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Sample records for e-mail ascii text

  1. Is Judging Text On Screen Different from Judging Text in Print? A Naturalistic E-Mail Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, James

    2002-01-01

    An e-mail enquiry asked 270 people to compare two styles of passages sent via attachments and to judge which was more suitable for an undergraduate textbook. Of the 152 respondents, 70 (46%) read their texts on screen and 82 (54%) first printed out their texts. Results showed this had no measurable effects upon their judgments. (AEF)

  2. Computerized Automated Reminder Diabetes System (CARDS): E-Mail and SMS Cell Phone Text Messaging Reminders to Support Diabetes Management

    PubMed Central

    Hanauer, David A.; Wentzell, Katherine; Laffel, Nikki

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cell phone text messaging, via the Short Messaging Service (SMS), offers the promise of a highly portable, well-accepted, and inexpensive modality for engaging youth and young adults in the management of their diabetes. This pilot and feasibility study compared two-way SMS cell phone messaging with e-mail reminders that were directed at encouraging blood glucose (BG) monitoring. Methods: Forty insulin-treated adolescents and young adults with diabetes were randomized to receive electronic reminders to check their BG levels via cell phone text messaging or e-mail reminders for a 3-month pilot study. Electronic messages were automatically generated, and participant replies with BG results were processed by the locally developed Computerized Automated Reminder Diabetes System (CARDS). Participants set their schedule for reminders on the secure CARDS website where they could also enter and review BG data. Results: Of the 40 participants, 22 were randomized to receive cell phone text message reminders and 18 to receive e-mail reminders; 18 in the cell phone group and 11 in the e-mail group used the system. Compared to the e-mail group, users in the cell phone group received more reminders (180.4 vs. 106.6 per user) and responded with BG results significantly more often (30.0 vs. 6.9 per user, P=0.04). During the first month cell phone users submitted twice as many BGs as e-mail users (27.2 vs. 13.8 per user); by month 3, usage waned. Conclusions: Cell phone text messaging to promote BG monitoring is a viable and acceptable option in adolescents and young adults with diabetes. However, maintaining interest levels for prolonged intervals remains a challenge. PMID:19848576

  3. German Deaf People Using Text Communication: Short Message Service, TTY, Relay Services, Fax, and E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Des; Power, Mary R.; Rehling, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    An online survey of German deaf people demonstrated that they use text communication through Short Message Service (SMS), e-mail, fax, and telephone typewriters (TTY) to communicate within communities of deaf and hearing people. SMS is used most, with more than 96% of respondents having access to a mobile phone. Most use is intrinsic and directed…

  4. Exploring potential use of internet, E-mail, and instant text messaging to promote breast health and mammogram use among immigrant Hispanic women in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Dang, Catherine M; Estrada, Sylvia; Bresee, Catherine; Phillips, Edward H

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is now the leading cause of death in Hispanic women (HW). Internet, e-mail, and instant text messaging may be cost-effective in educating HW about breast health and in reducing breast cancer mortality. We surveyed 905 HW women attending a free health fair about their technology use, acculturation, insurance status, mammography use, and breast cancer knowledge. Data were analyzed by t test or χ(2) tests. Mean age was 51.9 ± 14.2 years (range, 18 to 88 years). Ninety-two per cent were foreign-born. Most had completed some high school (39%) or elementary (38%) education. Most (62%) were uninsured. The majority spoke (67%) and read (66%) only Spanish. Only 60 per cent of HW older than 40 years had a recent mammogram. HW older than 40 years who had not had a recent mammogram were younger (mean 54.9 ± 10.8 vs 58 ± 10.4 years) and less likely to have health insurance (25 vs 44%; P < 0.001). Most HW never use the Internet (58%) or e-mail (64%). However, 70 per cent have mobile phones (66% older than 40 years), and 65 per cent use text messaging daily (58% older than 40 years, P = 0.001). In fact, 45 per cent wish to receive a mammogram reminder by text. Text messaging may be an inexpensive way to promote breast health and screening mammography use among uninsured HW. PMID:24160786

  5. Did You Get My E-Mail? Moving E-Mails beyond the Inbox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    The challenge today is how to make e-mail and other forms of electronic communication effective in motivating volunteer action. Is it possible to make e-mails feel personal and welcoming? E-mail, instant messaging, texting, and social media are tools that allow individuals to communicate quickly and inexpensively, but they are lifeless without the…

  6. Hooked on E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Kathy

    2011-01-01

    Information overload, and an expectation that e-mails, tweets, and text messages will be answered immediately, impact productivity. The younger, information-addicted workers have a greater capacity to process this open floodgate of information, as well as a better ability to multitask. Research suggests that there is a marked drop in worker…

  7. E-Mail and Ethical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Loretta J.; Hendricks, Bret

    2009-01-01

    The proliferation of the use of e-mail and texting has created some ethical dilemmas for family counselors. Although e-mail can expand and encourage communication, it is not problem free and, in fact, can pose problems. There are issues with privacy, confidentiality, and maintaining an appropriate professional relationship. Family counselors…

  8. Business E-mail: Guidelines for Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munter, Mary; Rogers, Priscilla S.; Rymer, Jone

    2003-01-01

    Presents guidelines to help businesspeople and business students become more effective and efficient in the use of e-mail. Includes the authors' experiences as instructors in diverse business schools and corporate settings. Notes that the guidelines cover: recognizing the nature of e-mail; composing e-mail; and processing and managing e-mail. (SG)

  9. E-Mail: Write Protection?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    1998-01-01

    A complex case involving a disgruntled ex-employee's invasion of a college president's e-mail system resulted in a decision granting two plaintiffs' motions for summary judgment. This was the first recorded education-related collision on the electronic superhighway. Every educational institution should have a policy and procedure regarding what…

  10. LLNL E-Mail Utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dellamaggiore, N. J.; Hamel, B. B.

    2005-10-31

    The LLNL E-mail Utilities software library is a Java API that simplifies the creation and delivery of email in Java business applications. It consists of a database-driven template engine, various strategies for composing, queuing, dispatching email and a Java Swing GUI for creating and editing email templates.

  11. Electronic Mail--A New Style of Communication or Just a New Medium? An Investigation into the Text Features of E-Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gains, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    A study analyzed and compared the discourse of electronic mail messages from commercial and academic environments. Key text features were examined for style and convention patterns. Results suggest commercial messages follow normal conventions for standard written business English, and academic users may view the medium as a pseudo-conversational…

  12. Keeping E-Mail in Top Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2005-01-01

    Despite the fact that e-mail has been firmly entrenched in offices and homes for some time, debate still rages online about e-mail usage and style. How should and e-mail message begin and end? If replying to a message, should the message be quoted before or after? What tone should be taken with a business e-mail? The author talked with some heavy…

  13. Netiquette: e-mail for group practices.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jennifer A

    2007-01-01

    E-mail is a relatively new tool in business and communication, and it has unique nuances. Effective use of e-mail and its features can enhance performance, interaction, even morale. Misuse of e-mail can be a legal liability and damage relationships within your practice. This article provides a guide to optimizing the use of e-mail within your practice. PMID:17425016

  14. Senior Citizens Who Use E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark-Wroblewski, Kimberly; Edelbaum, Jessica K.; Ryan, Joseph J.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in the aging population and use of computer-related technology have spawned research regarding older adults' use of the Internet. This study examined characteristics differentiating rural Midwestern senior citizens (N = 298) who use e-mail from those who do not. Compared to those who did not use e-mail, e-mail-using seniors were younger…

  15. The E-Mail Reference Interview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abels, Eileen G.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses differences between e-mail reference interviews and those conducted using other media; presents a taxonomy of approaches to e-mail interviews; and introduces a model e-mail interview, based on a project at the University of Maryland's College of Library and Information Services. (Author/LRW)

  16. Devising Writing in E-Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    Describes the new medium of e-mail as a sort of hybrid combining of print and speech. Argues that writing teachers must not ignore this new medium. Includes an e-mail update to "Elements of Style" and a description of how one teacher uses e-mail. (SR)

  17. Properties of evolving e-mail networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; de Wilde, Philippe

    2004-12-01

    Computer viruses spread by attaching to an e-mail message and sending themselves to users whose addresses are in the e-mail address book of the recipients. Here we investigate a simple model of an evolving e-mail network, with nodes as e-mail address books of users and links as the records of e-mail addresses in the address books. Within specific periods, some new links are generated and some old links are deleted. We study the statistical properties of this e-mail network and observe the effect of the evolution on the structure of the network. We also find that the balance between the generation procedure and deletion procedure is dependent on different parameters of the model.

  18. Transparent Proxy for Secure E-Mail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalák, Juraj; Hudec, Ladislav

    2010-05-01

    The paper deals with the security of e-mail messages and e-mail server implementation by means of a transparent SMTP proxy. The security features include encryption and signing of transported messages. The goal is to design and implement a software proxy for secure e-mail including its monitoring, administration, encryption and signing keys administration. In particular, we focus on automatic public key on-the-fly encryption and signing of e-mail messages according to S/MIME standard by means of an embedded computer system whose function can be briefly described as a brouter with transparent SMTP proxy.

  19. E-Mail Communication with First Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, Elizabeth A.

    This qualitative study investigated the following questions: (1) How quickly can first graders master basic e-mailing skills? (2) Does communicating through the Internet and e-mail provide motivation or incentive for children to read or write? (3) Will children write with specific conventions due to having an identifiable audience to whom they are…

  20. Organizations and E-Mail Usage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krapels, Roberta H.; Moss, Frederick K.

    1997-01-01

    Argues that, with increasing interest in electronic communications, e-mail usage by employees becomes critical to teaching business communication issues. Presents interview results from three different types of businesses regarding employee e-mail usage. Notes that interviewees had little negative to say about electronic messaging. (SR)

  1. ascii2gdocs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-11-30

    Enables UNIX and Mac OS X command line users to put (individually or batch mode) local ascii files into Google Documents, where the ascii is converted to Google Document format using formatting the user can specify.

  2. E-mail netiquette for the medical practice employee: 50 do's and don'ts.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2011-01-01

    E-mail has at one and the same time become a primary communication tool for many medical practice employees and a source of untold frustration, misunderstandings, and stress. This article provides a total of 50 rules (25 do's and 25 don'ts) for e-mail netiquette to help medical practice employees use e-mail more effectively. It offers suggestions about the optimal format of e-mails, tips for writing concise e-mail texts, and guidance about the most pressing e-mail privacy and confidentiality concerns. Medical practice employees can use the practical tips presented in this article to help them save time and use their medical practices' e-mail system more productively and effectively. This article also offers suggestions for creating and using a medical practice e-mail disclaimer statement. It describes the six legal threats a disclaimer statement can prevent and the typical content for such disclaimers. Finally, this article includes guidance about creating and implementing a medical practice e-mail policy and provides an outline of typical e-mail policy content. PMID:22111286

  3. Embracing technology: patients', family members' and nurse specialists' experience of communicating using e-mail.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, Amanda; Moore, Sally; Plant, Hilary

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports on a study exploring the usefulness of e-mail as a means of communication between nurse specialists and patients with lung cancer and their families. The study involved two lung cancer nurse specialists and 16 patients and family members who used e-mail with them during the 6-month study period. Data were collected from three sources: (1) e-mail contact between the nurse specialists and patients/family members, (2) patient/family member questionnaire and (3) a focus group/reflective session with the nurse specialists. Quantitative data collected from the e-mails and the questionnaires were analysed descriptively and are presented as summary statistics. Text data from the questionnaires and e-mails were analysed using content analysis. Findings suggest that e-mail can be an effective and convenient means of communication between nurse specialists, and patients and family members. Patients and family members reported high levels of satisfaction with this method of communication. It was found to be quick and easy, and patients and family members were satisfied with both the response and the speed of response from the nurse specialists. Nurse specialists were also positive about e-mail use and found that the benefits of using e-mail with patients/family members outweighed any disadvantages. Further investigation is recommended involving other health care professionals and different patient groups to ensure the safe and appropriate use of e-mail within health care. PMID:18406667

  4. Who Owns Your E-mail?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panepinto, Joe

    1995-01-01

    Examines recent findings that could influence the use of e-mail on university campuses. National privacy legislation and the inviolability of student records are discussed. It is concluded that more effective safeguards are necessary, and that the current steps are inadequate for the protection of students' rights. (Author/LRW)

  5. Strategy Inventory for E-Mail Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Yu-Chih

    A 50-item, five-point Likert scale inventory was designed to be a valid and reliable group-administered instrument to provide a profile of the declarative knowledge of electronic mail (e-mail) strategies used by students learning English as a second language (ESL) or foreign language (EFL). The inventory was developed primarily for voluntary use…

  6. The Perils of E-Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    Describes several legal issues involving school board member use of electronic mail, especially violation of state open-meeting laws. Offers several tips to avoid legal pitfalls. Briefly describes Freedom on Information Act issues related to electronic communication. Provides sample policies on e-mail use. (PKP)

  7. Scale-free topology of e-mail networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, Holger; Mielsch, Lutz-Ingo; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2002-09-01

    We study the topology of e-mail networks with e-mail addresses as nodes and e-mails as links using data from server log files. The resulting network exhibits a scale-free link distribution and pronounced small-world behavior, as observed in other social networks. These observations imply that the spreading of e-mail viruses is greatly facilitated in real e-mail networks compared to random architectures.

  8. Poissonian bursts in e-mail correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anteneodo, C.; Malmgren, R. D.; Chialvo, D. R.

    2010-06-01

    Recent work has shown that the distribution of inter-event times for e-mail communication exhibits a heavy tail which is statistically consistent with a cascading Poisson process. In this work we extend this analysis to higher-order statistics, using the Fano and Allan factors to quantify the extent to which the empirical data are more correlated — bursty — than a Poisson process. Our analysis demonstrates that the correlations in the empirical data are indistinguishable from those of randomly reordered time series, illustrating that any correlations in the data are not due to the precise ordering of events. We further find that correlations in synthetic time series generated from a cascading Poisson process agree quite well with the correlations observed in the empirical data. Finally, we rescale the empirical time series to confirm that e-mail correspondence is no more correlated than expected from a suitably chosen Poisson process.

  9. E-mail: a new management parameter.

    PubMed

    Day, J

    2001-05-15

    E-mail is an increasingly common way to share information within business communities and the general population. This technology can significantly affect the process of and expectations for communications between the clinician and the patient. The unique characteristics and attributes of computer-based communications can ultimately enhance outcomes for patient well-being if the clinician is informed, proactive, and avoids certain potential pitfalls related to the technology and its inclusion within the pattern of care. In this article the author considers the impact of E-mail on personal and professional life and includes ideas the reader may find of value in managing and orchestrating this new dimension for communications. PMID:12167935

  10. E-mail, decisional styles, and rest breaks.

    PubMed

    Baker, James R; Phillips, James G

    2007-10-01

    E-mail is a common but problematic work application. A scale was created to measure tendencies to use e-mail to take breaks (e-breaking); and self-esteem and decisional style (vigilance, procrastination, buck-passing, hypervigilance) were used to predict the self-reported and actual e-mail behaviors of 133 participants (students and marketing employees). Individuals who were low in defensive avoidance (buck-passing) engaged in more e-mailing per week, both in time spent on e-mail and message volume. E-breakers were more likely to engage in behavioral procrastination and spent more time on personal e-mail. PMID:17927540

  11. Is Monitoring Employees' E-Mail an Invasion of Privacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geroy, Gary D.; Jankovich, Jackie L.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the issue of e-mail and employee privacy rights. Highlights include laws and proposed legislation, ethical dilemmas, task and nontask messages and organizational misconduct, and policy guidelines for decision making about e-mail monitoring. (AEF)

  12. Fluctuation in e-mail sizes weakens power-law correlations in e-mail flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, Yoshitsugu; Hieida, Yasuhiro; Tadaki, Shin-ichi

    2013-09-01

    Power-law correlations have been observed in packet flow over the Internet. The possible origin of these correlations includes demand for Internet services. We observe the demand for e-mail services in an organization, and analyze correlations in the flow and the sequence of send requests using a Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA). The correlation in the flow is found to be weaker than that in the send requests. Four types of artificial flow are constructed to investigate the effects of fluctuations in e-mail sizes. As a result, we find that the correlation in the flow originates from that in the sequence of send requests. The strength of the power-law correlation decreases as a function of the ratio of the standard deviation of e-mail sizes to their average.

  13. Prevent Spam Filters from Blocking Legitimate E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2004-01-01

    There's no question about it: Spam is a scourge. This ever-increasing torrent of unsolicited commercial mass e-mail saps productivity and, for some, threatens the very viability of e-mail. The battle against spam, unfortunately, is creating problems of its own, with people sometimes unable to send legitimate e-mail and other times unable to…

  14. Teleradiology applications with DICOM-e-mail.

    PubMed

    Weisser, G; Engelmann, U; Ruggiero, S; Runa, A; Schröter, A; Baur, S; Walz, M

    2007-05-01

    For the connection of several partners to a Dicom-e-mail based teleradiology network concepts were developed to allow the integration of different teleradiology applications. The organisational and technical needs for such an integration were analysed. More than 60 institutions including 23 hospitals in the Rhein-Neckar-Region, Germany were connected. The needed functionality was grouped in six teleradiology applications (emergency consultation, tele-guided examinations, expert consultations, cooperative work, scientific cooperations and homework with on call services) and their technical and organisational needs according to availability, speed of transfer, workflow definitions and data security needs was analysed. For the local integration of teleradiology services the setup and workflow is presented for a standalone teleradiology workstation and a server based teleradiology gateway. The line type needed for different groups of applications and users is defined. The security concept and fallback strategies are laid out, potential security problems and sources of errors are discussed. The specialties for the emergency teleradiology application are presented. The DICOM-e-mail protocol is a flexible and powerful protocol that can be used for a variety of teleradiology applications. It can meet the conditions for emergency applications but is limited if synchronous applications like teleconferences are needed. PMID:17031452

  15. Learning Environments for Studying Argumentation: Learning Effects of E-Mail and Face-to-Face Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marttunen, Miika; Laurinen, Leena

    In a teaching experiment, 16 face-to-face and 11 e-mail Finnish university students engaged in an argumentation course. The 19 students of the control group did not study argumentation. The course involved two lectures, exercises with argumentative texts, and face-to-face or e-mail seminar discussions based on these texts. The topics of the texts…

  16. AstroAsciiData: ASCII table Python module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kümmel, Martin; Haase, Jonas

    2013-11-01

    ASCII tables continue to be one of the most popular and widely used data exchange formats in astronomy. AstroAsciiData, written in Python, imports all reasonably well-formed ASCII tables. It retains formatting of data values, allows column-first access, supports SExtractor style headings, performs column sorting, and exports data to other formats, including FITS, Numpy/Numarray, and LaTeX table format. It also offers interchangeable comment character, column delimiter and null value.

