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Sample records for e2f-3a key regulators

  1. Oct3/4 directly regulates expression of E2F3a in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai, Dai; Ueda, Atsushi; Akagi, Tadayuki; Yokota, Takashi; Koide, Hiroshi

    2015-04-10

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells, derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts, have a characteristic cell cycle with truncated G1 and G2 phases. Recent findings that suppression of Oct3/4 expression results in a reduced proliferation rate of ES cells suggest the involvement of Oct3/4 in the regulation of ES cell growth, although the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we identified E2F3a as a direct target gene of Oct3/4 in ES cells. Oct3/4 directly bound to the promoter region of the E2F3a gene and positively regulated expression of E2F3a in mouse ES cells. Suppression of E2F3a activity by E2F6 overexpression led to the reduced proliferation in ES cells, which was relieved by co-expression of E2F3a. Furthermore, cell growth retardation caused by loss of Oct3/4 was rescued by E2F3a expression. These results suggest that Oct3/4 upregulates E2F3a expression to promote ES cell growth. - Highlights: • Oct3/4 positively regulates E2F3a expression in ES cells. • Oct3/4 binds to the promoter region of the E2F3a gene. • Overexpression of E2F6, an inhibitor of E2F3a, reduces ES cell growth. • E2F3a recovers growth retardation of ES cells caused by Oct3/4 reduction.

  2. [Key regulators of skeletal myogenesis].

    PubMed

    Kopantseva, E E; Belyavsky, A V

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal myogenesis has been extensively studied at both morphological and molecular levels. This review considers the main stages of embryonic skeletal myogenesis and myogenic factors that trigger their initiation, focusing on specific protein interactions involved in somitic myogenesis, head myogenesis, and limb myogenesis. The second part of the review describes the role of noncoding RNAs (microRNAs and long noncoding RNAs) in myogenesis. This information is of particular interest, because regulation of cell processes by noncoding RNAs is an actively developing field of molecular biology. Knowledge of mechanisms of skeletal myogenesis is of applied significance. Various transcription factors, noncoding RNAs, and other myogenic regulators can be employed in the induction of myogenic reprogramming in stem cells and differentiated somatic cells. Current trends and strategies in the field of skeletal myogenic reprogramming are discussed in the last part of the review. PMID:27239841

  3. 76 FR 68314 - Special Local Regulations; Key West World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Key West, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Key West World Championship... Key West, Florida during the Key West World Championship, a series of high-speed boat races. The event..., Super Boat International Productions, Inc. is hosting the Key West World Championship, a series of...

  4. Ethylene, a key factor in the regulation of seed dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Corbineau, Françoise; Xia, Qiong; Bailly, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Ethylene is an important component of the gaseous environment, and regulates numerous plant developmental processes including seed germination and seedling establishment. Dormancy, the inability to germinate in apparently favorable conditions, has been demonstrated to be regulated by the hormonal balance between abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellins (GAs). Ethylene plays a key role in dormancy release in numerous species, the effective concentrations allowing the germination of dormant seeds ranging between 0.1 and 200 μL L-1. Studies using inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis or of ethylene action and analysis of mutant lines altered in genes involved in the ethylene signaling pathway (etr1, ein2, ain1, etr1, and erf1) demonstrate the involvement of ethylene in the regulation of germination and dormancy. Ethylene counteracts ABA effects through a regulation of ABA metabolism and signaling pathways. Moreover, ethylene insensitive mutants in Arabidopsis are more sensitive to ABA and the seeds are more dormant. Numerous data also show an interaction between ABA, GAs and ethylene metabolism and signaling pathways. It has been increasingly demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play a significant role in the regulation of seed germination interacting with hormonal signaling pathways. In the present review the responsiveness of seeds to ethylene will be described, and the key role of ethylene in the regulation of seed dormancy via a crosstalk between hormones and other signals will be discussed. PMID:25346747

  5. Ethylene, a key factor in the regulation of seed dormancy.

    PubMed

    Corbineau, Françoise; Xia, Qiong; Bailly, Christophe; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat

    2014-01-01

    Ethylene is an important component of the gaseous environment, and regulates numerous plant developmental processes including seed germination and seedling establishment. Dormancy, the inability to germinate in apparently favorable conditions, has been demonstrated to be regulated by the hormonal balance between abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellins (GAs). Ethylene plays a key role in dormancy release in numerous species, the effective concentrations allowing the germination of dormant seeds ranging between 0.1 and 200 μL L(-1). Studies using inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis or of ethylene action and analysis of mutant lines altered in genes involved in the ethylene signaling pathway (etr1, ein2, ain1, etr1, and erf1) demonstrate the involvement of ethylene in the regulation of germination and dormancy. Ethylene counteracts ABA effects through a regulation of ABA metabolism and signaling pathways. Moreover, ethylene insensitive mutants in Arabidopsis are more sensitive to ABA and the seeds are more dormant. Numerous data also show an interaction between ABA, GAs and ethylene metabolism and signaling pathways. It has been increasingly demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play a significant role in the regulation of seed germination interacting with hormonal signaling pathways. In the present review the responsiveness of seeds to ethylene will be described, and the key role of ethylene in the regulation of seed dormancy via a crosstalk between hormones and other signals will be discussed. PMID:25346747

  6. Sirtuin 1 Deacetylase: A Key Regulator of Hepatic Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Jongsook Kim; Choi, SungE; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Summary Obesity is a serious medical problem worldwide and disruption of metabolic/energy homeostasis plays a pivotal role in this global epidemic. In obese people, fatty liver (steatosis) develops, which increases the risk for diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and even, liver cancer. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a NAD+-dependent deacetylase that functions as a key metabolic/energy sensor and mediates homeostatic responses to nutrient availability. Accumulating evidence indicates that SIRT1 is a master regulator of the transcriptional networks that control hepatic lipid metabolism. During energy-deprived conditions, SIRT1 deacetylates and alters the expression and activities of key transcriptional regulators involved in hepatic lipogenesis, fatty acid β-oxidation, and cholesterol/bile acid metabolism. This review will discuss the latest advances in this field, focusing on beneficial roles of SIRT1 in hepatic lipid metabolism including its potential as a therapeutic target for treatment of steatosis and other obesity-related metabolic diseases. PMID:23374725

  7. Key regulators of apoptosis execution as biomarker candidates in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Emilie M; Rehm, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to apoptosis is frequently detected in malignant melanoma, a skin cancer with rapidly growing incidence rates. Apoptosis resistance may develop with disease progression and may be associated with the poor responsiveness of metastatic melanoma to apoptosis-inducing treatments, such as genotoxic chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Likewise, the efficacy of novel treatment options (targeted kinase inhibitors and immunotherapeutics) that indirectly lead to cell death may depend on the susceptibility of melanoma to apoptosis. At its core, apoptosis execution is regulated by the interplay between a comparatively small number of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, and consequently numerous studies have investigated the potential of these players as biomarker candidates. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of biomarker discovery studies focusing on key regulators of apoptosis execution, critically review the findings of these studies, and outline strategies that address current limitations and challenges in exploiting regulators of apoptosis execution as prognostic or predictive biomarkers in melanoma. PMID:27308353

  8. T-bet as a key regulator of mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Rami; Lord, Graham M

    2016-04-01

    Initially understood to be a key regulator of interferon-γ-producing helper T cells, our knowledge of T-bet's functional roles has expanded to encompass a growing range of cellular lineages. In addition to regulating other interferon-γ-producing adaptive immune cells, it is now clear that T-bet plays a fundamental role in the regulation of innate immune responses across mucosal surfaces. This homeostatic role is demonstrated by the spontaneous colitis that occurs when T-bet is deleted from innate immune cells in RAG(-/-) mice. Using this model as a focal point, we review our understanding of T-bet's regulation of adaptive and innate immune systems, focusing particularly on mucosal populations including innate lymphoid cells, dendritic cells and intraepithelial lymphocytes. With the increasingly diverse effects of T-bet on different lineages, the classical binding-centric paradigm of T-bet's molecular functionality has increasingly struggled to account for the versatility of T-bet's biological effects. Recent recognition of the synergistic interactions between T-bet and other canonical transcription factors has led to a co-operative paradigm that has provided greater explanatory power. Synthesizing insights from ChIP-seq and comparative biology, we expand the co-operative paradigm further and suggest a network approach as a powerful way to understand and model T-bet's diverse functionality. PMID:26726991

  9. Functional Imaging of Autonomic Regulation: Methods and Key Findings

    PubMed Central

    Macey, Paul M.; Ogren, Jennifer A.; Kumar, Rajesh; Harper, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system processing of autonomic function involves a network of regions throughout the brain which can be visualized and measured with neuroimaging techniques, notably functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The development of fMRI procedures has both confirmed and extended earlier findings from animal models, and human stroke and lesion studies. Assessments with fMRI can elucidate interactions between different central sites in regulating normal autonomic patterning, and demonstrate how disturbed systems can interact to produce aberrant regulation during autonomic challenges. Understanding autonomic dysfunction in various illnesses reveals mechanisms that potentially lead to interventions in the impairments. The objectives here are to: (1) describe the fMRI neuroimaging methodology for assessment of autonomic neural control, (2) outline the widespread, lateralized distribution of function in autonomic sites in the normal brain which includes structures from the neocortex through the medulla and cerebellum, (3) illustrate the importance of the time course of neural changes when coordinating responses, and how those patterns are impacted in conditions of sleep-disordered breathing, and (4) highlight opportunities for future research studies with emerging methodologies. Methodological considerations specific to autonomic testing include timing of challenges relative to the underlying fMRI signal, spatial resolution sufficient to identify autonomic brainstem nuclei, blood pressure, and blood oxygenation influences on the fMRI signal, and the sustained timing, often measured in minutes of challenge periods and recovery. Key findings include the lateralized nature of autonomic organization, which is reminiscent of asymmetric motor, sensory, and language pathways. Testing brain function during autonomic challenges demonstrate closely-integrated timing of responses in connected brain areas during autonomic challenges, and the involvement with brain

  10. MDA-9/syntenin is a key regulator of glioma pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kegelman, Timothy P.; Das, Swadesh K.; Hu, Bin; Bacolod, Manny D.; Fuller, Christine E.; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Emdad, Luni; Dasgupta, Santanu; Baldwin, Albert S.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Dent, Paul; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Background The extraordinary invasiveness of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) contributes to treatment failure and the grim prognosis of patients diagnosed with this tumor. Consequently, it is imperative to define further the cellular mechanisms that control GBM invasion and identify promising novel therapeutic targets. Melanoma differentiation associated gene–9 (MDA-9/syntenin) is a highly conserved PDZ domain–containing scaffolding protein that promotes invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo in human melanoma models. To determine whether MDA-9/syntenin is a relevant target in GBM, we investigated its expression in tumor samples and involvement in GBM invasion and angiogenesis. Materials We assessed MDA-9/syntenin levels in available databases, patient tumor samples, and human-derived cell lines. Through gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies, we analyzed changes in invasion, angiogenesis, and signaling in vitro. We used orthotopic xenografts with GBM6 cells to demonstrate the role of MDA-9/syntenin in GBM pathogenesis in vivo. Results MDA-9/syntenin expression in high-grade astrocytomas is significantly higher than normal tissue counterparts. Forced overexpression of MDA-9/syntenin enhanced Matrigel invasion, while knockdown inhibited invasion, migration, and anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Moreover, overexpression of MDA-9/syntenin increased activation of c-Src, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor kappa-B, leading to elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and secretion of interleukin-8 with corresponding changes observed upon knockdown. GBM6 cells that stably express small hairpin RNA for MDA-9/syntenin formed smaller tumors and had a less invasive phenotype in vivo. Conclusions Our findings indicate that MDA-9/syntenin is a novel and important mediator of invasion in GBM and a key regulator of pathogenesis, and we identify it as a potential target for anti-invasive treatment in human astrocytoma

  11. Rab proteins: The key regulators of intracellular vesicle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuin, Tanmay; Roy, Jagat Kumar

    2014-10-15

    Vesicular/membrane trafficking essentially regulates the compartmentalization and abundance of proteins within the cells and contributes in many signalling pathways. This membrane transport in eukaryotic cells is a complex process regulated by a large and diverse array of proteins. A large group of monomeric small GTPases; the Rabs are essential components of this membrane trafficking route. Most of the Rabs are ubiquitously expressed proteins and have been implicated in vesicle formation, vesicle motility/delivery along cytoskeleton elements and docking/fusion at target membranes through the recruitment of effectors. Functional impairments of Rabs affecting transport pathways manifest different diseases. Rab functions are accompanied by cyclical activation and inactivation of GTP-bound and GDP-bound forms between the cytosol and membranes which is regulated by upstream regulators. Rab proteins are characterized by their distinct sub-cellular localization and regulate a wide variety of endocytic, transcytic and exocytic transport pathways. Mutations of Rabs affect cell growth, motility and other biological processes. - Highlights: • Rab proteins regulate different signalling pathways. • Deregulation of Rabs is the fundamental causes of a variety of human diseases. • This paper gives potential directions in developing therapeutic targets. • This paper also gives ample directions for modulating pathways central to normal physiology. • These are the huge challenges for drug discovery and delivery in near future.

  12. Regulating Subcellular Metal Homeostasis: The Key to Crop Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Khurram; Rasheed, Sultana; Kobayashi, Takanori; Seki, Motoaki; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), and copper (Cu) are essential micronutrient mineral elements for living organisms, as they regulate essential cellular processes, such as chlorophyll synthesis and photosynthesis (Fe, Cu, and Mn), respiration (Fe and Cu), and transcription (Zn). The storage and distribution of these minerals in various cellular organelles is strictly regulated to ensure optimal metabolic rates. Alteration of the balance in uptake, distribution, and/or storage of these minerals severely impairs cellular metabolism and significantly affects plant growth and development. Thus, any change in the metal profile of a cellular compartment significantly affects metabolism. Different subcellular compartments are suggested to be linked through complex retrograde signaling networks to regulate cellular metal homeostasis. Various genes regulating cellular and subcellular metal distribution have been identified and characterized. Understanding the role of these transporters is extremely important to elaborate the signaling between various subcellular compartments. Moreover, modulation of the proteins involved in cellular metal homeostasis may help in the regulation of metabolism, adaptability to a diverse range of environmental conditions, and biofortification. Here, we review progress in the understanding of different subcellular metal transport components in plants and discuss the prospects of regulating cellular metabolism and strategies to develop biofortified crop plants. PMID:27547212

  13. Regulating Subcellular Metal Homeostasis: The Key to Crop Improvement.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Khurram; Rasheed, Sultana; Kobayashi, Takanori; Seki, Motoaki; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), and copper (Cu) are essential micronutrient mineral elements for living organisms, as they regulate essential cellular processes, such as chlorophyll synthesis and photosynthesis (Fe, Cu, and Mn), respiration (Fe and Cu), and transcription (Zn). The storage and distribution of these minerals in various cellular organelles is strictly regulated to ensure optimal metabolic rates. Alteration of the balance in uptake, distribution, and/or storage of these minerals severely impairs cellular metabolism and significantly affects plant growth and development. Thus, any change in the metal profile of a cellular compartment significantly affects metabolism. Different subcellular compartments are suggested to be linked through complex retrograde signaling networks to regulate cellular metal homeostasis. Various genes regulating cellular and subcellular metal distribution have been identified and characterized. Understanding the role of these transporters is extremely important to elaborate the signaling between various subcellular compartments. Moreover, modulation of the proteins involved in cellular metal homeostasis may help in the regulation of metabolism, adaptability to a diverse range of environmental conditions, and biofortification. Here, we review progress in the understanding of different subcellular metal transport components in plants and discuss the prospects of regulating cellular metabolism and strategies to develop biofortified crop plants. PMID:27547212

  14. DC-STAMP: A Key Regulator in Osteoclast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Ya-Hui; Ritchlin, Christopher T

    2016-11-01

    Osteoimmunology research is a new emerging research field that investigates the links between the bone and immune responses. Results from osteoimmunology studies suggest that bone is not only an essential component of the musculoskeletal system, but is also actively involved in immune regulation. Many important factors involved in immune regulation also participate in bone homeostasis. Bone homeostasis is achieved by a coordinated action between bone-synthesizing osteoblasts and bone-degrading osteoclasts. An imbalanced action between osteoblasts and osteoclasts often results in pathological bone diseases: osteoporosis is caused by an excessive osteoclast activity, whereas osteopetrosis results from an increased osteoblast activity. This review focuses on dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), an important protein currently considered as a master regulator of osteoclastogenesis. Of clinical relevance, the frequency of circulating DC-STAMP+ cells is elevated during the pathogenesis of psoriatic diseases. Intriguingly, recent results suggest that DC-STAMP also plays an imperative role in bone homeostasis by regulating the differentiation of both osteoclasts and osteoblasts. This article summarizes our current knowledge on DC-STAMP by focusing on its interacting proteins, its regulation on osteoclastogenesis-related genes, its possible involvement in immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-mediated signaling cascade, and its potential of developing therapeutics for clinical applications. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2402-2407, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27018136

  15. 78 FR 33221 - Special Local Regulation; Annual Swim Around Key West, Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico; Key...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information The..., Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico; Key West, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a special local regulation on the waters of the Atlantic...

  16. Nonsense-mediated decay regulates key components of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Janke, Ryan; Kong, Jeremy; Braberg, Hannes; Cantin, Greg; Yates, John R; Krogan, Nevan J; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-06-20

    Cells frequently experience DNA damage that requires repair by homologous recombination (HR). Proteins involved in HR are carefully coordinated to ensure proper and efficient repair without interfering with normal cellular processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad55 functions in the early steps of HR and is regulated in response to DNA damage through phosphorylation by the Mec1 and Rad53 kinases of the DNA damage response. To further identify regulatory processes that target HR, we performed a high-throughput genetic interaction screen with RAD55 phosphorylation site mutants. Genes involved in the mRNA quality control process, nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), were found to genetically interact with rad55 phospho-site mutants. Further characterization revealed that RAD55 transcript and protein levels are regulated by NMD. Regulation of HR by NMD extends to multiple targets beyond RAD55, including RAD51, RAD54 and RAD57 Finally, we demonstrate that loss of NMD results in an increase in recombination rates and resistance to the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting this pathway negatively regulates HR under normal growth conditions. PMID:27001511

  17. Nonsense-mediated decay regulates key components of homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Janke, Ryan; Kong, Jeremy; Braberg, Hannes; Cantin, Greg; Yates, John R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Cells frequently experience DNA damage that requires repair by homologous recombination (HR). Proteins involved in HR are carefully coordinated to ensure proper and efficient repair without interfering with normal cellular processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad55 functions in the early steps of HR and is regulated in response to DNA damage through phosphorylation by the Mec1 and Rad53 kinases of the DNA damage response. To further identify regulatory processes that target HR, we performed a high-throughput genetic interaction screen with RAD55 phosphorylation site mutants. Genes involved in the mRNA quality control process, nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), were found to genetically interact with rad55 phospho-site mutants. Further characterization revealed that RAD55 transcript and protein levels are regulated by NMD. Regulation of HR by NMD extends to multiple targets beyond RAD55, including RAD51, RAD54 and RAD57. Finally, we demonstrate that loss of NMD results in an increase in recombination rates and resistance to the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting this pathway negatively regulates HR under normal growth conditions. PMID:27001511

  18. FADD is a key regulator of lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Hongqin; Wang, Xueshi; Zha, Daolong; Gan, Ziyi; Cai, Fangfang; Du, Pan; Yang, Yunwen; Yang, Bingya; Zhang, Xiangyu; Yao, Chun; Zhou, Yuqiang; Jiang, Chizhou; Guan, Shengwen; Zhang, Xuerui; Zhang, Jing; Jiang, Wenhui; Hu, Qingang; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    FADD, a classical apoptotic signaling adaptor, was recently reported to have non-apoptotic functions. Here, we report the discovery that FADD regulates lipid metabolism. PPAR-α is a dietary lipid sensor, whose activation results in hypolipidemic effects. We show that FADD interacts with RIP140, which is a corepressor for PPAR-α, and FADD phosphorylation-mimic mutation (FADD-D) or FADD deficiency abolishes RIP140-mediated transcriptional repression, leading to the activation of PPAR-α. FADD-D-mutant mice exhibit significantly decreased adipose tissue mass and triglyceride accumulation. Also, they exhibit increased energy expenditure with enhanced fatty acid oxidation in adipocytes due to the activation of PPAR-α. Similar metabolic phenotypes, such as reduced fat formation, insulin resistance, and resistance to HFD-induced obesity, are shown in adipose-specific FADD knockout mice. Additionally, FADD-D mutation can reverse the severe genetic obesity phenotype of ob/ob mice, with elevated fatty acid oxidation and oxygen consumption in adipose tissue, improved insulin resistance, and decreased triglyceride storage. We conclude that FADD is a master regulator of glucose and fat metabolism with potential applications for treatment of insulin resistance and obesity. PMID:27357657

  19. The osteocyte: key player in regulating bone turnover

    PubMed Central

    Goldring, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Osteocytes are the most abundant cell type in bone and are distributed throughout the mineralised bone matrix forming an interconnected network that ideally positions them to sense and to respond to local biomechanical and systemic stimuli to regulate bone remodelling and adaptation. The adaptive process is dependent on the coordinated activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts that form a so called bone multicellular unit that remodels cortical and trabecular bone through a process of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, followed by a phase of bone formation mediated by osteoblasts. Osteocytes mediate their effects on bone remodelling via both cell–cell interactions with osteoclasts and osteoblasts, but also via signaling through the release of soluble mediators. The remodelling process provides a mechanism for adapting the skeleton to local biomechanical factors and systemic hormonal influences and for replacing bone that has undergone damage from repetitive mechanical loading. PMID:26557372

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factors as key regulators of tumor inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mamlouk, Soulafa; Wielockx, Ben

    2013-06-15

    Low levels of oxygen or hypoxia is often an obstacle in health, particularly in pathological disorders like cancer. The main family of transcription factors responsible for cell survival and adaptation under strenuous conditions of hypoxia are the "hypoxia-inducible factors" (HIFs). Together with prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (PHDs), HIFs regulates tumor angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, metastasis, in addition to resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. Additionally, the entire HIF transcription cascade is involved in the "seventh" hallmark of cancer; inflammation. Studies have shown that hypoxia can influence tumor associated immune cells toward assisting in tumor proliferation, differentiation, vessel growth, distant metastasis and suppression of the immune response via cytokine expression alterations. These changes are not necessarily analogous to HIF's role in non-cancer immune responses, where hypoxia often encourages a strong inflammatory response. PMID:23055435

  1. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Key Regulator of Cutaneous Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Granstein, Richard D.; Wagner, John A.; Stohl, Lori L.; Ding, Wanhong

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been viewed as a neuropeptide and vasodilator. However, CGRP is more appropriately thought of as a pleiotropic signaling molecule. Indeed, CGRP has key regulatory functions on immune and inflammatory processes within the skin. CGRP-containing nerves are intimately associated with epidermal LCs and CGRP has profound regulatory effects on Langerhans cell antigen-presenting capability. When LCs are exposed to CGRP in vitro, their ability to present antigen for in vivo priming of naïve mice or elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity is inhibited in at least some situations. Administration of CGRP intradermally inhibits acquisition of immunity to Th1-dominant haptens applied to the injected site while augmenting immunity to Th2-dominant haptens, although the cellular targets of activity in these experiments remains unclear. Although CGRP can be a pro-inflammatory agent, several studies have demonstrated that administration of CGRP can inhibit the elicitation of inflammation by inflammatory stimuli in vivo. In this regard, CGRP inhibits the release of certain chemokines by stimulated endothelial cells. This is likely to be physiologically relevant since cutaneous blood vessels are innervated by sensory nerves. Exciting new studies suggest a significant role for CGRP in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and, most strikingly, that CGRP inhibit the ability of LCs to transmit the human immunodeficiency virus 1 to T lymphocytes. A more complete understanding of the role of CGRP in the skin immune system may lead to new and novel approaches for the therapy of immune mediated skin disorders. PMID:25534428

  2. Phosphatidate phosphatase, a key regulator of lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Florencia; Carman, George M

    2013-03-01

    Yeast Pah1p phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP) catalyzes the penultimate step in the synthesis of triacylglycerol. PAP plays a crucial role in lipid homeostasis by controlling the relative proportions of its substrate phosphatidate and its product diacylglycerol. The cellular amounts of these lipid intermediates influence the synthesis of triacylglycerol and the pathways by which membrane phospholipids are synthesized. Physiological functions affected by PAP activity include phospholipid synthesis gene expression, nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane growth, lipid droplet formation, and vacuole homeostasis and fusion. Yeast lacking Pah1p PAP activity are acutely sensitive to fatty acid-induced toxicity and exhibit respiratory deficiency. PAP is distinguished in its cellular location, catalytic mechanism, and physiological functions from Dpp1p and Lpp1p lipid phosphate phosphatases that utilize a variety of substrates that include phosphatidate. Phosphorylation/dephosphorylation is a major mechanism by which Pah1p PAP activity is regulated. Pah1p is phosphorylated by cytosolic-associated Pho85p-Pho80p, Cdc28p-cyclin B, and protein kinase A and is dephosphorylated by the endoplasmic reticulum-associated Nem1p-Spo7p phosphatase. The dephosphorylation of Pah1p stimulates PAP activity and facilitates the association with the membrane/phosphatidate allowing for its reaction and triacylglycerol synthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:22910056

  3. Flg22-Triggered Immunity Negatively Regulates Key BR Biosynthetic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Góngora, Tamara; Kim, Seong-Ki; Lozano-Durán, Rosa; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    In plants, activation of growth and activation of immunity are opposing processes that define a trade-off. In the past few years, the growth-promoting hormones brassinosteroids (BR) have emerged as negative regulators of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI), promoting growth at the expense of defense. The crosstalk between BR and PTI signaling was described as negative and unidirectional, since activation of PTI does not affect several analyzed steps in the BR signaling pathway. In this work, we describe that activation of PTI by the bacterial PAMP flg22 results in the reduced expression of BR biosynthetic genes. This effect does not require BR perception or signaling, and occurs within 15 min of flg22 treatment. Since the described PTI-induced repression of gene expression may result in a reduction in BR biosynthesis, the crosstalk between PTI and BR could actually be negative and bidirectional, a possibility that should be taken into account when considering the interaction between these two pathways. PMID:26617621

  4. Regulation of sucrose metabolism in higher plants: localization and regulation of activity of key enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, H.; Huber, S. C.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc) plays a central role in plant growth and development. It is a major end product of photosynthesis and functions as a primary transport sugar and in some cases as a direct or indirect regulator of gene expression. Research during the last 2 decades has identified the pathways involved and which enzymes contribute to the control of flux. Availability of metabolites for Suc synthesis and 'demand' for products of sucrose degradation are important factors, but this review specifically focuses on the biosynthetic enzyme sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), and the degradative enzymes, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and the invertases. Recent progress has included the cloning of genes encoding these enzymes and the elucidation of posttranslational regulatory mechanisms. Protein phosphorylation is emerging as an important mechanism controlling SPS activity in response to various environmental and endogenous signals. In terms of Suc degradation, invertase-catalyzed hydrolysis generally has been associated with cell expansion, whereas SuSy-catalyzed metabolism has been linked with biosynthetic processes (e.g., cell wall or storage products). Recent results indicate that SuSy may be localized in multiple cellular compartments: (1) as a soluble enzyme in the cytosol (as traditionally assumed); (2) associated with the plasma membrane; and (3) associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Phosphorylation of SuSy has been shown to occur and may be one of the factors controlling localization of the enzyme. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of the recent developments relating to regulation of activity and localization of key enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism in plants.

  5. Self-Regulated Learning in Higher Education: Identifying Key Component Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Simon

    2011-01-01

    The concept of self-regulated learning is becoming increasingly relevant in the study of learning and academic achievement, especially in higher education, where quite distinctive demands are placed on students. Though several key theoretical perspectives have been advanced for self-regulated learning, there is consensus regarding the central role…

  6. CGI-58, a key regulator of lipid homeostasis and signaling in plants, also regulates polyamine metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative Gene Identification-58 (CGI-58) is an alpha/beta hydrolase-type protein that regulates lipid homeostasis and signaling in eukaryotes by interacting with and stimulating the activity of several different types of proteins, including a lipase in mammalian cells and a peroxisomal ABC transp...

  7. AdpA, key regulator for morphological differentiation regulates bacterial chromosome replication

    PubMed Central

    Wolański, Marcin; Jakimowicz, Dagmara; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2012-01-01

    AdpA, one of the most pleiotropic transcription regulators in bacteria, controls expression of several dozen genes during Streptomyces differentiation. Here, we report a novel function for the AdpA protein: inhibitor of chromosome replication at the initiation stage. AdpA specifically recognizes the 5′ region of the Streptomyces coelicolor replication origin (oriC). Our in vitro results show that binding of AdpA protein decreased access of initiator protein (DnaA) to the oriC region. We also found that mutation of AdpA-binding sequences increased the accessibility of oriC to DnaA, which led to more frequent replication and acceleration of Streptomyces differentiation (at the stage of aerial hyphae formation). Moreover, we also provide evidence that AdpA and DnaA proteins compete for oriC binding in an ATP-dependent manner, with low ATP levels causing preferential binding of AdpA, and high ATP levels causing dissociation of AdpA and association of DnaA. This would be consistent with a role for ATP levels in determining when aerial hyphae emerge. PMID:22870392

  8. MicroRNAs: Key Regulators in the Central Nervous System and Their Implication in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dan-Dan; Li, Lu; Chan, Wai-Yee

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, well-conserved noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. They have been demonstrated to regulate a lot of biological pathways and cellular functions. Many miRNAs are dynamically regulated during central nervous system (CNS) development and are spatially expressed in adult brain indicating their essential roles in neural development and function. In addition, accumulating evidence strongly suggests that dysfunction of miRNAs contributes to neurological diseases. These observations, together with their gene regulation property, implicated miRNAs to be the key regulators in the complex genetic network of the CNS. In this review, we first focus on the ways through which miRNAs exert the regulatory function and how miRNAs are regulated in the CNS. We then summarize recent findings that highlight the versatile roles of miRNAs in normal CNS physiology and their association with several types of neurological diseases. Subsequently we discuss the limitations of miRNAs research based on current studies as well as the potential therapeutic applications and challenges of miRNAs in neurological disorders. We endeavor to provide an updated description of the regulatory roles of miRNAs in normal CNS functions and pathogenesis of neurological diseases. PMID:27240359

  9. The Arabidopsis NRG2 Protein Mediates Nitrate Signaling and Interacts with and Regulates Key Nitrate Regulators[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lufei; Zhang, Chengfei; Li, Zehui; Lei, Zhao; Liu, Fei; Guan, Peizhu; Crawford, Nigel M.

    2016-01-01

    We show that NITRATE REGULATORY GENE2 (NRG2), which we identified using forward genetics, mediates nitrate signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana. A mutation in NRG2 disrupted the induction of nitrate-responsive genes after nitrate treatment by an ammonium-independent mechanism. The nitrate content in roots was lower in the mutants than in the wild type, which may have resulted from reduced expression of NRT1.1 (also called NPF6.3, encoding a nitrate transporter/receptor) and upregulation of NRT1.8 (also called NPF7.2, encoding a xylem nitrate transporter). Genetic and molecular data suggest that NRG2 functions upstream of NRT1.1 in nitrate signaling. Furthermore, NRG2 directly interacts with the nitrate regulator NLP7 in the nucleus, but nuclear retention of NLP7 in response to nitrate is not dependent on NRG2. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that genes involved in four nitrogen-related clusters including nitrate transport and response to nitrate were differentially expressed in the nrg2 mutants. A nitrogen compound transport cluster containing some members of the NRT/PTR family was regulated by both NRG2 and NRT1.1, while no nitrogen-related clusters showed regulation by both NRG2 and NLP7. Thus, NRG2 plays a key role in nitrate regulation in part through modulating NRT1.1 expression and may function with NLP7 via their physical interaction. PMID:26744214

  10. eIF2B: recent structural and functional insights into a key regulator of translation.

    PubMed

    Wortham, Noel C; Proud, Christopher G

    2015-12-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) eIF2B is a key regulator of mRNA translation, being the guanine nt exchange factor (GEF) responsible for the recycling of the heterotrimeric G-protein, eIF2, which is required to allow translation initiation to occur. Unusually for a GEF, eIF2B is a multi-subunit protein, comprising five different subunits termed α through ε in order of increasing size. eIF2B is subject to tight regulation in the cell and may also serve additional functions. Here we review recent insights into the subunit organization of the mammalian eIF2B complex, gained both from structural studies of the complex and from studies of mutations of eIF2B that result in the neurological disorder leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter (VWM). We will also discuss recent data from yeast demonstrating a novel function of the eIF2B complex key for translational regulation. PMID:26614666

  11. Plant microRNAs: key regulators of root architecture and biotic interactions.

    PubMed

    Couzigou, Jean-Malo; Combier, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Contents 22 I. 22 II. 24 III. 25 IV. 27 V. 29 VI. 10 31 References 32 SUMMARY: Plants have evolved a remarkable faculty of adaptation to deal with various and changing environmental conditions. In this context, the roots have taken over nutritional aspects and the root system architecture can be modulated in response to nutrient availability or biotic interactions with soil microorganisms. This adaptability requires a fine tuning of gene expression. Indeed, root specification and development are highly complex processes requiring gene regulatory networks involved in hormonal regulations and cell identity. Among the different molecular partners governing root development, microRNAs (miRNAs) are key players for the fast regulation of gene expression. miRNAs are small RNAs involved in most developmental processes and are required for the normal growth of organisms, by the negative regulation of key genes, such as transcription factors and hormone receptors. Here, we review the known roles of miRNAs in root specification and development, from the embryonic roots to the establishment of root symbioses, highlighting the major roles of miRNAs in these processes. PMID:27292927

  12. Regulation of translesion DNA synthesis: posttranslational modification of lysine residues in key proteins

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Justyna; Woodgate, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Posttranslational modification of proteins often controls various aspects of their cellular function. Indeed, over the past decade or so, it has been discovered that posttranslational modification of lysine residues plays a major role in regulating translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) and perhaps the most appreciated lysine modification is that of ubiquitination. Much of the recent interest in ubiquitination stems from the fact that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was previously shown to be specifically ubiquitinated at K164 and that such ubiquitination plays a key role in regulating TLS. In addition, TLS polymerases themselves are now known to be ubiquitinated. In the case of human polymerase η, ubiquitination at four lysine residues in its C-terminus appears to regulate its ability to interact with PCNA and modulate TLS. Within the past few years, advances in global proteomic research has revealed that many proteins involved in TLS are, in fact, subject to a previously underappreciated number of lysine modifications. In this review, we will summarize the known lysine modifications of several key proteins involved in TLS; PCNA and Y-family polymerases η, ι, κ and Rev1 and we will discuss the potential regulatory effects of such modification in controlling TLS in vivo. PMID:25743599

  13. Nod2: a key regulator linking microbiota to intestinal mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Amlan; Petnicki-Ocwieja, Tanja; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-01-01

    The human intestine harbors a large number of bacteria that are constantly interacting with the intestinal immune system, eliciting non-pathological basal level immune responses. Increasing evidence points to dysbiosis of microbiota in the intestine as an underlying factor in inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility. Loss of function mutations in NOD2 are among the stronger genetic factors linked to ileal Crohn’s disease. Indeed, Nod2 is a key regulator of microbiota in the intestine, as microflora in the terminal ileum is dysregulated in Nod2-deficient mice. Nod2 is highly expressed in Paneth cells, which are responsible for the regulation of ileal microflora by anti-microbial compounds, and Nod2-deficient ileal intestinal epithelia are unable to kill bacteria efficiently. It is therefore likely that NOD2 mutations in Crohn’s disease may increase disease susceptibility by altering interactions between ileal microbiota and mucosal immunity. PMID:21861185

  14. The dark side of ZNF217, a key regulator of tumorigenesis with powerful biomarker value

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Pascale A.; Donini, Caterina F.; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Lincet, Hubert; Vendrell, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    The recently described oncogene ZNF217 belongs to a chromosomal region that is frequently amplified in human cancers. Recent findings have revealed that alternative mechanisms such as epigenetic regulation also govern the expression of the encoded ZNF217 protein. Newly discovered molecular functions of ZNF217 indicate that it orchestrates complex intracellular circuits as a new key regulator of tumorigenesis. In this review, we focus on recent research on ZNF217-driven molecular functions in human cancers, revisiting major hallmarks of cancer and highlighting the downstream molecular targets and signaling pathways of ZNF217. We also discuss the exciting translational medicine investigating ZNF217 expression levels as a new powerful biomarker, and ZNF217 as a candidate target for future anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26431164

  15. Partition of some key regulating services in terrestrial ecosystems: Meta-analysis and review.

    PubMed

    Viglizzo, E F; Jobbágy, E G; Ricard, M F; Paruelo, J M

    2016-08-15

    Our knowledge about the functional foundations of ecosystem service (ES) provision is still limited and more research is needed to elucidate key functional mechanisms. Using a simplified eco-hydrological scheme, in this work we analyzed how land-use decisions modify the partition of some essential regulatory ES by altering basic relationships between biomass stocks and water flows. A comprehensive meta-analysis and review was conducted based on global, regional and local data from peer-reviewed publications. We analyzed five datasets comprising 1348 studies and 3948 records on precipitation (PPT), aboveground biomass (AGB), AGB change, evapotranspiration (ET), water yield (WY), WY change, runoff (R) and infiltration (I). The conceptual framework was focused on ES that are associated with the ecological functions (e.g., intermediate ES) of ET, WY, R and I. ES included soil protection, carbon sequestration, local climate regulation, water-flow regulation and water recharge. To address the problem of data normality, the analysis included both parametric and non-parametric regression analysis. Results demonstrate that PPT is a first-order biophysical factor that controls ES release at the broader scales. At decreasing scales, ES are partitioned as result of PPT interactions with other biophysical and anthropogenic factors. At intermediate scales, land-use change interacts with PPT modifying ES partition as it the case of afforestation in dry regions, where ET and climate regulation may be enhanced at the expense of R and water-flow regulation. At smaller scales, site-specific conditions such as topography interact with PPT and AGB displaying different ES partition formats. The probable implications of future land-use and climate change on some key ES production and partition are discussed. PMID:27096628

  16. CDK6 as a key regulator of hematopoietic and leukemic stem cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Scheicher, Ruth; Hoelbl-Kovacic, Andrea; Bellutti, Florian; Tigan, Anca-Sarmiza; Prchal-Murphy, Michaela; Heller, Gerwin; Schneckenleithner, Christine; Salazar-Roa, María; Zöchbauer-Müller, Sabine; Zuber, Johannes; Malumbres, Marcos; Kollmann, Karoline

    2015-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) and CDK4 have redundant functions in regulating cell-cycle progression. We describe a novel role for CDK6 in hematopoietic and leukemic stem cells (hematopoietic stem cells [HSCs] and leukemic stem cells [LSCs]) that exceeds its function as a cell-cycle regulator. Although hematopoiesis appears normal under steady-state conditions, Cdk6−/− HSCs do not efficiently repopulate upon competitive transplantation, and Cdk6-deficient mice are significantly more susceptible to 5-fluorouracil treatment. We find that activation of HSCs requires CDK6, which interferes with the transcription of key regulators, including Egr1. Transcriptional profiling of HSCs is consistent with the central role of Egr1. The impaired repopulation capacity extends to BCR-ABLp210+ LSCs. Transplantation with BCR-ABLp210+–infected bone marrow from Cdk6−/− mice fails to induce disease, although recipient mice do harbor LSCs. Egr1 knock-down in Cdk6−/− BCR-ABLp210+ LSKs significantly enhances the potential to form colonies, underlining the importance of the CDK6-Egr1 axis. Our findings define CDK6 as an important regulator of stem cell activation and an essential component of a transcriptional complex that suppresses Egr1 in HSCs and LSCs. PMID:25342715

  17. A key developmental regulator controls the synthesis of the antibiotic erythromycin in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    PubMed

    Chng, Chinping; Lum, Amy M; Vroom, Jonathan A; Kao, Camilla M

    2008-08-12

    Saccharopolyspora erythraea makes erythromycin, an antibiotic commonly used in human medicine. Unusually, the erythromycin biosynthetic (ery) cluster lacks a pathway-specific regulatory gene. We isolated a transcriptional regulator of the ery biosynthetic genes from S. erythraea and found that this protein appears to directly link morphological changes caused by impending starvation to the synthesis of a molecule that kills other bacteria, i.e., erythromycin. DNA binding assays, liquid and affinity chromatography, MALDI-MS analysis, and de novo sequencing identified this protein (M(r) = 18 kDa) as the S. erythraea ortholog of BldD, a key regulator of development in Streptomyces coelicolor. Recombinant S. erythraea BldD bound to all five regions containing promoters in the ery cluster as well as to its own promoter, the latter with an order-of-magnitude stronger than to the ery promoters. Deletion of bldD in S. erythraea decreased the erythromycin titer in a liquid culture 7-fold and blocked differentiation on a solid medium. Moreover, an industrial strain of S. erythraea with a higher titer of erythromycin expressed more BldD than a wild-type strain during erythromycin synthesis. Together, these results suggest that BldD concurrently regulates the synthesis of erythromycin and morphological differentiation. The ery genes are the first direct targets of a BldD ortholog to be identified that are positively regulated. PMID:18685110

  18. A key developmental regulator controls the synthesis of the antibiotic erythromycin in Saccharopolyspora erythraea

    PubMed Central

    Chng, Chinping; Lum, Amy M.; Vroom, Jonathan A.; Kao, Camilla M.

