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Sample records for e-mail ascii text

  1. German Deaf People Using Text Communication: Short Message Service, TTY, Relay Services, Fax, and E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Des; Power, Mary R.; Rehling, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    An online survey of German deaf people demonstrated that they use text communication through Short Message Service (SMS), e-mail, fax, and telephone typewriters (TTY) to communicate within communities of deaf and hearing people. SMS is used most, with more than 96% of respondents having access to a mobile phone. Most use is intrinsic and directed…

  2. Exploring potential use of internet, E-mail, and instant text messaging to promote breast health and mammogram use among immigrant Hispanic women in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Dang, Catherine M; Estrada, Sylvia; Bresee, Catherine; Phillips, Edward H

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is now the leading cause of death in Hispanic women (HW). Internet, e-mail, and instant text messaging may be cost-effective in educating HW about breast health and in reducing breast cancer mortality. We surveyed 905 HW women attending a free health fair about their technology use, acculturation, insurance status, mammography use, and breast cancer knowledge. Data were analyzed by t test or χ(2) tests. Mean age was 51.9 ± 14.2 years (range, 18 to 88 years). Ninety-two per cent were foreign-born. Most had completed some high school (39%) or elementary (38%) education. Most (62%) were uninsured. The majority spoke (67%) and read (66%) only Spanish. Only 60 per cent of HW older than 40 years had a recent mammogram. HW older than 40 years who had not had a recent mammogram were younger (mean 54.9 ± 10.8 vs 58 ± 10.4 years) and less likely to have health insurance (25 vs 44%; P < 0.001). Most HW never use the Internet (58%) or e-mail (64%). However, 70 per cent have mobile phones (66% older than 40 years), and 65 per cent use text messaging daily (58% older than 40 years, P = 0.001). In fact, 45 per cent wish to receive a mammogram reminder by text. Text messaging may be an inexpensive way to promote breast health and screening mammography use among uninsured HW. PMID:24160786

  3. Did You Get My E-Mail? Moving E-Mails beyond the Inbox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    The challenge today is how to make e-mail and other forms of electronic communication effective in motivating volunteer action. Is it possible to make e-mails feel personal and welcoming? E-mail, instant messaging, texting, and social media are tools that allow individuals to communicate quickly and inexpensively, but they are lifeless without the…

  4. Hooked on E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Information overload, and an expectation that e-mails, tweets, and text messages will be answered immediately, impact productivity. The younger, information-addicted workers have a greater capacity to process this open floodgate of information, as well as a better ability to multitask. Research suggests that there is a marked drop in worker…

  5. E-Mail and Ethical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Loretta J.; Hendricks, Bret

    2009-01-01

    The proliferation of the use of e-mail and texting has created some ethical dilemmas for family counselors. Although e-mail can expand and encourage communication, it is not problem free and, in fact, can pose problems. There are issues with privacy, confidentiality, and maintaining an appropriate professional relationship. Family counselors…

  6. E-Mail and Ethical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Loretta J.; Hendricks, Bret

    2009-01-01

    The proliferation of the use of e-mail and texting has created some ethical dilemmas for family counselors. Although e-mail can expand and encourage communication, it is not problem free and, in fact, can pose problems. There are issues with privacy, confidentiality, and maintaining an appropriate professional relationship. Family counselors

  7. Business E-mail: Guidelines for Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munter, Mary; Rogers, Priscilla S.; Rymer, Jone

    2003-01-01

    Presents guidelines to help businesspeople and business students become more effective and efficient in the use of e-mail. Includes the authors' experiences as instructors in diverse business schools and corporate settings. Notes that the guidelines cover: recognizing the nature of e-mail; composing e-mail; and processing and managing e-mail. (SG)

  8. LLNL E-Mail Utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dellamaggiore, N. J.; Hamel, B. B.

    2005-10-31

    The LLNL E-mail Utilities software library is a Java API that simplifies the creation and delivery of email in Java business applications. It consists of a database-driven template engine, various strategies for composing, queuing, dispatching email and a Java Swing GUI for creating and editing email templates.

  9. Electronic Mail--A New Style of Communication or Just a New Medium? An Investigation into the Text Features of E-Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gains, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    A study analyzed and compared the discourse of electronic mail messages from commercial and academic environments. Key text features were examined for style and convention patterns. Results suggest commercial messages follow normal conventions for standard written business English, and academic users may view the medium as a pseudo-conversational…

  10. Keeping E-Mail in Top Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2005-01-01

    Despite the fact that e-mail has been firmly entrenched in offices and homes for some time, debate still rages online about e-mail usage and style. How should and e-mail message begin and end? If replying to a message, should the message be quoted before or after? What tone should be taken with a business e-mail? The author talked with some heavy…

  11. Senior Citizens Who Use E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark-Wroblewski, Kimberly; Edelbaum, Jessica K.; Ryan, Joseph J.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in the aging population and use of computer-related technology have spawned research regarding older adults' use of the Internet. This study examined characteristics differentiating rural Midwestern senior citizens (N = 298) who use e-mail from those who do not. Compared to those who did not use e-mail, e-mail-using seniors were younger…

  12. Properties of evolving e-mail networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; De Wilde, Philippe

    2004-12-01

    Computer viruses spread by attaching to an e-mail message and sending themselves to users whose addresses are in the e-mail address book of the recipients. Here we investigate a simple model of an evolving e-mail network, with nodes as e-mail address books of users and links as the records of e-mail addresses in the address books. Within specific periods, some new links are generated and some old links are deleted. We study the statistical properties of this e-mail network and observe the effect of the evolution on the structure of the network. We also find that the balance between the generation procedure and deletion procedure is dependent on different parameters of the model. PMID:15697448

  13. ascii2gdocs

    SciTech Connect

    Nightingale, Trever

    2011-11-30

    Enables UNIX and Mac OS X command line users to put (individually or batch mode) local ascii files into Google Documents, where the ascii is converted to Google Document format using formatting the user can specify.

  14. Inhale, exhale, e-mail: tips for effectively handling e-mail.

    PubMed

    Bridge, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Today's world is all about speed and gathering information, superficial or otherwise. E-mail, computers and technological devices, all of which are designed to make us more productive and efficient, can use us up, spit us out, and leave us feeling inferior, ineffective, frustrated, and stressed out. Learn how to get control of your e-mail. PMID:21090209

  15. The Perils of E-Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Describes several legal issues involving school board member use of electronic mail, especially violation of state open-meeting laws. Offers several tips to avoid legal pitfalls. Briefly describes Freedom on Information Act issues related to electronic communication. Provides sample policies on e-mail use. (PKP)

  16. E-mail, decisional styles, and rest breaks.

    PubMed

    Baker, James R; Phillips, James G

    2007-10-01

    E-mail is a common but problematic work application. A scale was created to measure tendencies to use e-mail to take breaks (e-breaking); and self-esteem and decisional style (vigilance, procrastination, buck-passing, hypervigilance) were used to predict the self-reported and actual e-mail behaviors of 133 participants (students and marketing employees). Individuals who were low in defensive avoidance (buck-passing) engaged in more e-mailing per week, both in time spent on e-mail and message volume. E-breakers were more likely to engage in behavioral procrastination and spent more time on personal e-mail. PMID:17927540

  17. Is Monitoring Employees' E-Mail an Invasion of Privacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geroy, Gary D.; Jankovich, Jackie L.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the issue of e-mail and employee privacy rights. Highlights include laws and proposed legislation, ethical dilemmas, task and nontask messages and organizational misconduct, and policy guidelines for decision making about e-mail monitoring. (AEF)

  18. Prevent Spam Filters from Blocking Legitimate E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2004-01-01

    There's no question about it: Spam is a scourge. This ever-increasing torrent of unsolicited commercial mass e-mail saps productivity and, for some, threatens the very viability of e-mail. The battle against spam, unfortunately, is creating problems of its own, with people sometimes unable to send legitimate e-mail and other times unable to…

  19. The Traveler's Guide to E-mail Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clyde, Anne

    1999-01-01

    Presents options that travelers can use to keep in e-mail contact. Discusses equipment/access issues related to traveling with a laptop; Internet cafes; free e-mail services; accessing home mail via a Web page; and new options e-mail access for travelers. Includes Internet resources on Internet access providers. (AEF)

  20. Fluctuation in e-mail sizes weakens power-law correlations in e-mail flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Yoshitsugu; Hieida, Yasuhiro; Tadaki, Shin-ichi

    2013-09-01

    Power-law correlations have been observed in packet flow over the Internet. The possible origin of these correlations includes demand for Internet services. We observe the demand for e-mail services in an organization, and analyze correlations in the flow and the sequence of send requests using a Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA). The correlation in the flow is found to be weaker than that in the send requests. Four types of artificial flow are constructed to investigate the effects of fluctuations in e-mail sizes. As a result, we find that the correlation in the flow originates from that in the sequence of send requests. The strength of the power-law correlation decreases as a function of the ratio of the standard deviation of e-mail sizes to their average.

  1. Learning Environments for Studying Argumentation: Learning Effects of E-Mail and Face-to-Face Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marttunen, Miika; Laurinen, Leena

    In a teaching experiment, 16 face-to-face and 11 e-mail Finnish university students engaged in an argumentation course. The 19 students of the control group did not study argumentation. The course involved two lectures, exercises with argumentative texts, and face-to-face or e-mail seminar discussions based on these texts. The topics of the texts…

  2. AstroAsciiData: ASCII table Python module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kümmel, Martin; Haase, Jonas

    2013-11-01

    ASCII tables continue to be one of the most popular and widely used data exchange formats in astronomy. AstroAsciiData, written in Python, imports all reasonably well-formed ASCII tables. It retains formatting of data values, allows column-first access, supports SExtractor style headings, performs column sorting, and exports data to other formats, including FITS, Numpy/Numarray, and LaTeX table format. It also offers interchangeable comment character, column delimiter and null value.

  3. A Discourse Analysis of School Counseling Supervisory E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Melissa; Gordon, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    This article is a discourse analysis of weekly computer-mediated communications between 8 school counseling interns and their e-mail supervisor over a 16-week semester. Course-required e-mail supervision was provided as an adjunct to traditional face-to-face individual and group supervision. School counselor supervisees and supervisor enacted 3

  4. Universal Access to E-Mail: Feasibility and Societal Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Robert H.; And Others

    E-mail has swept the communications and information world, providing instantaneous global information and data exchange. However, an information elite still exists, made up of those with access to and knowledge about computers and e-mail. The diverging trends in access based on income and education are placing significant groups of current and…

  5. Moving from U.S. Mail to E-Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruberg, Laurie F.; Miller, Mary G.

    The increasing use of computer technology for sending and receiving electronic mail messages not only signifies changes in how we communicate, but also signals changes in the skills, knowledge, and practices associated with communication by mail. Some of the characteristics of electronic mail (e-mail) are considered. E-mail refers to the capacity…

  6. Teacher Talk on E-Mail. Current Conversations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Elaine; Hill, Elaine

    1996-01-01

    A high school and a university teacher converse via e-mail concerning their cooperative project in electronic literacy. The conversation highlights the frustrations of system crashes, student successes and failures, and the beginning of one teacher's dissertation. References to technology include experiences with e-mail, an LCD panel, and closed…

  7. Private E-Mail Requests and the Diffusion of Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Greg; Yechiam, Eldad

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of e-mail technology and requesting information from multiple sources simultaneously focuses on an experiment demonstrating that addressing e-mails simultaneously to multiple recipients may actually reduce the number of helpful responses. Discusses diffusion of responsibility and implications for the application of social cueing theory…

  8. E-Mails Reveal Federal Reach Over Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Kathleen Kennedy

    2007-01-01

    This article reports how an "Education Week" review of hundreds of e-mail exchanges that detail a pattern of federal interference in "Reading First" have skirted legal prohibitions. In regular e-mail discussions, Christopher J. Doherty, the Reading First director at the U.S. Department of Education until last September, and G. Reid Lyon, a branch…

  9. E-mail: Boon or Bane for School Leaders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glendinning, Matt

    2006-01-01

    This article, by a principal who received over 17,000 e-mails in his first year on the job, explores ways in which email is reshaping education leadership. The main assets of e-mail--swift and efficient communication, more informed decision making through improved consultation with stakeholders, and automatic archiving of correspondence--come at a…

  10. Characteristics of Parent-Teacher E-Mail Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Blair

    2008-01-01

    In the past decade, the use of computer-mediated communication such as e-mail has reportedly increased the level of parental involvement and parent-teacher communication at the elementary and secondary level. However, research has not yet examined the characteristics of parent-teacher e-mail communication. Thirty parent and 30 teacher interviews…

  11. A Discourse Analysis of School Counseling Supervisory E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Melissa; Gordon, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    This article is a discourse analysis of weekly computer-mediated communications between 8 school counseling interns and their e-mail supervisor over a 16-week semester. Course-required e-mail supervision was provided as an adjunct to traditional face-to-face individual and group supervision. School counselor supervisees and supervisor enacted 3…

  12. E-mail: Boon or Bane for School Leaders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glendinning, Matt

    2006-01-01

    This article, by a principal who received over 17,000 e-mails in his first year on the job, explores ways in which email is reshaping education leadership. The main assets of e-mail--swift and efficient communication, more informed decision making through improved consultation with stakeholders, and automatic archiving of correspondence--come at a

  13. Framing of climate change in newspaper coverage of the East Anglia e-mail scandal.

    PubMed

    Bowe, Brian J; Oshita, Tsuyoshi; Terracina-Hartman, Carol; Chao, Wen-Chi

    2014-02-01

    In late 2009, a series of e-mails related to climate research were made public following the hacking into a server and the e-mail accounts of researchers at the University of East Anglia Climate Research Unit. According to some skeptics of climate change research, the content of those e-mails suggested data were being manipulated, while climate scientists said their words were taken out of context. The news coverage of this scandal provides an opportunity to consider media framing. This study has two aims: to extend previous research using a cluster analysis technique to discern frames in media texts; and to provide insight into newspaper coverage of the scandal, which is often referred to as "Climategate." This study examines the frames present in two British and two American newspapers' coverage of the issue. PMID:23825247

  14. IntegraTUM Teilprojekt E-Mail: Rezentralisierung von E-Mail-Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehn, Max; Haarer, Ado; Schreiner, Alexander; Storz, Michael

    Das Teilprojekt E-Mail hatte ursprünglich die Aufgabe einen zentralen Mailservice mit verteilter Administration der Mailadressen für die TUM aufzubauen und diesen durch Anti-Spam- und Anti-Viren-Maßnahmen zu schützen. Auf diesen Mailservice sollten sowohl die am LRZ gehosteten Maildomains als auch die vielen lokal betriebenen Mailserver - soweit von deren Betreibern gewünscht - migriert werden. Neben einigen Rückschlägen und Hindernissen kam es im Laufe des Projektes auch zu einer Änderung der Anforderungen, sodass zum Ende des Projektes statt eines reinen Mailsystems ein Doppelsystem mit "shared SMTP address space" bestehend aus einem klassischen Message-Store mit POP/IMAP-Zugriff auf Basis von Postfix + Dovecot und einem Groupware-System auf Basis von Microsoft Exchange in Produktion ging, wobei jeder Mitarbeiter und Student der TUM wählen kann, auf welchem der beiden Systeme sich seine Mailbox befindet.

  15. The Educational Impact of E-Mail: Extraverted versus Introverted Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunderewicz, Larisa; Michener, Stacey; Chambliss, Catherine

    College students (N=151) completed surveys assessing the relationship between e-mail use and extraversion. The variables studied included time spent on e-mail; the frequency of e-mail usage; and the purposes e-mail served for each student. The results suggest that extraverts use e-mail as a form of procrastination more than introverts, and that…

  16. [Teleradiology with DICOM e-mail: recommendations of @GIT].

    PubMed

    Mildenberger, P; Kämmerer, M; Engelmann, U; Ruggiero, S; Klos, G; Runa, A; Schröter, A; Weisser, G; Walz, M; Schütze, B

    2005-05-01

    E-mail is ideal for ad-hoc connections in teleradiology. The DICOM standard offers the possibility to append DICOM data types as a MIME attachment to any e-mail, thus ensuring the transmission of the original DICOM data. Nevertheless, there are additional requirements (e.g. protection of data privacy) which must be obeyed. Because of the lack of given standards which would grant interoperability as well as manufacturer independence, teleradiology has not been established in Germany until today. Therefore, the IT-Team (Arbeitsgemeinschaft fur Informationstechnologie, @GIT) of the Radiological Society of Germany (Deutsche Rontgengesellschaft, DRG) set up an initiative to standardise telemedicine by using e-mail. Its members agreed that an e-mail-based variant would be the most practicable way to a communication solution -- as easy to implement as to use. In their opinion, e-mail represents the smallest common denominator for a safe data interchange that would fulfill the legal advantages for telemedicine in Germany. PMID:15871085

  17. Successful Practices in the Use of Secure E-mail

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Laura W; Garrido, Terhilda; Christensen, Kate; Handley, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Physician use of secure e-mail with patients is anticipated to increase under Stage 2 Meaningful Use requirements, but little is known about how physicians can successfully incorporate it into daily work. We interviewed 27 “super user” physicians at Kaiser Permanente and Group Health who were identified by leaders as being technologically, operationally, and clinically adept and as having high levels of secure e-mail use with patients. They highly valued the use of secure e-mail with patients, despite concerns about a lack of adequate time to respond, and provided tips for using it successfully. They identified benefits that included better care and improved relationships with their patients. PMID:24937149

  18. Comparing Two Survey Research Approaches: E-Mail and Web-Based Technology versus Traditional Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howes, Colleen M.; Mailloux, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    Contrasted two survey methodologies: e-mail-Web and traditional mail. Found that: (1) e-mail-Web respondents were proportionately more likely to be male and enrolled in school full-time; (2) more individual question non-response was present for the e-mail-Web sample; and (3) e-mail-Web respondents value different aspects of graduate school. (EV)

  19. E-Mail from Professor Enhances Student Motivation and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legg, Angela M.; Wilson, Janie H.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, professors use the first day of class to build rapport. However, current technology allows professors to contact students prior to the first day of class. This study assessed how the receipt of a welcoming e-mail from a female professor 1 week before the first day of class affected student motivation and attitudes toward the…

  20. E-mail et Web : pour une navigation sans risque

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-28

    Présentation orale en français, support visuel en anglais. À travers des exemples concrets, vous consoliderez vos connaissances et pourrez ainsi réajuster vos habitudes concernant l’utilisation sécurisée de votre boîte e-mail et de votre navigateur Web.

  1. E-mail et Web : pour une navigation sans risque

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Présentation orale en français, support visuel en anglais. À travers des exemples concrets, vous consoliderez vos connaissances et pourrez ainsi réajuster vos habitudes concernant l?utilisation sécurisée de votre boîte e-mail et de votre navigateur Web.

  2. "E" for Exposed? E-Mail and Privacy Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon-Leary, Pat

    1997-01-01

    As a result of litigation, a number of companies have written policies declaring the right to monitor employee electronic communication. Discusses reasons why employers monitor employee e-mail, the prevalence of monitoring in universities, use and ethics policy statements, and bills of rights statements protecting employee privacy. (PEN)

  3. College Students' Gender Differences regarding E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punyanunt-Carter, Narissra M.; Hemby, Charles O.

    2006-01-01

    One hundred and forty-five undergraduate students at a large southwestern university completed a questionnaire designed to assess college students' computer-mediated communication behaviors. Findings revealed that males and females have different perceptions and usages concerning their computer-mediated communication behaviors when e-mailing and…

  4. Argumentation Analysis of the Content of E-Mail Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marttunen, Miika

    Although there are earlier experiences from computer mediated communication (CMC) applications in which e-mail has been used as a forum for argumentation and debate, the literature lacks systematic analyses on the use of CMC for this purpose. This kind of analysis would produce knowledge on the relevance of CMC for practicing argumentation that is…

  5. Colleges Get out of E-Mail Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Frantic troubleshooting by an overworked staff versus someone else fixing problems smoothly. A sliver of server space per person versus a five-gigabyte chunk. Half a million dollars versus free. That's what colleges are faced with as they decide whether to continue running their own e-mail services or outsource them to a professional service like…

  6. Fostering E-Mail Security Awareness: The West Point Carronade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Aaron J.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Military Academy (USMA) at West Point had a problem with some cadets clicking on suspicious attachments and embedded links, significantly affecting network performance and resource availability. West Point information technology leadership needed a way to increase e-mail security awareness in hopes of maintaining a strong…

  7. Using an E-Mail Exchange To Promote Cultural Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertel, Tammy Jandrey

    2003-01-01

    Describes an intercultural e-mail exchange at the college level. Students in a beginning Spanish class in the United States and an intermediate English-as-a-Second-Language class in Mexico corresponded weekly for one semester. Suggestions for implementing electronic exchanges are offered. (Author/VWL)

  8. Testing for telepathy in connection with e-mails.

    PubMed

    Sheldrake, Rupert; Smart, Pamela

    2005-12-01

    This study investigated possible telepathic communication in connection with e-mails. On each trial, there were four potential e-mailers, one of whom was selected at random by the experimenter. One minute before a prearranged time at which the e-mail was to be sent, the participant guessed who would send it. 50 participants (29 women and 21 men) were recruited through an employment web site. Of 552 trials, 235 (43%) guesses were hits, significantly above the chance expectation of 25%. Further tests with 5 participants (4 women, 1 man, ages 16 to 29) were videotaped continuously. On the filmed trials, the 64 hits of 137 (47%) were significantly above chance. PMID:16491679

  9. An AIS-Based E-mail Classification Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Jinjian; Mao, Ruilong; Bie, Rongfang; Gao, Xiao-Zhi

    This paper proposes a new e-mail classification method based on the Artificial Immune System (AIS), which is endowed with good diversity and self-adaptive ability by using the immune learning, immune memory, and immune recognition. In our method, the features of spam and non-spam extracted from the training sets are combined together, and the number of false positives (non-spam messages that are incorrectly classified as spam) can be reduced. The experimental results demonstrate that this method is effective in reducing the false rate.

  10. Subpoena of scientists' e-mails raises concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-07-01

    A recent court order that required the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) to hand over more than 3000 confidential e-mails to the energy company BP in May has led to concerns about the need to protect academic freedom, the deliberative scientific process, and intellectual property. Lawyers representing BP filed the subpoena in December 2011 to seek information from WHOI in relation to a lawsuit brought against BP by the U.S. government and others about damages from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. WHOI is not a party to the lawsuit.

  11. You've Got Mail!: Understanding How E-Mail Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Conceptually, e-mail is not a whole lot different from regular postal mail ("snail mail"), except that it is much faster. E-mail requires three things: (1) a personal computer; (2) a telephone or communication line; and (3) an Internet provider (e-mail service account). This article provides details on how it works--plus some research activities…

  12. An Investigation of the Use of E-Mail as a Supplemental Modality for Clinical Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clingerman, Tamara L.; Bernard, Janine M.

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigated the use of student-initiated e-mail as a supplemental modality for supervision. Nineteen students e-mailed their instructors weekly during their 15-week practicum: these e-mails were analyzed across 3 time periods using the categories of the discrimination model (J. M. Bernard, 1979, 1997) and an adaptation of W. Lanning's…

  13. Improving Instructor Response to Student E-Mails Using Template and Reminder Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbeck, Matthew; Song, Minjung

    2011-01-01

    Student e-mails without the student's name, message, file attachment, and other identifying information may impede a timely and thorough instructor response. To help resolve this issue, we apply template and reminder interventions to improve student e-mail format defined as the degree of agreement between a student's e-mail format and an…

  14. The Application of E-Mail to College English Teaching in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Guofeng

    2010-01-01

    With the development of information technology in the past 10 years, e-mail has been widely used in the field of English teaching. This paper, based on an analysis of the ways of using e-mail in college English teaching in China, probes the feasibility and the benefits of application of e-mail to college English teaching.

  15. Comparing Response Rates in E-Mail and Paper Surveys: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Tse-Hua; Fan, Xitao

    2009-01-01

    This meta-analysis examined 35 study results within last 10 years that directly compared the response rates of e-mail versus mail surveys. Individual studies reported inconsistent findings concerning the response rate difference between e-mail and mail surveys, but e-mail surveys generally have lower response rate (about 20% lower on the average)…

  16. The Development of E-Mail Literacy: From Writing to Peers to Writing to Authority Figures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chi-Fen Emily

    2006-01-01

    Though e-mail has become a common interpersonal communication medium, it does not mean that this medium is used without difficulty. While people can write e-mails to peers in any manner they like, writing e-mails to authority figures requires higher pragmatic competence and critical language awareness of how discourse shapes and reflects power…

  17. Comparing Response Rates in E-Mail and Paper Surveys: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Tse-Hua; Fan, Xitao

    2009-01-01

    This meta-analysis examined 35 study results within last 10 years that directly compared the response rates of e-mail versus mail surveys. Individual studies reported inconsistent findings concerning the response rate difference between e-mail and mail surveys, but e-mail surveys generally have lower response rate (about 20% lower on the average)

  18. Teledentistry: Distant Diagnosis of Oral Disease Using E-Mails

    PubMed Central

    Morosini, Imara de Almeida Castro; Possebon, Renata Seleme; Giovanini, Allan Fernando; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Leão, Jair Carneiro; Piazzetta, Cleto Mariosvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of telediagnosis in oral medicine, through the transmission of clinical digital images by e-mail. Subjects and Methods: The sample included 60 consecutive patients who sought oral medicine services at the Federal University of Paraná, in the state of Paraná, located in southern Brazil. The clinical history and oral lesion images were recorded using clinical electronic charts and a digital camera, respectively, and sent by e-mail to two oral medicine consultants. The consultants provided a maximum of two clinical hypotheses for each case, which were compared with biopsy results that served as the gold standard. Results: In 31 of the 60 cases (51.7%), both consultants made the correct diagnosis; in 17 cases (28.3%), only one consultant made the correct diagnosis; and in 12 cases (20%), neither consultant made the correct diagnosis. Therefore, in 80% of cases, at least one consultant provided the correct diagnosis. The agreement between the first consultant and the gold standard was substantial (κ=0.669), and the agreement between the second consultant and the gold standard was fair (κ=0.574). Conclusions: The use of information technology can increase the accuracy of consultations in oral medicine. As expected, the participation of two remote experts increased the possibility of correct diagnosis. PMID:23356381

  19. Professional e-mail communication among health care providers: proposing evidence-based guidelines.

    PubMed

    Malka, S Terez; Kessler, Chad S; Abraham, John; Emmet, Thomas W; Wilbur, Lee

    2015-01-01

    E-mail is now a primary method of correspondence in health care, and proficiency with professional e-mail use is a vital skill for physicians. Fundamentals of e-mail courtesy can be derived from lay literature, but there is a dearth of scientific literature that addresses the use of e-mail between physicians. E-mail communication between providers is generally more familiar and casual than other professional interactions, which can promote unprofessional behavior or misunderstanding. Not only e-mail content but also wording, format, and tone may influence clinical recommendations and perceptions of the e-mail sender. In addition, there are serious legal and ethical implications when unprofessional or unsecured e-mails related to patient-identifying information are exchanged or included within an electronic medical record. The authors believe that the appropriate use of e-mail is a vital skill for physicians, with serious legal and ethical ramifications and the potential to affect professional development and patient care. In this article, the authors analyze a comprehensive literature search, explore several facets of e-mail use between physicians, and offer specific recommendations for professional e-mail use. PMID:25162617

  20. 47 CFR 7.17 - Informal complaints; form and content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., telephone (voice/TRS/TTY), Internet e-mail, ASCII text, Internet e-mail, audio-cassette recording, and...), Internet e-mail, ASCII text, audio-cassette recording, braille; or some other method that will...

  1. E-mails in a Psychiatric Practice: Why Patients Send Them and How Psychiatrists Respond

    PubMed Central

    Moldawsky, Richard J; Shah, Pranav V

    2016-01-01

    Context: Little is known about what prompts patients to use e-mail with their physicians and how physicians respond to these e-mails. Objective: To identify the main reasons why patients e-mail and to learn how psychiatrists manage these e-mails as part of these patients’ overall care. Design: One hundred patient-initiated e-mails to each of two psychiatrists in a group practice were studied retrospectively for primary reason for the e-mail and for psychiatrists’ handling of each e-mail. Other data were collected to assess how representative the e-mailing patients were of the psychiatrists’ patient panels. Results: Age, sex, and diagnoses of the e-mailers were similar to our overall panels. The most common reasons for e-mailing were refill requests (19.5%), questions about prescribed medication (16.5%), and worsening of symptoms (11.5%). The modal e-mail was a patient with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder requesting a refill. The psychiatrists’ most common responses were authorizing a refill (25%), reassurance (22%), and making or moving up a scheduled appointment (16%). For all patients who reported a worsening of symptoms, responses, communicated by e-mail or telephone, included a combination of an earlier appointment and/or change in medication or dose and/or referral for psychotherapy. Both psychiatrists found e-mail to be an efficient enhancement of their practice, and it was inferred that this was also a satisfying mechanism for patients. Conclusion: Physician-patient communication via e-mail is timesaving for both, and the benefits to patient care should reassure physicians who are wary of using e-mail in their practice. Potential risks to patients without face-to-face or telephone contact appear to be minimal. PMID:26562306

  2. A Detection Method of FAQ Matching Inquiry E-mails by Automatic Generation of Characteristic Word Groups from Past Inquiry E-mails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakumichi, Yuki; Akiyoshi, Masanori; Samejima, Masaki; Oka, Hironori

    This paper discusses how to detect the inquiry e-mails corresponding to pre-defined FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions). Web-based interactions such as order and registration form on a Web page are usually provided with their FAQ pages for helping a user. However, most users submit their inquiry e-mails without checking such pages. This causes a help desk operator to process lots of e-mails even if some contents match FAQs. Automatic detecting of such e-mails is proposed based on SVM (Support Vector Machine) and specific Jaccard coefficient based on positive and negative already-received inquiry e-mails. Experimental results show its effectiveness, and we also discuss future work to improve our method.

  3. What a difference your e-mail makes: effects of informal e-mail addresses in online résumé screening.

    PubMed

    van Toorenburg, Marlies; Oostrom, Janneke K; Pollet, Thomas V

    2015-03-01

    Résumés are screened rapidly, with some reports stating that recruiters form their impressions within 10 seconds. Certain résumé characteristics can have a significant impact on the snap judgments these recruiters make. The main goal of the present study was to examine the effect of the e-mail address (formal vs. informal) used in a résumé on the hirability perceptions formed by professional recruiters (N=73). In addition, the effect of the e-mail address on hirability perceptions was compared to the effects of spelling errors and typeface. Participants assessed the cognitive ability, personality, and the hirability of six fictitious applicants for the job of an HR specialist. The hirability ratings for the résumés with informal e-mail addresses were significantly lower than the hirability ratings for résumés that featured a formal e-mail address. The effect of e-mail address was as strong as the effect of spelling errors and stronger than that of typeface. The effect of e-mail address on hirability was mediated by perceptions of conscientiousness and honesty-humility. This study among actual recruiters shows for the first time that the choice of the e-mail address used on a résumé might make a real difference. PMID:25751044

  4. Response Rates for Mixed-Mode Surveys Using Mail and E-Mail/Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Converse, Patrick D.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Huang, Xiaoting; Oswald, Frederick L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines response rates for mixed-mode survey implementation involving mail and e-mail/Web components. Using Dillman's Tailored Design Method, 1,500 participants were sent a survey either (a) via mail with a follow-up contact via e-mail that directed them to a Web-based questionnaire or (b) via e-mail that directed them to a Web-based…

  5. E-Mail Molecules—Individualizing the Large Lecture Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamser, Carl C.

    2003-11-01

    All students in the organic chemistry class are assigned a unique set of nine molecules to report on as optional extra credit assignments. The molecules are taken from a list containing over 200 molecules on the class Web site; they represent an assortment of biologically relevant compounds, from acetaminophen to yohimbine. Once a week, students may submit information about one of the molecules for two points extra credit (where the course includes a total of over 600 points from traditional quizzes and exams). The information requested about the molecules varies slightly each term as student expertise grows, for example, molecular formula, hybridizations, functional groups, or number of stereocenters, but always includes biological relevance and sources of information. Initially students submitted data directly to the instructor by e-mail, but submissions now are handled by a Web-based course management system (WebCT). The goal is to give students individualized assignments that are relatively realistic in light of their future careers in health sciences. Nearly all of the students do some of the molecules, and many students do all of them. About 30 40% of the students who do the assignments regularly gain a grade benefit. Student responses to the exercise have been positive.

  6. A MICROPROCESSOR ASCII CHARACTER BUFFERING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A microprocessor buffering system (MBS) was developed at the Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory -Cincinnati (EMSL-CI) to provide an efficient transfer for serial ASCII information between intelligent instrument systema and a Data General NOVA laboratory automation co...

  7. MedlinePlus E-mail Updates | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. MedlinePlus E-mail Updates Past Issues / Spring - Summer 2010 Table ... in health and medicine? Sign up for MedlinePlus e-mail updates, and you'll receive alerts whenever ...

  8. Districts Weigh Benefits and Drawbacks of Setting Up Student E-Mail Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Katie

    2008-01-01

    Some school districts hoping to improve communication and student engagement in learning are taking a step many educators still view warily: providing students with their own e-mail accounts. However, making e-mail a regular part of students' school lives raises a host of concerns about inappropriate use. In addition, many teachers doubt that the

  9. The U.S. Mail vs. E-mail: Understanding Interpersonal Communication through Traditional Pedagogical Pathways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swarts, Valerie R.; Walters, Timothy L.

    This paper investigates a number of questions concerning the relative advantages of the U.S. Mail versus electronic mail. Specifically, the paper asks: (1) what is the impact that E-mail has on the ways in which people communicate interpersonally in a visual presentation; (2) will E-mail replace such traditional forms of communication as greeting…

  10. Ars Dictaminis Perverted: The Personal Solicitation E-Mail as a Genre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Derek G.

    2009-01-01

    Phishing e-mails deceive individuals into giving out personal information which may then be utilized for identity theft. One particular type, the Personal Solicitation E-mail (PSE) mimics personal letters--modern perversions of "ars dictaminis" (the classical art of letter writing). In this article, I determine and discuss 19 appeals common to the…

  11. 14 CFR 1206.601 - Mail, fax and e-mail requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mail, fax and e-mail requests. 1206.601... AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Procedures § 1206.601 Mail, fax and e-mail requests. In view of... Aeronautics and Space Administration.” NASA cannot be responsible for cash sent by mail; stamps will not...