  17. How To: Use an E-Mail List

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    E-mail lists (also known as LISTERVS[TM]) are organized by topic of interest, such as the Foreign Language Teaching Forum or the "Elementary Education List." People with an interest in the topic can subscribe to the list to receive periodic e-mails. Some lists are read-only and similar to newsletters; others give subscribers the option to post to…

  18. Using E-mail as an Official Means of Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritland, Marian; Moore, Sue Shelton

    Nearly 90% of all University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire (UWEC) students and staff are regular users of e-mail. The University has taken advantage of this widespread use and replaced many paper distributions--payroll earnings statements, unofficial transcripts, degree audits, adviser grade reports, bills, et cetera--with distribution via e-mail.…

  19. Teacher Talk on E-Mail. Current Conversations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Elaine; Hill, Elaine

    1996-01-01

    A high school and a university teacher converse via e-mail concerning their cooperative project in electronic literacy. The conversation highlights the frustrations of system crashes, student successes and failures, and the beginning of one teacher's dissertation. References to technology include experiences with e-mail, an LCD panel, and closed…

  20. E-Mails Reveal Federal Reach Over Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Kathleen Kennedy

    2007-01-01

    This article reports how an "Education Week" review of hundreds of e-mail exchanges that detail a pattern of federal interference in "Reading First" have skirted legal prohibitions. In regular e-mail discussions, Christopher J. Doherty, the Reading First director at the U.S. Department of Education until last September, and G. Reid Lyon, a branch…

  1. E-Mail at Work: Is it Really Private?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, Cindy

    This paper examines the controversy of e-mail privacy in the workplace. Once an employee uses an e-mail system that belongs to the employer, according to recent case law, their privacy rights are forfeited. Employers will now have to start creating policies to safeguard themselves from expensive litigation, and employees will have to be more…

  2. Characteristics of Parent-Teacher E-Mail Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Blair

    2008-01-01

    In the past decade, the use of computer-mediated communication such as e-mail has reportedly increased the level of parental involvement and parent-teacher communication at the elementary and secondary level. However, research has not yet examined the characteristics of parent-teacher e-mail communication. Thirty parent and 30 teacher interviews…

  3. A Discourse Analysis of School Counseling Supervisory E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Melissa; Gordon, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    This article is a discourse analysis of weekly computer-mediated communications between 8 school counseling interns and their e-mail supervisor over a 16-week semester. Course-required e-mail supervision was provided as an adjunct to traditional face-to-face individual and group supervision. School counselor supervisees and supervisor enacted 3…

  4. Private E-Mail Requests and the Diffusion of Responsibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Greg; Yechiam, Eldad

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of e-mail technology and requesting information from multiple sources simultaneously focuses on an experiment demonstrating that addressing e-mails simultaneously to multiple recipients may actually reduce the number of helpful responses. Discusses diffusion of responsibility and implications for the application of social cueing theory…

  5. E-mail: Boon or Bane for School Leaders?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glendinning, Matt

    2006-01-01

    This article, by a principal who received over 17,000 e-mails in his first year on the job, explores ways in which email is reshaping education leadership. The main assets of e-mail--swift and efficient communication, more informed decision making through improved consultation with stakeholders, and automatic archiving of correspondence--come at a…

  6. E-mail communication in paediatrics: Ethical and clinical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Albersheim, S

    2010-01-01

    E-mail has become a commonplace ‘procedure’ in medical practice because it is efficient and inexpensive. However, there are potential misuses and abuses of this form of written communication, with clinical and ethical implications. Common uses of e-mail in paediatics include general communication with colleagues in a professional setting; electronic formal consultation, in which patient confidentiality is paramount; electronic ‘curb-side’ consultation, which may be perceived as a formal consultation; electronic discussion groups, which lack peer review; communication with current patients or their parents, which should be limited to simple, nonurgent issues; and communication with individuals seeking medical advice who are not patients, which is generally ill-advised. The present practice point offers a few practical suggestions including e-mail etiquette, security measures to ensure confidentiality, development of an e-mail policy for patients and parents, and separation of personal from professional e-mail. PMID:21358897

  7. E-mail to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening Within Social Networks: Acceptability and Content.

    PubMed

    Cutrona, Sarah L; Wagner, Joann; Roblin, Douglas W; Gaglio, Bridget; Williams, Andrew; Torres-Stone, Rosalie; Mazor, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Effective techniques to encourage colorectal cancer screening in underscreened populations have included social support interventions and e-mail reminders from physicians. Personalized e-mail messages to promote colorectal cancer screening within social networks could be even more effective but have not been studied. The authors interviewed 387 e-mail users, aged 42-73 years in Georgia, Hawaii, and Massachusetts. Participants were asked to edit a sample message in which the sender shares a recent colonoscopy experience and urges the recipient to discuss colorectal cancer screening with a doctor. For those reporting willingness to send this message, changes to the message and suggested subject lines were recorded. Edited text was analyzed for content and concordance with original message. The majority of participants (74.4%) were willing to e-mail a modifiable message. Of those willing, 63.5% edited the message. Common edits included deletion (17.7%) or modification (17.4%) of a negatively framed sentence on colon cancer risks and addition or modification of personalizing words (15.6%). Few edits changed the meaning of the message (5.6%), and even fewer introduced factual inaccuracies (1.7%). Modifiable e-mail messages offer a way for screened individuals to promote colorectal cancer screening to social network members. The accuracy and effects of such messages should be further studied. PMID:25839968

  8. Framing of climate change in newspaper coverage of the East Anglia e-mail scandal.

    PubMed

    Bowe, Brian J; Oshita, Tsuyoshi; Terracina-Hartman, Carol; Chao, Wen-Chi

    2014-02-01

    In late 2009, a series of e-mails related to climate research were made public following the hacking into a server and the e-mail accounts of researchers at the University of East Anglia Climate Research Unit. According to some skeptics of climate change research, the content of those e-mails suggested data were being manipulated, while climate scientists said their words were taken out of context. The news coverage of this scandal provides an opportunity to consider media framing. This study has two aims: to extend previous research using a cluster analysis technique to discern frames in media texts; and to provide insight into newspaper coverage of the scandal, which is often referred to as "Climategate." This study examines the frames present in two British and two American newspapers' coverage of the issue. PMID:23825247

  9. MAILBOOK: An E-mail Address Handling Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffily, M.; Miranda, M. S.; Nigri, A.; Santoro, A. F. S.

    Mailbook is a very useful tool for anyone who deals with a large amount of e-mail address and lists. It works both in UNIX and VMS systems, and supports the most popular mail agents for these systems. Its main purpose is the creation and maintenance of a standard e-mail address file from which extractions for the relevant mail agent can be made. Each address in the standard file has a nickname, known as mail alias. All the e-mail addresses and lists advantages are fully explored and are made available through the Mailbook tool interface.

  10. IntegraTUM Teilprojekt E-Mail: Rezentralisierung von E-Mail-Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehn, Max; Haarer, Ado; Schreiner, Alexander; Storz, Michael

    Das Teilprojekt E-Mail hatte ursprünglich die Aufgabe einen zentralen Mailservice mit verteilter Administration der Mailadressen für die TUM aufzubauen und diesen durch Anti-Spam- und Anti-Viren-Maßnahmen zu schützen. Auf diesen Mailservice sollten sowohl die am LRZ gehosteten Maildomains als auch die vielen lokal betriebenen Mailserver - soweit von deren Betreibern gewünscht - migriert werden. Neben einigen Rückschlägen und Hindernissen kam es im Laufe des Projektes auch zu einer Änderung der Anforderungen, sodass zum Ende des Projektes statt eines reinen Mailsystems ein Doppelsystem mit "shared SMTP address space" bestehend aus einem klassischen Message-Store mit POP/IMAP-Zugriff auf Basis von Postfix + Dovecot und einem Groupware-System auf Basis von Microsoft Exchange in Produktion ging, wobei jeder Mitarbeiter und Student der TUM wählen kann, auf welchem der beiden Systeme sich seine Mailbox befindet.

  11. [Teleradiology with DICOM e-mail: recommendations of @GIT].

    PubMed

    Mildenberger, P; Kämmerer, M; Engelmann, U; Ruggiero, S; Klos, G; Runa, A; Schröter, A; Weisser, G; Walz, M; Schütze, B

    2005-05-01

    E-mail is ideal for ad-hoc connections in teleradiology. The DICOM standard offers the possibility to append DICOM data types as a MIME attachment to any e-mail, thus ensuring the transmission of the original DICOM data. Nevertheless, there are additional requirements (e.g. protection of data privacy) which must be obeyed. Because of the lack of given standards which would grant interoperability as well as manufacturer independence, teleradiology has not been established in Germany until today. Therefore, the IT-Team (Arbeitsgemeinschaft fur Informationstechnologie, @GIT) of the Radiological Society of Germany (Deutsche Rontgengesellschaft, DRG) set up an initiative to standardise telemedicine by using e-mail. Its members agreed that an e-mail-based variant would be the most practicable way to a communication solution -- as easy to implement as to use. In their opinion, e-mail represents the smallest common denominator for a safe data interchange that would fulfill the legal advantages for telemedicine in Germany. PMID:15871085

  12. Successful practices in the use of secure e-mail.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura W; Garrido, Terhilda; Christensen, Kate; Handley, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Physician use of secure e-mail with patients is anticipated to increase under Stage 2 Meaningful Use requirements, but little is known about how physicians can successfully incorporate it into daily work. We interviewed 27 "super user" physicians at Kaiser Permanente and Group Health who were identified by leaders as being technologically, operationally, and clinically adept and as having high levels of secure e-mail use with patients. They highly valued the use of secure e-mail with patients, despite concerns about a lack of adequate time to respond, and provided tips for using it successfully. They identified benefits that included better care and improved relationships with their patients. PMID:24937149

  13. Successful Practices in the Use of Secure E-mail

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Laura W; Garrido, Terhilda; Christensen, Kate; Handley, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Physician use of secure e-mail with patients is anticipated to increase under Stage 2 Meaningful Use requirements, but little is known about how physicians can successfully incorporate it into daily work. We interviewed 27 “super user” physicians at Kaiser Permanente and Group Health who were identified by leaders as being technologically, operationally, and clinically adept and as having high levels of secure e-mail use with patients. They highly valued the use of secure e-mail with patients, despite concerns about a lack of adequate time to respond, and provided tips for using it successfully. They identified benefits that included better care and improved relationships with their patients. PMID:24937149

  14. Comparing Two Survey Research Approaches: E-Mail and Web-Based Technology versus Traditional Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howes, Colleen M.; Mailloux, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    Contrasted two survey methodologies: e-mail-Web and traditional mail. Found that: (1) e-mail-Web respondents were proportionately more likely to be male and enrolled in school full-time; (2) more individual question non-response was present for the e-mail-Web sample; and (3) e-mail-Web respondents value different aspects of graduate school. (EV)

  15. E-Mail: Instructional Potentials and Learning Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulware, Beverly

    2002-01-01

    Examines second-graders' use of email to share with the researchers favorite parts of books they read, or any other aspect of stories they read. Finds appropriate use of e-mail communication offers teachers opportunities to identify instructional focus and take advantage of instructional moments to fit the developmental needs of their students in…

  16. College Students' Gender Differences regarding E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punyanunt-Carter, Narissra M.; Hemby, Charles O.

    2006-01-01

    One hundred and forty-five undergraduate students at a large southwestern university completed a questionnaire designed to assess college students' computer-mediated communication behaviors. Findings revealed that males and females have different perceptions and usages concerning their computer-mediated communication behaviors when e-mailing and…

  17. E-mail et Web : pour une navigation sans risque

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Présentation orale en français, support visuel en anglais. À travers des exemples concrets, vous consoliderez vos connaissances et pourrez ainsi réajuster vos habitudes concernant l?utilisation sécurisée de votre boîte e-mail et de votre navigateur Web.

  18. E-Mail from Professor Enhances Student Motivation and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legg, Angela M.; Wilson, Janie H.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, professors use the first day of class to build rapport. However, current technology allows professors to contact students prior to the first day of class. This study assessed how the receipt of a welcoming e-mail from a female professor 1 week before the first day of class affected student motivation and attitudes toward the…

  19. Diagnostic Testing at UK Universities: An E-Mail Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillard, Jonathan; Levi, Margaret; Wilson, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In July 2009, an e-mail survey was sent to various UK universities to gain information regarding current practices concerning mathematics diagnostic testing, and to provide an update from the review "Diagnostic Testing for Mathematics" published by the LTSN MathsTEAM Project in 2003. A total of 38 university departments were contacted and the…

  20. "E" for Exposed? E-Mail and Privacy Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon-Leary, Pat

    1997-01-01

    As a result of litigation, a number of companies have written policies declaring the right to monitor employee electronic communication. Discusses reasons why employers monitor employee e-mail, the prevalence of monitoring in universities, use and ethics policy statements, and bills of rights statements protecting employee privacy. (PEN)

  1. Keypals--E-mail Leads to New Friends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durost, Dennis D.; Hutchinson, Sue L.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Keypal Project, a project in which e-mail was introduced in two kindergarten classes with the intent to enrich children's literacy and communication skills and foster long-distance relationships. Found the project had great learning potential and was easily incorporated into constructivist programs which emphasize active learning.…

  2. Fostering E-Mail Security Awareness: The West Point Carronade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Aaron J.

    2005-01-01

    The United States Military Academy (USMA) at West Point had a problem with some cadets clicking on suspicious attachments and embedded links, significantly affecting network performance and resource availability. West Point information technology leadership needed a way to increase e-mail security awareness in hopes of maintaining a strong…

  3. Postgraduate Supervision: E-Mail as an Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Toy; Coetzee, Elsabe

    2014-01-01

    Supervisors at higher education institutions cannot ignore the possibilities created by technology, and for the sake of this article, e-mail, as an aid for supervision on postgraduate level. After completing the modules for the Magister Technologiae (M Tech): Education qualification, students are required to complete a dissertation of limited…

  4. E-mail et Web : pour une navigation sans risque

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-28

    Présentation orale en français, support visuel en anglais. À travers des exemples concrets, vous consoliderez vos connaissances et pourrez ainsi réajuster vos habitudes concernant l’utilisation sécurisée de votre boîte e-mail et de votre navigateur Web.

  5. Colleges Get out of E-Mail Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Frantic troubleshooting by an overworked staff versus someone else fixing problems smoothly. A sliver of server space per person versus a five-gigabyte chunk. Half a million dollars versus free. That's what colleges are faced with as they decide whether to continue running their own e-mail services or outsource them to a professional service like…

  6. Automatic Classification of E-Mail Messages by Message Type.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Andrew D.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a system that automatically classifies e-mail messages in the HUMANIST electronic discussion group into one of four classes: question, response, announcement, or administrative. The system's ability to accurately classify a message was compared against manually assigned codes. Results suggested that there was a statistical agreement in…

  7. E-Mail as a Resource in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maarof, Nooreiny

    Use of electronic mail (e-mail) as a resource in a Universiti Kebangsaen Malaysia (UKM) English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) teacher education course in 1997-98 is described. The second-year undergraduate course, "The Teaching of Reading Skills in an ESL Context," enrolled 115 students with a range of experience with computers. One course project…

  8. Section's e-mail list keeps members informed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauxe, Lisa

    For years the geomagnetic/paleomagnetic community has used an e-mail list as an important means of communication. It was started by Sue Beske-Diehl and turned over to AGU management 3 years ago. Submissions to the list (gpmag@agu.org) are sent to ltauxe@wizard.ucsd.edu, who reviews them for suitability and sends them out to the recipients of the e-mail list. The recipients are distributed among two separate lists. The first is drawn from those identified as GP section members in the online membership directory at AGU and the second is a private list maintained by Lisa Tauxe. Anyone can be added to the latter on request (ltauxe@ucsd.edu).

  9. Using Lexical tools to convert Unicode characters to ASCII.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chris J; Browne, Allen C; Divita, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Unicode is an industry standard allowing computers to consistently represent and manipulate text expressed in most of the worlds writing systems. It is widely used in multilingual NLP (natural language processing) projects. On the other hand, there are some NLP projects still only dealing with ASCII characters. This paper describes methods of utilizing lexical tools to convert Unicode characters (UTF-8) to ASCII (7-bit) characters. PMID:18998787

  10. Hyperchaotic Encryption for Secure E-Mail Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Bustos, A. Y.; Cruz-Hernández, C.; López-Gutiérrez, R. M.; Tlelo-Cuautle, E.; Posadas-Castillo, C.

    In this chapter, secure computer communication based on synchronized hyperchaotic maps is presented. In particular, we appeal to model-matching approach from nonlinear control theory to synchronize the outputs of two coupled hyperchaotic Rössler maps. An application to secure e-mail communication for confidential information is given. By using a hyperchaotic encryption scheme, we show that output synchronization of hyperchaotic Rössler maps is indeed suitable for encryption, transmission, and decryption of information.

  11. Report on Climate Change E-mails Exonerates Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-07-01

    A new report commissioned by the University of East Anglia (UEA) has largely exonerated climate scientists from the university's Climatic Research Unit (CRU) who wrote a number of controversial e-mail messages that were made public without authorization in November 2009. Critics have argued that the e-mails indicate that scientists had tampered with scientific data—including data related to land station temperatures and temperature reconstructions from tree ring analysis—subverted the peer review process, misused the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) process, and withheld data from critics. At a 7 July news conference to release the “Independent climate change e-mails review,” report chair Muir Russell said, “Climate science is a matter of such global importance that the highest standards of honesty, rigor, and openness are needed in its conduct. On the specific allegations made against the behavior of CRU scientists, we find that their rigor and honesty as scientists are not in doubt.” He continued, “In addition, we do not find that their behavior has prejudiced the balance of advice given to policy makers. In particular, we did not find any evidence of behavior that might undermine the conclusions of the IPCC assessments.” Russell is chair of the Judicial Appointments Board for Scotland and formerly was principal and vice-chancellor of the University of Glasgow, in Scotland.

