7. Is muscle spindle proprioceptive function spared in muscular dystrophies? A muscle tendon vibration study.

    PubMed

    Ribot-Ciscar, Edith; Tréfouret, Sylvie; Aimonetti, Jean-Marc; Attarian, Shahram; Pouget, Jean; Roll, Jean-Pierre

    2004-06-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MDs) are characterized by the degeneration of skeletal muscle fibers. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the intrafusal fibers of muscle spindles are also affected in MD. The functional integrity of muscle spindles was tested by analyzing their involvement in the perception of body segment movements and in the control of posture. Twenty MD patients (4 with dystrophinopathy, 5 with myotonic dystrophies, 5 with fascioscapulohumeral MD, and 6 with limb-girdle dystrophies) and 10 healthy subjects participated in the study. The MD patients perceived passive movements and experienced illusory movements similar to those perceived by healthy subjects in terms of their direction and velocity. Vibratory stimulation applied to the neck and ankle muscle tendons induced postural responses in MD patients with spatial and temporal characteristics similar to those produced by healthy subjects. These results suggest that the proprioceptive function of muscle spindles is spared in muscular dystrophies. PMID:15170619

  8. Stakeholder cooperation to overcome challenges in orphan medicine development: the example of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Straub, Volker; Balabanov, Pavel; Bushby, Kate; Ensini, Monica; Goemans, Nathalie; De Luca, Annamaria; Pereda, Alejandra; Hemmings, Robert; Campion, Giles; Kaye, Edward; Arechavala-Gomeza, Virginia; Goyenvalle, Aurelie; Niks, Erik; Veldhuizen, Olav; Furlong, Pat; Stoyanova-Beninska, Violeta; Wood, Matthew J; Johnson, Alex; Mercuri, Eugenio; Muntoni, Francesco; Sepodes, Bruno; Haas, Manuel; Vroom, Elizabeth; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2016-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a rare, progressive, muscle-wasting disease leading to severe disability and premature death. Treatment is currently symptomatic, but several experimental therapies are in development. Implemented care standards, validated outcome measures correlating with clinical benefit, and comprehensive information about the natural history of the disease are essential for regulatory approval of any treatment. However, for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other rare diseases, these requirements are not always in place when potential therapies enter the clinical trial phase. A cooperative effort of stakeholders in Duchenne muscular dystrophy-including representatives from patients' groups, academia, industry, and regulatory agencies-is aimed at addressing this shortfall by identifying strategies to overcome challenges, developing the tools needed, and collecting relevant data. An open and constructive dialogue among European stakeholders has positively affected development of treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy; this approach could serve as a paradigm for development of treatments for rare diseases in general. PMID:27302365

  9. [Reflex dystrophy following so-called whiplash injury of the cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Bühring, M

    1984-01-01

    In bad cases of whiplash injury of the cervical spine the post-accidental course is complicated by pain, vegetative dysfunctional syndromes and by psychic and psychiatric disorders over many years. There is no satisfactory concept to understand the pathophysiology of these processes. The paper deals with the possibility of a reflex dystrophy. Sympathetic reflex dystrophy syndromes are seen principally in patients with joint, tendon or vascular lesions. In case of whiplash injury, it would concern the cervical spine itself as well as visceral organs including the central nervous system. For the CNS the lymphostatic encephalopathy is a well defined entity. Above all, a reflex dystrophy develops on the basis of a special personality structure. In case of psychic and psychiatric complaints after whiplash injury patients with a so called Sudeck-personality should not be suspected to aggravate; in contrast, especially in these patients complications by reflex dystrophy are credible. Consequences for the assessment and for rehabilitation are discussed. PMID:6475217

  10. Imperatives for DUCHENNE MD: a Simplified Guide to Comprehensive Care for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kinnett, Kathi; Rodger, Sunil; Vroom, Elizabeth; Furlong, Pat; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Bushby, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive, life-limiting muscle-wasting disease. Although no curative treatment is yet available, comprehensive multidisciplinary care has increased life expectancy significantly in recent decades. An international consensus care publication in 2010 outlined best-practice care, which includes corticosteroid treatment, respiratory, cardiac, orthopedic and rehabilitative interventions to address disease manifestations. While disease specialists are largely aware of these care standards, local physicians responsible for the day-to-day care of patients and families may be less familiar. To facilitate optimal care, a one-page document has been generated from published care recommendations, summarizing the key elements of comprehensive care for people living with DMD ("Imperatives for Duchenne muscular dystrophy). This document was developed through an international collaboration between Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD), United Parent Projects Muscular Dystrophy (UPPMD) and TREAT-NMD. PMID:26331093