  12. One Good Turn Deserves Another: Sustaining an Intercultural E-Mail Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schueller, Jeanne

    2007-01-01

    Instructors rely on asynchronous exchanges to provide learners with authentic input and opportunities to communicate in the TL. While most practitioners recognize the advantages of e-mail exchanges, learner benefits are not an automatic byproduct of participation in an exchange. This paper presents findings from an e-mail exchange carried out…

  13. 14 CFR 1206.601 - Mail, fax and e-mail requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mail, fax and e-mail requests. 1206.601... AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Procedures § 1206.601 Mail, fax and e-mail requests. In view of... Aeronautics and Space Administration.” NASA cannot be responsible for cash sent by mail; stamps will not...

  14. 14 CFR 1206.601 - Mail, fax and e-mail requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mail, fax and e-mail requests. 1206.601... AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Procedures § 1206.601 Mail, fax and e-mail requests. In view of... Aeronautics and Space Administration.” NASA cannot be responsible for cash sent by mail; stamps will not...

  15. Alumni Relationships in the Electronic Age: An Assessment of a Permission Based E-Mail Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Robert S.; McLaughlin, Caragh E.

    2007-01-01

    E-mail is seen as an inexpensive, fast way to communicate with university constituencies, especially alumni. The next logical stage for the use of this Internet technology is the development and evaluation of permission based e-mail (PBE) campaigns. In this paper, we directly examine recipient evaluation of PBE in the context of a university…

  16. 14 CFR 1206.601 - Mail, fax and e-mail requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Mail, fax and e-mail requests. 1206.601... AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Procedures § 1206.601 Mail, fax and e-mail requests. In view of... Aeronautics and Space Administration.” NASA cannot be responsible for cash sent by mail; stamps will not...

  17. 14 CFR 1206.601 - Mail, fax and e-mail requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mail, fax and e-mail requests. 1206.601... AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Procedures § 1206.601 Mail, fax and e-mail requests. In view of... Aeronautics and Space Administration.” NASA cannot be responsible for cash sent by mail; stamps will not...

  18. Comparative Response to a Survey Executed by Post, E-mail, & Web Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yun, Gi Woong

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes characteristics of three survey response modes: post, e-mail, and Web site, based on data from science writers' professional use of e-mail and the Web. Finds: several important differences in response characteristics of these three groups; and no significant influences of survey mode. Suggests that using multi-mode survey techniques…

  19. Ceci n'est pas un Objet? Talking about Objects in E-Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ducheneaut, Nicolas; Bellotti, Victoria

    2003-01-01

    Shows how e-mail users have evolved new forms of electronic deictic references to refer to work objects and offers design suggestions for future electronic mail software. Highlights include a study of e-mail work conversations; and changing the way we talk by transforming the conversation itself into an object of conversation. (Author/LRW)

  20. Chris Pierce and the Yankee Donut Company: An E-Mail-Based Management Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Danna N.; Rollag, Keith

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an e-mail-based simulation that helps students experience the fast-paced, complex world of the middle manager. In this electronic in-basket exercise, students assume the role of a district manager in a doughnut company as they respond to a rapid series of high- and low-priority e-mails ostensibly sent from…

  1. Using E-Mail in Computer Assisted Freshman Composition and Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowden, Rebecca; Humphries, Sharon

    1997-01-01

    Describes teaching freshman composition and rhetoric via e-mail as a distance education course at Tomball Community College (Texas). Discusses student and instructor responsibilities, e-mail procedures, problems encountered (lack of time, and managing disk and mailbox space), and benefits (reduced paper use, typed corrections, accurate records,…

  2. Location Is Everything: The Use and Marketing of Reference E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Susan L.

    2006-01-01

    Reference e-mail continues to be a vital reference service. This article studies the trends in reference e-mail use over an eight year period. Usage statistics are analyzed particularly in light of the marketing of the service via changes in the location of the service on the official university libraries' Web pages. Included are recommendations…

  3. Con Artists Attack Colleges with Fake Help-Desk E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    An e-mail scam has hit tens of thousands of users at dozens of colleges over the past few weeks, leaving network administrators scrambling to respond before campus computer accounts are taken over by spammers. Students, professors, and staff members at the affected colleges received e-mail messages that purported to come from the colleges' help

  4. Discourse Strategies in Professional E-Mail Negotiation: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Astrid

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to report on some of the preliminary results of an on-going study on the use of discourse strategies in e-mail negotiation. The analysis aims at showing how relations between the participants develop through the use of specific discourse strategies in their e-mail communication which covers a period of three months,…

  5. An IT Manager's View on E-Mail and Internet Policies and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desai, Mayur S.; Hart, Jeff; Richards, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    E-mail is mandatory tool of communications any business to survive in the 21st century. It is imperative that Information technology (IT) managers monitor and make sure that the e-mail systems are used properly. In order to organize a systematic process for proper use of email an administrator must have an input into the development of appropriate

  6. Request Strategies in Professional E-Mail Correspondence: Insights from the United States Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leopold, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing interest in the rhetorical features of e-mail correspondence, this is the first study to examine the request strategies in e-mails written by native English-speaking professionals from a variety of industries in the United States. This study uses Blum-Kulka, House, and Kasper's (1989) speech act framework to analyze the request…

  7. Reducing the Damage Done by E-Mail in Our Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glendinning, Matt

    2007-01-01

    E-mail is a tool that can vastly increase the efficiency and productivity of school leaders. It can enable them to better orchestrate school operations and so improve student learning. But administrators must remain wary of the effect that extensive e-mail communication can have on the school community, and they need to work to promote a healthy…

  8. Social Work Practice in the Digital Age: Therapeutic E-Mail as a Direct Practice Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattison, Marian

    2012-01-01

    The author addresses the risks and benefits of incorporating therapeutic e-mail communication into clinical social work practice. Consumer demand for online clinical services is growing faster than the professional response. E-mail, when used as an adjunct to traditional meetings with clients, offers distinct advantages and risks. Benefits include…

  9. Districts Weigh Benefits and Drawbacks of Setting Up Student E-Mail Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Katie

    2008-01-01

    Some school districts hoping to improve communication and student engagement in learning are taking a step many educators still view warily: providing students with their own e-mail accounts. However, making e-mail a regular part of students' school lives raises a host of concerns about inappropriate use. In addition, many teachers doubt that the…

  10. "My Heart Want to Say Something": Exploring ELL Vocabulary Use through E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Sung-on; Piazza, Carolyn L.; Pierce, Michael J.; Bryce, Sara M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on one high school English-language-learner's (ELL) breadth and depth of vocabulary as he communicated with his teacher through e-mail across geographic boundaries for over 18 months. Design/methodology/approach: The authors began by separating 358 e-mails into three time periods (first beginning,…

  11. Outcomes of an Intercultural E-Mail Based University Discussion Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furcsa, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the development of intercultural awareness in an electronic mail (e-mail) discussion project between Hungarian learners of English and American speakers. Students discussed topics relating to cultures, languages, and pedagogical issues. The e-mails were analyzed in terms of language skill improvement, apprehensiveness…

  12. The Most Preferred Free E-mail Service Used by Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavus, Nadire; Bicen, Huseyin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the most preferred free web based e-mail used by students in the technology departments of the Near East University (Departments CIS, CEIT and COM.ENG), and also to find out which technical characteristics affect the participants when making a decision for the choice of an e-mail service. The volunteer…

  13. Composing Effective and Efficient E-mails: A Primer for Pharmacy Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Marc R; Feemster, Agnes Ann

    2015-09-01

    This primer describes the purpose and importance of e-mail as a key communication medium in the workplace. It emphasizes clarity as a primary modality to enhance efficiency and effectiveness. Finally, the primer reviews elements of grammar, punctuation, and style that contribute to each e-mail's ability to meet language standards, enhance the writer's image, and successfully transmit information. PMID:26715801

  14. Con Artists Attack Colleges with Fake Help-Desk E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    An e-mail scam has hit tens of thousands of users at dozens of colleges over the past few weeks, leaving network administrators scrambling to respond before campus computer accounts are taken over by spammers. Students, professors, and staff members at the affected colleges received e-mail messages that purported to come from the colleges' help…

  15. The Effect of E-Mail Debate as a Teaching Tool: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Guo-Ming

    D. P. Thompson (1987) pointed out that the e-mail network can help students work collaboratively, solve problems, and experience writing as communication in the real situation. This study examined the impact of e-mail debate on intercultural sensitivity, writing apprehension, and computer anxiety. Fifty-four students in two sections of a…

  16. An IT Manager's View on E-Mail and Internet Policies and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desai, Mayur S.; Hart, Jeff; Richards, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    E-mail is mandatory tool of communications any business to survive in the 21st century. It is imperative that Information technology (IT) managers monitor and make sure that the e-mail systems are used properly. In order to organize a systematic process for proper use of email an administrator must have an input into the development of appropriate…

  17. Development of an E-mail Application Seemit and its Utilization in an Information Literacy Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Toshihiro; Miyazaki, Makoto; Nakano, Hiroshi; Sugitani, Kenichi; Akiyama, Hidenori

    We have developed a simple e-mail application named Seemit which is designed for being used in information literacy courses. It has necessary and sufficient functionality of an e-mail application, and it has been developed for the purpose of learning basic operations and mechanisms of e-mail transfer easily. It is equipped with the function to automatically set the configuration of user's SMTP/POP servers and e-mail address, etc. The process of transferring e-mail via SMTP and POP can be demonstrated step by step showing actual messages passed during the client-server interaction. We have utilized Seemit in a university-wide information literacy course which holds about 1800 students.

  18. Communicating with patients via e-mail: is it a good idea?

    PubMed

    Steinberg, C S

    1999-09-01

    As e-mail becomes an everyday part of more people's lives--and an important part of the way business is done--optometrists are naturally beginning to use it with patients. However, e-mail communication with patients creates a new set of potential dangers that doctors must consider: What defines the doctor-patient relationship? Should diagnoses be made and delivered via e-mail? How can privacy and confidentiality be maintained? Can marketing be done tastefully via e-mail? This author addresses each of these issues from a medico-legal perspective and offers advice on professional, ethical ways to communicate with patients via e-mail. PMID:10547976

  19. E-mail communication in the management of gastroenterology patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Plener, Ian; Hayward, Andrew; Saibil, Fred

    2014-01-01

    E-mail correspondence between physicians and patients can be a useful tool to improve communication efficiency, provide economic and ecological benefits, improve therapeutic interventions and adherence, and enhance self-management. The model of self-management in chronic disease has become an integral component of North American and British medicine. From a practical standpoint, the use of e-mail between physicians and patients can complement the self-management model. E-mail communication has many benefits from both patient and physician perspectives. E-mail contact reduces the inefficiencies associated with telecommunications. Physicians are able to better document out-of-office patient encounters and provide access to specialist care for patients in remote locations. This use of e-mail has the potential to increase patient safety through physician approval of self-manager actions, including earlier initiation of needed treatments. Fewer clinic visits afford additional time for new consultations and sicker patients, reducing the overall burden on referral and wait times. The present article reviews some of the literature regarding physician-patient e-mail communication in the general ambulatory setting, in the context of chronic disease and with a specific focus on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The authors provide a framework for the use of e-mail communication in the IBD population, with emphasis on the concept of e-mail use. Also illustrated are the benefits and disadvantages, and examples of the e-mail contract as proposed by the Canadian Medical Protective Association. Examples of specific e-mail communication topics are provided for several IBD scenarios. Potential negative consequences of this mode of communication are also discussed. PMID:24619639

  20. Experiences of physicians who frequently use e-mail with patients.

    PubMed

    Houston, Thomas K; Sands, Daniel Z; Nash, Beth R; Ford, Daniel E

    2003-01-01

    Despite its potential, the use of e-mail for physician-patient communication has not been widely adopted. Our purpose was to survey the experiences of physicians who are early adopters of the technology. Physicians, identified through a professional Internet information portal, completed a survey, including an assessment of satisfaction with using e-mail with patients. We identified 204 physicians who reported using e-mail with patients on a daily basis. Average age of the respondents was 49 years, 82% were male, and 35% were primary-care physicians. Among the 204 frequent users, commonly reported e-mail topics were new, nonurgent symptoms, and questions about lab results. Despite their daily use, 25% were not satisfied with physician-patient e-mail. The most important reasons for using e-mail with patients among those who were satisfied were "time saving" (33%) and "helps deliver better care" (28%) compared with "patient requested" (80%) among those who were not satisfied (p <.01). Dissatisfied physicians reported concerns about time demands, medicolegal risks, and ability of patients to use e-mail appropriately. Although the majority of these "vanguard" physicians reported benefits, some did not recommend that colleagues adopt this new technology. Increasing integration into practice to enhance time-saving aspects and improve patient education might lead to more sustained use of this promising communication tool. PMID:14527870

  1. The Messages They Send: E-Mail Use by Adolescents with and without a History of Specific Language Impairment (SLI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Durkin, Kevin; Walker, Allan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Contemporary adolescents use e-mail for a variety of purposes, including peer communication and education. Research into these uses has focused on typically developing individuals; much less is known about the use of e-mail by exceptional youth. Aims: The present study examined the structure and form of e-mail messages sent by…

  2. Exploring Students' Use of E-Mail for Out-of-Class Communication: Frequency, Satisfaction, and Learning Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Q.; Ahn, S.; Meyers, R. A.; Timmerman, C. E.; Fonner, K. L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors assessed students' use of e-mail for out-of-class communication (OCC) and its impact on satisfaction and learning self-efficacy. Findings showed that students and instructors use e-mail frequently for OCC, and frequency of use is positively associated with student satisfaction with e-mail as an OCC medium. Moreover, the content of…

  3. Elderly Americans and the Internet: E-Mail, TV News, Information and Entertainment Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilt, Michael L.; Lipschultz, Jeremy H.

    2004-01-01

    Older Americans, like other groups, vary in their use of the Internet. The participants for this study-elderly computer users from a Midwestern mid-size sample-used e-mail and considered it the most important Internet function. It was common for them to use e-mail with family and friends on a regular, if not daily, basis. When this group of older…

  4. Elderly Americans and the Internet: E-Mail, TV News, Information and Entertainment Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilt, Michael L.; Lipschultz, Jeremy H.

    2004-01-01

    Older Americans, like other groups, vary in their use of the Internet. The participants for this study--elderly computer users from a Midwestern mid-size sample--used e-mail and considered it the most important Internet function. It was common for them to use e-mail with family and friends on a regular, if not daily, basis. When this group of…

  5. Test of the Behavioral Perspective Model in the Context of an E-Mail Marketing Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Valdimar; Menon, R. G. Vishnu; Sigurdarson, Johannes Pall; Kristjansson, Jon Skafti; Foxall, Gordon R.

    2013-01-01

    An e-mail marketing experiment based on the behavioral perspective model was conducted to investigate consumer choice. Conversion e-mails were sent to two groups from the same marketing database of registered consumers interested in children's books. The experiment was based on A-B-A-C-A and A-C-A-B-A withdrawal designs and consisted of…

  6. Elderly Americans and the Internet: E-Mail, TV News, Information and Entertainment Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilt, Michael L.; Lipschultz, Jeremy H.

    2004-01-01

    Older Americans, like other groups, vary in their use of the Internet. The participants for this study--elderly computer users from a Midwestern mid-size sample--used e-mail and considered it the most important Internet function. It was common for them to use e-mail with family and friends on a regular, if not daily, basis. When this group of

  7. Elderly Americans and the Internet: E-Mail, TV News, Information and Entertainment Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilt, Michael L.; Lipschultz, Jeremy H.

    2004-01-01

    Older Americans, like other groups, vary in their use of the Internet. The participants for this study-elderly computer users from a Midwestern mid-size sample-used e-mail and considered it the most important Internet function. It was common for them to use e-mail with family and friends on a regular, if not daily, basis. When this group of older

  8. Test of the Behavioral Perspective Model in the Context of an E-Mail Marketing Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Valdimar; Menon, R. G. Vishnu; Sigurdarson, Johannes Pall; Kristjansson, Jon Skafti; Foxall, Gordon R.

    2013-01-01

    An e-mail marketing experiment based on the behavioral perspective model was conducted to investigate consumer choice. Conversion e-mails were sent to two groups from the same marketing database of registered consumers interested in children's books. The experiment was based on A-B-A-C-A and A-C-A-B-A withdrawal designs and consisted of

  9. Legal and policy issues associated with monitoring employee E-mail

    SciTech Connect

    Segura, M.A.; Rither, A.C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the legal issues involved with employer monitoring of employee e-mail. In addition to identifying pertinent legal issues, the paper provides guidelines that will help the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) establish a program for monitoring outgoing e-mail to insure compliance with company policies, particularly those regarding protection of trade secrets and proprietary information, and to comply with the Department of Energy`s (DOE) procedures for protecting Export Controlled Information (ECI). Electronic communication has allowed companies to enhance efficiency, responsiveness and effectiveness. E-mail allows employees to transmit all types of data to other individuals inside and outside of their companies. The ease with which information can be transmitted by e-mail has placed trade secrets, proprietary information, and other sensitive data at risk from inadvertent disclosure by employees. As employers attempt to protect their interests through measures such as monitoring e-mail, they may expose themselves to liability under federal and state laws for violating employee privacy. Business use of e-mail has proliferated so rapidly that the federal and state legal systems have not been able to adequately address the issues arising out of its use in the workplace.

  10. Effect of Media Usage Selection on Social Mobilization Speed: Facebook vs E-Mail

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Madnick, Stuart; Li, Xitong; Alstott, Jeff; Velu, Chander

    2015-01-01

    Social mobilization is a process that enlists a large number of people to achieve a goal within a limited time, especially through the use of social media. There is increasing interest in understanding the factors that affect the speed of social mobilization. Based on the Langley Knights competition data set, we analyzed the differences in mobilization speed between users of Facebook and e-mail. We include other factors that may influence mobilization speed (gender, age, timing, and homophily of information source) in our model as control variables in order to isolate the effect of such factors. We show that, in this experiment, although more people used e-mail to recruit, the mobilization speed of Facebook users was faster than that of those that used e-mail. We were also able to measure and show that the mobilization speed for Facebook users was on average seven times faster compared to e-mail before controlling for other factors. After controlling for other factors, we show that Facebook users were 1.84 times more likely to register compared to e-mail users in the next period if they have not done so at any point in time. This finding could provide useful insights for future social mobilization efforts. PMID:26422171

  11. Do you feel you know how to write an e-mail?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonova, Anna O.

    2003-10-01

    Computers have opened doors to the new era of telecommunication. Electronic mail is becoming very popular in different spheres of professional activity and everyday life of people all over the world as it provides people an excellent opportunity for real, natural communication. The use of e-mail and the Internet involves a whole range of skills including knowing how to use a personal computer, knowing how to navigate the immense resources of cyberspace, and becoming familiar with the special register of e-mail communication (which lies somewhere between the formality of traditional writing and the spontaneity of speech). Conferencing via e-mail, or communicating with partners through networked computers, offers many opportunities in the Scientific Community. E-mail allows us to collaborate easily with thousands of colleagues, sharing new ideas, resources, and materials. It can provide the information, contacts, and stimulation that can make our research work more effective and enjoyable. The English language is world-wide accepted as lingua-franca of the Internet and intercultural communication. This brings us to a necessity to introduce some ideas on e-mail writing.

  12. Effect of Media Usage Selection on Social Mobilization Speed: Facebook vs E-Mail.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Madnick, Stuart; Li, Xitong; Alstott, Jeff; Velu, Chander

    2015-01-01

    Social mobilization is a process that enlists a large number of people to achieve a goal within a limited time, especially through the use of social media. There is increasing interest in understanding the factors that affect the speed of social mobilization. Based on the Langley Knights competition data set, we analyzed the differences in mobilization speed between users of Facebook and e-mail. We include other factors that may influence mobilization speed (gender, age, timing, and homophily of information source) in our model as control variables in order to isolate the effect of such factors. We show that, in this experiment, although more people used e-mail to recruit, the mobilization speed of Facebook users was faster than that of those that used e-mail. We were also able to measure and show that the mobilization speed for Facebook users was on average seven times faster compared to e-mail before controlling for other factors. After controlling for other factors, we show that Facebook users were 1.84 times more likely to register compared to e-mail users in the next period if they have not done so at any point in time. This finding could provide useful insights for future social mobilization efforts. PMID:26422171

  13. Emotional expression in cyberspace: searching for moderators of the Pennebaker disclosure effect via e-mail.

    PubMed

    Sheese, Brad E; Brown, Erin L; Graziano, William G

    2004-09-01

    Research has shown that writing about emotional topics can positively influence physical and mental health. The current study tested the efficacy of an e-mail-based writing treatment and shows how such an implementation can aid in the search for moderators. Participants (N = 546) were randomly assigned to either a long- or short-interval traumatic writing condition or to a nonemotional writing control condition. In contrast to previous disclosure research, participants received and submitted their writing responses via e-mail. Health outcomes were assessed weekly for 5 weeks after treatment and were reported at the conclusion of the study. Results supported the effectiveness of an e-mail-based writing treatment in producing positive health outcomes and successfully identified several moderators of the writing treatment effect. The moderators implicated varied depending on the nature of the health outcome assessment. PMID:15367065

  14. E-Rate to Support Wireless E-Mail, Internet Calling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    This article deals with federal E-rate program's support of school leaders' Blackberry habit. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has cleared the way to allow money from the $2.25 billion program of subsidies for school technology to apply to e-mail service for mobile, wireless devices, such as the BlackBerry, which are increasingly…

  15. Minding Your E-Mail: District Leaders Need to Prepare for Public Records Requests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Daniel; Keener, Clinton; Shoaf, Michael; McIntyre, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Since the Supreme Court approved a 2006 amendment to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure requiring public entities such as school districts to produce electronically stored public records during the "discovery process" in lawsuits, maintaining such records, especially e-mail messages, has been an ongoing obligation for district leaders. While…

  16. Identification and Disidentification in Organizational Discourse: A Metaphor Analysis of E-Mail Communication at Enron

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnage, Anna K.

    2010-01-01

    This project is situated within the interpretive tradition in organizational communication research, focusing on organizational discourse. It goes further by bringing the discussion into the 21st century through examining how communication technology--specifically e-mail--plays a role in the linguistic practices that help create, maintain and…

  17. Exploring Culture from a Distance: A U.S./Israeli E-Mail Exchange Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutta, Joyce W.; Spector-Cohen, Elana

    2002-01-01

    Explores the use of electronic mail to link native-English-speaking teachers and teacher candidates in one country with English-as-a-Foreign-Language students in the other. An average of 10 participants per semester have spent approximately 2 months leaning about each other's cultures through an e-mail exchange of ideas and views. (Author/VWL)

  18. Language with Character: A Stratified Corpus Comparison of Individual Differences in E-Mail Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberlander, Jon; Gill, Alastair J.

    2006-01-01

    To what extent does the wording and syntactic form of people's writing reflect their personalities? Using a bottom-up stratified corpus comparison, rather than the top-down content analysis techniques that have been used before, we examine a corpus of e-mail messages elicited from individuals of known personality, as measured by the Eysenck…

  19. Inexpensive E-mail Systems for LANs and Dial-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaffman, Jay

    Internet e-mail is becoming more accessible to K-12 teachers. Many colleges and universities will give accounts to teachers for the price of asking. Unfortunately, many of these university systems are hard to use and are usually not offered to K-12 students. Also, most schools do not have phone lines in classrooms. This paper discusses two systems…

  20. A Grounded Theory Study of the Relationship between E-Mail and Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camargo, Marta Rocha

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: This study consisted of a qualitative investigation into the role of e-mail in work-related burnout among high technology employees working full time and on-site for Internet, hardware, and software companies. Method: Grounded theory methodology was used to provide a systemic approach in categorising, sorting, and analysing data…

  1. E-mail Communities--A Story of Collaboration between Students in Australia and Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lelong, Peter; Fearnley-Sander, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Describes two projects: the first linked teacher-education students in Australia and Indonesia through e-mail and then grew into a link between primary students; the second project was a prize-winning publication by the primary students on the Internet. Gives a list of different materials and guidelines for teachers. (CMK)

  2. Endorsement of the New Ecological Paradigm in Systematic and E-Mail Samples of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rideout, Bruce E.; Hushen, Katherine; McGinty, Dawn; Perkins, Stephanie; Tate, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    As the initial phase of a longitudinal study of environmental perspective in college students, resident student opinion was sampled using the New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) scale administered through systematic alphabetical sampling. Sampling was also carried out by a blanket e-mail distribution of surveys for voluntary response. Results showed…

  3. E-Mail Alerts and RSS Feeds for Distance Learning Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Allyson; Howell, Scott L.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how E-Mail Alerts and RSS feeds can be helpful tools for busy distance education administrators by helping them to efficiently sort through the research and news information that is now available. These tools and their respective filters and aggregators make it possible for busy distance education administrators to stay

  4. E-Mail Bonding: Making the Most of Electronic Communication between Teacher and Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zolten, Jerry

    An instructor's idea of using required e-mail as a communication link with students in the basic public speaking course sprang from his work with Gerald M. Philips in the pioneering reticence program he developed at Penn State University in the 1970s and 1980s. The instructor's focus in teaching a basic communication course has always been more on…

  5. E-Mail Writing: Providing Background Information in the Core of Computer Assisted Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazari, Behzad; Ninknejad, Sahar

    2015-01-01

    The present study highly supported the effective role of providing background information via email by the teacher to write e-mail by the students in learners' writing ability. A total number of 50 EFL advanced male students aged between 25 and 40 at different branches of Iran Language Institute in Tehran, Tehran. Through the placement test of…

  6. Not Wanted in the Inbox!: Evaluations of Unsolicited and Harassing E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoo, Pek Ne; Senn, Charlene Y.

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed as a first step to explore sexual harassment in the electronic domain. One hundred six students read 10 e-mail messages ranging from jokes to spam to a sexual proposition from a stranger and rated them on an offensiveness evaluative scale. Participants also completed social desirability and attitudes toward sexual…

  7. Learning of Argumentation in Face-to-Face and E-Mail Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marttunen, Miika; Laurinen, Leena

    This article describes a teaching experiment in Finland to develop critical thinking and argumentation skills in a university course using both face-to-face and e-mail settings. Subjects (n=49) were advanced students of education and three faculty members. All students received two lectures on argumentation and packages of argumentative writings…

  8. E-Mail Alerts and RSS Feeds for Distance Learning Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Allyson; Howell, Scott L.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how E-Mail Alerts and RSS feeds can be helpful tools for busy distance education administrators by helping them to efficiently sort through the research and news information that is now available. These tools and their respective filters and aggregators make it possible for busy distance education administrators to stay…

  9. 16 CFR 1130.8 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for Web site registration or... PRODUCTS (Eff. June 28, 2010) § 1130.8 Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration. (a) Link to registration page. The manufacturer's Web site, or other Web site established for...

  10. The Inclusion of E-Mail in Our Teaching: A Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partridge, Susan

    Educators are successfully incorporating electronic mail into elementary and secondary classrooms. This paper refers to an article by Hugh Barr which describes a variety of instructional programs that use electronic mail as part of the social studies curriculum. Barr notes that essential components of interschool e-mail are purpose, structure, and…

  11. 16 CFR 1130.8 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for Web site registration or... PRODUCTS § 1130.8 Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration. (a) Link to registration page. The manufacturer's Web site, or other Web site established for the purpose of...

  12. 16 CFR 1130.8 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for Web site registration or... PRODUCTS § 1130.8 Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration. (a) Link to registration page. The manufacturer's Web site, or other Web site established for the purpose of...

  13. 16 CFR 1130.8 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for Web site registration or... PRODUCTS § 1130.8 Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration. (a) Link to registration page. The manufacturer's Web site, or other Web site established for the purpose of...

  14. 16 CFR 1130.7 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for Web site registration or... PRODUCTS § 1130.7 Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration. (a) Link to registration page. The manufacturer's Web site, or other Web site established for the purpose of...

  15. 76 FR 46853 - International Business Machines Corporation, ITD Business Unit, Division 7, E-mail and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... Federal Register on May 28, 2010 (75 FR 30067). At the request of workers, the Department reviewed the..., applicable to workers of International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), ITD Business Unit, Division 7, E... Machines Corporation (IBM), ITD Business Unit, Division 7, E-mail and Collaboration ] Group,...

  16. Using viral e-mails to distribute tobacco control advertisements: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Carter, Owen B J; Donovan, Robert; Jalleh, Geoffrey

    2011-08-01

    The authors' objective was to conduct a trial of viral e-mail marketing as a distribution method for tobacco control advertisements. University students (n=200) in the state of Western Australia were randomly allocated to receive 1 of 2 e-mails with hyperlinks to tobacco control advertisements ("Toilet" and "Rubbish") emphasizing the disgusting nature of smoking. Recipients followed a hyperlink to a Web page playing Toilet or Rubbish on endless loop. Viewers were encouraged to forward the e-mail to their friends and invited to complete an online survey about the advertisement. Unique downloads for each advertisement were identified by internet provider (IP) location and tallied by date and geographical location to assess subsequent dissemination beyond the initial 200 students. There were 826 unique viewings of the advertisements averaging 26.9 viewings per day for the first fortnight, followed by a lower average of 4.1 hits per day for the next 3.5 months. IP addresses identified hits from 3 other Australian states and 7 other countries. Online surveys were completed by 103 respondents (12.5% of total hits) but included few smokers (n=9). Significantly more respondents rated Toilet as "funny" compared with Rubbish (40% vs. 11%; p<.05), likely explaining why the former accounted for significantly more viewings than the latter (487 vs. 339; p<.001). There was a greater than fourfold return in dissemination for each initial e-mail sent but daily hits rapidly deteriorated over time. Entertainment appears to facilitate viral e-mails being forwarded onwards but only exceptionally compelling tobacco control materials are ever likely to become self-perpetuating. PMID:21432712

  17. Responsiveness to a Prospective Student E-Mail Inquiry by Community Colleges in the Nine Mega-States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadinger, David A.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated e-mail responsiveness by community colleges in the nine mega-states to an inquiry from a prospective student. Noel-Levitz (2006b) reported that prospective students want to receive an e-mail with information about an institution prior to applying for admission. Specifically, high school juniors and seniors want…

  18. Internet/E-Mail Usage and Well-Being among 65-84 Year Olds in New Zealand: Policy Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koopman-Boyden, Peggy G.; Reid, Sarah L.

    2009-01-01

    Research indicates that significant groups of older people are using Internet/e-mail technology. Using data from a 2007 random sample of 1,680 New Zealanders aged 65-84, predictors of Internet/e-mail usage and the impact of usage on well-being were investigated. Gender, age, education, household composition, income, and work were significant…

  19. A Comparative Analysis of E-Mail and Face-to-Face Communication in an Educational Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightfoot, Jay M.

    2006-01-01

    Electronic mail (e-mail) is an extremely important medium for Internet-based education. Due to its unique characteristics, there is reason to be concerned that students do not put appropriate care into writing messages that are sent via e-mail. This has significant implications for the effectiveness of online learning environments. This paper…

  20. Evaluating Tandem Language Learning by E-Mail: Report on a Bilateral Project. CLCS Occasional Paper No. 55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, David; Ushioda, Ema; Appel, Marie Christine; Moran, John; O'Rourke, Breffni; Schwienhorst, Klaus

    The report details the Irish portion of an experiment in tandem language learning by electronic mail (e-mail). The partners were Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland) and Ruhr University, Bochum (Germany), funded by the European Union within the International E-Mail Tandem Network as part of a two-year project. Tandem language learning is a form of…

  1. 43 CFR 2.6 - Will the Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely available information? 2.6 Section 2... Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely available... C to this part. While the bureau will attempt to respond to oral requests (those made by...

  2. 7 CFR 984.445 - Procedures for voting by mail, e-mail, telephone, videoconference, facsimile, or any other means...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Procedures for voting by mail, e-mail, telephone... Rules and Regulations § 984.445 Procedures for voting by mail, e-mail, telephone, videoconference... vote. (b) Whenever the Board conducts meetings by telephone, videoconference, or any technology...

  3. 43 CFR 2.6 - Will the Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely available information? 2.6 Section 2... Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely available... C to this part. While the bureau will attempt to respond to oral requests (those made by...

  4. 7 CFR 984.445 - Procedures for voting by mail, e-mail, telephone, videoconference, facsimile, or any other means...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedures for voting by mail, e-mail, telephone... Rules and Regulations § 984.445 Procedures for voting by mail, e-mail, telephone, videoconference... vote. (b) Whenever the Board conducts meetings by telephone, videoconference, or any technology...

  5. 7 CFR 984.445 - Procedures for voting by mail, e-mail, telephone, videoconference, facsimile, or any other means...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedures for voting by mail, e-mail, telephone... Rules and Regulations § 984.445 Procedures for voting by mail, e-mail, telephone, videoconference... vote. (b) Whenever the Board conducts meetings by telephone, videoconference, or any technology...

  6. 43 CFR 2.6 - Will the Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely available information? 2.6 Section 2.6 Public... Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely available... C to this part. While the bureau will attempt to respond to oral requests (those made by...