    2008-01-01

    Saccharopolyspora erythraea makes erythromycin, an antibiotic commonly used in human medicine. Unusually, the erythromycin biosynthetic (ery) cluster lacks a pathway-specific regulatory gene. We isolated a transcriptional regulator of the ery biosynthetic genes from S. erythraea and found that this protein appears to directly link morphological changes caused by impending starvation to the synthesis of a molecule that kills other bacteria, i.e., erythromycin. DNA binding assays, liquid and affinity chromatography, MALDI-MS analysis, and de novo sequencing identified this protein (Mr = 18 kDa) as the S. erythraea ortholog of BldD, a key regulator of development in Streptomyces coelicolor. Recombinant S. erythraea BldD bound to all five regions containing promoters in the ery cluster as well as to its own promoter, the latter with an order-of-magnitude stronger than to the ery promoters. Deletion of bldD in S. erythraea decreased the erythromycin titer in a liquid culture 7-fold and blocked differentiation on a solid medium. Moreover, an industrial strain of S. erythraea with a higher titer of erythromycin expressed more BldD than a wild-type strain during erythromycin synthesis. Together, these results suggest that BldD concurrently regulates the synthesis of erythromycin and morphological differentiation. The ery genes are the first direct targets of a BldD ortholog to be identified that are positively regulated. PMID:18685110

  19. Adaptive Control Model Reveals Systematic Feedback and Key Molecules in Metabolic Pathway Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Richard A.; Merrill, Alfred H.; Wang, May D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Robust behavior in metabolic pathways resembles stabilized performance in systems under autonomous control. This suggests we can apply control theory to study existing regulation in these cellular networks. Here, we use model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) to investigate the dynamics of de novo sphingolipid synthesis regulation in a combined theoretical and experimental case study. The effects of serine palmitoyltransferase over-expression on this pathway are studied in vitro using human embryonic kidney cells. We report two key results from comparing numerical simulations with observed data. First, MRAC simulations of pathway dynamics are comparable to simulations from a standard model using mass action kinetics. The root-sum-square (RSS) between data and simulations in both cases differ by less than 5%. Second, MRAC simulations suggest systematic pathway regulation in terms of adaptive feedback from individual molecules. In response to increased metabolite levels available for de novo sphingolipid synthesis, feedback from molecules along the main artery of the pathway is regulated more frequently and with greater amplitude than from other molecules along the branches. These biological insights are consistent with current knowledge while being new that they may guide future research in sphingolipid biology. In summary, we report a novel approach to study regulation in cellular networks by applying control theory in the context of robust metabolic pathways. We do this to uncover potential insight into the dynamics of regulation and the reverse engineering of cellular networks for systems biology. This new modeling approach and the implementation routines designed for this case study may be extended to other systems. Supplementary Material is available at www.liebertonline.com/cmb. PMID:21314456

  20. Dopamine is a key regulator in the signalling pathway underlying predator-induced defences in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Linda C; Leese, Florian; Laforsch, Christian; Tollrian, Ralph

    2015-10-01

    The waterflea Daphnia is a model to investigate the genetic basis of phenotypic plasticity resulting from one differentially expressed genome. Daphnia develops adaptive phenotypes (e.g. morphological defences) thwarting predators, based on chemical predator cue perception. To understand the genomic basis of phenotypic plasticity, the description of the precedent cellular and neuronal mechanisms is fundamental. However, key regulators remain unknown. All neuronal and endocrine stimulants were able to modulate but not induce defences, indicating a pathway of interlinked steps. A candidate able to link neuronal with endocrine responses is the multi-functional amine dopamine. We here tested its involvement in trait formation in Daphnia pulex and Daphnia longicephala using an induction assay composed of predator cues combined with dopaminergic and cholinergic stimulants. The mere application of both stimulants was sufficient to induce morphological defences. We determined dopamine localization in cells found in close association with the defensive trait. These cells serve as centres controlling divergent morphologies. As a mitogen and sclerotization agent, we anticipate that dopamine is involved in proliferation and structural formation of morphological defences. Furthermore, dopamine pathways appear to be interconnected with endocrine pathways, and control juvenile hormone and ecdysone levels. In conclusion, dopamine is suggested as a key regulator of phenotypic plasticity. PMID:26423840

  1. Dynamics of the Transcriptome during Human Spermatogenesis: Predicting the Potential Key Genes Regulating Male Gametes Generation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zijue; Li, Chong; Yang, Shi; Tian, Ruhui; Wang, Junlong; Yuan, Qingqing; Dong, Hui; He, Zuping; Wang, Shengyue; Li, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Many infertile men are the victims of spermatogenesis disorder. However, conventional clinical test could not provide efficient information on the causes of spermatogenesis disorder and guide the doctor how to treat it. More effective diagnosis and treating methods could be developed if the key genes that regulate spermatogenesis were determined. Many works have been done on animal models, while there are few works on human beings due to the limited sample resources. In current work, testis tissues were obtained from 27 patients with obstructive azoospermia via surgery. The combination of Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting and Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting was chosen as the efficient method to sort typical germ cells during spermatogenesis. RNA Sequencing was carried out to screen the change of transcriptomic profile of the germ cells during spermatogenesis. Differential expressed genes were clustered according to their expression patterns. Gene Ontology annotation, pathway analysis, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis were carried out on genes with specific expression patterns and the potential key genes such as HOXs, JUN, SP1, and TCF3 which were involved in the regulation of spermatogenesis, with the potential value serve as molecular tools for clinical purpose, were predicted. PMID:26753906

  2. Dynamics of the Transcriptome during Human Spermatogenesis: Predicting the Potential Key Genes Regulating Male Gametes Generation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zijue; Li, Chong; Yang, Shi; Tian, Ruhui; Wang, Junlong; Yuan, Qingqing; Dong, Hui; He, Zuping; Wang, Shengyue; Li, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Many infertile men are the victims of spermatogenesis disorder. However, conventional clinical test could not provide efficient information on the causes of spermatogenesis disorder and guide the doctor how to treat it. More effective diagnosis and treating methods could be developed if the key genes that regulate spermatogenesis were determined. Many works have been done on animal models, while there are few works on human beings due to the limited sample resources. In current work, testis tissues were obtained from 27 patients with obstructive azoospermia via surgery. The combination of Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting and Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting was chosen as the efficient method to sort typical germ cells during spermatogenesis. RNA Sequencing was carried out to screen the change of transcriptomic profile of the germ cells during spermatogenesis. Differential expressed genes were clustered according to their expression patterns. Gene Ontology annotation, pathway analysis, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis were carried out on genes with specific expression patterns and the potential key genes such as HOXs, JUN, SP1, and TCF3 which were involved in the regulation of spermatogenesis, with the potential value serve as molecular tools for clinical purpose, were predicted. PMID:26753906

  3. The Neuroplastin adhesion molecules: key regulators of neuronal plasticity and synaptic function.

    PubMed

    Beesley, Philip W; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Smalla, Karl-Heinz; Seidenbecher, Constanze

    2014-11-01

    The Neuroplastins Np65 and Np55 are neuronal and synapse-enriched immunoglobulin superfamily molecules that play important roles in a number of key neuronal and synaptic functions including, for Np65, cell adhesion. In this review we focus on the physiological roles of the Neuroplastins in promoting neurite outgrowth, regulating the structure and function of both inhibitory and excitatory synapses in brain, and in neuronal and synaptic plasticity. We discuss the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms by which the Neuroplastins exert their physiological effects and how these are dependent upon the structural features of Np65 and Np55, which enable them to bind to a diverse range of protein partners. In turn this enables the Neuroplastins to interact with a number of key neuronal signalling cascades. These include: binding to and activation of the fibroblast growth factor receptor; Np65 trans-homophilic binding leading to activation of p38 MAPK and internalization of glutamate (GluR1) receptor subunits; acting as accessory proteins for monocarboxylate transporters, thus affecting neuronal energy supply, and binding to GABAA α1, 2 and 5 subunits, thus regulating the composition and localization of GABAA receptors. An emerging theme is the role of the Neuroplastins in regulating the trafficking and subcellular localization of specific binding partners. We also discuss the involvement of Neuroplastins in a number of pathophysiological conditions, including ischaemia, schizophrenia and breast cancer and the role of a single nucleotide polymorphism in the human Neuroplastin (NPTN) gene locus in impairment of cortical development and cognitive functions. Neuroplastins are neuronal cell adhesion molecules, which induce neurite outgrowth and play important roles in synaptic maturation and plasticity. This review summarizes the functional implications of Neuroplastins for correct synaptic membrane protein localization, neuronal energy supply, expression of LTP and LTD

  4. Key genetic elements and regulation systems in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Hao, Haihong; Dai, Menghong; Wang, Yulian; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2012-11-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), popularly known as a type of superbug, has been a serious challenge for animal and human health. S. aureus has developed methicillin resistance mainly by expression of β-lactamase and PBP2a, which is regulated by the blaZ-blaI-blaR1 and mecA-mecI-mecRI systems. Other genetic elements, including murE and femA, also participate in expression of methicillin resistance, but the mechanism remains unclear. The evolution of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec determines the epidemiological risk of MRSA. The plasmid-located gene cfr might contribute to multiresistance and transmission of MRSA. Some virulence factors, including Panton-Valentine leukocidin, phenol-soluble modulin, arginine catabolic mobile element and other toxin elements enhance the pathogenesis and fitness of MRSA. Two-component regulation systems (agr, saeRS and vraRS) are closely associated with pathogenesis and drug resistance of MRSA. The systematic exploration of key genetic elements and regulation systems involved in multidrug resistance/pathogenesis/transmission of MRSA is conclusively integrated into this review, providing fundamental information for the development of new antimicrobial agents and the establishment of reasonable antibiotic stewardship to reduce the risk of this superbug. PMID:23075449

  5. MicroRNAs as key regulators of GTPase-mediated apical actin reorganization in multiciliated epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mercey, Olivier; Kodjabachian, Laurent; Barbry, Pascal; Marcet, Brice

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multiciliated cells (MCCs), which are present in specialized vertebrate tissues such as mucociliary epithelia, project hundreds of motile cilia from their apical membrane. Coordinated ciliary beating in MCCs contributes to fluid propulsion in several biological processes. In a previous work, we demonstrated that microRNAs of the miR-34/449 family act as new conserved regulators of MCC differentiation by specifically repressing cell cycle genes and the Notch pathway. Recently, we have shown that miR-34/449 also modulate small GTPase pathways to promote, in a later stage of differentiation, the assembly of the apical actin network, a prerequisite for proper anchoring of centrioles-derived neo-synthesized basal bodies. We characterized several miR-34/449 targets related to small GTPase pathways including R-Ras, which represents a key and conserved regulator during MCC differentiation. Direct RRAS repression by miR-34/449 is necessary for apical actin meshwork assembly, notably by allowing the apical relocalization of the actin binding protein Filamin-A near basal bodies. Our studies establish miR-34/449 as central players that orchestrate several steps of MCC differentiation program by regulating distinct signaling pathways. PMID:27144998

  6. Computational Identification of Key Regulators in Two Different Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wlochowitz, Darius; Haubrock, Martin; Arackal, Jetcy; Bleckmann, Annalen; Wolff, Alexander; Beißbarth, Tim; Wingender, Edgar; Gültas, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are gene regulatory proteins that are essential for an effective regulation of the transcriptional machinery. Today, it is known that their expression plays an important role in several types of cancer. Computational identification of key players in specific cancer cell lines is still an open challenge in cancer research. In this study, we present a systematic approach which combines colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, namely 1638N-T1 and CMT-93, and well-established computational methods in order to compare these cell lines on the level of transcriptional regulation as well as on a pathway level, i.e., the cancer cell-intrinsic pathway repertoire. For this purpose, we firstly applied the Trinity platform to detect signature genes, and then applied analyses of the geneXplain platform to these for detection of upstream transcriptional regulators and their regulatory networks. We created a CRC-specific position weight matrix (PWM) library based on the TRANSFAC database (release 2014.1) to minimize the rate of false predictions in the promoter analyses. Using our proposed workflow, we specifically focused on revealing the similarities and differences in transcriptional regulation between the two CRC cell lines, and report a number of well-known, cancer-associated TFs with significantly enriched binding sites in the promoter regions of the signature genes. We show that, although the signature genes of both cell lines show no overlap, they may still be regulated by common TFs in CRC. Based on our findings, we suggest that canonical Wnt signaling is activated in 1638N-T1, but inhibited in CMT-93 through cross-talks of Wnt signaling with the VDR signaling pathway and/or LXR-related pathways. Furthermore, our findings provide indication of several master regulators being present such as MLK3 and Mapk1 (ERK2) which might be important in cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of 1638N-T1 and CMT-93, respectively. Taken together, we provide

  7. Computational Identification of Key Regulators in Two Different Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Wlochowitz, Darius; Haubrock, Martin; Arackal, Jetcy; Bleckmann, Annalen; Wolff, Alexander; Beißbarth, Tim; Wingender, Edgar; Gültas, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are gene regulatory proteins that are essential for an effective regulation of the transcriptional machinery. Today, it is known that their expression plays an important role in several types of cancer. Computational identification of key players in specific cancer cell lines is still an open challenge in cancer research. In this study, we present a systematic approach which combines colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines, namely 1638N-T1 and CMT-93, and well-established computational methods in order to compare these cell lines on the level of transcriptional regulation as well as on a pathway level, i.e., the cancer cell-intrinsic pathway repertoire. For this purpose, we firstly applied the Trinity platform to detect signature genes, and then applied analyses of the geneXplain platform to these for detection of upstream transcriptional regulators and their regulatory networks. We created a CRC-specific position weight matrix (PWM) library based on the TRANSFAC database (release 2014.1) to minimize the rate of false predictions in the promoter analyses. Using our proposed workflow, we specifically focused on revealing the similarities and differences in transcriptional regulation between the two CRC cell lines, and report a number of well-known, cancer-associated TFs with significantly enriched binding sites in the promoter regions of the signature genes. We show that, although the signature genes of both cell lines show no overlap, they may still be regulated by common TFs in CRC. Based on our findings, we suggest that canonical Wnt signaling is activated in 1638N-T1, but inhibited in CMT-93 through cross-talks of Wnt signaling with the VDR signaling pathway and/or LXR-related pathways. Furthermore, our findings provide indication of several master regulators being present such as MLK3 and Mapk1 (ERK2) which might be important in cell proliferation, migration, and invasion of 1638N-T1 and CMT-93, respectively. Taken together, we provide

  8. Patched 1 and patched 2 redundancy has a key role in regulating epidermal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Adolphe, Christelle; Nieuwenhuis, Erica; Villani, Rehan; Li, Zhu Juan; Kaur, Pritinder; Hui, Chi-Chung; Wainwright, Brandon J

    2014-07-01

    The Patched 1 (Ptch1) receptor has a pivotal role in inhibiting the activity of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway and is therefore critical in preventing the onset of many human developmental disorders and tumor formation. However, the functional role of the mammalian Ptch2 paralogue remains elusive, particularly the extent to which it contributes to regulating the spatial and temporal activity of Hh signaling. Here we demonstrate in three independent mouse models of epidermal development that in vivo ablation of both Ptch receptors results in a more severe phenotype than loss of Ptch1 alone. Our studies indicate that concomitant loss of Ptch1 and Ptch2 activity inhibits epidermal lineage specification and differentiation. These results reveal that repression of Hh signaling through a dynamic Ptch regulatory network is a crucial event in lineage fate determination in the skin. In general, our findings implicate Ptch receptor redundancy as a key issue in elucidating the cellular origin of Hh-induced tumors. PMID:24492243

  9. Oct4 Is a Key Regulator of Vertebrate Trunk Length Diversity.

    PubMed

    Aires, Rita; Jurberg, Arnon D; Leal, Francisca; Nóvoa, Ana; Cohn, Martin J; Mallo, Moisés

    2016-08-01

    Vertebrates exhibit a remarkably broad variation in trunk and tail lengths. However, the evolutionary and developmental origins of this diversity remain largely unknown. Posterior Hox genes were proposed to be major players in trunk length diversification in vertebrates, but functional studies have so far failed to support this view. Here we identify the pluripotency factor Oct4 as a key regulator of trunk length in vertebrate embryos. Maintaining high Oct4 levels in axial progenitors throughout development was sufficient to extend trunk length in mouse embryos. Oct4 also shifted posterior Hox gene-expression boundaries in the extended trunks, thus providing a link between activation of these genes and the transition to tail development. Furthermore, we show that the exceptionally long trunks of snakes are likely to result from heterochronic changes in Oct4 activity during body axis extension, which may have derived from differential genomic rearrangements at the Oct4 locus during vertebrate evolution. PMID:27453501

  10. Post-translational modifications as key regulators of TNF-induced necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Shi, F; Li, Y; Yu, X; Peng, S; Li, W; Luo, X; Cao, Y

    2016-01-01

    Necroptosis is a novel form of programmed cell death that is independent of caspase activity. Different stimuli can trigger necroptosis. At present, the most informative studies about necroptosis derive from the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-triggered system. The initiation of TNF-induced necroptosis requires the kinase activity of receptor-interacting protein 1 and 3 (RIP1 and RIP3). Evidence now reveals that the ability of RIP1 and RIP3 to modulate this key cellular event is tightly controlled by post-translational modifications, including ubiquitination, phosphorylation, caspase 8-mediated cleavage and GlcNAcylation. These regulatory events coordinately determine whether a cell will survive or die by apoptosis or necroptosis. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the study of post-translational modifications during TNF-induced necroptosis and discuss how these modifications regulate the complex and delicate control of programmed necrosis. PMID:27383048

  11. The homeobox gene BREVIPEDICELLUS is a key regulator of inflorescence architecture in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Venglat, S. P.; Dumonceaux, T.; Rozwadowski, K.; Parnell, L.; Babic, V.; Keller, W.; Martienssen, R.; Selvaraj, G.; Datla, R.

    2002-01-01

    Flowering plants display a remarkable range of inflorescence architecture, and pedicel characteristics are one of the key contributors to this diversity. However, very little is known about the genes or the pathways that regulate pedicel development. The brevipedicellus (bp) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana displays a unique phenotype with defects in pedicel development causing downward-pointing flowers and a compact inflorescence architecture. Cloning and molecular analysis of two independent mutant alleles revealed that BP encodes the homeodomain protein KNAT1, a member of the KNOX family. bp-1 is a null allele with deletion of the entire locus, whereas bp-2 has a point mutation that is predicted to result in a truncated protein. In both bp alleles, the pedicels and internodes were compact because of fewer cell divisions; in addition, defects in epidermal and cortical cell differentiation and elongation were found in the affected regions. The downward-pointing pedicels were produced by an asymmetric effect of the bp mutation on the abaxial vs. adaxial sides. Cell differentiation, elongation, and growth were affected more severely on the abaxial than adaxial side, causing the change in the pedicel growth angle. In addition, bp plants displayed defects in cell differentiation and radial growth of the style. Our results show that BP plays a key regulatory role in defining important aspects of the growth and cell differentiation of the inflorescence stem, pedicel, and style in Arabidopsis. PMID:11917137

  12. The autoregulatory loop: A common mechanism of regulation of key sex determining genes in insects.

    PubMed

    Sawanth, Suresh Kumar; Gopinath, Gajula; Sambrani, Nagraj; Arunkumar, Kallare P

    2016-06-01

    Sex determination in most insects is structured as a gene cascade, wherein a primary signal is passed through a series of sex-determining genes, culminating in a downstream double-switch known as doublesex that decides the sexual fate of the embryo. From the literature available on sex determination cascades, it becomes apparent that sex determination mechanisms have evolved rapidly. The primary signal that provides the cue to determine the sex of the embryo varies remarkably, not only among taxa, but also within taxa. Furthermore, the upstream key gene in the cascade also varies between species and even among closely related species. The order Insecta alone provides examples of astoundingly complex diversity of upstream key genes in sex determination mechanisms. Besides, unlike key upstream genes, the downstream double-switch gene is alternatively spliced to form functional sex-specific isoforms. This sex-specific splicing is conserved across insect taxa. The genes involved in the sex determination cascade such as Sex-lethal (Sxl) in Drosophila melanogaster, transformer (tra) in many other dipterans, coleopterans and hymenopterans, Feminizer (fem) in Apis mellifera, and IGF-II mRNA-binding protein (Bmimp) in Bombyx mori are reported to be regulated by an autoregulatory positive feedback loop. In this review, by taking examples from various insects, we propose the hypothesis that autoregulatory loop mechanisms of sex determination might be a general strategy. We also discuss the possible reasons for the evolution of autoregulatory loops in sex determination cascades and their impact on binary developmental choices. PMID:27240989

  13. Transcription Factor RFX2 Is a Key Regulator of Mouse Spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yujian; Hu, Xiangjing; Li, Zhen; Wang, Min; Li, Sisi; Wang, Xiuxia; Lin, Xiwen; Liao, Shangying; Zhang, Zhuqiang; Feng, Xue; Wang, Si; Cui, Xiuhong; Wang, Yanling; Gao, Fei; Hess, Rex A.; Han, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory factor X (RFX) family of transcription factors is crucial for ciliogenesis throughout evolution. In mice, Rfx1-4 are highly expressed in the testis where flagellated sperm are produced, but the functions of these factors in spermatogenesis remain unknown. Here, we report the production and characterization of the Rfx2 knockout mice. The male knockout mice were sterile due to the arrest of spermatogenesis at an early round spermatid step. The Rfx2-null round spermatids detached from the seminiferous tubules, forming large multinucleated giant cells that underwent apoptosis. In the mutants, formation of the flagellum was inhibited at its earliest stage. RNA-seq analysis identified a large number of cilia-related genes and testis-specific genes that were regulated by RFX2. Many of these genes were direct targets of RFX2, as revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR assays. These findings indicate that RFX2 is a key regulator of the post-meiotic development of mouse spermatogenic cells. PMID:26853561

  14. Caudal, a key developmental regulator, is a DPE-specific transcriptional factor

    PubMed Central

    Juven-Gershon, Tamar; Hsu, Jer-Yuan; Kadonaga, James T.

    2008-01-01

    The regulation of gene transcription is critical for the proper development and growth of an organism. The transcription of protein-coding genes initiates at the RNA polymerase II core promoter, which is a diverse module that can be controlled by many different elements such as the TATA box and downstream core promoter element (DPE). To understand the basis for core promoter diversity, we explored potential biological functions of the DPE. We found that nearly all of the Drosophila homeotic (Hox) gene promoters, which lack TATA-box elements, contain functionally important DPE motifs that are conserved from Drosophila melanogaster to Drosophila virilis. We then discovered that Caudal, a sequence-specific transcription factor and key regulator of the Hox gene network, activates transcription with a distinct preference for the DPE relative to the TATA box. The specificity of Caudal activation for the DPE is particularly striking when a BREu core promoter motif is associated with the TATA box. These findings show that Caudal is a DPE-specific activator and exemplify how core promoter diversity can be used to establish complex regulatory networks. PMID:18923080

  15. Phosphatidylethanolamine Is a Key Regulator of Membrane Fluidity in Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Dawaliby, Rosie; Trubbia, Cataldo; Delporte, Cédric; Noyon, Caroline; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Govaerts, Cédric

    2016-02-12

    Adequate membrane fluidity is required for a variety of key cellular processes and in particular for proper function of membrane proteins. In most eukaryotic cells, membrane fluidity is known to be regulated by fatty acid desaturation and cholesterol, although some cells, such as insect cells, are almost devoid of sterol synthesis. We show here that insect and mammalian cells present similar microviscosity at their respective physiological temperature. To investigate how both sterols and phospholipids control fluidity homeostasis, we quantified the lipidic composition of insect SF9 and mammalian HEK 293T cells under normal or sterol-modified condition. As expected, insect cells show minimal sterols compared with mammalian cells. A major difference is also observed in phospholipid content as the ratio of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) to phosphatidylcholine (PC) is inverted (4 times higher in SF9 cells). In vitro studies in liposomes confirm that both cholesterol and PE can increase rigidity of the bilayer, suggesting that both can be used by cells to maintain membrane fluidity. We then show that exogenously increasing the cholesterol amount in SF9 membranes leads to a significant decrease in PE:PC ratio whereas decreasing cholesterol in HEK 293T cells using statin treatment leads to an increase in the PE:PC ratio. In all cases, the membrane fluidity is maintained, indicating that both cell types combine regulation by sterols and phospholipids to control proper membrane fluidity. PMID:26663081

  16. CXCL12 is a key regulator in tumor microenvironment of cervical cancer: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Suresh Singh; Prasad, Shyam Babu; Prasad, Chandra Bhushan; Pandey, Lakshmi Kant; Pradhan, Satyajit; Singh, Sunita; Narayan, Gopeshwar

    2016-06-01

    CXCL12 is a small pro-inflammatory chemo-attractant cytokine which signals through chemokine receptor CXCR4. The importance of CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is coming to the fore in several divergent signaling pathway-initiating signals related to cell survival and/or proliferation and cancer metastasis. In the present study we have investigated whether deregulation in CXCR4 signaling (as a consequence of deregulated expression of CXCL12) modulate the metastatic potential of cervical carcinoma cells. We demonstrate that CXCL12 is frequently down regulated and its promoter is hypermethylated in cervical cancer cell lines and primary tumor biopsies. Exogenous treatment of cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa, SiHa and C-33A) with recombinant CXCL12 inhibited the metastasis promoting cell migration, cell invasion and anchorage independent cell growth events. Although this study will need further in vivo validation, our observations suggest that (a) silencing of CXCL12 in cervical cancer cells may be critical in migration and invasion, the key events in cancer cell metastases; (b) cervical cancer cells having down regulated CXCL12 are more prone to being attracted to CXCL12 expressed at secondary sites of metastases; and (c) CXCL12 inhibits anchorage independent cell growth via anoikis. These findings suggest the tumor suppressor functions of CXCL12 in cervical cancer. PMID:26970955

  17. Systems genetics reveals key genetic elements of drought induced gene regulation in diploid potato.

    PubMed

    van Muijen, Dennis; Anithakumari, A M; Maliepaard, Chris; Visser, Richard G F; van der Linden, C Gerard

    2016-09-01

    In plants, tolerance to drought stress is a result of numerous minor effect loci in which transcriptional regulation contributes significantly to the observed phenotypes. Under severe drought conditions, a major expression quantitative trait loci hotspot was identified on chromosome five in potato. A putative Nuclear factor y subunit C4 was identified as key candidate in the regulatory cascade in response to drought. Further investigation of the eQTL hotspots suggests a role for a putative Homeobox leucine zipper protein 12 in relation to drought in potato. Genes strongly co-expressed with Homeobox leucine zipper protein 12 were plant growth regulators responsive to water deficit stress in Arabidopsis thaliana, implying a possible conserved mechanism. Integrative analysis of genetic, genomic, phenotypic and transcriptomic data provided insights in the downstream functional components of the drought response. The abscisic acid- and environmental stress-inducible protein TAS14 was highly induced by severe drought in potato and acts as a reliable biomarker for the level of stress perceived by the plant. The systems genetics approach supported a role for multiple genes responsive to severe drought stress of Solanum tuberosum. The combination of gene regulatory networks, expression quantitative trait loci mapping and phenotypic analysis proved useful for candidate gene selection. PMID:27353051

  18. Transcription Factor RFX2 Is a Key Regulator of Mouse Spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yujian; Hu, Xiangjing; Li, Zhen; Wang, Min; Li, Sisi; Wang, Xiuxia; Lin, Xiwen; Liao, Shangying; Zhang, Zhuqiang; Feng, Xue; Wang, Si; Cui, Xiuhong; Wang, Yanling; Gao, Fei; Hess, Rex A; Han, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory factor X (RFX) family of transcription factors is crucial for ciliogenesis throughout evolution. In mice, Rfx1-4 are highly expressed in the testis where flagellated sperm are produced, but the functions of these factors in spermatogenesis remain unknown. Here, we report the production and characterization of the Rfx2 knockout mice. The male knockout mice were sterile due to the arrest of spermatogenesis at an early round spermatid step. The Rfx2-null round spermatids detached from the seminiferous tubules, forming large multinucleated giant cells that underwent apoptosis. In the mutants, formation of the flagellum was inhibited at its earliest stage. RNA-seq analysis identified a large number of cilia-related genes and testis-specific genes that were regulated by RFX2. Many of these genes were direct targets of RFX2, as revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR assays. These findings indicate that RFX2 is a key regulator of the post-meiotic development of mouse spermatogenic cells. PMID:26853561

  19. MicroRNA-146a: A Key Regulator of Astrocyte-Mediated Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Prabowo, Avanita; Fluiter, Kees; Spliet, Wim G. M.; van Rijen, Peter C.; Gorter, Jan A.; Aronica, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports the involvement of microRNAs (miRNA) in the regulation of inflammation in human neurological disorders. In the present study we investigated the role of miR-146a, a key regulator of the innate immune response, in the modulation of astrocyte-mediated inflammation. Using Taqman PCR and in situ hybridization, we studied the expression of miR-146a in epilepsy-associated glioneuronal lesions which are characterized by prominent activation of the innate immune response. In addition, cultured human astrocytes were used to study the regulation of miR-146a expression in response to proinflammatory cytokines. qPCR and western blot were used to evaluate the effects of overexpression or knockdown of miR-146a on IL-1β signaling. Downstream signaling in the IL-1β pathway, as well as the expression of IL-6 and COX-2 were evaluated by western blot and ELISA. Release several cytokines was evaluated using a human magnetic multiplex cytokine assay on a Luminex® 100™/200™ platform. Increased expression of miR-146a was observed in glioneuronal lesions by Taqman PCR. MiR-146a expression in human glial cell cultures was strongly induced by IL-1β and blocked by IL-1β receptor antagonist. Modulation of miR-146a expression by transfection of astrocytes with anti-miR146a or mimic, regulated the mRNA expression levels of downstream targets of miR-146a (IRAK-1, IRAK-2 and TRAF-6) and the expression of IRAK-1 protein. In addition, the expression of IL-6 and COX-2 upon IL-1β stimulation was suppressed by increased levels of miR-146a and increased by the reduction of miR-146a. Modulation of miR-146a expression affected also the release of several cytokines such as IL-6 and TNF-α. Our observations indicate that in response to inflammatory cues, miR-146a was induced as a negative-feedback regulator of the astrocyte-mediated inflammatory response. This supports an important role of miR-146a in human neurological disorders associated with chronic inflammation

  20. MicroRNA-146a: a key regulator of astrocyte-mediated inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Anand; Zurolo, Emanuele; Prabowo, Avanita; Fluiter, Kees; Spliet, Wim G M; van Rijen, Peter C; Gorter, Jan A; Aronica, Eleonora

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence supports the involvement of microRNAs (miRNA) in the regulation of inflammation in human neurological disorders. In the present study we investigated the role of miR-146a, a key regulator of the innate immune response, in the modulation of astrocyte-mediated inflammation. Using Taqman PCR and in situ hybridization, we studied the expression of miR-146a in epilepsy-associated glioneuronal lesions which are characterized by prominent activation of the innate immune response. In addition, cultured human astrocytes were used to study the regulation of miR-146a expression in response to proinflammatory cytokines. qPCR and western blot were used to evaluate the effects of overexpression or knockdown of miR-146a on IL-1β signaling. Downstream signaling in the IL-1β pathway, as well as the expression of IL-6 and COX-2 were evaluated by western blot and ELISA. Release several cytokines was evaluated using a human magnetic multiplex cytokine assay on a Luminex® 100™/200™ platform. Increased expression of miR-146a was observed in glioneuronal lesions by Taqman PCR. MiR-146a expression in human glial cell cultures was strongly induced by IL-1β and blocked by IL-1β receptor antagonist. Modulation of miR-146a expression by transfection of astrocytes with anti-miR146a or mimic, regulated the mRNA expression levels of downstream targets of miR-146a (IRAK-1, IRAK-2 and TRAF-6) and the expression of IRAK-1 protein. In addition, the expression of IL-6 and COX-2 upon IL-1β stimulation was suppressed by increased levels of miR-146a and increased by the reduction of miR-146a. Modulation of miR-146a expression affected also the release of several cytokines such as IL-6 and TNF-α. Our observations indicate that in response to inflammatory cues, miR-146a was induced as a negative-feedback regulator of the astrocyte-mediated inflammatory response. This supports an important role of miR-146a in human neurological disorders associated with chronic inflammation

  1. Divergent regulation of the key enzymes of polyamine metabolism by chiral alpha-methylated polyamine analogues.

    PubMed

    Hyvönen, Mervi T; Howard, Michael T; Anderson, Christine B; Grigorenko, Nikolay; Khomutov, Alex R; Vepsäläinen, Jouko; Alhonen, Leena; Jänne, Juhani; Keinänen, Tuomo A

    2009-09-01

    The natural polyamines are ubiquitous multifunctional organic cations which play important roles in regulating cellular proliferation and survival. Here we present a novel approach to investigating polyamine functions by using optical isomers of MeSpd (alpha-methylspermidine) and Me2Spm (alpha,omega-bismethylspermine), metabolically stable functional mimetics of natural polyamines. We studied the ability of MeSpd and Me2Spm to alter the normal polyamine regulation pathways at the level of polyamine uptake and the major control mechanisms known to affect the key polyamine metabolic enzymes. These include: (i) ODC (ornithine decarboxylase), which catalyses the rate-limiting step of polyamine synthesis; (ii) ODC antizyme, an inhibitor of ODC and polyamine uptake; (iii) SSAT (spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase), the major polyamine catabolic enzyme; and (iv) AdoMetDC (S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase), which is required for the conversion of putrescine into spermidine, and spermidine into spermine. We show that the stereoisomers differ in their cellular uptake and ability to downregulate ODC and AdoMetDC, and to induce SSAT. These effects are mediated by the ability of the enantiomers to induce +1 ribosomal frameshifting on ODC antizyme mRNA, to suppress the translation of AdoMetDC uORF (upstream open reading frame) and to regulate the alternative splicing of SSAT pre-mRNA. The unique effects of chiral polyamine analogues on polyamine metabolism may offer novel possibilities for studying the physiological functions, control mechanisms, and targets of the natural polyamines, as well as advance therapeutic drug development in cancer and other human health-related issues. PMID:19522702

  2. Ribosomal S6 Kinase 2 Is a Key Regulator in Tumor Promoter–Induced Cell Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Yeon; Yao, Ke; Kim, Hong-Gyum; Kang, Bong Seok; Zheng, Duo; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2010-01-01

    The ribosomal S6 kinase 2 (RSK2), a member of the p90RSK (RSK) family of proteins, is a widely expressed serine/threonine kinase that is activated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 in response to many growth factors and peptide hormones. Its activation signaling enhances cell survival. However, the roles of RSK2 in cell transformation have not yet been elucidated. Here, we found that RSK2 is a critical serine/threonine kinase for the regulation of cell transformation. When cells were stimulated with tumor promoters, such as epidermal growth factor (EGF) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), phosphorylation of RSK was increased within 5 min. Cell proliferation was suppressed in RSK2–/– mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) compared with RSK2+/+ MEFs. Moreover, RSK2–/– MEFs accumulated at the G1 phase of the cell cycle under normal cell culture conditions as well as after stimulation with EGF or TPA. In the anchorage-independent cell transformation assay (soft agar), stable expression of RSK2 in JB6 cells significantly enhanced colony formation in either the presence or absence of tumor promoters. Furthermore, knockdown of RSK2 with small interfering RNA-RSK2 suppressed constitutively active Ras (RasG12V)-induced foci formation in NIH3T3 cells. In addition, kaempferol, an inhibitor of RSK2, suppressed EGF-induced colony formation of JB6 Cl41 cells in soft agar, which was associated with inhibition of histone H3 phosphorylation (Ser10). These results showed that RSK2 is a key regulator for cell transformation induced by tumor promoters such as EGF and TPA. PMID:17804722

  3. Integrin Receptors Play a Key Role in the Regulation of Hepatic CYP3A.

    PubMed

    Jonsson-Schmunk, Kristina; Wonganan, Piynauch; Choi, Jin Huk; Callahan, Shellie M; Croyle, Maria A

    2016-05-01

    Landmark studies describing the effect of microbial infection on the expression and activity of hepatic CYP3A used bacterial lipopolysaccharide as a model antigen. Our efforts to determine whether these findings were translatable to viral infections led us to observations suggesting that engagement of integrin receptors is key in the initiation of processes responsible for changes in hepatic CYP3A4 during infection and inflammation. Studies outlined in this article were designed to evaluate whether engagement of integrins, receptors commonly used by a variety of microbes to enter cellular targets, is vital in the regulation of CYP3A in the presence and absence of virus infection. Mice infected with a recombinant adenovirus (AdlacZ) experienced a 70% reduction in hepatic CYP3A catalytic activity. Infection with a mutant virus with integrin-binding arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequences deleted from the penton base protein of the virus capsid (AdΔRGD) did not alter CYP3A activity. CYP3A mRNA and protein levels in AdlacZ-treated animals were also suppressed, whereas those of mice given AdΔRGD were not significantly different from uninfected control mice. Silencing of the integrinβ-subunit reverted adenovirus-mediated CYP3A4 suppression in vitro. Silencing of theα-subunit did not. Suppression of integrin subunits had a profound effect on nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor, whereas retinoid X receptorαwas largely unaffected. To our knowledge, this is the first time that extracellular receptors, like integrins, have been indicated in the regulation of CYP3A. This finding has several implications owing to the important role of integrins in normal physiologic process and in many disease states. PMID:26868618

  4. Hepatitis C virus suppresses Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 alpha, a key regulator of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vallianou, Ioanna; Dafou, Dimitra; Vassilaki, Niki; Mavromara, Penelope; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection presents with a disturbed lipid profile and can evolve to hepatic steatosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) is the most abundant transcription factor in the liver, a key regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism and a critical determinant of Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition and hepatic development. We have previously shown that transient inhibition of HNF4α initiates transformation of immortalized hepatocytes through a feedback loop consisting of miR-24, IL6 receptor (IL6R), STAT3, miR-124 and miR-629, suggesting a central role of HNF4α in HCC. However, the role of HNF4α in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)-related hepatocarcinoma has not been evaluated and remains controversial. In this study, we provide strong evidence suggesting that HCV downregulates HNF4α expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. The observed decrease of HNF4α expression correlated with the downregulation of its downstream targets, HNF1α and MTP. Ectopic overexpression of HCV proteins also exhibited an inhibitory effect on HNF4α levels. The inhibition of HNF4α expression by HCV appeared to be mediated at transcriptional level as HCV proteins suppressed HNF4α gene promoter activity. HCV also up-regulated IL6R, activated STAT3 protein phosphorylation and altered the expression of acute phase genes. Furthermore, as HCV triggered the loss of HNF4α a consequent change of miR-24, miR-629 or miR-124 was observed. Our findings demonstrated that HCV-related HCC could be mediated through HNF4α-microRNA deregulation implying a possible role of HNF4α in HCV hepatocarcinogenesis. HCV inhibition of HNF4α could be sustained to promote HCC. PMID:27477312

  5. The Ccr4-Not complex is a key regulator of eukaryotic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Collart, Martine A

    2016-07-01

    The Ccr4-Not complex is a multisubunit complex present in all eukaryotes that contributes to regulate gene expression at all steps, from production of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in the nucleus to their degradation in the cytoplasm. In the nucleus it influences the post-translational modifications of the chromatin template that has to be remodeled for transcription, it is present at sites of transcription and associates with transcription factors as well as with the elongating polymerase, it interacts with the factors that prepare the new transcript for export to the cytoplasm and finally is important for nuclear quality control and influences mRNA export. In the cytoplasm it is present in polysomes where mRNAs are translated and in RNA granules where mRNAs will be redirected upon inhibition of translation. It influences mRNA translatability, and is needed during translation, on one hand for co-translational protein interactions and on the other hand to preserve translation that stalls. It is one of the relevant players during co-translational quality control. It also interacts with factors that will repress translation or induce mRNA decapping when recruited to the translating template. Finally, Ccr4-Not carries deadenylating enzymes and is a key player in mRNA decay, generic mRNA decay that follows normal translation termination, co-translational mRNA decay of transcripts on which the ribosomes stall durably or which carry a non-sense mutation and finally mRNA decay that is induced by external signaling for a change in genetic programming. Ccr4-Not is a master regulator of eukaryotic gene expression. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:438-454. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1332 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26821858

  6. Human-specific hypomethylation of CENPJ, a key brain size regulator.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Lin, Qiang; Su, Bing

    2014-03-01

    Both the enlarged brain and concurrent highly developed cognitive skills are often seen as distinctive characteristics that set humans apart from other primates. Despite this obvious differentiation, the genetic mechanisms that underlie such human-specific traits are not clearly understood. In particular, whether epigenetic regulations may play a key role in human brain evolution remain elusive. In this study, we used bisulfite sequencing to compare the methylation patterns of four known genes that regulate brain size (ASPM, CDK5RAP2, CENPJ, and MCPH1) in the prefrontal cortex among several primate species spanning the major lineages of primates (i.e., humans, great apes, lesser apes, and Old World monkeys). The results showed a human-specific hypomethylation in the 5' UTR of CENPJ in the brain, where methylation levels among humans are only about one-third of those found among nonhuman primates. Similar methylation patterns were also detected in liver, kidney, and heart tissues, although the between-species differences were much less pronounced than those in the brain. Further in vitro methylation assays indicated that the methylation status of the CENPJ promoter could influence its expression. We also detected a large difference in CENPJ expression in the human and nonhuman primate brains of both adult individuals and throughout the major stages of fetal brain development. The hypomethylation and comparatively high expression of CENPJ in the central nervous system of humans suggest that a human-specific--and likely heritable--epigenetic modification likely occurred during human evolution, potentially leading to a much larger neural progenitor pool during human brain development, which may have eventually contributed to the dramatically enlarged brain and highly developed cognitive abilities associated with humans. PMID:24288161

  7. sox9b Is a Key Regulator of Pancreaticobiliary Ductal System Development

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Donghun; Ninov, Nikolay; Debrito Carten, Juliana; Pan, Luyuan; Ma, Taylur P.; Farber, Steven A.; Moens, Cecilia B.; Stainier, Didier Y. R.