  11. Imperatives for DUCHENNE MD: a Simplified Guide to Comprehensive Care for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kinnett, Kathi; Rodger, Sunil; Vroom, Elizabeth; Furlong, Pat; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Bushby, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive, life-limiting muscle-wasting disease. Although no curative treatment is yet available, comprehensive multidisciplinary care has increased life expectancy significantly in recent decades. An international consensus care publication in 2010 outlined best-practice care, which includes corticosteroid treatment, respiratory, cardiac, orthopedic and rehabilitative interventions to address disease manifestations. While disease specialists are largely aware of these care standards, local physicians responsible for the day-to-day care of patients and families may be less familiar. To facilitate optimal care, a one-page document has been generated from published care recommendations, summarizing the key elements of comprehensive care for people living with DMD (“Imperatives for Duchenne muscular dystrophy). This document was developed through an international collaboration between Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD), United Parent Projects Muscular Dystrophy (UPPMD) and TREAT-NMD.  PMID:26331093

  12. Defective (U-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.E.; Norris, B.J.; Brooke, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with normal skeletal muscle, muscle from patients with Duchenne dystrophy had decreased (U-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation. (1-14 C) palmitic acid oxidation was normal. These results may indicate a defect in intramitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

  13. Association of Smoking and Other Risk Factors With Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy Severity and Corneal Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Igo, Robert P.; Fondran, Jeremy; Mootha, V. Vinod; Oliva, Matt; Hammersmith, Kristin; Sugar, Alan; Lass, Jonathan H.; Iyengar, Sudha K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We investigated effects of smoking and other risk factors on the development of advanced Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) and on central corneal thickness (CCT). Methods. Eyes from Caucasian probands, affected and unaffected family members, and unrelated controls matched for age from the FECD Genetics Multi-Center Study (n = 2044 subjects) were examined. Univariate and multivariate models, adjusted for family correlations, were used to determine the effect of smoking, sex, diabetes, and age on FECD case/control status and CCT. Results. In a multivariate model, sex and smoking were associated significantly with advanced FECD (grades 4–6) development (P = 0.016 and P = 0.047, respectively). Female sex increased odds by 34%. Smoking increased odds by 30%. In a multivariate model, diabetes was associated with an increase of 9.1 μm in average CCT (P = 0.021). Female sex was associated significantly with a decrease in average CCT by 6.9 μm (P = 0.015). Smoking had no significant effect on CCT in any model. As shown previously, advanced FECD was associated with large increases in CCT (31.4–94.2 μm). Conclusions. Smoking was associated with an increased risk of advanced FECD and self-reported diabetes was associated with increased CCT. Further study of the impact of smoking and diabetes on FECD development and changes in corneal thickness is warranted. PMID:23882692

  14. Back pain in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: steroids are not always the culprit.

    PubMed

    Segal, Lee S; Odgers, Ryan; Carpentieri, David; Shrader, M Wade

    2016-01-01

    We report on a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy on prolonged corticosteroid treatment who presented with back pain and was subsequently found to have a monostotic fibrous dysplasia lesion of the spine. It is the intent of this case report to emphasize the need to maintain a high index of suspicion for other potential causes of back pain in Duchenne muscular dystrophy besides vertebral compression fractures. PMID:25714938

  15. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophies: Characteristics of Users and Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong; Romitti, Paul A.; Conway, Kristin M.; Andrews, Jennifer; Liu, Ke; Meaney, F. John; Street, Natalie; Puzhankara, Soman; Druschel, Charlotte M.; Matthews, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Complementary and alternative medicine is frequently used in the management of chronic pediatric diseases, but little is known about its use by those with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy. METHODS Complementary and alternative medicine use by male patients with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy and associations with characteristics of male patients and their caregivers were examined through interviews with 362 primary caregivers identified from the Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network. RESULTS Overall, 272 of the 362 (75.1%) primary caregivers reported that they had used any complementary and alternative medicine for the oldest Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network male in their family. The most commonly reported therapies were from the mind-body medicine domain (61.0%) followed by those from the biologically based practice (39.2%), manipulative and body-based practice (29.3%), and whole medical system (6.9%) domains. Aquatherapy, prayer and/or blessing, special diet, and massage were the most frequently used therapies. Compared with nonusers, male patients who used any therapy were more likely to have an early onset of symptoms and use a wheel chair; their caregivers were more likely to be non-Hispanic white. Among domains, associations were observed with caregiver education and family income (mind-body medicines [excluding prayer and/or blessing only] and whole medical systems) and Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network site (biologically based practices and mind-body medicines [excluding prayer and/or blessing only]). CONCLUSIONS Complementary and alternative medicine use was common in the management of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies among Muscular Dystrophy Surveillance, Tracking, and Research Network males. This widespread use suggests further study to evaluate the efficacy of integrating complementary and alternative medicine into treatment regimens for