  7. Mitigating E-Mail Requests in Teenagers' First and Second Language Academic Cyber-Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcón Soler, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The study analyses teenagers' e-mail requests during academic cyber-consultation, exploring how the performance of request modifiers is influenced by participants' perceptions of the degree of imposition of the speech act and social distance with the recipient. A total of 295 e-mail requests, 145 produced by British English speakers…

  8. Predicted Outcome Value of E-Mail Communication: Factors that Foster Professional Relational Development between Students and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Stacy; Kelsey, Dawn; Lancaster, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Using predicted outcome value theory as a guide, this study investigated the link between e-mail correspondence as a form of computer mediated extra class communication and how it may shape students' desire to foster student-teacher relational development. The findings revealed that when students believe their teacher e-mails the class frequently,…

  9. Can Messages Make a Difference? The Association between E-Mail Messages and Health Outcomes in Diabetes Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Jeanine Warisse; Robinson, James D.; Tian, Yan; Neustadtl, Alan; Angelus, Pam; Russell, Marie; Mun, Seong K.; Levine, Betty

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined the impact of social support messages on patient health outcomes. Forty-one American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian patients received a total of 618 e-mail messages from their healthcare provider (HCP). The e-mail messages were divided into 3,565 message units and coded for instances of emotional social…

  10. Uses and Perceptions of E-Mail for Course-Related Communication between Business Faculty and Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Technological advancements have facilitated the learning process by offering faculty members and students better access to resources, while increasing the potential for more interaction and communication flexibility (Firmin & Miller, 2005). Among these technologies is electronic mail or e-mail. The uses and perceptions of e-mail between business…

  11. Responsiveness to a Prospective Student E-Mail Inquiry by Community Colleges in the Nine Mega-States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadinger, David A.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated e-mail responsiveness by community colleges in the nine mega-states to an inquiry from a prospective student. Noel-Levitz (2006b) reported that prospective students want to receive an e-mail with information about an institution prior to applying for admission. Specifically, high school juniors and seniors want

  12. Can Messages Make a Difference? The Association between E-Mail Messages and Health Outcomes in Diabetes Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Jeanine Warisse; Robinson, James D.; Tian, Yan; Neustadtl, Alan; Angelus, Pam; Russell, Marie; Mun, Seong K.; Levine, Betty

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined the impact of social support messages on patient health outcomes. Forty-one American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian patients received a total of 618 e-mail messages from their healthcare provider (HCP). The e-mail messages were divided into 3,565 message units and coded for instances of emotional social

  13. Talking Shop via E-Mail: A Thematic and Linguistic Analysis of Electronic Mail Communication. Research Report 99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tella, Seppo

    The linguistic purposes of this research were to focus on content, themes and topics, and to analyze the way the target language (English) was used in e-mail. Communicativeness and the roles of the communicator (writer-reader) became central, emphasizing the multidirectional character of e-mail communication. The basic tenet of communicativeness…

  14. Computer-Mediated Communication in Psychology Teaching: Influence of Cultural Background on E-Mail Content and on Appraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Miriam; Jucks, Regina

    2014-01-01

    A significant amount of communication between lecturers and students takes place via e-mail. This study provides evidence that two types of cultural cues contained in the e-mail impacts lecturers' linguistic adaptation to, and appraisal of, the student. A total of 186 psychology lecturers from universities in Germany answered a fictitious…

  15. New Software Product Feature Identification: An Analysis of E-mail User Characteristics and Functional Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofuoglu, Ecehan; Basoglu, Nuri; Daim, Tugrul

    Improving the product development process is becoming more important as business environment gets more competitive. This study aims at understanding and characterizing potential users of a software product through idea sharing of users. It also targets to create a new product concept through understanding the common features users prefer most. During this product conceptualization stage, the customer ideas are captured through use of a questionnaire. The target users, priority of product functions and features are investigated and the details of the existing e-mail systems as well as of the ideal e-mail systems are identified. Some of the key results included users with demographic differences having different usage and requirements characteristics, expectations of females being higher than those of males and the software functions used and characteristics required being different for those with different job categories or educational backgrounds.

  16. Texting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Carol L.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing ranks of cell phone ownership is an increase in text messaging, or texting. During 2008, more than 2.5 trillion text messages were sent worldwide--that's an average of more than 400 messages for every person on the planet. Although many of the messages teenagers text each day are perhaps nothing more than "how r u?" or "c u…

  17. Texting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Carol L.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing ranks of cell phone ownership is an increase in text messaging, or texting. During 2008, more than 2.5 trillion text messages were sent worldwide--that's an average of more than 400 messages for every person on the planet. Although many of the messages teenagers text each day are perhaps nothing more than "how r u?" or "c u

  18. Impact of research-based synopses delivered as daily e-mail: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Grad, Roland M; Pluye, Pierre; Mercer, Jay; Marlow, Bernard; Beauchamp, Marie-Eve; Shulha, Michael; Johnson-Lafleur, Janique; Wood-Dauphinee, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a prospective observational study to (1) determine usage and construct validity of a method to gauge the cognitive impact of information derived from daily e-mail, and (2) describe self-reported impacts of research-based synopses (InfoPOEMs) delivered as e-mail. Ratings of InfoPOEMs using an Impact assessment scale provided (a) data on usage of the impact assessment method, (b) reports of impact by InfoPOEM and by doctor and (c) data for analysis of construct validity of the scale. PARTICIPANTS were family physicians or general practitioners who rated at least five InfoPOEMs delivered on e-mail. For each InfoPOEM rated, 0.1 continuing education credit was awarded by the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Use of the impact assessment scale linked to a daily InfoPOEM was sustained during the 150-day study period. 1,007 participants submitted 61,493 reports of 'cognitive impact' by rating on average 61 InfoPOEMs (range 5-111). 'I learned something new' was most frequently reported. 'I was frustrated as there was not enough information or nothing useful' was the most frequently reported negative type of impact. The proportion of reports of 'No Impact' varied substantially across individual InfoPOEMs. Impact patterns suggested an 8 or 9-factor solution. Our Impact assessment method facilitates knowledge transfer by promoting two-way exchange between providers of health information and family doctors. Providers of health information can use this method to better understand the impact of research-based synopses. Sustaining current practice and increasing knowledge about new developments in medicine are important outcomes arising from research-based synopses delivered as e-mail, in addition to practice change. PMID:18096905

  19. E-mail communication in pain practice: The importance of being earnest

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Irene Solera; Garca, Guadalupe Poblacin; Riquelme, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Background: Information technology can play a vital role in meeting patient needs and reinforcing the relationship among patients and their pain physicians. However, strong resistance remains on the medical side to this type of non-frontal care. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of an E-mail intervention on customers satisfaction. The secondary goals were to analyze the messages from patients to their clinician (not only the volume but also the content) and the impact on client, professional and health services outcomes. Study Design: A prospective, non-randomized evaluation of patients undergoing treatment for chronic pain from September 2011 to May 2012. Setting: A private, specialty referral center in Spain. Materials and Methods: Participants were users visiting the Pain Management Unit evaluated by one physician. The E-mail address of the facility was written in every medical report provided. Patient satisfaction at the end of the 8-month trial period was assessed and outcomes recorded. Results: Patients reported better communication with their therapist and greater satisfaction with overall care. 780 E-mails were read. Specialists received an average of 5 messages per day (standard deviation 0,3). None of them was unsuitable. Limitations: This is a prospective, single center evaluation performed by one doctor. There was no control group due to ethical considerations. Conclusions: Electronic communication is a cheap, easy and feasible way to address a wide range of concerns, thus enhancing patients satisfaction. More efforts are needed to implement routinely usage of this tool. If used appropriately, E-mail can facilitate physician-dependent interactions, promote access to care, save time and reduce costs. Concerns about billing, improper utilization, privacy and confidentiality might complicate its introduction and acceptance. Internet access remains a significant barrier to online patient-provider transference. PMID:25191188

  20. Comparison of e-mail communication skills among first- and fourth-year dental students.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Marnie; Horvath, Zsuzsa; Weinberg, Seth M; Bhatt, Jaya; Spallek, Heiko

    2013-11-01

    As e-mail and other forms of electronic communication increase in popularity, it is important for dental schools to consider a curriculum that prepares their graduates to understand and apply effective electronic communication strategies to their patients. Reflecting this shift in communication behavior, the American Medical Association has developed specific e-mail communication guidelines. Some behavioral examples in these guidelines include protecting patients' protected health information (PHI), ensuring proper record keeping, and using professional, courteous, and understandable language. In this study, a sample of first- and fourth-year dental students (n=160) at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine participated in an assignment assessing their patient-provider e-mail communication skills. A rubric was used to evaluate and compare the data between dental student classes. The results reveal a generalized lack of compliance with several of these guidelines by both classes (e.g., failure to protect PHI), despite efforts to expose students to these concepts in the curriculum. In an effort to train emerging dentists to function in a rapidly changing technological environment, these findings suggest a need for growth and development of curricula and perhaps guidelines/recommendations for behavioral competencies regarding dental students' use of electronic communication in the patient care environment. PMID:24192406

  1. Health literacy and global cognitive function predict e-mail but not internet use in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Schprechman, Jared P; Gathright, Emily C; Goldstein, Carly M; Guerini, Kate A; Dolansky, Mary A; Redle, Joseph; Hughes, Joel W

    2013-01-01

    Background. The internet offers a potential for improving patient knowledge, and e-mail may be used in patient communication with providers. However, barriers to internet and e-mail use, such as low health literacy and cognitive impairment, may prevent patients from using technological resources. Purpose. We investigated whether health literacy, heart failure knowledge, and cognitive function were related to internet and e-mail use in older adults with heart failure (HF). Methods. Older adults (N = 119) with heart failure (69.84 ± 9.09 years) completed measures of health literacy, heart failure knowledge, cognitive functioning, and internet use in a cross-sectional study. Results. Internet and e-mail use were reported in 78.2% and 71.4% of this sample of patients with HF, respectively. Controlling for age and education, logistic regression analyses indicated that higher health literacy predicted e-mail (P < .05) but not internet use. Global cognitive function predicted e-mail (P < .05) but not internet use. Only 45% used the Internet to obtain information on HF and internet use was not associated with greater HF knowledge. Conclusions. The majority of HF patients use the internet and e-mail, but poor health literacy and cognitive impairment may prevent some patients from accessing these resources. Future studies that examine specific internet and email interventions to increase HF knowledge are needed. PMID:24282634

  2. A Mixed-Methods Study of Patient-Provider E-Mail Content in a Safety-Net Setting.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Jacob B; Tieu, Lina; Lyles, Courtney; Sarkar, Urmimala

    2016-01-01

    To explore the content of patient-provider e-mails in a safety-net primary care clinic, we conducted a content analysis using inductive and deductive coding of e-mail exchanges (n = 31) collected from January through November 2013. Participants were English-speaking adult patients with a chronic condition (or their caregivers) cared for at a single publicly funded general internal medicine clinic and their primary care providers (attending general internist physicians, clinical fellows, internal medicine residents, and nurse practitioners). All e-mails were nonurgent. Patients included a medical update in 19% of all e-mails. Patients requested action in 77% of e-mails, and the most common requests overall were for action regarding medications or treatment (29%). Requests for information were less common (45% of e-mails). Patient requests (n = 56) were resolved in 84% of e-mail exchanges, resulting in 63 actions. These results show that patients in safety-net clinics are capable of safely and effectively using electronic messaging for between-visit communication with providers. Safety-net systems should implement electronic communications tools as soon as possible to increase health care access and enhance patients' involvement in their care. PMID:26332306

  3. Speech-based E-mail and driver behavior: effects of an in-vehicle message system interface.

    PubMed

    Jamson, A Hamish; Westerman, Stephen J; Hockey, G Robert J; Carsten, Oliver M J

    2004-01-01

    As mobile office technology becomes more advanced, drivers have increased opportunity to process information "on the move." Although speech-based interfaces can minimize direct interference with driving, the cognitive demands associated with such systems may still cause distraction. We studied the effects on driving performance of an in-vehicle simulated "E-mail" message system; E-mails were either system controlled or driver controlled. A high-fidelity, fixed-base driving simulator was used to test 19 participants on a car-following task. Virtual traffic scenarios varying in driving demand. Drivers compensated for the secondary task by adopting longer headways but showed reduced anticipation of braking requirements and shorter time to collision. Drivers were also less reactive when processing E-mails, demonstrated by a reduction in steering wheel inputs. In most circumstances, there were advantages in providing drivers with control over when E-mails were opened. However, during periods without E-mail interaction in demanding traffic scenarios, drivers showed reduced braking anticipation. This may be a result of increased cognitive costs associated with the decision making process when using a driver-controlled interface when the task of scheduling E-mail acceptance is added to those of driving and E-mail response. Actual or potential applications of this research include the design of speech-based in-vehicle messaging systems. PMID:15709325

  4. Faculty and Student Expectations and Perceptions of E-mail Communication in a Campus and Distance Doctor of Pharmacy Program

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul D.; Monaghan, Michael S.; Walters, Ryan W.; Merkel, Jennifer J.; Lipschultz, Jeremy H.; Lenz, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine faculty members' and students' expectations and perceptions of e-mail communication in a dual pathway pharmacy program. Methods Three parallel survey instruments were administered to campus students, distance students, and faculty members, respectively. Focus groups with students and faculty were conducted. Results Faculty members perceived themselves as more accessible and approachable by e-mail than either group of students did. Campus students expected a shorter faculty response time to e-mail and for faculty members to be more available than did distance students. Conclusion E-mail is an effective means of computer-mediated communication between faculty members and students and can be used to promote a sense of community and inclusiveness (ie, immediacy), especially with distant students. PMID:21436932

  5. The Use of E-Mail as a Tool To Enhance Second Language Education Programs: An Example from a Core French Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Geoff

    2002-01-01

    Outlines reasons why electronic mail, and specifically e-mail exchanges, are valuable tools for promoting authentic target language interaction in the second language (L2) classroom. Research examining the use of e-mail exchanges on the L2 learning process is outlined, followed by one specific example of an e-mail exchange in a secondary core…

  6. In their own words? A terminological analysis of e-mail to a cancer information service.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Catherine Arnott; Stavri, P. Zoë; Chapman, Wendy Webber

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To better understand the terms used by consumers to describe their health information needs and determine if this "consumer terminology"differs from those used by health care professionals. METHODS: Features and findings identified in 139 e-mail messages to the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute's Cancer Information and Referral Service were coded and matched against the 2001 Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus. RESULTS:504 unique terms were identified. 185 (36%) were exact matches to concepts in the 2001 UMLS Metathesaurus (MTH). 179 (35%) were partial string matches; 119 (24%) were known synonyms for MTH concepts; and 2 (<1%) were lexical variants. Only 19,or 4% of the total terms, were not found to be present in the 2001 MT1H. CONCLUSION: 96% of the clinical findings and features mentioned in e-mail by correspondents who did not self-identify as healthcare professionals were described using terms from controlled healthcare terminologies. The notion of a paradigmatic "consumer" who uses a particular vocabulary specific to her "consumer" status may be ill-founded. PMID:12463914

  7. English Longitudinal Study of Aging: Can Internet/E-mail Use Reduce Cognitive Decline?

    PubMed Central

    d’Orsi, Eleonora; de Oliveira, Cesar M.; Orrell, Martin; Demakakos, Panayotes; Biddulph, Jane P.; Marmot, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Cognitive decline is a major risk factor for disability, dementia, and death. The use of Internet/E-mail, also known as digital literacy, might decrease dementia incidence among the older population. The aim was to investigate whether digital literacy might be associated with decreased cognitive decline in older adulthood. Methods. Data from the English Longitudinal Study of Aging cohort with 6,442 participants aged 50–89 years, followed for 8 years, with baseline cognitive testing and four additional time points. The main outcome variable was the relative percentage change in delayed recall from a 10-word-list learning task across five separate measurement points. In addition to digital literacy, socioeconomic variables, including wealth and education, comorbidities, and baseline cognitive function were included in predictive models. The analysis used Generalized Estimating Equations. Results. Higher education, no functional impairment, fewer depressive symptoms, no diabetes, and Internet/E-mail use predicted better performance in delayed recall. Conclusions. Digital literacy may help reduce cognitive decline among persons aged between 50 and 89 years. PMID:25116923

  8. Use of Bright Light Therapy Among Psychiatrists in Massachusetts: An E-Mail Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ciraulo, Domenic A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Evidence on the use of bright light therapy for conditions beyond seasonal affective disorder continues to accrue; however, data on the prevalent use of bright light therapy in the community or in hospitals remain limited, particularly in the United States. Method: We conducted a 5-minute e-mail survey of practicing psychiatrists in Massachusetts using the membership roster through the Massachusetts Psychiatric Society to evaluate prevalent use of bright light therapy as well as to solicit attitudes toward the treatment. Three e-mails were sent out over a 2-week period, and responses were obtained from March 2–24, 2013. An iPad raffle was used to incentivize survey completion. Results: Of the 1,366 delivered e-mails, 197 responses were obtained. Of respondents, 72% indicated that they used bright light therapy in their practice, and, among these, all but 1 used bright light therapy for seasonal affective disorder. Only 55% of responding psychiatrists who use bright light therapy consider it to treat nonseasonal depression, and 11% of respondents who recommend bright light therapy would consider its use in inpatient settings. Lack of insurance coverage for light-delivery devices was identified as the largest barrier to using bright light therapy, being cited by 55% of respondents. Survey results suggest that limitations in practitioner knowledge of bright light therapy and the absence of bright light therapy in treatment algorithms are the 2 leading modifiable factors to encourage broader implementation. Limitations: The principal limitation of our survey was the low response rate. As such, we consider these data preliminary. Conclusions: Response bias very likely led to an overestimation in prevalent use of bright light therapy; however, this bias notwithstanding, it appears that bright light therapy is used significantly less often for nonseasonal depression than for seasonal affective disorder. Further, its use in inpatient settings is significantly less than in outpatient settings. We expect that efforts to educate practitioners on the use and efficacy of bright light therapy for various psychiatric disorders combined with its inclusion on treatment algorithms may foster greater prevalent use. PMID:25317374

  9. "While you still think, I already type": experienced social power reduces deliberation during e-mail communication.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Annika; Sassenberg, Kai

    2014-11-01

    E-mail allows individuals to deliberate on their communication before sending it off. For instance, communication partners can easily take their time to ponder how best to frame a request before they actually send a message. Individuals at times strategically exploit this opportunity to deliberate in order to tailor messages to their communication partner, such as when communicating with a relatively more powerful person. As social power reduces concerns about impression management, we predicted that individuals deliberate more while composing e-mail messages under low (vs. high) power. This assumption was tested with well-established power priming. As such, we expected that experienced power in one context would diminish deliberation times during a subsequent e-mail communication. An experiment manipulating the experience of (low vs. high) power and measuring deliberation times during e-mail composition supported this hypothesis. The findings thus indicate how social power alters deliberation times. More importantly, the results show that individuals not only strategically deliberate during e-mail communication in line with their current situation, but also in line with their social standing in a previous situation (here, their experience of power). PMID:25286277

  10. The lost e-mail: prosocial reactions induced by uniquely human emotions.

    PubMed

    Vaes, Jeroen; Paladino, Maria-Paola; Leyens, Jacques-Philippe

    2002-12-01

    Leyens et al. (2000) have developed a theory on the role of secondary emotions as a uniquely human characteristic. An implication of this theory is that the use of secondary emotions, compared to primary emotions, will increase prosocial intentions and behaviours. Given the uniquely human character of secondary emotions, people who express themselves in terms of these emotions are tacitly seen as more human. As a consequence, these individuals share the human nature that we usually reserve for our own group or ourselves and will therefore evoke prosocial attitudes and behaviours. In two studies, French-speaking participants were confronted with an e-mail that started with either a primary or a secondary emotion. As expected, secondary emotion messages, compared to primary emotion messages, provoked stronger intentions to help the sender (Expt 1) and elicited 'nicer' responses (Expt 2). Implications for intergroup relations are discussed. PMID:12593751

  11. Productivity, part 1: getting things done, using e-mail, scanners, reference managers, note-taking applications, and text expanders.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Amanda E; Moshiri, Mariam; Pandey, Tarun; Lall, Chandana; Lalwani, Neeraj; Bhargava, Puneet

    2014-05-01

    In an era of declining reimbursements and tightening of the job market, today's radiologists are forced to "make do with less." With the rollout of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly called "Obamacare," radiologists will be expected not only to interpret studies but to also take on many additional roles, adding a new layer of complexity to already demanding daily duties. These changes make it more important than ever to develop a personal workflow management system incorporating some of the most potent productivity tools. In this article, the authors discuss current productivity techniques and related software with the most potential to help radiologists keep up with the ever increasing demands on their time at the work place and help us lead more balanced lives. PMID:24656443

  12. Analysis of E-Mail Produced by Middle School Students with Disabilities Using Accessible Interfaces: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohlberg, McKay Moore; Todis, Bonnie; Fickas, Stephen; Ehlhardt, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this exploratory study was to investigate electronic communication as a potential method to enhance social communication in a range of students with disabilities. This study investigated the usability of an adapted e-mail interface, TeenMail, for 11 middle school students with significant learning and communication impairments who…

  13. How Users Take Advantage of Different Forms of Interactivity on Online News Sites: Clicking, E-Mailing, and Commenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boczkowski, Pablo J.; Mitchelstein, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the uptake of multiple interactive features on news sites. It looks at the thematic composition of the most clicked, most e-mailed, and most commented stories during periods of heightened and routine political activity. Results show that (a) during the former period, the most commented stories were more likely to be focused on…

  14. How Users Take Advantage of Different Forms of Interactivity on Online News Sites: Clicking, E-Mailing, and Commenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boczkowski, Pablo J.; Mitchelstein, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the uptake of multiple interactive features on news sites. It looks at the thematic composition of the most clicked, most e-mailed, and most commented stories during periods of heightened and routine political activity. Results show that (a) during the former period, the most commented stories were more likely to be focused on

  15. RDA Implementation and Training Issues across United States Academic Libraries: An In-Depth E-Mail Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jung-ran; Tosaka, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at providing in-depth perspectives on the ways in which cataloging and metadata professionals have coped with RDA training and implementation through an e-mail interview method. Results show that the performance-based, "learn-as-you-go," peer learning method is found by practitioners to be most effective in acquiring and

  16. Efficacy of a Single Computer-Tailored E-Mail for Smoking Cessation: Results after 6 Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poel, Fam Te; Bolman, Catherine; Reubsaet, Astrid; de Vries, Hein

    2009-01-01

    To date, few Internet-delivered smoking cessation interventions have been tested. This study tested the efficacy, understandability, credibility and personal relevance of an e-mail-delivered computer-tailored smoking cessation intervention. It included tailored action plan feedback, as recent studies have demonstrated the importance of planning in…

  17. Improving the Motivation and Retention of Online Students through the Use of ARCS-Based E-Mails

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huett, Jason Bond; Kalinowski, Kevin E.; Moller, Leslie; Huett, Kimberly Cleaves

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the use of ARCS-based, motivational mass e-mail messages designed to improve the motivation and retention of students enrolled in an online, entry-level, undergraduate computer applications course. Data from the Course Interest Survey, based on Keller's ARCS model, were gathered and analyzed for two online groups (one treatment…

  18. An Analysis of E-mail Technologies Used by Business Educators at the Secondary and Postsecondary Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Melody W.; Zhao, Jensen J.; Underwood, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 225 secondary and 251 postsecondary business educators indicated the following: (1) secondary teachers had less frequent e-mail access, training, and use; (2) primary recipients were friends/family and faculty/staff; (3) primary use was internal administrative communications; (4) postsecondary teachers were more likely to give their…

  19. Virtual Collaborations in the Spanish Class: From E-Mail to Web Design and CD-ROM Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellebrandt, Josef

    1999-01-01

    Modern technologies can provide language students with authentic content and contextualized, collaborative learning situations. This article illustrates how e-mail exchanges, Web exercises, and CD-ROM development between students in the United States and organizations in Ecuador can promote contextualized and authentic practice of Spanish language…

  20. EFL Students' Vocabulary Learning in NS-NNS E-Mail Interactions: Do They Learn New Words by Imitation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasaki, Akihiko; Takeuchi, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated Japanese students' EFL vocabulary development through e-mail interactions with a native English speaker (NS), with primary focus on students' imitation of new words. According to sociocultural theory, learners can internalize new linguistic knowledge by imitating an expert's expressions to create his/her own…

  1. Paper Trail: An Angry Professor Uses a State Law to Get Colleagues' E-Mail Messages and Other Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2005-01-01

    Angry over the department's vote not to hire his wife, University of Georgia history of science professor Alexei Kojevnikov obtained access to professors' and administrators' e-mails and documents related to the hiring process and spousal hires. This article discusses the controversy from different perspectives, the state of Georgia's law that…

  2. Assessing the Factors Affecting the Amount of E-Mail Spam Delivery in a Public School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasenchock, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Eighty to ninety percent of e-mail is considered unsolicited commercial communication, or spam. Not only does spam violate the privacy of users, but it also incurs societal costs associated with time-related losses, serves as a vehicle for cyber-crime, and threatens the success of e-commerce by lowering consumer confidence. This quantitative

  3. Assessing the Factors Affecting the Amount of E-Mail Spam Delivery in a Public School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasenchock, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Eighty to ninety percent of e-mail is considered unsolicited commercial communication, or spam. Not only does spam violate the privacy of users, but it also incurs societal costs associated with time-related losses, serves as a vehicle for cyber-crime, and threatens the success of e-commerce by lowering consumer confidence. This quantitative…

  4. Differences between chat room and e-mail sampling approaches in Chinese men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanyi; Ross, Michael W

    2002-10-01

    In a study to determine sampling differences between Internet sites, we obtained data on 353 men who have sex with men in Chinese gay chat rooms and through e-mail web sites. Respondents were approached by the investigator and agreed to fill out an anonymous questionnaire on their Internet use and sexual activity. All materials and contacts were in Chinese characters. Data indicated that there were few differences between the chat room and Internet samples, but that those using e-mail appear to be more isolated, more homosexually-identified (rather than bisexual), have more experience with casual partners on a number of sexual activities, and were less likely to carry condoms and to have safe sex. E-mail respondents were more likely to want to discuss HIV/AIDS prevention on a web site or other site. These data suggest that the two recruiting methods are largely comparable in respondent characteristics, but that e-mail respondents are likely to be more isolated and at higher HIV risk than chat room participants. PMID:12413182

  5. RDA Implementation and Training Issues across United States Academic Libraries: An In-Depth E-Mail Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jung-ran; Tosaka, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at providing in-depth perspectives on the ways in which cataloging and metadata professionals have coped with RDA training and implementation through an e-mail interview method. Results show that the performance-based, "learn-as-you-go," peer learning method is found by practitioners to be most effective in acquiring and…

  6. Efficacy of a Single Computer-Tailored E-Mail for Smoking Cessation: Results after 6 Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poel, Fam Te; Bolman, Catherine; Reubsaet, Astrid; de Vries, Hein

    2009-01-01

    To date, few Internet-delivered smoking cessation interventions have been tested. This study tested the efficacy, understandability, credibility and personal relevance of an e-mail-delivered computer-tailored smoking cessation intervention. It included tailored action plan feedback, as recent studies have demonstrated the importance of planning in

  7. Bit-parallel ASCII code artificial numeric keypad

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, G.M.

    1981-03-01

    Seven integrated circuits and a voltage regulator are combined with twelve reed relays to allow the ASCII encoded numerals 0 through 9 and characters ''.'' and R or S to momentarily close switches to an applications device, simulating keypad switch closures. This invention may be used as a PARALLEL TLL (Transistor Transistor Logic) data acqusition interface to a standard Hewlett-Packard HP-97 Calculator modified with a cable.

  8. What does an e-mail address add? - Doing health and technology at home.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Hege K

    2011-02-01

    There is increasing interest in using electronic mail and other electronic health technologies (e-health technologies) in patient follow-ups. This study sheds light on patients' reception of provider-initiated e-health in their everyday environments. In a research project carried out in Norway (2005-2007), an electronic address for a hospital dermatology ward was offered to 50 patient families for improved access to expert advice from the patients' homes. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 12 families, this paper explores how the electronic address was integrated into everyday health practice. The research illuminates how the electronic address did not only represent changes related to treatment procedures and frequency or nature of expert contact; it was also important to other practices in the everyday lives of the families of patients with chronic illness. Once in place on the patients' computers, the electronic address was ascribed at least four different roles: it was used as the intended riverbed for a flow of information, but also as a safety alarm, as a shield to the medical gaze and as a token of competence in care and parenting. The multiplicity in use and reception of an electronic address in patient settings illustrates the need to include patients' everyday practices in current professional and political discussions of e-mail and other e-health technologies. Thus this paper argues that there is a need for research on electronic patient-provider communication that moves beyond frequency of use and questions on how technology will affect medical encounters. Social science equally needs to investigate how provider-initiated e-health technologies gets involved in patients' moral and social performance of health and illness in everyday life. PMID:21208702

  9. IntegraTUM Teilprojekt E-Mail: Aufbau eines mandantenfähigen Groupware-Services und seine Integration in Identity Management und E-Mail Infrastruktur der Technischen Universität München

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehn, Max

    Die E-Mail-Infrastruktur an der Technischen Universität München (TUM) ist historisch bedingt sehr heterogen und komplex. Viele Einrichtungen müssen wertvolle Arbeitskraft auf die Administration eigener Mailserver verwenden. Auf der anderen Seite wird bei einigen Einrichtungen der Ruf nach Groupware-Funktionalitäten wie z.B. gemeinsame Kalender immer lauter. Das Teilprojekt E-Mail stellt einen zentralen Mail- und Groupware-Service bereit, der den Einrichtungen ermöglichen soll, den Betrieb eigener Server und zugehöriger Systeme (etwa lokaler Benutzerverwaltungen) für diesen Zweck aufzugeben und diese Dienste an das Teilprojekt E-Mail zu migrieren, ohne ihre Verwaltungshoheit oder ihre Maildomains aufgeben zu müssen. Dieser Service versteht sich als eine Ergänzung zur bestehenden Grundversorgung der TUM mit den Maildiensten des myTUM-Mailers, ist mandantenfähig aufgebaut und kann daher künftig neben der TUM auch weiteren Organisationen im Münchner Wissenschaftsnetz zur Verfügung gestellt werden.

  10. A Classification Method of Inquiry E-mails for Describing FAQ with Automatic Setting Mechanism of Judgment Thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Yuki; Akiyoshi, Masanori; Samejima, Masaki; Oka, Hironori

    In this paper the authors propose a classification method of inquiry e-mails for describing FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) and automatic setting mechanism of judgment thresholds. In this method, a dictionary used for classification of inquiries is generated and updated automatically by statistical information of characteristic words in clusters, and inquiries are classified correctly to each proper cluster by using the dictionary. Threshold values are automatically set by using statistical information.

  11. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) file format description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford; Hammond, Dana

    1987-01-01

    Described is a format for writing ASCII data on a file to facilitate its transfer from one computer system to another. The TOAD format conforms to all ANSI FORTRAN 77 standards. There are two advantages in using the TOAD format. First, TOAD files are of the preferred type and record length to make them easy to edit, read from and write on magnetic tape, or transfer across communications networks. Secondly, application programs, using the TOAD format to write computational results, are more portable and the answer files easier to postprocess. TOAD utility software is listed in an appendix.

  12. Effectiveness of an intensive E-mail based intervention in smoking cessation (TABATIC study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intensive interventions on smoking cessation increase abstinence rates. However, few electronic mail (E-mail) based intensive interventions have been tested in smokers and none in primary care (PC) setting. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive E-mail based intervention in smokers attending PC services. Methods/design Randomized Controlled Multicentric Trial. Study population: 1060 smokers aged between 18–70 years from Catalonia, Salamanca and Aragón (Spain) who have and check regularly an E-mail account. Patients will be randomly assigned to control or intervention group. Intervention: Six phase intensive intervention with two face to face interviews and four automatically created and personal E-mail patients tracking, if needed other E-mail contacts will be made. Control group will receive a brief advice on smoking cessation. Outcome measures: Will be measured at 6 and 12 months after intervention: self reported continuous abstinence (confirmed by cooximetry), point prevalence abstinence, tobacco consumption, evolution of stage according to Prochaska and DiClemente's Stages of Change Model, length of visit, costs for the patient to access Primary Care Center. Statistical analysis: Descriptive and logistic and Poisson regression analysis under the intention to treat basis using SPSS v.17. Discussion The proposed intervention is an E-mail based intensive intervention in smokers attending primary care. Positive results could be useful to demonstrate a higher percentage of short and long-term abstinence among smokers attended in PC in Spain who regularly use E-mail. Furthermore, this intervention could be helpful in all health services to help smokers to quit. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT01494246. PMID:23597262

  13. Social equity and access to the World Wide Web and E-mail: implications for design and implementation of medical applications.

    PubMed Central

    Mandl, K. D.; Katz, S. B.; Kohane, I. S.

    1998-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The distribution and types of Internet connectivity will determine the equity of access by patient populations to emerging health technologies. We sought to measure the rates, types, and predictors of access in a patient population targeted for Web-based medical services. METHODS: Design. Cross sectional in-person interview. Setting. Emergency department of a large urban pediatric teaching hospital. Subjects. Primary caretakers of patients or patients at least 16 years old. Procedure and measures. Subjects were asked about access to e-mail and the Internet as well as about willingness to use and concerns about Web-based services. Views of equity and access and sociodemographic data were also elicited. RESULTS: 132 subjects were enrolled in the study. Of respondents, 67.2% use a computer and 36.4% can access the Internet or e-mail from home. Including Internet connections and/or e-mail accounts at work, school and public libraries, 50.7% of the sample has access. Forty percent of families have e-mail accounts. The rate at which families have connectivity is primarily correlated with income (r = 0.6, p < 0.01). At all income levels, rates of access to the World Wide Web are higher than to e-mail. White patients are much more likely to have e-mail (OR 5.0, 95% CI 2.4-10.8) and Web access (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.7-7.5). CONCLUSIONS: Connectivity is directly correlated with income and distributed unevenly across racial and ethnic groups. World Wide Web access is more prevalent than e-mail accounts, and both are often obtained outside the home. Design of health applications should account for these attributes of patient access. PMID:9929213

  14. Text File Display Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavrus, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    LOOK program permits user to examine text file in pseudorandom access manner. Program provides user with way of rapidly examining contents of ASCII text file. LOOK opens text file for input only and accesses it in blockwise fashion. Handles text formatting and displays text lines on screen. User moves forward or backward in file by any number of lines or blocks. Provides ability to "scroll" text at various speeds in forward or backward directions.