    2012-01-01

    The pancreaticobiliary ductal system connects the liver and pancreas to the intestine. It is composed of the hepatopancreatic ductal (HPD) system as well as the intrahepatic biliary ducts and the intrapancreatic ducts. Despite its physiological importance, the development of the pancreaticobiliary ductal system remains poorly understood. The SRY-related transcription factor SOX9 is expressed in the mammalian pancreaticobiliary ductal system, but the perinatal lethality of Sox9 heterozygous mice makes loss-of-function analyses challenging. We turned to the zebrafish to assess the role of SOX9 in pancreaticobiliary ductal system development. We first show that zebrafish sox9b recapitulates the expression pattern of mouse Sox9 in the pancreaticobiliary ductal system and use a nonsense allele of sox9b, sox9bfh313, to dissect its function in the morphogenesis of this structure. Strikingly, sox9bfh313 homozygous mutants survive to adulthood and exhibit cholestasis associated with hepatic and pancreatic duct proliferation, cyst formation, and fibrosis. Analysis of sox9bfh313 mutant embryos and larvae reveals that the HPD cells appear to mis-differentiate towards hepatic and/or pancreatic fates, resulting in a dysmorphic structure. The intrahepatic biliary cells are specified but fail to assemble into a functional network. Similarly, intrapancreatic duct formation is severely impaired in sox9bfh313 mutants, while the embryonic endocrine and acinar compartments appear unaffected. The defects in the intrahepatic and intrapancreatic ducts of sox9bfh313 mutants worsen during larval and juvenile stages, prompting the adult phenotype. We further show that Sox9b interacts with Notch signaling to regulate intrahepatic biliary network formation: sox9b expression is positively regulated by Notch signaling, while Sox9b function is required to maintain Notch signaling in the intrahepatic biliary cells. Together, these data reveal key roles for SOX9 in the morphogenesis of the

  8. Anandamide and decidual remodelling: COX-2 oxidative metabolism as a key regulator.

    PubMed

    Almada, M; Piscitelli, F; Fonseca, B M; Di Marzo, V; Correia-da-Silva, G; Teixeira, N

    2015-11-01

    Recently, endocannabinoids have emerged as signalling mediators in reproduction. It is widely accepted that anandamide (AEA) levels must be tightly regulated, and that a disturbance in AEA levels may impact decidual stability and regression. We have previously characterized the endocannabinoid machinery in rat decidual tissue and reported the pro-apoptotic action of AEA on rat decidual cells. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible enzyme that plays a crucial role in early pregnancy, and is also a key modulator in the crosstalk between endocannabinoids and prostaglandins. On the other hand, AEA-oxidative metabolism by COX-2 is not merely a mean to inactivate its action, but it yields the formation of a new class of mediators, named prostaglandin-ethanolamides, or prostamides. In this study we found that AEA-induced apoptosis in decidual cells involves COX-2 metabolic pathway. AEA induced COX-2 expression through p38 MAPK, resulting in the formation of prostamide E2 (PME2). Our findings also suggest that AEA-induced effect is associated with NF-kB activation. Finally, we describe the involvement of PME2 in the induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in rat decidual cells. Altogether, our findings highlight the role of COX-2 as a gatekeeper in the uterine environment and clarify the impact of the deregulation of AEA levels on the decidual remodelling process. PMID:26335727

  9. 6-Gingerol Protects against Nutritional Steatohepatitis by Regulating Key Genes Related to Inflammation and Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Chang, Chia Ju; Liu, I-Min

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, including non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), appears to be increasingly common worldwide. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of 6-gingerol ((S)-5-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-decanone), a bioactive ingredient of plants belonging to the Zingiberaceae family, on experimental models of NASH. In HepG2 cells, 6-gingerol (100 μmol/L) treatment inhibited free fatty acids mixture (0.33 mmol/L palmitate and 0.66 mmol/L oleate)-induced triglyceride and inflammatory marker accumulations. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with a methionine and choline-deficient (MCD) diet to induce steatohepatitis. After four weeks of MCD diet feeding, the mice were dosed orally with 6-gingerol (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg/day) once daily for another four weeks. 6-Gingerol (100 mg/kg/day) attenuated liver steatosis and necro-inflammation in MCD diet-fed mice. The expressions of inflammatory cytokine genes, including those for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6, and nuclear transcription factor (NF-κB), which were increased in the livers of MCD diet-fed mice, were attenuated by 6-gingerol. 6-Gingerol possesses a repressive property on hepatic steatosis, which is associated with induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α. Our study demonstrated the protective role of 6-gingerol in ameliorating nutritional steatohepatitis. The effect was mediated through regulating key genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammation. PMID:25658238

  10. Role of key-regulator genes in melanoma susceptibility and pathogenesis among patients from South Italy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Several genetic alterations have been demonstrated to contribute to the development and progression of melanoma. In this study, we further investigated the impact of key-regulator genes in susceptibility and pathogenesis of such a disease. Methods A large series (N = 846) of sporadic and familial cases originating from South Italy was screened for germline mutations in p16CDKN2A, BRCA2, and MC1R genes by DHPLC analysis and automated DNA sequencing. Paired primary melanomas and lymph node metastases from same patients (N = 35) as well as melanoma cell lines (N = 18) were analyzed for somatic mutations in NRAS, BRAF, and p16CDKN2A genes. Results For melanoma susceptibility, investigations at germline level indicated that p16CDKN2A was exclusively mutated in 16/545 (2.9%) non-Sardinian patients, whereas BRCA2 germline mutations were observed in 4/91 (4.4%) patients from North Sardinia only. Two MC1R germline variants, Arg151Cys and Asp294His, were significantly associated with melanoma in Sardinia. Regarding genetic events involved in melanoma pathogenesis at somatic level, mutually-exclusive mutations of NRAS and BRAF genes were observed at quite same rate (about two thirds) in cultured and in vivo melanomas (either primary or metastatic lesions). Conversely, p16CDKN2A gene alterations were observed at increased rates moving from primary to metastatic melanomas and melanoma cell lines. Activation of the ERK gene product was demonstrated to be consistently induced by a combination of molecular alterations (NRAS/BRAF mutations and p16CDKN2A silencing). Conclusion Our findings further clarified that: a) mutation prevalence in melanoma susceptibility genes may vary within each specific geographical area; b) multiple molecular events are accumulating during melanomagenesis. PMID:19799798

  11. Identification of the key regulating genes of diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) by network and gene ontology analysis.

    PubMed

    Pashaiasl, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2016-09-01

    Diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) is one of the reasons for infertility that not only affects both older and young women. Ovarian reserve assessment can be used as a new prognostic tool for infertility treatment decision making. Here, up- and down-regulated gene expression profiles of granulosa cells were analysed to generate a putative interaction map of the involved genes. In addition, gene ontology (GO) analysis was used to get insight intol the biological processes and molecular functions of involved proteins in DOR. Eleven up-regulated genes and nine down-regulated genes were identified and assessed by constructing interaction networks based on their biological processes. PTGS2, CTGF, LHCGR, CITED, SOCS2, STAR and FSTL3 were the key nodes in the up-regulated networks, while the IGF2, AMH, GREM, and FOXC1 proteins were key in the down-regulated networks. MIRN101-1, MIRN153-1 and MIRN194-1 inhibited the expression of SOCS2, while CSH1 and BMP2 positively regulated IGF1 and IGF2. Ossification, ovarian follicle development, vasculogenesis, sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factor activity, and golgi apparatus are the major differential groups between up-regulated and down-regulated genes in DOR. Meta-analysis of publicly available transcriptomic data highlighted the high coexpression of CTGF, connective tissue growth factor, with the other key regulators of DOR. CTGF is involved in organ senescence and focal adhesion pathway according to GO analysis. These findings provide a comprehensive system biology based insight into the aetiology of DOR through network and gene ontology analyses. PMID:27324248

  12. 77 FR 23425 - Revisions of Boundaries, Regulations and Zoning Scheme for Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... condition of selected key species including corals, queen conch, long spined sea urchin, apex predatory fish, birds and sea turtles. B. To facilitate to the extent compatible with the primary objective of...

  13. Computational Analysis Reveals a Key Regulator of Cryptococcal Virulence and Determinant of Host Response

    PubMed Central

    Gish, Stacey R.; Maier, Ezekiel J.; Haynes, Brian C.; Santiago-Tirado, Felipe H.; Srikanta, Deepa L.; Ma, Cynthia Z.; Li, Lucy X.; Williams, Matthew; Crouch, Erika C.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a ubiquitous, opportunistic fungal pathogen that kills over 600,000 people annually. Here, we report integrated computational and experimental investigations of the role and mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in cryptococcal infection. Major cryptococcal virulence traits include melanin production and the development of a large polysaccharide capsule upon host entry; shed capsule polysaccharides also impair host defenses. We found that both transcription and translation are required for capsule growth and that Usv101 is a master regulator of pathogenesis, regulating melanin production, capsule growth, and capsule shedding. It does this by directly regulating genes encoding glycoactive enzymes and genes encoding three other transcription factors that are essential for capsule growth: GAT201, RIM101, and SP1. Murine infection with cryptococci lacking Usv101 significantly alters the kinetics and pathogenesis of disease, with extended survival and, unexpectedly, death by pneumonia rather than meningitis. Our approaches and findings will inform studies of other pathogenic microbes. PMID:27094327

  14. Id-1 is a Key Transcriptional Regulator of Glioblastoma Aggressiveness and a Novel Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Soroceanu, Liliana; Murase, Ryuichi; Limbad, Chandani; Singer, Eric; Allison, Juanita; Adrados, Isabel; Kawamura, Rumi; Pakdel, Arash; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Nguyen, Daniel; Khan, Sabeena; Arauz, Robert; Yount, Garret L.; Moore, Dan H.; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; McAllister, Sean D.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common form of primary adult brain tumors. A majority of GBMs grow invasively into distant brain tissue, leading to tumor recurrence, which is ultimately incurable. It is, therefore, essential to discover master regulators that control GBM invasiveness and target them therapeutically. We demonstrate here that the transcriptional regulator Id-1 plays a critical role in modulating the invasiveness of GBM cell lines and primary GBM cells. Id-1 expression levels positively correlate with glioma cell invasiveness in culture and with histopathological grades in patient biopsies. Id-1 knockdown dramatically reduces GBM cell invasion that is accompanied by profound morphological changes and robust reduction in expression levels of “mesenchymal” markers, as well as inhibition of self-renewal potential and down-regulation of glioma stem cell markers. Importantly, genetic knockdown of Id-1 leads to a significant increase in survival in an orthotopic model of human GBM. Furthermore, we show that a non-toxic compound, cannabidiol, significantly down-regulates Id-1 gene expression and associated glioma cell invasiveness and self-renewal. Additionally, cannabidiol significantly inhibits the invasion of GBM cells through an organotypic brain slice and glioma progression in vivo. Our results suggest that Id-1 regulates multiple tumor-promoting pathways in GBM, and that drugs targeting Id-1 represent a novel and promising strategy for improving the therapy and outcome of GBM patients. PMID:23243024

  15. The STARS signaling pathway: a key regulator of skeletal muscle function.

    PubMed

    Lamon, Séverine; Wallace, Marita A; Russell, Aaron P

    2014-09-01

    During the last decade, the striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS), a muscle-specific protein, has been proposed to play an increasingly important role in skeletal muscle growth, metabolism, regeneration and stress adaptation. STARS influences actin dynamics and, as a consequence, regulates the myocardin-related transcription factor A/serum response factor (MRTF-A/SRF) transcriptional program, a well-known pathway controlling skeletal muscle development and function. Muscle-specific stress conditions, such as exercise, positively regulates, while disuse and degenerative muscle diseases are associated with a downregulation of STARS and its downstream partners, suggesting a pivotal role for STARS in skeletal muscle health. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the known role and regulation of STARS and the members of its signaling pathway, RhoA, MRTF-A and SRF, in skeletal muscle. PMID:24557714

  16. The Cell Cycle Regulator CCDC6 Is a Key Target of RNA-Binding Protein EWS

    PubMed Central

    Duggimpudi, Sujitha; Larsson, Erik; Nabhani, Schafiq; Borkhardt, Arndt; Hoell, Jessica I

    2015-01-01

    Genetic translocation of EWSR1 to ETS transcription factor coding region is considered as primary cause for Ewing sarcoma. Previous studies focused on the biology of chimeric transcription factors formed due to this translocation. However, the physiological consequences of heterozygous EWSR1 loss in these tumors have largely remained elusive. Previously, we have identified various mRNAs bound to EWS using PAR-CLIP. In this study, we demonstrate CCDC6, a known cell cycle regulator protein, as a novel target regulated by EWS. siRNA mediated down regulation of EWS caused an elevated apoptosis in cells in a CCDC6-dependant manner. This effect was rescued upon re-expression of CCDC6. This study provides evidence for a novel functional link through which wild-type EWS operates in a target-dependant manner in Ewing sarcoma. PMID:25751255

  17. 75 FR 72655 - Marine Sanitation Device Discharge Regulations for the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... This Federal Register document is also accessible via the Internet at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.... NOAA issued final regulations and a final management plan in 1997 for the FKNMS (62 FR 32161; June 12... (66 FR 38967; July 26, 2001). A 90-day public comment period followed (ending October 26,...

  18. SF-1 in the ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus: A key regulator of homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) regulates food intake and body weight homeostasis. The nuclear receptor NR5A1 (steroidogenic factor 1; SF-1) is a transcription factor whose expression is highly restricted in the VMH and is required for the development of the nucleus. Neurons expressing...

  19. PfsR Is a Key Regulator of Iron Homeostasis in Synechocystis PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dan; He, Qingfang

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential cofactor in numerous cellular processes. The iron deficiency in the oceans affects the primary productivity of phytoplankton including cyanobacteria. In this study, we examined the function of PfsR, a TetR family transcriptional regulator, in iron homeostasis of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. Compared with the wild type, the pfsR deletion mutant displayed stronger tolerance to iron limitation and accumulated significantly more chlorophyll a, carotenoid, and phycocyanin under iron-limiting conditions. The mutant also maintained more photosystem I and photosystem II complexes than the wild type after iron deprivation. In addition, the activities of photosystem I and photosystem II were much higher in pfsR deletion mutant than in wild-type cells under iron-limiting conditions. The transcripts of pfsR were enhanced by iron limitation and inactivation of the gene affected pronouncedly expression of fut genes (encoding a ferric iron transporter), feoB (encoding a ferrous iron transporter), bfr genes (encoding bacterioferritins), ho genes (encoding heme oxygenases), isiA (encoding a chlorophyll-binding protein), and furA (encoding a ferric uptake regulator). The iron quota in pfsR deletion mutant cells was higher than in wild-type cells both before and after exposure to iron limitation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that PfsR bound to its own promoter and thereby auto-regulated its own expression. These data suggest that PfsR is a critical regulator of iron homeostasis. PMID:25010795

  20. MPC1, a key gene in cancer metabolism, is regulated by COUPTFII in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leiming; Xu, Mafei; Qin, Jun; Lin, Shih-Chieh; Lee, Hui-Ju; Tsai, Sophia Y.; Tsai, Ming-Jer

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (MPC1) and MPC 2 form a transporter complex in cells to control pyruvate transportation into mitochondria. Reduced expression of MPC1 disrupts the transporter function, induces metabolic shift to increase glycolysis, and thus plays important roles in several diseases, including cancer. However, the role of MPC1 in prostate cancer and the underlying mechanism causing the down-regulation of MPC1 in tumor cells remain to be defined. Here, we show that MPC1 serves as a critical regulator of glycolysis in prostate cancer cells, which in turn controls cancer cell growth, invasion, and the tumorigenic capability. More importantly, we identified that chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII), a steroid receptor superfamily member, transcriptionally regulates the expression of MPC1. We further demonstrate that COUP-TFII, which is upregulated in the prostate cancer patient, regulates MPC1 and glycolysis to promote tumor growth and metastasis. Our findings reveal that COUP-TFII represses MPC1 expression in prostate cancer cells to facilitate a metabolism switch to increase glycolysis and promote cancer progression. This observation raises an intriguing possibility of targeting COUP-TFII to modulate cancer cell metabolism for prostate cancer intervention. PMID:26895100

  1. Self-Regulated Learning: A Key of a Successful Learner in Online Learning Environments in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samruayruen, Buncha; Enriquez, Judith; Natakuatoong, Onjaree; Samruayruen, Kingkaew

    2013-01-01

    This study identified five effective self-regulated learning (SRL), investigated the correlation of demographic information and SRL, and measured significant predictor of prior experiences on SRL. Eighty-eight Thai learners participated in the SRL survey, which was adapted from the MSLQ. The findings indicated that Intrinsic Goal and Self-Efficacy…

  2. 75 FR 952 - Draft Marine Sanitation Device Discharge Regulations for the Florida Keys National Marine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ... proposed rule, issued on November 16, 2009 (74 FR 58923), to amend the regulations implementing the Florida... prevent discharges (74 FR 58923). The meetings described in the DATES section above are intended to... plants, fishes, and invertebrates, including the Nation's only living coral reef that lies adjacent...

  3. Self-Regulating Capacities as the Key to Boosting up English Metaphor Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halim, Abd.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the degree of metaphorical meaning acquisition reflected in the ratings of Mental Lexicon Organizations (MLOs) namely subordinate, compound and coordinate; and to explore the interaction effects of the self-regulating capacities and age on the ratings. The method is quantitative. 261 out of 1,278 students of English,…

  4. Small G proteins as key regulators of pancreatic digestive enzyme secretion

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John A.; Chen, Xuequn; Sabbatini, Maria E.

    2009-01-01

    Small GTP-binding (G) proteins act as molecular switches to regulate a number of cellular processes, including vesicular transport. Emerging evidence indicates that small G proteins regulate a number of steps in the secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Diverse small G proteins have been localized at discrete compartments along the secretory pathway and particularly on the secretory granule. Rab3D, Rab27B, and Rap1 are present on the granule membrane and play a role in the steps leading up to exocytosis. Whether the function of these G proteins is simply to ensure appropriate targeting or if they are involved as regulatory molecules is discussed. Most evidence suggests that Rab3D and Rab27B play a role in tethering the secretory granule to its target membrane. Other Rabs have been identified on the secretory granule that are associated with different steps in the secretory pathway. The Rho family small G proteins RhoA and Rac1 also regulate secretion through remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Possible mechanisms for regulation of these G proteins and their effector molecules are considered. PMID:19088252

  5. FoxO1 Deacetylation Regulates Thyroid Hormone-induced Transcription of Key Hepatic Gluconeogenic Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Zhou, Jin; Xie, Sherwin Ying; You, Seo-Hee; Gauthier, Karine; Yen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is a concerted process that integrates transcriptional regulation with hormonal signals. A major regulator is thyroid hormone (TH), which acts through its nuclear receptor (TR) to induce the expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC). Forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 also is an important regulator of these genes; however, its functional interactions with TR are not known. Here, we report that TR-mediated transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in human hepatic cells and mouse liver was FoxO1-dependent and furthermore required FoxO1 deacetylation by the NAD+-dependent deacetylase, SirT1. siRNA knockdown of FoxO1 decreased, whereas overexpression of FoxO1 increased, TH-dependent transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in cultured hepatic cells. FoxO1 siRNA knockdown also decreased TH-mediated transcription in vivo. Additionally, TH was unable to induce FoxO1 deacetylation or hepatic PCK1 gene expression in TH receptor β-null (TRβ−/−) mice. Moreover, TH stimulated FoxO1 recruitment to the PCK1 and G6PC gene promoters in a SirT1-dependent manner. In summary, our results show that TH-dependent deacetylation of a second metabolically regulated transcription factor represents a novel mechanism for transcriptional integration of nuclear hormone action with cellular energy status. PMID:23995837

  6. O-GlcNAcase: Promiscuous Hexosaminidase or Key Regulator of O-GlcNAc Signaling?

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Jana; Schimpl, Marianne; van Aalten, Daan M. F.

    2014-01-01

    O-GlcNAc signaling is regulated by an opposing pair of enzymes: O-GlcNAc transferase installs and O-GlcNAcase (OGA) removes the modification from proteins. The dynamics and regulation of this process are only beginning to be understood as the physiological functions of both enzymes are being probed using genetic and pharmacological approaches. This minireview charts the discovery and functional and structural analysis of OGA and summarizes the insights gained from recent studies using OGA inhibition, gene knock-out, and overexpression. We identify several areas of “known unknowns” that would benefit from future research, such as the enigmatic C-terminal domain of OGA. PMID:25336650

  7. TOR (target of rapamycin) is a key regulator of triacylglycerol accumulation in microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Sousuke; Kawase, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Ikki; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most microalgae abundantly accumulate lipid droplets (LDs) containing triacylglycerols (TAGs) under several stress conditions, but the underlying molecular mechanism of this accumulation remains unclear. In a recent study, we found that inhibition of TOR (target of rapamycin), a highly conserved protein kinase of eukaryotes, by rapamycin resulted in TAG accumulation in microalgae, indicating that TOR negatively regulates TAG accumulation. Here, we show that formation of intracellular LDs and TAG accumulation were also induced in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii after exposure to Torin1 or AZD8055, which are novel TOR inhibitors that inhibit TOR activity in a manner different from rapamycin. These results supported quite well our previous conclusion that TOR is a central regulator of TAG accumulation in microalgae. PMID:26855321

  8. GATA4 Is a Key Regulator of Steroidogenesis and Glycolysis in Mouse Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schrade, Anja; Kyrönlahti, Antti; Akinrinade, Oyediran; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Häkkinen, Merja; Fischer, Simon; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Velagapudi, Vidya; Toppari, Jorma; Wilson, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor GATA4 is expressed in somatic cells of the mammalian testis. Gene targeting studies in mice have shown that GATA4 is essential for proper differentiation and function of Sertoli cells. The role of GATA4 in Leydig cell development, however, remains controversial, because targeted mutagenesis experiments in mice have not shown a consistent phenotype, possibly due to context-dependent effects or compensatory responses. We therefore undertook a reductionist approach to study the function of GATA4 in Leydig cells. Using microarray analysis and quantitative RT-PCR, we identified a set of genes that are down-regulated or up-regulated after small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of Gata4 in the murine Leydig tumor cell line mLTC-1. These same genes were dysregulated when primary cultures of Gata4flox/flox adult Leydig cells were subjected to adenovirus-mediated cre-lox recombination in vitro. Among the down-regulated genes were enzymes of the androgen biosynthetic pathway (Cyp11a1, Hsd3b1, Cyp17a1, and Srd5a). Silencing of Gata4 expression in mLTC-1 cells was accompanied by reduced production of sex steroid precursors, as documented by mass spectrometric analysis. Comprehensive metabolomic analysis of GATA4-deficient mLTC-1 cells showed alteration of other metabolic pathways, notably glycolysis. GATA4-depleted mLTC-1 cells had reduced expression of glycolytic genes (Hk1, Gpi1, Pfkp, and Pgam1), lower intracellular levels of ATP, and increased extracellular levels of glucose. Our findings suggest that GATA4 plays a pivotal role in Leydig cell function and provide novel insights into metabolic regulation in this cell type. PMID:25668067

  9. STAT3 is a key transcriptional regulator of cancer stem cell marker CD133 in HCC

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Sarani; Fuchs, Bryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cell (CSC) marker CD133 was found to be upregulated in many cancers including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the molecular mechanism of CD133 regulation in the liver tumor microenvironment has remained elusive. In this study Won and colleagues report that interleukin-6 (IL-6) mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) signaling and hypoxia enhance the expression of CD133 and promote the progression of HCC. PMID:27275460

  10. Global transcriptome analysis reveals circadian regulation of key pathways in plant growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Michael F; Maloof, Julin N; Straume, Marty; Kay, Steve A; Harmer, Stacey L

    2008-01-01

    Background As nonmotile organisms, plants must rapidly adapt to ever-changing environmental conditions, including those caused by daily light/dark cycles. One important mechanism for anticipating and preparing for such predictable changes is the circadian clock. Nearly all organisms have circadian oscillators that, when they are in phase with the Earth's rotation, provide a competitive advantage. In order to understand how circadian clocks benefit plants, it is necessary to identify the pathways and processes that are clock controlled. Results We have integrated information from multiple circadian microarray experiments performed on Arabidopsis thaliana in order to better estimate the fraction of the plant transcriptome that is circadian regulated. Analyzing the promoters of clock-controlled genes, we identified circadian clock regulatory elements correlated with phase-specific transcript accumulation. We have also identified several physiological pathways enriched for clock-regulated changes in transcript abundance, suggesting they may be modulated by the circadian clock. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that transcript abundance of roughly one-third of expressed A. thaliana genes is circadian regulated. We found four promoter elements, enriched in the promoters of genes with four discrete phases, which may contribute to the time-of-day specific changes in the transcript abundance of these genes. Clock-regulated genes are over-represented among all of the classical plant hormone and multiple stress response pathways, suggesting that all of these pathways are influenced by the circadian clock. Further exploration of the links between the clock and these pathways will lead to a better understanding of how the circadian clock affects plant growth and leads to improved fitness. PMID:18710561

  11. The Key Regulator for Language and Speech Development, FOXP2, is a Novel Substrate for SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Leslie J; Wang, Chiung-Min; Nascimento, Leticia; Liu, Runhua; Wang, Lizhong; Yang, Wei-Hsiung

    2016-02-01

    Transcription factor forkhead box protein P2 (FOXP2) plays an essential role in the development of language and speech. However, the transcriptional activity of FOXP2 regulated by the post-translational modifications remains unknown. Here, we demonstrated that FOXP2 is clearly defined as a SUMO target protein at the cellular levels as FOXP2 is covalently modified by both SUMO1 and SUMO3. Furthermore, SUMOylation of FOXP2 was significantly decreased by SENP2 (a specific SUMOylation protease). We further showed that FOXP2 is selectively SUMOylated in vivo on a phylogenetically conserved lysine 674 but the SUMOylation does not alter subcellular localization and stability of FOXP2. Interestingly, we observed that human etiological FOXP2 R553H mutation robustly reduces its SUMOylation potential as compared to wild-type FOXP2. In addition, the acidic residues downstream the core SUMO motif on FOXP2 are required for its full SUMOylation capacity. Finally, our functional analysis using reporter gene assays showed that SUMOylation may modulate transcriptional activity of FOXP2 in regulating downstream target genes (DISC1, SRPX2, and MiR200c). Altogether, we provide the first evidence that FOXP2 is a substrate for SUMOylation and SUMOylation of FOXP2 plays a functional role in regulating its transcriptional activity. PMID:26212494

  12. miR-195 is a key regulator of Raf1 in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangzheng; Jiang, Chuner; Sun, Quanquan; Yan, Fenqin; Wang, Lei; Fu, Zhenfu; Liu, Tongxin; Hu, Fujun

    2015-01-01

    Proto-oncogene Raf1 serves as a part of the mitogen-activated protein kinases/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signal transduction pathway and regulates cell migration, apoptosis, and differentiation. Although a large number of studies have shown that Raf1 is overexpressed in various kinds of cancer, little is known about the association between Raf1 and miRNAs in thyroid carcinoma. This study proves that Raf1 is overexpressed in thyroid cancer, which has been confirmed by many other studies. Besides, we identify that Raf1 is a direct target of miR-15a/b, miR-16, and miR-195 by dual luciferase reporter assay. We also find that the expression of miR-195 is downregulated in 50 pairs of thyroid tumor tissues compared to the adjacent nontumor tissues, while there is no difference in the expression of miR-15a/b and miR-16 between the groups. Furthermore, exogenous overexpression of miR-195 significantly inhibits the protein expression of Raf1 and blocks the thyroid cancer cell proliferation. Our findings delineate a novel mechanism for the regulation of Raf1 in thyroid cancer, which may help to provide a new direction for the treatment of thyroid cancer. PMID:26527888

  13. PPAR{alpha} is a key regulator of hepatic FGF21

    SciTech Connect

    Lundasen, Thomas; Hunt, Mary C.; Nilsson, Lisa-Mari; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Angelin, Bo; Alexson, Stefan E.H.; Rudling, Mats . E-mail: mats.rudling@cnt.ki.se

    2007-08-24

    The metabolic regulator fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) has antidiabetic properties in animal models of diabetes and obesity. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we here show that the hepatic gene expression of FGF21 is regulated by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}). Fasting or treatment of mice with the PPAR{alpha} agonist Wy-14,643 induced FGF21 mRNA by 10-fold and 8-fold, respectively. In contrast, FGF21 mRNA was low in PPAR{alpha} deficient mice, and fasting or treatment with Wy-14,643 did not induce FGF21. Obese ob/ob mice, known to have increased PPAR{alpha} levels, displayed 12-fold increased hepatic FGF21 mRNA levels. The potential importance of PPAR{alpha} for FGF21 expression also in human liver was shown by Wy-14,643 induction of FGF21 mRNA in human primary hepatocytes, and PPAR{alpha} response elements were identified in both the human and mouse FGF21 promoters. Further studies on the mechanisms of regulation of FGF21 by PPAR{alpha} in humans will be of great interest.

  14. MYC TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS: KEY REGULATORS BEHIND ESTABLISHMENT AND MAINTENANCE OF PLURIPOTENCY

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Keriayn; Dalton, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Summary The interplay between transcription factors, epigenetic modifiers, chromatin remodelers and miRNAs form the foundation of a complex regulatory network required for establishment and maintenance of the pluripotent state. Recent work indicates that Myc transcription factors are essential elements of this regulatory system. Despite numerous reports however, aspects of how Myc controls self-renewal and pluripotency remain obscure. Here, we review evidence supporting the placement of Myc as a central regulator of the pluripotent state and discuss possible mechanisms of action. PMID:21082893

  15. Gene expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis is sex dependent in mice with growth hormone receptor deletion in liver.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Ilona; Masternak, Michal M; List, Edward O; Stout, Michael B; Berryman, Darlene E; Lewinski, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Gesing, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is an essential process for cell viability. Mice with disruption of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene (Ghr gene) in the liver (LiGHRKO), in contrast to long-lived mice with global deletion of the Ghr gene (GHRKO), are characterized by lack of improved insulin sensitivity and severe hepatic steatosis. Tissue-specific disruption of the GHR in liver results in a mouse model with dramatically altered GH/IGF1 axis. We have previously shown increased levels of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis in insulin-sensitive GHRKO mice. The aim of the present study is to assess, using real-time PCR, the gene expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis (Pgc1α, Ampk, Sirt1, Nrf2 and Mfn2) and a marker of mitochondrial activity (CoxIV) in brains, kidneys and livers of male and female LiGHRKO and wild-type (WT) mice. There were significant differences between males and females. In the brain, expression of Pgc1α, Ampk, Sirt1, Nrf2 and Mfn2 was lower in pooled females compared to pooled males. In the kidneys, expression of Ampk and Sirt1 was also lower in female mice. In the liver, no differences between males and females were observed. Sexual dimorphism may play an important role in regulating the biogenesis of mitochondria. PMID:25855408

  16. Obestatin as a key regulator of metabolism and cardiovascular function with emerging therapeutic potential for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Elaine; Burch, Kerry J; Green, Brian D; Grieve, David J

    2016-07-01

    Obestatin is a 23-amino acid C-terminally amidated gastrointestinal peptide derived from preproghrelin and which forms an α helix. Although obestatin has a short biological half-life and is rapidly degraded, it is proposed to exert wide-ranging pathophysiological actions. Whilst the precise nature of many of its effects is unclear, accumulating evidence supports positive actions on both metabolism and cardiovascular function. For example, obestatin has been reported to inhibit food and water intake, body weight gain and gastrointestinal motility and also to mediate promotion of cell survival and prevention of apoptosis. Obestatin-induced increases in beta cell mass, enhanced adipogenesis and improved lipid metabolism have been noted along with up-regulation of genes associated with beta cell regeneration, insulin production and adipogenesis. Furthermore, human circulating obestatin levels generally demonstrate an inverse association with obesity and diabetes, whilst the peptide has been shown to confer protective metabolic effects in experimental diabetes, suggesting that it may hold therapeutic potential in this setting. Obestatin also appears to be involved in blood pressure regulation and to exert beneficial effects on endothelial function, with experimental studies indicating that it may also promote cardioprotective actions against, for example, ischaemia-reperfusion injury. This review will present a critical appraisal of the expanding obestatin research area and discuss the emerging therapeutic potential of this peptide for both metabolic and cardiovascular complications of diabetes. PMID:27111465

  17. NO homeostasis is a key regulator of early nitrate perception and root elongation in maize*

    PubMed Central

    Quaggiotti, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Crop plant development is strongly dependent on nitrogen availability in the soil and on the efficiency of its recruitment by roots. For this reason, the understanding of the molecular events underlying root adaptation to nitrogen fluctuations is a primary goal to develop biotechnological tools for sustainable agriculture. However, knowledge about molecular responses to nitrogen availability is derived mainly from the study of model species. Nitric oxide (NO) has been recently proposed to be implicated in plant responses to environmental stresses, but its exact role in the response of plants to nutritional stress is still under evaluation. In this work, the role of NO production by maize roots after nitrate perception was investigated by focusing on the regulation of transcription of genes involved in NO homeostasis and by measuring NO production in roots. Moreover, its involvement in the root growth response to nitrate was also investigated. The results provide evidence that NO is produced by nitrate reductase as an early response to nitrate supply and that the coordinated induction of non-symbiotic haemoglobins (nsHbs) could finely regulate the NO steady state. This mechanism seems to be implicated on the modulation of the root elongation in response to nitrate perception. Moreover, an improved agar-plate system for growing maize seedlings was developed. This system, which allows localized treatments to be performed on specific root portions, gave the opportunity to discern between localized and systemic effects of nitrate supply to roots. PMID:24220653

  18. Revisiting Human Cholesterol Synthesis and Absorption: The Reciprocity Paradigm and its Key Regulators.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Peter A S; Jones, Peter J H

    2016-05-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Cholesterol homeostasis in the body is governed by the interplay between absorption, synthesis, and excretion or conversion of cholesterol into bile acids. A reciprocal relationship between cholesterol synthesis and absorption is known to regulate circulating cholesterol in response to dietary or therapeutic interventions. However, the degree to which these factors affect synthesis and absorption and the extent to which one vector shifts in response to the other are not thoroughly understood. Also, huge inter-individual variability exists in the manner in which the two systems act in response to any cholesterol-lowering treatment. Various factors are known to account for this variability and in light of recent experimental advances new players such as gene-gene interactions, gene-environmental effects, and gut microbiome hold immense potential in offering an explanation to the complex traits of inter-individual variability in human cholesterol metabolism. In this context, the objective of the present review is to provide an overview on cholesterol metabolism and discuss the role of potential factors such as genetics, epigenetics, epistasis, and gut microbiome, as well as other regulators in modulating cholesterol metabolism, especially emphasizing the reciprocal relationship between cholesterol synthesis and absorption. Furthermore, an evaluation of the implications of this push-pull mechanism on cholesterol-lowering strategies is presented. PMID:26620375

  19. Orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is key regulator of hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Don-Kyu; Ryu, Dongryeol; Koh, Minseob; Lee, Min-Woo; Lim, Donghyun; Kim, Min-Jung; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Cho, Won-Jea; Lee, Chul-Ho; Park, Seung Bum; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2012-06-22

    Glucose homeostasis is tightly controlled by hormonal regulation of hepatic glucose production. Dysregulation of this system is often associated with insulin resistance and diabetes, resulting in hyperglycemia in mammals. Here, we show that the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel downstream mediator of glucagon action in hepatic gluconeogenesis and demonstrate a beneficial impact of the inverse agonist GSK5182. Hepatic ERRγ expression was increased by fasting-dependent activation of the cAMP-response element-binding protein-CRTC2 pathway. Overexpression of ERRγ induced Pck1 and G6PC gene expression and glucose production in primary hepatocytes, whereas abolition of ERRγ gene expression attenuated forskolin-mediated induction of gluconeogenic gene expression. Deletion and mutation analyses of the Pck1 promoter showed that ERRγ directly regulates the Pck1 gene transcription via ERR response elements of the Pck1 promoter as confirmed by ChIP assay and in vivo imaging analysis. We also demonstrate that GSK5182, an inverse agonist of ERRγ, specifically inhibits the transcriptional activity of ERRγ in a PGC-1α dependent manner. Finally, the ERRγ inverse agonist ameliorated hyperglycemia through inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis in db/db mice. Control of hepatic glucose production by an ERRγ-specific inverse agonist is a new potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:22549789

  20. Orphan Nuclear Receptor Estrogen-Related Receptor γ (ERRγ) Is Key Regulator of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Don-Kyu; Ryu, Dongryeol; Koh, Minseob; Lee, Min-Woo; Lim, Donghyun; Kim, Min-Jung; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Cho, Won-Jea; Lee, Chul-Ho; Park, Seung Bum; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Glucose homeostasis is tightly controlled by hormonal regulation of hepatic glucose production. Dysregulation of this system is often associated with insulin resistance and diabetes, resulting in hyperglycemia in mammals. Here, we show that the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel downstream mediator of glucagon action in hepatic gluconeogenesis and demonstrate a beneficial impact of the inverse agonist GSK5182. Hepatic ERRγ expression was increased by fasting-dependent activation of the cAMP-response element-binding protein-CRTC2 pathway. Overexpression of ERRγ induced Pck1 and G6PC gene expression and glucose production in primary hepatocytes, whereas abolition of ERRγ gene expression attenuated forskolin-mediated induction of gluconeogenic gene expression. Deletion and mutation analyses of the Pck1 promoter showed that ERRγ directly regulates the Pck1 gene transcription via ERR response elements of the Pck1 promoter as confirmed by ChIP assay and in vivo imaging analysis. We also demonstrate that GSK5182, an inverse agonist of ERRγ, specifically inhibits the transcriptional activity of ERRγ in a PGC-1α dependent manner. Finally, the ERRγ inverse agonist ameliorated hyperglycemia through inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis in db/db mice. Control of hepatic glucose production by an ERRγ-specific inverse agonist is a new potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:22549789

  1. MicroRNAs: Not “Fine-Tuners” but Key Regulators of Neuronal Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Gregory M.; Haas, Matilda A.; Pocock, Roger

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short non-coding RNAs that operate as prominent post-transcriptional regulators of eukaryotic gene expression. miRNAs are abundantly expressed in the brain of most animals and exert diverse roles. The anatomical and functional complexity of the brain requires the precise coordination of multilayered gene regulatory networks. The flexibility, speed, and reversibility of miRNA function provide precise temporal and spatial gene regulatory capabilities that are crucial for the correct functioning of the brain. Studies have shown that the underlying molecular mechanisms controlled by miRNAs in the nervous systems of invertebrate and vertebrate models are remarkably conserved in humans. We endeavor to provide insight into the roles of miRNAs in the nervous systems of these model organisms and discuss how such information may be used to inform regarding diseases of the human brain. PMID:26635721

  2. p24 family proteins: key players in the regulation of trafficking along the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Cantizano, Noelia; Montesinos, Juan Carlos; Bernat-Silvestre, César; Marcote, María Jesús; Aniento, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    p24 family proteins have been known for a long time, but their functions have remained elusive. However, they are emerging as essential regulators of protein trafficking along the secretory pathway, influencing the composition, structure, and function of different organelles in the pathway, especially the ER and the Golgi apparatus. In addition, they appear to modulate the transport of specific cargos, including GPI-anchored proteins, G-protein-coupled receptors, or K/HDEL ligands. As a consequence, they have been shown to play specific roles in signaling, development, insulin secretion, and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The search of new putative ligands may open the way to discover new functions for this fascinating family of proteins. PMID:26224213

  3. Epigenetic regulation in pluripotent stem cells: a key to breaking the epigenetic barrier.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akira; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    The differentiation and reprogramming of cells are accompanied by drastic changes in the epigenetic profiles of cells. Waddington's classical model clearly describes how differentiating cells acquire their cell identity as the developmental potential of an individual cell population declines towards the terminally differentiated state. The recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells as well as of somatic cell nuclear transfer provided evidence that the process of differentiation can be reversed. The identity of somatic cells is strictly protected by an epigenetic barrier, and these cells acquire pluripotency by breaking the epigenetic barrier by reprogramming factors such as Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, Myc and LIN28. This review covers the current understanding of the spatio-temporal regulation of epigenetics in pluripotent and differentiated cells, and discusses how cells determine their identity and overcome the epigenetic barrier during the reprogramming process. PMID:23166402

  4. Is Nox4 a key regulator of the activated state of fibroblasts in systemic sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Böhm, Markus; Dosoki, Heba; Kerkhoff, Claus

    2014-09-01

    The family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases consists of phagocytic gp91(phox) and six-related isoforms. Recent evidence indicates that the NADPH oxidase isoform Nox4 controls vascular, renal and pulmonary injury. We propose that Nox4 is an intrinsic regulator of the activated state of dermal fibroblasts in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Profibrotic cytokines on the one hand and antifibrogenic factors such as α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone on the other hand may target Nox4 as an intracellular nodal point. Via increased or decreased generation of reactive oxygen species and/or hydrogen peroxide, Nox4 could orchestrate collagen synthesis, differentiation of dermal fibroblasts into a profibrotic myofibroblast phenotype and thus dermal fibrosis. Confirmation of this hypothesis will have important consequences in our understanding of the activated state of dermal fibroblasts in SSc. Based on the availability of clinically useful Nox4 inhibitors, novel antifibrotic therapies of SSc can be envisioned. PMID:25040787

  5. Response Regulator Heterodimer Formation Controls a Key Stage in Streptomyces Development

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bassam, Mahmoud M.; Bibb, Maureen J.; Bush, Matthew J.; Chandra, Govind; Buttner, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    The orphan, atypical response regulators BldM and WhiI each play critical roles in Streptomyces differentiation. BldM is required for the formation of aerial hyphae, and WhiI is required for the differentiation of these reproductive structures into mature spores. To gain insight into BldM function, we defined the genome-wide BldM regulon using ChIP-Seq and transcriptional profiling. BldM target genes clustered into two groups based on their whi gene dependency. Expression of Group I genes depended on bldM but was independent of all the whi genes, and biochemical experiments showed that Group I promoters were controlled by a BldM homodimer. In contrast, Group II genes were expressed later than Group I genes and their expression depended not only on bldM but also on whiI and whiG (encoding the sigma factor that activates whiI). Additional ChIP-Seq analysis showed that BldM Group II genes were also direct targets of WhiI and that in vivo binding of WhiI to these promoters depended on BldM and vice versa. We go on to demonstrate that BldM and WhiI form a functional heterodimer that controls Group II promoters, serving to integrate signals from two distinct developmental pathways. The BldM-WhiI system thus exemplifies the potential of response regulator heterodimer formation as a mechanism to expand the signaling capabilities of bacterial cells. PMID:25101778

  6. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 is a key regulator of the MYCN oncoprotein in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Hyun; Szemes, Marianna; Vieira, Gabriella Cunha; Melegh, Zsombor; Malik, Sally; Heesom, Kate J; Von Wallwitz-Freitas, Laura; Greenhough, Alexander; Brown, Keith W; Zheng, Y George; Catchpoole, Daniel; Deery, Michael J; Malik, Karim

    2015-03-01

    Approximately half of poor prognosis neuroblastomas (NBs) are characterized by pathognomonic MYCN gene amplification and MYCN over-expression. Here we present data showing that short-interfering RNA mediated depletion of the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) in cell-lines representative of NBs with MYCN gene amplification leads to greatly impaired growth and apoptosis. Growth suppression is not apparent in the MYCN-negative SH-SY5Y NB cell-line, or in two immortalized human fibroblast cell-lines. Immunoblotting of NB cell-lines shows that high PRMT5 expression is strongly associated with MYCN-amplification (P < 0.004, Mann-Whitney U-test) and immunohistochemical analysis of primary NBs reveals that whilst PRMT5 protein is ubiquitously expressed in the cytoplasm of most cells, MYCN-amplified tumours exhibit pronounced nuclear PRMT5 staining. PRMT5 knockdown in MYCN-overexpressing cells, including the SHEP-21N cell-line with inducible MYCN expression leads to a dramatic decrease in MYCN protein and MYCN-associated cell-death in SHEP-21N cells. Quantitative gene expression analysis and cycloheximide chase experiments suggest that PRMT5 regulates MYCN at a post-transcriptional level. Reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that endogenous PRMT5 and MYCN interact in both SK-N-BE(2)C and NGP cell lines. By using liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of immunoprecipitated MYCN protein, we identified several potential sites of arginine dimethylation on the MYCN protein. Together our studies implicate PRMT5 in a novel mode of MYCN post-translational regulation and suggest PRMT5 plays a major role in NB tumorigenesis. Small-molecule inhibitors of PRMT5 may therefore represent a novel therapeutic strategy for neuroblastoma and other cancers driven by the MYCN oncogene. PMID:25475372