  16. Decreased Insulin Receptors but Normal Glucose Metabolism in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pirro, Roberto; Lauro, Renato; Testa, Ivano; Ferretti, Ginofabrizio; de Martinis, Carlo; Dellantonio, Renzo

    1982-04-01

    Compared to matched controls, 17 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy showed decreased insulin binding to monocytes due to decreased receptor concentration. These patients showed no signs of altered glucose metabolism and retrospective analysis of the clinical records of a further 56 such patients revealed no modification in carbohydrate metabolism. These data suggest that reduced insulin receptor number does not produce overt modifications of glucose metabolism in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  17. Bethlem myopathy is not allelic to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Speer, M.C.; Yamaoka, L.H.; Stajich, J.; Lewis, K.

    1995-08-28

    The Bethlem myopathy, an autosomal-dominant myopathy, shows a distribution of proximal muscle weakness similar to that observed in dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Yet the Bethlem myopathy differs from most limb-girdle dystrophies in two important regards. First, the Bethlem myopathy presents with joint contractures most commonly observed at the elbows, ankles, and neck. Secondly, disease onset in the Bethlem myopathy is in early childhood, while most dominant LGMDs present with adult onset. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Linker molecules between laminins and dystroglycan ameliorate laminin-α2–deficient muscular dystrophy at all disease stages

    PubMed Central

    Meinen, Sarina; Barzaghi, Patrizia; Lin, Shuo; Lochmüller, Hanns; Ruegg, Markus A.

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in laminin-α2 cause a severe congenital muscular dystrophy, called MDC1A. The two main receptors that interact with laminin-α2 are dystroglycan and α7β1 integrin. We have previously shown in mouse models for MDC1A that muscle-specific overexpression of a miniaturized form of agrin (mini-agrin), which binds to dystroglycan but not to α7β1 integrin, substantially ameliorates the disease (Moll, J., P. Barzaghi, S. Lin, G. Bezakova, H. Lochmuller, E. Engvall, U. Muller, and M.A. Ruegg. 2001. Nature. 413:302–307; Bentzinger, C.F., P. Barzaghi, S. Lin, and M.A. Ruegg. 2005. Matrix Biol. 24:326–332.). Now we show that late-onset expression of mini-agrin still prolongs life span and improves overall health, although not to the same extent as early expression. Furthermore, a chimeric protein containing the dystroglycan-binding domain of perlecan has the same activities as mini-agrin in ameliorating the disease. Finally, expression of full-length agrin also slows down the disease. These experiments are conceptual proof that linking the basement membrane to dystroglycan by specifically designed molecules or by endogenous ligands, could be a means to counteract MDC1A at a progressed stage of the disease, and thus opens new possibilities for the development of treatment options for this muscular dystrophy. PMID:17389231

  19. Induction and reversal of myotonic dystrophy type 1 pre-mRNA splicing defects by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Tran, Tuan; Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, HaJeung; Chen, Catherine Z; Hoskins, Jason; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan J; Patnaik, Samarjit; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Chris P; Schatz, George C; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    The ability to control pre-mRNA splicing with small molecules could facilitate the development of therapeutics or cell-based circuits that control gene function. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 is caused by the dysregulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing due to sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1) by expanded, non-coding r(CUG) repeats (r(CUG)(exp)). Here we report two small molecules that induce or ameliorate alternative splicing dysregulation. A thiophene-containing small molecule (1) inhibits the interaction of MBNL1 with its natural pre-mRNA substrates. Compound (2), a substituted naphthyridine, binds r(CUG)(exp) and displaces MBNL1. Structural models show that 1 binds MBNL1 in the Zn-finger domain and that 2 interacts with UU loops in r(CUG)(exp). This study provides a structural framework for small molecules that target MBNL1 by mimicking r(CUG)(exp) and shows that targeting MBNL1 causes dysregulation of alternative splicing, suggesting that MBNL1 is thus not a suitable therapeutic target for the treatment of myotonic dystrophy type 1. PMID:23806903