  12. Research on an E-mail Encryption Protocol Based on Quantum Teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shufen, Xiao; Yumin, Dong; Hongyang, Ma; Libo, Chen

    2016-07-01

    With the rapid development of information technology (IT), E-mail has become an important communication tool between human beings. Meanwhile, E-mail safety becomes increasingly important because of its universal applications. In order to overcome shortages of classical E-mail encryption, an E-mail encryption protocol based on quantum teleportation was proposed. It makes quantum encryption of E-mails during sending and receiving processes by taking advantages of entanglement and nonclonability of quantum, thus ensuring safety and reliability of E-mail transmission.

  13. Therapeutic neuroscience education via e-mail: a case report.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan

    2014-11-01

    Therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE) aims to alter a patient's thoughts and beliefs about pain and has shown efficacy in treating chronic pain. To date, TNE sessions mainly consist of one-on-one verbal communication. This approach limits availability of TNE to pain patients in remote areas. A 32-year-old patient with chronic low back pain (CLBP) who underwent surgery for thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) attended a single clinic one-on-one TNE session followed by TNE via electronic mail (e-mail), pacing and graded exposure over a 4-month period. A physical examination, Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), and Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ) were assessed during her initial physical therapy visit as well as 1 and 4 months later. Pre-TNE, the patient reported: NPRS (arm) = 7/10; NPRS (leg) = 4/10; ODI = 10.0%; DASH = 36.7%; FABQ-W = 24; and FABQ-PA = 17. After 5 e-mail sessions all outcome measures improved, most noticeably NRS (arm) = 2/10; NRS (leg) = 0/10; DASH = 16.7%; FABQ-W = 8; and FABQ-PA = 7. TNE can potentially be delivered to suffering pain patients in remote areas or to individuals who have time and financial constraints, and likely at a significant reduced cost via e-mail. PMID:24779489

  14. Business Education Leaders Compare E-mail and Regular Mail Survey Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truell, Allen D.; Goss, Perry

    2002-01-01

    Business education leaders (n=128) received e-mail surveys; 34 returned them via e-mail, 13 by postal mail, 12 were blank and unusable; another group of 128 received mailed surveys with 73 returned. E-mail response took an average of 12.5 days, postal response 24.2 days. E-mail respondents completed 20.9 of 35 questions, the postal group 19.4 of…

  15. An AIS-Based E-mail Classification Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qing, Jinjian; Mao, Ruilong; Bie, Rongfang; Gao, Xiao-Zhi

    This paper proposes a new e-mail classification method based on the Artificial Immune System (AIS), which is endowed with good diversity and self-adaptive ability by using the immune learning, immune memory, and immune recognition. In our method, the features of spam and non-spam extracted from the training sets are combined together, and the number of false positives (non-spam messages that are incorrectly classified as spam) can be reduced. The experimental results demonstrate that this method is effective in reducing the false rate.

  16. In Brief: IPY E-mail alerts available for educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2007-05-01

    The U.S. interagency Web portal for the International Polar Year (http://www.ipy.gov) has established a new RSS feed that will allow subscribers to receive e-mail alerts that provide information about educational resources for IPY. These resources include classroom materials and resources and notices of opportunities to assist scientists in the field. A second RSS feed, ``news and features,'' is also available. Directions for subscribing to the feeds are available on the Web site. The IPY, which began in March 2007 and will continue into 2009, is a global research effort intended to advance understanding of the polar regions.

  17. Subpoena of scientists' e-mails raises concerns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-07-01

    A recent court order that required the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) to hand over more than 3000 confidential e-mails to the energy company BP in May has led to concerns about the need to protect academic freedom, the deliberative scientific process, and intellectual property. Lawyers representing BP filed the subpoena in December 2011 to seek information from WHOI in relation to a lawsuit brought against BP by the U.S. government and others about damages from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. WHOI is not a party to the lawsuit.

  18. You've Got Mail!: Understanding How E-Mail Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Conceptually, e-mail is not a whole lot different from regular postal mail ("snail mail"), except that it is much faster. E-mail requires three things: (1) a personal computer; (2) a telephone or communication line; and (3) an Internet provider (e-mail service account). This article provides details on how it works--plus some research activities…

  19. Making E-Mail Requests to Professors: Taiwanese vs. American Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chi-Fen Emily

    This study compared how Taiwanese and U.S. graduate students at one U.S. university made e-mail requests to professors. Taiwanese students had received formal English education in Taiwan but none in the United States. All participants provided several e-mails containing requests to their professors. E-mail data were divided into high-imposition…

  20. The Development of E-Mail Literacy: From Writing to Peers to Writing to Authority Figures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chi-Fen Emily

    2006-01-01

    Though e-mail has become a common interpersonal communication medium, it does not mean that this medium is used without difficulty. While people can write e-mails to peers in any manner they like, writing e-mails to authority figures requires higher pragmatic competence and critical language awareness of how discourse shapes and reflects power…

  1. Comparing Response Rates in E-Mail and Paper Surveys: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Tse-Hua; Fan, Xitao

    2009-01-01

    This meta-analysis examined 35 study results within last 10 years that directly compared the response rates of e-mail versus mail surveys. Individual studies reported inconsistent findings concerning the response rate difference between e-mail and mail surveys, but e-mail surveys generally have lower response rate (about 20% lower on the average)…

  2. The Application of E-Mail to College English Teaching in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Guofeng

    2010-01-01

    With the development of information technology in the past 10 years, e-mail has been widely used in the field of English teaching. This paper, based on an analysis of the ways of using e-mail in college English teaching in China, probes the feasibility and the benefits of application of e-mail to college English teaching.

  3. An Investigation of the Use of E-Mail as a Supplemental Modality for Clinical Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clingerman, Tamara L.; Bernard, Janine M.

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigated the use of student-initiated e-mail as a supplemental modality for supervision. Nineteen students e-mailed their instructors weekly during their 15-week practicum: these e-mails were analyzed across 3 time periods using the categories of the discrimination model (J. M. Bernard, 1979, 1997) and an adaptation of W. Lanning's…

  4. Academic and Social Integration in Cyberspace: Students and E-Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatz, Lisa B.; Hirt, Joan B.

    2000-01-01

    Examined how traditional-age, residential, first-year students (n=23) use e-mail and found that, although students used e-mail extensively, only a limited amount of their correspondence enhanced academic or social integration. Classification of messages (n=4,603) indicated that 10.2 percent of e-mail messages went to professors or classmates,…

  5. Improving Instructor Response to Student E-Mails Using Template and Reminder Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbeck, Matthew; Song, Minjung

    2011-01-01

    Student e-mails without the student's name, message, file attachment, and other identifying information may impede a timely and thorough instructor response. To help resolve this issue, we apply template and reminder interventions to improve student e-mail format defined as the degree of agreement between a student's e-mail format and an…

  6. Doctors Who Are Using E-mail With Their Patients: a Qualitative Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Patt, Madhavi R; Jenckes, Mollie W; Sands, Daniel Z; Ford, Daniel E

    2003-01-01

    Background Despite the potential for rapid, asynchronous, documentable communication, the use of e-mail for physician-patient communication has not been widely adopted. Objective To survey physicians currently using e-mail with their patients daily to understand their experiences. Methods In-depth phone interviews of 45 physicians currently using e-mail with patients were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. Two investigators independently qualitatively coded comments. Differences were adjudicated by group consensus. Results Almost all of the 642 comments from these physicians who currently use e-mail with patients daily could be grouped into 1 of 4 broad domains: (1) e-mail access and content, (2) effects of e-mail on the doctor-patient relationship, (3) managing clinical issues by e-mail, and (4) integrating e-mail into office processes. The most consistent theme was that e-mail communication enhances chronic-disease management. Many physicians also reported improved continuity of care and increased flexibility in responding to nonurgent issues. Integration of e-mail into daily workflow, such as utilization of office personnel, appears to be a significant area of concern for many of the physicians. For other issues, such as content, efficiency of e-mail, and confidentiality, there were diverging experiences and opinions. Physicians appear to be selective in choosing which patients they will communicate with via e-mail, but the criteria for selection is unclear. Conclusions These physician respondents did perceive benefits to e-mail with a select group of patients. Several areas, such as identifying clinical situations where e-mail communication is effective, incorporating e-mail into office flow, and being reimbursed for online medical care/communication, need to be addressed before this mode of communication diffuses into most practices. PMID:12857665

  7. E-mail or snail mail? Randomized controlled trial on which works better for surveys.

    PubMed Central

    Seguin, Rachelle; Godwin, Marshall; MacDonald, Susan; McCall, Marnie

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare e-mail with regular mail for conducting surveys of physicians. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Ontario, Canada. PARTICIPANTS: A random sample of physicians listed in the College of Family Physicians of Canada's membership database. INTERVENTIONS: Survey delivered by e-mail and by post. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Response rates and times, and completeness and characteristics of responses to the survey. RESULTS: Overall response rate was 44.7% (33.6% of e-mail recipients, 52.7% of post recipients who have e-mail, and 47.8% of post recipients without e-mail). While the e-mail rate was significantly lower than for both post groups, e-mail responses were received much faster. There was no significant difference among groups as to completeness of responses, but e-mail responses had more frequent and longer comments. CONCLUSION: E-mail provides faster but fewer responses to surveys. Content of structured-response questions was similar in all groups, but e-mail provided more and longer responses to open-ended questions. Where a quick response to a survey is required, e-mail is superior. PMID:15318679

  8. Professional e-mail communication among health care providers: proposing evidence-based guidelines.

    PubMed

    Malka, S Terez; Kessler, Chad S; Abraham, John; Emmet, Thomas W; Wilbur, Lee

    2015-01-01

    E-mail is now a primary method of correspondence in health care, and proficiency with professional e-mail use is a vital skill for physicians. Fundamentals of e-mail courtesy can be derived from lay literature, but there is a dearth of scientific literature that addresses the use of e-mail between physicians. E-mail communication between providers is generally more familiar and casual than other professional interactions, which can promote unprofessional behavior or misunderstanding. Not only e-mail content but also wording, format, and tone may influence clinical recommendations and perceptions of the e-mail sender. In addition, there are serious legal and ethical implications when unprofessional or unsecured e-mails related to patient-identifying information are exchanged or included within an electronic medical record. The authors believe that the appropriate use of e-mail is a vital skill for physicians, with serious legal and ethical ramifications and the potential to affect professional development and patient care. In this article, the authors analyze a comprehensive literature search, explore several facets of e-mail use between physicians, and offer specific recommendations for professional e-mail use. PMID:25162617

  9. A Detection Method of FAQ Matching Inquiry E-mails by Automatic Generation of Characteristic Word Groups from Past Inquiry E-mails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakumichi, Yuki; Akiyoshi, Masanori; Samejima, Masaki; Oka, Hironori

    This paper discusses how to detect the inquiry e-mails corresponding to pre-defined FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions). Web-based interactions such as order and registration form on a Web page are usually provided with their FAQ pages for helping a user. However, most users submit their inquiry e-mails without checking such pages. This causes a help desk operator to process lots of e-mails even if some contents match FAQs. Automatic detecting of such e-mails is proposed based on SVM (Support Vector Machine) and specific Jaccard coefficient based on positive and negative already-received inquiry e-mails. Experimental results show its effectiveness, and we also discuss future work to improve our method.

  10. E-mails in a Psychiatric Practice: Why Patients Send Them and How Psychiatrists Respond

    PubMed Central

    Moldawsky, Richard J; Shah, Pranav V

    2016-01-01

    Context: Little is known about what prompts patients to use e-mail with their physicians and how physicians respond to these e-mails. Objective: To identify the main reasons why patients e-mail and to learn how psychiatrists manage these e-mails as part of these patients’ overall care. Design: One hundred patient-initiated e-mails to each of two psychiatrists in a group practice were studied retrospectively for primary reason for the e-mail and for psychiatrists’ handling of each e-mail. Other data were collected to assess how representative the e-mailing patients were of the psychiatrists’ patient panels. Results: Age, sex, and diagnoses of the e-mailers were similar to our overall panels. The most common reasons for e-mailing were refill requests (19.5%), questions about prescribed medication (16.5%), and worsening of symptoms (11.5%). The modal e-mail was a patient with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder requesting a refill. The psychiatrists’ most common responses were authorizing a refill (25%), reassurance (22%), and making or moving up a scheduled appointment (16%). For all patients who reported a worsening of symptoms, responses, communicated by e-mail or telephone, included a combination of an earlier appointment and/or change in medication or dose and/or referral for psychotherapy. Both psychiatrists found e-mail to be an efficient enhancement of their practice, and it was inferred that this was also a satisfying mechanism for patients. Conclusion: Physician-patient communication via e-mail is timesaving for both, and the benefits to patient care should reassure physicians who are wary of using e-mail in their practice. Potential risks to patients without face-to-face or telephone contact appear to be minimal. PMID:26562306

  11. What a difference your e-mail makes: effects of informal e-mail addresses in online résumé screening.

    PubMed

    van Toorenburg, Marlies; Oostrom, Janneke K; Pollet, Thomas V

    2015-03-01

    Résumés are screened rapidly, with some reports stating that recruiters form their impressions within 10 seconds. Certain résumé characteristics can have a significant impact on the snap judgments these recruiters make. The main goal of the present study was to examine the effect of the e-mail address (formal vs. informal) used in a résumé on the hirability perceptions formed by professional recruiters (N=73). In addition, the effect of the e-mail address on hirability perceptions was compared to the effects of spelling errors and typeface. Participants assessed the cognitive ability, personality, and the hirability of six fictitious applicants for the job of an HR specialist. The hirability ratings for the résumés with informal e-mail addresses were significantly lower than the hirability ratings for résumés that featured a formal e-mail address. The effect of e-mail address was as strong as the effect of spelling errors and stronger than that of typeface. The effect of e-mail address on hirability was mediated by perceptions of conscientiousness and honesty-humility. This study among actual recruiters shows for the first time that the choice of the e-mail address used on a résumé might make a real difference. PMID:25751044

  12. Secure e-mailing between physicians and patients: transformational change in ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Terhilda; Meng, Di; Wang, Jian J; Palen, Ted E; Kanter, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Secure e-mailing between Kaiser Permanente physicians and patients is widespread; primary care providers receive an average of 5 e-mails from patients each workday. However, on average, secure e-mailing with patients has not substantially impacted primary care provider workloads. Secure e-mail has been associated with increased member retention and improved quality of care. Separate studies associated patient portal and secure e-mail use with both decreased and increased use of other health care services, such as office visits, telephone encounters, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations. Directions for future research include more granular analysis of associations between patient-physician secure e-mail and health care utilization. PMID:24887522

  13. Secure E-Mail Communication across Company Boundaries Experiences and Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichmann, Markus; von der Heidt, Guido; Hille, Carsten; Jacobson, Gunnar

    The important role of e-mail in business communication demands a protection of the transmitted information, not only within one company, but in particular across company borders. E-mail encryption using digital certificates provides means to fulfill this demand. The article discusses the obstacles organizations are faced with during the set up and operation of e-mail encryption between companies. Based on the case study of Siemens, experiences made as well as organizational and infrastructural solutions are outlined.

  14. E-mail in patient–provider communication: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jiali; Rust, George; Fry-Johnson, Yvonne; Strothers, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review systematically the role of e-mails in patient–provider communication in terms of e-mail content, and perspectives of providers and patients on e-mail communication in health care. Methods A systematic review of studies on e-mail communication between patients and health providers in regular health care published from 2000 to 2008. Results A total of 24 studies were included in the review. Among these studies, 21 studies examined e-mail communication between patients and providers, and three studies examined the e-mail communication between parents of patients in pediatric primary care and pediatricians. In the content analyses of e-mail messages, topics well represented were medical information exchange, medical condition or update, medication information, and subspecialty evaluation. A number of personal and institutional features were associated with the likelihood of e-mail use between patients and providers. While benefits of e-mails in enhancing communication were recognized by both patients and providers, concerns about confidentiality and security were also expressed. Conclusion The e-mail is transforming the relationship between patients and providers. The rigorous exploration of pros and cons of electronic interaction in health care settings will help make e-mail communication a more powerful, mutually beneficial health care provision tool. Practice implications It is important to develop an electronic communication system for the clinical practice that can address a range of concerns. More efforts need to be made to educate patients and providers to appropriately and effectively use e-mail for communication. PMID:19914022

  15. Response Rates for Mixed-Mode Surveys Using Mail and E-Mail/Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Converse, Patrick D.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Huang, Xiaoting; Oswald, Frederick L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines response rates for mixed-mode survey implementation involving mail and e-mail/Web components. Using Dillman's Tailored Design Method, 1,500 participants were sent a survey either (a) via mail with a follow-up contact via e-mail that directed them to a Web-based questionnaire or (b) via e-mail that directed them to a Web-based…

  16. Design of a MPEG-4-based multimedia e-mail system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoyin; Liao, Li

    2000-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss the design of an MPEG-4 compression technology based multimedia e-mail system. As our test in ISDN context indicates, the MPEG-4 gives high compression ratio up to 130:1 without discernable quality deterioration in multimedia e-mail application where video is featured by infrequent and slow motions. It is an exciting improvement over other compressors in this area. The performance comparison of our system with other similar systems is also given in this paper. IN our multimedia e- mail system, messaging subsystem is implemented with Messaging Application Programming Interface (MAPI). A special architecture of multimedia e-mail package is also presented.

  17. E-mail access to NetCME: implementation of server push paradigm.

    PubMed Central

    McEnery, K. W.; Grossman, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a Continuing Medical Education project which utilizes e-mail delivery of HTML documents to facilitate participant access to case material. HTML e-mail is displayed directly within the e-mail reader of the Netscape browser. This system of proactive educational content delivery ensures simultaneous distribution to all participants. Although a more effective method of content distribution, the system preserves user confidentiality and maintains security. HTML e-mail is non-proprietary and could be integrated into existing Internet-based educational projects to facilitate user access. Images p694-a Figure 5 PMID:9357714

  18. E-Mail Molecules—Individualizing the Large Lecture Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamser, Carl C.

    2003-11-01

    All students in the organic chemistry class are assigned a unique set of nine molecules to report on as optional extra credit assignments. The molecules are taken from a list containing over 200 molecules on the class Web site; they represent an assortment of biologically relevant compounds, from acetaminophen to yohimbine. Once a week, students may submit information about one of the molecules for two points extra credit (where the course includes a total of over 600 points from traditional quizzes and exams). The information requested about the molecules varies slightly each term as student expertise grows, for example, molecular formula, hybridizations, functional groups, or number of stereocenters, but always includes biological relevance and sources of information. Initially students submitted data directly to the instructor by e-mail, but submissions now are handled by a Web-based course management system (WebCT). The goal is to give students individualized assignments that are relatively realistic in light of their future careers in health sciences. Nearly all of the students do some of the molecules, and many students do all of them. About 30 40% of the students who do the assignments regularly gain a grade benefit. Student responses to the exercise have been positive.