  7. NRF2, a Key Regulator of Antioxidants with Two Faces towards Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    While reactive oxygen species (ROS) is generally considered harmful, a relevant amount of ROS is necessary for a number of cellular functions, including the intracellular signal transduction. In order to deal with an excessive amount of ROS, organisms are equipped with a sufficient amount of antioxidants together with NF-E2-related factor-2 (NRF2), a transcription factor that plays a key role in the protection of organisms against environmental or intracellular stresses. While the NRF2 activity has been generally viewed as beneficial to preserve the integrity of organisms, recent studies have demonstrated that cancer cells hijack the NRF2 activity to survive under the oxidative stress and, therefore, a close check must be kept on the NRF2 activity in cancer. In the present review, we briefly highlight important progresses in understanding the molecular mechanism, structure, and function of KEAP1 and NRF2 interaction. In addition, we provide general perspectives that justify conflicting views on the NRF2 activity in cancer. PMID:27340506

  8. Cdc42 is a key regulator of B cell differentiation and is required for antiviral humoral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Burbage, Marianne; Keppler, Selina J.; Gasparrini, Francesca; Martínez-Martín, Nuria; Gaya, Mauro; Feest, Christoph; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Brakebusch, Cord; Collinson, Lucy; Bruckbauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The small Rho GTPase Cdc42, known to interact with Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) protein, is an important regulator of actin remodeling. Here, we show that genetic ablation of Cdc42 exclusively in the B cell lineage is sufficient to render mice unable to mount antibody responses. Indeed Cdc42-deficient mice are incapable of forming germinal centers or generating plasma B cells upon either viral infection or immunization. Such severe immune deficiency is caused by multiple and profound B cell abnormalities, including early blocks during B cell development; impaired antigen-driven BCR signaling and actin remodeling; defective antigen presentation and in vivo interaction with T cells; and a severe B cell–intrinsic block in plasma cell differentiation. Thus, our study presents a new perspective on Cdc42 as key regulator of B cell physiology. PMID:25547673

  9. Arrestin2/Clathrin Interaction is Regulated by Key N- and C-terminal Regions in Arrestin2+

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Ronald C.; Kang, Dong Soo; Benovic, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of non-visual arrestins with clathrin is an important step in mediating the endocytosis of cell surface receptors. Previous studies have shown that mutation of the clathrin-binding box in arrestin leads to severe defects in arrestin mediated trafficking. However, little is known about how arrestin/clathrin interaction is regulated. Here we show that both the N- and C-terminal regions of arrestin2 function to inhibit basal interaction with clathrin. Truncation analysis revealed that clathrin binding increases as the C-tail of arrestin2 is shortened while site-directed mutagenesis identified Glu-404, Glu-405, and Glu-406 as being primarily responsible for this inhibition. Mutagenesis also identified Lys-4, Arg-7, Lys-10, and Lys-11 within the N-terminus as playing a key role regulating clathrin binding. Based on similarities with visual arrestin, Lys-10 and Lys-11 likely function as phospho-sensors in arrestin2 to initially discriminate the phosphorylation status of target receptors. Analysis of the arrestin2 structure reveals that Arg-7, Lys-10 and Lys-11 are in close proximity to Glu-389 and Asp-390, suggesting that these residues may form intramolecular interactions. In fact, simultaneous mutation of Glu-389 and Asp-390 also leads to enhanced clathrin binding. These results reveal that multiple intramolecular interactions coordinately regulate arrestin2 interaction with clathrin, highlighting this interaction as a critical step in regulating receptor trafficking. PMID:19555118

  10. The Circadian Clock in Murine Chondrocytes Regulates Genes Controlling Key Aspects of Cartilage Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gossan, Nicole; Zeef, Leo; Hensman, James; Hughes, Alun; Bateman, John F; Rowley, Lynn; Little, Christopher B; Piggins, Hugh D; Rattray, Magnus; Boot-Handford, Raymond P; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2013-01-01

    ObjectiveTo characterize the circadian clock in murine cartilage tissue and identify tissue-specific clock target genes, and to investigate whether the circadian clock changes during aging or during cartilage degeneration using an experimental mouse model of osteoarthritis (OA). MethodsCartilage explants were obtained from aged and young adult mice after transduction with the circadian clock fusion protein reporter PER2::luc, and real-time bioluminescence recordings were used to characterize the properties of the clock. Time-series microarrays were performed on mouse cartilage tissue to identify genes expressed in a circadian manner. Rhythmic genes were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction using mouse tissue, primary chondrocytes, and a human chondrocyte cell line. Experimental OA was induced in mice by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM), and articular cartilage samples were microdissected and subjected to microarray analysis. ResultsMouse cartilage tissue and a human chondrocyte cell line were found to contain intrinsic molecular circadian clocks. The cartilage clock could be reset by temperature signals, while the circadian period was temperature compensated. PER2::luc bioluminescence demonstrated that circadian oscillations were significantly lower in amplitude in cartilage from aged mice. Time-series microarray analyses of the mouse tissue identified the first circadian transcriptome in cartilage, revealing that 615 genes (∼3.9% of the expressed genes) displayed a circadian pattern of expression. This included genes involved in cartilage homeostasis and survival, as well as genes with potential importance in the pathogenesis of OA. Several clock genes were disrupted in the early stages of cartilage degeneration in the DMM mouse model of OA. ConclusionThese results reveal an autonomous circadian clock in chondrocytes that can be implicated in key aspects of cartilage biology and pathology. Consequently

  11. Key Residues Regulating the Reductase Activity of the Human Mitochondrial Apoptosis Inducing Factor.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Raquel; Ferreira, Patricia; Marcuello, Carlos; Usón, Alejandro; Miramar, M Dolores; Peleato, M Luisa; Lostao, Anabel; Susin, Santos A; Medina, Milagros

    2015-08-25

    The human Apoptosis Inducing Factor (hAIF) is a bifunctional NAD(P)H-dependent flavoreductase involved in both mitochondrial energy metabolism and caspase-independent cell death. Even though several studies indicate that both functions are redox controlled by NADH binding, the exact role of hAIF as a reductase in healthy mitochondria remains unknown. Upon reduction by NADH, hAIF dimerizes and produces very stable flavin/nicotinamide charge transfer complexes (CTC), by stacking of the oxidized nicotinamide moiety of the NAD(+) coenzyme against the re-face of the reduced flavin ring of its FAD cofactor. Such complexes are critical to restrict the hAIF efficiency as a reductase. The molecular basis of the hAIF reductase activity is here investigated by analyzing the role played by residues contributing to the interaction of the FAD isoalloxazine ring and of the nicotinamide moiety of NADH at the active site. Mutations at K177 and E314 produced drastic effects on the hAIF ability to retain the FAD cofactor, indicating that these residues are important to set up the holo-enzyme active site conformation. Characterization of P173G hAIF indicates that the stacking of P173 against the isoalloxazine ring is relevant to determine the flavin environment and to modulate the enzyme affinity for NADH. Finally, the properties of the F310G and H454S hAIF mutants indicate that these two positions contribute to form a compact active site essential for NADH binding, CTC stabilization, and NAD(+) affinity for the reduced state of hAIF. These features are key determinants of the particular behavior of hAIF as a NADH-dependent oxidoreductase. PMID:26237213

  12. Oxygen, a Key Factor Regulating Cell Behavior during Neurogenesis and Cerebral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kuan; Zhu, Lingling; Fan, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen is vital to maintain the normal functions of almost all the organs, especially for brain which is one of the heaviest oxygen consumers in the body. The important roles of oxygen on the brain are not only reflected in the development, but also showed in the pathological processes of many cerebral diseases. In the current review, we summarized the oxygen levels in brain tissues tested by real-time measurements during the embryonic and adult neurogenesis, the cerebral diseases, or in the hyperbaric/hypobaric oxygen environment. Oxygen concentration is low in fetal brain (0.076–7.6 mmHg) and in adult brain (11.4–53.2 mmHg), decreased during stroke, and increased in hyperbaric oxygen environment. In addition, we reviewed the effects of oxygen tensions on the behaviors of neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro cultures at different oxygen concentration (15.2–152 mmHg) and in vivo niche during different pathological states and in hyperbaric/hypobaric oxygen environment. Moderate hypoxia (22.8–76 mmHg) can promote the proliferation of NSCs and enhance the differentiation of NSCs into the TH-positive neurons. Next, we briefly presented the oxygen-sensitive molecular mechanisms regulating NSCs proliferation and differentiation recently found including the Notch, Bone morphogenetic protein and Wnt pathways. Finally, the future perspectives about the roles of oxygen on brain and NSCs were given. PMID:21503147

  13. The contractile vacuole as a key regulator of cellular water flow in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Komsic-Buchmann, Karin; Wöstehoff, Luisa; Becker, Burkhard

    2014-11-01

    Most freshwater flagellates use contractile vacuoles (CVs) to expel excess water. We have used Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a green model system to investigate CV function during adaptation to osmotic changes in culture medium. We show that the contractile vacuole in Chlamydomonas is regulated in two different ways. The size of the contractile vacuoles increases during cell growth, with the contraction interval strongly depending on the osmotic strength of the medium. In contrast, there are only small fluctuations in cytosolic osmolarity and plasma membrane permeability. Modeling of the CV membrane permeability indicates that only a small osmotic gradient is necessary for water flux into the CV, which most likely is facilitated by the aquaporin major intrinsic protein 1 (MIP1). We show that MIP1 is localized to the contractile vacuole, and that the expression rate and protein level of MIP1 exhibit only minor fluctuations under different osmotic conditions. In contrast, SEC6, a protein of the exocyst complex that is required for the water expulsion step, and a dynamin-like protein are upregulated under strong hypotonic conditions. The overexpression of a CreMIP1-GFP construct did not change the physiology of the CV. The functional implications of these results are discussed. PMID:25217463

  14. Histone demethylase KDM5B is a key regulator of genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Liu, Ling; Yang, Shangda; Song, Nan; Zhou, Xing; Gao, Jie; Yu, Na; Shan, Lin; Wang, Qian; Liang, Jing; Xuan, Chenghao; Wang, Yan; Shang, Yongfeng; Shi, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of genomic stability is essential for normal organismal development and is vital to prevent diseases such as cancer. As genetic information is packaged into chromatin, it has become increasingly clear that the chromatin environment plays an important role in DNA damage response. However, how DNA repair is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms is not fully understood. Here we report the identification and characterization of lysine-specific histone demethylase 5B (KDM5B), a member of the JmjC domain-containing histone demethylases, as an important player in multiple aspects of DNA double-strand break (DSB) response in human cells. We found that KDM5B becomes enriched in DNA-damage sites after ironizing radiation and endonuclease treatment in a poly(ADP ribose) polymerase 1- and histone variant macroH2A1.1-dependent manner. We showed that KDM5B is required for efficient DSB repair and for the recruitment of Ku70 and BRCA1, the essential component of nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination, respectively. Significantly, KDM5B deficiency disengages the DNA repair process, promotes spontaneous DNA damage, activates p53 signaling, and sensitizes cells to genotoxic insults. Our results suggest that KDM5B is a bona fide DNA damage response protein and indicate that KDM5B is an important genome caretaker and a critical regulator of genome stability, adding to the understanding of the roles of epigenetics in the maintenance of genetic fidelity. PMID:24778210

  15. The Contractile Vacuole as a Key Regulator of Cellular Water Flow in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Komsic-Buchmann, Karin; Wöstehoff, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Most freshwater flagellates use contractile vacuoles (CVs) to expel excess water. We have used Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a green model system to investigate CV function during adaptation to osmotic changes in culture medium. We show that the contractile vacuole in Chlamydomonas is regulated in two different ways. The size of the contractile vacuoles increases during cell growth, with the contraction interval strongly depending on the osmotic strength of the medium. In contrast, there are only small fluctuations in cytosolic osmolarity and plasma membrane permeability. Modeling of the CV membrane permeability indicates that only a small osmotic gradient is necessary for water flux into the CV, which most likely is facilitated by the aquaporin major intrinsic protein 1 (MIP1). We show that MIP1 is localized to the contractile vacuole, and that the expression rate and protein level of MIP1 exhibit only minor fluctuations under different osmotic conditions. In contrast, SEC6, a protein of the exocyst complex that is required for the water expulsion step, and a dynamin-like protein are upregulated under strong hypotonic conditions. The overexpression of a CreMIP1-GFP construct did not change the physiology of the CV. The functional implications of these results are discussed. PMID:25217463

  16. Quantitative image analysis identifies pVHL as a key regulator of microtubule dynamic instability.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Claudio R; Matov, Alexandre; Gutbrodt, Katrin L; Hoerner, Christian R; Smole, Zlatko; Krek, Wilhelm; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2010-09-20

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene mutations predispose carriers to kidney cancer. The protein pVHL has been shown to interact with microtubules (MTs), which is critical to cilia maintenance and mitotic spindle orientation. However, the function for pVHL in the regulation of MT dynamics is unknown. We tracked MT growth via the plus end marker EB3 (end-binding protein 3)-GFP and inferred additional parameters of MT dynamics indirectly by spatiotemporal grouping of growth tracks from live cell imaging. Our data establish pVHL as a near-optimal MT-stabilizing protein: it attenuates tubulin turnover, both during MT growth and shrinkage, inhibits catastrophe, and enhances rescue frequencies. These functions are mediated, in part, by inhibition of tubulin guanosine triphosphatase activity in vitro and at MT plus ends and along the MT lattice in vivo. Mutants connected to the VHL cancer syndrome are differentially compromised in these activities. Thus, single cell-level analysis of pVHL MT regulatory function allows new predictions for genotype to phenotype associations that deviate from the coarser clinically defined mutant classifications. PMID:20855504

  17. Mevalonate Biosynthesis Intermediates Are Key Regulators of Innate Immunity in Bovine Endometritis

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Christine; Griffin, Sholeem; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Sandra, Olivier; Smith, David G.; Mahan, Suman; Dieuzy-Labaye, Isabelle; Sheldon, I. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic changes can influence inflammatory responses to bacteria. To examine whether localized manipulation of the mevalonate pathway impacts innate immunity, we exploited a unique mucosal disease model, endometritis, where inflammation is a consequence of innate immunity. IL responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS were modulated in bovine endometrial cell and organ cultures by small molecules that target the mevalonate pathway. Treatment with multiple statins, bisphosphonates, squalene synthase inhibitors, and small interfering RNA showed that inhibition of farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyl transferase (squalene synthase), but not 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase or farnesyl diphosphate synthase, reduced endometrial organ and cellular inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS. Although manipulation of the mevalonate pathway reduced cellular cholesterol, impacts on inflammation were independent of cholesterol concentration as cholesterol depletion using cyclodextrins did not alter inflammatory responses. Treatment with the isoprenoid mevalonate pathway-intermediates, farnesyl diphosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate, also reduced endometrial cellular inflammatory responses to LPS. These data imply that manipulating the mevalonate pathway regulates innate immunity within the endometrium, and that isoprenoids are regulatory molecules in this process, knowledge that could be exploited for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26673142

  18. Erk5 Is a Key Regulator of Naive-Primed Transition and Embryonic Stem Cell Identity.

    PubMed

    Williams, Charles A C; Fernandez-Alonso, Rosalia; Wang, Jinhua; Toth, Rachel; Gray, Nathanael S; Findlay, Greg M

    2016-08-16

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can self-renew or differentiate into any cell type, a phenomenon known as pluripotency. Distinct pluripotent states, termed naive and primed pluripotency, have been described. However, the mechanisms that control naive-primed pluripotent transition are poorly understood. Here, we perform a targeted screen for kinase inhibitors, which modulate the naive-primed pluripotent transition. We find that XMD compounds, which selectively inhibit Erk5 kinase and BET bromodomain family proteins, drive ESCs toward primed pluripotency. Using compound selectivity engineering and CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing, we reveal distinct functions for Erk5 and Brd4 in pluripotency regulation. We show that Erk5 signaling maintains ESCs in the naive state and suppresses progression toward primed pluripotency and neuroectoderm differentiation. Additionally, we identify a specialized role for Erk5 in defining ESC lineage selection, whereby Erk5 inhibits a cardiomyocyte-specific differentiation program. Our data therefore reveal multiple critical functions for Erk5 in controlling ESC identity. PMID:27498864

  19. Estrogen-related receptor gamma is a key regulator of muscle mitochondrial activity and oxidative capacity.

    PubMed

    Rangwala, Shamina M; Wang, Xiaomei; Calvo, Jennifer A; Lindsley, Loren; Zhang, Yunyu; Deyneko, Galina; Beaulieu, Valerie; Gao, Jiaping; Turner, Gordon; Markovits, Judit

    2010-07-16

    Estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRgamma) regulates the perinatal switch to oxidative metabolism in the myocardium. We wanted to understand the significance of induction of ERRgamma expression in skeletal muscle by exercise. Muscle-specific VP16ERRgamma transgenic mice demonstrated an increase in exercise capacity, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and enlarged mitochondria despite lower muscle weights. Furthermore, peak oxidative capacity was higher in the transgenics as compared with control littermates. In contrast, mice lacking one copy of ERRgamma exhibited decreased exercise capacity and muscle mitochondrial function. Interestingly, we observed that increased ERRgamma in muscle generates a gene expression profile that closely overlays that of red oxidative fiber-type muscle. We further demonstrated that a small molecule agonist of ERRbeta/gamma can increase mitochondrial function in mouse myotubes. Our data indicate that ERRgamma plays an important role in causing a shift toward slow twitch muscle type and, concomitantly, a greater capacity for endurance exercise. Thus, the activation of this nuclear receptor provides a potential node for therapeutic intervention for diseases such as obesity, which is associated with reduced oxidative metabolism and a lower type I fiber content in skeletal muscle. PMID:20418374

  20. Estrogen-related Receptor γ Is a Key Regulator of Muscle Mitochondrial Activity and Oxidative Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Rangwala, Shamina M.; Wang, Xiaomei; Calvo, Jennifer A.; Lindsley, Loren; Zhang, Yunyu; Deyneko, Galina; Beaulieu, Valerie; Gao, Jiaping; Turner, Gordon; Markovits, Judit

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) regulates the perinatal switch to oxidative metabolism in the myocardium. We wanted to understand the significance of induction of ERRγ expression in skeletal muscle by exercise. Muscle-specific VP16ERRγ transgenic mice demonstrated an increase in exercise capacity, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and enlarged mitochondria despite lower muscle weights. Furthermore, peak oxidative capacity was higher in the transgenics as compared with control littermates. In contrast, mice lacking one copy of ERRγ exhibited decreased exercise capacity and muscle mitochondrial function. Interestingly, we observed that increased ERRγ in muscle generates a gene expression profile that closely overlays that of red oxidative fiber-type muscle. We further demonstrated that a small molecule agonist of ERRβ/γ can increase mitochondrial function in mouse myotubes. Our data indicate that ERRγ plays an important role in causing a shift toward slow twitch muscle type and, concomitantly, a greater capacity for endurance exercise. Thus, the activation of this nuclear receptor provides a potential node for therapeutic intervention for diseases such as obesity, which is associated with reduced oxidative metabolism and a lower type I fiber content in skeletal muscle. PMID:20418374

  1. Key diffusion mechanisms involved in regulating bidirectional water permeation across E. coli outer membrane lectin

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Shivangi; Kolimi, Narendar; Nair, Sanjana Anilkumar; Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi

    2016-01-01

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) are major bacterial virulent determinants that facilitate host immune evasion. E. coli group1 K30CPS is noncovalently attached to bacterial surface by Wzi, a lectin. Intriguingly, structure based phylogenetic analysis indicates that Wzi falls into porin superfamily. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations further shed light on dual role of Wzi as it also functions as a bidirectional passive water specific porin. Such a functional role of Wzi was not realized earlier, due to the occluded pore. While five water specific entry points distributed across extracellular & periplasmic faces regulate the water diffusion involving different mechanisms, a luminal hydrophobic plug governs water permeation across the channel. Coincidently, MD observed open state structure of “YQF” triad is seen in sugar-binding site of sodium-galactose cotransporters, implicating its involvement in K30CPS surface anchorage. Importance of Loop 5 (L5) in membrane insertion is yet another highlight. Change in water diffusion pattern of periplasmic substitution mutants suggests Wzi’s role in osmoregulation by aiding in K30CPS hydration, corroborating earlier functional studies. Water molecules located inside β-barrel of Wzi crystal structure further strengthens the role of Wzi in osmoregulation. Thus, interrupting water diffusion or L5 insertion may reduce bacterial virulence. PMID:27320406

  2. Mevalonate Biosynthesis Intermediates Are Key Regulators of Innate Immunity in Bovine Endometritis.

    PubMed

    Healey, Gareth D; Collier, Christine; Griffin, Sholeem; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Sandra, Olivier; Smith, David G; Mahan, Suman; Dieuzy-Labaye, Isabelle; Sheldon, I Martin

    2016-01-15

    Metabolic changes can influence inflammatory responses to bacteria. To examine whether localized manipulation of the mevalonate pathway impacts innate immunity, we exploited a unique mucosal disease model, endometritis, where inflammation is a consequence of innate immunity. IL responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS were modulated in bovine endometrial cell and organ cultures by small molecules that target the mevalonate pathway. Treatment with multiple statins, bisphosphonates, squalene synthase inhibitors, and small interfering RNA showed that inhibition of farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyl transferase (squalene synthase), but not 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase or farnesyl diphosphate synthase, reduced endometrial organ and cellular inflammatory responses to pathogenic bacteria and LPS. Although manipulation of the mevalonate pathway reduced cellular cholesterol, impacts on inflammation were independent of cholesterol concentration as cholesterol depletion using cyclodextrins did not alter inflammatory responses. Treatment with the isoprenoid mevalonate pathway-intermediates, farnesyl diphosphate and geranylgeranyl diphosphate, also reduced endometrial cellular inflammatory responses to LPS. These data imply that manipulating the mevalonate pathway regulates innate immunity within the endometrium, and that isoprenoids are regulatory molecules in this process, knowledge that could be exploited for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26673142

  3. Hic-5 mediates the initiation of endothelial sprouting by regulating a key surface metalloproteinase.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jui M; Abbey, Colette A; Duran, Camille L; Seo, Heewon; Johnson, Gregory A; Bayless, Kayla J

    2016-02-15

    During angiogenesis, endothelial cells must coordinate matrix proteolysis with migration. Here, we tested whether the focal adhesion scaffold protein Hic-5 (also known as TGFB1I1) regulated endothelial sprouting in three dimensions. Hic-5 silencing reduced endothelial sprouting and lumen formation, and sprouting defects were rescued by the return of Hic-5 expression. Pro-angiogenic factors enhanced colocalization and complex formation between membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP, also known as MMP14) and Hic-5, but not between paxillin and MT1-MMP. The LIM2 and LIM3 domains of Hic-5 were necessary and sufficient for Hic-5 to form a complex with MT1-MMP. The degree of interaction between MT1-MMP and Hic-5 and the localization of the complex within detergent-resistant membrane fractions were enhanced during endothelial sprouting, and Hic-5 depletion lowered the surface levels of MT1-MMP. In addition, we observed that loss of Hic-5 partially reduced complex formation between MT1-MMP and focal adhesion kinase (FAK, also known as PTK2), suggesting that Hic-5 bridges MT1-MMP and FAK. Finally, Hic-5 LIM2-LIM3 deletion mutants reduced sprout initiation. Hic-5, MT1-MMP and FAK colocalized in angiogenic vessels during porcine pregnancy, supporting that this complex assembles during angiogenesis in vivo. Collectively, Hic-5 appears to enhance complex formation between MT1-MMP and FAK in activated endothelial cells, which likely coordinates matrix proteolysis and cell motility. PMID:26769900

  4. The physical size of transcription factors is key to transcriptional regulation in chromatin domains.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Kaizu, Kazunari; Tamura, Sachiko; Nozaki, Tadasu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-02-18

    Genetic information, which is stored in the long strand of genomic DNA as chromatin, must be scanned and read out by various transcription factors. First, gene-specific transcription factors, which are relatively small (∼50 kDa), scan the genome and bind regulatory elements. Such factors then recruit general transcription factors, Mediators, RNA polymerases, nucleosome remodellers, and histone modifiers, most of which are large protein complexes of 1-3 MDa in size. Here, we propose a new model for the functional significance of the size of transcription factors (or complexes) for gene regulation of chromatin domains. Recent findings suggest that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres (10 nm fibres) and forms numerous condensed domains (e.g., topologically associating domains). Although the flexibility and dynamics of chromatin allow repositioning of genes within the condensed domains, the size exclusion effect of the domain may limit accessibility of DNA sequences by transcription factors. We used Monte Carlo computer simulations to determine the physical size limit of transcription factors that can enter condensed chromatin domains. Small gene-specific transcription factors can penetrate into the chromatin domains and search their target sequences, whereas large transcription complexes cannot enter the domain. Due to this property, once a large complex binds its target site via gene-specific factors it can act as a 'buoy' to keep the target region on the surface of the condensed domain and maintain transcriptional competency. This size-dependent specialization of target-scanning and surface-tethering functions could provide novel insight into the mechanisms of various DNA transactions, such as DNA replication and repair/recombination. PMID:25563431

  5. The physical size of transcription factors is key to transcriptional regulation in chromatin domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Kaizu, Kazunari; Tamura, Sachiko; Nozaki, Tadasu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-02-01

    Genetic information, which is stored in the long strand of genomic DNA as chromatin, must be scanned and read out by various transcription factors. First, gene-specific transcription factors, which are relatively small (˜50 kDa), scan the genome and bind regulatory elements. Such factors then recruit general transcription factors, Mediators, RNA polymerases, nucleosome remodellers, and histone modifiers, most of which are large protein complexes of 1-3 MDa in size. Here, we propose a new model for the functional significance of the size of transcription factors (or complexes) for gene regulation of chromatin domains. Recent findings suggest that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres (10 nm fibres) and forms numerous condensed domains (e.g., topologically associating domains). Although the flexibility and dynamics of chromatin allow repositioning of genes within the condensed domains, the size exclusion effect of the domain may limit accessibility of DNA sequences by transcription factors. We used Monte Carlo computer simulations to determine the physical size limit of transcription factors that can enter condensed chromatin domains. Small gene-specific transcription factors can penetrate into the chromatin domains and search their target sequences, whereas large transcription complexes cannot enter the domain. Due to this property, once a large complex binds its target site via gene-specific factors it can act as a ‘buoy’ to keep the target region on the surface of the condensed domain and maintain transcriptional competency. This size-dependent specialization of target-scanning and surface-tethering functions could provide novel insight into the mechanisms of various DNA transactions, such as DNA replication and repair/recombination.

  6. Etv2 and Fli1b Function Together as Key Regulators of Vasculogenesis and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Michael P.; Grajevskaja, Viktorija; Liao, Hsin-Kai; Balciuniene, Jorune; Ekker, Stephen C.; Park, Joo-Seop; Essner, Jeffrey J.; Balciunas, Darius; Sumanas, Saulius

    2015-01-01

    Objective The E26 transformation-specific domain transcription factor Etv2/Etsrp/ER71 is a master regulator of vascular endothelial differentiation during vasculogenesis, although its later role in sprouting angiogenesis remains unknown. Here, we investigated in the zebrafish model a role for Etv2 and related E26 transformation-specific factors, Fli1a and Fli1b in developmental angiogenesis. Approach and Results Zebrafish fli1a and fli1b mutants were obtained using transposon-mediated gene trap approach. Individual fli1a and fli1b homozygous mutant embryos display normal vascular patterning, yet the angiogenic recovery observed in older etv2 mutant embryos does not occur in embryos lacking both etv2 and fli1b. Etv2 and fli1b double-deficient embryos fail to form any angiogenic sprouts and show greatly increased apoptosis throughout the axial vasculature. In contrast, fli1a mutation did not affect the recovery of etv2 mutant phenotype. Overexpression analyses indicate that both etv2 and fli1b, but not fli1a, induce the expression of multiple vascular markers and of each other. Temporal inhibition of Etv2 function using photoactivatable morpholinos indicates that the function of Etv2 and Fli1b during angiogenesis is independent from the early requirement of Etv2 during vasculogenesis. RNA-Seq analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation suggest that Etv2 and Fli1b share the same transcriptional targets and bind to the same E26 transformation-specific sites. Conclusions Our data argue that there are 2 phases of early vascular development with distinct requirements of E26 transformation-specific transcription factors. Etv2 alone is required for early vasculogenesis, whereas Etv2 and Fli1b function redundantly during late vasculogenesis and early embryonic angiogenesis. PMID:25722433

  7. Sphingolipids: Key Regulators of Apoptosis and Pivotal Players in Cancer Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Giussani, Paola; Tringali, Cristina; Riboni, Laura; Viani, Paola; Venerando, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance elicited by cancer cells still constitutes a huge problem that frequently impairs the efficacy of both conventional and novel molecular therapies. Chemotherapy usually acts to induce apoptosis in cancer cells; therefore, the investigation of apoptosis control and of the mechanisms used by cancer cells to evade apoptosis could be translated in an improvement of therapies. Among many tools acquired by cancer cells to this end, the de-regulated synthesis and metabolism of sphingolipids have been well documented. Sphingolipids are known to play many structural and signalling roles in cells, as they are involved in the control of growth, survival, adhesion, and motility. In particular, in order to increase survival, cancer cells: (a) counteract the accumulation of ceramide that is endowed with pro-apoptotic potential and is induced by many drugs; (b) increase the synthesis of sphingosine-1-phosphate and glucosylceramide that are pro-survivals signals; (c) modify the synthesis and the metabolism of complex glycosphingolipids, particularly increasing the levels of modified species of gangliosides such as 9-O acetylated GD3 (αNeu5Ac(2-8)αNeu5Ac(2-3)βGal(1-4)βGlc(1-1)Cer) or N-glycolyl GM3 (αNeu5Ac (2-3)βGal(1-4)βGlc(1-1)Cer) and de-N-acetyl GM3 (NeuNH(2)βGal(1-4)βGlc(1-1)Cer) endowed with anti-apoptotic roles and of globoside Gb3 related to a higher expression of the multidrug resistance gene MDR1. In light of this evidence, the employment of chemical or genetic approaches specifically targeting sphingolipid dysregulations appears a promising tool for the improvement of current chemotherapy efficacy. PMID:24625663

  8. Chemokines and Their Receptors Are Key Players in the Orchestra That Regulates Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Green, Manuela; Petreaca, Melissa; Wang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Significance Normal wound healing progresses through a series of overlapping phases, all of which are coordinated and regulated by a variety of molecules, including chemokines. Because these regulatory molecules play roles during the various stages of healing, alterations in their presence or function can lead to dysregulation of the wound-healing process, potentially leading to the development of chronic, nonhealing wounds. Recent Advances A discovery that chemokines participate in a variety of disease conditions has propelled the study of these proteins to a level that potentially could lead to new avenues to treat disease. Their small size, exposed termini, and the fact that their only modifications are two disulfide bonds make them excellent targets for manipulation. In addition, because they bind to G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), they are highly amenable to pharmacological modulation. Critical Issues Chemokines are multifunctional, and in many situations, their functions are highly dependent on the microenvironment. Moreover, each specific chemokine can bind to several GPCRs to stimulate the function, and both can function as monomers, homodimers, heterodimers, and even oligomers. Activation of one receptor by any single chemokine can lead to desensitization of other chemokine receptors, or even other GPCRs in the same cell, with implications for how these proteins or their receptors could be used to manipulate function. Future Directions Investment in better understanding of the functions of chemokines and their receptors in a local context can reveal new ways for therapeutic intervention. Understanding how different chemokines can activate the same receptor and vice versa could identify new possibilities for drug development based on their heterotypic interactions. PMID:24587971

  9. Krüppel-like Factor 15 (KLF15) Is a Key Regulator of Podocyte Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Mallipattu, Sandeep K.; Liu, Ruijie; Zheng, Feng; Narla, Goutham; Ma'ayan, Avi; Dikman, Steven; Jain, Mukesh K.; Saleem, Moin; D'Agati, Vivette; Klotman, Paul; Chuang, Peter Y.; He, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Podocyte injury resulting from a loss of differentiation is the hallmark of many glomerular diseases. We previously showed that retinoic acid (RA) induces podocyte differentiation via stimulation of the cAMP pathway. However, many podocyte maturity markers lack binding sites for RA-response element or cAMP-response element (CREB) in their promoter regions. We hypothesized that transcription factors induced by RA and downstream of CREB mediate podocyte differentiation. We performed microarray gene expression studies in human podocytes treated with and without RA to identify differentially regulated genes. In comparison with known CREB target genes, we identified Krüppel-like factor 15 (KLF15), a kidney-enriched nuclear transcription factor, that has been previously shown to mediate cell differentiation. We confirmed that RA increased KLF15 expression in both murine and human podocytes. Overexpression of KLF15 stimulated expression of differentiation markers in both wild-type and HIV-1-infected podocytes. Also, KLF15 binding to the promoter regions of nephrin and podocin was increased in RA-treated podocytes. Although KLF15−/− mice at base line had minimal phenotype, lipopolysaccharide- or adriamycin-treated KLF15−/− mice had a significant increase in proteinuria and podocyte foot process effacement with a reduction in the expression of podocyte differentiation markers as compared with the wild-type treated mice. Finally, KLF15 expression was reduced in glomeruli isolated from HIV transgenic mice as well as in kidney biopsies from patients with HIV-associated nephropathy and idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. These results indicate a critical role of KLF15 in mediating podocyte differentiation and in protecting podocytes against injury. PMID:22493483

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase-1 functions regulate key aspects of the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Seregin, Sergey S; Rastall, David P W; Aylsworth, Charles F; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Busuito, Christopher J; Godbehere-Roosa, Sarah; Kim, Sungjin; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase-1 (ERAP1) is a multifunctional, ubiquitously expressed enzyme whose peptide-trimming role during antigen processing for presentation by MHC I molecules is well established, however, a role for ERAP1 in modulating global innate immune responses has not been described to date. Here we demonstrate that, relative to wild type mice, mice lacking ERAP1 exhibit exaggerated innate immune responses early during pathogen recognition, as characterized by increased activation of splenic and hepatic NK and NKT cells and enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL12 and MCP1. Our data also revealed that ERAP1 is playing a critical role in NK cell development and function. We observed higher frequencies of terminally matured NK cells, as well as higher frequencies of licensed NK cells (expressing the Ly49C and Ly49I receptors) in ERAP1-KO mice, results that positively correlated with an enhanced NK activation and IFNγ production by ERAP1-KO mice challenged with pro-inflammatory stimuli. Furthermore, during pathogen recognition, ERAP1 regulates IL12 production by CD11c(+) DCs specifically, with increases in IL12 production positively correlated with an increased phagocytic activity of splenic DCs and macrophages. Collectively, our results demonstrate a previously unrecognized, more central role for the ERAP1 protein in modulating several aspects of both the development of the innate immune system, and its responses during the initial stages of pathogen recognition. Such a role may explain why ERAP1 has been implicated by GWAS in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases that may be precipitated by aberrant responses to pathogen encounters. PMID:23894499

  11. KDEL receptor 1 regulates T-cell homeostasis via PP1 that is a key phosphatase for ISR

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Daisuke; Katsunuma, Kokichi; Arima, Yasunobu; Atsumi, Toru; Jiang, Jing-jing; Bando, Hidenori; Meng, Jie; Sabharwal, Lavannya; Stofkova, Andrea; Nishikawa, Naoki; Suzuki, Hironao; Ogura, Hideki; Ueda, Naoko; Tsuruoka, Mineko; Harada, Masaya; Kobayashi, Junya; Hasegawa, Takanori; Yoshida, Hisahiro; Koseki, Haruhiko; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishida, Keigo; Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Fukada, Toshiyuki; Hirano, Toshio; Murakami, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    KDEL receptors are responsible for retrotransporting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones from the Golgi complex to the ER. Here we describe a role for KDEL receptor 1 (KDELR1) that involves the regulation of integrated stress responses (ISR) in T cells. Designing and using an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mutant mouse line, T-Red (naïve T-cell reduced), we show that a point mutation in KDELR1 is responsible for the reduction in the number of naïve T cells in this model owing to an increase in ISR. Mechanistic analysis shows that KDELR1 directly regulates protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a key phosphatase for ISR in naïve T cells. T-Red KDELR1 does not associate with PP1, resulting in reduced phosphatase activity against eIF2α and subsequent expression of stress responsive genes including the proapoptotic factor Bim. These results demonstrate that KDELR1 regulates naïve T-cell homeostasis by controlling ISR. PMID:26081938

  12. KDEL receptor 1 regulates T-cell homeostasis via PP1 that is a key phosphatase for ISR.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Daisuke; Katsunuma, Kokichi; Arima, Yasunobu; Atsumi, Toru; Jiang, Jing-jing; Bando, Hidenori; Meng, Jie; Sabharwal, Lavannya; Stofkova, Andrea; Nishikawa, Naoki; Suzuki, Hironao; Ogura, Hideki; Ueda, Naoko; Tsuruoka, Mineko; Harada, Masaya; Kobayashi, Junya; Hasegawa, Takanori; Yoshida, Hisahiro; Koseki, Haruhiko; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishida, Keigo; Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Fukada, Toshiyuki; Hirano, Toshio; Murakami, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    KDEL receptors are responsible for retrotransporting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones from the Golgi complex to the ER. Here we describe a role for KDEL receptor 1 (KDELR1) that involves the regulation of integrated stress responses (ISR) in T cells. Designing and using an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mutant mouse line, T-Red (naïve T-cell reduced), we show that a point mutation in KDELR1 is responsible for the reduction in the number of naïve T cells in this model owing to an increase in ISR. Mechanistic analysis shows that KDELR1 directly regulates protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a key phosphatase for ISR in naïve T cells. T-Red KDELR1 does not associate with PP1, resulting in reduced phosphatase activity against eIF2α and subsequent expression of stress responsive genes including the proapoptotic factor Bim. These results demonstrate that KDELR1 regulates naïve T-cell homeostasis by controlling ISR. PMID:26081938

  13. LrhA as a new transcriptional key regulator of flagella, motility and chemotaxis genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lehnen, D; Blumer, C; Polen, T; Wackwitz, B; Wendisch, V F; Unden, G

    2002-07-01

    The function of the LysR-type regulator LrhA of Escherichia coli was defined by comparing whole-genome mRNA profiles from wild-type E. coli and an isogenic lrhA mutant on a DNA microarray. In the lrhA mutant, a large number (48) of genes involved in flagellation, motility and chemotaxis showed relative mRNA abundances increased by factors between 3 and 80. When a representative set of five flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes was tested in lacZ reporter gene fusions, similar factors for derepression were found in the lrhA mutant. In gel retardation experiments, the LrhA protein bound specifically to flhD and lrhA promoter DNA (apparent K(D) approximately 20 nM), whereas the promoters of fliC, fliA and trg were not bound by LrhA. The expression of flhDC (encoding FlhD(2)C(2)) was derepressed by a factor of 3.5 in the lrhA mutant. FlhD(2)C(2) is known as the master regulator for the expression of flagellar and chemotaxis genes. By DNase I footprinting, LrhA binding sites at the flhDC and lrhA promoters were identified. The lrhA gene was under positive autoregulation by LrhA as shown by gel retardation and lrhA expression studies. It is suggested that LrhA is a key regulator controlling the transcription of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes by regulating the synthesis and concentration of FlhD(2)C(2). PMID:12123461

  14. Hyperosmotic stress regulates the distribution and stability of myocardin-related transcription factor, a key modulator of the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Ly, Donald L; Waheed, Faiza; Lodyga, Monika; Speight, Pam; Masszi, András; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Hersom, Maria; Pedersen, Stine F; Szászi, Katalin; Kapus, András

    2013-01-15

    Hyperosmotic stress initiates several adaptive responses, including the remodeling of the cytoskeleton. Besides maintaining structural integrity, the cytoskeleton has emerged as an important regulator of gene transcription. Myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), an actin-regulated coactivator of serum response factor, is a major link between the actin skeleton and transcriptional control. We therefore investigated whether MRTF is regulated by hyperosmotic stress. Here we show that hypertonicity induces robust, rapid, and transient translocation of MRTF from the cytosol to the nucleus in kidney tubular cells. We found that the hyperosmolarity-triggered MRTF translocation is mediated by the RhoA/Rho kinase (ROK) pathway. Moreover, the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor GEF-H1 is activated by hyperosmotic stress, and it is a key contributor to the ensuing RhoA activation and MRTF translocation, since siRNA-mediated GEF-H1 downregulation suppresses these responses. While the osmotically induced RhoA activation promotes nuclear MRTF accumulation, the concomitant activation of p38 MAP kinase mitigates this effect. Moderate hyperosmotic stress (600 mosM) drives MRTF-dependent transcription through the cis-element CArG box. Silencing or pharmacological inhibition of MRTF prevents the osmotic stimulation of CArG-dependent transcription and renders the cells susceptible to osmotic shock-induced structural damage. Interestingly, strong hyperosmolarity promotes proteasomal degradation of MRTF, concomitant with apoptosis. Thus, MRTF is an osmosensitive and osmoprotective transcription factor, whose intracellular distribution is regulated by the GEF-H1/RhoA/ROK and p38 pathways. However, strong osmotic stress destabilizes MRTF, concomitant with apoptosis, implying that hyperosmotically induced cell death takes precedence over epithelial-myofibroblast transition, a potential consequence of MRTF-mediated phenotypic reprogramming. PMID:23054059

  15. Hyperosmotic stress regulates the distribution and stability of myocardin-related transcription factor, a key modulator of the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Donald L.; Waheed, Faiza; Lodyga, Monika; Speight, Pam; Masszi, András; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Hersom, Maria; Pedersen, Stine F.; Szászi, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    Hyperosmotic stress initiates several adaptive responses, including the remodeling of the cytoskeleton. Besides maintaining structural integrity, the cytoskeleton has emerged as an important regulator of gene transcription. Myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), an actin-regulated coactivator of serum response factor, is a major link between the actin skeleton and transcriptional control. We therefore investigated whether MRTF is regulated by hyperosmotic stress. Here we show that hypertonicity induces robust, rapid, and transient translocation of MRTF from the cytosol to the nucleus in kidney tubular cells. We found that the hyperosmolarity-triggered MRTF translocation is mediated by the RhoA/Rho kinase (ROK) pathway. Moreover, the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor GEF-H1 is activated by hyperosmotic stress, and it is a key contributor to the ensuing RhoA activation and MRTF translocation, since siRNA-mediated GEF-H1 downregulation suppresses these responses. While the osmotically induced RhoA activation promotes nuclear MRTF accumulation, the concomitant activation of p38 MAP kinase mitigates this effect. Moderate hyperosmotic stress (600 mosM) drives MRTF-dependent transcription through the cis-element CArG box. Silencing or pharmacological inhibition of MRTF prevents the osmotic stimulation of CArG-dependent transcription and renders the cells susceptible to osmotic shock-induced structural damage. Interestingly, strong hyperosmolarity promotes proteasomal degradation of MRTF, concomitant with apoptosis. Thus, MRTF is an osmosensitive and osmoprotective transcription factor, whose intracellular distribution is regulated by the GEF-H1/RhoA/ROK and p38 pathways. However, strong osmotic stress destabilizes MRTF, concomitant with apoptosis, implying that hyperosmotically induced cell death takes precedence over epithelial-myofibroblast transition, a potential consequence of MRTF-mediated phenotypic reprogramming. PMID:23054059

  16. A mitochondrial RNAi screen defines cellular bioenergetic determinants and identifies an adenylate kinase as a key regulator of ATP levels

    PubMed Central

    Lanning, Nathan J.; Looyenga, Brendan D.; Kauffman, Audra L.; Niemi, Natalie M.; Sudderth, Jessica; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Altered cellular bioenergetics and mitochondrial function are major features of several diseases including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. Given this important link to human health, we sought to define proteins within mitochondria that are critical for maintaining homeostatic ATP levels. We screened an RNAi library targeting >1,000 nuclear-encoded genes whose protein products localize to the mitochondria in multiple metabolic conditions to examine their effect on cellular ATP levels. We identified a mechanism by which electron transport chain perturbation under glycolytic conditions increased ATP production through enhanced glycolytic flux; thereby highlighting the cellular potential for metabolic plasticity. Additionally, we identified a mitochondrial adenylate kinase (AK4) that regulates cellular ATP levels, AMPK signaling, and whose expression significantly correlates with glioma patient survival. As a result, this study maps the bioenergetic landscape of >1,000 mitochondrial proteins in the context of varied metabolic substrates and begins to link key metabolic genes with clinical outcome. PMID:24767988

  17. LEAFY COTYLEDON1, a Key Regulator of Seed Development, Is Expressed in Vegetative and Sexual Propagules of Selaginella moellendorffii

    PubMed Central

    Kirkbride, Ryan C.; Fischer, Robert L.; Harada, John J.