  20. VBP15, a novel anti-inflammatory and membrane-stabilizer, improves muscular dystrophy without side effects

    PubMed Central

    Heier, Christopher R; Damsker, Jesse M; Yu, Qing; Dillingham, Blythe C; Huynh, Tony; Van der Meulen, Jack H; Sali, Arpana; Miller, Brittany K; Phadke, Aditi; Scheffer, Luana; Quinn, James; Tatem, Kathleen; Jordan, Sarah; Dadgar, Sherry; Rodriguez, Olga C; Albanese, Chris; Calhoun, Michael; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Connor, Edward M; McCall, John M; Hoffman, Eric P; Reeves, Erica K M; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2013-01-01

    Absence of dystrophin makes skeletal muscle more susceptible to injury, resulting in breaches of the plasma membrane and chronic inflammation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Current management by glucocorticoids has unclear molecular benefits and harsh side effects. It is uncertain whether therapies that avoid hormonal stunting of growth and development, and/or immunosuppression, would be more or less beneficial. Here, we discover an oral drug with mechanisms that provide efficacy through anti-inflammatory signaling and membrane-stabilizing pathways, independent of hormonal or immunosuppressive effects. We find VBP15 protects and promotes efficient repair of skeletal muscle cells upon laser injury, in opposition to prednisolone. Potent inhibition of NF-κB is mediated through protein interactions of the glucocorticoid receptor, however VBP15 shows significantly reduced hormonal receptor transcriptional activity. The translation of these drug mechanisms into DMD model mice improves muscle strength, live-imaging and pathology through both preventive and post-onset intervention regimens. These data demonstrate successful improvement of dystrophy independent of hormonal, growth, or immunosuppressive effects, indicating VBP15 merits clinical investigation for DMD and would benefit other chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:24014378

  1. VBP15, a novel anti-inflammatory and membrane-stabilizer, improves muscular dystrophy without side effects.

    PubMed

    Heier, Christopher R; Damsker, Jesse M; Yu, Qing; Dillingham, Blythe C; Huynh, Tony; Van der Meulen, Jack H; Sali, Arpana; Miller, Brittany K; Phadke, Aditi; Scheffer, Luana; Quinn, James; Tatem, Kathleen; Jordan, Sarah; Dadgar, Sherry; Rodriguez, Olga C; Albanese, Chris; Calhoun, Michael; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Connor, Edward M; McCall, John M; Hoffman, Eric P; Reeves, Erica K M; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2013-10-01

    Absence of dystrophin makes skeletal muscle more susceptible to injury, resulting in breaches of the plasma membrane and chronic inflammation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Current management by glucocorticoids has unclear molecular benefits and harsh side effects. It is uncertain whether therapies that avoid hormonal stunting of growth and development, and/or immunosuppression, would be more or less beneficial. Here, we discover an oral drug with mechanisms that provide efficacy through anti-inflammatory signaling and membrane-stabilizing pathways, independent of hormonal or immunosuppressive effects. We find VBP15 protects and promotes efficient repair of skeletal muscle cells upon laser injury, in opposition to prednisolone. Potent inhibition of NF-κB is mediated through protein interactions of the glucocorticoid receptor, however VBP15 shows significantly reduced hormonal receptor transcriptional activity. The translation of these drug mechanisms into DMD model mice improves muscle strength, live-imaging and pathology through both preventive and post-onset intervention regimens. These data demonstrate successful improvement of dystrophy independent of hormonal, growth, or immunosuppressive effects, indicating VBP15 merits clinical investigation for DMD and would benefit other chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:24014378

  2. Malattia Leventinese/Doyne Honeycomb Retinal Dystrophy: Similarities to Age-Related Macular Degeneration and Potential Therapies.

    PubMed

    Hulleman, John D

    2016-01-01

    Fibulin-3 (F3) is a secreted, disulfide-rich glycoprotein which is expressed in a variety of tissues within the body, including the retina. An Arg345Trp (R345W) mutation in F3 was identified as the cause of a rare retinal dystrophy, Malattia Leventinese/Doyne Honeycomb Retinal Dystrophy (ML/DHRD). ML/DHRD shares many phenotypic similarities with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The most prominent feature of ML/DHRD is the development of radial or honeycomb patterns of drusen which can develop as early as adolescence. Two independent mouse models of ML/DHRD show evidence of complement activation as well as retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy, strengthening the phenotypic connection with AMD. Because of its similarities with AMD, ML/DHRD is receiving increasing interest as a potential surrogate disease to study the underpinnings of AMD. This mini-review summarizes the current knowledge of F3 and points toward potential therapeutic strategies which directly or indirectly target cellular dysfunction associated with R345W F3. PMID:26427406