  19. A MICROPROCESSOR ASCII CHARACTER BUFFERING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A microprocessor buffering system (MBS) was developed at the Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory -Cincinnati (EMSL-CI) to provide an efficient transfer for serial ASCII information between intelligent instrument systema and a Data General NOVA laboratory automation co...

  20. SAM II Data and Information (ASCII)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-09-01

    SAM II (ASCII) Data and Information Data obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II instrument, ... Parameters:  Aerosols Order Data:  ASDC Order Tool:  Order Data Guide Documents:  ...

  1. E-Mailing in a Foreign Language: Learning Contexts and Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonglewski, Margaret; Meloni, Christine; Brant, Jocelyne

    This article aims to provide an overview of the various uses for e-mail in foreign language learning. It describes the advantages that have been referred to in the literature about the use of e-mail in foreign language learning contexts and provides an overview of the different types of contexts and possibilities for communicative interaction…

  2. Con Artists Attack Colleges with Fake Help-Desk E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    An e-mail scam has hit tens of thousands of users at dozens of colleges over the past few weeks, leaving network administrators scrambling to respond before campus computer accounts are taken over by spammers. Students, professors, and staff members at the affected colleges received e-mail messages that purported to come from the colleges' help…

  3. MedlinePlus E-mail Updates | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. MedlinePlus E-mail Updates Past Issues / Spring - Summer 2010 Table ... in health and medicine? Sign up for MedlinePlus e-mail updates, and you'll receive alerts whenever ...

  4. The Most Preferred Free E-mail Service Used by Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavus, Nadire; Bicen, Huseyin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the most preferred free web based e-mail used by students in the technology departments of the Near East University (Departments CIS, CEIT and COM.ENG), and also to find out which technical characteristics affect the participants when making a decision for the choice of an e-mail service. The volunteer…

  5. Districts Weigh Benefits and Drawbacks of Setting Up Student E-Mail Accounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Katie

    2008-01-01

    Some school districts hoping to improve communication and student engagement in learning are taking a step many educators still view warily: providing students with their own e-mail accounts. However, making e-mail a regular part of students' school lives raises a host of concerns about inappropriate use. In addition, many teachers doubt that the…

  6. Request Strategies in Professional E-Mail Correspondence: Insights from the United States Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leopold, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing interest in the rhetorical features of e-mail correspondence, this is the first study to examine the request strategies in e-mails written by native English-speaking professionals from a variety of industries in the United States. This study uses Blum-Kulka, House, and Kasper's (1989) speech act framework to analyze the request…

  7. An IT Manager's View on E-Mail and Internet Policies and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desai, Mayur S.; Hart, Jeff; Richards, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    E-mail is mandatory tool of communications any business to survive in the 21st century. It is imperative that Information technology (IT) managers monitor and make sure that the e-mail systems are used properly. In order to organize a systematic process for proper use of email an administrator must have an input into the development of appropriate…

  8. Ceci n'est pas un Objet? Talking about Objects in E-Mail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ducheneaut, Nicolas; Bellotti, Victoria

    2003-01-01

    Shows how e-mail users have evolved new forms of electronic deictic references to refer to work objects and offers design suggestions for future electronic mail software. Highlights include a study of e-mail work conversations; and changing the way we talk by transforming the conversation itself into an object of conversation. (Author/LRW)

  9. E-mail marketing grows up: a primer for the managed care industry.

    PubMed

    Dysart, J

    2000-02-01

    Managed care plans are jumping onto the electronic marketing bandwagon in a big way, taking advantage of not only the basic E-mail system but also expanding on that medium and developing creative vehicles to send the health plan's message. In this article, the author describes how E-mail technology is being used to hone the marketing edge in MCOs. PMID:11067390

  10. Psychiatrist says counselling via e-mail may be yet another medical use for Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, C

    1996-01-01

    The head of the Personality Disorders Clinic at the University of Michigan recently told the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association that he has used "e-mail counselling" to treat seriously ill patients. He provided some advice about the possible use of e-mail to supplement face-to-face sessions in the psychiatrist's office. PMID:8956841

  11. Gender and Status Effects in Student E-Mails to Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, R.; Colley, A.

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to examine gender and status effects in the kind of e-mails used to manage course administrative issues in an educational setting. Students were asked to respond to an e-mail presented as being from a member of staff, informing them of failure to submit coursework and asking for an explanation to be provided. The sex and status of…

  12. Evaluation of E-Mail Feedback on the Verbal Behaviors of Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Erin E.; Wolery, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The effects of e-mail feedback with written verbatim examples and frequency counts of expansions on pre-service teachers' verbal behaviors were examined in two studies. In Experiment I, e-mail feedback on the use of expansions was evaluated in a multiple baseline design across 3 undergraduate early childhood special education students. Results…

  13. Communication Topics and Strategies in E-Mail Consultation: Comparison between American and International University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesenbach-Lucas, Sigrun

    2005-01-01

    On today's "wired" college campuses, students avail themselves in increasing numbers of electronic channels, most notably e-mail, as a means to consult with their professors. While some research has investigated the purposes for which university students communicate with their instructors via e-mail, little research has examined differences in…

  14. One Good Turn Deserves Another: Sustaining an Intercultural E-Mail Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schueller, Jeanne

    2007-01-01

    Instructors rely on asynchronous exchanges to provide learners with authentic input and opportunities to communicate in the TL. While most practitioners recognize the advantages of e-mail exchanges, learner benefits are not an automatic byproduct of participation in an exchange. This paper presents findings from an e-mail exchange carried out…

  15. Alumni Relationships in the Electronic Age: An Assessment of a Permission Based E-Mail Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Robert S.; McLaughlin, Caragh E.

    2007-01-01

    E-mail is seen as an inexpensive, fast way to communicate with university constituencies, especially alumni. The next logical stage for the use of this Internet technology is the development and evaluation of permission based e-mail (PBE) campaigns. In this paper, we directly examine recipient evaluation of PBE in the context of a university…

  16. Ars Dictaminis Perverted: The Personal Solicitation E-Mail as a Genre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Derek G.

    2009-01-01

    Phishing e-mails deceive individuals into giving out personal information which may then be utilized for identity theft. One particular type, the Personal Solicitation E-mail (PSE) mimics personal letters--modern perversions of "ars dictaminis" (the classical art of letter writing). In this article, I determine and discuss 19 appeals common to the…

  17. Chris Pierce and the Yankee Donut Company: An E-Mail-Based Management Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Danna N.; Rollag, Keith

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe an e-mail-based simulation that helps students experience the fast-paced, complex world of the middle manager. In this electronic in-basket exercise, students assume the role of a district manager in a doughnut company as they respond to a rapid series of high- and low-priority e-mails ostensibly sent from…

  18. Location Is Everything: The Use and Marketing of Reference E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Susan L.

    2006-01-01

    Reference e-mail continues to be a vital reference service. This article studies the trends in reference e-mail use over an eight year period. Usage statistics are analyzed particularly in light of the marketing of the service via changes in the location of the service on the official university libraries' Web pages. Included are recommendations…

  19. The Effect of E-Mail Debate as a Teaching Tool: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Guo-Ming

    D. P. Thompson (1987) pointed out that the e-mail network can help students work collaboratively, solve problems, and experience writing as communication in the real situation. This study examined the impact of e-mail debate on intercultural sensitivity, writing apprehension, and computer anxiety. Fifty-four students in two sections of a…

  20. "My Heart Want to Say Something": Exploring ELL Vocabulary Use through E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Sung-on; Piazza, Carolyn L.; Pierce, Michael J.; Bryce, Sara M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on one high school English-language-learner's (ELL) breadth and depth of vocabulary as he communicated with his teacher through e-mail across geographic boundaries for over 18 months. Design/methodology/approach: The authors began by separating 358 e-mails into three time periods (first beginning,…

  1. Social Work Practice in the Digital Age: Therapeutic E-Mail as a Direct Practice Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattison, Marian

    2012-01-01

    The author addresses the risks and benefits of incorporating therapeutic e-mail communication into clinical social work practice. Consumer demand for online clinical services is growing faster than the professional response. E-mail, when used as an adjunct to traditional meetings with clients, offers distinct advantages and risks. Benefits include…

  2. Reducing the Damage Done by E-Mail in Our Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glendinning, Matt

    2007-01-01

    E-mail is a tool that can vastly increase the efficiency and productivity of school leaders. It can enable them to better orchestrate school operations and so improve student learning. But administrators must remain wary of the effect that extensive e-mail communication can have on the school community, and they need to work to promote a healthy…

  3. Outcomes of an Intercultural E-Mail Based University Discussion Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furcsa, Laura

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the development of intercultural awareness in an electronic mail (e-mail) discussion project between Hungarian learners of English and American speakers. Students discussed topics relating to cultures, languages, and pedagogical issues. The e-mails were analyzed in terms of language skill improvement, apprehensiveness…

  4. 14 CFR 1206.601 - Mail, fax and e-mail requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mail, fax and e-mail requests. 1206.601 Section 1206.601 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Procedures § 1206.601 Mail, fax and e-mail requests. In view...

  5. 14 CFR 1206.601 - Mail, fax and e-mail requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mail, fax and e-mail requests. 1206.601 Section 1206.601 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Procedures § 1206.601 Mail, fax and e-mail requests. In view...

  6. 14 CFR 1206.601 - Mail, fax and e-mail requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Mail, fax and e-mail requests. 1206.601 Section 1206.601 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Procedures § 1206.601 Mail, fax and e-mail requests. In view...

  7. 14 CFR 1206.601 - Mail, fax and e-mail requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mail, fax and e-mail requests. 1206.601 Section 1206.601 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Procedures § 1206.601 Mail, fax and e-mail requests. In view...

  8. Discourse Strategies in Professional E-Mail Negotiation: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Astrid

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to report on some of the preliminary results of an on-going study on the use of discourse strategies in e-mail negotiation. The analysis aims at showing how relations between the participants develop through the use of specific discourse strategies in their e-mail communication which covers a period of three months,…

  9. Transcending E-Mail Dissonance: the Mediating Effects of Feminine Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, Hallie S.

    Sample excerpts from e-mail discussion used in place of the traditional journal in freshman composition illustrate the fascinating issues raised in this new forum. E-mail allows confrontational statements that would not have been made face-to-face and puts in written form a dialogue for analysis by the entire class. A study concentrated on three…

  10. Composing Effective and Efficient E-mails: A Primer for Pharmacy Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, Marc R; Feemster, Agnes Ann

    2015-09-01

    This primer describes the purpose and importance of e-mail as a key communication medium in the workplace. It emphasizes clarity as a primary modality to enhance efficiency and effectiveness. Finally, the primer reviews elements of grammar, punctuation, and style that contribute to each e-mail's ability to meet language standards, enhance the writer's image, and successfully transmit information. PMID:26715801

  11. Using E-Mail in Computer Assisted Freshman Composition and Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowden, Rebecca; Humphries, Sharon

    1997-01-01

    Describes teaching freshman composition and rhetoric via e-mail as a distance education course at Tomball Community College (Texas). Discusses student and instructor responsibilities, e-mail procedures, problems encountered (lack of time, and managing disk and mailbox space), and benefits (reduced paper use, typed corrections, accurate records,…

  12. Comparative Response to a Survey Executed by Post, E-mail, & Web Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yun, Gi Woong

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes characteristics of three survey response modes: post, e-mail, and Web site, based on data from science writers' professional use of e-mail and the Web. Finds: several important differences in response characteristics of these three groups; and no significant influences of survey mode. Suggests that using multi-mode survey techniques…

  13. Development of an E-mail Application Seemit and its Utilization in an Information Literacy Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Toshihiro; Miyazaki, Makoto; Nakano, Hiroshi; Sugitani, Kenichi; Akiyama, Hidenori

    We have developed a simple e-mail application named Seemit which is designed for being used in information literacy courses. It has necessary and sufficient functionality of an e-mail application, and it has been developed for the purpose of learning basic operations and mechanisms of e-mail transfer easily. It is equipped with the function to automatically set the configuration of user's SMTP/POP servers and e-mail address, etc. The process of transferring e-mail via SMTP and POP can be demonstrated step by step showing actual messages passed during the client-server interaction. We have utilized Seemit in a university-wide information literacy course which holds about 1800 students.

  14. Influence of an e-mail with a drug information attachment on sales of prescribed drugs: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Edward, Christina; Himmelmann, Anders; Wallerstedt, Susanna M

    2007-01-01

    Background To provide doctors with producer-independent information to facilitate choice of treatment is an important task. The objective of the present study was to evaluate if an e-mail with a drug information attachment has effects on sales of prescribed drugs and if the design of the attachment is of importance. Methods The Swedish pharmaceutical benefit board found rizatriptan (Maxalt®) 10 mg to be the most cost-effective triptan. All 119 heads of primary care units in western Sweden were randomized to receive information concerning this conclusion via (i) e-mail with attachment I, (ii) e-mail with attachment II or (iii) no information (control). Attachment I was a short one (heading plus three lines text), whereas attachment II was a long one (heading plus one page text and one page with tables). The change in percentage rizatriptan of total triptans sold before and after the intervention (May – July 2004 and May – July 2005, respectively) was compared between the groups. Results Totally 48,229 (2004) and 50,674 (2005) defined daily doses of triptans were prescribed and sold during May – July in primary care units in the western part of Sweden. The absolute change in percentage rizatriptan was greater in the intervention groups compared with the control group 2 (25th – 75th percentile: -3 – 7) vs 0 (-7 - 5), P = 0.031). The absolute change in percentage rizatriptan did not differ between the two attachment groups (P = 0.93). Conclusion An e-mail with a drug information attachment may influence sales of prescribed drugs. No difference between different designs of the attachment could be detected. PMID:17942000

  15. E-mail communication in the management of gastroenterology patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Plener, Ian; Hayward, Andrew; Saibil, Fred

    2014-01-01

    E-mail correspondence between physicians and patients can be a useful tool to improve communication efficiency, provide economic and ecological benefits, improve therapeutic interventions and adherence, and enhance self-management. The model of self-management in chronic disease has become an integral component of North American and British medicine. From a practical standpoint, the use of e-mail between physicians and patients can complement the self-management model. E-mail communication has many benefits from both patient and physician perspectives. E-mail contact reduces the inefficiencies associated with telecommunications. Physicians are able to better document out-of-office patient encounters and provide access to specialist care for patients in remote locations. This use of e-mail has the potential to increase patient safety through physician approval of self-manager actions, including earlier initiation of needed treatments. Fewer clinic visits afford additional time for new consultations and sicker patients, reducing the overall burden on referral and wait times. The present article reviews some of the literature regarding physician-patient e-mail communication in the general ambulatory setting, in the context of chronic disease and with a specific focus on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The authors provide a framework for the use of e-mail communication in the IBD population, with emphasis on the concept of e-mail use. Also illustrated are the benefits and disadvantages, and examples of the e-mail contract as proposed by the Canadian Medical Protective Association. Examples of specific e-mail communication topics are provided for several IBD scenarios. Potential negative consequences of this mode of communication are also discussed. PMID:24619639

  16. E-mail communication in the management of gastroenterology patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Plener, Ian; Hayward, Andrew; Saibil, Fred

    2014-03-01

    E-mail correspondence between physicians and patients can be a useful tool to improve communication efficiency, provide economic and ecological benefits, improve therapeutic interventions and adherence, and enhance self-management. The model of self-management in chronic disease has become an integral component of North American and British medicine. From a practical standpoint, the use of e-mail between physicians and patients can complement the self-management model. E-mail communication has many benefits from both patient and physician perspectives. E-mail contact reduces the inefficiencies associated with telecommunications. Physicians are able to better document out-of-office patient encounters and provide access to specialist care for patients in remote locations. This use of e-mail has the potential to increase patient safety through physician approval of self-manager actions, including earlier initiation of needed treatments. Fewer clinic visits afford additional time for new consultations and sicker patients, reducing the overall burden on referral and wait times. The present article reviews some of the literature regarding physician-patient e-mail communication in the general ambulatory setting, in the context of chronic disease and with a specific focus on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The authors provide a framework for the use of e-mail communication in the IBD population, with emphasis on the concept of e-mail use. Also illustrated are the benefits and disadvantages, and examples of the e-mail contract as proposed by the Canadian Medical Protective Association. Examples of specific e-mail communication topics are provided for several IBD scenarios. Potential negative consequences of this mode of communication are also discussed. PMID:24619639

  17. [Research on testing the robustness of DICOM-e-mail secure teleradiology systems].

    PubMed

    Cao, O Li-ji; Zhao, Jun; Zhuang, Tian-ge

    2006-07-01

    DICOM-e-mail is a secure teleradiology protocol released by German Radiology Society and has already been applied clinically. To improve the robustness of the system, the protocol has been upgraded by adding some mechanisms such as system feedback. Moreover, a test method is also implemented by sending erroneous mails to application software that supports DICOM-e-mail. Through the tests for two different DICOM-e-mail teleradiology application, the validity of the new protocol is proved and at the same time some bugs are found. The implementation of the latest protocol and the general error tests can help to make the whole teleradiology system a better robustness. The implementation of DICOM-e-mail protocol in our country is also discussed in this paper. PMID:17039939

  18. Test of the Behavioral Perspective Model in the Context of an E-Mail Marketing Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Valdimar; Menon, R. G. Vishnu; Sigurdarson, Johannes Pall; Kristjansson, Jon Skafti; Foxall, Gordon R.

    2013-01-01

    An e-mail marketing experiment based on the behavioral perspective model was conducted to investigate consumer choice. Conversion e-mails were sent to two groups from the same marketing database of registered consumers interested in children's books. The experiment was based on A-B-A-C-A and A-C-A-B-A withdrawal designs and consisted of…

  19. Elderly Americans and the Internet: E-Mail, TV News, Information and Entertainment Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilt, Michael L.; Lipschultz, Jeremy H.

    2004-01-01

    Older Americans, like other groups, vary in their use of the Internet. The participants for this study-elderly computer users from a Midwestern mid-size sample-used e-mail and considered it the most important Internet function. It was common for them to use e-mail with family and friends on a regular, if not daily, basis. When this group of older…

  20. Elderly Americans and the Internet: E-Mail, TV News, Information and Entertainment Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilt, Michael L.; Lipschultz, Jeremy H.