  15. Uptake and adherence of a self-directed internet-based mental health intervention with tailored e-mail reminders in senior high schools in Norway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) is a promising approach to the prevention and reduction of depressive symptoms among adolescents. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of disseminating a self-directed internet-based mental health intervention (MoodGYM) in senior high schools. It also sought to investigate possible effects of tailored and weekly e-mail reminders on initial uptake and adherence to the intervention. Method A baseline survey was conducted in four senior high schools in two Norwegian municipalities (n = 1337). 52.8% (707/1337) of the students consented to further participation in the trial and were randomly allocated to one of three MoodGYM intervention groups (tailored weekly e-mail reminder (n = 175), standardized weekly e-mail reminder (n = 176 ) or no e-mail reminder (n = 175)) or a waitlist control group (n = 180). We tested for effects of the intervention on depression and self-esteem using multivariate analysis of variance, effects of tailored e-mail and self-reported current need of help on initial uptake of the intervention using logistic regression and the effect of weekly e-mails on adherence using ordinal regression. Results There was substantial non-participation from the intervention, with only 8.5% (45/527) participants logging on to MoodGYM, and few proceeding beyond the first part of the programme. No significant effect on depression or self-esteem was found among the sample as a whole or among participants with elevated depression scores at baseline. Having a higher average grade in senior high school predicted initial uptake of the intervention, but tailored e-mail and self-reported current need of help did not. Weekly e-mail prompts did not predict adherence. The main reasons for non-use reported were lack of time/forgetting about it and doubt about the usefulness of the program. Conclusion Overall, disseminating a self-directed internet-based intervention to a school population proved difficult despite steps taken to reduce barriers in terms of tailoring feedback and dispatching weekly e-mail reminders. Providing mental health interventions within the school environment is likely to ensure better uptake among senior high school students, but there is a need to effectively communicate that such programmes can be helpful. Trial registration The trial was registered retrospectively as ACTRN12612001106820. PMID:24443820

  16. Development of a discharge lounge: the use of E-mail to facilitate the quality improvement process.

    PubMed

    Rafoth, R J

    1997-01-01

    Quality improvement is often seen as a time-consuming and cumbersome process with high "people" overhead as employees are pulled from their regular duties to attend meetings. As a result, there has been a trend toward tackling smaller, well defined problems with quickly achievable results. The E-mail approach used in this instance offers an approach that may bridge this gap. It allows a large group of people to participate in a complex project without the need for structured meetings spread out over a long period of time. The result, a blend of the strong points of quality improvement (inclusive, using the wisdom of a group of people) with a speedy, low overhead process, seems to address the concerns that have slowed the acceptance of the quality improvement process in many organizations thus far. PMID:9385730

  17. E-Mail and Word Processing in the ESL Classroom: How the Medium Affects the Message.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesenbach-Lucas, Sigrun; Weasenforth, Donald

    2001-01-01

    Examines whether electronic mail writing will improve academic writing abilities. Nonnative students in an intermediate pre-academic English-as-a-Second-Language course responded to writing prompts using electronic mail and word processing. Their writing was examined for differences in uses of cohesive features, length of text produced in each

  18. E-Mail and Word Processing in the ESL Classroom: How the Medium Affects the Message.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesenbach-Lucas, Sigrun; Weasenforth, Donald

    2001-01-01

    Examines whether electronic mail writing will improve academic writing abilities. Nonnative students in an intermediate pre-academic English-as-a-Second-Language course responded to writing prompts using electronic mail and word processing. Their writing was examined for differences in uses of cohesive features, length of text produced in each…

  19. Mining emotional profiles using e-mail messages for earlier warnings of potential terrorist activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galitsky, Boris; Kovalerchuk, Boris

    2006-04-01

    We develop a software system Text Scanner for Emotional Distress (TSED) for helping to detect email messages which are suspicious of coming from people under strong emotional distress. It has been confirmed by multiple studies that terrorist attackers have experienced a substantial emotional distress at some points before committing a terrorist attack. Therefore, if an individual in emotional distress can be detected on the basis of email texts, some preventive measures can be taken. The proposed detection machinery is based on extraction and classification of emotional profiles from emails. An emotional profile is a formal representation of a sequence of emotional states through a textual discourse where communicative actions are attached to these emotional states. The issues of extraction of emotional profiles from text and reasoning about it are discussed and illustrated. We then develop an inductive machine learning and reasoning framework to relate an emotional profile to the class "Emotional distress" or "No emotional distress", given a training dataset where the class is assigned by an expert. TSED's machine learning is evaluated using the database of structured customer complaints.

  20. E-mail to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening Within Social Networks: Acceptability and Content

    PubMed Central

    CUTRONA, SARAH L.; WAGNER, JOANN; ROBLIN, DOUGLAS W.; GAGLIO, BRIDGET; WILLIAMS, ANDREW; TORRES-STONE, ROSALIE; MAZOR, KATHLEEN M.

    2016-01-01

    Effective techniques to encourage colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in underscreened populations have included social support interventions and email reminders from physicians. Personalized email messages to promote CRC screening within social networks could be even more effective, but have not been studied. We interviewed 387 email users, aged 42-73 years in Massachusetts, Hawaii, and Georgia. Participants were asked to edit a sample message in which the sender shares a recent colonoscopy experience and urges the recipient to discuss CRC screening with a doctor. For those reporting willingness to send this message, changes to the message and suggested subject lines were recorded. Edited text was analyzed for content and concordance with original message. The majority of participants (74.4%) were willing to email a modifiable message. Of those willing, 63.5% edited the message. Common edits included deletion (17.7%) or modification (17.4%) of a negatively framed sentence on colon cancer risks and addition or modification of personalizing words (15.6%). Few edits changed the meaning of the message (5.6%) and even fewer introduced factual inaccuracies (1.7%). Modifiable email messages offer a way for screened individuals to promote CRC screening to social network members. Accuracy and impact of such messages should be further studied. PMID:25839968

  1. The Feasibility of an E-Mail-Delivered Intervention to Improve Nutrition and Physical Activity Behaviors in African American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Eleanor; Schweitzer, Amy; Hurtado, Maria Eugenia; Hathway, Joanne; DiPietro, Loretta; Lei, Kai Y.; Klein, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of an e-mail-delivered program to promote nutrition and physical activity in African American college students. Participants: Forty-seven students (76% female, aged 18-20 years). Methods: Students participated in a 24-week randomized controlled trial, receiving either general health…

  2. Comparing Traditional Journal Writing with Journal Writing Shared over E-mail List Serves as Tools for Facilitating Reflective Thinking: A Study of Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Diane S.; Rupley, William H.; Sparks, Joanne; Holcomb, Angelia

    2007-01-01

    To determine the conditions that would best encourage reflection in journal writing of preservice teachers in field-based reading internships, the degree of reflective content found in self-contained traditional journals was compared to the reflective content found in journal entries shared over e-mail list serves. Participants were 56 preservice…

  3. Foreign language learning using e-mail in a task-oriented perspective: Interuniversity experiments in communication and collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barson, John; Frommer, Judith; Schwartz, Michael

    1993-12-01

    From 1988 to 1990 several collaborative “cross-country” intermediate French classes at Harvard and Stanford became one class. Students combined their efforts and insights in the accomplishment of a semester-long task, in most cases the publication of a student newspaper or magazine, using the electronic mail (e-mail) network to contact each other, elaborate their plans, and bring their projects to successful conclusion. Additional experiments of a similar nature took place between Harvard and the University of Pittsburgh (in the spring of 1990) and between Stanford and the University of Pittsburgh during 1991 1993. This paper suggests that this type of task-oriented learning through distance-communication is applicable at many different course levels and has considerable merit as an approach to teaching and learning. The key phases of this task-based model are presented along with technological information regarding computers and networks, as a guide to colleagues interested in pursuing similar lines of experimental teaching. Also included are samples of student messages, with their varied and often highly colorful discourse features, which attest to the motivation of students and reveal the strong personal investment made by the participants as they join hands across the miles in a productive, communication-based enterprise. The language and learning styles generated by technology and computers fully deserve closer investigation by researchers and teaching practitioners alike. The authors summarize the experiments, discuss assessment, and present research issues, concluding that good pedagogy and quality technology must share a vision of what can be accomplished in this rapidly evolving educational work place.

  4. Preferences of interns and residents for E-mail, paging, or traditional methods for the delivery of different types of clinical information.

    PubMed

    Wagner, M M; Eisenstadt, S A; Hogan, W R; Pankaskie, M C

    1998-01-01

    We elicited from medical house staff their preferences for e-mail and alphanumeric pager as communication channels for the delivery of 18 different types of clinical information about their inpatients. For each type, we calculated the proportion of users who preferred delivery by e-mail, pager, both, or neither (usual delivery). For 14/18 (78%) types, more users preferred delivery by pager than by the other options. For 2/18 (11%) types, e-mail was preferred. For 2/18 (11%) types, more users preferred redundant delivery using both channels. For no types did more users prefer neither, meaning that the information would be delivered by traditional channels, if any. We conclude that medical house staff in the inpatient setting prefer to receive many types of clinical information by pager. The reason may be that they otherwise would have to query clinical information systems for these data, which is wasteful of their time and introduces delays into the process of care. Additionally, we found significant inter-user variability, suggesting that it may be useful for the notification services of an enterprise to employ user profiles for the delivery of clinical information. PMID:9929198

  5. Self-Help for Depression via E-mail: A Randomised Controlled Trial of Effects on Depression and Self-Help Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Amy J.; Jorm, Anthony F.; Mackinnon, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-help or self-management strategies are commonly used to deal with depression, but not all are thought to be helpful. A previous study found that sub-threshold depression symptoms were improved by an e-mail intervention that encouraged the use of evidence-based self-help strategies. Aim To investigate whether these e-mails were effective for adults with a range of depression symptomatology including major depression. Method The study was a parallel-group randomised controlled trial. Adult participants with any level of depressive symptoms were recruited over the internet from the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand and the United States. Participants were randomised to receive a series of e-mails either promoting the use of evidence-based self-help strategies or containing depression information as a control. E-mails were sent automatically twice a week for six weeks. Depression symptoms were assessed with the self-rated Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale (PHQ-9). Results 1736 participants with a wide range of symptom severity were recruited and assigned to active (n = 862) and control (n = 874) groups. However, there was a significant attrition rate, with 66.9% lost to follow-up at post-intervention. Both groups showed large improvements in depression symptoms overall, with no significant difference in improvement at the end of the study (mean difference in improvement 0.35 points, 95% CI: −0.57 to 1.28, d = 0.11, 95% CI: −0.06 to 0.27), although there was a small effect at the study mid-point. Results were similar for the sub-group of participants with major depression. The active group showed small to moderate improvements in self-help behaviour (d = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.23 to 0.56). Conclusions These results suggest that the e-mails were able to increase participants’ use of evidence-based self-help, but that this did not improve depression more than an attention control. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01399502 PMID:23805231

  6. E-mail as the Appropriate Method of Communication for the Decision-Maker When Soliciting Advice for an Intellective Decision Task.

    PubMed

    Prahl, Andrew; Dexter, Franklin; Swol, Lyn Van; Braun, Michael T; Epstein, Richard H

    2015-09-01

    For many problems in operating room and anesthesia group management, there are tasks with optimal decisions, and yet experienced personnel tend to make decisions that are worse or no better than random chance. Such decisions include staff scheduling, case scheduling, moving cases among operating rooms, and choosing patient arrival times. In such settings, operating room management leadership decision-making should typically be autocratic rather than participative. Autocratic-style decision-making calls for managers to solicit and consider feedback from stakeholders in the decision outcome but to make the decision themselves using their expert knowledge and the facts received. For this to be effective, often the manager will obtain expert advice from outside the organization (e.g., health system). In this narrative review, we evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using prompt asynchronous written communication (i.e., e-mail) as a communication channel for such interaction between a decision-maker (manager) and advisor. A detailed Appendix (Supplemental Digital Content, http://links.lww.com/AA/B72) lists each observational and experimental result. We find that the current ubiquitous role of e-mail for such communication is appropriate. Its benefits include improved time management via asynchronicity, low cognitive load (e.g., relative to Web conferencing), the ability to hide undesirable and irrelevant cues (e.g., physical appearance), the appropriateness of adding desirable cues (e.g., titles and degrees), the opportunity to provide written expression of confidence, and the ability for the advisor to demonstrate the answer for the decision-maker. Given that the manager is e-mailing an advisor whose competence the manager trusts, it is unnecessary to use a richer communication channel to develop trust. Finally, many of the limitations of e-mail can be rectified through training. We expect that decades from now, e-mail (i.e., asynchronous writing) between an expert and decision-maker will remain the dominant means of communication for intellective tasks. PMID:26287297

  7. Convertor of MAD Programs to a Set of ASCII files to load into SYBASE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-07-12

    Used in Lattice support and maintenance; current buffer in Emacs editor is converted into a bunch of ASCII files (each for specific MAD token type). These files are in some fixed format and are ready to be loaded into the database (sysbase).

  8. An E-mail Delivered CBT for Sleep-Health Program for College Students: Effects on Sleep Quality and Depression Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Trockel, Mickey; Manber, Rachel; Chang, Vickie; Thurston, Alexandra; Tailor, Craig Barr

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: We examined the effects of a cognitive behavioral self-help program (Refresh) to improve sleep, on sleep quality and symptoms of depression among first-year college students. Methods: Students in one residence hall (n = 48) participated in Refresh and students in another residence hall (n = 53) participated in a program of equal length (Breathe) designed to improve mood and increase resilience to stress. Both programs were delivered by e-mail in 8 weekly PDF files. Of these, 19 Refresh program participants and 15 Breathe program participants reported poor sleep quality at baseline (scores ≥ 5 on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI]). Participants completed the PSQI and the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D) at baseline and post-intervention. Results: Among students with poor sleep (PSQI > 5) at baseline, participation in Refresh was associated with greater improvements in sleep quality and greater reduction in depressive symptoms than participation in Breathe. Among students with high sleep quality at baseline there was no difference in baseline to post-intervention changes in sleep (PSQI) or depressive symptom severity (CES-D). Conclusions: A cognitive behavioral sleep improvement program delivered by e-mail may be a cost effective way for students with poor sleep quality to improve their sleep and reduce depressive symptoms. An important remaining question is whether improving sleep will also reduce risk for future depression. Citation: Trockel M; Manber R; Chang V; Thurston A; Tailor CB. An e-mail delivered CBT for sleep-health program for college students: effects on sleep quality and depression symptoms. J Clin Sleep Med 2011;7(3):276-281. PMID:21677898

  9. What a rude e-mail! Examining the differential effects of incivility versus support on mood, energy, engagement, and performance in an online context.

    PubMed

    Giumetti, Gary W; Hatfield, Andrea L; Scisco, Jenna L; Schroeder, Amber N; Muth, Eric R; Kowalski, Robin M

    2013-07-01

    Existing research on workplace incivility has demonstrated an association with a host of negative outcomes, including increased burnout, turnover intentions, and physical symptoms. With the rise in Internet communication over the last decade, interpersonal mistreatment has spilled over to the Internet, but little is known about the impact of incivility communicated via e-mail on employee psychological and performance outcomes. The current study presents a within-subjects experiment wherein incivility and support were manipulated in a laboratory-based simulated workplace setting. Eighty-four participants completed a series of math tasks while interacting with either an uncivil or a supportive supervisor via e-mail. Data were collected on energy, cardiac activity, mood, task performance, and engagement. Findings indicate that participants reported higher levels of negative affect and lower levels of energy after working with the uncivil supervisor than with the supportive supervisor. Additionally, participants performed significantly worse on the math tasks and had lower engagement in the uncivil condition than the supportive condition, and these relationships were mediated by energy. No differences were found in cardiac activity between the two conditions. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for the 21st century world of work. PMID:23834445

  10. RF model of the distribution system as a communication channel, phase 2. Volume 4: Sofware source program and illustrations ASCII database listings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rustay, R. C.; Gajjar, J. T.; Rankin, R. W.; Wentz, R. C.; Wooding, R.

    1982-01-01

    Listings of source programs and some illustrative examples of various ASCII data base files are presented. The listings are grouped into the following categories: main programs, subroutine programs, illustrative ASCII data base files. Within each category files are listed alphabetically.

  11. Personalized feedback as a universal prevention approach for college drinking: a randomized trial of an e-mail linked universal web-based alcohol intervention.

    PubMed

    Palfai, Tibor P; Winter, Michael; Lu, John; Rosenbloom, David; Saitz, Richard

    2014-04-01

    Alcohol use among first-year university students continues to be a central health concern. Efforts to address drinking in this population have increasingly relied on web-based interventions, which have the capacity to reach large numbers of students through a convenient and highly utilized medium. Despite evidence for the utility of this approach for reducing hazardous drinking, recent studies that have examined the effectiveness of this approach as a universal prevention strategy in campus-wide studies have produced mixed results. We sought to test the effectiveness of a web-based alcohol intervention as a universal prevention strategy for first-year students. An e-mail invitation linked to a brief, web-based survey on health behaviors was sent to all first-year students during the fall semester. Those who completed the baseline assessment were randomized to receive either a feedback-based alcohol intervention (intervention condition) or feedback about other health-related behaviors such as sleep and nutrition (control condition). A second web-based survey was used to collect follow-up drinking data 5 months later. The number of heavy drinking episodes in the previous month and alcohol-related consequences in the previous 3 months served as the primary dependent variables. Negative binomial regression analyses did not indicate a significant effect of the intervention at follow-up on either heavy drinking episodes or alcohol-related consequences. Analyses of additional drinking outcomes among the subsample of students who reported that they did not drink at baseline showed that those who received the alcohol intervention were subsequently less likely to drink alcohol. These results suggest that web-based alcohol interventions may be a potentially useful method of maintaining abstinence among underage, non-drinking students. Overall, however, results indicate that an e-mail-linked, campus-wide, web-intervention approach to address alcohol use among first-year students may have limited effectiveness as an approach to minimize hazardous drinking over the course of the year. PMID:24421075

  12. Increasing Induction-Level Teachers' Positive-to-Negative Communication Ratio and Use of Behavior-Specific Praise through E-Mailed Performance Feedback and Its Effect on Students' Task Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathel, Jeanna M.; Drasgow, Erik; Brown, William H.; Marshall, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of e-mailed specific performance feedback that included progress monitoring graphs on induction-level teachers' ratios of positive-to-negative communication behaviors and their use of behavior-specific praise in classrooms for students with emotional and behavioral disorders, mild

  13. Increasing Induction-Level Teachers' Positive-to-Negative Communication Ratio and Use of Behavior-Specific Praise through E-Mailed Performance Feedback and Its Effect on Students' Task Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathel, Jeanna M.; Drasgow, Erik; Brown, William H.; Marshall, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of e-mailed specific performance feedback that included progress monitoring graphs on induction-level teachers' ratios of positive-to-negative communication behaviors and their use of behavior-specific praise in classrooms for students with emotional and behavioral disorders, mild…

  14. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford D.; Shea, Anne L.; Hofler, Alicia S.

    1991-01-01

    The Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor is an interactive software tool for manipulating the contents of TOAD files. The TOAD editor is specifically designed to work with tabular data. Selected subsets of data may be displayed to the user's screen, sorted, exchanged, duplicated, removed, replaced, inserted, or transferred to and from external files. It also offers a number of useful features including on-line help, macros, a command history, an 'undo' option, variables, and a full compliment of mathematical functions and conversion factors. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77 and completely self-contained, the TOAD editor is very portable and has already been installed on SUN, SGI/IRIS, and CONVEX hosts.

  15. The BlackBerry Project: Capturing the Content of Adolescents' Text Messaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.; Rosen, Lisa H.; More, David; Ehrenreich, Samuel E.; Gentsch, Joanna K.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an innovative method for capturing the content of adolescents' electronic communication on handheld devices: text messaging, e-mail, and instant messaging. In an ongoing longitudinal study, adolescents were provided with BlackBerry devices with service plans paid for by the investigators, and use of text messaging was

  16. The BlackBerry Project: Capturing the Content of Adolescents' Text Messaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.; Rosen, Lisa H.; More, David; Ehrenreich, Samuel E.; Gentsch, Joanna K.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an innovative method for capturing the content of adolescents' electronic communication on handheld devices: text messaging, e-mail, and instant messaging. In an ongoing longitudinal study, adolescents were provided with BlackBerry devices with service plans paid for by the investigators, and use of text messaging was…

  17. Spam Filtering without Text Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belabbes, Sihem; Richard, Gilles

    Our paper introduces a new way to filter spam using as background the Kolmogorov complexity theory and as learning component a Support Vector Machine. Our idea is to skip the classical text analysis in use with standard filtering techniques, and to focus on the measure of the informative content of a message to classify it as spam or legitimate. Exploiting the fact that we can estimate a message information content through compression techniques, we represent an e-mail as a multi-dimensional real vector and we train a Support Vector Machine to get a classifier achieving accuracy rates in the range of 90%-97%, bringing our combined technique at the top of the current spam filtering technologies.

  18. Keyless Entry: Building a Text Database Using OCR Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grotophorst, Clyde W.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the use of optical character recognition (OCR) technology to produce an ASCII text database. A tutorial on digital scanning and OCR is provided, and a systems integration project which used the Calera CDP-3000XF scanner and text retrieval software to construct a database of dissertations at George Mason University is described. (four…

  19. Comparing Text, Document, and Relational Database Management Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Clifford

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the critical need for tools to manage, access, and disseminate text and image information ranging from free-form ASCII data to scanned documents stored on optical media. Current types of integrated text/image databases are described and the advancement of technology toward systems that manage large collections of documents made up of…

  20. TRMM Gridded Text Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) has many products that contain instantaneous or gridded rain rates often among many other parameters. However, these products because of their completeness can often seem intimidating to users just desiring surface rain rates. For example one of the gridded monthly products contains well over 200 parameters. It is clear that if only rain rates are desired, this many parameters might prove intimidating. In addition, for many good reasons these products are archived and currently distributed in HDF format. This also can be an inhibiting factor in using TRMM rain rates. To provide a simple format and isolate just the rain rates from the many other parameters, the TRMM product created a series of gridded products in ASCII text format. This paper describes the various text rain rate products produced. It provides detailed information about parameters and how they are calculated. It also gives detailed format information. These products are used in a number of applications with the TRMM processing system. The products are produced from the swath instantaneous rain rates and contain information from the three major TRMM instruments: radar, radiometer, and combined. They are simple to use, human readable, and small for downloading.

  1. Progress Report on the ASCII for Science Data, Airborne and Geospatial Working Groups of the 2014 ESDSWG for MEaSUREs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, K. D.; Krotkov, N. A.; Mattmann, C. A.; Boustani, M.; Law, E.; Conover, H.; Chen, G.; Olding, S. W.; Walter, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth Science Data Systems Working Groups (ESDSWG) were setup by NASA HQ 10 years ago. The role of the ESDSWG is to make recommendations relevant to NASA's Earth science data systems from users experiences. Each group works independently focussing on a unique topic. Participation in ESDSWG groups comes from a variety of NASA-funded science and technology projects, NASA information technology experts, affiliated contractor staff and other interested community members from academia and industry. Recommendations from the ESDSWG groups will enhance NASA's efforts to develop long term data products. The ASCII for Science Data Working Group (WG) will define a minimum set of information that should be included in ASCII file headers so that the users will be able to access the data using only the header information. After reviewing various use cases, such as field data and ASCII data exported from software tools, and reviewing ASCII data guidelines documentation, this WG will deliver guidelines for creating ASCII files that contain enough header information to allow the user to access the science data. The Airborne WG's goal is to improve airborne data access and use for NASA science. The first step is to evaluate the state of airborne data and make recommendations focusing on data delivery to the DAACs (data centers). The long term goal is to improve airborne data use for Earth Science research. Many data aircraft observations are reported in ASCII format. The ASCII and Airborne WGs seem like the same group, but the Airborne WG is concerned with maintaining and using airborne for science research, not just the data format. The Geospatial WG focus is on the interoperability issues of Geospatial Information System (GIS) and remotely sensed data, in particular, focusing on DAAC(s) data from NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. This WG will provide a set of tools (GIS libraries) to use with training and/or cookbooks through the use of Open Source technologies. A progress report on these groups from the 2014 ESDSWG will be presented.

  2. Text compression using hybrids of BWT and GBAM.

    PubMed

    Al-Nassiri, Amer

    2003-02-01

    In this paper we considered a theoretical evaluation of data and text compression algorithm based on the Burrows-Wheeler Transform (BWT) and General Bidirectional Associative Memory (GBAM). A new data and text lossless compression method, based on the combination of BWT1 and GBAM2 approaches, is presented. The algorithm was tested on many texts in different formats (ASCII and RTF). The compression ratio achieved is fairly good, on average 28-36%. Decompression is fast. PMID:12638122

  3. Text Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trybula, Walter J.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the state of research in text mining, focusing on newer developments. The intent is to describe the disparate investigations currently included under the term text mining and provide a cohesive structure for these efforts. A summary of research identifies key organizations responsible for pushing the development of text mining. A section…

  4. Text Superstructures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, Suzanne Bratcher

    1986-01-01

    Draws from the work of J. Kinneavy to identify text superstructures that are considered organizational patterns within larger structures: literary, expository, persuasive, and expressive writing. (HOD)

  5. Text Sets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giorgis, Cyndi; Johnson, Nancy J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents annotations of approximately 30 titles grouped in text sets. Defines a text set as five to ten books on a particular topic or theme. Discusses books on the following topics: living creatures; pirates; physical appearance; natural disasters; and the Irish potato famine. (SG)

  6. E-mail on the Move

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    PocketScience, Inc. was a member of the NASA Ames Technology Commercialization Center. Their PocketMail product is an email service that brings email capabilities to new hand-held devices. The PocketMail service uses technology originally developed at JPL. Through its involvement with the ATCC, PocketScience, Inc. was able to use this space probe communications technology and adapt it for advanced signal processing on Earth.

  7. Stalked by E-mail on Vacation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugeja, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In this essay, the author describes the difficulties email has introduced to the academic world, from monopolizing faculty's down time to adding a new dimension to interpersonal problems. He discusses the "withdrawal" symptoms he felt when he decided to go without email during a family vacation, and his realization, upon examining the emails sent…

  8. Using E-Mail across Computer Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Sunil

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the use of telecommunications technology to exchange electronic mail, files, and messages across different computer networks. Networks highlighted include ARPA Internet; BITNET; USENET; FidoNet; MCI Mail; and CompuServe. Examples of the successful use of networks in higher education are given. (Six references) (LRW)

  9. Reorganized text.

    PubMed

    2015-05-01

    Reorganized Text: In the Original Investigation titled “Patterns of Hospital Utilization for Head and Neck Cancer Care: Changing Demographics” posted online in the January 29, 2015, issue of JAMA Otolaryngology–Head & Neck Surgery (doi:10.1001 /jamaoto.2014.3603), information was copied within sections and text rearranged to accommodate Continuing Medical Education quiz formatting. The information from the topic statements of each paragraph in the Hypothesis Testing subsection of the Methods section was collected in a new first paragraph for that subsection, which reads as follows: “Several hypotheses regarding the causes of regionalization of HNCA care were tested using the NIS data: (1) increasing patient comorbidities over time, causing a shift in care to teaching institutions that would theoretically be better equipped to handle such increased comorbidities; (2) shifting of payer status; (3) increased proportion of prior radiation therapy; and (4) a higher fraction of more complex procedures being referred and performed at teaching institutions.” In addition, the phrase "As summarized in Table3," was added to the beginning of paragraph 6 of the Discussion section, and the call-out to Table 3 in the middle of that paragraph was deleted. Finally, paragraphs 6 and 7 of the Discussion section were combined. PMID:25996397

  10. Log ASCII Standard (LAS) Files for Geophysical (Gamma Ray) Wireline Well Logs and Their Application to Geologic Cross Section C-C' Through the Central Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trippi, Michael H.; Crangle, Robert D., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) regional geologic cross section C-C' (Ryder and others, 2008) displays key stratigraphic intervals in the central Appalachian basin. For this cross section, strata were correlated by using descriptions of well cuttings and gamma ray well log traces. This report summarizes the procedures used to convert gamma ray curves on paper well logs to the digital Log ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) Standard (LAS) format using the third-party software application Neuralog. The procedures could be used with other geophysical wireline logs also. The creation of digital LAS files from paper well logs by using Neuralog is very helpful, especially when dealing with older logs with limited or nonexistent digital data. The LAS files from the gamma ray logs of 11 wells used to construct cross section C-C' are included in this report. They may be downloaded from the index page as a single ZIP file.

  11. TARFOX UWC131A (ASCII)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-25

    ... Parameters: Aerosol Backscattering Coeff Aerosol Light Scattering Coeff Cloud Condensation Nuclei Droplet Concentration ... Radius Liquid Water Content Ozone (O3) Mixing Ratio Particle Number Concentration Order Data: ASDC Order Tool: ...

  12. TRMM .25 deg x .25 deg Gridded Precipitation Text Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich; Kelley, Owen

    2009-01-01

    Since the launch of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the Precipitation Measurement Missions science team has endeavored to provide TRMM precipitation retrievals in a variety of formats that are more easily usable by the broad science community than the standard Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) in which TRMM data is produced and archived. At the request of users, the Precipitation Processing System (PPS) has developed a .25 x .25 gridded product in an easily used ASCII text format. The entire TRMM mission data has been made available in this format. The paper provides the details of this new precipitation product that is designated with the TRMM designator 3G68.25. The format is packaged into daily files. It provides hourly precipitation information from the TRMM microwave imager (TMI), precipitation radar (PR), and TMI/PR combined rain retrievals. A major advantage of this approach is the inclusion only of rain data, compression when a particular grid has no rain from the PR or combined, and its direct ASCII text format. For those interested only in rain retrievals and whether rain is convection or stratiform, these products provide a huge reduction in the data volume inherent in the standard TRMM products. This paper provides examples of the 3G68 data products and their uses. It also provides information about C tools that can be used to aggregate daily files into larger time samples. In addition, it describes the possibilities inherent in the spatial sampling which allows resampling into coarser spatial sampling. The paper concludes with information about downloading the gridded text data products.

  13. LOOK- A TEXT FILE DISPLAY PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavrus, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The LOOK program was developed to permit a user to examine a text file in a psuedo-random access manner. Many engineering and scientific programs generate large amounts of printed output. Often this output needs to be examined in only a few places. On mini-computers (like the DEC VAX) high-speed printers are usually at a premium. One alternative is to save the output in a text file and examine it with a text editor. The slowness of a text editor, the possibility of inadvertently changing the output, and other factors make this an unsatisfactory solution. The LOOK program provides the user with a means of rapidly examining the contents of an ASCII text file. LOOK's basis of operation is to open the text file for input only and then access it in a block-wise fashion. LOOK handles the text formatting and displays the text lines on the screen. The user can move forward or backward in the file by a given number of lines or blocks. LOOK also provides the ability to "scroll" the text at various speeds in the forward or backward directions. The user can perform a search for a string (or a combination of up to 10 strings) in a forward or backward direction. Also, user selected portions of text may be extracted and submitted to print or placed in a file. Additional features available to the LOOK user include: cancellation of an operation with a keystroke, user definable keys, switching mode of operation (e.g. 80/132 column), on-line help facility, trapping broadcast messages, and the ability to spawn a sub-process to carry out DCL functions without leaving LOOK. The LOOK program is written in FORTRAN 77 and MACRO ASSEMBLER for interactive execution and has been implemented on a DEC VAX computer using VAX/VMS with a central memory requirement of approximately 430K of 8 bit bytes. LOOK operation is terminal independent but will take advantage of the features of the DEC VT100 terminal if available. LOOK was developed in 1983.

  14. Writing Home/Decolonizing Text(s)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asher, Nina

    2009-01-01

    The article draws on postcolonial and feminist theories, combined with critical reflection and autobiography, and argues for generating decolonizing texts as one way to write and reclaim home in a postcolonial world. Colonizers leave home to seek power and control elsewhere, and the colonized suffer loss of home as they know it. This dislocation

  15. Writing Home/Decolonizing Text(s)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asher, Nina

    2009-01-01

    The article draws on postcolonial and feminist theories, combined with critical reflection and autobiography, and argues for generating decolonizing texts as one way to write and reclaim home in a postcolonial world. Colonizers leave home to seek power and control elsewhere, and the colonized suffer loss of home as they know it. This dislocation…

  16. Native Language Processing using Exegy Text Miner

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, J

    2007-10-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's New Architectures Testbed recently evaluated Exegy's Text Miner appliance to assess its applicability to high-performance, automated native language analysis. The evaluation was performed with support from the Computing Applications and Research Department in close collaboration with Global Security programs, and institutional activities in native language analysis. The Exegy Text Miner is a special-purpose device for detecting and flagging user-supplied patterns of characters, whether in streaming text or in collections of documents at very high rates. Patterns may consist of simple lists of words or complex expressions with sub-patterns linked by logical operators. These searches are accomplished through a combination of specialized hardware (i.e., one or more field-programmable gates arrays in addition to general-purpose processors) and proprietary software that exploits these individual components in an optimal manner (through parallelism and pipelining). For this application the Text Miner has performed accurately and reproducibly at high speeds approaching those documented by Exegy in its technical specifications. The Exegy Text Miner is primarily intended for the single-byte ASCII characters used in English, but at a technical level its capabilities are language-neutral and can be applied to multi-byte character sets such as those found in Arabic and Chinese. The system is used for searching databases or tracking streaming text with respect to one or more lexicons. In a real operational environment it is likely that data would need to be processed separately for each lexicon or search technique. However, the searches would be so fast that multiple passes should not be considered as a limitation a priori. Indeed, it is conceivable that large databases could be searched as often as necessary if new queries were deemed worthwhile. This project is concerned with evaluating the Exegy Text Miner installed in the New Architectures Testbed running under software version 2.0. The concrete goals of the evaluation were to test the speed and accuracy of the Exegy and explore ways that it could be employed in current or future text-processing projects at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This study extended beyond this to evaluate its suitability for processing foreign language sources. The scope of this study was limited to the capabilities of the Exegy Text Miner in the file search mode and does not attempt simulating the streaming mode. Since the capabilities of the machine are invariant to the choice of input mode and since timing should not depend on this choice, it was felt that the added effort was not necessary for this restricted study.

  17. Contextual Text Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mei, Qiaozhu

    2009-01-01

    With the dramatic growth of text information, there is an increasing need for powerful text mining systems that can automatically discover useful knowledge from text. Text is generally associated with all kinds of contextual information. Those contexts can be explicit, such as the time and the location where a blog article is written, and the

  18. Contextual Text Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mei, Qiaozhu

    2009-01-01

    With the dramatic growth of text information, there is an increasing need for powerful text mining systems that can automatically discover useful knowledge from text. Text is generally associated with all kinds of contextual information. Those contexts can be explicit, such as the time and the location where a blog article is written, and the…

  19. Text encryption via double-random phase-encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Jun; Ling, Shenggui; Alam, Mohammad S.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, double-random phase-encoding based image hiding method was employed to encrypt and hide text. The ASCII codes of the secret text information was denoted as binary, and then transformed to a 2-dimensional array in the form of an image. Each element in the transformed array has a value between 0 and 255, where the highest 2 bits or the highest 4 bits were stored with the binary bits of the text information, while the lower bits were filled with binary bits. Then, the double-random phase-encoding method was used to encode the transformed array, and the encoded array was hidden into an expanded cover image to achieve text information hiding. Experimental results show that the secret text can be recovered accurately with the ratio of 100% and 99.89% by storing the binary bits of the text information to the highest 2 bits and the highest 4 bits of the transformed array, respectively. By employing the optical information processing method, the proposed method can improve the security of text information transmission, while keeping high hiding capacity.