  3. Muscular dystrophy in the Japanese Spitz: an inversion disrupts the DMD and RPGR genes.

    PubMed

    Atencia-Fernandez, Sabela; Shiel, Robert E; Mooney, Carmel T; Nolan, Catherine M

    2015-04-01

    An X-linked muscular dystrophy, with deficiency of full-length dystrophin and expression of a low molecular weight dystrophin-related protein, has been described in Japanese Spitz dogs. The aim of this study was to identify the causative mutation and develop a specific test to identify affected cases and carrier animals. Gene expression studies in skeletal muscle of an affected animal indicated aberrant expression of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (dystrophin) gene and an anomaly in intron 19 of the gene. Genome-walking experiments revealed an inversion that interrupts two genes on the X chromosome, the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene and the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator gene. All clinically affected dogs and obligate carriers that were tested had the mutant chromosome, and it is concluded that the inversion is the causative mutation for X-linked muscular dystrophy in the Japanese Spitz breed. A PCR assay that amplifies mutant and wild-type alleles was developed and proved capable of identifying affected and carrier individuals. Unexpectedly, a 7-year-old male animal, which had not previously come to clinical attention, was shown to possess the mutant allele and to have a relatively mild form of the disease. This observation indicates phenotypic heterogeneity in Japanese Spitz muscular dystrophy, a feature described previously in humans and Golden Retrievers. With the availability of a simple, fast and accurate test for Japanese Spitz muscular dystrophy, detection of carrier animals and selected breeding should help eliminate the mutation from the breed. PMID:25644216

  4. Pathophysiology of Corneal Dystrophies: From Cellular Genetic Alteration to Clinical Findings.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Marta; Macchi, Ilaria; Tiezzi, Alessandro; La Cava, Maurizio; Massaro-Giordano, Giacomina; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2016-02-01

    Corneal dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of bilateral, inherited, rare diseases characterized by slowly progressive corneal opacities, that lead to visual impairment. Most of them have an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with variable expressivity, but new mutations have been described. Many corneal dystrophies have been genetically characterized and the specific gene mutations identified, such as for the epithelial-stromal TGFBI dystrophies. Current classification systems identified four main groups of corneal dystrophies based on clinical, histologic, and genetic information. Diagnosis is performed during a routine ophthalmic examination that shows typical cellular abnormalities of the corneal epithelium, stroma, or endothelium. Disease progression should be carefully monitored to decide the proper clinical management. The treatment of corneal dystrophies is variable, depending on symptoms, clinical course, severity, and type of dystrophy. Management aimed to reduce symptoms and to improve vision, includes different surgical approaches. Novel cellular and genetic therapeutic approaches are under evaluation. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 261-269, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26104822

  5. Effect of spinal surgery on lung function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, J. D.; Staples, A. J.; Brook, P. D.; Parsons, D. W.; Sutherland, A. D.; Martin, A. J.; Stern, L. M.; Foster, B. K.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The effect on subsequent respiratory function of spinal stabilisation for scoliosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy is unclear. In order to clarify this clinical problem, changes in the forced vital capacity of a group of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who had undergone spinal surgery were measured and compared with a group of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who had not had surgery. METHODS--In this retrospective study 17 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who underwent spinal stabilisation at a mean age of 14.9 years (surgical group) were compared with 21 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who had not had surgery (non-surgical group). The mean (SD) Cobb angle of the surgical group at 14.9 years was 57 (16.4) degrees, and of the non-surgical group at 15 years was 45 (29.9) degrees. Forced vital capacity expressed as percentage predicted (% FVC) was measured in total over a seven year period in the surgical group and over 6.5 years in the non-surgical group, and regression equations were calculated. Survival curves for both groups were also constructed. RESULTS--No difference was found between spinal stabilisation (surgical group) and the non-surgical group in the rate of deterioration of % FVC which was 3-5% per year. There was no difference in survival in either group. CONCLUSIONS--Spinal stabilisation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy does not alter the decline in pulmonary function, nor does it improve survival. PMID:8553273