    2004-01-01

    Older Americans, like other groups, vary in their use of the Internet. The participants for this study--elderly computer users from a Midwestern mid-size sample--used e-mail and considered it the most important Internet function. It was common for them to use e-mail with family and friends on a regular, if not daily, basis. When this group of…

  1. Learning to Improve E-mail Classification with numéro interactive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Dean M.

    This paper describes some of the ways in which we use artificial intelligence technologies in numéro interactive, a Customer Interaction Management system. In particular, we focus on the classification of e-mail messages into one of multiple business categories. We describe different features that are extracted from e-mail messages to help in this classification, and the improvement in the overall classification accuracy that results from the use of each kind of feature.

  2. The Use of Wireless E-Mail to Improve Healthcare Team Communication

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Chris; Friedrich, Jan O.; Scales, Damon C.; Adhikari, Neill K.J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the impact of using wireless e-mail for clinical communication in an intensive care unit (ICU). Design The authors implemented push wireless e-mail over a GSM cellular network in a 26-bed ICU during a 6-month study period. Daytime ICU staff (intensivists, nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, clerical staff, and ICU leadership) used handheld devices (BlackBerry, Research in Motion, Waterloo, ON) without dedicated training. The authors recorded e-mail volume and used standard methods to develop a self-administered survey of ICU staff to measure wireless e-mail impact. Measurements The survey assessed perceived impact of wireless e-mail on communication, team relationships, staff satisfaction and patient care. Answers were recorded on a 7-point Likert scale; favorable responses were categorized as Likert responses 5, 6, and 7. Results Staff sent 5.2 (1.9) and received 8.9 (2.1) messages (mean [SD]) per day during 5 months of the 6-month study period; usage decreased after study completion. Most (106/125 [85%]) staff completed the questionnaire. The majority reported that wireless e-mail improved speed (92%) and reliability (92%) of communication, improved coordination of ICU team members (88%), reduced staff frustration (75%), and resulted in faster (90%) and safer (75%) patient care; Likert responses were significantly different from neutral (p < 0.001 for all). Staff infrequently (18%) reported negative effects on communication. There were no reports of radiofrequency interference with medical devices. Conclusions Interdisciplinary ICU staff perceived wireless e-mail to improve communication, team relationships, staff satisfaction, and patient care. Further research should address the impact of wireless e-mail on efficiency and timeliness of staff workflow and clinical outcomes. PMID:19567803

  3. 14 CFR § 1206.601 - Mail, fax and e-mail requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mail, fax and e-mail requests. § 1206.601 Section § 1206.601 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF AGENCY RECORDS TO MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC Procedures § 1206.601 Mail, fax and e-mail requests. In view...

  4. The Messages They Send: E-Mail Use by Adolescents with and without a History of Specific Language Impairment (SLI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Durkin, Kevin; Walker, Allan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Contemporary adolescents use e-mail for a variety of purposes, including peer communication and education. Research into these uses has focused on typically developing individuals; much less is known about the use of e-mail by exceptional youth. Aims: The present study examined the structure and form of e-mail messages sent by…

  5. Exploring Students' Use of E-Mail for Out-of-Class Communication: Frequency, Satisfaction, and Learning Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Q.; Ahn, S.; Meyers, R. A.; Timmerman, C. E.; Fonner, K. L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors assessed students' use of e-mail for out-of-class communication (OCC) and its impact on satisfaction and learning self-efficacy. Findings showed that students and instructors use e-mail frequently for OCC, and frequency of use is positively associated with student satisfaction with e-mail as an OCC medium. Moreover, the content of…

  6. Legal and policy issues associated with monitoring employee E-mail

    SciTech Connect

    Segura, M.A.; Rither, A.C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the legal issues involved with employer monitoring of employee e-mail. In addition to identifying pertinent legal issues, the paper provides guidelines that will help the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) establish a program for monitoring outgoing e-mail to insure compliance with company policies, particularly those regarding protection of trade secrets and proprietary information, and to comply with the Department of Energy`s (DOE) procedures for protecting Export Controlled Information (ECI). Electronic communication has allowed companies to enhance efficiency, responsiveness and effectiveness. E-mail allows employees to transmit all types of data to other individuals inside and outside of their companies. The ease with which information can be transmitted by e-mail has placed trade secrets, proprietary information, and other sensitive data at risk from inadvertent disclosure by employees. As employers attempt to protect their interests through measures such as monitoring e-mail, they may expose themselves to liability under federal and state laws for violating employee privacy. Business use of e-mail has proliferated so rapidly that the federal and state legal systems have not been able to adequately address the issues arising out of its use in the workplace.

  7. Social work practice in the digital age: therapeutic e-mail as a direct practice methodology.

    PubMed

    Mattison, Marian

    2012-07-01

    The author addresses the risks and benefits of incorporating therapeutic e-mail communication into clinical social work practice. Consumer demand for online clinical services is growing faster than the professional response. E-mail, when used as an adjunct to traditional meetings with clients, offers distinct advantages and risks. Benefits include the potential to reach clients in geographically remote and underserved communities, enhancing and extending the therapeutic relationship and improving treatment outcomes. Risks include threats to client confidentiality and privacy, liability coverage for practitioners, licensing jurisdiction, and the lack of competency standards for delivering e-mail interventions. Currently, the social work profession does not have adequate instructive guidelines and best-practice standards for using e-mail as a direct practice methodology. Practitioners need (formal) academic training in the techniques connected to e-mail exchanges with clients. The author describes the ethical and legal risks for practitioners using therapeutic e-mail with clients and identifies recommendations for establishing best-practice standards. PMID:23252316

  8. Patient Access to U.S. Physicians Who Conduct Internet or E-mail Consults

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Michelle L.; Shenassa, Edmond D.; Houston, Thomas K.

    2007-01-01

    Background E-mail communication has the potential to improve communication between patients and doctors. Objective The objective of the study is to describe the access of patients to physicians who conduct e-mail consults. Methods We analyzed data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of office-based physician visits, in 2001, 2002, and 2003. The main outcome measure was the percentage of visits to a provider who reported doing internet or e-mail consults. Results There was fewer than 1 in 10 outpatient visits in 2001 (9.2%) to physicians who reported doing internet or e-mail consults, and this did not increase in 2002 (5.8%) or 2003 (5.5%). Access to these physicians was greater among patients who were male, nonminority, lived in the Western United States, seen for pre-/postoperative care, seen by a primary care provider, and not seen by a nurse during their visit. Access to physicians who conducted internet or e-mail consults was independent of other patient (e.g., chronic conditions), provider (e.g., office setting), and visit (e.g., medications prescribed) characteristics. Conclusions Access to physicians who do internet or e-mail consults is generally low and did not increase between 2001 and 2003, despite growth in internet access and in other internet-related activities. PMID:17356972

  9. Managing E-mail Interactions with Patients: A Discussion with Clinicians in Evaluating the Personal Health Link Project

    PubMed Central

    Serrato, Carl A; Retecki, Sally

    2004-01-01

    One software feature in the Personal Health Link (PHL) Project allows members of Kaiser Permanente to send secure e-mail messages to clinicians and staff. As an early step in the PHL evaluation process, a group of primary care physicians met to discuss their opinions and experiences with e-mail interactions with patients and to suggest strategies for effectively managing these e-mail interactions. Most clinicians spoke from their experience with e-mail interactions with patients in a conventional e-mail environment; only one clinician in the group was using PHL. PMID:26705166

  10. Effect of Media Usage Selection on Social Mobilization Speed: Facebook vs E-Mail

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Madnick, Stuart; Li, Xitong; Alstott, Jeff; Velu, Chander

    2015-01-01

    Social mobilization is a process that enlists a large number of people to achieve a goal within a limited time, especially through the use of social media. There is increasing interest in understanding the factors that affect the speed of social mobilization. Based on the Langley Knights competition data set, we analyzed the differences in mobilization speed between users of Facebook and e-mail. We include other factors that may influence mobilization speed (gender, age, timing, and homophily of information source) in our model as control variables in order to isolate the effect of such factors. We show that, in this experiment, although more people used e-mail to recruit, the mobilization speed of Facebook users was faster than that of those that used e-mail. We were also able to measure and show that the mobilization speed for Facebook users was on average seven times faster compared to e-mail before controlling for other factors. After controlling for other factors, we show that Facebook users were 1.84 times more likely to register compared to e-mail users in the next period if they have not done so at any point in time. This finding could provide useful insights for future social mobilization efforts. PMID:26422171

  11. Effect of Media Usage Selection on Social Mobilization Speed: Facebook vs E-Mail.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Madnick, Stuart; Li, Xitong; Alstott, Jeff; Velu, Chander

    2015-01-01

    Social mobilization is a process that enlists a large number of people to achieve a goal within a limited time, especially through the use of social media. There is increasing interest in understanding the factors that affect the speed of social mobilization. Based on the Langley Knights competition data set, we analyzed the differences in mobilization speed between users of Facebook and e-mail. We include other factors that may influence mobilization speed (gender, age, timing, and homophily of information source) in our model as control variables in order to isolate the effect of such factors. We show that, in this experiment, although more people used e-mail to recruit, the mobilization speed of Facebook users was faster than that of those that used e-mail. We were also able to measure and show that the mobilization speed for Facebook users was on average seven times faster compared to e-mail before controlling for other factors. After controlling for other factors, we show that Facebook users were 1.84 times more likely to register compared to e-mail users in the next period if they have not done so at any point in time. This finding could provide useful insights for future social mobilization efforts. PMID:26422171

  12. Internet and e-mail use in ENT: a survey of patient usage and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Shaw, B; Farboud, A; Trinidade, A; Kothari, P

    2012-03-01

    Nowadays, internet and e-mail are important modes of communication and information. This paper seeks to determine internet usage as a source of health information amongst ENT patients and to investigate whether patients prefer to communicate primarily with the hospital via e-mail. The method used is a questionnaire study and 201 patients attending an ENT clinic completed questionnaires over 2 weeks in December 2010. Of those with internet access (85%), 37% had used it for health information prior to their appointment; 90% rated the information between average and excellent; over half stated they would like doctor-recommended websites. Overall, 8% had previously used e-mail to communicate with healthcare professionals, but 50% stated that they wished to use e-mail in the future. ENT patients are becoming increasingly computer-literate. As healthcare professionals, we must do more to incorporate the internet as a source of reliable healthcare information. Properly implemented, e-mail can become an invaluable method of communication with patients. PMID:21968629

  13. Do you feel you know how to write an e-mail?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonova, Anna O.

    2003-10-01

    Computers have opened doors to the new era of telecommunication. Electronic mail is becoming very popular in different spheres of professional activity and everyday life of people all over the world as it provides people an excellent opportunity for real, natural communication. The use of e-mail and the Internet involves a whole range of skills including knowing how to use a personal computer, knowing how to navigate the immense resources of cyberspace, and becoming familiar with the special register of e-mail communication (which lies somewhere between the formality of traditional writing and the spontaneity of speech). Conferencing via e-mail, or communicating with partners through networked computers, offers many opportunities in the Scientific Community. E-mail allows us to collaborate easily with thousands of colleagues, sharing new ideas, resources, and materials. It can provide the information, contacts, and stimulation that can make our research work more effective and enjoyable. The English language is world-wide accepted as lingua-franca of the Internet and intercultural communication. This brings us to a necessity to introduce some ideas on e-mail writing.

  14. Emotional expression in cyberspace: searching for moderators of the Pennebaker disclosure effect via e-mail.

    PubMed

    Sheese, Brad E; Brown, Erin L; Graziano, William G

    2004-09-01

    Research has shown that writing about emotional topics can positively influence physical and mental health. The current study tested the efficacy of an e-mail-based writing treatment and shows how such an implementation can aid in the search for moderators. Participants (N = 546) were randomly assigned to either a long- or short-interval traumatic writing condition or to a nonemotional writing control condition. In contrast to previous disclosure research, participants received and submitted their writing responses via e-mail. Health outcomes were assessed weekly for 5 weeks after treatment and were reported at the conclusion of the study. Results supported the effectiveness of an e-mail-based writing treatment in producing positive health outcomes and successfully identified several moderators of the writing treatment effect. The moderators implicated varied depending on the nature of the health outcome assessment. PMID:15367065

  15. 47 CFR 6.17 - Informal complaints; form and content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...., letter, facsimile transmission, telephone (voice/TRS/TTY), Internet e-mail, ASCII text, audio-cassette... transmission, telephone (voice/TRS/TTY), Internet e-mail, ASCII text, audio-cassette recording, braille;...

  16. 47 CFR 6.17 - Informal complaints; form and content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...., letter, facsimile transmission, telephone (voice/TRS/TTY), Internet e-mail, ASCII text, audio-cassette... transmission, telephone (voice/TRS/TTY), Internet e-mail, ASCII text, audio-cassette recording, braille;...

  17. 47 CFR 6.17 - Informal complaints; form and content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...., letter, facsimile transmission, telephone (voice/TRS/TTY), Internet e-mail, ASCII text, audio-cassette... transmission, telephone (voice/TRS/TTY), Internet e-mail, ASCII text, audio-cassette recording, braille;...

  18. 47 CFR 6.17 - Informal complaints; form and content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...., letter, facsimile transmission, telephone (voice/TRS/TTY), Internet e-mail, ASCII text, audio-cassette... transmission, telephone (voice/TRS/TTY), Internet e-mail, ASCII text, audio-cassette recording, braille;...

  19. 47 CFR 6.17 - Informal complaints; form and content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...., letter, facsimile transmission, telephone (voice/TRS/TTY), Internet e-mail, ASCII text, audio-cassette... transmission, telephone (voice/TRS/TTY), Internet e-mail, ASCII text, audio-cassette recording, braille;...

  20. Electronic information exchange between NRC and licensees using Internet E-mail

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, J.W.; Carpenter, C.E. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    One of the goals established in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Strategic Information Technology Plan was the development of high-performance computer networks that would allow users to have E-mail and document transfer capabilities with NRC staff, certain U.S. Department of Energy laboratories, and with outside users over the public Internet network. Subsequently, individual Internet E-mail accounts have been established for project managers in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR), which allow informal communications with licensees that have access to the Internet.

  1. Can ASCII data files be standardized for Earth Science?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, K. D.; Chen, G.; Wilson, A.; Law, E.; Olding, S. W.; Krotkov, N. A.; Conover, H.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Earth Science Data Systems Working Groups (ESDSWG) was created over 10 years ago. The role of the ESDSWG is to make recommendations relevant to NASA's Earth science data systems from user experiences. Each group works independently focusing on a unique topic. Participation in ESDSWG groups comes from a variety of NASA-funded science and technology projects, such as MEaSUREs, NASA information technology experts, affiliated contractor, staff and other interested community members from academia and industry. Recommendations from the ESDSWG groups will enhance NASA's efforts to develop long term data products. Each year, the ESDSWG has a face-to-face meeting to discuss recommendations and future efforts. Last year's (2014) ASCII for Science Data Working Group (ASCII WG) completed its goals and made recommendations on a minimum set of information that is needed to make ASCII files at least human readable and usable for the foreseeable future. The 2014 ASCII WG created a table of ASCII files and their components as a means for understanding what kind of ASCII formats exist and what components they have in common. Using this table and adding information from other ASCII file formats, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a standardized format. For instance, Space Geodesy scientists have been using the same RINEX/SINEX ASCII format for decades. Astronomers mostly archive their data in the FITS format. Yet Earth scientists seem to have a slew of ASCII formats, such as ICARTT, netCDF (an ASCII dump) and the IceBridge ASCII format. The 2015 Working Group is focusing on promoting extendibility and machine readability of ASCII data. Questions have been posed, including, Can we have a standardized ASCII file format? Can it be machine-readable and simultaneously human-readable? We will present a summary of the current used ASCII formats in terms of advantages and shortcomings, as well as potential improvements.

  2. Towards linking patients and clinical information: detecting UMLS concepts in e-mail.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Aronson, Alan R

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to explore the feasibility of detecting terms within the electronic messages of patients that could be used to effectively search electronic knowledge resources and bring health information resources into the hands of patients. Our team is exploring the application of the natural language processing (NLP) tools built within the Lister Hill Center at the National Library of Medicine (NLM) to the challenge of detecting relevant concepts from the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) within the free text of lay people's electronic messages (e-mail). We obtained a sample of electronic messages sent by patients participating in a randomized field evaluation of an internet-based home care support service to the project nurse, and we subjected elements of these messages to a series of analyses using several vocabularies from the UMLS Metathesaurus and the selected NLP tools. The nursing vocabularies provide an excellent starting point for this exercise because their domain encompasses patient's responses to health challenges. In successive runs we augmented six nursing vocabularies (NANDA Nursing Diagnosis, Nursing Interventions Classification, Nursing Outcomes Classification, Home Health Classification, Omaha System, and the Patient Care Data Set) with selected sets of clinical terminologies (International Classification of Primary Care; International Classification of Primary Care- American English; Micromedex DRUGDEX; National Drug Data File; Thesaurus of Psychological Terms; WHO Adverse Drug Reaction Terminology) and then additionally with either Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) or SNOMED International terms. The best performance was obtained when the nursing vocabularies were complemented with selected clinical terminologies. These findings have implications not only for facilitating lay people's access to electronic knowledge resources but may also be of assistance in developing new tools to aid in linking free text (e.g., clinical

  3. An Intergenerational E-Mail Pal Project on Attitudes of College Students toward Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Carla A.

    2011-01-01

    Intergenerational interactions have demonstrated some success at improving attitudes of college students toward older adults. This quasiexperimental study involved undergraduate college students paired with older adults for a six-week e-mail exchange. Student attitudes toward older adults were measured pre- and posttest with Polizzi's revised…

  4. E-Mail Bonding: Making the Most of Electronic Communication between Teacher and Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zolten, Jerry

    An instructor's idea of using required e-mail as a communication link with students in the basic public speaking course sprang from his work with Gerald M. Philips in the pioneering reticence program he developed at Penn State University in the 1970s and 1980s. The instructor's focus in teaching a basic communication course has always been more on…

  5. Using WWW, Usenets, and E-Mail To Manage a Mathematics Pre-Service Technology Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, Leslee Francis; Pelton, Timothy W.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the need to learn about computer technology in preservice teacher education and describes a course developed at Brigham Young University as a model for teaching mathematics using technology that was offered via the Internet. Discusses Web pages, e-mail, Usenet, student and teacher reactions, and applications to K-12 classrooms. (LRW)

  6. Identification and Disidentification in Organizational Discourse: A Metaphor Analysis of E-Mail Communication at Enron

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnage, Anna K.