  20. Questioning the Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Stephanie

    2001-01-01

    One way teachers can improve students' reading comprehension is to teach them to think while reading, questioning the text and carrying on an inner conversation. This involves: choosing the text for questioning; introducing the strategy to the class; modeling thinking aloud and marking the text with stick-on notes; and allowing time for guided…

  1. Creating Vocative Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicol, Jennifer J.

    2008-01-01

    Vocative texts are expressive poetic texts that strive to show rather than tell, that communicate felt knowledge, and that appeal to the senses. They are increasingly used by researchers to present qualitative findings, but little has been written about how to create such texts. To this end, excerpts from an inquiry into the experience and meaning…

  2. Text Coherence in Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Yanping

    2009-01-01

    In the thesis a coherent text is defined as a continuity of senses of the outcome of combining concepts and relations into a network composed of knowledge space centered around main topics. And the author maintains that in order to obtain the coherence of a target language text from a source text during the process of translation, a translator can

  3. E-Alerts: Energy (environmental studies). E-mail newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    The paper discussed air, noise, water, and solid waste pollution and pollution control from energy resource development, fuel production, energy production, and energy use; and environmental impacts of energy production and use.

  4. Clinician-patient E-mail communication: challenges for reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Komives, Eugenie M

    2005-01-01

    Clinicians are rapidly gaining experience with online clinician-patient consultation, and more tools are becoming available to support these efforts. In addition, we now have evidence that using electronic communication is cost-effective to payers and appealing to patients and providers. At present, there appear to be few barriers to the adoption of these solutions for practices that use other online services. Security concerns can easily be overcome by using programs described in this commentary. Larger and longer studies that evaluate the benefits and cost savings in more detail may help convince other payers and providers of the utility of the Web-based programs. More studies are needed to understand the effect of dinician-patient electronic communication on the costs of caring for chronic illness. When these solutions also include support tools, such as electronic prescribing, which could improve patient safety and quality of care, they should be encouraged. In their article entitled, "Electrons in Flight-Email between Doctors and Patients," Delbanco and Sands postulate that the future of e-communication in medicine will be integrated with a patient-controlled health record and will include secure synchronous and asynchronous communication, video conferencing and messaging, instant transcription into the written record, full-patient access to the record, translation into different languages, connectivity to multiple data sources, incorporation of multi-media educational materials. It-will also allow data from home-based diagnostic technology to be sent to clinicians. "Electronic communication will move medicine inexorably toward such transparency, enabling doctors and patients to share knowledge, responsibility, and decision-making more equally. We need to explore rapidly how this change will affect the quality of care for patients and the quality of life for doctors." The widespread dependence on Internet-based electronic communication to support a variety of commercial, educational, and entertainment needs and interests offers us an opportunity to develop innovative approaches to some long-standing problems-assuring the accessibility of clinicians to their patients and the effectiveness and timeliness of communication between them. It is exciting that we now have well-documented examples of how these new technologies can be used to enhance the quality of primary care practice in both large and small practice organizations. PMID:16130953

  5. Keeping It Simple: The Case for E-Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haimovic, Gila

    The Open University of Israel (OUI) is a distance education institution that offers over 250 computer-mediated courses through the Internet. All OUI students must pass an English reading comprehension exemption exam or take the University's English reading comprehension courses. Because reading instruction differs from content instruction,

  6. E-Mail Chronicles of a New Instructor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papajohn, Dean; Cao, Zhiying

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that a teaching assistantship combined with mentoring can help advance a graduate student from learner to colleague, and that electronic mail opens new ways for mentoring graduate students. Discusses emails between a graduate student and faculty mentor on separate campuses that illustrate various characteristics of the stages of teacher…

  7. Using E-Mail To Write about Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tichenor, Mercedes S.; Jewell, Mary Jean

    2001-01-01

    Describes a collaborative writing project between 13 college and 21 elementary students that engaged them in mathematical discourse via electronic mail. Offers recommendations for teachers wanting to replicate the program. (Contains 11 references.) (Author/JOW)

  8. Lightweight, mobile E-mail for intra-clinic communication.

    PubMed Central

    Acuff, R. D.; Fagan, L. M.; Rindfleisch, T. C.; Levitt, B. J.; Ford, P. M.

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a mobile messaging system designed for use in the clinic setting. The system is designed to facilitate quick, informal, interactions that occur in a clinical setting, e.g., requests for assistance or information. The system includes safeguards to make sure that the sender of a message is aware if a message is not read in a timely fashion. Evaluation of the system shows message delivery was about 50% slower than our target of 30 seconds. Although the mobile device used is fairly small when combined with a radio unit, it is too bulky and users did not necessarily carry the system with them. This led to delays (over eleven minutes on average) before messages were seen. We expect that improvements in hardware and clinical software will lead to more common use of such adjunct software systems. PMID:9357721

  9. Business E-Mail Communication: Some Emerging Tendencies in Register.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gimenez, Julio C.

    2000-01-01

    Investigates whether the spoken nature of electronic mail messages has already started to affect business written communication. Examines register and context of the language as well as the style used in commercial electronic mail. (Author/VWL)

  10. Archiving Writers' Work in the Age of E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolowich, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The job of literary archivist is changing as paper manuscripts yield to laptops, Blackberry's, and Facebook content, and digital preservation lets scholars learn more about authors' creative process than ever before. Personal computers and external storage devices have been around for more than a quarter-century, but only now, as the famous

  11. Politeness Strategies in Collaborative E-Mail Exchanges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinagre, Margarita

    2008-01-01

    Computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) has been the subject of a wide range of studies over the last twenty years. Previous research suggests that CSCL exchanges can facilitate group-based learning and knowledge construction among learners who are in different geographical locations [Littleton, K. & Whitelock, D. (2004). "Guiding the…

  12. E-Mail in the Writing Class: Promoting Student Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Marjorie

    A Valparaiso University (Indiana) computer network was used to investigate the use of campus electronic mail to encourage students in English-as-a-Second-Language reading and writing classes to increase communication among themselves, to make homework assignments more interesting, and to familiarize students with on-line composing and editing.…

  13. Archiving Writers' Work in the Age of E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolowich, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The job of literary archivist is changing as paper manuscripts yield to laptops, Blackberry's, and Facebook content, and digital preservation lets scholars learn more about authors' creative process than ever before. Personal computers and external storage devices have been around for more than a quarter-century, but only now, as the famous…

  14. E-Mail in Academia: Expectations, Use, and Instructional Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Meredith; Hanson-Baldauf, Dana

    2008-01-01

    The popularity of and reliance on emergent computer-mediated communication technologies such as instant messaging, blogs, and social networks have arguably widened the generation gap between faculty and traditional undergraduate students. Marc Prensky defined this generational technology divide by coining the terms "digital natives" and "digital…

  15. E-Alerts: Material sciences. E-mail newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    Contents contained here are: Ablative Materials and Ablation; Adhesives and Sealants; Carbon and Graphite; Ceramics, Refractories, and Glass; Coatings, Colorants, and Finishes; Composite Materials; Corrosion and Corrosion Inhibition; Elastomers; Fibers and Textiles; Iron and Iron Alloys; Lubricants and Hydraulic Fluids; Materials Degradation and Fouling; Miscellaneous Materials; Nonferrous Metals and Alloys.

  16. Cross-Cultural Analysis of E-Mail Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shachaf, Pnina; Meho, Lokman I.; Hara, Noriko

    2007-01-01

    Studies that examined virtual reference and its potential for collaboration have by and large represented experiences in western English-speaking countries. This article reports the results of a three-nation (Israel, Japan, and Lebanon) comparative analysis to bridge this research gap. Similarities and differences between these countries highlight…

  17. Text File Comparator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotler, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    File Comparator program IFCOMP, is text file comparator for IBM OS/VScompatable systems. IFCOMP accepts as input two text files and produces listing of differences in pseudo-update form. IFCOMP is very useful in monitoring changes made to software at the source code level.

  18. Making Sense of Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Rebecca G.

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the triadic nature regarding meaning construction of texts. Grounded in Rosenblatt's (1995; 1998; 2004) Transactional Theory, research conducted in an undergraduate Language Arts curriculum course revealed that when presented with unfamiliar texts, students used prior experiences, social interactions, and literary…

  19. Composing Texts, Composing Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perl, Sondra

    1994-01-01

    Using composition, reader response, critical, and feminist theories, a teacher demonstrates how adult students respond critically to literary texts and how teachers must critically analyze the texts of their teaching practice. Both students and teachers can use writing to bring their experiences to interpretation. (SK)

  20. Solar Energy Project: Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    The text is a compilation of background information which should be useful to teachers wishing to obtain some technical information on solar technology. Twenty sections are included which deal with topics ranging from discussion of the sun's composition to the legal implications of using solar energy. The text is intended to provide useful…

  1. The Perfect Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Ruth

    1998-01-01

    A chemistry teacher describes the elements of the ideal chemistry textbook. The perfect text is focused and helps students draw a coherent whole out of the myriad fragments of information and interpretation. The text would show chemistry as the central science necessary for understanding other sciences and would also root chemistry firmly in the…

  2. YORUBA, INTERMEDIATE TEXTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCLURE, H. DAVID; OYEWALE, JOHN O.

    THIS COURSE IS BASED ON A SERIES OF BRIEF MONOLOGUES RECORDED BY A WESTERN-EDUCATED NATIVE SPEAKER OF YORUBA FROM THE OYO AREA. THE TAPES CONSTITUTE THE CENTRAL PART OF THE COURSE, WITH THE TEXT INTENDED AS SUPPLEMENTARY AND AUXILIARY MATERIAL. THE TEXT TOPICS WERE CHOSEN FOR THEIR SPECIAL RELEVANCE TO PEACE CORPS VOLUNTEERS WHO EXPECT TO USE…

  3. Explaining the use of text-based communication media: an examination of three theories of media use.

    PubMed

    Park, Namkee; Chung, Jae Eun; Lee, Seungyoon

    2012-07-01

    The present study examined the factors associated with individuals' use of three different text-based communication media: e-mail, cell-phone texting, and Facebook Wall postings. Three theoretical perspectives, including media richness theory, uses and gratifications, and perceived network effects, were examined. Using data from a survey of college students (N=280), the study found that the theoretical constructs from these theories play different roles when applied to different technologies. The results suggest that a simultaneous consideration of technological attributes, users' motivations, and social circumstances in which users select and use the technology is useful for fully understanding the dynamics of the selection and the use of a given technology. PMID:22780995

  4. Thinking in Pixels: An Editing System for Electronic Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhlenschmidt, Sally; Mosby, Charmaine

    2001-01-01

    Explores implications of increased publication options and examines conceptual distinctions among Fixed-Format, Electronic, and Meta-media Editors. Proposes a keyboard editing/commenting technique that will work across platforms and software programs and in every mode of electronic communication including simple e-mail. Suggests an increased…

  5. Thinking in Pixels: An Editing System for Electronic Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhlenschmidt, Sally; Mosby, Charmaine

    2001-01-01

    Explores implications of increased publication options and examines conceptual distinctions among Fixed-Format, Electronic, and Meta-media Editors. Proposes a keyboard editing/commenting technique that will work across platforms and software programs and in every mode of electronic communication including simple e-mail. Suggests an increased

  6. Noisy text categorization.

    PubMed

    Vinciarelli, Alessandro

    2005-12-01

    This work presents categorization experiments performed over noisy texts. By noisy, we mean any text obtained through an extraction process (affected by errors) from media other than digital texts (e.g., transcriptions of speech recordings extracted with a recognition system). The performance of a categorization system over the clean and noisy (Word Error Rate between approximately 10 and approximately 50 percent) versions of the same documents is compared. The noisy texts are obtained through handwriting recognition and simulation of optical character recognition. The results show that the performance loss is acceptable for Recall values up to 60-70 percent depending on the noise sources. New measures of the extraction process performance, allowing a better explanation of the categorization results, are proposed. PMID:16355657

  7. Machine Translation from Text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habash, Nizar; Olive, Joseph; Christianson, Caitlin; McCary, John

    Machine translation (MT) from text, the topic of this chapter, is perhaps the heart of the GALE project. Beyond being a well defined application that stands on its own, MT from text is the link between the automatic speech recognition component and the distillation component. The focus of MT in GALE is on translating from Arabic or Chinese to English. The three languages represent a wide range of linguistic diversity and make the GALE MT task rather challenging and exciting.

  8. The earliest medical texts.

    PubMed

    Frey, E F

    The first civilization known to have had an extensive study of medicine and to leave written records of its practices and procedures was that of ancient Egypt. The oldest extant Egyptian medical texts are six papyri from the period between 2000 B.C. and 1500 B.C.: the Kahun Medical Papyrus, the Ramesseum IV and Ramesseum V Papyri, the Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus, The Ebers Medical Papyrus and the Hearst Medical Papyrus. These texts, most of them based on older texts dating possibly from 3000 B.C., are comparatively free of the magician's approach to treating illness. Egyptian medicine influenced the medicine of neighboring cultures, including the culture of ancient Greece. From Greece, its influence spread onward, thereby affecting Western civilization significantly. PMID:2463895

  9. Text Exchange System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. V.; Hanson, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Text Exchange System (TES) exchanges and maintains organized textual information including source code, documentation, data, and listings. System consists of two computer programs and definition of format for information storage. Comprehensive program used to create, read, and maintain TES files. TES developed to meet three goals: First, easy and efficient exchange of programs and other textual data between similar and dissimilar computer systems via magnetic tape. Second, provide transportable management system for textual information. Third, provide common user interface, over wide variety of computing systems, for all activities associated with text exchange.

  10. Taming the Wild Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allyn, Pam

    2012-01-01

    As a well-known advocate for promoting wider reading and reading engagement among all children--and founder of a reading program for foster children--Pam Allyn knows that struggling readers often face any printed text with fear and confusion, like Max in the book Where the Wild Things Are. She argues that teachers need to actively create a

  11. Text as Image.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woal, Michael; Corn, Marcia Lynn

    As electronically mediated communication becomes more prevalent, print is regaining the original pictorial qualities which graphemes (written signs) lost when primitive pictographs (or picture writing) and ideographs (simplified graphemes used to communicate ideas as well as to represent objects) evolved into first written, then printed, texts of

  12. Taming the Wild Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allyn, Pam

    2012-01-01

    As a well-known advocate for promoting wider reading and reading engagement among all children--and founder of a reading program for foster children--Pam Allyn knows that struggling readers often face any printed text with fear and confusion, like Max in the book Where the Wild Things Are. She argues that teachers need to actively create a…

  13. Summarizing Expository Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westby, Carol; Culatta, Barbara; Lawrence, Barbara; Hall-Kenyon, Kendra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews the literature on students' developing skills in summarizing expository texts and describes strategies for evaluating students' expository summaries. Evaluation outcomes are presented for a professional development project aimed at helping teachers develop new techniques for teaching summarization. Methods: Strategies…

  14. Polymorphous Perversity in Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Eilola, Johndan

    2012-01-01

    Here's the tricky part: If we teach ourselves and our students that texts are made to be broken apart, remixed, remade, do we lose the polymorphous perversity that brought us pleasure in the first place? Does the pleasure of transgression evaporate when the borders are opened?

  15. Text Mining for Neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirupattur, Naveen; Lapish, Christopher C.; Mukhopadhyay, Snehasis

    2011-06-01

    Text mining, sometimes alternately referred to as text analytics, refers to the process of extracting high-quality knowledge from the analysis of textual data. Text mining has wide variety of applications in areas such as biomedical science, news analysis, and homeland security. In this paper, we describe an approach and some relatively small-scale experiments which apply text mining to neuroscience research literature to find novel associations among a diverse set of entities. Neuroscience is a discipline which encompasses an exceptionally wide range of experimental approaches and rapidly growing interest. This combination results in an overwhelmingly large and often diffuse literature which makes a comprehensive synthesis difficult. Understanding the relations or associations among the entities appearing in the literature not only improves the researchers current understanding of recent advances in their field, but also provides an important computational tool to formulate novel hypotheses and thereby assist in scientific discoveries. We describe a methodology to automatically mine the literature and form novel associations through direct analysis of published texts. The method first retrieves a set of documents from databases such as PubMed using a set of relevant domain terms. In the current study these terms yielded a set of documents ranging from 160,909 to 367,214 documents. Each document is then represented in a numerical vector form from which an Association Graph is computed which represents relationships between all pairs of domain terms, based on co-occurrence. Association graphs can then be subjected to various graph theoretic algorithms such as transitive closure and cycle (circuit) detection to derive additional information, and can also be visually presented to a human researcher for understanding. In this paper, we present three relatively small-scale problem-specific case studies to demonstrate that such an approach is very successful in replicating a neuroscience expert's mental model of object-object associations entirely by means of text mining. These preliminary results provide the confidence that this type of text mining based research approach provides an extremely powerful tool to better understand the literature and drive novel discovery for the neuroscience community.

  16. Health information text characteristics.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Gondy; Eryilmaz, Evren; Laroya, Benjamin T

    2006-01-01

    Millions of people search online for medical text, but these texts are often too complicated to understand. Readability evaluations are mostly based on surface metrics such as character or words counts and sentence syntax, but content is ignored. We compared four types of documents, easy and difficult WebMD documents, patient blogs, and patient educational material, for surface and content-based metrics. The documents differed significantly in reading grade levels and vocabulary used. WebMD pages with high readability also used terminology that was more consumer-friendly. Moreover, difficult documents are harder to understand due to their grammar and word choice and because they discuss more difficult topics. This indicates that we can simplify many documents by focusing on word choice in addition to sentence structure, however, for difficult documents this may be insufficient. PMID:17238387

  17. The Texting Principal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Susan Stone

    2009-01-01

    The author was appointed principal of a large, urban comprehensive high school in spring 2008. One of the first things she had to figure out was how she would develop a connection with her students when there were so many of them--nearly 2,000--and only one of her. Texts may be exchanged more quickly than having a conversation over the phone,

  18. Happiness in texting times

    PubMed Central

    Hevey, David; Hand, Karen; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Assessing national levels of happiness has become an important research and policy issue in recent years. We examined happiness and satisfaction in Ireland using phone text messaging to collect large-scale longitudinal data from 3,093 members of the general Irish population. For six consecutive weeks, participants’ happiness and satisfaction levels were assessed. For four consecutive weeks (weeks 2–5) a different random third of the sample got feedback on the previous week’s mean happiness and satisfaction ratings. Text messaging proved a feasible means of assessing happiness and satisfaction, with almost three quarters (73%) of participants completing all assessments. Those who received feedback on the previous week’s mean ratings were eight times more likely to complete the subsequent assessments than those not receiving feedback. Providing such feedback data on mean levels of happiness and satisfaction did not systematically bias subsequent ratings either toward or away from these normative anchors. Texting is a simple and effective means to collect population level happiness and satisfaction data. PMID:26441804

  19. Recognizing musical text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Alastair T.; Brown, B. M.; Thorne, M. P.

    1993-08-01

    This paper reports on some recent developments in a software product that recognizes printed music notation. There are a number of computer systems available which assist in the task of printing music; however the full potential of these systems cannot be realized until the musical text has been entered into the computer. It is this problem that we address in this paper. The software we describe, which uses computationally inexpensive methods, is designed to analyze a music score, previously read by a flat bed scanner, and to extract the musical information that it contains. The paper discusses the methods used to recognize the musical text: these involve sampling the image at strategic points and using this information to estimate the musical symbol. It then discusses some hard problems that have been encountered during the course of the research; for example the recognition of chords and note clusters. It also reports on the progress that has been made in solving these problems and concludes with a discussion of work that needs to be undertaken over the next five years in order to transform this research prototype into a commercial product.

  20. Reading Text While Driving

    PubMed Central

    Horrey, William J.; Hoffman, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, we investigated how drivers adapt secondary-task initiation and time-sharing behavior when faced with fluctuating driving demands. Background Reading text while driving is particularly detrimental; however, in real-world driving, drivers actively decide when to perform the task. Method In a test track experiment, participants were free to decide when to read messages while driving along a straight road consisting of an area with increased driving demands (demand zone) followed by an area with low demands. A message was made available shortly before the vehicle entered the demand zone. We manipulated the type of driving demands (baseline, narrow lane, pace clock, combined), message format (no message, paragraph, parsed), and the distance from the demand zone when the message was available (near, far). Results In all conditions, drivers started reading messages (drivers’ first glance to the display) before entering or before leaving the demand zone but tended to wait longer when faced with increased driving demands. While reading messages, drivers looked more or less off road, depending on types of driving demands. Conclusions For task initiation, drivers avoid transitions from low to high demands; however, they are not discouraged when driving demands are already elevated. Drivers adjust time-sharing behavior according to driving demands while performing secondary tasks. Nonetheless, such adjustment may be less effective when total demands are high. Application This study helps us to understand a driver’s role as an active controller in the context of distracted driving and provides insights for developing distraction interventions. PMID:25850162

  1. Prediction of Fault-Prone Software Modules Using a Generic Text Discriminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Osamu; Kikuno, Tohru

    This paper describes a novel approach for detecting fault-prone modules using a spam filtering technique. Fault-prone module detection in source code is important for the assurance of software quality. Most previous fault-prone detection approaches have been based on using software metrics. Such approaches, however, have difficulties in collecting the metrics and constructing mathematical models based on the metrics. Because of the increase in the need for spam e-mail detection, the spam filtering technique has progressed as a convenient and effective technique for text mining. In our approach, fault-prone modules are detected in such a way that the source code modules are considered text files and are applied to the seam filter directly. To show the applicability of our approach, we conducted experimental applications using source code repositories of Java based open source developments. The result of experiments shows that our approach can correctly predict 78% of actual fault-prone modules as fault-prone.

  2. Important Text Characteristics for Early-Grades Text Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Jill; Elmore, Jeff; Koons, Heather; Hiebert, Elfrieda H.; Bowen, Kimberly; Sanford-Moore, Eleanor E.; Stenner, A. Jackson

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core set a standard for all children to read increasingly complex texts throughout schooling. The purpose of the present study was to explore text characteristics specifically in relation to early-grades text complexity. Three hundred fifty primary-grades texts were selected and digitized. Twenty-two text characteristics were identified

  3. Important Text Characteristics for Early-Grades Text Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Jill; Elmore, Jeff; Koons, Heather; Hiebert, Elfrieda H.; Bowen, Kimberly; Sanford-Moore, Eleanor E.; Stenner, A. Jackson

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core set a standard for all children to read increasingly complex texts throughout schooling. The purpose of the present study was to explore text characteristics specifically in relation to early-grades text complexity. Three hundred fifty primary-grades texts were selected and digitized. Twenty-two text characteristics were identified…

  4. Improving text recognition by distinguishing scene and overlay text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quehl, Bernhard; Yang, Haojin; Sack, Harald

    2015-02-01

    Video texts are closely related to the content of a video. They provide a valuable source for indexing and interpretation of video data. Text detection and recognition task in images or videos typically distinguished between overlay and scene text. Overlay text is artificially superimposed on the image at the time of editing and scene text is text captured by the recording system. Typically, OCR systems are specialized on one kind of text type. However, in video images both types of text can be found. In this paper, we propose a method to automatically distinguish between overlay and scene text to dynamically control and optimize post processing steps following text detection. Based on a feature combination a Support Vector Machine (SVM) is trained to classify scene and overlay text. We show how this distinction in overlay and scene text improves the word recognition rate. Accuracy of the proposed methods has been evaluated by using publicly available test data sets.

  5. Guiding Students through Expository Text with Text Feature Walks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Michelle J.; Clausen-Grace, Nicki

    2010-01-01

    The Text Feature Walk is a structure created and employed by the authors that guides students in the reading of text features in order to access prior knowledge, make connections, and set a purpose for reading expository text. Results from a pilot study are described in order to illustrate the benefits of using the Text Feature Walk over…

  6. Text analysis methods, text analysis apparatuses, and articles of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Whitney, Paul D; Willse, Alan R; Lopresti, Charles A; White, Amanda M

    2014-10-28

    Text analysis methods, text analysis apparatuses, and articles of manufacture are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a text analysis method includes accessing information indicative of data content of a collection of text comprising a plurality of different topics, using a computing device, analyzing the information indicative of the data content, and using results of the analysis, identifying a presence of a new topic in the collection of text.

  7. Mining the Text: 34 Text Features that Can Ease or Obstruct Text Comprehension and Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Sheida

    2012-01-01

    This article presents 34 characteristics of texts and tasks ("text features") that can make continuous (prose), noncontinuous (document), and quantitative texts easier or more difficult for adolescents and adults to comprehend and use. The text features were identified by examining the assessment tasks and associated texts in the national

  8. Mining the Text: 34 Text Features that Can Ease or Obstruct Text Comprehension and Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Sheida

    2012-01-01

    This article presents 34 characteristics of texts and tasks ("text features") that can make continuous (prose), noncontinuous (document), and quantitative texts easier or more difficult for adolescents and adults to comprehend and use. The text features were identified by examining the assessment tasks and associated texts in the national…

  9. The Challenge of Challenging Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Timothy; Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards emphasize the value of teaching students to engage with complex text. But what exactly makes a text complex, and how can teachers help students develop their ability to learn from such texts? The authors of this article discuss five factors that determine text complexity: vocabulary, sentence structure, coherence,

  10. Technical Vocabulary in Specialised Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Teresa Mihwa; Nation, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Describes two studies of technical vocabulary, one using an anatomy text and the other an applied linguistics text. Technical vocabulary was found by rating words in the texts on a four-step scale. Found that technical vocabulary made up a very substantial proportion of both the different words and the running words in texts. (Author/VWL)

  11. Texts in Homes and Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pahl, Kate

    This paper considers how children's text making is shaped by the environment in which the texts are made. By considering texts made in classrooms and texts made in homes, the paper explores how classrooms and homes interact with children's (6-7 year old boys) reflective processes as they create artifacts--drawings, models, and writings. The paper…

  12. Text Complexity and the CCSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspen Institute, 2012

    2012-01-01

    What is meant by text complexity is a measurement of how challenging a particular text is to read. There are a myriad of different ways of explaining what makes text challenging to read, from the sophistication of the vocabulary employed to the length of its sentences to even measurements of how the text as a whole coheres. Research shows that no…

  13. The Challenge of Challenging Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Timothy; Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards emphasize the value of teaching students to engage with complex text. But what exactly makes a text complex, and how can teachers help students develop their ability to learn from such texts? The authors of this article discuss five factors that determine text complexity: vocabulary, sentence structure, coherence,…

  14. Text-Attentional Convolutional Neural Network for Scene Text Detection.

    PubMed

    He, Tong; Huang, Weilin; Qiao, Yu; Yao, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Recent deep learning models have demonstrated strong capabilities for classifying text and non-text components in natural images. They extract a high-level feature globally computed from a whole image component (patch), where the cluttered background information may dominate true text features in the deep representation. This leads to less discriminative power and poorer robustness. In this paper, we present a new system for scene text detection by proposing a novel text-attentional convolutional neural network (Text-CNN) that particularly focuses on extracting text-related regions and features from the image components. We develop a new learning mechanism to train the Text-CNN with multi-level and rich supervised information, including text region mask, character label, and binary text/non-text information. The rich supervision information enables the Text-CNN with a strong capability for discriminating ambiguous texts, and also increases its robustness against complicated background components. The training process is formulated as a multi-task learning problem, where low-level supervised information greatly facilitates the main task of text/non-text classification. In addition, a powerful low-level detector called contrast-enhancement maximally stable extremal regions (MSERs) is developed, which extends the widely used MSERs by enhancing intensity contrast between text patterns and background. This allows it to detect highly challenging text patterns, resulting in a higher recall. Our approach achieved promising results on the ICDAR 2013 data set, with an F-measure of 0.82, substantially improving the state-of-the-art results. PMID:27093723

  15. Binary/BCD-to-ASCII data converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    Converter inputs multiple precision binary words, converts data to multiple precision binary-coded decimal, and routes data back to computer. Converter base can be readily changed without need for new gate structure for each base changeover.

  16. Text analysis devices, articles of manufacture, and text analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Alan E; Hetzler, Elizabeth G; Nakamura, Grant C

    2013-05-28

    Text analysis devices, articles of manufacture, and text analysis methods are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a text analysis device includes processing circuitry configured to analyze initial text to generate a measurement basis usable in analysis of subsequent text, wherein the measurement basis comprises a plurality of measurement features from the initial text, a plurality of dimension anchors from the initial text and a plurality of associations of the measurement features with the dimension anchors, and wherein the processing circuitry is configured to access a viewpoint indicative of a perspective of interest of a user with respect to the analysis of the subsequent text, and wherein the processing circuitry is configured to use the viewpoint to generate the measurement basis.

  17. Text-Attentional Convolutional Neural Network for Scene Text Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tong; Huang, Weilin; Qiao, Yu; Yao, Jian

    2016-06-01

    Recent deep learning models have demonstrated strong capabilities for classifying text and non-text components in natural images. They extract a high-level feature computed globally from a whole image component (patch), where the cluttered background information may dominate true text features in the deep representation. This leads to less discriminative power and poorer robustness. In this work, we present a new system for scene text detection by proposing a novel Text-Attentional Convolutional Neural Network (Text-CNN) that particularly focuses on extracting text-related regions and features from the image components. We develop a new learning mechanism to train the Text-CNN with multi-level and rich supervised information, including text region mask, character label, and binary text/nontext information. The rich supervision information enables the Text-CNN with a strong capability for discriminating ambiguous texts, and also increases its robustness against complicated background components. The training process is formulated as a multi-task learning problem, where low-level supervised information greatly facilitates main task of text/non-text classification. In addition, a powerful low-level detector called Contrast- Enhancement Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (CE-MSERs) is developed, which extends the widely-used MSERs by enhancing intensity contrast between text patterns and background. This allows it to detect highly challenging text patterns, resulting in a higher recall. Our approach achieved promising results on the ICDAR 2013 dataset, with a F-measure of 0.82, improving the state-of-the-art results substantially.

  18. Text editor on a chip

    SciTech Connect

    Jung Wan Cho; Heung Kyu Lee

    1983-01-01

    The authors propose a processor which provides useful facilities for implementing text editing commands. The processor now being developed is a component of the general front-end editing system which parses the program text and processes the text. This processor attached to a conventional microcomputer system bus executes screen editing functions. Conventional text editing is a typical application of the microprocessors. But in this paper emphasis is given to the firmware and hardware processing of texts in order that the processor can be fabricated in a single VLSI chip. To increase the overall regularity and decrease the design cost, the basic instructions are text editing oriented with short basic cycles. 6 references.

  19. Text Editing in Chemistry Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngu, Bing Hiong; Low, Renae; Sweller, John

    2002-01-01

    Describes experiments with Australian high school students that investigated differences in performance on chemistry word problems between two learning strategies: text editing, and conventional problem solving. Concluded that text editing had no advantage over problem solving in stoichiometry problems, and that the suitability of a text editing…

  20. Too Dumb for Complex Texts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauerlein, Mark

    2011-01-01

    High school students' lack of experience and practice with reading complex texts is a primary cause of their difficulties with college-level reading. Filling the syllabus with digital texts does little to address this deficiency. Complex texts demand three dispositions from readers: a willingness to probe works characterized by dense meanings, the…

  1. Slippery Texts and Evolving Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    The idea of "slippery texts" provides a useful descriptor for materials that mutate and evolve across different media. Eight adult gamers, encountering the slippery text "American McGee's Alice," demonstrate a variety of ways in which players attempt to manage their attention as they encounter a new text with many resonances. The range of their…

  2. Text Editing in Chemistry Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngu, Bing Hiong; Low, Renae; Sweller, John

    2002-01-01

    Describes experiments with Australian high school students that investigated differences in performance on chemistry word problems between two learning strategies: text editing, and conventional problem solving. Concluded that text editing had no advantage over problem solving in stoichiometry problems, and that the suitability of a text editing

  3. Choosing Software for Text Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    Review of text processing software for microcomputers covers data entry, text editing, document formatting, and spelling and proofreading programs including "Wordstar,""PeachText,""PerfectWriter,""Select," and "The Word Plus.""The Whole Earth Software Catalog" and a new terminal to be manufactured for OCLC by IBM are mentioned. (EJS)

  4. Informational Text and the CCSS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspen Institute, 2012

    2012-01-01

    What constitutes an informational text covers a broad swath of different types of texts. Biographies & memoirs, speeches, opinion pieces & argumentative essays, and historical, scientific or technical accounts of a non-narrative nature are all included in what the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) envisions as informational text. Also included…

  5. Text Signals Influence Team Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.; Rysavy, Monica D.; Taricani, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory quasi-experimental investigation describes the influence of text signals on team visual map artifacts. In two course sections, four-member teams were given one of two print-based text passage versions on the course-related topic "Social influence in groups" downloaded from Wikipedia; this text had two paragraphs, each…

  6. Text Signals Influence Team Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.; Rysavy, Monica D.; Taricani, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory quasi-experimental investigation describes the influence of text signals on team visual map artifacts. In two course sections, four-member teams were given one of two print-based text passage versions on the course-related topic "Social influence in groups" downloaded from Wikipedia; this text had two paragraphs, each

  7. The Only Safe SMS Texting Is No SMS Texting.

    PubMed

    Toth, Cheryl; Sacopulos, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Many physicians and practice staff use short messaging service (SMS) text messaging to communicate with patients. But SMS text messaging is unencrypted, insecure, and does not meet HIPAA requirements. In addition, the short and abbreviated nature of text messages creates opportunities for misinterpretation, and can negatively impact patient safety and care. Until recently, asking patients to sign a statement that they understand and accept these risks--as well as having policies, device encryption, and cyber insurance in place--would have been enough to mitigate the risk of using SMS text in a medical practice. But new trends and policies have made SMS text messaging unsafe under any circumstance. This article explains these trends and policies, as well as why only secure texting or secure messaging should be used for physician-patient communication. PMID:26856033

  8. ParaText : scalable text analysis and visualization.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Stanton, Eric T.; Shead, Timothy M.

    2010-07-01

    Automated analysis of unstructured text documents (e.g., web pages, newswire articles, research publications, business reports) is a key capability for solving important problems in areas including decision making, risk assessment, social network analysis, intelligence analysis, scholarly research and others. However, as data sizes continue to grow in these areas, scalable processing, modeling, and semantic analysis of text collections becomes essential. In this paper, we present the ParaText text analysis engine, a distributed memory software framework for processing, modeling, and analyzing collections of unstructured text documents. Results on several document collections using hundreds of processors are presented to illustrate the exibility, extensibility, and scalability of the the entire process of text modeling from raw data ingestion to application analysis.

  9. Text Association Analysis and Ambiguity in Text Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhonde, S. B.; Paikrao, R. L.; Rahane, K. U.