  6. Merosin-negative congenital muscular dystrophy: Report of five cases

    PubMed Central

    Incecik, Faruk; Herguner, Ozlem M.; Ceylaner, Serdar; Altunbasak, Sakir

    2015-01-01

    Context: Congenital muscular dystrophy type 1A (MDC1A) is caused by mutations in the laminin α-2 gene encoding laminin-a2. Aims: The purpose of this study is to determine clinical and genetic results in five Turkish patients with MDC1A. Setting and Designs: Five children with MDC1A were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Three (60%) were boys, and 2 (40%) were girls. Parental consanguinity was found in all the families. In all the patients, hypotonia, weakness, delayed motor milestones, markedly elevated creatine phosphokinase (CPK) concentration, and brain white matter abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging were detected. Mutation analysis was performed in all the patients, and 3 different mutations were detected. However, a mutation in patient 1 and 2 has not been previously described in the literature. Conclusions: When a patient presents with severe congenital hypotonia, muscle weakness, high serum CPK levels, and white matter abnormalities, should be suspected as MDC1A. PMID:26962340

  7. Deletion patterns of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies in Greece.

    PubMed Central

    Florentin, L; Mavrou, A; Kekou, K; Metaxotou, C

    1995-01-01

    We present molecular data from 90 Greek boys with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy using cDNA analysis or multiplex PCR or both. Deletions were detected in 63.3% of patients and were mainly clustered in two areas of the gene, one in the 3' and one in the 5' end of the gene (exons 3-19 and 44-53). Almost 17% of deletion breakpoints lay in intron 44 while 29% of deletions have a breakpoint in intron 50. Thus the distribution of deletions in our DMD/BMD patients differs from that previously reported. Furthermore a 1:4.35 proximal:distal ratio was observed in familial cases and a 1:2.45 ratio in isolated ones. PMID:7897627

  8. A case of paternally inherited congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, M; Yamada, H; Higuchi, I; Kaminishi, Y; Miki, T; Johnson, K; Osame, M

    1994-01-01

    We report two sisters with congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM) born to a normal mother and an affected father. The congenitally affected daughters had symptoms from birth. The age of onset of DM in the father was 39 years. Analysis of the CTG trinucleotide expansion in this family showed increase in the repeat length with increasing severity, with the smallest expansion in the grandfather and the largest expansion in the younger of the two CDM sisters. This family shows that exceptionally it is possible for CDM to be inherited paternally and refutes the hypothesis that CDM is exclusively of maternal origin. This contradicts several of the previous hypotheses concerning the mechanisms by which the CDM phenotype arises. Images PMID:8064819

  9. Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy: the most recognizable laminopathy.

    PubMed

    Madej-Pilarczyk, A; Kochański, A

    2016-01-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), a rare inherited disease, is characterized clinically by humero-peroneal muscle atrophy and weakness, multijoint contractures, spine rigidity and cardiac insufficiency with conduction defects. There are at least six types of EDMD known so far, of which five have been associated with mutations in genes encoding nuclear proteins. The majority of the EDMD cases described so far are of the emerinopathy (EDMD1) kind, with a recessive X-linked mode of inheritance, or else laminopathy (EDMD2), with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. In the work described here, the authors have sought to describe the history by which EDMD came to be distinguished as a separate entity, as well as the clinical and genetic characteristics of the disease, the pathophysiology of lamin-related muscular diseases and, finally, therapeutic issues, prevention and ethical aspects. PMID:27179216

  10. [Therapeutic trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: between hopes and disappointments].

    PubMed

    Bloetzer, Clemens; Fluss, Joël; Jeannet, Pierre-Yves

    2012-02-22

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked progressive muscle disease. Since the discovery of the dystrophin gene responsible for the condition, various therapeutic strategies have been elaborated. In this paper we introduce three of them, which are well into clinical trials. The first is based on the ability to read through premature stop codons, the second is based on the technique of exon skipping. Both strategies are examples of "personalized medicines", tailored for specific mutation types. The third approach is a pharmacological one, potentially useful for all Duchenne patients, regardless of their mutation type. These first clinical trials raise many questions for researchers as well as for patients and their families, some of which are discussed. PMID:22432241

  11. Gene for OTC: characterisation and linkage to Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, K E; Briand, P; Ionasescu, V; Ionasescu, G; Williamson, R; Brown, C; Cavard, C; Cathelineau, L

    1985-01-01

    Cloned coding sequences for rat and human ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) were obtained by screening a rat and a human cDNA library respectively with a synthetic oligonucleotide corresponding to 27 bases of the rat sequence. These clones, 1100 bp long for the rat clone and 1300 bp for the human, contain approximately 80% of the human OTC coding sequence. The OTC mRNA length determined by Northern blot analysis is 1700bp. The human OTC sequence was shown to be localised Xp11.4-Xp21 using somatic cell hybrids. There is a frequent RFLP revealed with the restriction enzyme MspI. OTC is located more closely to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy mutation than previously reported markers such as RC8 and L1.28, and therefore should prove useful in carrier detection and haplotype analysis of families carrying the mutation causing the disease. Images PMID:3839070