    2010-01-01

    This project is situated within the interpretive tradition in organizational communication research, focusing on organizational discourse. It goes further by bringing the discussion into the 21st century through examining how communication technology--specifically e-mail--plays a role in the linguistic practices that help create, maintain and…

  7. E-Rate to Support Wireless E-Mail, Internet Calling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    This article deals with federal E-rate program's support of school leaders' Blackberry habit. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has cleared the way to allow money from the $2.25 billion program of subsidies for school technology to apply to e-mail service for mobile, wireless devices, such as the BlackBerry, which are increasingly…

  8. 76 FR 46853 - International Business Machines Corporation, ITD Business Unit, Division 7, E-mail and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration International Business Machines Corporation, ITD Business Unit, Division 7, E-mail and Collaboration Group, Including Workers Off-Site From Various States in the United States Reporting to Armonk, NY;...

  9. Not Wanted in the Inbox!: Evaluations of Unsolicited and Harassing E-Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khoo, Pek Ne; Senn, Charlene Y.

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed as a first step to explore sexual harassment in the electronic domain. One hundred six students read 10 e-mail messages ranging from jokes to spam to a sexual proposition from a stranger and rated them on an offensiveness evaluative scale. Participants also completed social desirability and attitudes toward sexual…

  10. E-Mail Dialogues with Third-Grade Writers: Redefining the Curricular-Interpersonal Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britsch, Susan J.

    The purpose of this paper is to portray children's writing as a medium for participation in social response to an audience, in a situation where children are active contributors to evolving written dialogues. Throughout this 2-year project, data were collected by compiling the e-mail correspondence between the adults (the researcher and five…

  11. The Effects of Teaching Approaches on Student's Writing Strategies in the E-Mail Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Yu-Chih

    A study investigated the writing strategies used by English as a second language (ESL) students in writing electronic mail (e-mail) messages, and to what extent certain ESL teaching variables influenced students' use of writing strategies. Subjects were 16 ESL teachers and their 208 university students. Students were administered a 50-item…

  12. E-Mail Dialogue Journaling in an ESL Reading and Writing Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-mei

    This case study involved designing an electronic-based environment to explore the effectiveness of electronic mail (e-mail) as a writing tool for dialogue journaling. The setting for this study was an intermediate-level reading and writing class in the American English Institute Program on the campus of a large public university. Over a period of…

  13. 16 CFR 1130.7 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration. 1130.7 Section 1130.7 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR CONSUMER REGISTRATION OF DURABLE INFANT OR TODDLER PRODUCTS § 1130.7...

  14. 16 CFR 1130.8 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration. 1130.8 Section 1130.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR CONSUMER REGISTRATION OF DURABLE INFANT OR TODDLER PRODUCTS (Eff. June 28, 2010)...

  15. 16 CFR 1130.8 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration. 1130.8 Section 1130.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR CONSUMER REGISTRATION OF DURABLE INFANT OR TODDLER PRODUCTS § 1130.8...

  16. A Grounded Theory Study of the Relationship between E-Mail and Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camargo, Marta Rocha

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: This study consisted of a qualitative investigation into the role of e-mail in work-related burnout among high technology employees working full time and on-site for Internet, hardware, and software companies. Method: Grounded theory methodology was used to provide a systemic approach in categorising, sorting, and analysing data…

  17. 16 CFR 1130.8 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration. 1130.8 Section 1130.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR CONSUMER REGISTRATION OF DURABLE INFANT OR TODDLER PRODUCTS § 1130.8...

  18. Small-group CME using e-mail discussions. Can it work?

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, J. N.; Stewart, M.; Ostbye, T.

    2001-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Traditional continuing medical education (CME) approaches do not work well in changing physicians' behaviour, but some promising strategies and technologies might help. Our program sought to meld small-group learning with an Internet e-mail approach. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: In 1994, the Family medicine Education and Research Network (FERN) was developed to support on-line discussion among London, Ont, and area family physicians. To support educational, moderated case discussions using e-mail, FERN Dissemination (FERN-D) was introduced to a subgroup of participants. We hoped to increase awareness and use of evidence-based research in clinical practice and to increase use of Internet-based resources for CME. The target group was family physicians in the London area. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: Forty volunteers were recruited and were e-mailed one case every 2 weeks; 34 completed the study. Each case was followed by further postings and, at the end of 2 weeks, by a summary of the group's discussion. Background material for each case was researched and was evidence-based. Evaluation was conducted using preintervention and postintervention mailed surveys combined with an e-mail feedback questionnaire and a modified focus group. CONCLUSION: On-line case-based discussion is a promising strategy for encouraging family physicians to access current research. More research is needed to determine whether it can be effectively used to change physicians' practice. PMID:11281090

  19. 16 CFR 1130.8 - Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements for Web site registration or alternative e-mail registration. 1130.8 Section 1130.8 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR CONSUMER REGISTRATION OF DURABLE INFANT OR TODDLER PRODUCTS § 1130.8...

  20. Embedding E-Mail in Primary Schools: Developing a Tool for Collective Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vries, Bregje; van der Meig, Hans; Boersma, Kerst TH.; Pieters, Jules M.

    2005-01-01

    Reflection is an important aspect of learning in groups. In collective moments of reflection, learners can share and compare their ideas with others, and by doing so can reach an articulated and personal understanding of a learning task and domain. In the research presented here, e-mail is examined as a means for reflection in the context of group…

  1. Undergraduate Students' Use of Information Elicited During E-Mail "Tutorials."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trushell, John; Reymond, Christine; Burrell, Clare

    1998-01-01

    Considers questions posed by students during e-mail tutorials to elicit information from guest lecturers and the use of that information by students in their essays. Findings indicate: tutees tend to pose questions to elicit information or clarification rather than to elicit opinions of the guest lecturer; and two-thirds of tutees' essays cited…

  2. Minding Your E-Mail: District Leaders Need to Prepare for Public Records Requests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Daniel; Keener, Clinton; Shoaf, Michael; McIntyre, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Since the Supreme Court approved a 2006 amendment to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure requiring public entities such as school districts to produce electronically stored public records during the "discovery process" in lawsuits, maintaining such records, especially e-mail messages, has been an ongoing obligation for district leaders. While…

  3. The Use of E-Mail to Deliver Performance-Based Feedback to Early Childhood Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Erin E.; Pribble, Lois; Chen, Ching-I

    2013-01-01

    Three studies are described that examined the relation between performance-based (PB) feedback delivered via e-mail and preschool teachers' use of recommended practices. The authors conducted the first two studies in the same classroom with different classroom staff. The third study was conducted with three different teachers employed in…

  4. E-Mail Writing: Providing Background Information in the Core of Computer Assisted Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazari, Behzad; Ninknejad, Sahar

    2015-01-01

    The present study highly supported the effective role of providing background information via email by the teacher to write e-mail by the students in learners' writing ability. A total number of 50 EFL advanced male students aged between 25 and 40 at different branches of Iran Language Institute in Tehran, Tehran. Through the placement test of…

  5. E-Mail Alerts and RSS Feeds for Distance Learning Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Allyson; Howell, Scott L.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how E-Mail Alerts and RSS feeds can be helpful tools for busy distance education administrators by helping them to efficiently sort through the research and news information that is now available. These tools and their respective filters and aggregators make it possible for busy distance education administrators to stay…

  6. The Inclusion of E-Mail in Our Teaching: A Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partridge, Susan

    Educators are successfully incorporating electronic mail into elementary and secondary classrooms. This paper refers to an article by Hugh Barr which describes a variety of instructional programs that use electronic mail as part of the social studies curriculum. Barr notes that essential components of interschool e-mail are purpose, structure, and…

  7. Language with Character: A Stratified Corpus Comparison of Individual Differences in E-Mail Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberlander, Jon; Gill, Alastair J.

    2006-01-01

    To what extent does the wording and syntactic form of people's writing reflect their personalities? Using a bottom-up stratified corpus comparison, rather than the top-down content analysis techniques that have been used before, we examine a corpus of e-mail messages elicited from individuals of known personality, as measured by the Eysenck…

  8. "Dear Mr. Shawn": A Lesson in E-Mail Pragmatics (Netiquette).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Shawn

    2003-01-01

    This tip provides information that will help English-as-a-Second-Language learners understand the rules of formal e-mail communication, also known as netiquette, and enable them to practice using these communication skills effectively for academic purposes. (Author/VWL)

  9. Inexpensive E-mail Systems for LANs and Dial-up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaffman, Jay

    Internet e-mail is becoming more accessible to K-12 teachers. Many colleges and universities will give accounts to teachers for the price of asking. Unfortunately, many of these university systems are hard to use and are usually not offered to K-12 students. Also, most schools do not have phone lines in classrooms. This paper discusses two systems…

  10. Changing Cultural Stereotypes through E-Mail Assisted Foreign Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itakura, Hiroko

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the question of how cultural stereotypes are formed, modified, dismissed or reinforced, drawing on findings from a collaborative intercultural e-mail project between Hong Kong learners of Japanese at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University and native Japanese speakers at Kagoshima University. It also evaluates role of e-mail…

  11. Using viral e-mails to distribute tobacco control advertisements: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Carter, Owen B J; Donovan, Robert; Jalleh, Geoffrey

    2011-08-01

    The authors' objective was to conduct a trial of viral e-mail marketing as a distribution method for tobacco control advertisements. University students (n = 200) in the state of Western Australia were randomly allocated to receive 1 of 2 e-mails with hyperlinks to tobacco control advertisements ("Toilet" and "Rubbish") emphasizing the disgusting nature of smoking. Recipients followed a hyperlink to a Web page playing Toilet or Rubbish on endless loop. Viewers were encouraged to forward the e-mail to their friends and invited to complete an online survey about the advertisement. Unique downloads for each advertisement were identified by internet provider (IP) location and tallied by date and geographical location to assess subsequent dissemination beyond the initial 200 students. There were 826 unique viewings of the advertisements averaging 26.9 viewings per day for the first fortnight, followed by a lower average of 4.1 hits per day for the next 3.5 months. IP addresses identified hits from 3 other Australian states and 7 other countries. Online surveys were completed by 103 respondents (12.5% of total hits) but included few smokers (n = 9). Significantly more respondents rated Toilet as "funny" compared with Rubbish (40% vs. 11%; p < .05), likely explaining why the former accounted for significantly more viewings than the latter (487 vs. 339; p < .001). There was a greater than fourfold return in dissemination for each initial e-mail sent but daily hits rapidly deteriorated over time. Entertainment appears to facilitate viral e-mails being forwarded onwards but only exceptionally compelling tobacco control materials are ever likely to become self-perpetuating. PMID:21432712

  12. Evaluating Tandem Language Learning by E-Mail: Report on a Bilateral Project. CLCS Occasional Paper No. 55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, David; Ushioda, Ema; Appel, Marie Christine; Moran, John; O'Rourke, Breffni; Schwienhorst, Klaus

    The report details the Irish portion of an experiment in tandem language learning by electronic mail (e-mail). The partners were Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland) and Ruhr University, Bochum (Germany), funded by the European Union within the International E-Mail Tandem Network as part of a two-year project. Tandem language learning is a form of…

  13. Can Messages Make a Difference? The Association between E-Mail Messages and Health Outcomes in Diabetes Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Jeanine Warisse; Robinson, James D.; Tian, Yan; Neustadtl, Alan; Angelus, Pam; Russell, Marie; Mun, Seong K.; Levine, Betty

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined the impact of social support messages on patient health outcomes. Forty-one American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian patients received a total of 618 e-mail messages from their healthcare provider (HCP). The e-mail messages were divided into 3,565 message units and coded for instances of emotional social…

  14. Internet/E-Mail Usage and Well-Being among 65-84 Year Olds in New Zealand: Policy Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koopman-Boyden, Peggy G.; Reid, Sarah L.

    2009-01-01

    Research indicates that significant groups of older people are using Internet/e-mail technology. Using data from a 2007 random sample of 1,680 New Zealanders aged 65-84, predictors of Internet/e-mail usage and the impact of usage on well-being were investigated. Gender, age, education, household composition, income, and work were significant…

  15. Uses and Perceptions of E-Mail for Course-Related Communication between Business Faculty and Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Technological advancements have facilitated the learning process by offering faculty members and students better access to resources, while increasing the potential for more interaction and communication flexibility (Firmin & Miller, 2005). Among these technologies is electronic mail or e-mail. The uses and perceptions of e-mail between business…

  16. A Comparative Analysis of E-Mail and Face-to-Face Communication in an Educational Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightfoot, Jay M.

    2006-01-01

    Electronic mail (e-mail) is an extremely important medium for Internet-based education. Due to its unique characteristics, there is reason to be concerned that students do not put appropriate care into writing messages that are sent via e-mail. This has significant implications for the effectiveness of online learning environments. This paper…

  17. Responsiveness to a Prospective Student E-Mail Inquiry by Community Colleges in the Nine Mega-States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadinger, David A.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated e-mail responsiveness by community colleges in the nine mega-states to an inquiry from a prospective student. Noel-Levitz (2006b) reported that prospective students want to receive an e-mail with information about an institution prior to applying for admission. Specifically, high school juniors and seniors want…

  18. Mitigating E-Mail Requests in Teenagers' First and Second Language Academic Cyber-Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcón Soler, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The study analyses teenagers' e-mail requests during academic cyber-consultation, exploring how the performance of request modifiers is influenced by participants' perceptions of the degree of imposition of the speech act and social distance with the recipient. A total of 295 e-mail requests, 145 produced by British English speakers…

  19. Predicted Outcome Value of E-Mail Communication: Factors that Foster Professional Relational Development between Students and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Stacy; Kelsey, Dawn; Lancaster, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Using predicted outcome value theory as a guide, this study investigated the link between e-mail correspondence as a form of computer mediated extra class communication and how it may shape students' desire to foster student-teacher relational development. The findings revealed that when students believe their teacher e-mails the class frequently,…

  20. 43 CFR 2.6 - Will the Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Will the Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely available information? 2.6 Section 2... Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely...

  1. 43 CFR 2.6 - Will the Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Will the Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely available information? 2.6 Section 2... Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely...

  2. 43 CFR 2.6 - Will the Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Will the Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely available information? 2.6 Section 2.6 Public... Department accept written requests, including fax, e-mail, or telephone requests, for routinely...

  3. Computer-Mediated Communication in Psychology Teaching: Influence of Cultural Background on E-Mail Content and on Appraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Miriam; Jucks, Regina

    2014-01-01

    A significant amount of communication between lecturers and students takes place via e-mail. This study provides evidence that two types of cultural cues contained in the e-mail impacts lecturers' linguistic adaptation to, and appraisal of, the student. A total of 186 psychology lecturers from universities in Germany answered a fictitious…

  4. Talking Shop via E-Mail: A Thematic and Linguistic Analysis of Electronic Mail Communication. Research Report 99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tella, Seppo

    The linguistic purposes of this research were to focus on content, themes and topics, and to analyze the way the target language (English) was used in e-mail. Communicativeness and the roles of the communicator (writer-reader) became central, emphasizing the multidirectional character of e-mail communication. The basic tenet of communicativeness…

  5. Incremental E-Mail Classification and Rule Suggestion Using Simple Term Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzywicki, Alfred; Wobcke, Wayne

    In this paper, we present and use a method for e-mail categorization based on simple term statistics updated incrementally. We apply simple term statistics to two different tasks. The first task is to predict folders for classification of e-mails when large numbers of messages are required to remain unclassified. The second task is to support users who define rule bases for the same classification task, by suggesting suitable keywords for constructing Ripple Down Rule bases in this scenario. For both tasks, the results are compared with a number of standard machine learning algorithms. The comparison shows that the simple term statistics method achieves a higher level of accuracy than other machine learning methods when taking computation time into account.

  6. Entropy of dialogues creates coherent structures in e-mail traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckmann, Jean-Pierre; Moses, Elisha; Sergi, Danilo

    2004-10-01

    We study the dynamic network of e-mail traffic and find that it develops self-organized coherent structures similar to those appearing in many nonlinear dynamic systems. Such structures are uncovered by a general information theoretic approach to dynamic networks based on the analysis of synchronization among trios of users. In the e-mail network, coherent structures arise from temporal correlations when users act in a synchronized manner. These temporally linked structures turn out to be functional, goal-oriented aggregates that must react in real time to changing objectives and challenges (e.g., committees at a university). In contrast, static structures turn out to be related to organizational units (e.g., departments).

  7. Entropy of dialogues creates coherent structures in e-mail traffic

    PubMed Central

    Eckmann, Jean-Pierre; Moses, Elisha; Sergi, Danilo

    2004-01-01

    We study the dynamic network of e-mail traffic and find that it develops self-organized coherent structures similar to those appearing in many nonlinear dynamic systems. Such structures are uncovered by a general information theoretic approach to dynamic networks based on the analysis of synchronization among trios of users. In the e-mail network, coherent structures arise from temporal correlations when users act in a synchronized manner. These temporally linked structures turn out to be functional, goal-oriented aggregates that must react in real time to changing objectives and challenges (e.g., committees at a university). In contrast, static structures turn out to be related to organizational units (e.g., departments). PMID:15448210

  8. New Software Product Feature Identification: An Analysis of E-mail User Characteristics and Functional Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofuoglu, Ecehan; Basoglu, Nuri; Daim, Tugrul

    Improving the product development process is becoming more important as business environment gets more competitive. This study aims at understanding and characterizing potential users of a software product through idea sharing of users. It also targets to create a new product concept through understanding the common features users prefer most. During this product conceptualization stage, the customer ideas are captured through use of a questionnaire. The target users, priority of product functions and features are investigated and the details of the existing e-mail systems as well as of the ideal e-mail systems are identified. Some of the key results included users with demographic differences having different usage and requirements characteristics, expectations of females being higher than those of males and the software functions used and characteristics required being different for those with different job categories or educational backgrounds.