    2013-01-01

    LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) is a central regulator of seed development that plays a key role in controlling the maturation phase during which storage macromolecules accumulate and the embryo becomes tolerant of desiccation. We queried the genomes of seedless plants and identified a LEC1 homolog in the lycophyte, Selaginellamoellendorffii, but not in the bryophyte, Physcomitrellapatens. Genetic suppression experiments indicated that Selaginella LEC1 is the functional ortholog of Arabidopsis LEC1. Together, these results suggest that LEC1 originated at least 30 million years before the first seed plants appeared in the fossil record. The accumulation of Selaginella LEC1 RNA primarily in sexual and asexual reproductive structures suggests its involvement in cellular processes similar to those that occur during the maturation phase of seed development. PMID:23776713

  18. Aging is a primary risk factor for cardiac arrhythmias: disruption of intracellular Ca2+ regulation as a key suspect.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Fiona; Lancaster, Matthew K; Jones, Sandra A

    2011-08-01

    Aging is an inevitable time-dependent progression associated with a functional decline of the cardiovascular system even in 'healthy' individuals. Age positively correlates with an increasing risk of cardiac problems including arrhythmias. Not only the prevalence but also the severity of arrhythmias escalates with age. The reasons for this are multifactorial but dysregulation of intracellular calcium within the heart is likely to play a key role in initiating and perpetuating these life-threatening events. We now know that several aspects of cardiac calcium regulation significantly change with advancing age - changes that could produce electrical instability. Further development of knowledge of the mechanisms underlying these changes will allow us to reduce what currently is an inevitable increase in the incidence of arrhythmias in the elderly. PMID:21878050

  19. A core human primary tumor angiogenesis signature identifies the endothelial orphan receptor ELTD1 as a key regulator of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Masiero, Massimo; Simões, Filipa Costa; Han, Hee Dong; Snell, Cameron; Peterkin, Tessa; Bridges, Esther; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Wu, Sherry Yen-Yao; Pradeep, Sunila; Li, Demin; Han, Cheng; Dalton, Heather; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Tuynman, Jurriaan B; Mortensen, Neil; Li, Ji-Liang; Patient, Roger; Sood, Anil K; Banham, Alison H; Harris, Adrian L; Buffa, Francesca M

    2013-08-12

    Limited clinical benefits derived from anti-VEGF therapy have driven the identification of new targets involved in tumor angiogenesis. Here, we report an integrative meta-analysis to define the transcriptional program underlying angiogenesis in human cancer. This approach identified ELTD1, an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor whose expression is induced by VEGF/bFGF and repressed by DLL4 signaling. Extensive analysis of multiple cancer types demonstrates significant upregulation of ELTD1 in tumor-associated endothelial cells, with a higher expression correlating with favorable prognosis. Importantly, ELTD1 silencing impairs endothelial sprouting and vessel formation in vitro and in vivo, drastically reducing tumor growth and greatly improving survival. Collectively, these results provide insight into the regulation of tumor angiogenesis and highlight ELTD1 as key player in blood vessel formation. PMID:23871637

  20. Transcription Factor ATAF1 in Arabidopsis Promotes Senescence by Direct Regulation of Key Chloroplast Maintenance and Senescence Transcriptional Cascades.

    PubMed

    Garapati, Prashanth; Xue, Gang-Ping; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Balazadeh, Salma

    2015-07-01

    Senescence represents a fundamental process of late leaf development. Transcription factors (TFs) play an important role for expression reprogramming during senescence; however, the gene regulatory networks through which they exert their functions, and their physiological integration, are still largely unknown. Here, we identify the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) abscisic acid (ABA)- and hydrogen peroxide-activated TF Arabidopsis thaliana activating factor1 (ATAF1) as a novel upstream regulator of senescence. ATAF1 executes its physiological role by affecting both key chloroplast maintenance and senescence-promoting TFs, namely GOLDEN2-LIKE1 (GLK1) and ORESARA1 (Arabidopsis NAC092), respectively. Notably, while ATAF1 activates ORESARA1, it represses GLK1 expression by directly binding to their promoters, thereby generating a transcriptional output that shifts the physiological balance toward the progression of senescence. We furthermore demonstrate a key role of ATAF1 for ABA- and hydrogen peroxide-induced senescence, in accordance with a direct regulatory effect on ABA homeostasis genes, including nine-CIS-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase3 involved in ABA biosynthesis and ABC transporter G family member40, encoding an ABA transport protein. Thus, ATAF1 serves as a core transcriptional activator of senescence by coupling stress-related signaling with photosynthesis- and senescence-related transcriptional cascades. PMID:25953103

  1. Global Analysis of mRNA, Translation, and Protein Localization: Local Translation Is a Key Regulator of Cell Protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Mardakheh, Faraz K.; Paul, Angela; Kümper, Sandra; Sadok, Amine; Paterson, Hugh; Mccarthy, Afshan; Yuan, Yinyin; Marshall, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Polarization of cells into a protrusive front and a retracting cell body is the hallmark of mesenchymal-like cell migration. Many mRNAs are localized to protrusions, but it is unclear to what degree mRNA localization contributes toward protrusion formation. We performed global quantitative analysis of the distributions of mRNAs, proteins, and translation rates between protrusions and the cell body by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and quantitative proteomics. Our results reveal local translation as a key determinant of protein localization to protrusions. Accordingly, inhibition of local translation destabilizes protrusions and inhibits mesenchymal-like morphology. Interestingly, many mRNAs localized to protrusions are translationally repressed. Specific cis-regulatory elements within mRNA UTRs define whether mRNAs are locally translated or repressed. Finally, RNAi screening of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) enriched in protrusions revealed trans-regulators of localized translation that are functionally important for protrusions. We propose that by deciphering the localized mRNA UTR code, these proteins regulate protrusion stability and mesenchymal-like morphology. PMID:26555054

  2. The Regulation of Alfalfa Saponin Extract on Key Genes Involved in Hepatic Cholesterol Metabolism in Hyperlipidemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yinghua; Guo, Rui; Wang, Xianke; Yuan, Dedi; Zhang, Senhao; Wang, Jie; Yan, Xuebing; Wang, Chengzhang

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the cholesterol-lowering effects of alfalfa saponin extract (ASE) and its regulation mechanism on some key genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, 40 healthy 7 weeks old male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups with 10 rats in each group: control group, hyperlipidemic group, ASE treatment group, ASE prevention group. The body weight gain, relative liver weight and serum lipid 1evels of rats were determined. Total cholesterol (TC) and total bile acids (TBA) levels in liver and feces were also measured. Furthermore, the activity and mRNA expressions of Hmgcr, Acat2, Cyp7a1 and Ldlr were investigated. The results showed the following: (1) The abnormal serum lipid levels in hyperlipidemic rats were ameliorated by ASE administration (both ASE prevention group and treatment group) (P<0.05). (2) Both ASE administration to hyperlipidemic rats significantly reduced liver TC and increased liver TBA level (P<0.05). TC and TBA levels in feces of hyperlipidemic rats were remarkably elevated by both ASE administration (P<0.05). (3) mRNA expressions of Hmgcr and Acat2 in the liver of hyperlipidemic rats were remarkably down-regulated (P<0.05), as well as mRNA expressions of Cyp7a1 and Ldlr were dramatically up-regulated by both ASE administration (P<0.05). The activities of these enzymes also paralleled the observed changes in mRNA levels. (4) There was no significant difference between ASE treatment and ASE prevention group for most parameters evaluated. Our present study indicated that ASE had cholesterol-lowering effects. The possible mechanism could be attributed to (1) the down-regulation of Hmgcr and Acat2, as well as up-regulation of Cyp7a1 and Ldlr in the liver of hyperlipidemic rats, which was involved in cholesterol biosynthesis, uptake, and efflux pathway; (2) the increase in excretion of cholesterol. The findings in our study suggested ASE had great potential usefulness as a natural agent for treating hyperlipidemia. PMID

  3. Bcl-2 is a novel interacting partner for the 2-oxoglutarate carrier and a key regulator of mitochondrial glutathione.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Heather M; Marquardt, Kristin; Lash, Lawrence H; Linseman, Daniel A

    2012-01-15

    Despite making up only a minor fraction of the total cellular glutathione, recent studies indicate that the mitochondrial glutathione pool is essential for cell survival. Selective depletion of mitochondrial glutathione is sufficient to sensitize cells to mitochondrial oxidative stress (MOS) and intrinsic apoptosis. Glutathione is synthesized exclusively in the cytoplasm and must be actively transported into mitochondria. Therefore, regulation of mitochondrial glutathione transport is a key factor in maintaining the antioxidant status of mitochondria. Bcl-2 resides in the outer mitochondrial membrane where it acts as a central regulator of the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. In addition, Bcl-2 displays an antioxidant-like function that has been linked experimentally to the regulation of cellular glutathione content. We have previously demonstrated a novel interaction between recombinant Bcl-2 and reduced glutathione (GSH), which was antagonized by either Bcl-2 homology-3 domain (BH3) mimetics or a BH3-only protein, recombinant Bim. These previous findings prompted us to investigate if this novel Bcl-2/GSH interaction might play a role in regulating mitochondrial glutathione transport. Incubation of primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) with the BH3 mimetic HA14-1 induced MOS and caused specific depletion of the mitochondrial glutathione pool. Bcl-2 was coimmunoprecipitated with GSH after chemical cross-linking in CGNs and this Bcl-2/GSH interaction was antagonized by preincubation with HA14-1. Moreover, both HA14-1 and recombinant Bim inhibited GSH transport into isolated rat brain mitochondria. To further investigate a possible link between Bcl-2 function and mitochondrial glutathione transport, we next examined if Bcl-2 associated with the 2-oxoglutarate carrier (OGC), an inner mitochondrial membrane protein known to transport glutathione in liver and kidney. After cotransfection of CHO cells, Bcl-2 was coimmunoprecipitated with OGC and this novel

  4. Bcl-2 is a novel interacting partner for the 2-oxoglutarate carrier and a key regulator of mitochondrial glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Heather M.; Marquardt, Kristin; Lash, Lawrence H.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite making up only a minor fraction of the total cellular glutathione, recent studies indicate that the mitochondrial glutathione pool is essential for cell survival. Selective depletion of mitochondrial glutathione is sufficient to sensitize cells to mitochondrial oxidative stress (MOS)1 and intrinsic apoptosis. Glutathione is synthesized exclusively in the cytoplasm and must be actively transported into mitochondria. Therefore, regulation of mitochondrial glutathione transport is a key factor in maintaining the antioxidant status of mitochondria. Bcl-2 is resident in the outer mitochondrial membrane where it acts as a central regulator of the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. In addition, Bcl-2 displays an antioxidant-like function that has been linked experimentally to the regulation of cellular glutathione content. We have previously demonstrated a novel interaction between recombinant Bcl-2 and reduced glutathione (GSH) which was antagonized by either Bcl-2 homology-3 domain (BH3) mimetics or a BH3-only protein, recombinant Bim. These previous findings prompted us to investigate if this novel Bcl-2/GSH interaction might play a role in regulating mitochondrial glutathione transport. Incubation of primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) with the BH3 mimetic, HA14-1, induced MOS and caused specific depletion of the mitochondrial glutathione pool. Bcl-2 was co-immunoprecipitated with GSH following chemical cross-linking in CGNs and this Bcl-2/GSH interaction was antagonized by pre-incubation with HA14-1. Moreover, both HA14-1 and recombinant Bim inhibited GSH transport into isolated rat brain mitochondria. To further investigate a possible link between Bcl-2 function and mitochondrial glutathione transport, we next examined if Bcl-2 associated with the 2-oxoglutarate carrier (OGC), an inner mitochondrial membrane protein known to transport glutathione in liver and kidney. Following co-transfection of CHO cells, Bcl-2 was co-immunoprecipitated with OGC

  5. The Neuronal Kinesin UNC-104/KIF1A Is a Key Regulator of Synaptic Aging and Insulin Signaling-Regulated Memory.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Bo; Lei, Haoyun; Arey, Rachel N; Li, Pengpeng; Liu, Jianfeng; Murphy, Coleen T; Xu, X Z Shawn; Shen, Kang

    2016-03-01

    Aging is the greatest risk factor for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, normal aging is associated with a decline in sensory, motor, and cognitive functions. Emerging evidence suggests that synapse alterations, rather than neuronal cell death, are the causes of neuronal dysfunctions in normal aging and in early stages of neurodegenerative diseases. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying age-related synaptic decline. Here, we uncover a surprising role of the anterograde molecular motor UNC-104/KIF1A as a key regulator of neural circuit deterioration in aging C. elegans. Through analyses of synapse protein localization, synaptic transmission, and animal behaviors, we find that reduced function of UNC-104 accelerates motor circuit dysfunction with age, whereas upregulation of UNC-104 significantly improves motor function at advanced ages and also mildly extends lifespan. In addition, UNC-104-overexpressing animals outperform wild-type controls in associative learning and memory tests. Further genetic analyses suggest that UNC-104 functions downstream of the DAF-2-signaling pathway and is regulated by the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16, which contributes to the effects of DAF-2 in neuronal aging. Together, our cellular, electrophysiological, and behavioral analyses highlight the importance of axonal transport in the maintenance of synaptic structural integrity and function during aging and raise the possibility of targeting kinesins to slow age-related neural circuit dysfunction. PMID:26877087

  6. Transcriptome Analysis of Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Fibroblasts Reveals a Disease Extracellular Matrix Signature and Key Molecular Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Maria Angels; Jou, Cristina; Puigdelloses, Montserrat; Ortez, Carlos I.; Diaz-Manera, Jordi; Gallardo, Eduardo; Colomer, Jaume; Nascimento, Andrés; Kalko, Susana G.; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Background Collagen VI related myopathies encompass a range of phenotypes with involvement of skeletal muscle, skin and other connective tissues. They represent a severe and relatively common form of congenital disease for which there is no treatment. Collagen VI in skeletal muscle and skin is produced by fibroblasts. Aims & Methods In order to gain insight into the consequences of collagen VI mutations and identify key disease pathways we performed global gene expression analysis of dermal fibroblasts from patients with Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy with and without vitamin C treatment. The expression data were integrated using a range of systems biology tools. Results were validated by real-time PCR, western blotting and functional assays. Findings We found significant changes in the expression levels of almost 600 genes between collagen VI deficient and control fibroblasts. Highly regulated genes included extracellular matrix components and surface receptors, including integrins, indicating a shift in the interaction between the cell and its environment. This was accompanied by a significant increase in fibroblasts adhesion to laminin. The observed changes in gene expression profiling may be under the control of two miRNAs, miR-30c and miR-181a, which we found elevated in tissue and serum from patients and which could represent novel biomarkers for muscular dystrophy. Finally, the response to vitamin C of collagen VI mutated fibroblasts significantly differed from healthy fibroblasts. Vitamin C treatment was able to revert the expression of some key genes to levels found in control cells raising the possibility of a beneficial effect of vitamin C as a modulator of some of the pathological aspects of collagen VI related diseases. PMID:26670220

  7. A key hydrophobic patch identified in an AAA⁺ protein essential for its in trans inhibitory regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Simpson, Timothy; Lawton, Edward; Uzdavinys, Povilas; Joly, Nicolas; Burrows, Patricia; Buck, Martin

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial enhancer binding proteins (bEBPs) are a subclass of the AAA(+) (ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities) protein family. They are responsible for σ(54)-dependent transcription activation during infection and function under many stressful growth conditions. The majority of bEBPs are regulated in their formation of ring-shaped hexameric self-assemblies via an amino-terminal domain through its phosphorylation or ligand binding. In contrast, the Escherichia coli phage shock protein F (PspF) is negatively regulated in trans by phage shock protein A (PspA). Up to six PspA subunits suppress PspF hexamer action. Here, we present biochemical evidence that PspA engages across the side of a PspF hexameric ring. We identify three key binding determinants located in a surface-exposed 'W56 loop' of PspF, which form a tightly packed hydrophobic cluster, the 'YLW' patch. We demonstrate the profound impact of the PspF W56 loop residues on ATP hydrolysis, the σ(54) binding loop 1, and the self-association interface. We infer from single-chain studies that for complete PspF inhibition to occur, more than three PspA subunits need to bind a PspF hexamer with at least two binding to adjacent PspF subunits. By structural modelling, we propose that PspA binds to PspF via its first two helical domains. After PspF binding-induced conformational changes, PspA may then share structural similarities with a bEBP regulatory domain. PMID:23659791

  8. VdNUC-2, the Key Regulator of Phosphate Responsive Signaling Pathway, Is Required for Verticillium dahliae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Sheng; Wang, Cai-yue; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Qing; Lin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    In fungal cells, a phosphate (Pi) responsive signaling and metabolism (PHO) pathway regulates Pi-homeostasis. NUC-2/PHO81 and its homologs are one of the most important components in the regulation pathway. In soil-borne phytopathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae, we identified a Neurospora crassa nuc-2 homolog gene VdNUC-2. VdNUC-2 is composed of 1,018 amino acids, and is highly conserved in tested filamentous fungi. Under conditions of Pi-starvation, compared with the wild-type strain and ectopic complementation strains, the VdNUC-2 knocked out mutants exhibited reduced radial growth, decreased production of conidia and microsclerotia, and were more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide stress. The virulence of VdNUC-2 defective mutants was significantly compromised, and that was unable to be restored by exogenous application of extra Pi. Additionally, the deletion mutants of VdNUC-1, a key transcription factor gene positively controlled by VdNUC-2 in the PHO pathway, showed the similar cultural phenotypes as VdNUC-2 mutants when both of them grew in Pi-limited conditions. However, the virulence of VdNUC-1 mutants was comparable to the wild-type strain. These evidences indicated that the virulence reduction in VdNUC-2 mutants is not due to the interruptions in the PHO pathway or the disturbance of Pi-homeostasis in V. dahliae cytoplasm. VdNUC-2 is not only a crucial gene in the PHO pathway in V. dahliae, but also is required for the full virulence during host-infection. PMID:26670613

  9. Review: Leptin gene expression in the placenta--regulation of a key hormone in trophoblast proliferation and survival.

    PubMed

    Maymó, J L; Pérez Pérez, A; Gambino, Y; Calvo, J C; Sánchez-Margalet, V; Varone, C L

    2011-03-01

    Leptin is a 16000 MW protein originally described as an adipocyte-derived signaling molecule for the central control of metabolism. However, pleiotropic effects of leptin have been identified in reproduction and pregnancy. The leptin gene is expressed in placenta, where leptin promotes proliferation and survival of trophoblast cells. Study of the major signaling pathways known to be triggered by leptin receptor has revealed that leptin stimulates JAK/STAT, MAPK and PI3K pathways in placental cells. Leptin also exerts an antiapoptotic action in placenta and this effect is mediated by the MAPK pathway. Moreover, leptin stimulates protein synthesis by activating the translational machinery via both PI3K and MAPK pathways. Expression of leptin in placenta is highly regulated, suggesting that certain key pregnancy molecules participate in such regulation. An important hormone in reproduction, hCG, induces leptin expression in trophoblast cells and this effect involves the MAPK signal transduction pathway. Moreover, the cyclic nucleotide cAMP, which has profound actions upon human trophoblast function, also stimulates leptin expression and this effect seems to be mediated by crosstalk between the PKA and MAPK signaling pathways. Estrogens play a central role in reproduction. 17β-estradiol upregulates leptin expression in placental cells through genomic and non-genomic actions, probably via crosstalk between estrogen receptor-α and the MAPK and PI3K signal transduction pathways. Taken together these findings give a better understanding of the function of leptin and the regulatory mechanisms of leptin expression in human placental trophoblast and further support the importance of leptin in the biology of reproduction. PMID:21303721

  10. VdNUC-2, the Key Regulator of Phosphate Responsive Signaling Pathway, Is Required for Verticillium dahliae Infection.

    PubMed

    Deng, Sheng; Wang, Cai-yue; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Qing; Lin, Ling

    2015-01-01

    In fungal cells, a phosphate (Pi) responsive signaling and metabolism (PHO) pathway regulates Pi-homeostasis. NUC-2/PHO81 and its homologs are one of the most important components in the regulation pathway. In soil-borne phytopathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae, we identified a Neurospora crassa nuc-2 homolog gene VdNUC-2. VdNUC-2 is composed of 1,018 amino acids, and is highly conserved in tested filamentous fungi. Under conditions of Pi-starvation, compared with the wild-type strain and ectopic complementation strains, the VdNUC-2 knocked out mutants exhibited reduced radial growth, decreased production of conidia and microsclerotia, and were more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide stress. The virulence of VdNUC-2 defective mutants was significantly compromised, and that was unable to be restored by exogenous application of extra Pi. Additionally, the deletion mutants of VdNUC-1, a key transcription factor gene positively controlled by VdNUC-2 in the PHO pathway, showed the similar cultural phenotypes as VdNUC-2 mutants when both of them grew in Pi-limited conditions. However, the virulence of VdNUC-1 mutants was comparable to the wild-type strain. These evidences indicated that the virulence reduction in VdNUC-2 mutants is not due to the interruptions in the PHO pathway or the disturbance of Pi-homeostasis in V. dahliae cytoplasm. VdNUC-2 is not only a crucial gene in the PHO pathway in V. dahliae, but also is required for the full virulence during host-infection. PMID:26670613

  11. EphA2 is a key effector of the MEK/ERK/RSK pathway regulating glioblastoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hamaoka, Yuho; Negishi, Manabu; Katoh, Hironori

    2016-08-01

    EphA2, a member of the Eph receptor tyrosine kinases, is frequently overexpressed in a variety of malignancies, including glioblastoma, and its expression is correlated with poor prognosis. EphA2 acts as a tumor promoter through a ligand ephrin-independent mechanism, which requires phosphorylation of EphA2 on serine 897 (S897), leading to increased cell migration and invasion. In this study, we show that ligand-independent EphA2 signaling occurs downstream of the MEK/ERK/RSK pathway and mediates epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced cell proliferation in glioblastoma cells. Suppression of EphA2 expression by long-term exposure to ligand ephrinA1 or EphA2-targeted shRNA inhibited EGF-induced cell proliferation. Stimulation of the cells with EGF induced EphA2 S897 phosphorylation, which was suppressed by MEK and RSK inhibitors, but not by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt inhibitors. The RSK inhibitor or RSK2-targeted shRNA also suppressed EGF-induced cell proliferation. Furthermore, overexpression of wild-type EphA2 promoted cell proliferation without EGF stimulation, whereas overexpression of EphA2-S897A mutant suppressed EGF- or RSK2-induced proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that EphA2 is a key downstream target of the MEK/ERK/RSK signaling pathway in the regulation of glioblastoma cell proliferation. PMID:27132626

  12. The basal function of teleost prolactin as a key regulator on ion uptake identified with zebrafish knockout models

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yuqin; Lou, Qiyong; Dai, Ziru; Dai, Xiangyan; He, Jiangyan; Hu, Wei; Yin, Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is an anterior pituitary hormone with a broad range of functions. Its ability to stimulate lactogenesis, maternal behavior, growth and development, osmoregulation, and epithelial ion transport has been reported in many vertebrates. In our present study, we have targeted the zebrafish prl locus via transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). Two independent targeted mutant lines with premature termination of the putative sequence of PRL peptides were generated. All prl-deficient zebrafish progeny died at 6–16 days post-fertilization stage (dpf) in egg water. However, the prl-deficient larvae thrived and survived through adulthood in brackish water (5175 mg/L ocean salts), without obvious defects in somatic growth or reproduction. When raised in egg water, the expression levels of certain key Na+/Cl− cotransporters in the gills and Na+/K+-ATPase subunits, Na+/H+ exchangers and Na+/Cl− transporters in the pronephros of prl-deficient larvae were down-regulated at 5 dpf, which caused Na+/K+/Cl− uptake defects in the mutant fish at 6 dpf. Our present results demonstrate that the primary function of zebrafish prl is osmoregulation via governing the uptake and homeostasis of Na+, K+ and Cl−. Our study provides valuable evidence to understand the mechanisms of PRL function better through both phylogenetic and physiological perspectives. PMID:26726070

  13. The basal function of teleost prolactin as a key regulator on ion uptake identified with zebrafish knockout models.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yuqin; Lou, Qiyong; Dai, Ziru; Dai, Xiangyan; He, Jiangyan; Hu, Wei; Yin, Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is an anterior pituitary hormone with a broad range of functions. Its ability to stimulate lactogenesis, maternal behavior, growth and development, osmoregulation, and epithelial ion transport has been reported in many vertebrates. In our present study, we have targeted the zebrafish prl locus via transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). Two independent targeted mutant lines with premature termination of the putative sequence of PRL peptides were generated. All prl-deficient zebrafish progeny died at 6-16 days post-fertilization stage (dpf) in egg water. However, the prl-deficient larvae thrived and survived through adulthood in brackish water (5175 mg/L ocean salts), without obvious defects in somatic growth or reproduction. When raised in egg water, the expression levels of certain key Na(+)/Cl(-) cotransporters in the gills and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase subunits, Na(+)/H(+) exchangers and Na(+)/Cl(-) transporters in the pronephros of prl-deficient larvae were down-regulated at 5 dpf, which caused Na(+)/K(+)/Cl(-) uptake defects in the mutant fish at 6 dpf. Our present results demonstrate that the primary function of zebrafish prl is osmoregulation via governing the uptake and homeostasis of Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-). Our study provides valuable evidence to understand the mechanisms of PRL function better through both phylogenetic and physiological perspectives. PMID:26726070

  14. Screening Active Components from Yu-Ping-Feng-San for Regulating Initiative Key Factors in Allergic Sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhijie; Yu, Xi; Liu, Hailiang; Wang, Huizhu; Fan, Hongwei; Wang, Dawei; Jiang, Guorong; Hong, Min

    2014-01-01

    Yu-ping-feng-san (YPFS) is a Chinese medical formula that is used clinically for allergic diseases and characterized by reducing allergy relapse. Our previous studies demonstrated that YPFS efficiently inhibited T helper 2 cytokines in allergic inflammation. The underlying mechanisms of action of YPFS and its effective components remain unclear. In this study, it was shown that YPFS significantly inhibited production of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), an epithelial cell-derived initiative factor in allergic inflammation, in vitro and in vivo. A method of human bronchial epithelial cell (16HBE) binding combined with HPLC-MS (named 16HBE-HPLC-MS) was established to explore potential active components of YPFS. The following five components bound to 16HBE cells: calycosin-7-glucoside, ononin, claycosin, sec-o-glucosylhamaudol and formononetin. Serum from YPFS-treated mice was analyzed and three major components were detected claycosin, formononetin and cimifugin. Among these, claycosin and formononetin were detected by 16HBE-HPLC-MS and in the serum of YPFS-treated mice. Claycosin and formononetin decreased the level of TSLP markedly at the initial stage of allergic inflammation in vivo. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB, a key transcription factor in TSLP production, was also inhibited by claycosin and formononetin, either in terms of transcriptional activation or its nuclear translocation in vitro. Allergic inflammation was reduced by claycosin and formononetin when they are administered only at the initial stage in a murine model of atopic contact dermatitis. Thus, epithelial cell binding combined with HPLC-MS is a valid method for screening active components from complex mixtures of Chinese medicine. It was demonstrated that the compounds screened from YPFS significantly attenuated allergic inflammation probably by reducing TSLP production via regulating NF-κB activation. PMID:25198676

  15. Acidosis Is a key regulator of osteoblast ecto‐nucleotidase pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (NPP1) expression and activity

    PubMed Central

    Key, Michelle L.; Hajjawi, Mark O.R.; Millán, José L.; Arnett, Timothy R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous work has shown that acidosis prevents bone nodule formation by osteoblasts in vitro by inhibiting mineralisation of the collagenous matrix. The ratio of phosphate (Pi) to pyrophosphate (PPi) in the bone microenvironment is a fundamental regulator of bone mineralisation. Both Pi and PPi, a potent inhibitor of mineralisation, are generated from extracellular nucleotides by the actions of ecto‐nucleotidases. This study investigated the expression and activity of ecto‐nucleotidases by osteoblasts under normal and acid conditions. We found that osteoblasts express mRNA for a number of ecto‐nucleotidases including NTPdase 1–6 (ecto‐nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase) and NPP1‐3 (ecto‐nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase). The rank order of mRNA expression in differentiating rat osteoblasts (day 7) was Enpp1 > NTPdase 4 > NTPdase 6 > NTPdase 5 > alkaline phosphatase > ecto‐5‐nucleotidase > Enpp3 > NTPdase 1 > NTPdase 3 > Enpp2 > NTPdase 2. Acidosis (pH 6.9) upregulated NPP1 mRNA (2.8‐fold) and protein expression at all stages of osteoblast differentiation compared to physiological pH (pH 7.4); expression of other ecto‐nucleotidases was unaffected. Furthermore, total NPP activity was increased up to 53% in osteoblasts cultured in acid conditions (P < 0.001). Release of ATP, one of the key substrates for NPP1, from osteoblasts, was unaffected by acidosis. Further studies showed that mineralised bone formation by osteoblasts cultured from NPP1 knockout mice was increased compared with wildtypes (2.5‐fold, P < 0.001) and was partially resistant to the inhibitory effect of acidosis. These results indicate that increased NPP1 expression and activity might contribute to the decreased mineralisation observed when osteoblasts are exposed to acid conditions. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 3049–3056, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  16. Decreased levels of proapoptotic factors and increased key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis constitute new potential beneficial features of long-lived growth hormone receptor gene-disrupted mice.

    PubMed

    Gesing, Adam; Masternak, Michal M; Lewinski, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Kopchick, John J; Bartke, Andrzej

    2013-06-01

    Decreased somatotrophic signaling is among the most important mechanisms associated with extended longevity. Mice homozygous for the targeted disruption of the growth hormone (GH) receptor gene (GH receptor knockout; GHRKO) are obese and dwarf, are characterized by a reduced weight and body size, undetectable levels of GH receptor, high concentration of serum GH, and greatly reduced plasma levels of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I, and are remarkably long lived. Recent results suggest new features of GHRKO mice that may positively affect longevity-decreased levels of proapoptotic factors and increased levels of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. The alterations in levels of the proapoptotic factors and key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis were not further improved by two other potential life-extending interventions-calorie restriction and visceral fat removal. This may attribute the primary role to GH resistance in the regulation of apoptosis and mitochondrial biogenesis in GHRKO mice in terms of increased life span. PMID:23197187

  17. Microglial p38α MAPK is a key regulator of proinflammatory cytokine up-regulation induced by toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands or beta-amyloid (Aβ)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines from activated microglia has been implicated as an important contributor to pathophysiology progression in both acute and chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, it is critical to elucidate intracellular signaling pathways that are significant contributors to cytokine overproduction in microglia exposed to specific stressors, especially pathways amenable to drug interventions. The serine/threonine protein kinase p38α MAPK is a key enzyme in the parallel and convergent intracellular signaling pathways involved in stressor-induced production of IL-1β and TNFα in peripheral tissues, and is a drug development target for peripheral inflammatory diseases. However, much less is known about the quantitative importance of microglial p38α MAPK in stressor-induced cytokine overproduction, or the potential of microglial p38α MAPK to be a druggable target for CNS disorders. Therefore, we examined the contribution of microglial p38αMAPK to cytokine up-regulation, with a focus on the potential to suppress the cytokine increase by inhibition of the kinase with pharmacological or genetic approaches. Methods The microglial cytokine response to TLR ligands 2/3/4/7/8/9 or to Aβ1-42 was tested in the presence of a CNS-penetrant p38α MAPK inhibitor, MW01-2-069A-SRM. Primary microglia from mice genetically deficient in p38α MAPK were used to further establish a linkage between microglia p38α MAPK and cytokine overproduction. The in vivo significance was determined by p38α MAPK inhibitor treatment in a LPS-induced model of acute neuroinflammation. Results Increased IL-1β and TNFα production by the BV-2 microglial cell line and by primary microglia cultures was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the p38α MAPK-targeted inhibitor. Cellular target engagement was demonstrated by the accompanying decrease in the phosphorylation state of two p38α MAPK protein substrates, MK2 and MSK1. Consistent with the

  18. AP-1 Is a Key Regulator of Proinflammatory Cytokine TNFα-mediated Triple-negative Breast Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yichun; He, Huan; Jonsson, Philip; Sinha, Indranil; Zhao, Chunyan; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2016-03-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents a highly aggressive form of breast cancer with limited treatment options. Proinflammatory cytokines such as TNFα can facilitate tumor progression and metastasis. However, the mechanistic aspects of inflammation mediated TNBC progression remain unclear. Using ChIP-seq, we demonstrate that the cistrome for the AP-1 transcription factor c-Jun is comprised of 13,800 binding regions in TNFα-stimulated TNBC cells. In addition, we show that c-Jun regulates nearly a third of the TNFα-regulated transcriptome. Interestingly, high expression level of the c-Jun-regulated pro-invasion gene program is associated with poor clinical outcome in TNBCs. We further demonstrate that c-Jun drives TNFα-mediated increase of malignant characteristics of TNBC cells by transcriptional regulation of Ninj1. As exemplified by the CXC chemokine genes clustered on chromosome 4, we demonstrate that NF-κB might be a pioneer factor required for the regulation of TNFα-inducible inflammatory genes, whereas c-Jun has little effect. Together, our results uncover AP-1 as an important determinant for inflammation-induced cancer progression, rather than inflammatory response. PMID:26792858

  19. A regulating method for the distribution of phosphorus fractions based on environmental parameters related to the key phosphate-solubilizing bacteria during composting.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuquan; Wei, Zimin; Cao, Zhenyu; Zhao, Yue; Zhao, Xinyu; Lu, Qian; Wang, Xueqin; Zhang, Xu

    2016-07-01

    This study was conducted to assess the abundance, incidence and diversity of the culturable phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) community during different organic wastes composting. The key PSB affecting different phosphorus (P) fractions and their relationship with environmental variables were analyzed by redundancy analysis (RDA). The results showed that there were distinct differences in amounts, incidence and community composition of PSB for the composts from different sources. Regression analysis demonstrated significant corrections between the density and incidence of PSB and pH, temperature, OM and DOC/DON. Most of culturable PSB showed high percentages of identity with the phyla of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. There were thirteen key PSB correlated closely (p<0.05) with different P fractions variation. Conclusively, we suggested a process control method to regulate the distribution of P fractions during composting based on the relationship between the key PSB and P fractions as well as environmental parameters. PMID:27043056

  20. Using a large-scale knowledge database on reactions and regulations to propose key upstream regulators of various sets of molecules participating in cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Most of the existing methods to analyze high-throughput data are based on gene ontology principles, providing information on the main functions and biological processes. However, these methods do not indicate the regulations behind the biological pathways. A critical point in this context is the extraction of information from many possible relationships between the regulated genes, and its combination with biochemical regulations. This study aimed at developing an automatic method to propose a reasonable number of upstream regulatory candidates from lists of various regulated molecules by confronting experimental data with encyclopedic information. Results A new formalism of regulated reactions combining biochemical transformations and regulatory effects was proposed to unify the different mechanisms contained in knowledge libraries. Based on a related causality graph, an algorithm was developed to propose a reasonable set of upstream regulators from lists of target molecules. Scores were added to candidates according to their ability to explain the greatest number of targets or only few specific ones. By testing 250 lists of target genes as inputs, each with a known solution, the success of the method to provide the expected transcription factor among 50 or 100 proposed regulatory candidates, was evaluated to 62.6% and 72.5% of the situations, respectively. An additional prioritization among candidates might be further realized by adding functional ontology information. The benefit of this strategy was proved by identifying PPAR isotypes and their partners as the upstream regulators of a list of experimentally-identified targets of PPARA, a pivotal transcriptional factor in lipid oxidation. The proposed candidates participated in various biological functions that further enriched the original information. The efficiency of the method in merging reactions and regulations was also illustrated by identifying gene candidates participating in glucose

  1. Basic roles of key molecules connected with NMDAR signaling pathway on regulating learning and memory and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2016-01-01

    With key roles in essential brain functions ranging from the long-term potentiation (LTP) to synaptic plasticity, the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) can be considered as one of the fundamental glutamate receptors in the central nervous system. The role of NMDA R was first identified in synaptic plasticity and has been extensively studied. Some molecules, such as Ca(2+), postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95), calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II), protein kinase A (PKA), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsive element binding protein (CREB), are of special importance in learning and memory. This review mainly focused on the new research of key molecules connected with learning and memory, which played important roles in the NMDAR signaling pathway. PMID:27583167

  2. miR-340 predicts glioblastoma survival and modulates key cancer hallmarks through down-regulation of NRAS.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Danilo; Donnarumma, Elvira; Roscigno, Giuseppina; Iaboni, Margherita; Russo, Valentina; Affinito, Alessandra; Adamo, Assunta; De Martino, Fabio; Quintavalle, Cristina; Romano, Giulia; Greco, Adelaide; Soini, Ylermi; Brunetti, Arturo; Croce, Carlo M; Condorelli, Gerolama

    2016-04-12

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults; with a survival rate of 12 months from diagnosis. However, a small subgroup of patients, termed long-term survivors (LTS), has a survival rate longer then 12-14 months. There is thus increasing interest in the identification of molecular signatures predicting glioblastoma prognosis and in how to improve the therapeutic approach. Here, we report miR-340 as prognostic tumor-suppressor microRNA for glioblastoma. We analyzed microRNA expression in > 500 glioblastoma patients and found that although miR-340 is strongly down-regulated in glioblastoma overall, it is up-regulated in LTS patients compared to short-term survivors (STS). Indeed, miR-340 expression predicted better prognosis in glioblastoma patients. Coherently, overexpression of miR-340 in glioblastoma cells was found to produce a tumor-suppressive activity. We identified NRAS mRNA as a critical, direct target of miR-340: in fact, miR-340 negatively influenced multiple aspects of glioblastoma tumorigenesis by down-regulating NRAS and downstream AKT and ERK pathways. Thus, we demonstrate that expression of miR-340 in glioblastoma is responsible for a strong tumor-suppressive effect in LTS patients by down-regulating NRAS. miR-340 may thus represent a novel marker for glioblastoma diagnosis and prognosis, and may be developed into a tool to improve treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:26799668

  3. miR-340 predicts glioblastoma survival and modulates key cancer hallmarks through down-regulation of NRAS

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Danilo; Donnarumma, Elvira; Roscigno, Giuseppina; Iaboni, Margherita; Russo, Valentina; Affinito, Alessandra; Adamo, Assunta; De Martino, Fabio; Quintavalle, Cristina; Romano, Giulia; Greco, Adelaide; Soini, Ylermi; Brunetti, Arturo; Croce, Carlo M.; Condorelli, Gerolama

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults; with a survival rate of 12 months from diagnosis. However, a small subgroup of patients, termed long-term survivors (LTS), has a survival rate longer then 12–14 months. There is thus increasing interest in the identification of molecular signatures predicting glioblastoma prognosis and in how to improve the therapeutic approach. Here, we report miR-340 as prognostic tumor-suppressor microRNA for glioblastoma. We analyzed microRNA expression in > 500 glioblastoma patients and found that although miR-340 is strongly down-regulated in glioblastoma overall, it is up-regulated in LTS patients compared to short-term survivors (STS). Indeed, miR-340 expression predicted better prognosis in glioblastoma patients. Coherently, overexpression of miR-340 in glioblastoma cells was found to produce a tumor-suppressive activity. We identified NRAS mRNA as a critical, direct target of miR-340: in fact, miR-340 negatively influenced multiple aspects of glioblastoma tumorigenesis by down-regulating NRAS and downstream AKT and ERK pathways. Thus, we demonstrate that expression of miR-340 in glioblastoma is responsible for a strong tumor-suppressive effect in LTS patients by down-regulating NRAS. miR-340 may thus represent a novel marker for glioblastoma diagnosis and prognosis, and may be developed into a tool to improve treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:26799668

  4. HrcT Is a Key Component of the Type III Secretion System in Xanthomonas spp. and Also Regulates the Expression of the Key hrp Transcriptional Activator HrpX

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Yang; Zou, Li-Fang; Xue, Xiao-Bo; Cai, Lu-Lu; Ma, Wen-Xiu; Xiong, Li; Ji, Zhi-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS), encoded by hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes in Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacteria, delivers repertoires of T3SS effectors (T3SEs) into plant cells to trigger the hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost or resistant-host plants and promote pathogenicity in susceptible plants. The expression of hrp genes in Xanthomonas is regulated by two key regulatory proteins, HrpG and HrpX. However, the interactions between hrp gene products in directing T3SE secretion are largely unknown. Here we demonstrated that HrcT of X. oryzae pv. oryzicola functions as a T3SS component and positively regulates the expression of hrpX. Transcription of hrcT occurs via two distinct promoters; one (T1) is with the hrpB operon and the second (T3) within hrpB7 Via either promoter T1 or T3, the defect in Hrp phenotype by hrcT deletion was corrected in the presence of hrcT only from Xanthomonas species but not from other phytopathogenic bacteria. An N-terminally truncated HrcT was able to bind the hrpX promoter and activate the expression of hrpX, supporting that HrcT is a positive regulator of hrpX. A revised model showing the regulatory interactions between HrcT, HrpX, and HrpG is proposed. PMID:24747909

  5. The bHLH transcription factor SPATULA is a key regulator of organ size in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Makkena, Srilakshmi; Lamb, Rebecca S.