  12. Acetoacetate Accelerates Muscle Regeneration and Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoting; Meng, Jiao; Li, Li; Han, Wanhong; Li, Changyin; Zhong, Ran; Miao, Xuexia; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Yong; Zhu, Dahai

    2016-01-29

    Acetoacetate (AA) is a ketone body and acts as a fuel to supply energy for cellular activity of various tissues. Here, we uncovered a novel function of AA in promoting muscle cell proliferation. Notably, the functional role of AA in regulating muscle cell function is further evidenced by its capability to accelerate muscle regeneration in normal mice, and it ameliorates muscular dystrophy in mdx mice. Mechanistically, our data from multiparameter analyses consistently support the notion that AA plays a non-metabolic role in regulating muscle cell function. Finally, we show that AA exerts its function through activation of the MEK1-ERK1/2-cyclin D1 pathway, revealing a novel mechanism in which AA serves as a signaling metabolite in mediating muscle cell function. Our findings highlight the profound functions of a small metabolite as signaling molecule in mammalian cells. PMID:26645687

  13. Twenty-Nail Dystrophy and Darier's (Darier-White) Disease.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Chatterjee, Kingshuk; Chaudhuri, Anita; Verma, Prashant; Sharma, Sonal

    2015-01-01

    A 35-year-old married man presented with progressive distortion of all the nails of the hands and toes for the past 30 years. Initially, his parents noticed yellowish discoloration and roughness of the thumb nail at the age of 5 years. Since then, the changes have been insidious to involve the other nails. Currently, the nails are lusterless, rough, ridged, and difficult to trim. In addition, the patient has had dark, dirty-looking raised eruptions over the skin, attended by generalized itching, corresponding to the onset of the nail lesions. His mother experienced similar disease. Examination of the nails was marked by alternating elevation and depression (ridging) and/or pitting, lack of luster, roughening, sandpaper texture, and splitting, along with muddy, grayish white discoloration. Dystrophy of the nails was prominent. The changes were bilateral and symmetrical, affecting all 10 fingers and 10 toes (Figure 1). PMID:26861433

  14. FSHD: copy number variations on the theme of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cabianca, Daphne Selvaggia

    2010-01-01

    In humans, copy number variations (CNVs) are a common source of phenotypic diversity and disease susceptibility. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an important genetic disease caused by CNVs. It is an autosomal-dominant myopathy caused by a reduction in the copy number of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat located at chromosome 4q35. Interestingly, the reduction of D4Z4 copy number is not sufficient by itself to cause FSHD. A number of epigenetic events appear to affect the severity of the disease, its rate of progression, and the distribution of muscle weakness. Indeed, recent findings suggest that virtually all levels of epigenetic regulation, from DNA methylation to higher order chromosomal architecture, are altered at the disease locus, causing the de-regulation of 4q35 gene expression and ultimately FSHD. PMID:21149563

  15. Genomic organization and transcriptional units at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, D.J.; Rundle, S.A.; Harley, H.G.; Crow, S.R.; Harper, P.S. ); McCurrach, M.; Sohn, R.; Thirion, J.P.; Buckler, A.J.; Housman, D.E.; Brook, J.D. ); Hamshere, M.G. )

    1993-12-01

    The genomic structure and apparently complete coding sequence of the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene have been determined. The gene contains 15 exons distributed over about 13 kb of genomic DNA. It codes for a protein of 624 amino acids with an N-terminal domain highly homologous to cAMP-dependent serine-threonine protein kinases, an intermediate domain with a high [alpha]-helical content and weak similarity to various filamentous proteins, and a hydrophobic C-terminal segment. Located in close proximity is a second gene, coding for a transcript of about 3 kb, that is homologous to the gene DMR-N9 in the corresponding mouse locus, but has no homologies to other known genes or proteins. Strong expression of the latter gene in brain suggests that it may have a role in the development of mental symptoms in severe cases of the disease. 23 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Duchenne muscular dystrophy drugs face tough path to approval.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, L; Sorbera, L; Graul, A I