  9. E-mail communication in pain practice: The importance of being earnest

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Irene Solera; García, Guadalupe Población; Riquelme, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Background: Information technology can play a vital role in meeting patient needs and reinforcing the relationship among patients and their pain physicians. However, strong resistance remains on the medical side to this type of non-frontal care. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of an E-mail intervention on customers’ satisfaction. The secondary goals were to analyze the messages from patients to their clinician (not only the volume but also the content) and the impact on client, professional and health services outcomes. Study Design: A prospective, non-randomized evaluation of patients undergoing treatment for chronic pain from September 2011 to May 2012. Setting: A private, specialty referral center in Spain. Materials and Methods: Participants were users visiting the Pain Management Unit evaluated by one physician. The E-mail address of the facility was written in every medical report provided. Patient satisfaction at the end of the 8-month trial period was assessed and outcomes recorded. Results: Patients reported better communication with their therapist and greater satisfaction with overall care. 780 E-mails were read. Specialists received an average of 5 messages per day (standard deviation 0,3). None of them was unsuitable. Limitations: This is a prospective, single center evaluation performed by one doctor. There was no control group due to ethical considerations. Conclusions: Electronic communication is a cheap, easy and feasible way to address a wide range of concerns, thus enhancing patients’ satisfaction. More efforts are needed to implement routinely usage of this tool. If used appropriately, E-mail can facilitate physician-dependent interactions, promote access to care, save time and reduce costs. Concerns about billing, improper utilization, privacy and confidentiality might complicate its introduction and acceptance. Internet access remains a significant barrier to online patient

  10. Impact of Research-based Synopses Delivered as Daily E-mail: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Grad, Roland M.; Pluye, Pierre; Mercer, Jay; Marlow, Bernard; Beauchamp, Marie-Eve; Shulha, Michael; Johnson-Lafleur, Janique; Wood-Dauphinee, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a prospective observational study to (1) determine usage and construct validity of a method to gauge the cognitive impact of information derived from daily e-mail, and (2) describe self-reported impacts of research-based synopses (InfoPOEMs) delivered as e-mail. Ratings of InfoPOEMs using an Impact assessment scale provided (a) data on usage of the impact assessment method, (b) reports of impact by InfoPOEM and by doctor and (c) data for analysis of construct validity of the scale. Participants were family physicians or general practitioners who rated at least five InfoPOEMs delivered on e-mail. For each InfoPOEM rated, 0.1 continuing education credit was awarded by the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Use of the impact assessment scale linked to a daily InfoPOEM was sustained during the 150-day study period. 1,007 participants submitted 61,493 reports of ‘cognitive impact’ by rating on average 61 InfoPOEMs (range 5–111). ‘I learned something new’ was most frequently reported. ‘I was frustrated as there was not enough information or nothing useful’ was the most frequently reported negative type of impact. The proportion of reports of ‘No Impact’ varied substantially across individual InfoPOEMs. Impact patterns suggested an 8 or 9-factor solution. Our Impact assessment method facilitates knowledge transfer by promoting two-way exchange between providers of health information and family doctors. Providers of health information can use this method to better understand the impact of research-based synopses. Sustaining current practice and increasing knowledge about new developments in medicine are important outcomes arising from research-based synopses delivered as e-mail, in addition to practice change. PMID:18096905

  11. Composing Effective and Efficient E-mails: A Primer for Pharmacy Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Feemster, Agnes Ann

    2015-01-01

    This primer describes the purpose and importance of e-mail as a key communication medium in the workplace. It emphasizes clarity as a primary modality to enhance efficiency and effectiveness. Finally, the primer reviews elements of grammar, punctuation, and style that contribute to each e-mail’s ability to meet language standards, enhance the writer’s image, and successfully transmit information. PMID:26715801

  12. Impact of research-based synopses delivered as daily e-mail: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Grad, Roland M; Pluye, Pierre; Mercer, Jay; Marlow, Bernard; Beauchamp, Marie-Eve; Shulha, Michael; Johnson-Lafleur, Janique; Wood-Dauphinee, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a prospective observational study to (1) determine usage and construct validity of a method to gauge the cognitive impact of information derived from daily e-mail, and (2) describe self-reported impacts of research-based synopses (InfoPOEMs) delivered as e-mail. Ratings of InfoPOEMs using an Impact assessment scale provided (a) data on usage of the impact assessment method, (b) reports of impact by InfoPOEM and by doctor and (c) data for analysis of construct validity of the scale. PARTICIPANTS were family physicians or general practitioners who rated at least five InfoPOEMs delivered on e-mail. For each InfoPOEM rated, 0.1 continuing education credit was awarded by the College of Family Physicians of Canada. Use of the impact assessment scale linked to a daily InfoPOEM was sustained during the 150-day study period. 1,007 participants submitted 61,493 reports of 'cognitive impact' by rating on average 61 InfoPOEMs (range 5-111). 'I learned something new' was most frequently reported. 'I was frustrated as there was not enough information or nothing useful' was the most frequently reported negative type of impact. The proportion of reports of 'No Impact' varied substantially across individual InfoPOEMs. Impact patterns suggested an 8 or 9-factor solution. Our Impact assessment method facilitates knowledge transfer by promoting two-way exchange between providers of health information and family doctors. Providers of health information can use this method to better understand the impact of research-based synopses. Sustaining current practice and increasing knowledge about new developments in medicine are important outcomes arising from research-based synopses delivered as e-mail, in addition to practice change. PMID:18096905

  13. Comparison of e-mail communication skills among first- and fourth-year dental students.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Marnie; Horvath, Zsuzsa; Weinberg, Seth M; Bhatt, Jaya; Spallek, Heiko

    2013-11-01

    As e-mail and other forms of electronic communication increase in popularity, it is important for dental schools to consider a curriculum that prepares their graduates to understand and apply effective electronic communication strategies to their patients. Reflecting this shift in communication behavior, the American Medical Association has developed specific e-mail communication guidelines. Some behavioral examples in these guidelines include protecting patients' protected health information (PHI), ensuring proper record keeping, and using professional, courteous, and understandable language. In this study, a sample of first- and fourth-year dental students (n=160) at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine participated in an assignment assessing their patient-provider e-mail communication skills. A rubric was used to evaluate and compare the data between dental student classes. The results reveal a generalized lack of compliance with several of these guidelines by both classes (e.g., failure to protect PHI), despite efforts to expose students to these concepts in the curriculum. In an effort to train emerging dentists to function in a rapidly changing technological environment, these findings suggest a need for growth and development of curricula and perhaps guidelines/recommendations for behavioral competencies regarding dental students' use of electronic communication in the patient care environment. PMID:24192406

  14. A Mixed-Methods Study of Patient-Provider E-Mail Content in a Safety-Net Setting.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Jacob B; Tieu, Lina; Lyles, Courtney; Sarkar, Urmimala

    2016-01-01

    To explore the content of patient-provider e-mails in a safety-net primary care clinic, we conducted a content analysis using inductive and deductive coding of e-mail exchanges (n = 31) collected from January through November 2013. Participants were English-speaking adult patients with a chronic condition (or their caregivers) cared for at a single publicly funded general internal medicine clinic and their primary care providers (attending general internist physicians, clinical fellows, internal medicine residents, and nurse practitioners). All e-mails were nonurgent. Patients included a medical update in 19% of all e-mails. Patients requested action in 77% of e-mails, and the most common requests overall were for action regarding medications or treatment (29%). Requests for information were less common (45% of e-mails). Patient requests (n = 56) were resolved in 84% of e-mail exchanges, resulting in 63 actions. These results show that patients in safety-net clinics are capable of safely and effectively using electronic messaging for between-visit communication with providers. Safety-net systems should implement electronic communications tools as soon as possible to increase health care access and enhance patients' involvement in their care. PMID:26332306

  15. Health literacy and global cognitive function predict e-mail but not internet use in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Schprechman, Jared P; Gathright, Emily C; Goldstein, Carly M; Guerini, Kate A; Dolansky, Mary A; Redle, Joseph; Hughes, Joel W

    2013-01-01

    Background. The internet offers a potential for improving patient knowledge, and e-mail may be used in patient communication with providers. However, barriers to internet and e-mail use, such as low health literacy and cognitive impairment, may prevent patients from using technological resources. Purpose. We investigated whether health literacy, heart failure knowledge, and cognitive function were related to internet and e-mail use in older adults with heart failure (HF). Methods. Older adults (N = 119) with heart failure (69.84 ± 9.09 years) completed measures of health literacy, heart failure knowledge, cognitive functioning, and internet use in a cross-sectional study. Results. Internet and e-mail use were reported in 78.2% and 71.4% of this sample of patients with HF, respectively. Controlling for age and education, logistic regression analyses indicated that higher health literacy predicted e-mail (P < .05) but not internet use. Global cognitive function predicted e-mail (P < .05) but not internet use. Only 45% used the Internet to obtain information on HF and internet use was not associated with greater HF knowledge. Conclusions. The majority of HF patients use the internet and e-mail, but poor health literacy and cognitive impairment may prevent some patients from accessing these resources. Future studies that examine specific internet and email interventions to increase HF knowledge are needed. PMID:24282634

  16. Health Literacy and Global Cognitive Function Predict E-Mail but Not Internet Use in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schprechman, Jared P.; Gathright, Emily C.; Goldstein, Carly M.; Guerini, Kate A.; Dolansky, Mary A.; Redle, Joseph; Hughes, Joel W.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The internet offers a potential for improving patient knowledge, and e-mail may be used in patient communication with providers. However, barriers to internet and e-mail use, such as low health literacy and cognitive impairment, may prevent patients from using technological resources. Purpose. We investigated whether health literacy, heart failure knowledge, and cognitive function were related to internet and e-mail use in older adults with heart failure (HF). Methods. Older adults (N = 119) with heart failure (69.84 ± 9.09 years) completed measures of health literacy, heart failure knowledge, cognitive functioning, and internet use in a cross-sectional study. Results. Internet and e-mail use were reported in 78.2% and 71.4% of this sample of patients with HF, respectively. Controlling for age and education, logistic regression analyses indicated that higher health literacy predicted e-mail (P < .05) but not internet use. Global cognitive function predicted e-mail (P < .05) but not internet use. Only 45% used the Internet to obtain information on HF and internet use was not associated with greater HF knowledge. Conclusions. The majority of HF patients use the internet and e-mail, but poor health literacy and cognitive impairment may prevent some patients from accessing these resources. Future studies that examine specific internet and email interventions to increase HF knowledge are needed. PMID:24282634

  17. TME11/385: International Pathology Consultations through Internet E-mail and High Resolution Digital Photomicrography

    PubMed Central

    Della Mea, V; Mariuzzi, L; Beltrami, CA; Marchevsky, A

    1999-01-01

    Introduction Remote consultation though static telepathology, i.e. based on the delivery of still histology images, is one of the most interesting as well as discussed telemedicine fields, due to its suitability for an email implementation, and to the problem of the preliminary image sampling. Current scanning digital cameras can acquire digital images at very high resolutions that allow the acquisition of microscopic images at low optical magnification, decreasing the number of photographs necessary to represent a histology slide. A small number of images can be thus tiled to represent an entire biopsy, obtaining a visual representation that resembles that of light microscope. In this way, no real sampling is needed. The present paper discusses this approach in conjunction with the Internet Electronic mail. Methods The acquisition device: the images were acquired through a photoscanner, which incorporates a linear CCD chip, that slides onto the image field as in flatbed scanners. This allows for very high resolutions (up to 3400x2700 pixels) at a cost considerably lower than equivalent digital cameras, but with higher time for acquisition (1-2 minutes). This allows for the acquisition of low magnification large fields which at the same time contain as much detail as higher magnification fields. 20:1 JPEG compression has been adopted for reducing storage size. E-mail protocols and formats: MIME is a message format for heterogeneous, possibly encrypted and signed, multimedia e-mail still deliverable by the usual protocols, i.e. SMTP and POP. MIME is adequate for representing a static telepathology case composed of text data and a set of histology images. In our study, we used the Netscape Communicator 4.0 mail agent. Material: The study included two steps. The former involved the delivery of 31 cases acquired by a senior pathology resident, the latter 30 cases acquired by a physician with little pathology knowledge, both in Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and e-mailed

  18. Texting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilley, Carol L.

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing ranks of cell phone ownership is an increase in text messaging, or texting. During 2008, more than 2.5 trillion text messages were sent worldwide--that's an average of more than 400 messages for every person on the planet. Although many of the messages teenagers text each day are perhaps nothing more than "how r u?" or "c u…

  19. A Content Analysis of E-mail Communication between Patients and Their Providers: Patients Get the Message

    PubMed Central

    White, Casey B.; Moyer, Cheryl A.; Stern, David T.; Katz, Steven J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: E-mail use in the clinical setting has been slow to diffuse for several reasons, including providers' concerns about patients' inappropriate and inefficient use of the technology. This study examined the content of a random sample of patient–physician e-mail messages to determine the validity of those concerns. Design: A qualitative analysis of patient–physician e-mail messages was performed. Measurements: A total of 3,007 patient–physician e-mail messages were collected over 11 months as part of a randomized, controlled trial of a triage-based e-mail system in two primary care centers (including 98 physicians); 10% of messages were randomly selected for review. Messages were coded across such domains as message type, number of requests per e-mail, inclusion of sensitive content, necessity of a physician response, and message tone. Results: The majority (82.8%) of messages addressed a single issue. The most common message types included information updates to the physicians (41.4%), prescription renewals (24.2%), health questions (13.2%), questions about test results (10.9%), referrals (8.8%), “other” (including thank yous, apologies) (8.8%), appointments (5.4%), requests for non-health-related information (4.8%), and billing questions (0.3%). Overall, messages were concise, formal, and medically relevant. Very few (5.1%) included sensitive content, and none included urgent messages. Less than half (43.2%) required a physician response. Conclusion: A triage-based e-mail system promoted e-mail exchanges appropriate for primary care. Most patients adhered to guidelines aimed at focusing content, limiting the number of requests per message, and avoiding urgent requests or highly sensitive content. Thus, physicians' concerns about the content of patients' e-mails may be unwarranted. PMID:15064295

  20. Increased demand for E-mail health consultation service: analysis of a Web survey.

    PubMed

    Klinar, Ivana; Balazin, Ana; Basić, Martina; Plantas, Igor; Biskupić, Kresimir

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the study was to explore characteristics of the users of the Interactive Service "Your Questions" that is based on E-mail health consultations. We wanted to find out what motivated users to use it, were they satisfied with it and what were its impacts on their health behavior. Therefore, we developed a Web survey and invited 2,747 users to take part in it. 919 (33.5%) of users responded. Results showed that the majority of respondents were women (79.1%) and that most hold at least a college degree (52.4%). The Service was mostly used for obtaining information about certain medical symptoms or medical conditions (50.1%), for a second opinion on a diagnosis (18.6%) and for more information about medical treatment (14.4%). In terms of Service features, it was used because of its convenience with regard to time (38.7%) and a sense of privacy (25.7%). Before posting a question to the Service, 93.2% of the respondents searched for health articles on the PLIVAzdravlje portal while 90% of them read the Questions and Answers database. Over half of them (61.8%) posted their question after they already visited their physicians on that particular issue. Nevertheless, 48% of them were encouraged to visit their physicians after they received the answer. The results show an important trend of increased demand for e-mail health consultation and the need for reliable medical information, with one thousand questions submitted to the Service in the observed period of 40 days. If the source of medical information is reliable, as in case of our Service as well as other forms of e-mail health consultations, it can have positive impact on valuable physician-patient communication based on knowledge and mutual understanding. PMID:20698120

  1. Faculty and Student Expectations and Perceptions of E-mail Communication in a Campus and Distance Doctor of Pharmacy Program

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul D.; Monaghan, Michael S.; Walters, Ryan W.; Merkel, Jennifer J.; Lipschultz, Jeremy H.; Lenz, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine faculty members' and students' expectations and perceptions of e-mail communication in a dual pathway pharmacy program. Methods Three parallel survey instruments were administered to campus students, distance students, and faculty members, respectively. Focus groups with students and faculty were conducted. Results Faculty members perceived themselves as more accessible and approachable by e-mail than either group of students did. Campus students expected a shorter faculty response time to e-mail and for faculty members to be more available than did distance students. Conclusion E-mail is an effective means of computer-mediated communication between faculty members and students and can be used to promote a sense of community and inclusiveness (ie, immediacy), especially with distant students. PMID:21436932

  2. In their own words? A terminological analysis of e-mail to a cancer information service.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Catherine Arnott; Stavri, P. Zoë; Chapman, Wendy Webber

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To better understand the terms used by consumers to describe their health information needs and determine if this "consumer terminology"differs from those used by health care professionals. METHODS: Features and findings identified in 139 e-mail messages to the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute's Cancer Information and Referral Service were coded and matched against the 2001 Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus. RESULTS:504 unique terms were identified. 185 (36%) were exact matches to concepts in the 2001 UMLS Metathesaurus (MTH). 179 (35%) were partial string matches; 119 (24%) were known synonyms for MTH concepts; and 2 (<1%) were lexical variants. Only 19,or 4% of the total terms, were not found to be present in the 2001 MT1H. CONCLUSION: 96% of the clinical findings and features mentioned in e-mail by correspondents who did not self-identify as healthcare professionals were described using terms from controlled healthcare terminologies. The notion of a paradigmatic "consumer" who uses a particular vocabulary specific to her "consumer" status may be ill-founded. PMID:12463914

  3. A Poissonian explanation for heavy tails in e-mail communication

    PubMed Central

    Malmgren, R. Dean; Stouffer, Daniel B.; Motter, Adilson E.; Amaral, Luís A. N.

    2008-01-01

    Patterns of deliberate human activity and behavior are of utmost importance in areas as diverse as disease spread, resource allocation, and emergency response. Because of its widespread availability and use, e-mail correspondence provides an attractive proxy for studying human activity. Recently, it was reported that the probability density for the inter-event time τ between consecutively sent e-mails decays asymptotically as τ−α, with α ≈ 1. The slower-than-exponential decay of the inter-event time distribution suggests that deliberate human activity is inherently non-Poissonian. Here, we demonstrate that the approximate power-law scaling of the inter-event time distribution is a consequence of circadian and weekly cycles of human activity. We propose a cascading nonhomogeneous Poisson process that explicitly integrates these periodic patterns in activity with an individual's tendency to continue participating in an activity. Using standard statistical techniques, we show that our model is consistent with the empirical data. Our findings may also provide insight into the origins of heavy-tailed distributions in other complex systems. PMID:19017788

  4. E-mail surveys assist investigation and response: a university conjunctivitis outbreak.

    PubMed Central

    Passaro, D. J.; Scott, M.; Dworkin, M. S.