    2013-01-01

    Plant organ size and thus plant size is determined by both cell proliferation and cell expansion. The bHLH transcription factor SPATULA (SPT) was originally identified as a regulator of carpel patterning. It has subsequently been found to control growth of the organs of the shoot. It does this at least in part by controlling the size of meristematic regions of organs in parallel to gibberellic acid (GA). It also acts downstream of several environmental signals, influencing growth in response to light and temperature. We have recently demonstrated that SPT functions to repress the size of the root meristem and thus root growth and size. It appears to do this using a similar mechanism to its control of leaf size. Based on the recent work on SPT, we propose that it is a growth repressor that acts to limit the size of meristems in response to environmental signals, perhaps by regulating auxin transport. PMID:23470719

  6. IGF-I: A Key Growth Factor that Regulates Neurogenesis and Synaptogenesis from Embryonic to Adult Stages of the Brain.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Estévez, Vanesa; Defterali, Çağla; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The generation of neurons in the adult mammalian brain requires the activation of quiescent neural stem cells (NSCs). This activation and the sequential steps of neuron formation from NSCs are regulated by a number of stimuli, which include growth factors. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) exert pleiotropic effects, regulating multiple cellular processes depending on their concentration, cell type, and the developmental stage of the animal. Although IGF-I expression is relatively high in the embryonic brain its levels drop sharply in the adult brain except in neurogenic regions, i.e., the hippocampus (HP) and the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb (SVZ-OB). By contrast, the expression of IGF-IR remains relatively high in the brain irrespective of the age of the animal. Evidence indicates that IGF-I influences NSC proliferation and differentiation into neurons and glia as well as neuronal maturation including synapse formation. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that IGF-I not only promote adult neurogenesis by regulating NSC number and differentiation but also by influencing neuronal positioning and migration as described during SVZ-OB neurogenesis. In this article we will revise and discuss the actions reported for IGF-I signaling in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models, focusing on the maintenance and proliferation of NSCs/progenitors, neurogenesis, and neuron integration in synaptic circuits. PMID:26941597

  7. IGF-I: A Key Growth Factor that Regulates Neurogenesis and Synaptogenesis from Embryonic to Adult Stages of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Estévez, Vanesa; Defterali, Çağla; Vicario-Abejón, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The generation of neurons in the adult mammalian brain requires the activation of quiescent neural stem cells (NSCs). This activation and the sequential steps of neuron formation from NSCs are regulated by a number of stimuli, which include growth factors. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) exert pleiotropic effects, regulating multiple cellular processes depending on their concentration, cell type, and the developmental stage of the animal. Although IGF-I expression is relatively high in the embryonic brain its levels drop sharply in the adult brain except in neurogenic regions, i.e., the hippocampus (HP) and the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb (SVZ-OB). By contrast, the expression of IGF-IR remains relatively high in the brain irrespective of the age of the animal. Evidence indicates that IGF-I influences NSC proliferation and differentiation into neurons and glia as well as neuronal maturation including synapse formation. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that IGF-I not only promote adult neurogenesis by regulating NSC number and differentiation but also by influencing neuronal positioning and migration as described during SVZ-OB neurogenesis. In this article we will revise and discuss the actions reported for IGF-I signaling in a variety of in vitro and in vivo models, focusing on the maintenance and proliferation of NSCs/progenitors, neurogenesis, and neuron integration in synaptic circuits. PMID:26941597

  8. Interferon regulatory factor 3 is a key regulation factor for inducing the expression of SAMHD1 in antiviral innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shen; Zhan, Yuan; Zhou, Yanjun; Jiang, Yifeng; Zheng, Xuchen; Yu, Lingxue; Tong, Wu; Gao, Fei; Li, Liwei; Huang, Qinfeng; Ma, Zhiyong; Tong, Guangzhi

    2016-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a type I interferon (IFN) inducible host innate immunity restriction factor that inhibits an early step of the viral life cycle. The underlying mechanisms of SAMHD1 transcriptional regulation remains elusive. Here, we report that inducing SAMHD1 upregulation is part of an early intrinsic immune response via TLR3 and RIG-I/MDA5 agonists that ultimately induce the nuclear translocation of the interferon regulation factor 3 (IRF3) protein. Further studies show that IRF3 plays a major role in upregulating endogenous SAMHD1 expression in a mechanism that is independent of the classical IFN-induced JAK-STAT pathway. Both overexpression and activation of IRF3 enhanced the SAMHD1 promoter luciferase activity, and activated IRF3 was necessary for upregulating SAMHD1 expression in a type I IFN cascade. We also show that the SAMHD1 promoter is a direct target of IRF3 and an IRF3 binding site is sufficient to render this promoter responsive to stimulation. Collectively, these findings indicate that upregulation of endogenous SAMHD1 expression is attributed to the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 and we suggest that type I IFN induction and induced SAMHD1 expression are coordinated. PMID:27411355

  9. Key Role for Sulfur in Peptide Metabolism and in Regulation of Three Hydrogenases in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Michael W. W.; Holden, James F.; Menon, Angeli Lal; Schut, Gerrit J.; Grunden, Amy M.; Hou, Chun; Hutchins, Andrea M.; Jenney, Francis E.; Kim, Chulhwan; Ma, Kesen; Pan, Guangliang; Roy, Roopali; Sapra, Rajat; Story, Sherry V.; Verhagen, Marc F. J. M.

    2001-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus grows optimally at 100°C by the fermentation of peptides and carbohydrates. Growth of the organism was examined in media containing either maltose, peptides (hydrolyzed casein), or both as the carbon source(s), each with and without elemental sulfur (S0). Growth rates were highest on media containing peptides and S0, with or without maltose. Growth did not occur on the peptide medium without S0. S0 had no effect on growth rates in the maltose medium in the absence of peptides. Phenylacetate production rates (from phenylalanine fermentation) from cells grown in the peptide medium containing S0 with or without maltose were the same, suggesting that S0 is required for peptide utilization. The activities of 14 of 21 enzymes involved in or related to the fermentation pathways of P. furiosus were shown to be regulated under the five different growth conditions studied. The presence of S0 in the growth media resulted in decreases in specific activities of two cytoplasmic hydrogenases (I and II) and of a membrane-bound hydrogenase, each by an order of magnitude. The primary S0-reducing enzyme in this organism and the mechanism of the S0 dependence of peptide metabolism are not known. This study provides the first evidence for a highly regulated fermentation-based metabolism in P. furiosus and a significant regulatory role for elemental sulfur or its metabolites. PMID:11133967

  10. Pseudo-transition Analysis Identifies the Key Regulators of Dynamic Metabolic Adaptations from Steady-State Data.

    PubMed

    Gerosa, Luca; Haverkorn van Rijsewijk, Bart R B; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Kochanowski, Karl; Schmidt, Thomas S B; Noor, Elad; Sauer, Uwe

    2015-10-28

    Hundreds of molecular-level changes within central metabolism allow a cell to adapt to the changing environment. A primary challenge in cell physiology is to identify which of these molecular-level changes are active regulatory events. Here, we introduce pseudo-transition analysis, an approach that uses multiple steady-state observations of (13)C-resolved fluxes, metabolites, and transcripts to infer which regulatory events drive metabolic adaptations following environmental transitions. Pseudo-transition analysis recapitulates known biology and identifies an unexpectedly sparse, transition-dependent regulatory landscape: typically a handful of regulatory events drive adaptation between carbon sources, with transcription mainly regulating TCA cycle flux and reactants regulating EMP pathway flux. We verify these observations using time-resolved measurements of the diauxic shift, demonstrating that some dynamic transitions can be approximated as monotonic shifts between steady-state extremes. Overall, we show that pseudo-transition analysis can explore the vast regulatory landscape of dynamic transitions using relatively few steady-state data, thereby guiding time-consuming, hypothesis-driven molecular validations. PMID:27136056

  11. PABP interacting protein 2A (PAIP2A) regulates specific key proteins during spermiogenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Delbes, Geraldine; Yanagiya, Akiko; Sonenberg, Nahum; Robaire, Bernard

    2012-03-01

    During spermiogenesis, expression of the specific proteins needed for proper differentiation of male germ cells is under translational control. We have shown that PAIP2A is a major translational regulator involved in the maturation of male germ cells and male fertility. To identify the proteins controlled by PAIP2A during spermiogenesis, we characterized the proteomic profiles of elongated spermatids from wild-type (WT) mice and mice that were Paip2a/Paip2b double-null mutants (DKO). Elongated spermatid populations were obtained and proteins were extracted and separated on gradient polyacrylamide gels. The gels were digested with trypsin and peptides were identified by mass spectrometry. We identified 632 proteins with at least two unique peptides and a confidence level of 95%. Only 209 proteins were consistently detected in WT or DKO replicates with more than five spectra. Twenty-nine proteins were differentially expressed with at least a 1.5-fold change; 10 and 19 proteins were down- and up-regulated, respectively, in DKO compared to WT mice. We confirmed the significantly different expression levels of three proteins, EIF4G1, AKAP4, and HK1, by Western blot analysis. We have characterized novel proteins that have their expression controlled by PAIP2A; of these, 50% are involved in flagellar structure and sperm motility. Although several proteins affected by abrogation of Paip2a have established roles in reproduction, the roles of many others remain to be determined. PMID:22190698

  12. Ln Is a Key Regulator of Leaflet Shape and Number of Seeds per Pod in Soybean[W

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Namhee; Suh, Su Jeoung; Kim, Min-Hee; Lee, Seukki; Moon, Jung-Kyung; Kim, Hong Sig; Jeong, Soon-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Narrow leaflet soybean (Glycine max) varieties tend to have more seeds per pod than broad leaflet varieties. Narrow leaflet in soybean is conferred by a single recessive gene, ln. Here, we show that the transition from broad (Ln) to narrow leaflet (ln) is associated with an amino acid substitution in the EAR motif encoded by a gene (designated Gm-JAGGED1) homologous to Arabidopsis JAGGED (JAG) that regulates lateral organ development and the variant exerts a pleiotropic effect on fruit patterning. The genomic region that regulates both the traits was mapped to a 12.6-kb region containing only one gene, Gm-JAG1. Introducing the Gm-JAG1 allele into a loss-of-function Arabidopsis jagged mutant partially restored the wild-type JAG phenotypes, including leaf shape, flower opening, and fruit shape, but the Gm-jag1 (ln) and EAR-deleted Gm-JAG1 alleles in the jagged mutant did not result in an apparent phenotypic change. These observations indicate that despite some degree of functional change of Gm-JAG1 due to the divergence from Arabidopsis JAG, Gm-JAG1 complemented the functions of JAG in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the Gm-JAG1 homoeolog, Gm-JAG2, appears to be sub- or neofunctionalized, as revealed by the differential expression of the two genes in multiple plant tissues, a complementation test, and an allelic analysis at both loci. PMID:23243125

  13. Hyaluronic acid regulates a key redox control factor Nrf2 via phosphorylation of Akt in bovine articular chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Yuta; Teramura, Takeshi; Takehara, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Kanji

    2015-01-01

    One important pharmacological function of hyaluronic acid (HA) in chondrocytes is reduction of cellular superoxide generation and accumulation. Here we demonstrated a relationship between HA supplementation and accumulation of Nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which is a master transcription factor in cellular redox reactions, in cultured chondrocytes derived from bovine joint cartilage. In HA-treated chondrocytes, expression of Nrf2 and its downstream genes was upregulated. In HA-treated chondrocytes, Akt was phosphorylated, and inhibition of Akt activity or suppression of HA receptors CD44 and/or RHAMM with siRNAs prevented HA-mediated Nrf2 accumulation. Furthermore, Nrf2 siRNA inhibited the HA effect on antioxidant enzymes. These results show that HA might contribute to ROS reduction through Nrf2 regulation by activating Akt. Our study suggests a new mechanism for extracellular matrix (ECM)-mediated redox systems in chondrocytes. PMID:26106522

  14. Solvent Role in the Formation of Electric Double Layers with Surface Charge Regulation: A Bystander or a Key Participant?

    PubMed

    Fleharty, Mark E; van Swol, Frank; Petsev, Dimiter N

    2016-01-29

    The charge formation at interfaces involving electrolyte solutions is due to the chemical equilibrium between the surface reactive groups and the potential determining ions in the solution (i.e., charge regulation). In this Letter we report our findings that this equilibrium is strongly coupled to the precise molecular structure of the solution near the charged interface. The neutral solvent molecules dominate this structure due to their overwhelmingly large number. Treating the solvent as a structureless continuum leads to a fundamentally inadequate physical picture of charged interfaces. We show that a proper account of the solvent effect leads to an unexpected and complex system behavior that is affected by the molecular and ionic excluded volumes and van der Waals interactions. PMID:26871358

  15. Solvent Role in the Formation of Electric Double Layers with Surface Charge Regulation: A Bystander or a Key Participant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleharty, Mark E.; van Swol, Frank; Petsev, Dimiter N.

    2016-01-01

    The charge formation at interfaces involving electrolyte solutions is due to the chemical equilibrium between the surface reactive groups and the potential determining ions in the solution (i.e., charge regulation). In this Letter we report our findings that this equilibrium is strongly coupled to the precise molecular structure of the solution near the charged interface. The neutral solvent molecules dominate this structure due to their overwhelmingly large number. Treating the solvent as a structureless continuum leads to a fundamentally inadequate physical picture of charged interfaces. We show that a proper account of the solvent effect leads to an unexpected and complex system behavior that is affected by the molecular and ionic excluded volumes and van der Waals interactions.

  16. The p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase is a key regulator of myelination and remyelination in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Chung, S-H; Biswas, S; Selvaraj, V; Liu, X-B; Sohn, J; Jiang, P; Chen, C; Chmilewsky, F; Marzban, H; Horiuchi, M; Pleasure, D E; Deng, W

    2015-01-01

    The p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is one of the serine/threonine kinases regulating a variety of biological processes, including cell-type specification, differentiation and migration. Previous in vitro studies using pharmacological inhibitors suggested that p38 MAPK is essential for oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation and myelination. To investigate the specific roles of p38α MAPK in OL development and myelination in vivo, we generated p38α conditional knockout (CKO) mice under the PLP and nerve/glial antigen 2 (NG2) gene promoters, as these genes are specifically expressed in OL progenitor cells (OPCs). Our data revealed that myelin synthesis was completely inhibited in OLs differentiated from primary OPC cultures derived from the NG2 Cre-p38α CKO mouse brains. Although an in vivo myelination defect was not obvious after gross examination of these mice, electron microscopic analysis showed that the ultrastructure of myelin bundles was severely impaired. Moreover, the onset of myelination in the corpus callosum was delayed in the knockout mice compared with p38α fl/fl control mice. A delay in OL differentiation in the central nervous system was observed with concomitant downregulation in the expression of OPC- and OL-specific genes such as Olig1 and Zfp488 during early postnatal development. OPC proliferation was not affected during this time. These data indicate that p38α is a positive regulator of OL differentiation and myelination. Unexpectedly, we observed an opposite effect of p38α on remyelination in the cuprizone-induced demyelination model. The p38α CKO mice exhibited better remyelination capability compared with p38α fl/fl mice following demyelination. The opposing roles of p38α in myelination and remyelination could be due to a strong anti-inflammatory effect of p38α or a dual reciprocal regulatory action of p38α on myelin formation during development and on remyelination after demyelination. PMID:25950478

  17. Leptin receptor neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus are key regulators of energy expenditure and body weight, but not food intake

    PubMed Central

    Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Yu, Sanghou; Jiang, Yanyan; Laque, Amanda; Schwartzenburg, Candice; Morrison, Christopher D.; Derbenev, Andrei V.; Zsombok, Andrea; Münzberg, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Objective Leptin responsive neurons play an important role in energy homeostasis, controlling specific autonomic, behavioral, and neuroendocrine functions. We have previously identified a population of leptin receptor (LepRb) expressing neurons within the dorsomedial hypothalamus/dorsal hypothalamic area (DMH/DHA) which are related to neuronal circuits that control brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis. Intra-DMH leptin injections also activate sympathetic outflow to BAT, but whether such effects are mediated directly via DMH/DHA LepRb neurons and whether this is physiologically relevant for whole body energy expenditure and body weight regulation has yet to be determined. Methods We used pharmacosynthetic receptors (DREADDs) to selectively activate DMH/DHA LepRb neurons. We further deleted LepRb with virally driven cre-recombinase from DMH/DHA neurons and determined the physiological importance of DMH/DHA LepRb neurons in whole body energy homeostasis. Results Neuronal activation of DMH/DHA LepRb neurons with DREADDs promoted BAT thermogenesis and locomotor activity, which robustly induced energy expenditure (p < 0.001) and decreases body weight (p < 0.001). Similarly, intra-DMH/DHA leptin injections normalized hypothermia and attenuated body weight gain in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Conversely, ablation of LepRb from DMH/DHA neurons remarkably drives weight gain (p < 0.001) by reducing energy expenditure (p < 0.001) and locomotor activity (p < 0.001). The observed changes in body weight were largely independent of food intake. Conclusion Taken together, our data highlight that DMH/DHA LepRb neurons are sufficient and necessary to regulate energy expenditure and body weight. PMID:25352997

  18. The SARP Family Regulator Txn9 and Two-Component Response Regulator Txn11 are Key Activators for Trioxacarcin Biosynthesis in Streptomyces bottropensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kui; Qi, Li-Hua; Zhang, Mei; Hou, Xian-Feng; Pan, Hai-Xue; Tang, Gong-Li; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Hua

    2015-10-01

    Trioxacarcin A is a polyoxygenated, structurally complex antibiotic produced by Streptomyces spp., which possesses high anti-bacterial, anti-malaria, and anti-tumor activities. The trioxacarcin biosynthetic pathway involves type II polyketide synthases (PKSs) with L-isoleucine as a unique starter unit, as well as many complex post-PKS tailoring enzymes and resistance and regulatory proteins. In this work, two regulatory genes, txn9 coding for a Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein family regulator and txn11 for a two-component response regulator, were revealed to be absolutely required for trioxacarcin production by individually inactivating all the six annotated regulatory genes in the txn cluster. Complementation assay suggested that these two activators do not have a regulatory cascade relationship. Moreover, transcriptional analysis showed that they activate 15 of the 28 txn operons, indicating that a complicated regulatory network is involved in the trioxacarcin production. Information gained from this study may be useful for improving the production of the highly potent trioxacarcin A. PMID:26178900

  19. The non-octarepeat copper binding site of the prion protein is a key regulator of prion conversion

    PubMed Central

    Giachin, Gabriele; Mai, Phuong Thao; Tran, Thanh Hoa; Salzano, Giulia; Benetti, Federico; Migliorati, Valentina; Arcovito, Alessandro; Longa, Stefano Della; Mancini, Giordano; D’Angelo, Paola; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The conversion of the prion protein (PrPC) into prions plays a key role in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Despite the importance for pathogenesis, the mechanism of prion formation has escaped detailed characterization due to the insoluble nature of prions. PrPC interacts with copper through octarepeat and non-octarepeat binding sites. Copper coordination to the non-octarepeat region has garnered interest due to the possibility that this interaction may impact prion conversion. We used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to study copper coordination at pH 5.5 and 7.0 in human PrPC constructs, either wild-type (WT) or carrying pathological mutations. We show that mutations and pH cause modifications of copper coordination in the non-octarepeat region. In the WT at pH 5.5, copper is anchored to His96 and His111, while at pH 7 it is coordinated by His111. Pathological point mutations alter the copper coordination at acidic conditions where the metal is anchored to His111. By using in vitro approaches, cell-based and computational techniques, we propose a model whereby PrPC coordinating copper with one His in the non-octarepeat region converts to prions at acidic condition. Thus, the non-octarepeat region may act as the long-sought-after prion switch, critical for disease onset and propagation. PMID:26482532

  20. Integrating 'omic' data and biogeochemical modeling: the key to understanding the microbial regulation of matter cycling in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagel, Holger; Kandeler, Ellen; Seifert, Jana; Camarinha-Silva, Amélia; Kügler, Philipp; Rennert, Thilo; Poll, Christian; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Matter cycling in soils and associated soil functions are intrinsically controlled by microbial dynamics. It is therefore crucial to consider functional traits of microorganisms in biogeochemical models. Tremendous advances in 'omic' methods provide a plethora of data on physiology, metabolic capabilities and ecological life strategies of microorganisms in soil. Combined with isotopic techniques, biochemical pathways and transformations can be identified and quantified. Such data have been, however, rarely used to improve the mechanistic representation of microbial dynamics in soil organic matter models. It is the goal of the Young Investigator Group SoilReg to address this challenge. Our general approach is to tightly integrate experiments and biochemical modeling. NextGen sequencing will be applied to identify key functional groups. Active microbial groups will be quantified by measurements of functional genes and by stable isotope probing methods of DNA and proteins. Based on this information a biogeochemical model that couples a mechanistic representation of microbial dynamics with physicochemical processes will be set up and calibrated. Sensitivity and stability analyses of the model as well as scenario simulations will reveal the importance of intrinsic and extrinsic controls of organic matter turnover. We will demonstrate our concept and present first results of two case studies on pesticide degradation and methane oxidation.

  1. The non-octarepeat copper binding site of the prion protein is a key regulator of prion conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giachin, Gabriele; Mai, Phuong Thao; Tran, Thanh Hoa; Salzano, Giulia; Benetti, Federico; Migliorati, Valentina; Arcovito, Alessandro; Longa, Stefano Della; Mancini, Giordano; D'Angelo, Paola; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    The conversion of the prion protein (PrPC) into prions plays a key role in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Despite the importance for pathogenesis, the mechanism of prion formation has escaped detailed characterization due to the insoluble nature of prions. PrPC interacts with copper through octarepeat and non-octarepeat binding sites. Copper coordination to the non-octarepeat region has garnered interest due to the possibility that this interaction may impact prion conversion. We used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to study copper coordination at pH 5.5 and 7.0 in human PrPC constructs, either wild-type (WT) or carrying pathological mutations. We show that mutations and pH cause modifications of copper coordination in the non-octarepeat region. In the WT at pH 5.5, copper is anchored to His96 and His111, while at pH 7 it is coordinated by His111. Pathological point mutations alter the copper coordination at acidic conditions where the metal is anchored to His111. By using in vitro approaches, cell-based and computational techniques, we propose a model whereby PrPC coordinating copper with one His in the non-octarepeat region converts to prions at acidic condition. Thus, the non-octarepeat region may act as the long-sought-after prion switch, critical for disease onset and propagation.

  2. Russelioside B, a pregnane glycoside ameliorates hyperglycemia in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats by regulating key enzymes of glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sattar, Essam; El-Maraghy, Shohda A; El-Dine, Riham Salah; Rizk, Sherine M

    2016-05-25

    An alternative strategy to treat diabetes mellitus is the use of various natural agents possessing hypoglycemic effect. Caralluma quadrangula has been used in Saudi traditional medicine in cases of thirst and hunger and for the treatment of diabetes. The present study was designed to evaluate the improving effect of russelioside B, a pregnane glycoside isolated from Caralluma quadrangula on glucose metabolism in the liver of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced in rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body weight). Experimental rats were administered russelioside B at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight once a day for 30 days. The results showed that RB improved the fasting serum glucose level, glycated hemoglobin percent, serum insulin level and lipid profile. A significant improvement was observed upon the administration of russelioside B on the activities of the key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism (glucokinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glycogen phosphorylase) in the liver of diabetic rats. Further, russelioside B administration to diabetic rats reverted gene expression of glucokinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, glycogen synthase and glycogen synthase kinase-3β to near normal levels. In conclusion, russelioside B possess antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effect in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Hence, administration of russelioside B may represent a potentially useful strategy for the management of diabetes. PMID:27038876

  3. CR6-interacting factor 1 is a key regulator in Aβ-induced mitochondrial disruption and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Byun, J; Son, S M; Cha, M-Y; Shong, M; Hwang, Y J; Kim, Y; Ryu, H; Moon, M; Kim, K-S; Mook-Jung, I

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, often characterized by massive fission and other morphological abnormalities, is a well-known risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). One causative mechanism underlying AD-associated mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to be amyloid-β (Aβ), yet the pathways between Aβ and mitochondrial dysfunction remain elusive. In this study, we report that CR6-interacting factor 1 (Crif1), a mitochondrial inner membrane protein, is a key player in Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Specifically, we found that Crif1 levels were downregulated in the pathological regions of Tg6799 mice brains, wherein overexpressed Aβ undergoes self-aggregation. Downregulation of Crif1 was similarly observed in human AD brains as well as in SH-SY5Y cells treated with Aβ. In addition, knockdown of Crif1, using RNA interference, induced mitochondrial dysfunction with phenotypes similar to those observed in Aβ-treated cells. Conversely, Crif1 overexpression prevented Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Finally, we show that Aβ-induced downregulation of Crif1 is mediated by enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS-dependent sumoylation of the transcription factor specificity protein 1 (Sp1). These results identify the ROS-Sp1-Crif1 pathway to be a new mechanism underlying Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and suggest that ROS-mediated downregulation of Crif1 is a crucial event in AD pathology. We propose that Crif1 may serve as a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of AD. PMID:25361083

  4. Cortistatin Is a Key Factor Regulating the Sex-Dependent Response of the GH and Stress Axes to Fasting in Mice.

    PubMed

    Cordoba-Chacón, José; Gahete, Manuel D; Pozo-Salas, Ana I; de Lecea, Luis; Castaño, Justo P; Luque, Raúl M

    2016-07-01

    Cortistatin (CORT) shares high structural and functional similarities with somatostatin (SST) but displays unique sex-dependent pituitary actions. Indeed, although female CORT-knockout (CORT-KO) mice exhibit enhanced GH expression/secretion, Proopiomelanocortin expression, and circulating ACTH/corticosterone/ghrelin levels, male CORT-KO mice only display increased plasma GH/corticosterone levels. Changes in peripheral ghrelin and SST (rather than hypothalamic levels) seem to regulate GH/ACTH axes in CORT-KOs under fed conditions. Because changes in GH/ACTH axes during fasting provide important adaptive mechanisms, we sought to determine whether CORT absence influences GH/ACTH axes during fasting. Accordingly, fed and fasted male/female CORT-KO were compared with littermate controls. Fasting increased circulating GH levels in male/female controls but not in CORT-KO, suggesting that CORT can be a relevant regulator of GH secretion during fasting. However, GH levels were already higher in CORT-KO than in controls in fed state, which might preclude a further elevation in GH levels. Interestingly, although fasting-induced pituitary GH expression was elevated in both male/female controls, GH expression only increased in fasted female CORT-KOs, likely owing to specific changes observed in key factors controlling somatotrope responsiveness (ie, circulating ghrelin and IGF-1, and pituitary GHRH and ghrelin receptor expression). Fasting increased corticosterone levels in control and, most prominently, in CORT-KO mice, which might be associated with a desensitization to SST signaling and to an augmentation in CRH and ghrelin-signaling regulating corticotrope function. Altogether, these results provide compelling evidence that CORT plays a key, sex-dependent role in the regulation of the GH/ACTH axes in response to fasting. PMID:27175972

  5. DHN melanin biosynthesis in the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea is based on two developmentally regulated key enzyme (PKS)-encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Julia

    2016-02-01

    Botrytis cinerea is the causal agent of gray mold disease in various plant species and produces grayish macroconidia and/or black sclerotia at the end of the infection cycle. It has been suggested that the pigmentation is due to the accumulation of 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin. To unravel its basis and regulation, the putative melanogenic and regulatory genes were identified and functionally characterized. Unlike other DHN melanin-producing fungi, B. cinerea and other Leotiomycetes contain two key enzyme (PKS)-encoding enzymes. Bcpks12 and bcpks13 are developmentally regulated and are required for melanogenesis in sclerotia and conidia respectively. BcYGH1 converts the BcPKS13 product and contributes thereby to conidial melanogenesis. In contrast, enzymes acting downstream in conversion of the PKS products (BcBRN2, BcSCD1 and BcBRN1) are required for both, sclerotial and conidial melanogenesis, suggesting that DHN melanogenesis in B. cinerea follows a non-linear pathway that is rather unusual for secondary metabolic pathways. Regulation of the melanogenic genes involves three pathway-specific transcription factors (TFs) that are clustered with bcpks12 or bcpks13 and other developmental regulators such as light-responsive TFs. Melanogenic genes are dispensable in vegetative mycelia for proper growth and virulence. However, DHN melanin is considered to contribute to the longevity of the reproduction structures. PMID:26514268

  6. The stress-regulated protein M6a is a key modulator for neurite outgrowth and filopodium/spine formation.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Julieta; Fernández, María E; Cooper, Benjamin; Flugge, Gabriele; Frasch, Alberto C

    2005-11-22

    Neuronal remodeling is a fundamental process by which the brain responds to environmental influences, e.g., during stress. In the hippocampus, chronic stress causes retraction of dendrites in CA3 pyramidal neurons. We have recently identified the glycoprotein M6a as a stress-responsive gene in the hippocampal formation. This gene is down-regulated in the hippocampus of both socially and physically stressed animals, and this effect can be reversed by antidepressant treatment. In the present work, we analyzed the biological function of the M6a protein. Immunohistochemistry showed that the M6a protein is abundant in all hippocampal subregions, and subcellular analysis in primary hippocampal neurons revealed its presence in membrane protrusions (filopodia/spines). Transfection experiments revealed that M6a overexpression induces neurite formation and increases filopodia density in hippocampal neurons. M6a knockdown with small interference RNA methodology showed that M6a low-expressing neurons display decreased filopodia number and a lower density of synaptophysin clusters. Taken together, our findings indicate that M6a plays an important role in neurite/filopodium outgrowth and synapse formation. Therefore, reduced M6a expression might be responsible for the morphological alterations found in the hippocampus of chronically stressed animals. Potential mechanisms that might explain the biological effects of M6a are discussed. PMID:16286650

  7. Vitamin A as a key regulator of obesity & its associated disorders: Evidences from an obese rat model

    PubMed Central

    Jeyakumar, Shanmugam M.; Vajreswari, Ayyalasomayajula

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, vitamin A has evolved from its classical role as a fat-soluble vitamin and attained the status of para-/autocrine hormone. Besides its well-established role in embryogenesis, growth and development, reproduction and vision, vitamin A has also been implicated in several other physiological processes. Emerging experimental evidences emphasize adipose tissue as an active endocrine organ with great propensity to continuous growth (throughout life). Due to various genetic and lifestyle factors, excess energy accumulates in adipose tissue as fat, resulting in obesity and other complications such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have shed light on vitamin A metabolites; retinaldehyde and retinoic acid and participation of their pathway proteins in the regulation of adipose tissue metabolism and thus, obesity. In this context, we discuss here some of our important findings, which establish the role of vitamin A (supplementation) in obesity and its associated disorders by employing an obese rat model; WNIN/Ob strain. PMID:25963488

  8. The HAP complex in Fusarium verticillioides is a key regulator of growth, morphogenesis, secondary metabolism, and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ridenour, John B; Bluhm, Burton H

    2014-08-01

    Among eukaryotic organisms, the HAP complex is a conserved, multimeric transcription factor that regulates gene expression by binding to the consensus sequence CCAAT. In filamentous fungi, the HAP complex has been linked to primary and secondary metabolism, but its role in pathogenesis has not been investigated extensively. The overarching goal of this study was to elucidate the role of the HAP complex in Fusariumverticillioides, a ubiquitous and damaging pathogen of maize. To this end, orthologs of core HAP complex genes (FvHAP2, FvHAP3, and FvHAP5) were identified and deleted in F. verticillioides via a reverse genetics approach. Deletion of FvHAP2, FvHAP3, or FvHAP5 resulted in an indistinguishable phenotype among the deletion strains, including reduced radial growth and conidiation, altered colony morphology, and derepression of pigmentation. Additionally, disruption of the HAP complex impaired infection and colonization of maize stalks. Deletion strains were hypersensitive to osmotic and oxidative stress, which suggests the HAP complex of F. verticillioides may mediate responses to environmental stress during pathogenesis. This study directly implicates the HAP complex in primary and secondary metabolism in F. verticillioides and provides one of the first links between the HAP complex and virulence in a plant pathogenic fungus. PMID:24875423

  9. Arginase 1 Regulation of Nitric Oxide Production Is Key to Survival of Trophic Factor-Deprived Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Estévez, Alvaro G.; Sahawneh, Mary Anne; Lange, Philipp S.; Bae, Narae; Egea, Mariela; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2008-01-01

    When deprived of trophic factors, the majority of cultured motor neurons undergo nitric oxide-dependent apoptosis. However, for reasons that have remained unclear, 30–50% of the motor neurons survive for several days without trophic factors. Here we hypothesize that the resistance of this motor neuron subpopulation to trophic factor deprivation can be attributed to diminished nitric oxide production resulting from the activity of the arginine-degrading enzyme arginase. When incubated with nor-NG-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine (NOHA), the normally resistant trophic factor-deprived motor neurons showed a drop in survival rates, whereas trophic factor-treated neurons did not. NOHA-induced motor neuron death was inhibited by blocking nitric oxide synthesis and the scavenging of superoxide and peroxynitrite, suggesting that peroxynitrite mediates NOHA toxicity. When we transfected arginase 1 into motor neurons to see whether it alone could abrogate trophic factor deprivation-induced death, we found that its forced expression did indeed do so. The protection afforded by arginase 1 expression is reversed when cells are incubated with NOHA or with low concentrations of nitric oxide. These results reveal that arginase acts as a central regulator of trophic factor-deprived motor neuron survival by suppressing nitric oxide production and the consequent peroxynitrite toxicity. They also suggest that the resistance of motor neuron subpopulations to trophic factor deprivation may result from increased arginase activity. PMID:16914676

  10. The HGF receptor/Met tyrosine kinase is a key regulator of dendritic cell migration in skin immunity.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jea-Hyun; Birchmeier, Carmen; Zenke, Martin; Hieronymus, Thomas

    2012-08-15

    The Met tyrosine kinase has a pivotal role in embryonic development and tissue regeneration, and deregulated Met signaling contributes to tumorigenesis. After binding of its cognate ligand hepatocyte growth factor, Met signaling confers mitogenic, morphogenic, and motogenic activity to various cells. Met expression in the hematopoietic compartment is limited to progenitor cells and their Ag-presenting progeny, including dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we demonstrate that Met signaling in skin-resident DCs is essential for their emigration toward draining lymph nodes upon inflammation-induced activation. By using a conditional Met-deficient mouse model (Met(flox/flox)), we show that Met acts on the initial step of DC release from skin tissue. Met-deficient DCs fail to reach skin-draining lymph nodes upon activation while exhibiting an activated phenotype. Contact hypersensitivity reactions in response to various contact allergens is strongly impaired in Met-deficient mice. Inhibition of Met signaling by single-dose epicutaneous administration of the Met kinase-specific inhibitor SU11274 also suppressed contact hypersensitivity in wild-type mice. Additionally, we found that Met signaling regulates matrix metalloproteinase MMP2 and MMP9 activity, which is important for DC migration through extracellular matrix. These data unveil Met signaling in DCs as a critical determinant for the maintenance of normal immune function and suggest Met as a potential target for treatment of autoimmune skin diseases. PMID:22802413

  11. Impact of environmental chemicals on key transcription regulators and correlation to toxicity end points within EPA's ToxCast program.

    PubMed

    Martin, Matthew T; Dix, David J; Judson, Richard S; Kavlock, Robert J; Reif, David M; Richard, Ann M; Rotroff, Daniel M; Romanov, Sergei; Medvedev, Alexander; Poltoratskaya, Natalia; Gambarian, Maria; Moeser, Matt; Makarov, Sergei S; Houck, Keith A

    2010-03-15

    Exposure to environmental chemicals adds to the burden of disease in humans and wildlife to a degree that is difficult to estimate and, thus, mitigate. The ability to assess the impact of existing chemicals for which little to no toxicity data are available or to foresee such effects during early stages of chemical development and use, and before potential exposure occurs, is a pressing need. However, the capacity of the current toxicity evaluation approaches to meet this demand is limited by low throughput and high costs. In the context of EPA's ToxCast project, we have evaluated a novel cellular biosensor system (Factorial (1) ) that enables rapid, high-content assessment of a compound's impact on gene regulatory networks. The Factorial biosensors combined libraries of cis- and trans-regulated transcription factor reporter constructs with a highly homogeneous method of detection enabling simultaneous evaluation of multiplexed transcription factor activities. Here, we demonstrate the application of the technology toward determining bioactivity profiles by quantitatively evaluating the effects of 309 environmental chemicals on 25 nuclear receptors and 48 transcription factor response elements. We demonstrate coherent transcription factor activity across nuclear receptors and their response elements and that Nrf2 activity, a marker of oxidative stress, is highly correlated to the overall promiscuity of a chemical. Additionally, as part of the ToxCast program, we identify molecular targets that associate with in vivo end points and represent modes of action that can serve as potential toxicity pathway biomarkers and inputs for predictive modeling of in vivo toxicity. PMID:20143881

  12. S phase of the cell cycle: a key phase for the regulation of thermodormancy in barley grain.

    PubMed

    Gendreau, Emmanuel; Cayla, Thibaud; Corbineau, Françoise

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the occurrence of the cell cycle during germination as related to thermodormancy in barley (Hordeum vulgare L., cv. Pewter) grains in relation with abscisic acid (ABA) by: (i) flow cytometry to determine the progression of the cell cycle; and (ii) reverse transcription-PCR to characterize the expression of some important genes involved in cell-cycle regulation. In dry embryos, cells are mostly (82%) arrested in G1 phase of the cell cycle, the remaining cells being in the G2 (17%) or S phase (0.9%). Germination at 20 °C was associated with an increase in the nuclei population in G2 and S (up to 32.5-44.5 and 9.2-11.3%, respectively, after 18-24h). At 30 °C, partial reactivation of the cell cycle occurred in embryos of dormant grains that did not germinate. Incubation with 50mM hydroxyurea suggests that thermodormancy resulted in a blocking of the nuclei in the S phase. In dry dormant grains, transcripts of CDKA1, CYCA3, KRP4, and WEE1 were present, while those of CDKB1, CDKD1, CYCB1, and CYCD4 were not detected. Incubation at 30 °C resulted in a strong reduction of CDKB1, CYCB1, and CYCD4 expression and overexpression of CDK1 and KRP4. ABA had a similar effect as incubation at 30 °C on the expression of CDKB1, CYCB1, and CYCD4, but did not increase that of CDK1 and KRP4. Patterns of gene expression are discussed with regard to thermodormancy expression and ABA. PMID:22859679

  13. S phase of the cell cycle: a key phase for the regulation of thermodormancy in barley grain

    PubMed Central

    Corbineau, FranÇOise

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the occurrence of the cell cycle during germination as related to thermodormancy in barley (Hordeum vulgare L., cv. Pewter) grains in relation with abscisic acid (ABA) by: (i) flow cytometry to determine the progression of the cell cycle; and (ii) reverse transcription-PCR to characterize the expression of some important genes involved in cell-cycle regulation. In dry embryos, cells are mostly (82%) arrested in G1 phase of the cell cycle, the remaining cells being in the G2 (17%) or S phase (0.9%). Germination at 20 °C was associated with an increase in the nuclei population in G2 and S (up to 32.5–44.5 and 9.2–11.3%, respectively, after 18–24h). At 30 °C, partial reactivation of the cell cycle occurred in embryos of dormant grains that did not germinate. Incubation with 50mM hydroxyurea suggests that thermodormancy resulted in a blocking of the nuclei in the S phase. In dry dormant grains, transcripts of CDKA1, CYCA3, KRP4, and WEE1 were present, while those of CDKB1, CDKD1, CYCB1, and CYCD4 were not detected. Incubation at 30 °C resulted in a strong reduction of CDKB1, CYCB1, and CYCD4 expression and overexpression of CDK1 and KRP4. ABA had a similar effect as incubation at 30 °C on the expression of CDKB1, CYCB1, and CYCD4, but did not increase that of CDK1 and KRP4. Patterns of gene expression are discussed with regard to thermodormancy expression and ABA. PMID:22859679

  14. Diterpene synthesis in Stevia rebaudiana: recruitment and up-regulation of key enzymes from the gibberellin biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Richman, A S; Gijzen, M; Starratt, A N; Yang, Z; Brandle, J E

    1999-08-01

    Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni leaves accumulate a mixture of at least eight different glycosides derived from the tetracyclic diterpene steviol. These natural products taste intensely sweet and have similar biosynthetic origins to those of gibberellic acid (GA). The initial steps leading to the formation of GA result from the two-step cyclization of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP) to (-)-kaurene via the action of two terpene cyclases (-)-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS) and (-)-kaurene synthase (KS). Steviol biosynthesis probably uses the same mechanism although the genes and enzymes from S. rebaudiana that are involved in the cyclization of GGDP have not been characterized. We have isolated both the CPS and KS genes from S. rebaudiana and found that recombinant CPS and KS were catalytically active, suggesting that the CPS and KS genes participate in steviol biosynthesis. The genes coding for CPS and KS are usually present in single copies in most plant species and their expression is normally low and limited to rapidly growing tissues. The KS gene has been duplicated in the S. rebaudiana genome and both the KS and CPS genes are highly expressed in mature leaves, a pattern opposite to that found with GA biosynthesis. This pattern may, at least in part, lead to temporal and spatial separation of GA and steviol biosynthesis and probably helps to prevent over-expression from interfering with normal GA metabolism. Our results show that CPS and KS are part of the steviol glycoside biosynthetic pathway and that Stevia rebaudiana has recruited two genes to secondary metabolism from a highly regulated pathway involved in hormone biosynthesis. PMID:10504563

  15. Kaiso is a key regulator of spleen germinal center formation by repressing Bcl6 expression in splenocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Dong-In; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Kyeong; An, Haemin; Kim, Min-Young; Hur, Man-Wook

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •Knockout of Kaiso results in concordant high expression of Bcl6 and c-Myc in spleen. •Kaiso binds the Bcl6 promoter and represses Bcl6 transcription by recruiting NCoR. •Upregulated Bcl6 increases splenocyte proliferation and causes large diffused GC. •Cell cycle-inhibition genes such as Cdkn1b and Cdkn1a are repressed by Bcl6. -- Abstract: Kaiso was previously described as a methylated DNA-binding protein and a transcription repressor interacting with the corepressor protein complex NCoR. In the current study, we show that generation-3 Kaiso knockout mice show a phenotype of splenomegaly and large diffused germinal centers (GC). In the spleens of Kaiso knockout mice, Bcl6 (a transcriptional repressor that plays a critical role in GC development in spleen) and c-Myc were highly expressed, while the cell cycle arrest genes p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a were downregulated. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and transcription assays suggested that Kaiso represses Bcl6 expression, and in Kaiso knockout mice, derepressed Bcl6 increased cell proliferation by suppressing p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a, while upregulating the oncogene c-Myc. Further evidence for Kaiso regulation of splenomegaly was provided by B lymphocyte Ramos cells, in which ectopic KAISO repressed BCL6 and c-MYC expression, while concomitantly increasing the expression of the cell cycle arrestors p21, p27 and Gadd45a. In summary, derepressed Bcl6 expression may be responsible for increases in GC cell proliferation and splenomegaly of Kaiso knockout mice.