    2010-11-01

    Text Mining is the process of analyzing a semantically rich document or set of documents to understand the content and meaning of the information they contain. The research in Text Mining will enhance human's ability to process massive quantities of information, and it has high commercial values. Firstly, the paper discusses the introduction of TM its definition and then gives an overview of the process of text mining and the applications. Up to now, not much research in text mining especially in concept/entity extraction has focused on the ambiguity problem. This paper addresses ambiguity issues in natural language texts, and presents a new technique for resolving ambiguity problem in extracting concept/entity from texts. In the end, it shows the importance of TM in knowledge discovery and highlights the up-coming challenges of document mining and the opportunities it offers.

  10. Using online computer tailoring to promote physical activity: a randomized trial of text, video, and combined intervention delivery modes.

    PubMed

    Soetens, Katja C M; Vandelanotte, Corneel; de Vries, Hein; Mummery, Kerry W

    2014-12-01

    Website-delivered interventions are increasingly used to deliver physical activity interventions, yet problems with engagement and retention result in reduced effectiveness. Hence, alternative modes of online intervention delivery need to be explored. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the acceptability and effectiveness of a computer-tailored physical activity intervention delivered on the Internet in 3 delivery modes: video, text, or both. Australian adults (N = 803), recruited through e-mail, were randomized into the three delivery modes and received personal physical activity advice. Intervention content was identical across groups. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used to compare the three groups regarding acceptability, website usability, and physical activity. Participants in the video group accepted the content of the physical activity advice significantly better (F = 5.59; p < .01), and spent significantly more time on the website (F = 21.19; p < .001) compared with the text and combination groups. Total physical activity improved significantly over time in all groups (F = 3.95; p < .01). Although the combination group increased physical activity the most, few significant differences between groups were observed. Providing video-tailored feedback has advantages over the conventional text-tailored interventions; however, this study revealed few behavioral differences. More studies, examining alternative delivery modes, that can overcome the limitations of the present study, are needed. PMID:24749983

  11. ParaText : scalable text modeling and analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Stanton, Eric T.; Shead, Timothy M.

    2010-06-01

    Automated processing, modeling, and analysis of unstructured text (news documents, web content, journal articles, etc.) is a key task in many data analysis and decision making applications. As data sizes grow, scalability is essential for deep analysis. In many cases, documents are modeled as term or feature vectors and latent semantic analysis (LSA) is used to model latent, or hidden, relationships between documents and terms appearing in those documents. LSA supplies conceptual organization and analysis of document collections by modeling high-dimension feature vectors in many fewer dimensions. While past work on the scalability of LSA modeling has focused on the SVD, the goal of our work is to investigate the use of distributed memory architectures for the entire text analysis process, from data ingestion to semantic modeling and analysis. ParaText is a set of software components for distributed processing, modeling, and analysis of unstructured text. The ParaText source code is available under a BSD license, as an integral part of the Titan toolkit. ParaText components are chained-together into data-parallel pipelines that are replicated across processes on distributed-memory architectures. Individual components can be replaced or rewired to explore different computational strategies and implement new functionality. ParaText functionality can be embedded in applications on any platform using the native C++ API, Python, or Java. The ParaText MPI Process provides a 'generic' text analysis pipeline in a command-line executable that can be used for many serial and parallel analysis tasks. ParaText can also be deployed as a web service accessible via a RESTful (HTTP) API. In the web service configuration, any client can access the functionality provided by ParaText using commodity protocols ... from standard web browsers to custom clients written in any language.

  12. Text analysis devices, articles of manufacture, and text analysis methods

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Alan E; Hetzler, Elizabeth G; Nakamura, Grant C

    2015-03-31

    Text analysis devices, articles of manufacture, and text analysis methods are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a text analysis device includes a display configured to depict visible images, and processing circuitry coupled with the display and wherein the processing circuitry is configured to access a first vector of a text item and which comprises a plurality of components, to access a second vector of the text item and which comprises a plurality of components, to weight the components of the first vector providing a plurality of weighted values, to weight the components of the second vector providing a plurality of weighted values, and to combine the weighted values of the first vector with the weighted values of the second vector to provide a third vector.

  13. Detection of text strings from mixed text/graphics images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chien-Hua; Papachristou, Christos A.

    2000-12-01

    A robust system for text strings separation from mixed text/graphics images is presented. Based on a union-find (region growing) strategy the algorithm is thus able to classify the text from graphics and adapts to changes in document type, language category (e.g., English, Chinese and Japanese), text font style and size, and text string orientation within digital images. In addition, it allows for a document skew that usually occurs in documents, without skew correction prior to discrimination while these proposed methods such a projection profile or run length coding are not always suitable for the condition. The method has been tested with a variety of printed documents from different origins with one common set of parameters, and the experimental results of the performance of the algorithm in terms of computational efficiency are demonstrated by using several tested images from the evaluation.

  14. Texting while driving: is speech-based text entry less risky than handheld text entry?

    PubMed

    He, J; Chaparro, A; Nguyen, B; Burge, R J; Crandall, J; Chaparro, B; Ni, R; Cao, S

    2014-11-01

    Research indicates that using a cell phone to talk or text while maneuvering a vehicle impairs driving performance. However, few published studies directly compare the distracting effects of texting using a hands-free (i.e., speech-based interface) versus handheld cell phone, which is an important issue for legislation, automotive interface design and driving safety training. This study compared the effect of speech-based versus handheld text entries on simulated driving performance by asking participants to perform a car following task while controlling the duration of a secondary text-entry task. Results showed that both speech-based and handheld text entries impaired driving performance relative to the drive-only condition by causing more variation in speed and lane position. Handheld text entry also increased the brake response time and increased variation in headway distance. Text entry using a speech-based cell phone was less detrimental to driving performance than handheld text entry. Nevertheless, the speech-based text entry task still significantly impaired driving compared to the drive-only condition. These results suggest that speech-based text entry disrupts driving, but reduces the level of performance interference compared to text entry with a handheld device. In addition, the difference in the distraction effect caused by speech-based and handheld text entry is not simply due to the difference in task duration. PMID:25089769

  15. Situational Interest in Literary Text

    PubMed

    Schraw

    1997-10-01

    This study examined relationships among text characteristics, situational interest, two measures of text understanding, and personal responses when reading a literary text. A factor analysis of ratings made after reading revealed six interrelated text characteristics. Of these, suspense, coherence and thematic complexity explained 54% of the variance in interest. Additional analyses found that situational interest was unrelated to a multiple choice test of main ideas; but was related to personal responses and holistic interpretations of the text. These results suggest that multiple aspects of literary texts are interesting to readers, and that interest is related to personal engagement variables, even when it is not related to the comprehension of main ideas. Copyright 1997Academic Press PMID:9356182

  16. Zum Uebersetzen fachlicher Texte (On the Translation of Technical Texts)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friederich, Wolf

    1975-01-01

    Reviews a 1974 East German publication on translation of scientific literature from Russian to German. Considers terminology, different standard levels of translation in East Germany, and other matters related to translation. (Text is in German.) (DH)

  17. Understanding and Teaching Complex Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Teachers in today's classrooms struggle every day to design instructional interventions that would build students' reading skills and strategies in order to ensure their comprehension of complex texts. Text complexity can be determined in both qualitative and quantitative ways. In this article, the authors describe various innovative…

  18. Improve Reading with Complex Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards have cast a renewed light on reading instruction, presenting teachers with the new requirements to teach close reading of complex texts. Teachers and administrators should consider a number of essential features of close reading: They are short, complex texts; rich discussions based on worthy questions; revisiting…

  19. Understanding and Teaching Complex Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Teachers in today's classrooms struggle every day to design instructional interventions that would build students' reading skills and strategies in order to ensure their comprehension of complex texts. Text complexity can be determined in both qualitative and quantitative ways. In this article, the authors describe various innovative

  20. ETAT: Expository Text Analysis Tool.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Abarca, Eduardo; Reyes, Héctor; Gilabert, Ramiro; Calpe, Javier; Soria, Emilio; Graesser, Arthur C

    2002-02-01

    Qualitative methods that analyze the coherence of expository texts not only are time consuming, but also present challenges in collecting data on coding reliability. We describe software that analyzes expository texts more rapidly and produces a notable level of objectivity. ETAT (Expository Text Analysis Tool) analyzes the coherence of expository texts. ETAT adopts a symbolic representational system, known as conceptual graph structures. ETAT follows three steps: segmentation of a text into nodes, classification of the unidentified nodes, and linking the nodes with relational arcs. ETAT automatically constructs a graph in the form of nodes and their interrelationships, along with various attendant statistics and information about noninterrelated, isolated nodes. ETAT was developed in Java, so it is compatible with virtually all computer systems. PMID:12060996

  1. Text-interpreter language for flexible generation of patient notes and instructions.

    PubMed Central

    Forker, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    An interpreted computer language has been developed along with a windowed user interface and multi-printer-support formatter to allow preparation of documentation of patient visits, including progress notes, prescriptions, excuses for work/school, outpatient laboratory requisitions, and patient instructions. Input is by trackball or mouse with little or no keyboard skill required. For clinical problems with specific protocols, the clinician can be prompted with problem-specific items of history, exam, and lab data to be gathered and documented. The language implements a number of text-related commands as well as branching logic and arithmetic commands. In addition to generating text, it is simple to implement arithmetic calculations such as weight-specific drug dosages; multiple branching decision-support protocols for paramedical personnel (or physicians); and calculation of clinical scores (e.g., coma or trauma scores) while simultaneously documenting the status of each component of the score. ASCII text files produced by the interpreter are available for computerized quality audit. Interpreter instructions are contained in text files users can customize with any text editor. PMID:1483011

  2. Text structures in medical text processing: empirical evidence and a text understanding prototype.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, U.; Romacker, M.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the role of textual structures in medical texts. In particular, we examine the impact the lacking recognition of text phenomena has on the validity of medical knowledge bases fed by a natural language understanding front-end. First, we review the results from an empirical study on a sample of medical texts considering, in various forms of local coherence phenomena (anaphora and textual ellipses). We then discuss the representation bias emerging in the text knowledge base that is likely to occur when these phenomena are not dealt with--mainly the emergence of referentially incoherent and invalid representations. We then turn to a medical text understanding system designed to account for local text coherence. PMID:9357739

  3. Toward text understanding: classification of text documents by word map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visa, Ari J. E.; Toivanen, Jarmo; Back, Barbro; Vanharanta, Hannu

    2000-04-01

    In many fields, for example in business, engineering, and law there is interest in the search and the classification of text documents in large databases. To information retrieval purposes there exist methods. They are mainly based on keywords. In cases where keywords are lacking the information retrieval is problematic. One approach is to use the whole text document as a search key. Neural networks offer an adaptive tool for this purpose. This paper suggests a new adaptive approach to the problem of clustering and search in large text document databases. The approach is a multilevel one based on word, sentence, and paragraph level maps. Here only the word map level is reported. The reported approach is based on smart encoding, on Self-Organizing Maps, and on document histograms. The results are very promising.

  4. Why is Light Text Harder to Read Than Dark Text?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharff, Lauren V.; Ahumada, Albert J.

    2005-01-01

    Scharff and Ahumada (2002, 2003) measured text legibility for light text and dark text. For paragraph readability and letter identification, responses to light text were slower and less accurate for a given contrast. Was this polarity effect (1) an artifact of our apparatus, (2) a physiological difference in the separate pathways for positive and negative contrast or (3) the result of increased experience with dark text on light backgrounds? To rule out the apparatus-artifact hypothesis, all data were collected on one monitor. Its luminance was measured at all levels used, and the spatial effects of the monitor were reduced by pixel doubling and quadrupling (increasing the viewing distance to maintain constant angular size). Luminances of vertical and horizontal square-wave gratings were compared to assess display speed effects. They existed, even for 4-pixel-wide bars. Tests for polarity asymmetries in display speed were negative. Increased experience might develop full letter templates for dark text, while recognition of light letters is based on component features. Earlier, an observer ran all conditions at one polarity and then switched. If dark and light letters were intermixed, the observer might use component features on all trials and do worse on the dark letters, reducing the polarity effect. We varied polarity blocking (completely blocked, alternating smaller blocks, and intermixed blocks). Letter identification responses times showed polarity effects at all contrasts and display resolution levels. Observers were also more accurate with higher contrasts and more pixels per degree. Intermixed blocks increased the polarity effect by reducing performance on the light letters, but only if the randomized block occurred prior to the nonrandomized block. Perhaps observers tried to use poorly developed templates, or they did not work as hard on the more difficult items. The experience hypothesis and the physiological gain hypothesis remain viable explanations.

  5. Stemming Malay Text and Its Application in Automatic Text Categorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasukawa, Michiko; Lim, Hui Tian; Yokoo, Hidetoshi

    In Malay language, there are no conjugations and declensions and affixes have important grammatical functions. In Malay, the same word may function as a noun, an adjective, an adverb, or, a verb, depending on its position in the sentence. Although extensively simple root words are used in informal conversations, it is essential to use the precise words in formal speech or written texts. In Malay, to make sentences clear, derivative words are used. Derivation is achieved mainly by the use of affixes. There are approximately a hundred possible derivative forms of a root word in written language of the educated Malay. Therefore, the composition of Malay words may be complicated. Although there are several types of stemming algorithms available for text processing in English and some other languages, they cannot be used to overcome the difficulties in Malay word stemming. Stemming is the process of reducing various words to their root forms in order to improve the effectiveness of text processing in information systems. It is essential to avoid both over-stemming and under-stemming errors. We have developed a new Malay stemmer (stemming algorithm) for removing inflectional and derivational affixes. Our stemmer uses a set of affix rules and two types of dictionaries: a root-word dictionary and a derivative-word dictionary. The use of set of rules is aimed at reducing the occurrence of under-stemming errors, while that of the dictionaries is believed to reduce the occurrence of over-stemming errors. We performed an experiment to evaluate the application of our stemmer in text mining software. For the experiment, text data used were actual web pages collected from the World Wide Web to demonstrate the effectiveness of our Malay stemming algorithm. The experimental results showed that our stemmer can effectively increase the precision of the extracted Boolean expressions for text categorization.

  6. An Experimental Text-Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Joan

    1976-01-01

    An experimental text-commentary of selected passages from Sophocles'"Antigone" is described. The commentary is intended for students seeking more than a conventional translation who do not know enough Greek to use a standard commentary. (RM)

  7. Dangers of Texting While Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Center Consumer Enforcement International Media Public Safety Wireless Wireline Offices You are here Home / For Consumers / ... no national ban on texting or using a wireless phone while driving, but a number of states ...

  8. Text Mining in Social Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Charu C.; Wang, Haixun

    Social networks are rich in various kinds of contents such as text and multimedia. The ability to apply text mining algorithms effectively in the context of text data is critical for a wide variety of applications. Social networks require text mining algorithms for a wide variety of applications such as keyword search, classification, and clustering. While search and classification are well known applications for a wide variety of scenarios, social networks have a much richer structure both in terms of text and links. Much of the work in the area uses either purely the text content or purely the linkage structure. However, many recent algorithms use a combination of linkage and content information for mining purposes. In many cases, it turns out that the use of a combination of linkage and content information provides much more effective results than a system which is based purely on either of the two. This paper provides a survey of such algorithms, and the advantages observed by using such algorithms in different scenarios. We also present avenues for future research in this area.

  9. Text Structures, Readings, and Retellings: An Exploration of Two Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Prisca; Arya, Poonam; Wilson, Pat; Jin, Lijun

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between children's use of reading strategies and language cues while reading and their comprehension after reading two texts: "Cherries and Cherry Pits" (Williams, 1986) and "There's Something in My Attic" (Mayer, 1988). The data were drawn from a larger study of the reading strategies of…

  10. Text Format, Text Comprehension, and Related Reader Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Jodi L.

    2009-01-01

    This investigation explored relationships between format of text (electronic or print-based) and reading comprehension of adolescent readers. Also in question were potential influences on comprehension from related measures including academic placement of participants, gender, prior knowledge of the content, and overall reading ability. Influences…

  11. GPU-Accelerated Text Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Mueller, Frank; Zhang, Yongpeng; Potok, Thomas E

    2009-01-01

    Accelerating hardware devices represent a novel promise for improving the performance for many problem domains but it is not clear for which domains what accelerators are suitable. While there is no room in general-purpose processor design to significantly increase the processor frequency, developers are instead resorting to multi-core chips duplicating conventional computing capabilities on a single die. Yet, accelerators offer more radical designs with a much higher level of parallelism and novel programming environments. This present work assesses the viability of text mining on CUDA. Text mining is one of the key concepts that has become prominent as an effective means to index the Internet, but its applications range beyond this scope and extend to providing document similarity metrics, the subject of this work. We have developed and optimized text search algorithms for GPUs to exploit their potential for massive data processing. We discuss the algorithmic challenges of parallelization for text search problems on GPUs and demonstrate the potential of these devices in experiments by reporting significant speedups. Our study may be one of the first to assess more complex text search problems for suitability for GPU devices, and it may also be one of the first to exploit and report on atomic instruction usage that have recently become available in NVIDIA devices.

  12. GPM Mission Gridded Text Products Providing Surface Precipitation Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz; Kelley, Owen; Huffman, George; Kummerow, Christian

    2015-04-01

    In February 2015, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission core satellite will complete its first year in space. The core satellite carries a conically scanning microwave imager called the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), which also has 166 GHz and 183 GHz frequency channels. The GPM core satellite also carries a dual frequency radar (DPR) which operates at Ku frequency, similar to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar), and a new Ka frequency. The precipitation processing system (PPS) is producing swath-based instantaneous precipitation retrievals from GMI, both radars including a dual-frequency product, and a combined GMI/DPR precipitation retrieval. These level 2 products are written in the HDF5 format and have many additional parameters beyond surface precipitation that are organized into appropriate groups. While these retrieval algorithms were developed prior to launch and are not optimal, these algorithms are producing very creditable retrievals. It is appropriate for a wide group of users to have access to the GPM retrievals. However, for reseachers requiring only surface precipitation, these L2 swath products can appear to be very intimidating and they certainly do contain many more variables than the average researcher needs. Some researchers desire only surface retrievals stored in a simple easily accessible format. In response, PPS has begun to produce gridded text based products that contain just the most widely used variables for each instrument (surface rainfall rate, fraction liquid, fraction convective) in a single line for each grid box that contains one or more observations. This paper will describe the gridded data products that are being produced and provide an overview of their content. Currently two types of gridded products are being produced: (1) surface precipitation retrievals from the core satellite instruments - GMI, DPR, and combined GMI/DPR (2) surface precipitation retrievals for the partner constellation satellites. Both of these gridded products are generated for a .25 degree x .25 degree hourly grid, which are packaged into daily ASCII files that can downloaded from the PPS FTP site. To reduce the download size, the files are compressed using the gzip utility. This paper will focus on presenting high-level details about the gridded text product being generated from the instruments on the GPM core satellite. But summary information will also be presented about the partner radiometer gridded product. All retrievals for the partner radiometer are done using the GPROF2014 algorithm using as input the PPS generated inter-calibrated 1C product for the radiometer.

  13. Biomarker Identification Using Text Mining

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Liu, Chunmei

    2012-01-01

    Identifying molecular biomarkers has become one of the important tasks for scientists to assess the different phenotypic states of cells or organisms correlated to the genotypes of diseases from large-scale biological data. In this paper, we proposed a text-mining-based method to discover biomarkers from PubMed. First, we construct a database based on a dictionary, and then we used a finite state machine to identify the biomarkers. Our method of text mining provides a highly reliable approach to discover the biomarkers in the PubMed database. PMID:23197989

  14. A Visually Oriented Text Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    HERMAN employs Evans & Sutherland Picture System 2 to provide screenoriented editing capability for DEC PDP-11 series computer. Text altered by visual indication of characters changed. Group of HERMAN commands provides for higher level operations. HERMAN provides special features for editing FORTRAN source programs.

  15. Reading Instruction and Text Difficulty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donne, Vicki

    2011-01-01

    An observational study investigated the influence of text difficulty (independent, instructional, or frustration level) on the reading experiences of students in grades 1-3 in two schools for the deaf. Participants included 12 students who are deaf or hard of hearing and 5 educators. The most significant findings were twofold. First, students…

  16. Transformation and Text: Journal Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Carol

    One intention that an instructor had for her new course called "Writing and Healing: Women's Journal Writing" was to make apparent the power of self-written text to transform the writer. She asked her students--women studying women writing their lives and women writing their own lives--to write three pages a day and to focus on change. The…

  17. Reviving "Walden": Mining the Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt Julia

    2000-01-01

    Describes how the author and her high school English students begin their study of Thoreau's "Walden" by mining the text for quotations to inspire their own writing and discussion on the topic, "How does Thoreau speak to you or how could he speak to someone you know?" (SR)

  18. Solar Concepts: A Background Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham, Jonathan W.

    This text is designed to provide teachers, students, and the general public with an overview of key solar energy concepts. Various energy terms are defined and explained. Basic thermodynamic laws are discussed. Alternative energy production is described in the context of the present energy situation. Described are the principal contemporary solar…

  19. Predictive Encoding in Text Compression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raita, Timo; Teuhola, Jukka

    1989-01-01

    Presents three text compression methods of increasing power and evaluates each based on the trade-off between compression gain and processing time. The advantages of using hash coding for speed and optimal arithmetic coding to successor information for compression gain are discussed. (26 references) (Author/CLB)

  20. The TEXT upgrade vertical interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallock, G. A.; Gartman, M. L.; Li, W.; Chiang, K.; Shin, S.; Castles, R. L.; Chatterjee, R.; Rahman, A. S.

    1992-10-01

    A far-infrared interferometer has been installed on TEXT upgrade to obtain electron density profiles. The primary system views the plasma vertically through a set of large (60-cm radial×7.62-cm toroidal) diagnostic ports. A 1-cm channel spacing (59 channels total) and fast electronic time response is used, to provide high resolution for radial profiles and perturbation experiments. Initial operation of the vertical system was obtained late in 1991, with six operating channels.

  1. [On two antique medical texts].

    PubMed

    Rosa, Maria Carlota

    2005-01-01

    The two texts presented here--Regimento proueytoso contra ha pestenença [literally, "useful regime against pestilence"] and Modus curandi cum balsamo ["curing method using balm"]--represent the extent of Portugal's known medical library until circa 1530, produced in gothic letters by foreign printers: Germany's Valentim Fernandes, perhaps the era's most important printer, who worked in Lisbon between 1495 and 1518, and Germdo Galharde, a Frenchman who practiced his trade in Lisbon and Coimbra between 1519 and 1560. Modus curandi, which came to light in 1974 thanks to bibliophile José de Pina Martins, is anonymous. Johannes Jacobi is believed to be the author of Regimento proueytoso, which was translated into Latin (Regimen contra pestilentiam), French, and English. Both texts are presented here in facsimile and in modern Portuguese, while the first has also been reproduced in archaic Portuguese using modern typographical characters. This philological venture into sixteenth-century medicine is supplemented by a scholarly glossary which serves as a valuable tool in interpreting not only Regimento proueytoso but also other texts from the era. Two articles place these documents in historical perspective. PMID:17500134

  2. Identifying Issue Frames in Text

    PubMed Central

    Sagi, Eyal; Diermeier, Daniel; Kaufmann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Framing, the effect of context on cognitive processes, is a prominent topic of research in psychology and public opinion research. Research on framing has traditionally relied on controlled experiments and manually annotated document collections. In this paper we present a method that allows for quantifying the relative strengths of competing linguistic frames based on corpus analysis. This method requires little human intervention and can therefore be efficiently applied to large bodies of text. We demonstrate its effectiveness by tracking changes in the framing of terror over time and comparing the framing of abortion by Democrats and Republicans in the U.S. PMID:23874909

  3. Efficient Index for Handwritten Text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, Ibrahim

    This paper deals with one of the new emerging multimedia data types, namely, handwritten cursive text. The paper presents two indexing methods for searching a collection of cursive handwriting. The first index, word-level index, treats word as pictogram and uses global features for retrieval. The word-level index is suitable for large collection of cursive text. While the second one, called stroke-level index, treats the word as a set of strokes. The stroke-level index is more accurate, but more costly than the word level index. Each word (or stroke) can be described with a set of features and, thus, can be stored as points in the feature space. The Karhunen-Loeve transform is then used to minimize the number of features used (data dimensionality) and thus the index size. Feature vectors are stored in an R-tree. We implemented both indexes and carried many simulation experiments to measure the effectiveness and the cost of the search algorithm. The proposed indexes achieve substantial saving in the search time over the sequential search. Moreover, the proposed indexes improve the matching rate up to 46% over the sequential search.

  4. Text Mining for Protein Docking

    PubMed Central

    Badal, Varsha D.; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly growing amount of publicly available information from biomedical research is readily accessible on the Internet, providing a powerful resource for predictive biomolecular modeling. The accumulated data on experimentally determined structures transformed structure prediction of proteins and protein complexes. Instead of exploring the enormous search space, predictive tools can simply proceed to the solution based on similarity to the existing, previously determined structures. A similar major paradigm shift is emerging due to the rapidly expanding amount of information, other than experimentally determined structures, which still can be used as constraints in biomolecular structure prediction. Automated text mining has been widely used in recreating protein interaction networks, as well as in detecting small ligand binding sites on protein structures. Combining and expanding these two well-developed areas of research, we applied the text mining to structural modeling of protein-protein complexes (protein docking). Protein docking can be significantly improved when constraints on the docking mode are available. We developed a procedure that retrieves published abstracts on a specific protein-protein interaction and extracts information relevant to docking. The procedure was assessed on protein complexes from Dockground (http://dockground.compbio.ku.edu). The results show that correct information on binding residues can be extracted for about half of the complexes. The amount of irrelevant information was reduced by conceptual analysis of a subset of the retrieved abstracts, based on the bag-of-words (features) approach. Support Vector Machine models were trained and validated on the subset. The remaining abstracts were filtered by the best-performing models, which decreased the irrelevant information for ~ 25% complexes in the dataset. The extracted constraints were incorporated in the docking protocol and tested on the Dockground unbound benchmark set, significantly increasing the docking success rate. PMID:26650466

  5. Text documents as social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balinsky, Helen; Balinsky, Alexander; Simske, Steven J.

    2012-03-01

    The extraction of keywords and features is a fundamental problem in text data mining. Document processing applications directly depend on the quality and speed of the identification of salient terms and phrases. Applications as disparate as automatic document classification, information visualization, filtering and security policy enforcement all rely on the quality of automatically extracted keywords. Recently, a novel approach to rapid change detection in data streams and documents has been developed. It is based on ideas from image processing and in particular on the Helmholtz Principle from the Gestalt Theory of human perception. By modeling a document as a one-parameter family of graphs with its sentences or paragraphs defining the vertex set and with edges defined by Helmholtz's principle, we demonstrated that for some range of the parameters, the resulting graph becomes a small-world network. In this article we investigate the natural orientation of edges in such small world networks. For two connected sentences, we can say which one is the first and which one is the second, according to their position in a document. This will make such a graph look like a small WWW-type network and PageRank type algorithms will produce interesting ranking of nodes in such a document.

  6. Talk or text to tell? How young adults in Canada and South Africa prefer to receive STI results, counseling, and treatment updates in a wireless world.

    PubMed

    Labacher, Lukas; Mitchell, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Young adults often lack access to confidential, long-lasting, and nonjudgmental interactions with sexual health professionals at brick-and-mortar clinics. To ensure that patients return for their STI test results, post-result counseling, and STI-related information, computer-mediated health intervention programming allows them to receive sexual health information through onsite computers, the Internet, and mobile phone calls and text messages. To determine whether young adults (age: M = 21 years) prefer to communicate with health professionals about the status of their sexual health through computer-mediated communication devices, 303 second-year university students (183 from an urban North American university and 120 from a periurban university in South Africa) completed a paper-based survey indicating how they prefer to communicate with doctors and nurses: talking face to face, mobile phone call, text message, Internet chat programs, Facebook, Twitter, or e-mail. Nearly all students, and female students in South Africa in particular, prefer to receive their STI test results, post-results counseling, and STI-related information by talking face to face with doctors and nurses rather than communicating through computers or mobile phones. Results are clarified in relation to gender, availability of various technologies, and prevalence of HIV in Canada and in South Africa. PMID:24015829

  7. What's so Simple about Simplified Texts? A Computational and Psycholinguistic Investigation of Text Comprehension and Text Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, Scott A.; Yang, Hae Sung; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2014-01-01

    This study uses a moving windows self-paced reading task to assess both text comprehension and processing time of authentic texts and these same texts simplified to beginning and intermediate levels. Forty-eight second language learners each read 9 texts (3 different authentic, beginning, and intermediate level texts). Repeated measures ANOVAs…

  8. What's so Simple about Simplified Texts? A Computational and Psycholinguistic Investigation of Text Comprehension and Text Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, Scott A.; Yang, Hae Sung; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2014-01-01

    This study uses a moving windows self-paced reading task to assess both text comprehension and processing time of authentic texts and these same texts simplified to beginning and intermediate levels. Forty-eight second language learners each read 9 texts (3 different authentic, beginning, and intermediate level texts). Repeated measures ANOVAs

  9. Forget E-Mail: New Messaging Service Has Students and Professors Atwitter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Some professors, librarians, and administrators have begun using Twitter, a service that can blast very short notes (up to 140 characters) to select users' cell phones or computer screens. The practice is often called microblogging because people use it to send out pithy updates about their daily lives. No need to wait until you are back at your…

  10. E-Alerts: Environmental pollution and control. E-mail newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    Topics of discussion the following: Air Pollution and Control; Noise Pollution and Control; Solid Wastes Pollution and Control; Water Pollution and Control; Pesticides Pollution and Control; Radiation Pollution and Control; Environmental Health and Safety; Environmental Impact Statements.

  11. E-Alerts: Combustion, engines, and propellants (reciprocation and rotating combustion engines). E-mail newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    Design, performance, and testing of reciprocating and rotating engines of various configurations for all types of propulsion. Includes internal and external combustion engines; engine exhaust systems; engine air systems components; engine structures; stirling and diesel engines.

  12. Dear Gayle, Dear Sheryl: Using E-Mail for a Principal Mentorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boris-Schacter, Sheryl; Vonasek, Gayle

    2009-01-01

    A little over a year ago, Sheryl, one of the authors, became a principal for the first time. Her transformation from education professor to elementary principal represented a significant and unusual career progression. Gayle, one of the authors and an elementary school principal for 11 years and a curriculum specialist and classroom teacher for…

  13. Absence of Body as Context Problem in E-mail Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diket, Read M.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on three devices (plan, analysis, and context) with which one can consider electronic mail. States that the inequality in "message contexts" (social, mental, and physical) is the problem in electronic mail communication. Offers implications for using semiotics with visual culture in education. (CMK)

  14. Purposeful E-Mail as Stage 3 Technology: IEP Goals Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trollinger, Gayle; Slavkin, Rachel

    1999-01-01

    Describes the benefits of technology in special education and the use of electronic mail as an instructional strategy. Highlights the use of electronic mail by a student with Down syndrome to learn communication, reading, and written expression skills. Recommendations for using technology in the classroom are provided. (CR)

  15. Asynchronous Distance Learning: E-mail Attachments Used as the Medium for Assigned Coursework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrells, D. Scott

    2002-01-01

    Postsecondary students were sent case studies to analyze and submit via electronic mail attachments. Results of an evaluation indicate that the benefits of using electronic mail for course work far outweigh the disadvantages. (Contains 10 references.) (JOW)

  16. Chat, E-Mail, Web, and Chat Room Slang and Acronyms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Yard nm, or NM Never Mind NP, np No Problem NRN 1. No Response Necessary 2. Not Right ... way” P911 My parents are in the room. P=Parents, and 911=emergency, in ... PEBCAK Problem Exists Between Chair And Keyboard peeps People. example: “ ...

  17. Cyber in the Cloud -- Lessons Learned from INL's Cloud E-Mail Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Hiltbrand; Daniel Jones

    2012-12-01

    As we look at the cyber security ecosystem, are we planning to fight the battle as we did yesterday, with firewalls and intrusion detection systems (IDS), or are we sensing a change in how security is evolving and planning accordingly? With the technology enablement and possible financial benefits of cloud computing, the traditional tools for establishing and maintaining our cyber security ecosystems are being dramatically altered.

  18. The Multicultural E-Mail of High School-College Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Elaine N.; Whitaker, Elaine E.

    A collaboration between a university English professor and a high-school English teacher was successful in building community, yet rather unsuccessful in manipulating the Internet. Their collaboration worked, as far as it did, because of an absence of hierarchy. To create a basis for comparison with other studies, analysis of the collaboration can…

  19. E-Alerts: Environmental pollution and control (solid waste pollution and control). E-mail newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    The paper discusses pollution by solid wastes including garbage, scrap, junked automobiles, spoil, sludge, containers; Disposal methods such as composts or land application, injection wells, incineration, sanitary landfills; Mining wastes; Processing for separation and materials recovery; Solid waste utilization; Recycling; Biological and ecological effects; Superfund (Records of Decision, etc.); SITE technology; Laws, legislation, and regulations; Public administration; Economics; Land use. The discussion includes disposal of concentrated or pure liquids such as brines, oils, chemicals, and hazardous materials.

  20. Analyzing Oral Skills in Voice E-Mail and Online Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volle, Lisa M.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the acquisition of speaking skills in an online distance education course of 19 first semester Spanish learners. The possibility of oral development in a strictly online course was examined based on students' pronunciation production in two types of recorded speaking activities and in two real-time conversations. Students…

  1. Participation Rates in a Worksite Wellness Program Using E-Mail Wellness Messages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anenson, Larry W.; Brunt, Ardith; Terbizan, Donna J.; Christensen, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which days of the work week had the largest rate of opened e-health messages, whether detailed or basic e-health messages were more likely to be opened, if motivation influenced the rate of message opening, and if the rate of opening messages declined over time. Ninety-one city employees (52 male and 39…

  2. E-Alerts: Environmental pollution and control (air pollution and control). E-mail newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    Topics of discussion include the following: Air pollution from flue gases, exhaust gases, odors, dust, smog, microorganisms, etc.; Control techniques and equipment; Sampling and analytical techniques, and equipment; Waste gas recovery; Biological and ecological effects; Air pollution chemistry; Acid precipitation; Atmospheric motion; Laws, legislation, and regulations; Public administration; Economics; Land use.

  3. E-Alerts: Energy (policies, regulations and studies). E-mail newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    Energy conservation; licensing; legislation; government policies and regulatory controls; energy goals; research needs; energy management, economics, and financing; depletion allowances and leasing policies; rates and energy models; energy shortages; international issues.