    2004-01-01

    A conjunctivitis outbreak affecting more than 200 individuals occurred on a university campus in Evanston, Illinois, USA, in spring 2002. An investigation was conducted jointly by the Evanston Department of Health and the Illinois Department of Public Health. A combination of e-mail and traditional telephone-based surveys demonstrated that wearing contact lenses was a risk factor for any conjunctivitis and bilateral conjunctivitis, whereas using glasses was protective. Laboratory and epidemiological evidence suggested that the outbreak was caused by a viral pathogen that eluded characterization despite extensive culture and PCR-based laboratory testing. Enhanced laboratory surveillance could help clinicians and public-health officials to identify relevant secular changes in the spectrum of causes of conjunctivitis. During institutional outbreaks, e-mail surveys can help public-health officials to efficiently access information not easily collected by traditional case-control studies, and can provide an effective conduit for providing prevention recommendation, such as the need for improved hand and contact-lens hygiene during outbreaks. PMID:15310179

  5. Management of Asymptomatic Erosive Esophagitis: An E-Mail Survey of Physician's Opinions

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seong Woo; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Heung Up; Jeon, Seong Woo

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The management of asymptomatic erosive esophagitis is controversial. We surveyed physicians' opinions on asymptomatic erosive esophagitis using e-mail. Methods All members of the Korean Society of Neurogastro-enterology and Motility were invited to answer the questionnaire on the treatment and follow-up of patients with asymptomatic erosive esophagitis by e-mail. Results A total of 73 members answered the questionnaire (response rate, 18%). As initial management, 41% of respondents chose pharmacologic treatment, whereas 59% chose nonpharmacologic treatment. In the case of pharmacologic treatment, proton pump inhibitors were the preferred medication. The most common treatment duration was 4 weeks (43%), followed by 8 weeks (38%), and 6 months (11%). Sixty-two percent of the respondents recommended follow-up endoscopy annually, whereas 29% chose no endoscopic follow-up. Thirty-four percent of the respondents answered that they would talk about reflux-related sleep disturbances. Only 25% of the respondents explained the possibility of Barrett's esophagus or esophageal adenocarcinoma to their patients. Conclusions There are substantial practice variations in the management of asymptomatic erosive esophagitis in Korea. PMID:23710309

  6. Standardization of teleradiology using Dicom e-mail: recommendations of the German Radiology Society.

    PubMed

    Weisser, G; Walz, M; Ruggiero, S; Kämmerer, M; Schröter, A; Runa, A; Mildenberger, P; Engelmann, U

    2006-03-01

    Until recently there has been no standard for an interoperable and manufacturer-independent protocol for secure teleradiology connections. This was one of the main reasons for the limited use of teleradiology in Germany. Various teleradiology solutions have been developed in the past, but the vast majority have not been interoperable. Therefore an ad hoc teleradiology connection was impossible even between partners who were already equipped with teleradiology workstations. Based on the evaluation of vendor-independent protocols in recent years the IT Working Group (AGIT) of the German Radiology Society set up an initiative to standardize basic teleradiology. An e-mail based solution using the Dicom standard for e-mail attachments with additional encryption according to the OpenPGP standard was found to be the common denominator. This protocol is easy to implement and safe for personalized patient data and fulfills the legal requirements for teleradiology in Germany and other countries. The first version of the recommendation was presented at the 85th German Radiology Convention in 2004. Eight commercial and three open-source implementations of the protocol are currently available; the protocol is in daily use in over 50 hospitals and institutions. PMID:16228213

  7. Use of Bright Light Therapy Among Psychiatrists in Massachusetts: An E-Mail Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ciraulo, Domenic A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Evidence on the use of bright light therapy for conditions beyond seasonal affective disorder continues to accrue; however, data on the prevalent use of bright light therapy in the community or in hospitals remain limited, particularly in the United States. Method: We conducted a 5-minute e-mail survey of practicing psychiatrists in Massachusetts using the membership roster through the Massachusetts Psychiatric Society to evaluate prevalent use of bright light therapy as well as to solicit attitudes toward the treatment. Three e-mails were sent out over a 2-week period, and responses were obtained from March 2–24, 2013. An iPad raffle was used to incentivize survey completion. Results: Of the 1,366 delivered e-mails, 197 responses were obtained. Of respondents, 72% indicated that they used bright light therapy in their practice, and, among these, all but 1 used bright light therapy for seasonal affective disorder. Only 55% of responding psychiatrists who use bright light therapy consider it to treat nonseasonal depression, and 11% of respondents who recommend bright light therapy would consider its use in inpatient settings. Lack of insurance coverage for light-delivery devices was identified as the largest barrier to using bright light therapy, being cited by 55% of respondents. Survey results suggest that limitations in practitioner knowledge of bright light therapy and the absence of bright light therapy in treatment algorithms are the 2 leading modifiable factors to encourage broader implementation. Limitations: The principal limitation of our survey was the low response rate. As such, we consider these data preliminary. Conclusions: Response bias very likely led to an overestimation in prevalent use of bright light therapy; however, this bias notwithstanding, it appears that bright light therapy is used significantly less often for nonseasonal depression than for seasonal affective disorder. Further, its use in inpatient settings is significantly

  8. Rosetta: Ensuring the Preservation and Usability of ASCII-based Data into the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, M. K.; Arms, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Field data obtained from dataloggers often take the form of comma separated value (CSV) ASCII text files. While ASCII based data formats have positive aspects, such as the ease of accessing the data from disk and the wide variety of tools available for data analysis, there are some drawbacks, especially when viewing the situation through the lens of data interoperability and stewardship. The Unidata data translation tool, Rosetta, is a web-based service that provides an easy, wizard-based interface for data collectors to transform their datalogger generated ASCII output into Climate and Forecast (CF) compliant netCDF files following the CF-1.6 discrete sampling geometries. These files are complete with metadata describing what data are contained in the file, the instruments used to collect the data, and other critical information that otherwise may be lost in one of many README files. The choice of the machine readable netCDF data format and data model, coupled with the CF conventions, ensures long-term preservation and interoperability, and that future users will have enough information to responsibly use the data. However, with the understanding that the observational community appreciates the ease of use of ASCII files, methods for transforming the netCDF back into a CSV or spreadsheet format are also built-in. One benefit of translating ASCII data into a machine readable format that follows open community-driven standards is that they are instantly able to take advantage of data services provided by the many open-source data server tools, such as the THREDDS Data Server (TDS). While Rosetta is currently a stand-alone service, this talk will also highlight efforts to couple Rosetta with the TDS, thus allowing self-publishing of thoroughly documented datasets by the data producers themselves.

  9. 48 CFR 52.223-18 - Encouraging Contractor Policies To Ban Text Messaging While Driving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... short message service texting, e-mailing, instant messaging, obtaining navigational information, or... the safety risks associated with texting while driving. (d) Subcontracts. The Contractor shall...

  10. 48 CFR 52.223-18 - Encouraging Contractor Policies To Ban Text Messaging While Driving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... short message service texting, e-mailing, instant messaging, obtaining navigational information, or... the safety risks associated with texting while driving. (d) Subcontracts. The Contractor shall...

  11. 48 CFR 52.223-18 - Encouraging Contractor Policies To Ban Text Messaging While Driving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... short message service texting, e-mailing, instant messaging, obtaining navigational information, or... the safety risks associated with texting while driving. (d) Subcontracts. The Contractor shall...

  12. 48 CFR 52.223-18 - Encouraging Contractor Policies To Ban Text Messaging While Driving.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... short message service texting, e-mailing, instant messaging, obtaining navigational information, or... the safety risks associated with texting while driving. (d) Subcontracts. The Contractor shall...

  13. The effectiveness of personalized e-mail newsletters and the role of personal characteristics.

    PubMed

    Maslowska, Ewa; Putte, Bas van den; Smit, Edith G

    2011-12-01

    Personalizing communication means creating persuasive messages that refer to aspects of a person's self. Although the use of personalization is increasing, research on its effectiveness is limited and the results are mixed. This study examined the persuasiveness of personalized e-mail newsletters in terms of increased attention, cognitive activity, evaluation, attitude, intention, and behavior by means of an experiment (n=109). Participants randomly received either a personalized or a generic newsletter advertising a sports center. Personalization triggered a more positive evaluation of the message; however, it did not influence the other effect variables. The effects were moderated by consumers' need for uniqueness, trust, and privacy concerns, suggesting that personalization is a good strategy to increase message evaluation only among individuals who have a high need for uniqueness. PMID:21790275

  14. Physician assessments of the value of therapeutic information delivered via e-mail

    PubMed Central

    Grad, Roland; Pluye, Pierre; Repchinsky, Carol; Jovaisas, Barbara; Marlow, Bernard; Marques Ricarte, Ivan L.; Galvão, Maria Cristiane Barbosa; Shulha, Michael; de Gaspé Bonar, James

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed Although e-learning programs are popular and access to electronic knowledge resources has improved, raising awareness about updated therapeutic recommendations in practice continues to be a challenge. Objective of program To raise awareness about and document the use of therapeutic recommendations. Program description In 2010, family physicians evaluated e-Therapeutics (e-T) Highlights with a Web-based tool called the Information Assessment Method (IAM). The e-T Highlights consisted of information found in the primary care reference e-Therapeutics+. Each week, family physicians received an e-mail containing a link to 1 Highlight from a different chapter of e-Therapeutics+. Family physicians received continuing medical education credits for each Highlight they rated with the IAM. Of the 5346 participants, 85% of them were full-time or part-time practitioners. A total of 31 429 Highlights ratings were received in 2010 (median of 2 ratings per participant, range 1 to 49). Among participants who rated more than 2 Highlights, the median number of ratings was 7 (mean 11.9). The relevance of the information from individual Highlights varied widely; however, for 90% of the rated Highlights participants indicated total or partial relevance of the information for at least 1 patient. For 41% of rated Highlights, participants expected patient health benefits to result from implementing the recommendation, such as avoiding an unnecessary or inappropriate treatment, or a preventive intervention. Conclusion This continuing medical education program stimulated family physicians to rate therapeutic recommendations that were delivered weekly via e-mail. The process of rating e-T Highlights with the IAM raised awareness about treatment recommendations and documented self-reported use of this information in practice. PMID:24829020

  15. "While you still think, I already type": experienced social power reduces deliberation during e-mail communication.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Annika; Sassenberg, Kai

    2014-11-01

    E-mail allows individuals to deliberate on their communication before sending it off. For instance, communication partners can easily take their time to ponder how best to frame a request before they actually send a message. Individuals at times strategically exploit this opportunity to deliberate in order to tailor messages to their communication partner, such as when communicating with a relatively more powerful person. As social power reduces concerns about impression management, we predicted that individuals deliberate more while composing e-mail messages under low (vs. high) power. This assumption was tested with well-established power priming. As such, we expected that experienced power in one context would diminish deliberation times during a subsequent e-mail communication. An experiment manipulating the experience of (low vs. high) power and measuring deliberation times during e-mail composition supported this hypothesis. The findings thus indicate how social power alters deliberation times. More importantly, the results show that individuals not only strategically deliberate during e-mail communication in line with their current situation, but also in line with their social standing in a previous situation (here, their experience of power). PMID:25286277

  16. Providing cell phone numbers and e-mail addresses to patients: The patient’s perspective, a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Today patients can consult with their treating physician by cell phone or e-mail. These means of communication enhance the quality of medical care and increase patient satisfaction, but they can also impinge on physicians’ free time and their patient schedule while at work. The objective of this study is to assess the attitudes and practice of patients on obtaining the cell phone number or e-mail address of their physician for the purpose of medical consultation. Methods Personal interviews with patients, 18 years of age or above, selected by random sampling from the roster of adults insured by Clalit Health Services, Southern Division. The total response rate was 41%. The questionnaire included questions on the attitude and practice of patients towards obtaining their physician’s cell phone number or e-mail address. Comparisons were performed using Chi-square tests to analyze statistically significant differences of categorical variables. Two-tailed p values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant, with a power of 0.8. Results The study sample included 200 patients with a mean age of 46.6 ± 17.1, of whom 110 were women (55%). Ninety-three (46.5%) responded that they would be very interested in obtaining their physician’s cell phone number, and an additional 83 (41.5%) would not object to obtaining it. Of the 171 patients (85.5%) who had e-mail addresses, 25 (14.6%) said they would be very interested in obtaining their physician’s e-mail address, 85 (49.7%) said they would not object to getting it, and 61 (35.7%) were not interested. In practice only one patient had requested the physician’s e-mail address and none actually had it. Conclusions Patients favored cell phones over e-mail for consulting with their treating physicians. With new technologies such as cell phones and e-mail in common use, it is important to determine how they can be best used and how they should be integrated into the flow of clinical practice

  17. Productivity, part 1: getting things done, using e-mail, scanners, reference managers, note-taking applications, and text expanders.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Amanda E; Moshiri, Mariam; Pandey, Tarun; Lall, Chandana; Lalwani, Neeraj; Bhargava, Puneet

    2014-05-01

    In an era of declining reimbursements and tightening of the job market, today's radiologists are forced to "make do with less." With the rollout of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly called "Obamacare," radiologists will be expected not only to interpret studies but to also take on many additional roles, adding a new layer of complexity to already demanding daily duties. These changes make it more important than ever to develop a personal workflow management system incorporating some of the most potent productivity tools. In this article, the authors discuss current productivity techniques and related software with the most potential to help radiologists keep up with the ever increasing demands on their time at the work place and help us lead more balanced lives. PMID:24656443

  18. "The Tutor's Computer Ate My Paper" and Other Notes from a Pilot Study of E-mail Tutoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarvers, Josephine Koster; Buswell, Eric

    A study examined the feasibility of e-mail tutoring at Winthrop University, a medium-sized state supported liberal arts university with limited technology access. Initially it looked at the questions of directive versus nondirective methods in tutoring, but it quickly spread to questions of submission, formatting, and strategy. A total of 26…

  19. How Users Take Advantage of Different Forms of Interactivity on Online News Sites: Clicking, E-Mailing, and Commenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boczkowski, Pablo J.; Mitchelstein, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the uptake of multiple interactive features on news sites. It looks at the thematic composition of the most clicked, most e-mailed, and most commented stories during periods of heightened and routine political activity. Results show that (a) during the former period, the most commented stories were more likely to be focused on…

  20. Using an E-mail tutorial and student seminars to improve an intermediate-level undergraduate physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finch, J. D.; Hand, L. N.

    1998-10-01

    The authors revised the junior-level classical mechanics course at Cornell University to incorporate asynchronous, autonomous, and group learning. We created an E-mail tutorial and a student seminar. We will first discuss the theoretical background for these changes and then describe the results of their implementation over a period of three years.

  1. Tandem Language Learning by E-Mail: Some Basic Principles and a Case Study. CLCS Occasional Paper No. 54.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appel, Marie Christine

    A study investigated the effectiveness of tandem second language learning using electronic mail (e-mail). Tandem language learning refers to a partnership between two learners, each learning the other's native language. The underlying principles of reciprocity and learner autonomy are explored, use of asynchronous communication between individuals…

  2. Self-Presentation and Interactional Alliances in E-Mail Discourse: The Style- and Code-Switches of Greek Messages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgakopoulou, Alexandra

    1997-01-01

    Analyzes the ways in which language use reflects alignments and symmetry between people who are well-acquainted and communicate via electronic mail in Greek. Focus is on certain discourse features that form the conventionalized style of e-mail and frame contextualization cues, particularly certain patterns of code-switching and style shifts. (MSE)

  3. Is the Medium the Message? Comparing Student Perceptions of Teacher Responses via Written and E-mail Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Nancy

    Telecommunications in the classroom helps transform familiar types of assignments into new forms, increasing students' motivation while extending opportunities for critical thinking. This goals of this study were to increase apprentice teachers' technology use and evaluation skills while determining the value of e-mail communication in…

  4. Efficacy of a Single Computer-Tailored E-Mail for Smoking Cessation: Results after 6 Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poel, Fam Te; Bolman, Catherine; Reubsaet, Astrid; de Vries, Hein

    2009-01-01

    To date, few Internet-delivered smoking cessation interventions have been tested. This study tested the efficacy, understandability, credibility and personal relevance of an e-mail-delivered computer-tailored smoking cessation intervention. It included tailored action plan feedback, as recent studies have demonstrated the importance of planning in…

  5. 7 CFR 984.445 - Procedures for voting by mail, e-mail, telephone, videoconference, facsimile, or any other means...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedures for voting by mail, e-mail, telephone, videoconference, facsimile, or any other means of communication. 984.445 Section 984.445 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables,...

  6. Provider Link: Facilitating Healthcare Providers’ Support of Web-based Smoking Cessation Efforts via Secure E-mail

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Kashyap; Bansod, Aditya; Frysinger, Dan; Perkins, Dawna; Cabanting, Jeannette; Lenert, Leslie

    2003-01-01

    Provider Link is a system designed to enhance the efficacy of a web-based intervention for smoking cessation by helping health care providers support their patients via e-mail. The system is designed to maintain confidentiality while allowing providers rapid access to patient data collected over the web. A trial of Provider Link is currently underway. PMID:14728539

  7. Making Meaning of Graduate Students' and Preservice Teachers' E-Mail Communication in a Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Janet C.; Bennett, Susan V.; Shea, Kim T.

    2007-01-01

    This inquiry examined graduate students' and preservice teachers' e-mail communication as they made decisions about supporting the instructional needs of children at-risk in a community of practice summer literacy camp. The correspondence gradually evolved from impersonal to interpersonal communication over a ten-week time span, and influenced the…

  8. EFL Students' Vocabulary Learning in NS-NNS E-Mail Interactions: Do They Learn New Words by Imitation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasaki, Akihiko; Takeuchi, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated Japanese students' EFL vocabulary development through e-mail interactions with a native English speaker (NS), with primary focus on students' imitation of new words. According to sociocultural theory, learners can internalize new linguistic knowledge by imitating an expert's expressions to create his/her own…

  9. The Ethnographic Approach and Meta-Analysis: On the Intricacies of Identity Construction among Mohawk E-mail Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDougall, Robert

    Shortly after a researcher arrived at a Traditional Mohawk (Iroquois) Indian community in New York State in May 1997, seven community members began using the Netscape 3.0 e-mail system with steadily increasing frequency. The researcher was interested in studying the relationship between new communication technology and identity maintenance. E-mail…

  10. Analysis of E-Mail Produced by Middle School Students with Disabilities Using Accessible Interfaces: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohlberg, McKay Moore; Todis, Bonnie; Fickas, Stephen; Ehlhardt, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this exploratory study was to investigate electronic communication as a potential method to enhance social communication in a range of students with disabilities. This study investigated the usability of an adapted e-mail interface, TeenMail, for 11 middle school students with significant learning and communication impairments who…