  16. AMP-activated protein kinase: a key regulator of energy balance with many roles in human disease.

    PubMed

    Grahame Hardie, D

    2014-12-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of cellular energy status that regulates cellular and whole-body energy balance. A recently reported crystal structure has illuminated the complex regulatory mechanisms by which AMP and ADP cause activation of AMPK, involving phosphorylation by the upstream kinase LKB1. Once activated by falling cellular energy status, AMPK activates catabolic pathways that generate ATP whilst inhibiting anabolic pathways and other cellular processes that consume ATP. A role of AMPK is implicated in many human diseases. Mutations in the γ2 subunit cause heart disease due to excessive glycogen storage in cardiac myocytes, leading to ventricular pre-excitation. AMPK-activating drugs reverse many of the metabolic defects associated with insulin resistance, and recent findings suggest that the insulin-sensitizing effects of the widely used antidiabetic drug metformin are mediated by AMPK. The upstream kinase LKB1 is a tumour suppressor, and AMPK may exert many of its antitumour effects. AMPK activation promotes the oxidative metabolism typical of quiescent cells, rather than the aerobic glycolysis observed in tumour cells and cells involved in inflammation, explaining in part why AMPK activators have both antitumour and anti-inflammatory effects. Salicylate (the major in vivo metabolite of aspirin) activates AMPK, and this could be responsible for at least some of the anticancer and anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin. In addition to metformin and salicylates, novel drugs that modulate AMPK are likely to enter clinical trials soon. Finally, AMPK may be involved in viral infection: downregulation of AMPK during hepatitis C virus infection appears to be essential for efficient viral replication. PMID:24824502

  17. Comprehensive interrogation of CpG island methylation in the gene encoding COMT, a key estrogen and catecholamine regulator

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    interrogation of COMT methylation. We corroborate previous findings of variation in COMT methylation with gene expression and the Val 158 Met genotype, and also report novel associations with socioeconomic status (SES) and ethnicity at several methylated loci. These results point to novel mechanisms for COMT regulation, which may have broad therapeutic implications. PMID:24460628

  18. Mitochondrial Activity and Cyr1 Are Key Regulators of Ras1 Activation of C. albicans Virulence Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Grahl, Nora; Demers, Elora G.; Lindsay, Allia K.; Harty, Colleen E.; Willger, Sven D.; Piispanen, Amy E.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is both a major fungal pathogen and a member of the commensal human microflora. The morphological switch from yeast to hyphal growth is associated with disease and many environmental factors are known to influence the yeast-to-hyphae switch. The Ras1-Cyr1-PKA pathway is a major regulator of C. albicans morphogenesis as well as biofilm formation and white-opaque switching. Previous studies have shown that hyphal growth is strongly repressed by mitochondrial inhibitors. Here, we show that mitochondrial inhibitors strongly decreased Ras1 GTP-binding and activity in C. albicans and similar effects were observed in other Candida species. Consistent with there being a connection between respiratory activity and GTP-Ras1 binding, mutants lacking complex I or complex IV grew as yeast in hypha-inducing conditions, had lower levels of GTP-Ras1, and Ras1 GTP-binding was unaffected by respiratory inhibitors. Mitochondria-perturbing agents decreased intracellular ATP concentrations and metabolomics analyses of cells grown with different respiratory inhibitors found consistent perturbation of pyruvate metabolism and the TCA cycle, changes in redox state, increased catabolism of lipids, and decreased sterol content which suggested increased AMP kinase activity. Biochemical and genetic experiments provide strong evidence for a model in which the activation of Ras1 is controlled by ATP levels in an AMP kinase independent manner. The Ras1 GTPase activating protein, Ira2, but not the Ras1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Cdc25, was required for the reduction of Ras1-GTP in response to inhibitor-mediated reduction of ATP levels. Furthermore, Cyr1, a well-characterized Ras1 effector, participated in the control of Ras1-GTP binding in response to decreased mitochondrial activity suggesting a revised model for Ras1 and Cyr1 signaling in which Cyr1 and Ras1 influence each other and, together with Ira2, seem to form a master-regulatory complex necessary to integrate

  19. Molecular Analysis of Neutrophil Differentiation from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Delineates the Kinetics of Key Regulators of Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Colin L; Teng, Ruifeng; Wang, Hongmei; Merling, Randall K; Lee, Janet; Choi, Uimook; Koontz, Sherry; Wright, Daniel G; Malech, Harry L

    2016-06-01

    In vitro generation of mature neutrophils from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) requires hematopoietic progenitor development followed by myeloid differentiation. The purpose of our studies was to extensively characterize this process, focusing on the critical window of development between hemogenic endothelium, hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), and myeloid commitment, to identify associated regulators and markers that might enable the stem cell field to improve the efficiency and efficacy of iPSC hematopoiesis. We utilized a four-stage differentiation protocol involving: embryoid body (EB) formation (stage-1); EB culture with hematopoietic cytokines (stage-2); HSPC expansion (stage-3); and neutrophil maturation (stage-4). CD34(+) CD45(-) putative hemogenic endothelial cells were observed in stage-3 cultures, and expressed VEGFR-2/Flk-1/KDR and VE-cadherin endothelial markers, GATA-2, AML1/RUNX1, and SCL/TAL1 transcription factors, and endothelial/HSPC-associated microRNAs miR-24, miR-125a-3p, miR-126/126*, and miR-155. Upon further culture, CD34(+) CD45(-) cells generated CD34(+) CD45(+) HSPCs that produced hematopoietic CFUs. Mid-stage-3 CD34(+) CD45(+) HSPCs exhibited increased expression of GATA-2, AML1/RUNX1, SCL/TAL1, C/EBPα, and PU.1 transcription factors, but exhibited decreased expression of HSPC-associated microRNAs, and failed to engraft in immune-deficient mice. Mid-stage-3 CD34(-) CD45(+) cells maintained PU.1 expression and exhibited increased expression of hematopoiesis-associated miR-142-3p/5p and a trend towards increased miR-223 expression, indicating myeloid commitment. By late Stage-4, increased CD15, CD16b, and C/EBPɛ expression were observed, with 25%-65% of cells exhibiting morphology and functions of mature neutrophils. These studies demonstrate that hematopoiesis and neutrophil differentiation from human iPSCs recapitulates many features of embryonic hematopoiesis and neutrophil production in marrow, but reveals

  20. Transcriptomic analysis by RNA-seq reveals AP-1 pathway as key regulator that green tea may rely on to inhibit lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jing; Zhang, Qi; Xiong, Donghai; Vedell, Peter; Yan, Ying; Jiang, Hui; Cui, Peng; Ding, Feng; Tichelaar, Jay W; Wang, Yian; Lubet, Ronald A; You, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Green tea is a promising chemopreventive agent for lung cancer. Multiple signaling events have been reported, however, the relative importance of these mechanisms in mediating the chemopreventive function of green tea is unclear. In the present study, to examine the involvement of AP-1 in green tea polyphenols induced tumor inhibition, human NSCLC cell line H1299 and mouse SPON 10 cells were identified as AP-1 dependent, as these two lines exhibit high constitutive AP-1 activity, and when TAM67 expression was induced with doxycycline, cell growth was inhibited and correlated with suppressed AP-1 activity. RNA-seq was used to determine the global transcriptional effects of AP-1 inhibition and also uncover the possible involvement of AP-1 in tea polyphenols induced chemoprevention. TAM67 mediated changes in gene expression were identified, and within down-regulated genes, AP-1 was identified as a key transcription regulator. RNA-seq analysis revealed that Polyphenon E-treated cells shared 293 commonly down-regulated genes within TAM67 expressing H1299 cells, and by analysis of limited Chip-seq data, over 10% of the down-regulated genes contain a direct AP-1 binding site, indicating that Polyphenon E elicits chemopreventive activity by regulating AP-1 target genes. Conditional TAM67 expressing transgenic mice and NSCLC cell lines were used to further confirm that the chemopreventive activity of green tea is AP-1 dependent. Polyphenon E lost its chempreventive function both in vitro and in vivo when AP-1 was inhibited, indicating that AP-1 inhibition is a major pathway through which green tea exhibits chemopreventive effects. PMID:24343902

  1. AtGA3ox2, a Key Gene Responsible for Bioactive Gibberellin Biosynthesis, Is Regulated during Embryogenesis by LEAFY COTYLEDON2 and FUSCA3 in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Curaba, Julien; Moritz, Thomas; Blervaque, Renaud; Parcy, François; Raz, Vered; Herzog, Michel; Vachon, Gilles

    2004-01-01

    Embryonic regulators LEC2 (LEAFY COTYLEDON2) and FUS3 (FUSCA3) are involved in multiple aspects of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed development, including repression of leaf traits and premature germination and activation of seed storage protein genes. In this study, we show that gibberellin (GA) hormone biosynthesis is regulated by LEC2 and FUS3 pathways. The level of bioactive GAs is increased in immature seeds of lec2 and fus3 mutants relative to wild-type level. In addition, we show that the formation of ectopic trichome cells on lec2 and fus3 embryos is a GA-dependent process as in true leaves, suggesting that the GA pathway is misactivated in embryonic mutants. We next demonstrate that the GA-biosynthesis gene AtGA3ox2, which encodes the key enzyme AtGA3ox2 that catalyzes the conversion of inactive to bioactive GAs, is ectopically activated in embryos of the two mutants. Interestingly, both β-glucuronidase reporter gene expression and in situ hybridization indicate that FUS3 represses AtGA3ox2 expression mainly in epidermal cells of embryo axis, which is distinct from AtGA3ox2 pattern at germination. Finally, we show that the FUS3 protein physically interacts with two RY elements (CATGCATG) present in the AtGA3ox2 promoter. This work suggests that GA biosynthesis is directly controlled by embryonic regulators during Arabidopsis embryonic development. PMID:15516508

  2. BRCA1 deficiency in ovarian cancer is associated with alteration in expression of several key regulators of cell motility – A proteomics study

    PubMed Central

    Gau, David M; Lesnock, Jamie L; Hood, Brian L; Bhargava, Rohit; Sun, Mai; Darcy, Kathleen; Luthra, Soumya; Chandran, Uma; Conrads, Thomas P; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Krivak, Thomas C; Roy, Partha

    2015-01-01

    Functional loss of expression of breast cancer susceptibility gene 1(BRCA1) has been implicated in genomic instability and cancer progression. There is emerging evidence that BRCA1 gene product (BRCA1) also plays a role in cancer cell migration. We performed a quantitative proteomics study of EOC patient tumor tissues and identified changes in expression of several key regulators of actin cytoskeleton/cell adhesion and cell migration (CAPN1, 14-3-3, CAPG, PFN1, SPTBN1, CFN1) associated with loss of BRCA1 function. Gene expression analyses demonstrate that several of these proteomic hits are differentially expressed between early and advanced stage EOC thus suggesting clinical relevance of these proteins to disease progression. By immunohistochemistry of ovarian tumors with BRCA1+/+ and BRCA1null status, we further verified our proteomic-based finding of elevated PFN1 expression associated with BRCA1 deficiency. Finally, we established a causal link between PFN1 and BRCA1-induced changes in cell migration thus uncovering a novel mechanistic basis for BRCA1-dependent regulation of ovarian cancer cell migration. Overall, findings of this study open up multiple avenues by which BRCA1 can potentially regulate migration and metastatic phenotype of EOC cells. PMID:25927284

  3. Non-metastatic 2 (NME2)-mediated suppression of lung cancer metastasis involves transcriptional regulation of key cell adhesion factor vinculin

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Ram Krishna; Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Kumar, Akinchan; Singh, Ankita; Pal, Krishnendu; Hoeppner, Luke; Saha, Dhurjhoti; Purohit, Gunjan; Basundra, Richa; Kar, Anirban; Halder, Rashi; Kumar, Pankaj; Baral, Aradhita; Kumar, MJ Mahesh; Baldi, Alfonso; Vincenzi, Bruno; Lorenzon, Laura; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Kumar, Praveen; Shridhar, Viji; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    Tumor metastasis refers to spread of a tumor from site of its origin to distant organs and causes majority of cancer deaths. Although >30 metastasis suppressor genes (MSGs) that negatively regulate metastasis have been identified so far, two issues are poorly understood: first, which MSGs oppose metastasis in a tumor type, and second, which molecular function of MSG controls metastasis. Herein, integrative analyses of tumor-transcriptomes (n = 382), survival data (n = 530) and lymph node metastases (n = 100) in lung cancer patients identified non-metastatic 2 (NME2) as a key MSG from a pool of >30 metastasis suppressors. Subsequently, we generated a promoter-wide binding map for NME2 using chromatin immunoprecipitation with promoter microarrays (ChIP-chip), and transcriptome profiling. We discovered novel targets of NME2 which are involved in focal adhesion signaling. Importantly, we detected binding of NME2 in promoter of focal adhesion factor, vinculin. Reduced expression of NME2 led to enhanced transcription of vinculin. In comparison, NME1, a close homolog of NME2, did not bind to vinculin promoter nor regulate its expression. In line, enhanced metastasis of NME2-depleted lung cancer cells was found in zebrafish and nude mice tumor models. The metastatic potential of NME2-depleted cells was remarkably diminished upon selective RNA-i-mediated silencing of vinculin. Together, we demonstrate that reduced NME2 levels lead to transcriptional de-repression of vinculin and regulate lung cancer metastasis. PMID:25249619

  4. Transcription Factor ATAF1 in Arabidopsis Promotes Senescence by Direct Regulation of Key Chloroplast Maintenance and Senescence Transcriptional Cascades1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Garapati, Prashanth; Xue, Gang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Senescence represents a fundamental process of late leaf development. Transcription factors (TFs) play an important role for expression reprogramming during senescence; however, the gene regulatory networks through which they exert their functions, and their physiological integration, are still largely unknown. Here, we identify the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) abscisic acid (ABA)- and hydrogen peroxide-activated TF Arabidopsis thaliana ACTIVATING FACTOR1 (ATAF1) as a novel upstream regulator of senescence. ATAF1 executes its physiological role by affecting both key chloroplast maintenance and senescence-promoting TFs, namely GOLDEN2-LIKE1 (GLK1) and ORESARA1 (ARABIDOPSIS NAC092), respectively. Notably, while ATAF1 activates ORESARA1, it represses GLK1 expression by directly binding to their promoters, thereby generating a transcriptional output that shifts the physiological balance toward the progression of senescence. We furthermore demonstrate a key role of ATAF1 for ABA- and hydrogen peroxide-induced senescence, in accordance with a direct regulatory effect on ABA homeostasis genes, including NINE-CIS-EPOXYCAROTENOID DIOXYGENASE3 involved in ABA biosynthesis and ABC TRANSPORTER G FAMILY MEMBER40, encoding an ABA transport protein. Thus, ATAF1 serves as a core transcriptional activator of senescence by coupling stress-related signaling with photosynthesis- and senescence-related transcriptional cascades. PMID:25953103

  5. Expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis in growth hormone receptor knockout (GHRKO) mice is enhanced but is not further improved by other potential life-extending interventions.

    PubMed

    Gesing, Adam; Masternak, Michal M; Wang, Feiya; Joseph, Anna-Maria; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Westbrook, Reyhan; Lewinski, Andrzej; Karbownik-Lewinska, Malgorzata; Bartke, Andrzej

    2011-10-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is essential for cell viability. Growth hormone receptor knockout (GHRKO), calorie restriction, and surgical visceral fat removal constitute experimental interventions to delay aging and increase life span. We examined the expression of known regulators of mitochondriogenesis: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α), adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK), sirtuin-1 (SIRT-1) and sirtuin-3 (SIRT-3), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), nuclear respiratory factor-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), and mitofusin-2 (MFN-2) in the skeletal muscles and hearts of control and calorie-restricted female GHRKO mice and in the kidneys of male GHRKOs after visceral fat removal or sham surgery. Expression of PGC-1α in skeletal muscles, AMPK, SIRT-1, SIRT-3, eNOS, and MFN-2 in the heart and PGC-1α, AMPK, SIRT-3, eNOS, and MFN-2 in kidneys was increased in GHRKO mice but was not affected by calorie restriction or visceral fat removal. GHRKO mice have increased expression of key regulators of mitochondriogenesis, which is not improved further by calorie restriction or visceral fat removal. PMID:21788651

  6. Histone Demethylase Jumonji AT-rich Interactive Domain 1B (JARID1B) Controls Mammary Gland Development by Regulating Key Developmental and Lineage Specification Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Mike Ran; Cao, Jian; Liu, Zongzhi; Huh, Sung Jin; Polyak, Kornelia; Yan, Qin

    2014-01-01

    The JmjC domain-containing H3K4 histone demethylase jumonji AT-rich interactive domain 1B (JARID1B) (also known as KDM5B and PLU1) is overexpressed in breast cancer and is a potential target for breast cancer treatment. To investigate the in vivo function of JARID1B, we developed Jarid1b−/− mice and characterized their phenotypes in detail. Unlike previously reported Jarid1b−/− strains, the majority of these Jarid1b−/− mice were viable beyond embryonic and neonatal stages. This allowed us to further examine phenotypes associated with the loss of JARID1B in pubertal development and pregnancy. These Jarid1b−/− mice exhibited decreased body weight, premature mortality, decreased female fertility, and delayed mammary gland development. Related to these phenotypes, JARID1B loss decreased serum estrogen level and reduced mammary epithelial cell proliferation in early puberty. In mammary epithelial cells, JARID1B loss diminished the expression of key regulators for mammary morphogenesis and luminal lineage specification, including FOXA1 and estrogen receptor α. Mechanistically, JARID1B was required for GATA3 recruitment to the Foxa1 promoter to activate Foxa1 expression. These results indicate that JARID1B positively regulates mammary ductal development through both extrinsic and cell-autonomous mechanisms. PMID:24802759

  7. Overexpression of AtAP1M3 regulates flowering time and floral development in Arabidopsis and effects key flowering-related genes in poplar.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Ye, Meixia; Su, Xiaoxing; Liao, Weihua; Ma, Huandi; Gao, Kai; Lei, Bingqi; An, Xinmin

    2015-08-01

    APETALA1 plays a crucial role in the transition from vegetative to reproductive phase and in floral development. In this study, to determine the effect of AP1 expression on flowering time and floral organ development, transgenic Arabidopsis and poplar overexpressing of AtAP1M3 (Arabidopsis AP1 mutant by dominant negative mutation) were generated. Transgenic Arabidopsis with e35Spro::AtAP1M3 displayed phenotypes with delayed-flowering compared to wild-type and flowers with abnormal sepals, petals and stamens. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis plants exhibited reduced growth vigor compared to the wild-type plants. Ectopic expression of AtAP1M3 in poplar resulted in up- or down-regulation of some endogenous key flowering-related genes, including floral meristems identity gene LFY, B-class floral organ identity genes AP3 and PI, flowering pathway integrator FT1 and flower repressors TFL1 and SVP. These results suggest that AtAP1M3 regulates flowering time and floral development in plants. PMID:25820621

  8. PIL5, a Phytochrome-Interacting Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Protein, Is a Key Negative Regulator of Seed Germination in Arabidopsis thalianaW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Eunkyoo; Kim, Jonghyun; Park, Eunae; Kim, Jeong-Il; Kang, Changwon; Choi, Giltsu

    2004-01-01

    The first decision made by an angiosperm seed, whether to germinate or not, is based on integration of various environmental signals such as water and light. The phytochromes (Phys) act as red and far-red light (Pfr) photoreceptors to mediate light signaling through yet uncharacterized pathways. We report here that the PIF3-like 5 (PIL5) protein, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, is a key negative regulator of phytochrome-mediated seed germination. PIL5 preferentially interacts with the Pfr forms of Phytochrome A (PhyA) and Phytochrome B (PhyB). Analyses of a pil5 mutant in conjunction with phyA and phyB mutants, a pif3 pil5 double mutant, and PIL5 overexpression lines indicate that PIL5 is a negative factor in Phy-mediated promotion of seed germination, inhibition of hypocotyl negative gravitropism, and inhibition of hypocotyl elongation. Our data identify PIL5 as the first Phy-interacting protein that regulates seed germination. PMID:15486102

  9. NsrR: a key regulator circumventing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium oxidative and nitrosative stress in vitro and in IFN-gamma-stimulated J774.2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gilberthorpe, Nicola J; Lee, Margaret E; Stevanin, Tania M; Read, Robert C; Poole, Robert K

    2007-06-01

    macrophage oxidative burst and Hmp-generated superoxide. This explanation is supported by the sensitivity in vitro of an nsrR mutant to superoxide and peroxide. Fur has recently been confirmed as a weak repressor of hmp transcription, and a fur mutant was also compromised for survival within macrophages even in the absence of elevated NO levels in non-stimulated macrophages. The results indicate the critical role of Hmp in protection of Salmonella from nitrosative stress within and outside macrophages, but also the key role of transcriptional regulation in tuning Hmp levels to prevent exacerbation of the oxidative stress encountered in macrophages. PMID:17526833

  10. CsFTL3, a chrysanthemum FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene, is a key regulator of photoperiodic flowering in chrysanthemums

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Atsushi; Narumi, Takako; Li, Tuoping; Kando, Takumi; Higuchi, Yohei; Sumitomo, Katsuhiko; Fukai, Seiichi; Hisamatsu, Tamotsu

    2012-01-01

    Chrysanthemum is a typical short-day (SD) plant that responds to shortening daylength during the transition from the vegetative to the reproductive phase. FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT)/Heading date 3a (Hd3a) plays a pivotal role in the induction of phase transition and is proposed to encode a florigen. Three FT-like genes were isolated from Chrysanthemum seticuspe (Maxim.) Hand.-Mazz. f. boreale (Makino) H. Ohashi & Yonek, a wild diploid chrysanthemum: CsFTL1, CsFTL2, and CsFTL3. The organ-specific expression patterns of the three genes were similar: they were all expressed mainly in the leaves. However, their response to daylength differed in that under SD (floral-inductive) conditions, the expression of CsFTL1 and CsFTL2 was down-regulated, whereas that of CsFTL3 was up-regulated. CsFTL3 had the potential to induce early flowering since its overexpression in chrysanthemum could induce flowering under non-inductive conditions. CsFTL3-dependent graft-transmissible signals partially substituted for SD stimuli in chrysanthemum. The CsFTL3 expression levels in the two C. seticuspe accessions that differed in their critical daylengths for flowering closely coincided with the flowering response. The CsFTL3 expression levels in the leaves were higher under floral-inductive photoperiods than under non-inductive conditions in both the accessions, with the induction of floral integrator and/or floral meristem identity genes occurring in the shoot apexes. Taken together, these results indicate that the gene product of CsFTL3 is a key regulator of photoperiodic flowering in chrysanthemums. PMID:22140240

  11. Maternal undernutrition around the time of conception and embryo number each impact on the abundance of key regulators of cardiac growth and metabolism in the fetal sheep heart.

    PubMed

    Lie, S; Sim, S M; McMillen, I C; Williams-Wyss, O; MacLaughlin, S M; Kleemann, D O; Walker, S K; Roberts, C T; Morrison, J L

    2013-10-01

    Poor maternal nutrition before and during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in later life. To determine the impact of maternal undernutrition during the periconceptional (PCUN: -45 days to 6 days) and preimplantation (PIUN: 0-6 days) periods on cardiac growth and metabolism, we have quantified the mRNA and protein abundance of key regulators of cardiac growth and metabolism in the left ventricle of the sheep fetus in late gestation. The cardiac protein abundance of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), phospho-acetyl CoA carboxykinase (ACC) and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-4 (PDK-4) were decreased, whereas ACC was increased in singletons in the PCUN and PIUN groups. In twins, however, cardiac ACC was decreased in the PCUN and PIUN groups, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) was increased in the PIUN group. In singletons, the cardiac abundance of insulin receptor β (IRβ) was decreased in the PCUN group, and phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDPK-1) was decreased in the PCUN and PIUN groups. In twins, however, the cardiac abundance of IRβ and phospho-Akt substrate 160kDa (pAS160) were increased in the PIUN group. The cardiac abundance of insulin-like growth factor-2 receptor (IGF-2R), protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) were decreased in PCUN and PIUN singletons and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was also decreased in the PIUN singletons. In contrast, in twins, cardiac abundance of IGF-2R and PKCα were increased in the PCUN and PIUN groups, phospho-ribosomal protein S6 (pRPS6) was increased in the PCUN group, and ERK and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) were also increased in the PIUN fetuses. In conclusion, maternal undernutrition limited to around the time of conception is sufficient to alter the abundance of key factors regulating cardiac growth and metabolism and this may increase the propensity for cardiovascular diseases in later life. PMID

  12. Regulation of ADAMTS-1, -4 and -5 expression in human macrophages: differential regulation by key cytokines implicated in atherosclerosis and novel synergism between TL1A and IL-17.

    PubMed

    Ashlin, Tim G; Kwan, Alvin P L; Ramji, Dipak P

    2013-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the vasculature regulated by cytokines. Macrophages play a crucial role at all stages of this disease, including regulation of foam cell formation, the inflammatory response and stability of atherosclerotic plaques. For example, matrix metalloproteinases produced by macrophages play an important role in modulating plaque stability. More recently, the ADAMTS proteases, which are known to play a key role in the control of cartilage degradation during arthritis, have been found to be expressed in atherosclerotic lesions and suggested to have potentially important functions in the control of plaque stability. Unfortunately, the action of cytokines on the expression of ADAMTS family in macrophages is poorly understood. We have investigated the effect of classical cytokines (IFN-γ and TGF-β) and those that have been recently identified (TL1A and IL-17) on the expression of ADAMTS-1, -4 and -5 in human macrophages. The expression of all three ADAMTS members was induced during differentiation of monocytes into macrophages. TGF-β had a differential action with induction of ADAMTS-1 and -5 expression and attenuation in the levels of ADAMTS-4. In contrast, IFN-γ suppressed the expression of ADAMTS-1 without having an effect on ADAMTS-4 and -5. Although TL-1A or IL-17A alone had little effect on the expression of all the members, they induced their expression synergistically when present together. These studies provide new insight into the regulation of key ADAMTS family members in human macrophages by major cytokines in relation to atherosclerosis. PMID:23859810

  13. The T-box transcription factor 3 is a promising biomarker and a key regulator of the oncogenic phenotype of a diverse range of sarcoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Willmer, T; Cooper, A; Sims, D; Govender, D; Prince, S

    2016-01-01

    Sarcomas represent a complex group of malignant neoplasms of mesenchymal origin and their heterogeneity poses a serious diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. There is therefore a need to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underpinning the pathogenesis of the more than 70 distinguishable sarcoma subtypes. The transcription factor TBX3, a critical developmental regulator, is overexpressed in several cancers of epithelial origin where it contributes to tumorigenesis by different molecular mechanisms. However, the status and role of TBX3 in sarcomas have not been reported. Here we show that a diverse subset of soft tissue and bone sarcoma cell lines and patient-derived sarcoma tissues express high levels of TBX3. We further explore the significance of this overexpression using a small interferring RNA approach and demonstrate that TBX3 promotes the migratory ability of chondrosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and liposarcoma cells but inhibits fibrosarcoma cell migration. This suggested that TBX3 may play a key role in the development of different sarcoma subtypes by functioning as either an oncoprotein or as a brake to prevent tumour progression. To further explore this, TBX3 knockdown and overexpression cell culture models were established using chondrosarcoma and fibrosarcoma cells as representatives of each scenario, and the resulting cells were characterized with regard to key features of tumorigenesis. Results from in vitro and in vivo assays reveal that, while TBX3 promotes substrate-dependent and -independent cell proliferation, migration and tumour formation in chondrosarcoma cells, it discourages fibrosarcoma formation. Our findings provide novel evidence linking TBX3 to cancers of mesenchymal origin. Furthermore, we show that TBX3 may be a biomarker for the diagnosis of histologically dynamic sarcoma subtypes and that it impacts directly on their oncogenic phenotype. Indeed, we reveal that TBX3 may exhibit oncogene or tumour suppressor activity in sarcomas, which

  14. Exogenous ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) and phospho-ceramide analogue-1 (PCERA-1) regulate key macrophage activities via distinct receptors

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Sebastián; Ernst, Orna; Avni, Dorit; Athamna, Muhammad; Philosoph, Amir; Arana, Lide; Ouro, Alberto; Hoeferlin, L. Alexis; Meijler, Michael M.; Chalfant, Charles E.; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio; Zor, Tsaffrir

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an ensemble of tightly regulated steps, in which macrophages play an essential role. Previous reports showed that the natural sphingolipid ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) stimulates macrophages migration, while the synthetic C1P mimic, phospho-ceramide analogue-1 (PCERA-1), suppresses production of the key pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and amplifies production of the key anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in LPS-stimulated macrophages, via one or more unidentified G-protein coupled receptors. We show that C1P stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages migration via the NFκB pathway and MCP-1 induction, while PCERA-1 neither mimicked nor antagonized these activities. Conversely, PCERA-1 synergistically elevated LPS-dependent IL-10 expression in RAW264.7 macrophages via the cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway, while C1P neither mimicked nor antagonized these activities. Interestingly, both compounds have the capacity to additively inhibit TNFα secretion; PCERA-1, but not C1P, suppressed LPS-induced TNFα expression in macrophages in a CREB-dependent manner, while C1P, but not PCERA-1, directly inhibited recombinant TNFα converting enzyme (TACE). Finally, PCERA-1 failed to interfere with binding of C1P to either the cell surface receptor or to TACE. These results thus indicate that the natural sphingolipid C1P and its synthetic analog PCERA-1 bind and activate distinct receptors expressed in RAW264.7 macrophages. Identification of these receptors will be instrumental for elucidation of novel activities of extra-cellular sphingolipids, and may pave the way for the design of new sphingolipid mimics for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, and pathologies which depend on cell migration, as in metastatic tumors. PMID:26656944

  15. The Drosophila Broad-Complex plays a key role in controlling ecdysone-regulated gene expression at the onset of metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Karim, F D; Guild, G M; Thummel, C S

    1993-07-01

    During Drosophila third instar larval development, one or more pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone activate three temporally distinct sets of genes in the salivary glands, represented by puffs in the polytene chromosomes. The intermolt genes are induced first, in mid-third instar larvae; these genes encode a protein glue used by the animal to adhere itself to a solid substrate for metamorphosis. The intermolt genes are repressed at puparium formation as a high titer ecdysone pulse directly induces a small set of early regulatory genes. The early genes both repress their own expression and activate more than 100 late secondary-response genes. The Broad-Complex (BR-C) is an early ecdysone-inducible gene that encodes a family of DNA binding proteins defined by at least three lethal complementation groups: br, rbp, and l(1)2Bc. We have found that the BR-C is critical for the appropriate regulation of all three classes of ecdysone-inducible genes. Both rbp and l(1)2Bc are required for glue gene induction in mid-third instar larvae. In addition, the l(1)2Bc function is required for glue gene repression in prepupae; in l(1)2Bc mutants the glue genes are re-induced by the late prepupal ecdysone pulse, recapitulating a mid-third instar regulatory response at an inappropriate stage in development. The l(1)2Bc function is also required for the complete ecdysone induction of some early mRNAs (E74A, E75A, and BR-C) and efficient repression of most early mRNAs in prepupae. Like the intermolt secondary-response genes, the late secondary-response genes are absolutely dependent on rbp for their induction. An effect of l(1)2Bc mutations on late gene activity can also be detected, but is most likely a secondary consequence of the submaximal ecdysone-induction of a subset of early regulatory products. Our results indicate that the BR-C plays a key role in dictating the stage-specificity of the ecdysone response. In addition, the ecdysone-receptor protein complex alone is not

  16. The key role of health insurance in a cost-effective health care system. Towards regulated competition in the Dutch medical market.

    PubMed

    van de Ven, W P

    1987-04-01

    The previous two sessions of this Symposium have dealt with incentives for cost-effective provider behaviour. Although incentive-reimbursement, which rewards the providers for delivery medical care in a cost-effective way, can be an important step towards a cost-effective health care system, it is not rewards the providers for delivering medical care in a cost-effective way, can be an important step towards a cost-effective health care system, it is not sufficient. As long as the insured consumers have both comprehensive health insurance coverage and freedom of choice of provider, providers will have great difficulty in resisting consumers' demand for ever more costly medical care, and politicians or other decision-makers will have great difficulty in restricting capacity and in preventing overcapacity. Fear of losing patients or voters might dominate. Therefore, in this session we shall focus on the key role of health insurance in a cost-effective health care system and on consumer incentives and insurer behaviour. If the consumers have a choice between several provider-insurer organizations. Although market forces do play an important role in a competitive health-care system, competition should not be confused with a "free market". Besides financial arrangements to protect the poor, pro-competitive regulation is needed to guarantee a "fair competition". Currently there is much consensus that the present Dutch health insurance system, in which 60% of the population is publicly insured and 40% is privately insured, should be replaced by a national health insurance scheme, which uniformly applies to the entire population. A few years ago, I made a proposal for such a scheme, which was based largely on the ideas of Ellwood, McClure, and Enthoven on competition between alternative delivery systems. The main features of this proposal will be discussed. In my opinion, the long-term prospects for regulated competition in the Dutch medical market seem rather favourable

  17. Co-recruitment analysis of the CBL and CBLB signalosomes in primary T cells identifies CD5 as a key regulator of TCR-induced ubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Voisinne, Guillaume; García-Blesa, Antonio; Chaoui, Karima; Fiore, Frédéric; Bergot, Elise; Girard, Laura; Malissen, Marie; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne; Malissen, Bernard; Roncagalli, Romain

    2016-01-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling is essential for the function of T cells and negatively regulated by the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases CBL and CBLB Here, we combined mouse genetics and affinity purification coupled to quantitative mass spectrometry to monitor the dynamics of the CBL and CBLB signaling complexes that assemble in normal T cells over 600 seconds of TCR stimulation. We identify most previously known CBL and CBLB interacting partners, as well as a majority of proteins that have not yet been implicated in those signaling complexes. We exploit correlations in protein association with CBL and CBLB as a function of time of TCR stimulation for predicting the occurrence of direct physical association between them. By combining co-recruitment analysis with biochemical analysis, we demonstrated that the CD5 transmembrane receptor constitutes a key scaffold for CBL- and CBLB-mediated ubiquitylation following TCR engagement. Our results offer an integrated view of the CBL and CBLB signaling complexes induced by TCR stimulation and provide a molecular basis for their negative regulatory function in normal T cells. PMID:27474268

  18. Phospho-ΔNp63α is a key regulator of the cisplatin-induced microRNAome in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Chuang, A; Hao, H; Talbot, C; Sen, T; Trink, B; Sidransky, D; Ratovitski, E

    2011-07-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells exposed to cisplatin (CIS) displayed a dramatic ATM-dependent phosphorylation of ΔNp63α that leads to the transcriptional regulation of downstream mRNAs. Here, we report that phospho (p)-ΔNp63α transcriptionally deregulates miRNA expression after CIS treatment. Several p-ΔNp63α-dependent microRNA species (miRNAs) were deregulated in HNSCC cells upon CIS exposure, including miR-181a, miR-519a, and miR-374a (downregulated) and miR-630 (upregulated). Deregulation of miRNA expression led to subsequent modulation of mRNA expression of several targets (TP53-S46, HIPK2, ATM, CDKN1A and 1B, CASP3, PARP1 and 2, DDIT1 and 4, BCL2 and BCL2L2, TP73, YES1, and YAP1) that are involved in the apoptotic process. Our data support the notion that miRNAs are critical downstream targets of p-ΔNp63α and mediate key pathways implicated in the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:21274007

  19. Dickkopf-1 negatively regulates the expression of osteoprotegerin, a key osteoclastogenesis inhibitor, by sequestering Lrp6 in primary and metastatic lytic bone lesions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Hang; Zhang, Yuanjin; Li, Hong-Yan; Liu, Yun-Yan; Sun, Tao

    2016-06-01

    Recently, an inverse role for Wnt signaling in the development of osteoclasts in the bone was demonstrated. In the present study, we examined whether there is a commonality in the mechanism of bone resorption and lysis that occur in a diverse set of bone metastatic lesions, as well as in primary bone lesions. Compared with control bone tissue and bone biopsies from patients with nonmetastatic primary tumors (i.e., breast carcinoma, lung adenocarcinoma, and prostate carcinoma), patients with bone metastatic lesions from the three aforementioned primary tumors, as well as osteolytic lesions obtained from the bone biopsies of patients with multiple myeloma, demonstrated an upregulated expression of the glycoprotein Dickkopf-1 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, by coimmunoprecipitation, Dickkopf-1 pulled-down low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (Lrp6), which is a key downstream effector of the Wnt signaling pathway. The expression of Lrp6 was unaltered in the osteometastatic lesions. This negative regulation was associated with a lowered expression of osteoprotegerin in the osteometastatic lesions, an observation that was previously reported to promote osteoclastogenesis. These findings provide a common mechanism for the inverse relationship between the Wnt signaling pathway and the development of primary or metastatic bone lesions. Pharmacological modulation of the Wnt signaling pathway might benefit the clinical management of primary and metastatic bone lesions. PMID:27310953

  20. Multiple mechanisms regulate circadian expression of the gene for cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a), a key enzyme in hepatic bile acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Noshiro, Mitsuhide; Usui, Emiko; Kawamoto, Takeshi; Kubo, Hiroshi; Fujimoto, Katsumi; Furukawa, Masae; Honma, Sato; Makishima, Makoto; Honma, Ken-ichi; Kato, Yukio

    2007-08-01

    Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A) and sterol 12alpha-hydroxylase (CYP8B) in bile acid biosynthesis and 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGCR) in cholesterol biosynthesis are the key enzymes in hepatic metabolic pathways, and their transcripts exhibit circadian expression profiles in rodent liver. The authors determined transcript levels of these enzymes and the regulatory factors for Cyp7a--including Dbp, Dec2, E4bp4, Hnf4alpha, Pparalpha, Lxralpha, Rev-erbalpha, and Rev-erbbeta--in the liver of wild-type and homozygous Clock mutant mice (Clock/Clock) and examined the effects of these transcription factors on the transcription activities of Cyp7a. The expression profile of the Cyp7a transcript in wild-type mice showed a strong circadian rhythm in both the 12L:12D light-dark cycle and constant darkness, and that in Clock/Clock also exhibited a circadian rhythm at an enhanced level with a lower amplitude, although its protein level became arrhythmic at a high level. The expression profile of Cyp8b mRNA in wild-type mice showed a shifted circadian rhythm from that of Cyp7a, becoming arrhythmic in Clock/Clock at an expression level comparable to that of wild-type mice. The expression profile of Hmgcr mRNA also lost its strong circadian rhythm in Clock/Clock , showing an expression level comparable to that of wild-type mice. The expressions of Dbp, Dec2, Rev-erbalpha, and Rev-erb beta--potent regulators for Cyp7a expression--were abolished or became arrhythmic in Clock/Clock, while other regulators for Cyp7a-Lxralpha, Hnf4alpha, Pparalpha, and E4bp4--had either less affected or enhanced expression in Clock/Clock. In luciferase reporter assays, REV-ERBalpha/beta, DBP, LXRalpha, and HNF4alpha increased the promoter activity of Cyp7a, whereas DEC2 abolished the transcription from the Cyp7a promoter: E4BP4 and PPARalpha were moderate negative regulators. Furthermore, knockdown of REV-ERBalpha/beta with siRNA suppressed Cyp7a transcript levels, and in the

  1. Dendrobium candidum inhibits MCF-7 cells proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and regulating key biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Guo, Yidi; Fu, Xueqi; Wang, Yongsen; Liu, Ye; Huo, Bo; Sheng, Jun; Hu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    regulating the key biomarkers in breast cancer cells. PMID:26730200

  2. Differential expression of key regulators of Toll-like receptors in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease: a role for Tollip and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma?