  4. E-Mail Reference: Who, When, Where, and What Is Asked.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederer, Naomi

    2001-01-01

    Summarizes national survey findings of email reference services in academic and public libraries; describes types of email reference services for selected Colorado libraries; and focuses on a detailed overview and analysis of two years of Colorado State University's email reference experiences. (Author/LRW)

  5. A Novel Network for Mentoring Family Physicians on Mental Health Issues Using E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jon J.; Rockman, Patricia; Gingrich, Nadine; Silveira, Jose; Salach, Lena

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Family practitioners are significant providers of mental health care and routinely report difficulty acquiring timely support in this area. The Collaborative Mental Health Care Network assembled groups of family practitioners and provided them with mental health practitioner mentors. This article addresses communication in the Network,

  6. Forget E-Mail: New Messaging Service Has Students and Professors Atwitter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Some professors, librarians, and administrators have begun using Twitter, a service that can blast very short notes (up to 140 characters) to select users' cell phones or computer screens. The practice is often called microblogging because people use it to send out pithy updates about their daily lives. No need to wait until you are back at your

  7. Mathematical Communications: Elementary Pre-Service Teachers' E-Mail Exchanges with Sixth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunc-Pekkan, Zelha; D'Ambrosio, Beatriz S.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the communication between pre-service teachers and sixth grade students in a project in which email was used for communication as students learned about fractions and were supported by the pre-service teachers. Specifically, the study investigated how the pre-service teachers applied their mathematical knowledge to understand…

  8. Teachers' Perspectives on Using E-Mail to Communicate with Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgore, Amanda J.

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that positive communication between parents and teachers at all grade levels is essential for student success and parent-teacher relationship formation. This positive communication practice is the key component of the parent-teacher relationship that is supported by the uncertainty reduction theory. The purpose of this study was…

  9. E-Alerts: Natural resources and earth sciences (mineral industries). E-mail newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    The paper discusses industries and their processes that exploit metallic and nonmetallic, fuel and nonfuel resources, including: Coal mining, mining wastes, and acid mine drainage; Coal preparation; Petroleum exploration, drilling, and production; Metals exploration and mining; Exploration geophysics and seismology; Reserves; Mine safety; Mineral economics; Underwater and continental shelf mining; Natural resources studies (excluding Earth Resource Satellite Surveys).

  10. Frauds, Hoaxes, Myths, and Chain Letters: or, What's This Doing in My E-Mail Box?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebbinghouse, Carol

    1998-01-01

    Looks at the equivalent of junk mail on the Internet, including hoaxes, myths and urban legends, frauds, chain letters, and spam. Sidebars include "False Flaming of the FCC" (Barbara Quint) and a list of Web sites useful for determining the legitimacy of questionable mailings and for eliminating unwanted solicitations. (JAK)

  11. You've Got Mail! Managing a Campus-Wide eMail Migration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diedriech, David; Colvin, Nathaniel

    2004-01-01

    In early 2003, DePauw University recognized the need to upgrade their existing email system, which was rapidly exceeding its capacity. The decision was made to convert the entire campus to Novell's GroupWise solution for email. This presentation will focus on the options considered as well as some of the issues involved, and then discuss the…

  12. Argumentative Discussions in Finnish Higher Education: Comparing E-mail and Face-to-Face Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marttunen, Miika; Laurinen, Leena

    A teaching experiment in Finland was designed to clarify ways to teach argumentation in Finnish higher education and how to motivate students to participate in critical content-area discussions. Finnish students traditionally hesitate to criticize each other's opinions or those of the teacher. The experimental teaching method gave them the…

  13. E-Mail-Based Formative Assessment: A Chronicle of Research-Inspired Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doige, Carl Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The importance of using systematic formative assessment to guide students toward meaningful learning has gained more recognition in the education community in recent years. This form of assessment is characterized by task-oriented feedback in a low-risk environment, which is believed to promote mastery goal orientation and self-regulated learning.…

  14. E-Alerts: Combustion, engines, and propellants. E-mail newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    Contents: Combustion and ignition; electric and ion propulsion; fuel and propellant tanks; jet and gas turbine engines; rocket engines and motors; rocket propellants; nuclear propulsion; reciprocation and rotating combustion engines.

  15. Experiential Education and the Computer Age: E-Mail and Listservs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Leadership, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Provides annotated listing and subscription procedures for four Listserv discussion groups focusing on outdoor, adventure, or experiential education: "AEELIST" is set up for anyone involved in experiential education; "Australian Outdoor Ed" focuses on current research and teaching interests; "Wildornt" facilitates discussions on wilderness…

  16. A Novel Network for Mentoring Family Physicians on Mental Health Issues Using E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jon J.; Rockman, Patricia; Gingrich, Nadine; Silveira, Jose; Salach, Lena

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Family practitioners are significant providers of mental health care and routinely report difficulty acquiring timely support in this area. The Collaborative Mental Health Care Network assembled groups of family practitioners and provided them with mental health practitioner mentors. This article addresses communication in the Network,…

  17. E-Alerts: Environmental pollution and control (environmental health and safety). E-mail newsletter

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    Topics of discussion include the following: Effects of pollution on public health and safety; Toxicology; Industrial health; Physiology; Psychology; Clinical medicine; Radiobiology; Animals used as research experimental models.

  18. Full-Text Databases in Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sievert, MaryEllen C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes types of full-text databases in medicine; discusses features for searching full-text journal databases available through online vendors; reviews research on full-text databases in medicine; and describes the MEDLINE/Full-Text Research Project at the University of Missouri (Columbia) which investigated precision, recall, and relevancy.…

  19. Using Electronic Texts in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the use of literary electronic texts in middle school classrooms. Topics include where to find electronic texts on the Internet through the World Wide Web, file transfer protocol, or gopher; the effects of copyright law on availability of electronic texts; and downloading texts. (LRW)

  20. The Effects of Questioning on Text Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, T. M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether structured or unstructured questioning strategies, combined with two levels of domain knowledge and text coherence, significantly affect text memory and text learning. Results of this study suggest that high domain knowledge and structured questioning strategies are the most reliable predictors of text memory and

  1. Examining Text Complexity in the Early Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Jill; Elmore, Jeff; Hiebert, Elfrieda H.; Koons, Heather H.; Bowen, Kimberly; Sanford-Moore, Eleanor E.; Stenner, A. Jackson

    2016-01-01

    The Common Core raises the stature of texts to new heights, creating a hubbub. The fuss is especially messy at the early grades, where children are expected to read more complex texts than in the past. But early-grades teachers have been given little actionable guidance about text complexity. The authors recently examined early-grades texts to…

  2. Block Addressing Indices for Approximate Text Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeza-Yates, Ricardo; Navarro, Gonzalo

    2000-01-01

    Discusses indexing in large text databases, approximate text searching, and space-time tradeoffs for indexed text searching. Studies the space overhead and retrieval times as functions of the text block size, concludes that an index can be sublinear in space overhead and query time, and applies the analysis to the Web. (Author/LRW)

  3. Linguistic Symbol Intraference in Textese and E-Mailese: Implications for Teaching and Learning Standard English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bode Ekundayo, Omowumi Steve

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how senders of text messages and informal e-mail redeploy linguistic symbols innovatively to communicate. Even a cursory look at an SMS text (textese) and informal e-mail (e-mailese) will show that its style is different from that of formal writing. Two thousand twenty text messages and five hundred informal e-mail were studied…

  4. Freedom System Text and Graphics System (TAGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The Text and Graphics System (TAGS) is a high-resolution facsimile system that scans text or graphics material and converts the analog SCAN data into serial digital data. This video shows the TAGS in operation.

  5. Visual Analysis of Text Document Collections

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Paul D.

    2005-11-30

    The volume of information, communications, and descriptions provided in text form is large and increasing. One of the most often used software application of our time, web page retrieval based on key word descriptions, can be constructed as a text analysis application. The volume and diversity of information available in text data sources has driven the development of a variety of methods for interacting with, and presenting the results from, text analyses. In short, text analysis provides a challenging, important area for statistical analysis and application. Existing text analysis systems and technologies are reviewed. Capabilities of the technology are described, including potential for scaling and analytic activities directly supported analytic activities that could be supported and unmet analytic needs. Statistics-related technologies that are contained in text visualization systems are identified. Choices and trade-offs made in text visualization systems are indicated, as are some areas of research and potential development.

  6. Does Supplementing Text by Illustrations Enhance Comprehension?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliese, Trevor; Over, Ray

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-four prevocational students and 24 apprentices in motor mechanical courses were tested after training involving text alone and text with diagrams. Knowledge was no greater in either situation, despite claims that illustrations enhance comprehension. (SK)

  7. Mathematical Texts as Narrative: Rethinking Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietiker, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework for reading mathematics texts as narratives. Building from a narrative framework of Meike Bal, a reader's experience with the mathematical content as it unfolds in the text (the "mathematical story") is distinguished from his or her logical reconstruction of the content beyond the text (the

  8. Assessing Text Readability Using Cognitively Based Indices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, Scott A.; Greenfield, Jerry; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2008-01-01

    Many programs designed to compute the readability of texts are narrowly based on surface-level linguistic features and take too little account of the processes which a reader brings to the text. This study is an exploratory examination of the use of Coh-Metrix, a computational tool that measures cohesion and text difficulty at various levels of…

  9. Children's Comprehension of Text: Research into Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muth, K. Denise, Ed.

    Reflecting the concerns of researchers and practitioners about children's text comprehension, this book defines and provides examples of narrative and expository text and describes research-based strategies for helping children comprehend these two types of text. The book contains the following chapters: (1) "Research on Stories: Implications for…

  10. Academic Journal Embargoes and Full Text Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Sam

    2003-01-01

    Documents the reasons for embargoes of academic journals in full text databases (i.e., publisher-imposed delays on the availability of full text content) and provides insight regarding common misconceptions. Tables present data on selected journals covering a cross-section of subjects and publishers and comparing two full text business databases.…

  11. Learning To Use a Text Editor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beal, Carole R.; Griffin, Elizabeth A.

    Designed to determine how quickly elementary school children can learn to use a text editor and what editing concepts are difficult for them to master, this study presents preliminary data on children's acquisition of text editor skills and on the kinds of revisions they accomplished with the text editor. Observations were made on a total of 25…

  12. Evaluation Methods of The Text Entities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popa, Marius

    2006-01-01

    The paper highlights some evaluation methods to assess the quality characteristics of the text entities. The main concepts used in building and evaluation processes of the text entities are presented. Also, some aggregated metrics for orthogonality measurements are presented. The evaluation process for automatic evaluation of the text entities is…

  13. Readers, Texts and Conceptual Change Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dole, Janice A.

    2000-01-01

    Examines reader and text variables related to conceptual change learning from science textbooks. Shows it is difficult to change readers' prior knowledge by reading texts that are inconsistent with that knowledge, but refutation text was shown to impact students' prior knowledge when that knowledge contained naive scientific conceptions. Addresses…

  14. Text Messaging for Student Communication and Voting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClean, Stephen; Hagan, Paul; Morgan, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Text messaging has gained widespread popularity in higher education as a communication tool and as a means of engaging students in the learning process. In this study we report on the use of text messaging in a large, year-one introductory chemistry module where students were encouraged to send questions and queries to a dedicated text number both…

  15. Using Text Messages to Communicate with Patrons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konshak, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Text messaging is an ideal communications method for libraries, which often want to send short, concise messages to their patrons near and far. Uses for text messaging in libraries include reminders about items' due dates, hold pickup notices, program reminders, and even short messages of content. Some libraries are already using text messaging…

  16. Text Editing with the TRS-80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatherly, Vivian; Affholter, Tom

    This individualized text was designed to lead students through a step-by-step course in text editing (word processing) using the TRS-80 Model III or IV. The program used in the course is a modification of SuperScripsit, to be printed out on an Epson printer. The text is organized into six sections covering the following topics: getting started,…

  17. Text Complexity: Primary Teachers' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Jill; Hiebert, Elfrieda H.; Bowen, Kimberly; Relyea-Kim, E. Jackie; Kung, Melody; Elmore, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The research question was, "What text characteristics do primary teachers think are most important for early grades text complexity?" Teachers from across the United States accomplished a two-part task. First, to stimulate teachers' thinking about important text characteristics, primary teachers completed an online paired-text…

  18. Mathematical Texts as Narrative: Rethinking Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietiker, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a framework for reading mathematics texts as narratives. Building from a narrative framework of Meike Bal, a reader's experience with the mathematical content as it unfolds in the text (the "mathematical story") is distinguished from his or her logical reconstruction of the content beyond the text (the…

  19. Does Writing Summaries Improve Memory for Text?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spirgel, Arie S.; Delaney, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    In five experiments, we consistently found that items included in summaries were better remembered than items omitted from summaries. We did not, however, find evidence that summary writing was better than merely restudying the text. These patterns held with shorter and longer texts, when the text was present or absent during the summary writing,…

  20. Teacher Modeling Using Complex Informational Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Modeling in complex texts requires that teachers analyze the text for factors of qualitative complexity and then design lessons that introduce students to that complexity. In addition, teachers can model the disciplinary nature of content area texts as well as word solving and comprehension strategies. Included is a planning guide for think aloud.

  1. The Costs of Texting in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Dakota; Henderson, Bruce B.

    2015-01-01

    Many college students seem to find it impossible to resist the temptation to text on electronic devices during class lectures and discussions. One common response of college professors is to yield to the inevitable and try to ignore student texting. However, research indicates that because of limited cognitive capacities, even simple texting can

  2. Text Matters in Learning to Read.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiebert, Elfrieda H.

    A study examined the opportunities provided by several types of text for beginning readers to learn about three aspects of written English: (1) consistent, common letter-sound patterns; (2) the most frequent words; and (3) the contexts of sentences and texts. Results indicate that texts based on high-frequency words give beginning readers ample…

  3. The Costs of Texting in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Dakota; Henderson, Bruce B.

    2015-01-01

    Many college students seem to find it impossible to resist the temptation to text on electronic devices during class lectures and discussions. One common response of college professors is to yield to the inevitable and try to ignore student texting. However, research indicates that because of limited cognitive capacities, even simple texting can…

  4. Bilingual Text Messaging Translation: Translating Text Messages From English Into Spanish for the Text4Walking Program

    PubMed Central

    Sandi, Giselle; Ingram, Diana; Welch, Mary Jane; Ocampo, Edith V

    2015-01-01

    Background Hispanic adults in the United States are at particular risk for diabetes and inadequate blood pressure control. Physical activity improves these health problems; however Hispanic adults also have a low rate of recommended aerobic physical activity. To address improving physical inactivity, one area of rapidly growing technology that can be utilized is text messaging (short message service, SMS). A physical activity research team, Text4Walking, had previously developed an initial database of motivational physical activity text messages in English that could be used for physical activity text messaging interventions. However, the team needed to translate these existing English physical activity text messages into Spanish in order to have culturally meaningful and useful text messages for those adults within the Hispanic population who would prefer to receive text messages in Spanish. Objective The aim of this study was to translate a database of English motivational physical activity messages into Spanish and review these text messages with a group of Spanish speaking adults to inform the use of these text messages in an intervention study. Methods The consent form and study documents, including the existing English physical activity text messages, were translated from English into Spanish, and received translation certification as well as Institutional Review Board approval. The translated text messages were placed into PowerPoint, accompanied by a set of culturally appropriate photos depicting barriers to walking, as well as walking scenarios. At the focus group, eligibility criteria for this study included being an adult between 30 to 65 years old who spoke Spanish as their primary language. After a general group introduction, participants were placed into smaller groups of two or three. Each small group was asked to review a segment of the translated text messages for accuracy and meaningfulness. After the break out, the group was brought back together to review the text messages. Results A translation confirmation group met at a church site in an urban community with a large population of Hispanics. Spanish speaking adults (N=8), with a mean age of 40 (SD 6.3), participated in the study. Participants were engaged in the group and viewed the text messages as culturally appropriate. They also thought that text messages could motivate them to walk more. Twenty-two new text messages were added to the original database of 246 translated text messages. While the text messages were generally understood, specific word preferences were seen related to personal preference, dialect, and level of formality which resulted in minor revisions to four text messages. Conclusions The English text messages were successfully translated into Spanish by a bilingual research staff and reviewed by Hispanic participants in order to inform the use of these text messages for future intervention studies. These Spanish text messages were recently used in a Text4Walking intervention study. PMID:25947953

  5. Robust Text Detection in Natural Scene Images.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xu-Cheng; Yin, Xuwang; Huang, Kaizhu; Hao, Hong-Wei

    2013-09-26

    Text detection in natural scene images is an important prerequisite for many content-based image analysis tasks. In this paper, we propose an accurate and robust method for detecting texts in natural scene images. A fast and effective pruning algorithm is designed to extract Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (MSERs) as character candidates using the strategy of minimizing regularized variations. Character candidates are grouped into text candidates by the single-link clustering algorithm, where distance weights and clustering threshold are learned automatically by a novel self-training distance metric learning algorithm. The posterior probabilities of text candidates corresponding to non-text are estimated with a character classifier; text candidates with high non-text probabilities are eliminated and texts are identified with a text classifier. The proposed system is evaluated on the ICDAR 2011 Robust Reading Competition database; the f measure is over 76%, much better than the state-of-the-art performance of 71%. Experiments on multilingual, street view, multi-orientation and even born-digital databases also demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Finally, an online demo of our proposed scene text detection system has been set up at http://kems.ustb.edu.cn/learning/yin/dtext. PMID:24080709

  6. The network of concepts in written texts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, S. M. G.; Petit Lobão, T. C.; Andrade, R. F. S.; Neme, A.; Miranda, J. G. V.

    2006-02-01

    Complex network theory is used to investigate the structure of meaningful concepts in written texts of individual authors. Networks have been constructed after a two phase filtering, where words with less meaning contents are eliminated and all remaining words are set to their canonical form, without any number, gender or time flexion. Each sentence in the text is added to the network as a clique. A large number of written texts have been scrutinised, and it is found that texts have small-world as well as scale-free structures. The growth process of these networks has also been investigated, and a universal evolution of network quantifiers have been found among the set of texts written by distinct authors. Further analyses, based on shuffling procedures taken either on the texts or on the constructed networks, provide hints on the role played by the word frequency and sentence length distributions to the network structure.

  7. Biomechanical patterns of text-message distraction.

    PubMed

    Le, Peter; Hwang, Jaejin; Grawe, Sarah; Li, Jing; Snyder, Alison; Lee, Christina; Marras, William S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify biomechanical measures that can distinguish texting distraction in a laboratory-simulated driving environment. The goal would be to use this information to provide an intervention for risky driving behaviour. Sixteen subjects participated in this study. Three independent variables were tested: task (texting, visual targeting, weighted and non-weighted movements), task direction (front and side) and task distance (close and far). Dependent variables consisted of biomechanical moments, head displacement and the length of time to complete each task. Results revealed that the time to complete each task was higher for texting compared to other tasks. Peak moments during texting were only distinguishable from visual targeting. Peak head displacement and cumulative biomechanical exposure measures indicated that texting can be distinguished from other tasks. Therefore, it may be useful to take into account both temporal and biomechanical measures when considering warning systems to detect texting distraction. PMID:25867196

  8. Robust Text Detection in Natural Scene Images.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xu-Cheng; Yin, Xuwang; Huang, Kaizhu; Hao, Hong-Wei

    2014-05-01

    Text detection in natural scene images is an important prerequisite for many content-based image analysis tasks. In this paper, we propose an accurate and robust method for detecting texts in natural scene images. A fast and effective pruning algorithm is designed to extract Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (MSERs) as character candidates using the strategy of minimizing regularized variations. Character candidates are grouped into text candidates by the single-link clustering algorithm, where distance weights and clustering threshold are learned automatically by a novel self-training distance metric learning algorithm. The posterior probabilities of text candidates corresponding to non-text are estimated with a character classifier; text candidates with high non-text probabilities are eliminated and texts are identified with a text classifier. The proposed system is evaluated on the ICDAR 2011 Robust Reading Competition database; the f-measure is over 76%, much better than the state-of-the-art performance of 71%. Experiments on multilingual, street view, multi-orientation and even born-digital databases also demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26353230

  9. Understanding machines from text and diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegarty, Mary; Just, Marcel A.

    1987-12-01

    Instructional materials typically use both text and diagrams to explain how machines work. In this paper we give an account of what information is involved in understanding a mechanical device and the role that diagrams might play in communicating this information. We propose a model of how people read a text and inspect an accompanying diagram which states that people inspect diagrams for three reasons: (1) to form a representation of information read in the text, (2) to reactivate information that has already been represented, and (3) to encode information that is absent from the text. Using data from subjects' eye fixations while they read a text and inspected an accompanying diagram, we find that low-ability subjects need to inspect diagrams more often than high-ability text. The data also suggest that knowledge of what is relevant in a diagram might be a prerequisite for encoding new information from a diagram. Instructional materials typically use both text and diagrams to explain how machines work. In this paper we give an account of what information is involved in understanding a mechanical device and the role that diagrams might play in communicating this information. We propose a model of how people read a text and inspect an accompanying diagram which states that people inspect diagrams for three reasons: (1) to form a representation of information read in the text; (2) to reactivate information that was alsready represented, and *3) to encode information that is absent from the text. Uinsg data from subjects' eye fixations while they read a text and inspected an accompanying diagram, we find that low-ability subjects need to inspect diagrmas more often than high-ability tesxt. The data also suggest that knowledge of what is relevant in a diagram might be a prerequisite and encoding information on a diagram.

  10. Interest, Inferences, and Learning from Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinton, Virginia; van den Broek, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Topic interest and learning from texts have been found to be positively associated with each other. However, the reason for this positive association is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine a cognitive process, inference generation, that could explain the positive association between interest and learning from texts. In…

  11. Diode and Diode Circuits, a Programmed Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman; Kirwin, Gerald J.

    This programed text on diode and diode circuits was developed under contract with the United States Office of Education as Number 4 in a series of materials for use in an electrical engineering sequence. It is intended as a supplement to a regular text and other instructional material. (DH)

  12. Teaching Theory through Popular Culture Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trier, James

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a pedagogical approach to teaching theory to pre-service teachers. This approach involves articulating academic texts that introduce theoretical ideas and tools with carefully selected popular culture texts that can be taken up to illustrate the elements of a particular theory. Examples of the theories…

  13. Text & Teaching: The Search for Human Excellence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Michael J., Ed.; Ambrosio, Francis J., Ed.

    This volume contains 13 essays by distinguished scholars and public figures on texts that influenced them to act wisely and justly in their personal and professional lives. These essays were originally given at two Symposia on Text and Teaching at Georgetown University. The participants and their subjects are as follows: (1) Edmund D. Pellegrino…

  14. Texts, Troubled Teens, and Troubling Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatum, Alfred W., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Seeking ways to effectively mediate texts with troubled teens in troubling times is worth the investment. Text is a powerful tool for shaping positive life trajectories, especially for those teens being affected by vulnerable-producing conditions that interrupt positive human development. These conditions, coupled with poor literacy skills

  15. The Weaknesses of Full-Text Searching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beall, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a theoretical critique of the deficiencies of full-text searching in academic library databases. Because full-text searching relies on matching words in a search query with words in online resources, it is an inefficient method of finding information in a database. This matching fails to retrieve synonyms, and it also retrieves…

  16. Cameras, Computers Help to Decipher Ancient Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coughlin, Ellen K.

    1987-01-01

    Epigrapher and philologist Bruce Zuckerman, directs an archive of photographs and other images of ancient biblical and related texts. By using sophisticated technical photography and computer graphics, he makes his photographs of ancient texts reveal more than a camera alone ever could. (MLW)

  17. Seeking a New Biology through Text Mining

    PubMed Central

    Rzhetsky, Andrey; Seringhaus, Michael; Gerstein, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Tens of thousands of biomedical journals exist, and the deluge of new articles in the biomedical sciences is leading to information overload. Hence, there is much interest in text mining, the use of computational tools to enhance the human ability to parse and understand complex text. PMID:18614002

  18. Texts, Troubled Teens, and Troubling Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatum, Alfred W., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Seeking ways to effectively mediate texts with troubled teens in troubling times is worth the investment. Text is a powerful tool for shaping positive life trajectories, especially for those teens being affected by vulnerable-producing conditions that interrupt positive human development. These conditions, coupled with poor literacy skills…

  19. Unlocking the Secrets of Complex Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenworth, Mary

    2013-01-01

    "Our job is to instill in students a deep sense of engagement with the intricacies of complex texts, to rouse them to see more in the texts they read--and to do this in a way that makes them want to read more," writes Mary Ehrenworth. A tall order--but Ehrenworth presents specific close reading practices that teachers can implement to…

  20. Opening Mathematics Texts: Resisting the Seduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, David

    2012-01-01

    This analysis of the writing in a grade 7 mathematics textbook distinguishes between closed texts and open texts, which acknowledge multiple possibilities. I use tools that have recently been applied in mathematics contexts, focussing on grammatical features that include personal pronouns, modality, and types of imperatives, as well as on…

  1. Causal Inferences during Text Comprehension and Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Susan

    As comprehension failure results whenever readers are unable to infer missing causal connections, recent comprehension research has focused both on assessing the inferential complexity of texts and on investigating students' developing ability to infer causal relationships. Studies have demonstrated that texts rely on four types of causal…

  2. Classifying the Context Clues in Children's Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowds, Susan J. Parault; Haverback, Heather Rogers; Parkinson, Meghan M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine which types of context clues exist in children's texts and whether it is possible for experts to identify reliably those clues. Three experienced coders used Ames' clue set as a foundation for a system to classify context clues in children's text. Findings showed that the adjustments to Ames' system resulted in 15

  3. Evaluating Statistics Texts Used in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwell, Michael R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the construction of instruments for evaluating statistics texts that are grounded in the statistical education and text evaluation literatures. Student, instructor, and expert evaluator instruments were piloted with 36 graduate students and 5 faculty members. Results suggest the usefulness of the developed instruments. (SLD)

  4. Helping Children Become More Knowledgeable through Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B.; Roskos, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    With the adoption of the Common Core State Standards, curriculum resources are shifting from an emphasis on literary texts to a greater focus on informational texts. Although we need to understand the intention of these new Common Core State Standards, and the important drive toward greater content knowledge for all students, we must be wary of…

  5. Managing Training Materials with Structured Text Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streit, Les D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes characteristics of structured text design; benefits of its use in training; benefits for developers of training materials and steps in preparing training materials. A case study illustrating how the structured text design process solved the sales training needs of the Mercedes-Benz Truck Company is presented. (MBR)

  6. Aesthetical Information Impact of a Literary Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, M. F.

    The aim of this study was to explore the aesthetic impact of a literary text on the human mind and to extend the knowledge on how and when the information from a book enters the human brain, and if and when it starts to be processed and, possibly, memorized. Readers' responses to aesthetic texts were measured through a series of biometric…

  7. Bodily Pleasures and/as the Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagood, Margaret C.

    2005-01-01

    Literacy education is at a crossroads. While traditional school experiences still prize disembodied experiences of reading print-based texts as the pinnacle of sound education, informal learning experiences provide fruitful examples of the ways that visual texts are read as they are embodied by readers. In this paper I draw from the literacy lives…

  8. Classifying the Context Clues in Children's Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowds, Susan J. Parault; Haverback, Heather Rogers; Parkinson, Meghan M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine which types of context clues exist in children's texts and whether it is possible for experts to identify reliably those clues. Three experienced coders used Ames' clue set as a foundation for a system to classify context clues in children's text. Findings showed that the adjustments to Ames' system resulted in 15…

  9. Traversing "Terra Incognita": Mapping Literary Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Sharona A.

    2001-01-01

    Considers how mapping literary works provides students with a powerful tool for critical analysis. Suggests that educators need to force students to do something different with the text. Notes that the author's solution is to insist that her students visualize the text on paper. (SG)

  10. Using Digital Texts to Promote Fluent Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoermer, Andrea; Williams, Lunetta

    2012-01-01

    Fluency is a critical skill of adept readers. As listening to read alouds and performing Readers Theatre scripts are two prevalent strategies that can increase students' fluency skills, this article provides suggestions in using these strategies with digital texts through free, online resources. Digital texts can be accessed using a desktop,…

  11. Elaborative Inferences on an Expository Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durgunoglu, Aydin Y.; Jehng, Jihn-Chang J.

    1991-01-01

    The distinction between remembering text information and applying the acquired knowledge (making inferences) was studied with a dissociation paradigm, using 110 undergraduates who performed verification and recognition tasks. The same variables did not affect performance on the two tasks. Text organization affected recognition but not verification…

  12. Improving Instructional Print Materials through Text Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balan, Phyllis

    1989-01-01

    Discusses how to use text design to improve printed instructional materials. Topics discussed include text structuring; how readers process information; page layout; spacing; illustrative material; information mapping; verbal and visual cues; the use of headings; and typographical cues. (nine references) (LRW)

  13. Reader, Text, Translation, and Interpretive Potentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollerup, Cay; And Others

    No matter what pains translators take to produce a target-language text "identical" to the source-language text, criticism and/or translation of an original literary work cannot be the same in different language communities. That translation may change potentialities in the textual experience is particularly obvious in literature with a strong

  14. Language and the Design of Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janks, Hilary

    2005-01-01

    By demonstrating lexical and grammatical analysis--the rough work that underpins critical discourse analysis--this paper demonstrates the importance of grammatical knowledge for the critical reading of texts. It also provides readers with a grammar rubric for working systematically with the linguistic analysis of texts and argues that Fairclough's

  15. Teaching Theory through Popular Culture Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trier, James

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a pedagogical approach to teaching theory to pre-service teachers. This approach involves articulating academic texts that introduce theoretical ideas and tools with carefully selected popular culture texts that can be taken up to illustrate the elements of a particular theory. Examples of the theories

  16. Readability Revisited? The Implications of Text Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, David; Janan, Dahlia

    2013-01-01

    The concept of readability has had a variable history, moving from a position where it was considered as a very important topic for those responsible for producing texts and matching those texts to the abilities and needs of learners, to its current declining visibility in the education literature. Some important work has been coming from the USA…

  17. Vocabulary Difficulty, Prior Knowledge, and Text Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahl, Steven A.; Jacobson, Michael G.

    1986-01-01

    Examines the relative importance of vocabulary difficulty and prior knowledge on comprehension of narrative passages. Finds that knowledge-based preinstruction can significantly improve comprehension of a text dealing with an unfamiliar topic, but cannot compensate for difficult text vocabulary. (RS)

  18. Automatically generating extraction patterns from untagged text

    SciTech Connect

    Riloff, E.

    1996-12-31

    Many corpus-based natural language processing systems rely on text corpora that have been manually annotated with syntactic or semantic tags. In particular, all previous dictionary construction systems for information extraction have used an annotated training corpus or some form of annotated input. We have developed a system called AutoSlog-TS that creates dictionaries of extraction patterns using only untagged text. AutoSlog-TS is based on the AutoSlog system, which generated extraction patterns using annotated text and a set of heuristic rules. By adapting AutoSlog and combining it with statistical techniques, we eliminated its dependency on tagged text. In experiments with the MUC-4 terrorism domain, AutoSlog-TS created a dictionary of extraction patterns that performed comparably to a dictionary created by AutoSlog, using only preclassified texts as input.

  19. Mining Quality Phrases from Massive Text Corpora

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jialu; Shang, Jingbo; Wang, Chi; Ren, Xiang; Han, Jiawei

    2015-01-01

    Text data are ubiquitous and play an essential role in big data applications. However, text data are mostly unstructured. Transforming unstructured text into structured units (e.g., semantically meaningful phrases) will substantially reduce semantic ambiguity and enhance the power and efficiency at manipulating such data using database technology. Thus mining quality phrases is a critical research problem in the field of databases. In this paper, we propose a new framework that extracts quality phrases from text corpora integrated with phrasal segmentation. The framework requires only limited training but the quality of phrases so generated is close to human judgment. Moreover, the method is scalable: both computation time and required space grow linearly as corpus size increases. Our experiments on large text corpora demonstrate the quality and efficiency of the new method. PMID:26705375

  20. Frontiers of biomedical text mining: current progress

    PubMed Central

    Zweigenbaum, Pierre; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Yu, Hong; Cohen, Kevin B.

    2008-01-01

    It is now almost 15 years since the publication of the first paper on text mining in the genomics domain, and decades since the first paper on text mining in the medical domain. Enormous progress has been made in the areas of information retrieval, evaluation methodologies and resource construction. Some problems, such as abbreviation-handling, can essentially be considered solved problems, and others, such as identification of gene mentions in text, seem likely to be solved soon. However, a number of problems at the frontiers of biomedical text mining continue to present interesting challenges and opportunities for great improvements and interesting research. In this article we review the current state of the art in biomedical text mining or ‘BioNLP’ in general, focusing primarily on papers published within the past year. PMID:17977867

  1. Recognition as Translating Images into Text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, Kobus; Duygulu, Pinar; Forsyth, David A.

    2003-01-01

    We present an overview of a new paradigm for tackling long standing computer vision problems. Specifically our approach is to build statistical models which translate from a visual representations (images) to semantic ones (associated text). As providing optimal text for training is difficult at best, we propose working with whatever associated text is available in large quantities. Examples include large image collections with keywords, museum image collections with descriptive text, news photos, and images on the web. In this paper we discuss how the translation approach can give a handle on difficult questions such as: What counts as an object? Which objects are easy to recognize and which are hard? Which objects are indistinguishable using our features? How to integrate low level vision processes such as feature based segmentation, with high level processes such as grouping. We also summarize some of the models proposed for translating from visual information to text, and some of the methods used to evaluate their performance.

  2. Mining for Surprise Events within Text Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Paul D.; Engel, David W.; Cramer, Nicholas O.

    2009-04-30

    This paper summarizes algorithms and analysis methodology for mining the evolving content in text streams. Text streams include news, press releases from organizations, speeches, Internet blogs, etc. These data are a fundamental source for detecting and characterizing strategic intent of individuals and organizations as well as for detecting abrupt or surprising events within communities. Specifically, an analyst may need to know if and when the topic within a text stream changes. Much of the current text feature methodology is focused on understanding and analyzing a single static collection of text documents. Corresponding analytic activities include summarizing the contents of the collection, grouping the documents based on similarity of content, and calculating concise summaries of the resulting groups. The approach reported here focuses on taking advantage of the temporal characteristics in a text stream to identify relevant features (such as change in content), and also on the analysis and algorithmic methodology to communicate these characteristics to a user. We present a variety of algorithms for detecting essential features within a text stream. A critical finding is that the characteristics used to identify features in a text stream are uncorrelated with the characteristics used to identify features in a static document collection. Our approach for communicating the information back to the user is to identify feature (word/phrase) groups. These resulting algorithms form the basis of developing software tools for a user to analyze and understand the content of text streams. We present analysis using both news information and abstracts from technical articles, and show how these algorithms provide understanding of the contents of these text streams.