    2016-03-01

    Highly anticipated as new disease-modifying treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), therapeutics by BioMarin Pharmaceutical (Kyndrisa™; drisapersen) and Sarepta Therapeutics (eteplirsen; AVI-4658) both recently received negative FDA reviews and are now facing battles for approval in the U.S. At present, BioMarin is committed to working with the FDA to forge a pathway to approval following the failure of its NDA, while Sarepta awaits the formal decision on its NDA, which is expected by late May 2016. Despite the critical nature of both reviews, analysts consider that there is still a narrow possibility of approval of both drugs. According to Consensus forecasts from Thomson Reuters Cortellis for Competitive Intelligence, Kyndrisa is forecast to achieve sales of USD 533.71 million in 2021. PMID:27186594

  17. Fibrogenic Cell Plasticity Blunts Tissue Regeneration and Aggravates Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pessina, Patrizia; Kharraz, Yacine; Jardí, Mercè; Fukada, So-ichiro; Serrano, Antonio L; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2015-06-01

    Preservation of cell identity is necessary for homeostasis of most adult tissues. This process is challenged every time a tissue undergoes regeneration after stress or injury. In the lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), skeletal muscle regenerative capacity declines gradually as fibrosis increases. Using genetically engineered tracing mice, we demonstrate that, in dystrophic muscle, specialized cells of muscular, endothelial, and hematopoietic origins gain plasticity toward a fibrogenic fate via a TGFβ-mediated pathway. This results in loss of cellular identity and normal function, with deleterious consequences for regeneration. Furthermore, this fibrogenic process involves acquisition of a mesenchymal progenitor multipotent status, illustrating a link between fibrogenesis and gain of progenitor cell functions. As this plasticity also was observed in DMD patients, we propose that mesenchymal transitions impair regeneration and worsen diseases with a fibrotic component. PMID:25981413

  18. Computer-based assessment for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chambers, O; Milenković, J; Pražnikar, A; Tasič, J F

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents a computer-based assessment for facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) diagnosis through characterisation of the fat and oedema percentages in the muscle region. A novel multi-slice method for the muscle-region segmentation in the T1-weighted magnetic resonance images is proposed using principles of the live-wire technique to find the path representing the muscle-region border. For this purpose, an exponential cost function is used that incorporates the edge information obtained after applying the edge-enhancement algorithm formerly designed for the fingerprint enhancement. The difference between the automatic segmentation and manual segmentation performed by a medical specialists is characterised using the Zijdenbos similarity index, indicating a high accuracy of the proposed method. Finally, the fat and oedema are quantified from the muscle region in the T1-weighted and T2-STIR magnetic resonance images, respectively, using the fuzzy c-mean clustering approach for 10 FSHD patients. PMID:25910520

  19. Gene discovery for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy by machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    González-Navarro, Félix F; Belanche-Muñoz, Lluís A; Gámez-Moreno, María G; Flores-Ríos, Brenda L; Ibarra-Esquer, Jorge E; López-Morteo, Gabriel A

    2016-04-28

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a neuromuscular disorder that shows a preference for the facial, shoulder and upper arm muscles. FSHD affects about one in 20-400,000 people, and no effective therapeutic strategies are known to halt disease progression or reverse muscle weakness or atrophy. Many genes may be incorrectly regulated in affected muscle tissue, but the mechanisms responsible for the progressive muscle weakness remain largely unknown. Although machine learning (ML) has made significant inroads in biomedical disciplines such as cancer research, no reports have yet addressed FSHD analysis using ML techniques. This study explores a specific FSHD data set from a ML perspective. We report results showing a very promising small group of genes that clearly separates FSHD samples from healthy samples. In addition to numerical prediction figures, we show data visualizations and biological evidence illustrating the potential usefulness of these results. PMID:26960968

  20. Patient Identified Disease Burden in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicholas E; Quinn, Christine; Eastwood, Eileen; Tawil, Rabi; Heatwole, Chad R

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The multitude of symptoms associated with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) disease burden are of varying importance. The extent of these symptoms and their cumulative effect on the FSHD population is unknown. Methods We conducted interviews with adult FSHD patients to identify which symptoms have the greatest effect on their lives. Each interview was recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed using a qualitative framework technique, triangulation, and 3-investigator consensus approach. Results 1375 quotes were obtained through 20 patient interviews. 251 symptoms of importance were identified representing 14 themes of FSHD disease burden. Symptoms associated with mobility impairment, activity limitation, and social role limitation were most frequently mentioned by participants. Conclusions There are multiple themes and symptoms, some previously under-recognized, that play a key role in FSHD disease burden. PMID:23225386