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P; MacSharry, J; Darby, T; Fanning, A; Shanahan, F; Houston, A; Brint, E

    2016-03-01

    The innate immune system is currently seen as the probable initiator of events which culminate in the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with Toll-like receptors (TLRs) known to be involved in this disease process. Many regulators of TLRs have been described, and dysregulation of these may also be important in the pathogenesis of IBD. The aim of this study was to perform a co-ordinated analysis of the expression levels of both key intestinal TLRs and their inhibitory proteins in the same IBD cohorts, both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), in order to evaluate the potential roles of these proteins in the pathogenesis of IBD. Of the six TLRs (TLRs 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and 9) examined, only TLR-4 was increased significantly in IBD, specifically in active UC. In contrast, differential alterations in expression of TLR inhibitory proteins were observed. A20 and suppressor of cytokine signalling 1 (SOCS1) were increased only in active UC while interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK-m) and B cell lymphoma 3 protein (Bcl-3) were increased in both active UC and CD. In contrast, expression of both peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and Toll interacting protein (Tollip) was decreased in both active and inactive UC and CD and at both mRNA and protein levels. In addition, expression of both PPARγ and A20 expression was increased by stimulation of a colonic epithelial cell line Caco-2 with both TLR ligands and commensal bacterial strains. These data suggest that IBD may be associated with distinctive changes in TLR-4 and TLR inhibitory proteins, implying that alterations in these may contribute to the pathogenesis of IBD. PMID:26462859

  3. Effect of nitrogen and phosphorus deficiency on transcriptional regulation of genes encoding key enzymes of starch metabolism in duckweed (Landoltia punctata).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhao; Shi, Hui-juan; Wang, Mao-lin; Cui, Long; Zhao, Hai; Zhao, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The production of starch by plants influences their use as biofuels. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) regulate starch gene expression during plant growth and development, yet the role of key enzymes such as ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (E.C. 2.7.7.27 AGPase) in starch metabolism during N- and P-deficiency remains unknown. We investigated the effect of N- and P-deficiency on the expression of large (LeAPL1, LeAPL2, and LeAPL3) and small (LeAPS) subunits of AGPase in duckweed (Landoltia punctata) and their correlation with starch content. We first isolated the full-length cDNA encoding LeAPL1 (GenBank Accession No. KJ603244) and LeAPS (GenBank Accession No. KJ603243); they contained open reading frames of 1554 bp (57.7-kDa polypeptide of 517 amino acids) and 1578 bp (57.0 kDa polypeptide of 525 amino acids), respectively. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that LeAPL1 and LeAPL3 were highly expressed during early stages of N-deficiency, while LeAPL2 was only expressed during late stage. However, in response to P-deficiency, LeAPL1 and LeAPL2 were upregulated during early stages and LeAPL3 was primarily expressed in the late stage. Interestingly, LeAPS was highly expressed following N-deficiency during both stages, but was only upregulated in the early stage after P-deficiency. The activities of AGPase and soluble starch synthesis enzyme (SSS EC 2.4.1.21) were positively correlated with changes in starch content. Furthermore, LeAPL3 and LeSSS (SSS gene) were positively correlated with changes in starch content during N-deficiency, while LeAPS and LeSSS were correlated with starch content in response to P-deficiency. These results elevate current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying starch synthesis. PMID:25438139

  4. Florida Keys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Florida Keys are a chain of islands, islets and reefs extending from Virginia Key to the Dry Tortugas for about 309 kilometers (192 miles). The keys are chiefly limestone and coral formations. The larger islands of the group are Key West (with its airport), Key Largo, Sugarloaf Key, and Boca Chica Key. A causeway extends from the mainland to Key West.

    This image was acquired on October 28, 2001, by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long- term research effort to understand and protect our home planet. Through the study of Earth, NASA will help to provide sound science to policy and economic

  5. Key Nutrients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Extension Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Lessons written to help trainer agents prepare aides for work with families in the Food and Nutrition Program are presented in this booklet. The key nutrients discussed in the 10 lessons are protein, carbohydrates, fat, calcium, iron, iodine, and Vitamins A, B, C, and D. the format of each lesson is as follows: Purpose, Presentation, Application…

  6. Determination of a Comprehensive Alternative Splicing Regulatory Network and Combinatorial Regulation by Key Factors during the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yueqin; Park, Juw Won; Bebee, Thomas W; Warzecha, Claude C; Guo, Yang; Shang, Xuequn; Xing, Yi; Carstens, Russ P

    2016-06-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an essential biological process during embryonic development that is also implicated in cancer metastasis. While the transcriptional regulation of EMT has been well studied, the role of alternative splicing (AS) regulation in EMT remains relatively uncharacterized. We previously showed that the epithelial cell-type-specific proteins epithelial splicing regulatory proteins 1 (ESRP1) and ESRP2 are important for the regulation of many AS events that are altered during EMT. However, the contributions of the ESRPs and other splicing regulators to the AS regulatory network in EMT require further investigation. Here, we used a robust in vitro EMT model to comprehensively characterize splicing switches during EMT in a temporal manner. These investigations revealed that the ESRPs are the major regulators of some but not all AS events during EMT. We determined that the splicing factor RBM47 is downregulated during EMT and also regulates numerous transcripts that switch splicing during EMT. We also determined that Quaking (QKI) broadly promotes mesenchymal splicing patterns. Our study highlights the broad role of posttranscriptional regulation during the EMT and the important role of combinatorial regulation by different splicing factors to fine tune gene expression programs during these physiological and developmental transitions. PMID:27044866

  7. Key Amino Acid Residues within the Third Membrane Domains of NR1 and NR2 Subunits Contribute to the Regulation of the Surface Delivery of N-methyl-d-aspartate Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Kaniakova, Martina; Krausova, Barbora; Vyklicky, Vojtech; Korinek, Miloslav; Lichnerova, Katarina; Vyklicky, Ladislav; Horak, Martin

    2012-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are glutamate ionotropic receptors that play critical roles in synaptic transmission, plasticity, and excitotoxicity. The functional NMDA receptors, heterotetramers composed mainly of two NR1 and two NR2 subunits, likely pass endoplasmic reticulum quality control before they are released from the endoplasmic reticulum and trafficked to the cell surface. However, the mechanism underlying this process is not clear. Using truncated and mutated NMDA receptor subunits expressed in heterologous cells, we found that the M3 domains of both NR1 and NR2 subunits contain key amino acid residues that contribute to the regulation of the number of surface functional NMDA receptors. These key residues are critical neither for the interaction between the NR1 and NR2 subunits nor for the formation of the functional receptors, but rather they regulate the early trafficking of the receptors. We also found that the identified key amino acid residues within both NR1 and NR2 M3 domains contribute to the regulation of the surface expression of unassembled NR1 and NR2 subunits. Thus, our data identify the unique role of the membrane domains in the regulation of the number of surface NMDA receptors. PMID:22711533

  8. Modulation of the cytoplasmic functions of mammalian post-transcriptional regulatory proteins by methylation and acetylation: a key layer of regulation waiting to be uncovered?

    PubMed

    Blee, Tajekesa K P; Gray, Nicola K; Brook, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    Post-transcriptional control of gene expression is critical for normal cellular function and viability and many of the proteins that mediate post-transcriptional control are themselves subject to regulation by post-translational modification (PTM), e.g. phosphorylation. However, proteome-wide studies are revealing new complexities in the PTM status of mammalian proteins, in particular large numbers of novel methylated and acetylated residues are being identified. Here we review studied examples of methylation/acetylation-dependent regulation of post-transcriptional regulatory protein (PTRP) function and present collated PTM data that points to the huge potential for regulation of mRNA fate by these PTMs. PMID:26614674

  9. Depth keying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvili, Ronen; Kaplan, Amir; Ofek, Eyal; Yahav, Giora

    2003-05-01

    We present a new solution to the known problem of video keying in a natural environment. We segment foreground objects from background objects using their relative distance from the camera, which makes it possible to do away with the use of color for keying. To do so, we developed and built a novel depth video camera, capable of producing RGB and D signals, where D stands for the distance to each pixel. The new RGBD camera enables the creation of a whole new gallery of effects and applications such as multi-layer background substitutions. This new modality makes the production of real time mixed reality video possible, as well as post-production manipulation of recorded video. We address the problem of color spill -- in which the color of the foreground object is mixed, along its boundary, with the background color. This problem prevents an accurate separation of the foreground object from its background, and it is most visible when compositing the foreground objects to a new background. Most existing techniques are limited to the use of a constant background color. We offer a novel general approach to the problem with enabling the use of the natural background, based upon the D channel generated by the camera.

  10. Comprehensive Profiling of Ethylene Response Factor Expression Identifies Ripening-Associated ERF Genes and Their Link to Key Regulators of Fruit Ripening in Tomato1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Bruna Lima; Mila, Isabelle; Frasse, Pierre; Zouine, Mohamed; Bouzayen, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of the factors mediating ethylene-dependent ripening of climacteric fruit remains limited. The transcription of ethylene-regulated genes is mediated by ethylene response factors (ERFs), but mutants providing information on the specific role of the ERFs in fruit ripening are still lacking, likely due to functional redundancy among this large multigene family of transcription factors. We present here a comprehensive expression profiling of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) ERFs in wild-type and tomato ripening-impaired tomato mutants (Never-ripe [Nr], ripening-inhibitor [rin], and non-ripening [nor]), indicating that out of the 77 ERFs present in the tomato genome, 27 show enhanced expression at the onset of ripening while 28 display a ripening-associated decrease in expression, suggesting that different ERFs may have contrasting roles in fruit ripening. Among the 19 ERFs exhibiting the most consistent up-regulation during ripening, the expression of 11 ERFs is strongly down-regulated in rin, nor, and Nr tomato ripening mutants, while only three are consistently up-regulated. Members of subclass E, SlERF.E1, SlERF.E2, and SlERF.E4, show dramatic down-regulation in the ripening mutants, suggesting that their expression might be instrumental in fruit ripening. This study illustrates the high complexity of the regulatory network connecting RIN and ERFs and identifies subclass E members as the most active ERFs in ethylene- and RIN/NOR-dependent ripening. PMID:26739234

  11. Comprehensive Profiling of Ethylene Response Factor Expression Identifies Ripening-Associated ERF Genes and Their Link to Key Regulators of Fruit Ripening in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingchun; Gomes, Bruna Lima; Mila, Isabelle; Purgatto, Eduardo; Peres, Lázaro E P; Frasse, Pierre; Maza, Elie; Zouine, Mohamed; Roustan, Jean-Paul; Bouzayen, Mondher; Pirrello, Julien

    2016-03-01

    Our knowledge of the factors mediating ethylene-dependent ripening of climacteric fruit remains limited. The transcription of ethylene-regulated genes is mediated by ethylene response factors (ERFs), but mutants providing information on the specific role of the ERFs in fruit ripening are still lacking, likely due to functional redundancy among this large multigene family of transcription factors. We present here a comprehensive expression profiling of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) ERFs in wild-type and tomato ripening-impaired tomato mutants (Never-ripe [Nr], ripening-inhibitor [rin], and non-ripening [nor]), indicating that out of the 77 ERFs present in the tomato genome, 27 show enhanced expression at the onset of ripening while 28 display a ripening-associated decrease in expression, suggesting that different ERFs may have contrasting roles in fruit ripening. Among the 19 ERFs exhibiting the most consistent up-regulation during ripening, the expression of 11 ERFs is strongly down-regulated in rin, nor, and Nr tomato ripening mutants, while only three are consistently up-regulated. Members of subclass E, SlERF.E1, SlERF.E2, and SlERF.E4, show dramatic down-regulation in the ripening mutants, suggesting that their expression might be instrumental in fruit ripening. This study illustrates the high complexity of the regulatory network connecting RIN and ERFs and identifies subclass E members as the most active ERFs in ethylene- and RIN/NOR-dependent ripening. PMID:26739234

  12. Suppressor of MEK null (SMEK)/protein phosphatase 4 catalytic subunit (PP4C) is a key regulator of hepatic gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Young-Sil; Lee, Min-Woo; Ryu, Dongryeol; Kim, Jeong Ho; Ma, Hui; Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Yo-Na; Kim, Su Sung; Lee, Chul Ho; Hunter, Tony; Choi, Cheol Soo; Montminy, Marc R.; Koo, Seung-Hoi

    2010-01-01

    Fasting promotes hepatic gluconeogenesis to maintain glucose homeostasis. The cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC2) is responsible for transcriptional activation of gluconeogenic genes and is critical for conveying the opposing hormonal signals of glucagon and insulin in the liver. Here, we show that suppressor of MEK null 1 (SMEK1) and SMEK2 [protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) regulatory subunits 3a and 3b, respectively] are directly involved in the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism in mice. Expression of hepatic SMEK1/2 is up-regulated during fasting or in mouse models of insulin-resistant conditions in a Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-gamma Coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)-dependent manner. Overexpression of SMEK promotes elevations in plasma glucose with increased hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression, whereas depletion of the SMEK proteins reduces hyperglycemia and enhances CRTC2 phosphorylation; the effect is blunted by S171A CRTC2, which is refractory to salt-inducible kinase (SIK)-dependent inhibition. Taken together, we would propose that mammalian SMEK/PP4C proteins are involved in the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism through dephosphorylation of CRTC2. PMID:20876121

  13. Small molecule-mediated up-regulation of microRNA targeting a key cell death modulator BNIP3 improves cardiac function following ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Se-Yeon; Lee, Seahyoung; Choi, Eunhyun; Ham, Onju; Lee, Chang Youn; Lee, Jiyun; Seo, Hyang-Hee; Cha, Min-Ji; Mun, Bohyun; Lee, Yunmi; Yoon, Cheesoon; Hwang, Ki-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Genetic ablation of BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3), an essential regulator of cardiac cell death, is an effective way to prevent cardiac cell death triggered by pathologic conditions. However, currently there exists no known means, such as inhibitors, to down-regulate BNIP3 in mature heart. Here, we report that a small molecule inducer of microRNA-182 (miR-182) suppressed ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced cardiac cell death by down-regulating BNIP3. We first selected miR-182 as a potent BNIP3-targeting miRNA based on miRNA-target prediction databases and empirical data. The subsequent screening of small molecules for inducing miR-182 expression identified Kenpaullone as a hit compound. Both exogenous miR-182 and Kenpaullone significantly suppressed hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte death in vitro. To investigate the effect of changing substituents of Kenpaullone on miR-182 expression, we synthesized 9 derivatives of Kenpaullone. Among these derivatives, compound 5 showed significantly improved ability to induce miR-182 expression. The results of the in vivo study showed that compound 5 significantly improved heart function following I/R-injury in rats. Our study provides strong evidence that the small molecule-mediated up-regulation of miRNAs is a viable strategy to down-regulate target proteins with no known chemical inhibitor and that compound 5 may have potential to prevent I/R-inflicted cardiac cell death. PMID:27008992

  14. Small molecule-mediated up-regulation of microRNA targeting a key cell death modulator BNIP3 improves cardiac function following ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se-Yeon; Lee, Seahyoung; Choi, Eunhyun; Ham, Onju; Lee, Chang Youn; Lee, Jiyun; Seo, Hyang-Hee; Cha, Min-Ji; Mun, Bohyun; Lee, Yunmi; Yoon, Cheesoon; Hwang, Ki-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Genetic ablation of BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19 kDa protein-interacting protein 3 (BNIP3), an essential regulator of cardiac cell death, is an effective way to prevent cardiac cell death triggered by pathologic conditions. However, currently there exists no known means, such as inhibitors, to down-regulate BNIP3 in mature heart. Here, we report that a small molecule inducer of microRNA-182 (miR-182) suppressed ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced cardiac cell death by down-regulating BNIP3. We first selected miR-182 as a potent BNIP3-targeting miRNA based on miRNA-target prediction databases and empirical data. The subsequent screening of small molecules for inducing miR-182 expression identified Kenpaullone as a hit compound. Both exogenous miR-182 and Kenpaullone significantly suppressed hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte death in vitro. To investigate the effect of changing substituents of Kenpaullone on miR-182 expression, we synthesized 9 derivatives of Kenpaullone. Among these derivatives, compound 5 showed significantly improved ability to induce miR-182 expression. The results of the in vivo study showed that compound 5 significantly improved heart function following I/R-injury in rats. Our study provides strong evidence that the small molecule-mediated up-regulation of miRNAs is a viable strategy to down-regulate target proteins with no known chemical inhibitor and that compound 5 may have potential to prevent I/R-inflicted cardiac cell death. PMID:27008992

  15. Adjustments of molecular key components of branchial ion and pH regulation in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in response to ocean acidification and warming.

    PubMed

    Michael, Katharina; Kreiss, Cornelia M; Hu, Marian Y; Koschnick, Nils; Bickmeyer, Ulf; Dupont, Sam; Pörtner, Hans-O; Lucassen, Magnus

    2016-03-01

    Marine teleost fish sustain compensation of extracellular pH after exposure to hypercapnia by means of efficient ion and acid-base regulation. Elevated rates of ion and acid-base regulation under hypercapnia may be stimulated further by elevated temperature. Here, we characterized the regulation of transepithelial ion transporters (NKCC1, NBC1, SLC26A6, NHE1 and 2) and ATPases (Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and V-type H(+) ATPase) in gills of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) after 4 weeks of exposure to ambient and future PCO2 levels (550 μatm, 1200 μatm, 2200 μatm) at optimum (10 °C) and summer maximum temperature (18 °C), respectively. Gene expression of most branchial ion transporters revealed temperature- and dose-dependent responses to elevated PCO2. Transcriptional regulation resulted in stable protein expression at 10 °C, whereas expression of most transport proteins increased at medium PCO2 and 18 °C. mRNA and protein expression of distinct ion transport proteins were closely co-regulated, substantiating cellular functional relationships. Na(+)/K(+) ATPase capacities were PCO2 independent, but increased with acclimation temperature, whereas H(+) ATPase capacities were thermally compensated but decreased at medium PCO2 and 10 °C. When functional capacities of branchial ATPases were compared with mitochondrial F1Fo ATP-synthase strong correlations of F1Fo ATP-synthase and ATPase capacities generally indicate close coordination of branchial aerobic ATP demand and supply. Our data indicate physiological plasticity in the gills of cod to adjust to a warming, acidifying ocean within limits. In light of the interacting and non-linear, dose-dependent effects of both climate factors the role of these mechanisms in shaping resilience under climate change remains to be explored. PMID:26688541

  16. Citrus fruit flavor and aroma biosynthesis: isolation, functional characterization, and developmental regulation of Cstps1, a key gene in the production of the sesquiterpene aroma compound valencene.

    PubMed

    Sharon-Asa, Liat; Shalit, Moshe; Frydman, Ahuva; Bar, Einat; Holland, Doron; Or, Etti; Lavi, Uri; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Eyal, Yoram

    2003-12-01

    Citrus fruits possess unique aromas rarely found in other fruit species. While fruit flavor is composed of complex combinations of soluble and volatile compounds, several low-abundance sesquiterpenes, such as valencene, nootkatone, alpha-sinensal, and beta-sinensal, stand out in citrus as important flavor and aroma compounds. The profile of terpenoid volatiles in various citrus species and their importance as aroma compounds have been studied in detail, but much is still lacking in our understanding of the physiological, biochemical, and genetic regulation of their production. Here, we report on the isolation, functional expression, and developmental regulation of Cstps1, a sesquiterpene synthase-encoding gene, involved in citrus aroma formation. The recombinant enzyme encoded by Cstps1 was shown to convert farnesyl diphosphate to a single sesquiterpene product identified as valencene by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Phylogenetic analysis of plant terpene synthase genes localized Cstps1 to the group of angiosperm sesquiterpene synthases. Within this group, Cstps1 belongs to a subgroup of citrus sesquiterpene synthases. Cstps1 was found to be developmentally regulated: transcript was found to accumulate only towards fruit maturation, corresponding well with the timing of valencene accumulation in fruit. Although citrus fruits are non-climacteric, valencene accumulation and Cstps1 expression were found to be responsive to ethylene, providing further evidence for the role of ethylene in the final stages of citrus fruit ripening. Isolation of the gene encoding valencene synthase provides a tool for an in-depth study of the regulation of aroma compound biosynthesis in citrus and for metabolic engineering for fruit flavor characteristics. PMID:14617067

  17. Expression-based GWAS identifies variants, gene interactions and key regulators affecting intramuscular fatty acid content and composition in porcine meat

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Oliveras, Anna; Revilla, Manuel; Castelló, Anna; Fernández, Ana I.; Folch, Josep M.; Ballester, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to better understand the genetic mechanisms determining two complex traits affecting porcine meat quality: intramuscular fat (IMF) content and its fatty acid (FA) composition. With this purpose, expression Genome-Wide Association Study (eGWAS) of 45 lipid-related genes associated with meat quality traits in swine muscle (Longissimus dorsi) of 114 Iberian × Landrace backcross animals was performed. The eGWAS identified 241 SNPs associated with 11 genes: ACSM5, CROT, FABP3, FOS, HIF1AN, IGF2, MGLL, NCOA1, PIK3R1, PLA2G12A and PPARA. Three expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTLs) for IGF2, ACSM5 and MGLL were identified, showing cis-acting effects, whereas 16 eQTLs had trans regulatory effects. A polymorphism in the ACSM5 promoter region associated with its expression was identified. In addition, strong candidate genes regulating ACSM5, FOS, PPARA, PIK3R1, PLA2G12A and HIF1AN gene expression were also seen. Notably, the analysis highlighted the NR3C1 transcription factor as a strong candidate gene involved in the regulation of the 45 genes analysed. Finally, the IGF2, MGLL, MC2R, ARHGAP6, and NR3C1 genes were identified as potential regulators co-localizing within QTLs for fatness and growth traits in the IBMAP population. The results obtained increase our knowledge in the functional regulatory mechanisms involved in these complex traits.

  18. Proteomic analysis of cap-dependent translation identifies LARP1 as a key regulator of 5'TOP mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Tcherkezian, Joseph; Cargnello, Marie; Romeo, Yves; Huttlin, Edward L; Lavoie, Genevieve; Gygi, Steven P; Roux, Philippe P

    2014-02-15

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) promotes cell growth and proliferation by promoting mRNA translation and increasing the protein synthetic capacity of the cell. Although mTOR globally promotes translation by regulating the mRNA 5' cap-binding protein eIF4E (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E), it also preferentially regulates the translation of certain classes of mRNA via unclear mechanisms. To help fill this gap in knowledge, we performed a quantitative proteomic screen to identify proteins that associate with the mRNA 5' cap in an mTOR-dependent manner. Using this approach, we identified many potential regulatory factors, including the putative RNA-binding protein LARP1 (La-related protein 1). Our results indicate that LARP1 associates with actively translating ribosomes via PABP and that LARP1 stimulates the translation of mRNAs containing a 5' terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) motif, encoding for components of the translational machinery. We found that LARP1 associates with the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and is required for global protein synthesis as well as cell growth and proliferation. Together, these data reveal important molecular mechanisms involved in TOP mRNA translation and implicate LARP1 as an important regulator of cell growth and proliferation. PMID:24532714

  19. Conserved Epigenetic Mechanisms Could Play a Key Role in Regulation of Photosynthesis and Development-Related Genes during Needle Development of Pinus radiata

    PubMed Central

    Meijón, Mónica; Escandón, Mónica; Cañal, María Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Needle maturation is a complex process that involves cell growth, differentiation and tissue remodelling towards the acquisition of full physiological competence. Leaf induction mechanisms are well known; however, those underlying the acquisition of physiological competence are still poorly understood, especially in conifers. We studied the specific epigenetic regulation of genes defining organ function (PrRBCS and PrRBCA) and competence and stress response (PrCSDP2 and PrSHMT4) during three stages of needle development and one de-differentiated control. Gene-specific changes in DNA methylation and histone were analysed by bisulfite sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). The expression of PrRBCA and PrRBCS increased during needle maturation and was associated with the progressive loss of H3K9me3, H3K27me3 and the increase in AcH4. The maturation-related silencing of PrSHMT4 was correlated with increased H3K9me3 levels, and the repression of PrCSDP2, to the interplay between AcH4, H3K27me3, H3K9me3 and specific DNA methylation. The employ of HAT and HDAC inhibitors led to a further determination of the role of histone acetylation in the regulation of our target genes. The integration of these results with high-throughput analyses in Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa suggests that the specific epigenetic mechanisms that regulate photosynthetic genes are conserved between the analysed species. PMID:25965766

  20. Targeted Intestinal Epithelial Deletion of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 Reveals Key Roles for Extracellular-Regulated Kinase-1/2 in Restitution

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Noah P.; Vongsa, Rebecca A.; Faherty, Sheena L.; Salzman, Nita H.; Dwinell, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Barrier defects and/or alterations in the ability of the gut epithelium to repair itself are critical etiologic mechanisms of gastrointestinal disease. Our ongoing studies indicate that the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its cognate ligand CXCL12 regulate intestinal epithelial barrier maturation and restitution in cell culture models. Gene deficient mice lacking CXCR4 expression specifically by the cells of the intestinal epithelium were used to test the hypothesis that CXCR4 regulates mucosal barrier integrity in vivo. Epithelial expression of CXCR4 was assessed by RT-PCR, Southern blot, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. In vivo wounding assays were performed by addition of 3% Dextran Sodium Sulfate in drinking water for 5 days. Intestinal damage and DAI scores were assessed by histological examination. ERK phosphorylation was assessed in vivo by immunoblot and immunofluorescence. CXCR4 knockdown cells were established using a lentiviral approach and ERK phosphorylation was assessed. Consistent with targeted roles in restitution, epithelium from patients with inflammatory bowel disease indicated that CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression was stable throughout the human colonic epithelium. Conditional CXCR4-deficient mice developed normally, with little phenotypic differences in epithelial morphology, proliferation, or migration. Re-epithelialization was absent in CXCR4 conditional knockout mice following acute dextran-sodium sulfate-induced inflammation. In contrast, heterozygous CXCR4 depleted mice displayed significant improvement in epithelial ulcer healing in acute and chronic inflammation. Mucosal injury repair was correlated with extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 activity and localization along the crypt-villus axis, with heterozygous mice characterized by increased ERK1/2 activation. Lentiviral depletion of CXCR4 in IEC6 cells similarly altered ERK1/2 activity and prevented chemokine stimulated migration. Together these data indicate that chemokine

  1. The RNA-Binding Protein, Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein 1 (PTBP1) Is a Key Regulator of CD4 T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Valentín-Acevedo, Aníbal

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that the RNA binding protein, polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTBP1) plays a critical role in regulating the expression of CD40L in activated CD4 T cells. This is achieved mechanistically through message stabilization at late times of activation as well as by altered distribution of CD40L mRNA within distinct cellular compartments. PTBP1 has been implicated in many different processes, however whether PTBP1 plays a broader role in CD4 T cell activation is not known. To examine this question, experiments were designed to introduce shRNA into primary human CD4 T cells to achieve decreased, but not complete ablation of PTBP1 expression. Analyses of shPTB-expressing CD4 T cells revealed multiple processes including cell proliferation, activation-induced cell death and expression of activation markers and cytokines that were regulated in part by PTBP1 expression. Although there was an overall decrease in the steady-state level of several activation genes, only IL-2 and CD40L appeared to be regulated by PTBP1 at the level of RNA decay suggesting that PTBP1 is critical at different regulatory steps of expression that is gene-specific. Importantly, even though the IL-2 protein levels were reduced in cells with lowered PTBP1, the steady-state level of IL-2 mRNA was significantly higher in these cells suggesting a block at the translational level. Evaluation of T cell activation in shPTB-expressing T cells revealed that PTBP1 was linked primarily to the activation of the PLCγ1/ERK1/2 and the NF-κB pathways. Overall, our results reveal the importance of this critical RNA binding protein in multiple steps of T cell activation. PMID:27513449

  2. Structural Analysis of the Regulatory Domain of ExsA, a Key Transcriptional Regulator of the Type Three Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Manisha; Xiao, Yi; Robinson, Howard; Schubot, Florian D.

    2015-08-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs a type three secretion system to facilitate infections in mammalian hosts. The operons encoding genes of structural components of the secretion machinery and associated virulence factors are all under the control of the AraC-type transcriptional activator protein, ExsA. ExsA belongs to a unique subfamily of AraC-proteins that is regulated through protein-protein contacts rather than small molecule ligands. Prior to infection, ExsA is inhibited through a direct interaction with the anti-activator ExsD. To activate ExsA upon host cell contact this interaction is disrupted by the anti-antiactivator protein ExsC. Here we report the crystal structure of the regulatory domain of ExsA, which is known to mediate ExsA dimerization as well as ExsD binding. The crystal structure suggests two models for the ExsA dimer. Both models confirmed the previously shown involvement of helix α-3 in ExsA dimerization but one also suggest a role for helix α-2. These structural data are supported by the observation that a mutation in α-2 greatly diminished the ability of ExsA to activate transcription in vitro. Lastly, additional in vitro transcription studies revealed that a conserved pocket, used by AraC and the related ToxT protein for the binding of small molecule regulators, although present in ExsA is not involved in binding of ExsD.

  3. Structural Analysis of the Regulatory Domain of ExsA, a Key Transcriptional Regulator of the Type Three Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Manisha; Xiao, Yi; Robinson, Howard; Schubot, Florian D.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs a type three secretion system to facilitate infections in mammalian hosts. The operons encoding genes of structural components of the secretion machinery and associated virulence factors are all under the control of the AraC-type transcriptional activator protein, ExsA. ExsA belongs to a unique subfamily of AraC-proteins that is regulated through protein-protein contacts rather than small molecule ligands. Prior to infection, ExsA is inhibited through a direct interaction with the anti-activator ExsD. To activate ExsA upon host cell contact this interaction is disrupted by the anti-antiactivator protein ExsC. Here we report the crystal structure of the regulatory domain of ExsA, which is known to mediate ExsA dimerization as well as ExsD binding. The crystal structure suggests two models for the ExsA dimer. Both models confirmed the previously shown involvement of helix α-3 in ExsA dimerization but one also suggest a role for helix α-2. These structural data are supported by the observation that a mutation in α-2 greatly diminished the ability of ExsA to activate transcription in vitro. Additional in vitro transcription studies revealed that a conserved pocket, used by AraC and the related ToxT protein for the binding of small molecule regulators, although present in ExsA is not involved in binding of ExsD. PMID:26317977

  4. Comparative Study of Early Cold-Regulated Proteins by Two-Dimensional Difference Gel Electrophoresis Reveals a Key Role for Phospholipase Dα1 in Mediating Cold Acclimation Signaling Pathway in Rice.

    PubMed

    Huo, Chenmin; Zhang, Baowen; Wang, Hui; Wang, Fawei; Liu, Meng; Gao, Yingjie; Zhang, Wenhua; Deng, Zhiping; Sun, Daye; Tang, Wenqiang

    2016-04-01

    To understand the early signaling steps that regulate cold responses in rice, two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE)(1)was used to study early cold-regulated proteins in rice seedlings. Using mass spectrometry, 32 spots, which represent 26 unique proteins that showed an altered expression level within 5 min of cold treatment were identified. Among these proteins, Western blot analyses confirmed that the cellular phospholipase D α1 (OsPLDα1) protein level was increased as early as 1 min after cold treatment. Genetic studies showed that reducing the expression ofOsPLDα1makes rice plants more sensitive to chilling stress as well as cold acclimation increased freezing tolerance. Correspondingly, cold-regulated proteomic changes and the expression of the cold-responsive C repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding 1 (OsDREB1) family of transcription factors were inhibited in thepldα1mutant. We also found that the expression ofOsPLDα1is directly regulated by OsDREB1A. This transcriptional regulation ofOsPLDα1could provide positive feedback regulation of the cold signal transduction pathway in rice. OsPLDα1 hydrolyzes phosphatidylcholine to produce the signal molecule phosphatidic acid (PA). By lipid-overlay assay, we demonstrated that the rice cold signaling proteins, MAP kinase 6 (OsMPK6) and OsSIZ1, bind directly to PA. Taken together, our results suggest that OsPLDα1 plays a key role in transducing cold signaling in rice by producing PA and regulatingOsDREB1s' expression by OsMPK6, OsSIZ1, and possibly other PA-binding proteins. PMID:26747563

  5. Structural Analysis of the Regulatory Domain of ExsA, a Key Transcriptional Regulator of the Type Three Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shrestha, Manisha; Xiao, Yi; Robinson, Howard; Schubot, Florian D.

    2015-08-28

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs a type three secretion system to facilitate infections in mammalian hosts. The operons encoding genes of structural components of the secretion machinery and associated virulence factors are all under the control of the AraC-type transcriptional activator protein, ExsA. ExsA belongs to a unique subfamily of AraC-proteins that is regulated through protein-protein contacts rather than small molecule ligands. Prior to infection, ExsA is inhibited through a direct interaction with the anti-activator ExsD. To activate ExsA upon host cell contact this interaction is disrupted by the anti-antiactivator protein ExsC. Here we report the crystal structure of the regulatory domainmore » of ExsA, which is known to mediate ExsA dimerization as well as ExsD binding. The crystal structure suggests two models for the ExsA dimer. Both models confirmed the previously shown involvement of helix α-3 in ExsA dimerization but one also suggest a role for helix α-2. These structural data are supported by the observation that a mutation in α-2 greatly diminished the ability of ExsA to activate transcription in vitro. Lastly, additional in vitro transcription studies revealed that a conserved pocket, used by AraC and the related ToxT protein for the binding of small molecule regulators, although present in ExsA is not involved in binding of ExsD.« less

  6. The micro-RNA72c-APETALA2-1 node as a key regulator of the common bean-Rhizobium etli nitrogen fixation symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Nova-Franco, Bárbara; Íñiguez, Luis P; Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Alvarado-Affantranger, Xochitl; Leija, Alfonso; Fuentes, Sara I; Ramírez, Mario; Paul, Sujay; Reyes, José L; Girard, Lourdes; Hernández, Georgina

    2015-05-01

    Micro-RNAs are recognized as important posttranscriptional regulators in plants. The relevance of micro-RNAs as regulators of the legume-rhizobia nitrogen-fixing symbiosis is emerging. The objective of this work was to functionally characterize the role of micro-RNA172 (miR172) and its conserved target APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factor in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)-Rhizobium etli symbiosis. Our expression analysis revealed that mature miR172c increased upon rhizobial infection and continued increasing during nodule development, reaching its maximum in mature nodules and decaying in senescent nodules. The expression of AP2-1 target showed a negative correlation with miR172c expression. A drastic decrease in miR172c and high AP2-1 mRNA levels were observed in ineffective nodules. Phenotypic analysis of composite bean plants with transgenic roots overexpressing miR172c or a mutated AP2-1 insensitive to miR172c cleavage demonstrated the pivotal regulatory role of the miR172 node in the common bean-rhizobia symbiosis. Increased miR172 resulted in improved root growth, increased rhizobial infection, increased expression of early nodulation and autoregulation of nodulation genes, and improved nodulation and nitrogen fixation. In addition, these plants showed decreased sensitivity to nitrate inhibition of nodulation. Through transcriptome analysis, we identified 114 common bean genes that coexpressed with AP2-1 and proposed these as being targets for transcriptional activation by AP2-1. Several of these genes are related to nodule senescence, and we propose that they have to be silenced, through miR172c-induced AP2-1 cleavage, in active mature nodules. Our work sets the basis for exploring the miR172-mediated improvement of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in common bean, the most important grain legume for human consumption. PMID:25739700

  7. The Micro-RNA172c-APETALA2-1 Node as a Key Regulator of the Common Bean-Rhizobium etli Nitrogen Fixation Symbiosis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nova-Franco, Bárbara; Íñiguez, Luis P.; Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Leija, Alfonso; Fuentes, Sara I.; Ramírez, Mario; Paul, Sujay

    2015-01-01

    Micro-RNAs are recognized as important posttranscriptional regulators in plants. The relevance of micro-RNAs as regulators of the legume-rhizobia nitrogen-fixing symbiosis is emerging. The objective of this work was to functionally characterize the role of micro-RNA172 (miR172) and its conserved target APETALA2 (AP2) transcription factor in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)-Rhizobium etli symbiosis. Our expression analysis revealed that mature miR172c increased upon rhizobial infection and continued increasing during nodule development, reaching its maximum in mature nodules and decaying in senescent nodules. The expression of AP2-1 target showed a negative correlation with miR172c expression. A drastic decrease in miR172c and high AP2-1 mRNA levels were observed in ineffective nodules. Phenotypic analysis of composite bean plants with transgenic roots overexpressing miR172c or a mutated AP2-1 insensitive to miR172c cleavage demonstrated the pivotal regulatory role of the miR172 node in the common bean-rhizobia symbiosis. Increased miR172 resulted in improved root growth, increased rhizobial infection, increased expression of early nodulation and autoregulation of nodulation genes, and improved nodulation and nitrogen fixation. In addition, these plants showed decreased sensitivity to nitrate inhibition of nodulation. Through transcriptome analysis, we identified 114 common bean genes that coexpressed with AP2-1 and proposed these as being targets for transcriptional activation by AP2-1. Several of these genes are related to nodule senescence, and we propose that they have to be silenced, through miR172c-induced AP2-1 cleavage, in active mature nodules. Our work sets the basis for exploring the miR172-mediated improvement of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in common bean, the most important grain legume for human consumption. PMID:25739700

  8. Expression profiling and functional analysis reveals that TOR is a key player in regulating photosynthesis and phytohormone signaling pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Pan; Xiong, Fangjie; Que, Yumei; Wang, Kai; Yu, Lihua; Li, Zhengguo; Ren, Maozhi

    2015-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) acts as a master regulator to control cell growth by integrating nutrient, energy, and growth factors in all eukaryotic species. TOR plays an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating the transcription of genes associated with anabolic and catabolic processes in Arabidopsis, but little is known about the functions of TOR in photosynthesis and phytohormone signaling, which are unique features of plants. In this study, AZD8055 (AZD) was screened as the strongest active-site TOR inhibitor (asTORi) in Arabidopsis compared with TORIN1 and KU63794 (KU). Gene expression profiles were evaluated using RNA-seq after treating Arabidopsis seedlings with AZD. More than three-fold differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in AZD-treated plants relative to rapamycin-treated plants in previous studies. Most of the DEGs and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways involved in cell wall elongation, ribosome biogenesis, and cell autophagy were common to both AZD- and rapamycin-treated samples, but AZD displayed much broader and more efficient inhibition of TOR compared with rapamycin. Importantly, the suppression of TOR by AZD resulted in remodeling of the expression profile of the genes associated with photosynthesis and various phytohormones, indicating that TOR plays a crucial role in modulating photosynthesis and phytohormone signaling in Arabidopsis. These newly identified DEGs expand the understanding of TOR signaling in plants. This study elucidates the novel functions of TOR in photosynthesis and phytohormone signaling and provides a platform to study the downstream targets of TOR in Arabidopsis. PMID:26442001

  9. UFBP1, a Key Component of the Ufm1 Conjugation System, Is Essential for Ufmylation-Mediated Regulation of Erythroid Development.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yafei; Pi, Wenhu; Sivaprakasam, Satish; Zhu, Xiaobin; Zhang, Mingsheng; Chen, Jijun; Makala, Levi; Lu, Chunwan; Wu, Jianchu; Teng, Yong; Pace, Betty; Tuan, Dorothy; Singh, Nagendra; Li, Honglin

    2015-11-01

    The Ufm1 conjugation system is an ubiquitin-like modification system that consists of Ufm1, Uba5 (E1), Ufc1 (E2), and less defined E3 ligase(s) and targets. The biological importance of this system is highlighted by its essential role in embryogenesis and erythroid development, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. UFBP1 (Ufm1 binding protein 1, also known as DDRGK1, Dashurin and C20orf116) is a putative Ufm1 target, yet its exact physiological function and impact of its ufmylation remain largely undefined. In this study, we report that UFBP1 is indispensable for embryonic development and hematopoiesis. While germ-line deletion of UFBP1 caused defective erythroid development and embryonic lethality, somatic ablation of UFBP1 impaired adult hematopoiesis, resulting in pancytopenia and animal death. At the cellular level, UFBP1 deficiency led to elevated ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress and activation of unfolded protein response (UPR), and consequently cell death of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. In addition, loss of UFBP1 suppressed expression of erythroid transcription factors GATA-1 and KLF1 and blocked erythroid differentiation from CFU-Es (colony forming unit-erythroid) to proerythroblasts. Interestingly, depletion of Uba5, a Ufm1 E1 enzyme, also caused elevation of ER stress and under-expression of erythroid transcription factors in erythroleukemia K562 cells. By contrast, knockdown of ASC1, a newly identified Ufm1 target that functions as a transcriptional co-activator of hormone receptors, led to down-regulation of erythroid transcription factors, but did not elevate basal ER stress. Furthermore, we found that ASC1 was associated with the promoters of GATA-1 and Klf1 in a UFBP1-dependent manner. Taken together, our findings suggest that UFBP1, along with ASC1 and other ufmylation components, play pleiotropic roles in regulation of hematopoietic cell survival and differentiation via modulating ER homeostasis and erythroid lineage

  10. Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) and Cch1-Yam8 Channels Play Key Roles in the Regulation of Cytoplasmic Ca2+ in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Sugiura, Reiko; Koike, Atsushi; Ebina, Hidemine; Sio, Susie O.; Kuno, Takayoshi

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of cytoplasmic Ca2+ is crucial for various cellular processes. Here, we examined the cytoplasmic Ca2+ levels in living fission yeast cells by a highly sensitive bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay using GFP-aequorin fusion protein linked by 19 amino acid. We monitored the cytoplasmic Ca2+ level and its change caused by extracellular stimulants such as CaCl2 or NaCl plus FK506 (calcineurin inhibitor). We found that the extracellularly added Ca2+ caused a dose-dependent increase in the cytoplasmic Ca2+ level and resulted in a burst-like peak. The overexpression of two transient receptor potential (TRP) channel homologues, Trp1322 or Pkd2, markedly enhanced this response. Interestingly, the burst-like peak upon TRP overexpression was completely abolished by gene deletion of calcineurin and was dramatically decreased by gene deletion of Prz1, a downstream transcription factor activated by calcineurin. Furthermore, 1 hour treatment with FK506 failed to suppress the burst-like peak. These results suggest that the burst-like Ca2+ peak is dependent on the transcriptional activity of Prz1, but not on the direct TRP dephosphorylation. We also found that extracellularly added NaCl plus FK506 caused a synergistic cytosolic Ca2+ increase that is dependent on the inhibition of calcineurin activity, but not on the inhibition of Prz1. The synergistic Ca2+ increase is abolished by the addition of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA into the media, and is also abolished by deletion of the gene encoding a subunit of the Cch1-Yam8 Ca2+ channel complex, indicating that the synergistic increase is caused by the Ca2+ influx from the extracellular medium via the Cch1-Yam8 complex. Furthermore, deletion of Pmk1 MAPK abolished the Ca2+ influx, and overexpression of the constitutively active Pek1 MAPKK enhanced the influx. These results suggest that Pmk1 MAPK and calcineurin positively and negatively regulate the Cch1-Yam8 complex, respectively, via modulating the