  3. Text density, eye movements, and reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arditi, Aries R.; Knoblauch, Kenneth; Grunwald, Ilana

    1990-10-01

    Variable width (often called proportionally-spaced) fonts pack more characters, and hence more information, into a line of text than do fixed width fonts. They are thus preferred by typographers, who use them as a means of fitting more text on fewer pages. Does this higher density result in faster or slower reading speeds? We compared maximum reading speeds on a CRT using identical characters under three conditions of pitch: 1) fixed width (FW), each character centered in a constant horizontal space, 2) variable width (VW), characters occupying only the space required to eliminate overlap, and 3) modified variable width (MVW), average text density equated to that of the FW condition through the addition of inter-word microspace. For small characters (close to the acuity limit), FW produced the fastest reading, with MVW yielding better performance than VW pitch, indicating two kinds of "crowding" effects: one interfering with individual character recognition and one interfering with word recognition. For medium and large characters (-0.25 to 6 deg height), performance was best with VW pitch, slowest with MVW pitch, and intermediate with FW pitch. Hence dense text packing may improve performance with all but the smallest characters. Control experiments using rapid serial visual presentation of text show that the higher text density and lower eye movement requirements of VW text are responsible for its superiority at medium and large character sizes.

  4. Rhetorical structure theory and text analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, William C.; Matthiessen, Christian M. I. M.; Thompson, Sandra A.

    1989-11-01

    Recent research on text generation has shown that there is a need for stronger linguistic theories that tell in detail how texts communicate. The prevailing theories are very difficult to compare, and it is also very difficult to see how they might be combined into stronger theories. To make comparison and combination a bit more approachable, we have created a book which is designed to encourage comparison. A dozen different authors or teams, all experienced in discourse research, are given exactly the same text to analyze. The text is an appeal for money by a lobbying organization in Washington, DC. It informs, stimulates and manipulates the reader in a fascinating way. The joint analysis is far more insightful than any one team's analysis alone. This paper is our contribution to the book. Rhetorical Structure Theory (RST), the focus of this paper, is a way to account for the functional potential of text, its capacity to achieve the purposes of speakers and produce effects in hearers. It also shows a way to distinguish coherent texts from incoherent ones, and identifies consequences of text structure.

  5. How Popular Culture Texts Inform and Shape Students' Discussions of Social Studies Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Leigh A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I examine how 6th-grade students used pop culture texts to inform their understandings about social studies texts and shape their discussions of it. Discussions showed that students used pop culture texts in three ways when talking about social studies texts. First, students applied comprehension strategies to pop culture texts to…

  6. Text-Based Recall and Extra-Textual Generations Resulting from Simplified and Authentic Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crossley, Scott A.; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2016-01-01

    This study uses a moving windows self-paced reading task to assess text comprehension of beginning and intermediate-level simplified texts and authentic texts by L2 learners engaged in a text-retelling task. Linear mixed effects (LME) models revealed statistically significant main effects for reading proficiency and text level on the number of…

  7. Engaging Texts: Effects of Concreteness on Comprehensibility, Interest, and Recall in Four Text Types.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadoski, Mark; Goetz, Ernest T.; Rodriguez, Maximo

    2000-01-01

    Investigates concreteness as a text feature that engaged undergraduate readers' comprehension, interest, and learning in four text types: persuasion, exposition, literary stories, and narratives. Results show that concrete texts were recalled better than abstract texts, although the magnitude of the advantage varied across text types. Concreteness…

  8. Supplementing Floundering Text with Adjunct Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Kauffman, Douglas F.; Robinson, Daniel H.; DuBois, Nelson F.; Staley, Richard K.

    1999-01-01

    Describes three experiments with college students that compared the learning potential of text, outline, and matrix displays. Explains the theoretical framework, reviews related research, and discusses results that show matrix displays produced greater relational learning. (Author/LRW)

  9. Building Fluency through the Phrased Text Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasinski, Timothy; Yildirim, Kasim; Nageldinger, James

    2012-01-01

    This Teaching Tip article explores the importance of phrasing while reading. It also presents an instructional intervention strategy for helping students develop greater proficiency in reading with phrases that reflect the meaning of the text.

  10. Information fusion for automatic text classification

    SciTech Connect

    Dasigi, V.; Mann, R.C.; Protopopescu, V.A.

    1996-08-01

    Analysis and classification of free text documents encompass decision-making processes that rely on several clues derived from text and other contextual information. When using multiple clues, it is generally not known a priori how these should be integrated into a decision. An algorithmic sensor based on Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) (a recent successful method for text retrieval rather than classification) is the primary sensor used in our work, but its utility is limited by the {ital reference}{ital library} of documents. Thus, there is an important need to complement or at least supplement this sensor. We have developed a system that uses a neural network to integrate the LSI-based sensor with other clues derived from the text. This approach allows for systematic fusion of several information sources in order to determine a combined best decision about the category to which a document belongs.

  11. The Cultural Content of Business Spanish Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Christine Uber; Uber, David

    1992-01-01

    Eight business Spanish texts were examined to learn about the cultural content of the business Spanish curriculum. Questions of cultural topics and themes, presentation of cultural information, activities and techniques, and use of authentic materials were considered. (16 references) (LB)

  12. Directory of Introductory Psychology Texts in Print

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Margo

    1977-01-01

    A list of 147 introductory psychology textbooks and 109 reviews. Publication data and references are provided for each entry. The texts include instructor's manuals, study guides and workbooks, tests, and reading books. (ND)

  13. Preserved Network Metrics across Translated Texts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabatbat, Josephine Jill T.; Monsanto, Jica P.; Tapang, Giovanni A.

    2014-09-01

    Co-occurrence language networks based on Bible translations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) translations in different languages were constructed and compared with random text networks. Among the considered network metrics, the network size, N, the normalized betweenness centrality (BC), and the average k-nearest neighbors, knn, were found to be the most preserved across translations. Moreover, similar frequency distributions of co-occurring network motifs were observed for translated texts networks.

  14. Figure-Associated Text Summarization and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Polepalli Ramesh, Balaji; Sethi, Ricky J.; Yu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical literature incorporates millions of figures, which are a rich and important knowledge resource for biomedical researchers. Scientists need access to the figures and the knowledge they represent in order to validate research findings and to generate new hypotheses. By themselves, these figures are nearly always incomprehensible to both humans and machines and their associated texts are therefore essential for full comprehension. The associated text of a figure, however, is scattered throughout its full-text article and contains redundant information content. In this paper, we report the continued development and evaluation of several figure summarization systems, the FigSum+ systems, that automatically identify associated texts, remove redundant information, and generate a text summary for every figure in an article. Using a set of 94 annotated figures selected from 19 different journals, we conducted an intrinsic evaluation of FigSum+. We evaluate the performance by precision, recall, F1, and ROUGE scores. The best FigSum+ system is based on an unsupervised method, achieving F1 score of 0.66 and ROUGE-1 score of 0.97. The annotated data is available at figshare.com (http://figshare.com/articles/Figure_Associated_Text_Summarization_and_Evaluation/858903). PMID:25643357

  15. A method of text watermarking using presuppositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vybornova, O.; Macq, B.

    2007-02-01

    We propose a method for watermarking texts of arbitrary length using natural-language semantic structures. For the key of our approach we use the linguistic semantic phenomenon of presuppositions. Presupposition is the implicit information considered as well-known or which readers of the text are supposed to treat as well-known; this information is a semantic component of certain linguistic expressions (lexical items and syntactical constructions called presupposition triggers). The same sentence can be used with or without presupposition, or with a different presupposition trigger, provided that all the relations between subjects, objects and other discourse referents are preserved - such transformations will not change the meaning of the sentence. We define the distinct rules for presupposition identification for each trigger and regular transformation rules for using/non-using the presupposition in a given sentence (one bit per sentence in this case). Isolated sentences can carry the proposed watermarks. However, the longer is the text, the more efficient is the watermark. The proposed approach is resilient to main types of random transformations, like passivization, topicalization, extraposition, preposing, etc. The web of resolved presupposed information in the text will hold the watermark of the text (e.g. integrity watermark, or prove of ownership), introducing "secret ordering" into the text structure to make it resilient to "data loss" attacks and "data altering" attacks.

  16. Overview of the penman text generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, W.C.

    1983-04-01

    The problem of programming computers to produce natural language explanations and other texts on demand is an active research area in artifical intelligence. In the past, research systems designed for this purpose have been limited by the weakness of their linguistic bases, especially their grammars, and their techniques often cannot be transferred to new knowledge domains. A new text generation system, Penman, is designed to overcome these problems and produce fluent multiparagraph text in English in response to a goal presented to the system. Penman consists of four major modules: a knowledge acquisition module which can perform domain-specific searches for knowledge relevant to a given communication goal; a text planning module which can organize the relevant information, decide what portion to present, and decide how to lead the reader's attention and knowledge through the content; a sentence generation module based on a large systemic grammar of English; and an evaluation and plan-perturbation module which revises text plans based on evaluation of text produced. Development of Penman has included implementation of the largest systemic grammar of English in a single notation. A new semantic notation has been added to the systemic framework, and the semantics of nearly the entire grammar has been defined. The semantics is designed to be independent of the system's knowledge notation, so that it is usable with widely differing knowledge representtions, including both frame-based and predicate-calculus-based approaches.

  17. Figure-associated text summarization and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Polepalli Ramesh, Balaji; Sethi, Ricky J; Yu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical literature incorporates millions of figures, which are a rich and important knowledge resource for biomedical researchers. Scientists need access to the figures and the knowledge they represent in order to validate research findings and to generate new hypotheses. By themselves, these figures are nearly always incomprehensible to both humans and machines and their associated texts are therefore essential for full comprehension. The associated text of a figure, however, is scattered throughout its full-text article and contains redundant information content. In this paper, we report the continued development and evaluation of several figure summarization systems, the FigSum+ systems, that automatically identify associated texts, remove redundant information, and generate a text summary for every figure in an article. Using a set of 94 annotated figures selected from 19 different journals, we conducted an intrinsic evaluation of FigSum+. We evaluate the performance by precision, recall, F1, and ROUGE scores. The best FigSum+ system is based on an unsupervised method, achieving F1 score of 0.66 and ROUGE-1 score of 0.97. The annotated data is available at figshare.com (http://figshare.com/articles/Figure_Associated_Text_Summarization_and_Evaluation/858903). PMID:25643357

  18. Practical vision based degraded text recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Khader; Agaian, Sos; Saleh, Hani

    2011-02-01

    Rapid growth and progress in the medical, industrial, security and technology fields means more and more consideration for the use of camera based optical character recognition (OCR) Applying OCR to scanned documents is quite mature, and there are many commercial and research products available on this topic. These products achieve acceptable recognition accuracy and reasonable processing times especially with trained software, and constrained text characteristics. Even though the application space for OCR is huge, it is quite challenging to design a single system that is capable of performing automatic OCR for text embedded in an image irrespective of the application. Challenges for OCR systems include; images are taken under natural real world conditions, Surface curvature, text orientation, font, size, lighting conditions, and noise. These and many other conditions make it extremely difficult to achieve reasonable character recognition. Performance for conventional OCR systems drops dramatically as the degradation level of the text image quality increases. In this paper, a new recognition method is proposed to recognize solid or dotted line degraded characters. The degraded text string is localized and segmented using a new algorithm. The new method was implemented and tested using a development framework system that is capable of performing OCR on camera captured images. The framework allows parameter tuning of the image-processing algorithm based on a training set of camera-captured text images. Novel methods were used for enhancement, text localization and the segmentation algorithm which enables building a custom system that is capable of performing automatic OCR which can be used for different applications. The developed framework system includes: new image enhancement, filtering, and segmentation techniques which enabled higher recognition accuracies, faster processing time, and lower energy consumption, compared with the best state of the art published techniques. The system successfully produced impressive OCR accuracies (90% -to- 93%) using customized systems generated by our development framework in two industrial OCR applications: water bottle label text recognition and concrete slab plate text recognition. The system was also trained for the Arabic language alphabet, and demonstrated extremely high recognition accuracy (99%) for Arabic license name plate text recognition with processing times of 10 seconds. The accuracy and run times of the system were compared to conventional and many states of art methods, the proposed system shows excellent results.

  19. Extracting text from real-world scenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bixler, J. Patrick; Miller, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Many scenes contain significant textual information that can be extremely helpful for understanding and/or navigation. For example, text-based information can frequently be the primary cure used for navigating inside buildings. A subject might first read a marquee, then look for an appropriate hallway and walk along reading door signs and nameplates until the destination is found. Optical character recognition has been studied extensively in recent years, but has been applied almost exclusively to printed documents. As these techniques improve it becomes reasonable to ask whether they can be applied to an arbitrary scene in an attempt to extract text-based information. Before an automated system can be expected to navigate by reading signs, however, the text must first be segmented from the rest of the scene. This paper discusses the feasibility of extracting text from an arbitrary scene and using that information to guide the navigation of a mobile robot. Considered are some simple techniques for first locating text components and then tracking the individual characters to form words and phrases. Results for some sample images are also presented.

  20. Ancient medical texts, modern reading problems.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Maria Carlota

    2006-12-01

    The word tradition has a very specific meaning in linguistics: the passing down of a text, which may have been completed or corrected by different copyists at different times, when the concept of authorship was not the same as it is today. When reading an ancient text the word tradition must be in the reader's mind. To discuss one of the problems an ancient text poses to its modern readers, this work deals with one of the first printed medical texts in Portuguese, the Regimento proueytoso contra ha pestenença, and draws a parallel between it and two related texts, A moche profitable treatise against the pestilence, and the Recopilaçam das cousas que conuem guardar se no modo de preseruar à Cidade de Lixboa E os sãos, & curar os que esteuerem enfermos de Peste. The problems which arise out of the textual structure of those books show how difficult is to establish a tradition of another type, the medical tradition. The linguistic study of the innumerable medieval plague treatises may throw light on the continuities and on the disruptions of the so-called hippocratic-galenical medical tradition. PMID:17308822

  1. Managing Legal Texts in Requirements Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Paul N.; Antn, Annie I.

    Laws and regulations are playing an increasingly important role in requirements engineering and systems development. Monitoring systems for requirements and policy compliance has been recognized in the requirements engineering community as a key area for research. Similarly, legal compliance is critical in systems development, especially given that non-compliance can result in both financial and criminal penalties. Working with legal texts can be very challenging, however, because they contain numerous ambiguities, cross-references, domain-specific definitions, and acronyms, and are frequently amended via new statutes, regulations, and case law. Requirements engineers and compliance auditors must be able to identify relevant legal texts, extract requirements and other key concepts, and monitor compliance. This chapter surveys research efforts over the past 50 years in handling legal texts for systems development. This survey can aid requirements engineers and auditors to better specify, test, and monitor systems for compliance.

  2. Runaway electrons in TEXT-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, M. R.

    1994-08-01

    Runaway electrons have long been studied in tokamak plasmas. The previous results regarding runaway electrons and the detection of hard x-rays are reviewed. The hard x-ray energy on Texas EXperimental Tokamak - Upgrade(TEXT-U) is measured and the scaling of energy with electron density, n(sub e), is noted. This scaling suggests a runaway source term that scales roughly as 1 / n(sub e). The results indicate that runaways are created throughout the discharges. An upper bound for Chi(sub e) due to magnetic fluctuations was found to be .0343 sq m per sec. This is an order of magnitude too low to explain the thermal transport in TEXT, implying that electrostatic fluctuations are important in thermal transport in TEXT.

  3. Tenosynovitis caused by texting: an emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Ashurst, John V; Turco, Domenic A; Lieb, Brian E

    2010-05-01

    De Quervain tenosynovitis is characterized by pain that overlies the radial aspect of the wrist and that is aggravated by ulnar deviation of the hand. The most common cause of de Quervain tenosynovitis is overuse of the thumb musculature. The authors report a case of bilateral de Quervain tenosynovitis observed in a woman aged 48 years at a rural outpatient primary care office. The condition was induced by the patient's excessive use of the text messaging feature on her cellular telephone. Treatment, including naproxen, cock-up wrist splints, and limitation of texting, resulted in complete recovery of the patient. The authors urge physicians to be aware of the potential association between a patient's tenosynovitis symptoms and excessive texting. PMID:20538752

  4. A Randomized Trial of Text2Quit

    PubMed Central

    Abroms, Lorien C.; Boal, Ashley L.; Simmens, Samuel J.; Mendel, Judith A.; Windsor, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Text messaging programs on mobile phones have shown some promise in helping people quit smoking. Text2Quit is an automated, personalized, interactive mobile health program that sends text messages to offer advice, support, and reminders about quitting smoking. Purpose To evaluate the effect of Text2Quit on biochemically confirmed repeated point prevalence abstinence in the context of an RCT conducted in the U.S. Methods Participants (n=503) were recruited on the Internet and randomized to receive Text2Quit or self-help material. Between 2011 and 2013, participants were surveyed at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months post-enrollment to assess smoking status. Saliva was collected from participants who reported not smoking in the past 7 days at the 6-month follow-up. An intent to treat analysis was used, and those lost to follow-up were categorized as smokers. All analyses were completed in 2013. Results Biochemically confirmed repeated point prevalence abstinence favored the intervention group, with 11.1% abstinent compared to 5.0% of the control group (relative risk [RR]=2.22, CI=1.16, 4.26, p<0.05). Similarly, self reported repeated point prevalence abstinence was higher in the intervention group (19.9%) than in the control group (10.0%) (p<0.01). Effects were found to be uniform across the analyzed demographic subgroups, although suggestive of a larger effect for non-whites than whites. Conclusions These results provide initial support for the relative efficacy of the Text2Quit program. PMID:24913220

  5. M68000 RNF text formatter user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, R. W.; Grantham, C.

    1985-01-01

    A powerful, flexible text formatting program, RNF, is described. It is designed to automate many of the tedious elements of typing, including breaking a document into pages with titles and page numbers, formatting chapter and section headings, keeping track of page numbers for use in a table of contents, justifying lines by inserting blanks to give an even right margin, and inserting figures and footnotes at appropriate places on the page. The RNF program greatly facilitates both preparing and modifying a document because it allows you to concentrate your efforts on the content of the document instead of its appearance and because it removes the necessity of retyping text that has not changed.

  6. Function Labeling for Unparsed Chinese Text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Caixia; Ren, Fuji; Wang, Xiaojie; Zhong, Yixin

    This paper presents a work of function labeling for unparsed Chinese text. Unlike other attempts that utilize the full parse trees, we propose an effective way to recognize function labels directly based on lexical information, which is easily scalable for languages that lack sufficient parsing resources. Furthermore, we investigate a general method to iteratively simplify a sentence, thus transferring complicated sentence into structurally simple pieces. By means of a sequence learning model with hidden Markov support vector machine, we achieve the best F-measure of 87.40 on the text from Penn Chinese Treebank resources - a statistically significant improvement over the existing Chinese function labeling systems.

  7. Events and Trends in Text Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, David W.; Whitney, Paul D.; Cramer, Nicholas O.

    2010-03-04

    "Text streams--collections of documents or messages that are generated and observed over time--are ubiquitous. Our research and development are targeted at developing algorithms to find and characterize changes in topic within text streams. To date, this research has demonstrated the ability to detect and describe 1) short duration, atypical events and 2) the emergence of longer-term shifts in topical content. This technology has been applied to predefined temporally ordered document collections but is also suitable for application to near-real-time textual data streams."

  8. Spatial Text Visualization Using Automatic Typographic Maps.

    PubMed

    Afzal, S; Maciejewski, R; Jang, Yun; Elmqvist, N; Ebert, D S

    2012-12-01

    We present a method for automatically building typographic maps that merge text and spatial data into a visual representation where text alone forms the graphical features. We further show how to use this approach to visualize spatial data such as traffic density, crime rate, or demographic data. The technique accepts a vector representation of a geographic map and spatializes the textual labels in the space onto polylines and polygons based on user-defined visual attributes and constraints. Our sample implementation runs as a Web service, spatializing shape files from the OpenStreetMap project into typographic maps for any region. PMID:26357164

  9. Ancient Indian Astronomy in Introductory Texts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narahari Achar, B. N.

    1997-10-01

    It is customary in introductory survey courses in astronomy to devote some time to the history of astronomy. In the available text books only the Greek contribution receives any attention. Apart from Stonehenge and Chichenitza pictures, contributions from Babylon and China are some times mentioned. Hardly any account is given of ancient Indian astronomy. Even when something is mentioned it is incomplete or incorrect or both. Examples are given from several text books currently available. An attempt is made to correct this situation by sketching the contributions from the earliest astronomy of India, namely Vedaanga Jyotisha.

  10. Green Chemistry: An Introductory Text (Mike Lancaster)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosan, Alan M.

    2003-10-01

    With the unrealistic and irreconcilable choice of either technical or environmental performance still dominating the consumer view, the need for green teaching, green thinking, and green practice is paramount. Replete with extensive and varied examples, detailed analyses, and critical comparisons, this text is an important contribution to the training of future chemists and chemical engineers who will need to work together to plan and conduct syntheses requiring atom economy, energy efficiency, waste minimization, safe reactor design and operation all linked by an overarching environmental ethic. If these laudable goals are ever attained it will be as a consequence of the insightful knowledge and forthright teachings of texts like this one.

  11. Putting Text Complexity in Context: Refocusing on Comprehension of Complex Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valencia, Sheila W.; Wixson, Karen K.; Pearson, P. David

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts have prompted enormous attention to issues of text complexity. The purpose of this article is to put text complexity in perspective by moving from a primary focus on the text itself to a focus on the comprehension of complex text. We argue that a focus on comprehension is at the heart of

  12. Exploring the Effect of Background Knowledge and Text Cohesion on Learning from Texts in Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasparinatou, Alexandra; Grigoriadou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examine the effect of background knowledge and local cohesion on learning from texts. The study is based on construction-integration model. Participants were 176 undergraduate students who read a Computer Science text. Half of the participants read a text of maximum local cohesion and the other a text of minimum local cohesion.…

  13. OMG! Texting in Class = U Fail :( Empirical Evidence That Text Messaging During Class Disrupts Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingerich, Amanda C.; Lineweaver, Tara T.

    2014-01-01

    In two experiments, we examined the effects of text messaging during lecture on comprehension of lecture material. Students (in Experiment 1) and randomly assigned participants (in Experiment 2) in a text message condition texted a prescribed conversation while listening to a brief lecture. Students and participants in the no-text condition…

  14. Texting Styles and Information Change of SMS Text Messages in Filipino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabatbat, Josephine Jill T.; Tapang, Giovanni A.

    2013-02-01

    We identify the different styles of texting in Filipino short message service (SMS) texts and analyze the change in unigram and bigram frequencies due to these styles. Style preference vectors for sample texts were calculated and used to identify the style combination used by an average individual. The change in Shannon entropy of the SMS text is explained in light of a coding process.

  15. Putting Text Complexity in Context: Refocusing on Comprehension of Complex Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valencia, Sheila W.; Wixson, Karen K.; Pearson, P. David

    2014-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts have prompted enormous attention to issues of text complexity. The purpose of this article is to put text complexity in perspective by moving from a primary focus on the text itself to a focus on the comprehension of complex text. We argue that a focus on comprehension is at the heart of…

  16. OMG! Texting in Class = U Fail :( Empirical Evidence That Text Messaging During Class Disrupts Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingerich, Amanda C.; Lineweaver, Tara T.

    2014-01-01

    In two experiments, we examined the effects of text messaging during lecture on comprehension of lecture material. Students (in Experiment 1) and randomly assigned participants (in Experiment 2) in a text message condition texted a prescribed conversation while listening to a brief lecture. Students and participants in the no-text condition

  17. Fieldwork, Heritage and Engaging Landscape Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mains, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines and analyses efforts to critically engage with "heritage" through the development and responses to a series of undergraduate residential fieldwork trips held in the North Coast of Jamaica. The ways in which we read heritage through varied "texts"--specifically, material landscapes, guided heritage tours,…

  18. Electric Circuit Theory--Computer Illustrated Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riches, Brian

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the use of a computer-illustrated text (CIT) with integrated software to teach electric circuit theory to college students. Examples of software use are given, including simple animation, graphical displays, and problem-solving programs. Issues affecting electric circuit theory instruction are also addressed, including mathematical…

  19. Using Analogies to Study Social Studies Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuse, Loretta S.; Kuse, Hildegard R.

    1986-01-01

    A strategy to help senior high school social studies students overcome reading problems is suggested. Students are asked to use analogies to describe how they feel when they reach a difficult passage in their textbook. The students then use their own analogies to analyze ways to study the text. (RM)

  20. Project Physics Text 4, Light and Electromagnetism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    Optical and electromagnetic fundamentals are presented in this fourth unit of the Project Physics text for use by senior high students. Development of the wave theory in the first half of the 19th Century is described to deal with optical problems at the early stage. Following explanations of electric charges and forces, field concepts are…

  1. Electromagnetic Induction Rediscovered Using Original Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Describes a teaching unit on electromagnetic induction using historic texts. Uses some of Faraday's diary entries from 1831 to introduce the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction and teach about the properties of electricity, of taking conclusions from experiment, and scientific methodology. (ASK)

  2. Information Retrieval beyond the Text Document.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rui, Yong; Ortega, Michael; Huang, Thomas S.; Mehrotra, Sharad

    1999-01-01

    Reports some of the progress made over the years toward exploring information beyond the text domain. Describes the Multimedia Analysis and Retrieval Systems (MARS), developed to increase access to non-textual information. Addresses the following aspects of MARS: (1) visual feature extraction; (2) retrieval models; (3) query reformulation…

  3. BaffleText: a Human Interactive Proof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Monica; Baird, Henry S.

    2003-01-01

    Internet services designed for human use are being abused by programs. We present a defense against such attacks in the form of a CAPTCHA (Completely Automatic Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart) that exploits the difference in ability between humans and machines in reading images of text. CAPTCHAs are a special case of 'human interactive proofs,' a broad class of security protocols that allow people to identify themselves over networks as members of given groups. We point out vulnerabilities of reading-based CAPTCHAs to dictionary and computer-vision attacks. We also draw on the literature on the psychophysics of human reading, which suggests fresh defenses available to CAPTCHAs. Motivated by these considerations, we propose BaffleText, a CAPTCHA which uses non-English pronounceable words to defend against dictionary attacks, and Gestalt-motivated image-masking degradations to defend against image restoration attacks. Experiments on human subjects confirm the human legibility and user acceptance of BaffleText images. We have found an image-complexity measure that correlates well with user acceptance and assists in engineering the generation of challenges to fit the ability gap. Recent computer-vision attacks, run independently by Mori and Jitendra, suggest that BaffleText is stronger than two existing CAPTCHAs.

  4. Mining Texts in Reading to Write.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Stuart

    1992-01-01

    Proposes a set of strategies for connecting reading and writing, placing the discussion in the context of other pedagogical approaches designed to exploit the relationship between reading and writing. Explores ways in which students employ the strategies involved in "mining" a text--reconstructing context, inferring or imposing structure, and…

  5. Task-Driven Dynamic Text Summarization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workman, Terri Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to examine the efficacy of natural language processing (NLP) in summarizing bibliographic text for multiple purposes. Researchers have noted the accelerating growth of bibliographic databases. Information seekers using traditional information retrieval techniques when searching large bibliographic databases are often…

  6. Roundtable on Teaching Texts and Translations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Kathleen; Brown, Jane K.; Letzter, Jacqueline; Roulston, Christine; Ugarte, Michael; Maier, Carol

    2001-01-01

    Several authors who are both teachers and translators of literary works into English discuss teaching texts and translations. Draws on different experiences in a range of teaching situations: a great-books course, a multi-sectioned honors humanities course, a single-author course, a women's studies course, and a literary and cultural translation…

  7. Teaching "Paul's Case" as a Gay Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meem, Deborah T.

    2002-01-01

    Notes how the author usually limits her instructional role to that of facilitator, focusing on methods more than on specific content, but occasionally she feels compelled to take a more proactive approach, to guide the students toward one reading of a text. Considers that teaching Willa Cather's 1905 short story "Paul's Case" as a piece of gay…

  8. Assessing Literary Reasoning: Text and Task Complexities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Carol D.; Goldman, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses 3 broad challenges of assessment in reading comprehension: (a) explicitly articulating the knowledge and skills students need to recognize and be able to use in comprehending complex texts; (b) understanding how knowledge and skills progress and successively deepen and develop over repeated opportunities to engage in tasks…

  9. Automatic extraction of angiogenesis bioprocess from text

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinglong; McKendrick, Iain; Barrett, Ian; Dix, Ian; French, Tim; Tsujii, Jun'ichi; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Understanding key biological processes (bioprocesses) and their relationships with constituent biological entities and pharmaceutical agents is crucial for drug design and discovery. One way to harvest such information is searching the literature. However, bioprocesses are difficult to capture because they may occur in text in a variety of textual expressions. Moreover, a bioprocess is often composed of a series of bioevents, where a bioevent denotes changes to one or a group of cells involved in the bioprocess. Such bioevents are often used to refer to bioprocesses in text, which current techniques, relying solely on specialized lexicons, struggle to find. Results: This article presents a range of methods for finding bioprocess terms and events. To facilitate the study, we built a gold standard corpus in which terms and events related to angiogenesis, a key biological process of the growth of new blood vessels, were annotated. Statistics of the annotated corpus revealed that over 36% of the text expressions that referred to angiogenesis appeared as events. The proposed methods respectively employed domain-specific vocabularies, a manually annotated corpus and unstructured domain-specific documents. Evaluation results showed that, while a supervised machine-learning model yielded the best precision, recall and F1 scores, the other methods achieved reasonable performance and less cost to develop. Availability: The angiogenesis vocabularies, gold standard corpus, annotation guidelines and software described in this article are available at http://text0.mib.man.ac.uk/~mbassxw2/angiogenesis/ Contact: xinglong.wang@gmail.com PMID:21821664

  10. Text-Bullying among Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raskauskas, Juliana

    2007-01-01

    Increased availability of cell-phones has provided new avenues through which adolescents can bully their peers. Text-bullying is an emerging form of bullying which may threaten the emotional well-being of early adolescents. In this study 565 early adolescents (10-13 years old) completed questionnaires regarding their experiences with bullying…

  11. Writing Treatment for Aphasia: A Texting Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeson, Pelagie M.; Higginson, Kristina; Rising, Kindle

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment studies have documented the therapeutic and functional value of lexical writing treatment for individuals with severe aphasia. The purpose of this study was to determine whether such retraining could be accomplished using the typing feature of a cellular telephone, with the ultimate goal of using text messaging for…

  12. Knowledge Revision Processes in Refutation Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendeou, Panayiota; Walsh, Erinn K.; Smith, Emily R.; O'Brien, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    In the present set of experiments, we systematically examined the processes that occur while reading texts designed to refute and explain commonsense beliefs that reside in readers' long-term memory. In Experiment 1 (n = 36), providing readers with a refutation-plus-explanation of a commonsense belief was sufficient to significantly reduce…

  13. On-line handwritten text categorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Saldarriaga, Sebastián; Viard-Gaudin, Christian; Morin, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    As new innovative devices, accepting or producing on-line documents, emerge, managing facilities for these kinds of documents such as topic spotting are required. This means that we should be able to perform text categorization of on-line documents. The textual data available in on-line documents can be extracted through online recognition, a process which produces noise, i.e. errors, in the resulting text. This work reports experiments on categorization of on-line handwritten documents based on their textual contents. We analyze the effect of the word recognition rate on the categorization performances, by comparing the performances of a categorization system over the texts obtained through on-line handwriting recognition and the same texts available as ground truth. Two categorization algorithms (kNN and SVM) are compared in this work. A subset of the Reuters-21578 corpus consisting of more than 2000 handwritten documents has been collected for this study. Results show that accuracy loss is not significant, and precision loss is only significant for recall values of 60%-80% depending on the noise levels.

  14. The Basilisk: A Chorti (Mayan) Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fought, John

    Chorti, a Mayan language spoken in eastern Guatemala, is analyzed in this paper on the basis of a story text provided by an adult native speaker. A phonological description of Chorti is presented for background information; syllables, suprasegmentals, pause groups, articulation, and phonological rules are all considered. The author presents the…

  15. The Cultural Content of Business Spanish Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Christine Uber; Uber, David

    A study examined eight business Spanish textbooks for cultural content by looking at commonly appearing cultural topics and themes, presentation of cultural information, activities and techniques used to promote cultural understanding, and incorporation of authentic materials. The texts were evenly divided among beginning, intermediate, and…

  16. Relations between Adolescents' Text Processing and Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Michael B. W.; Goldman, Susan R.

    2005-01-01

    This research examines adolescents' learning about a historical issue from multiple information sources. Adolescents read 2 contradictory texts explaining the Fall of Rome and thought out loud after each sentence. After reading, a series of questions probed their understanding and ability to reason with the information. Think-aloud protocols were…

  17. The Uncanny, Digital Texts and Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrington, Victoria

    2005-01-01

    Literacy is one of the binding threads of modern society. Print text and literacy are irretrievably intertwined with many of the core themes of industrial society: family, gender, nation state. In the shift to new digital technologies, changing sociocultural landscapes and new theoretical frames, the growing difficulty in defining and delineating…

  18. Full Text Journal Subscriptions: An Evolutionary Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luther, Judy

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of companies offering Web accessible subscriptions to full text electronic versions of scientific, technical, and medical journals (Academic Press, Blackwell, EBSCO, Elsevier, Highwire Press, Information Quest, Institute of Physics, Johns Hopkins University Press, OCLC, OVID, Springer, and SWETS). Also lists guidelines for…

  19. Text Memorisation in Chinese Foreign Language Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Xia

    2012-01-01

    In China, a widespread learning practice for foreign languages are reading, reciting and memorising texts. This book investigates this practice against a background of Confucian heritage learning and western attitudes towards memorising, particularly audio-lingual approaches to language teaching and later largely negative attitudes. The author…

  20. On Cognitive Strategies for Processing Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigney, Joseph W.; Munro, Allen

    Recent developments in cognitive psychology and artificial intelligence have shown that various types of prior knowledge play important roles in understanding during text processing and have resulted in a new kind of model for conceptual processing, "procedural semantics." This paper discusses two types of units, or schemata, which, according to…